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Napoli confirm Insigne in doubt for Inter with adductor strain

The attacker may be absent when when his side faces Inter in a top-of-the-table Serie A clash after he suffered a muscle strain

Napoli confirm Insigne adductor strain

Lorenzo Insigne may be absent when Napoli face Inter in a top-of-the-table Serie A clash after the attacker suffered a muscle strain.

Napoli star Insigne unsure if he'll be fit to face Inter

Napoli star Insigne unsure if he'll be fit to face Inter

Napoli star Insigne unsure if he'll be fit to face Inter

Napoli star Insigne unsure if he'll be fit to face Inter

Napoli star Insigne unsure if he'll be fit to face Inter

Napoli forward Lorenzo Insigne said he will find out on Wednesday if he will play second-placed Inter this weekend.

Icardi hat trick repairs rocky relationship with 'ultras'

Inter Milan's Mauro Icardi shows his jersey to fans as he celebrates after scoring his side's 3rd goal during the Serie A soccer match between Inter Milan and AC Milan, at the Milan San Siro Stadium, Italy, Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)

Icardi hat trick repairs rocky relationship with 'ultras'

Inter Milan's Mauro Icardi shows his jersey to fans as he celebrates after scoring his 3rd goal during the Serie A soccer match between Inter Milan and AC Milan, at the Milan San Siro Stadium, Italy, Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017. Inter Milan won 3-2 and Icardi scored a hat-trick. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)

Icardi hat trick repairs rocky relationship with 'ultras'

Inter Milan's Mauro Icardi scores his side's third goal on a penalty kick during the Serie A soccer match between Inter Milan and AC Milan, at the Milan San Siro Stadium, Italy, Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)

Icardi hat trick repairs rocky relationship with 'ultras'

Inter Milan's Mauro Icardi celebrates after scoring during the Serie A soccer match between Inter Milan and AC Milan, at the Milan San Siro Stadium, Italy, Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)

Icardi hat trick repairs rocky relationship with 'ultras'

Inter Milan's Mauro Icardi takes off his jersey as he celebrates after scoring his side's 3rd goal during the Serie A soccer match between Inter Milan and AC Milan, at the Milan San Siro Stadium, Italy, Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)

As Napoli bring 'Sarri-ball' to Man City, a glossary of football's tactical systems

Ahead of Manchester City's Champions League match with Napoli, Telegraph Sport looks at the tactics that have helped the Serie A team make a scintillating start to the season.  Sarri-ball Where did it come from? 'Sarri-ball' is the name given to the brave, progressive tactics of Napoli manager Maurizio Sarri.  How does it work? The style of play was described by L'Equipe as "vertical tiki-taka", and is a possession-based style with plenty of short, quick passes but an emphasis on moving up the pitch quickly. In other words: "liquid football".  Así sale jugando Napoli pic.twitter.com/2mwus1n6dM— El Tano. (@ElTano_) August 1, 2017 How successful is it?  At present, Sarri-ball is working to devastating effect, with Napoli top of Serie A having won all eight of their league matches this season. In his first two seasons at Napoli, Sarri led the club to second and third placed finishes, but he has spent most of his managerial career in Italy's lower leagues.  Napoli are top of Serie A having made a perfect start to the season  Tiki-taka Where did it come from? A possession-based style of play that dates back to Johan Cruyff's all-conquering Barcelona team of the early 1990s, and was perfected by the Spanish national side that won three consecutive major tournaments between 2008 and 2012.  How does it work? Tiki-taka relies on highly technical players, who are all comfortable on the ball and can move opposition players out of position with patient and accurate passing.  It can also be a defensive tactic in the way that it suffocates opponents by depriving them off the ball and gradually drains their energy.  Man City 2 - 0 Stoke (Raheem Sterling, 19 min) As well as Spain, tiki-taka is most associated with Pep Guardiola's Barcelona team of the same 2008-2012 period. Guardiola though despises the term and said in 2013: "I loathe all that passing for the sake of it, all that tiki-taka. It's so much rubbish and has no purpose. You have to pass the ball with a clear intention, with the aim of making it into the opposition's goal. It's not about passing for the sake of it." Pep Guardiola claims to hate 'tiki-taka' How successful is it?  Hugely, in the case of Spain and Barcelona. Less so in the case of Arsenal, who over the last decade have employed a similar style.  The tactic has drawn criticism in recent years for its obsession with keeping possession, and when executed badly, tiki-taka has been described as 'sterile domination'.  Gegenpressing Where did it come from? The tactic of hounding opposition players as soon as possession is lost is another of Guardiola's hallmarks, but the term 'gegenpressing' was made popular by Jurgen Klopp's Borussia Dortmund team of 2008-2015. Arrigo Sacchi’s AC Milan team of the 1980s and 1990s also played with a highly effective counter-pressing style as they won consecutive European cups in 1989 and 1990.  How does it work? Guardiola's Barcelona employed the 'six-second rule' where his players were instructed to launch into high-intensity sprints to win the ball back in the immediate aftermath of having lost it.  The idea is that the whole team presses together to try and force their opponents into giving up the ball, and does so high up the pitch where losing possession is most costly.  Talking tactics: Liverpool's heavy metal football 02:02 How successful is it?  Dortmund and Barcelona enjoyed great success with their high press, while Mauricio Pochettino's Tottenham have used the tactic to great effect in the last few years.  Klopp's protege at Dortmund David Wagner meanwhile used a gegenpress-fuelled 4-2-3-1 system to achieve promotion to the Premier League with Huddersfield last season. Klopp has received criticism though for running his teams into the ground and causing them injury with the tactic.  Catenaccio Where did it come from? Italian for 'door-bolt', catenaccio is a defensive tactic that evolved in the 1960s with the addition of a 'libero' (sweeper) into a back four to make a back five.  The system has since become synonymous with defensively minded Italian national and club teams.  How does it work? The basic idea of catenaccio is that a team has four defenders who can focus solely on snapping away at the player they are marking, while the libero picks up any loose balls and acts as the spare man.  There is also an often overlooked attacking element to the system, which is that the libero allows the full-backs to get forward more and join in with attacks. In many ways, the system laid the foundations for the 3-5-2 system and the 3-4-3, which is currently en vogue.  Using catenaccio, Inter Milan won consecutive European cups in the 1960s How successful is it?  The Argentine manager, Helenio Herrera, is credited as the man who introduced catenaccio to the world, and his Inter Milan team of the 1960s won three Serie A titles and two European cups.  Other catenaccio-fuelled successes include the limited Greece side triumphing at Euro 2004 under Otto Rehhagel, and Giovanni Trapatonni winning the Portuguese Liga with Benfica a year later.  The Italian national side have enjoyed mixed results with catenaccio and have on occasion been criticised for leaning too heavily on the model at the expense of creativity. Barry Davies, you may remember, almost went into meltdown when an unnecessarily defensive-minded Italy were knocked out of the 2002 World Cup by South Korea. "And the Italians are out because they will not learn," the exasperated commentator lamented.  Four years later Marcelo Lippi leaned on catenaccio in the second round win against Australia when the Azzurri were reduced to 10 men en route to lifting the 2006 World Cup.  Totaalvoetbal Where did it come from? Ajax employed variants of the system from the early 20th century, while the Austrian 'Wunderteam' of the 1930s is accepted to be the first national team to play it.  Totaalvoetbal (or Total Football) really took off in the 1960s however, when Ajax manager Rinus Michels relaunched the system with Johan Cruyff as its figurehead. Michels then used the system with the Dutch national team at the 1974 World Cup.  Johann Cruyff was the key player in Ajax and Holland's Total Football teams of the 1970s How does it work? Total Football is predicated on the idea that every player can play in every position, allowing for constant inter-changing among players roaming around the pitch.  Cruyff for instance was nominally a centre-forward, but he was allowed - and encouraged - to pop up all over the pitch, safe in the knowledge that a team-mate could occupy the space where the main striker was supposed to be.  How successful is it?  As with many of these systems, a manager would only attempt Total Football if he had a group of exceptionally talented footballers. This was certainly the case with the Ajax and Dutch sides that played Total Football, with the former in particular achieving a huge amount of success - most notably winning the 1971 European Cup.  Cruyff employed many of the principles of Total Football when Barcelona manager between 1988 and 1996, but it would take a very brave manager to attempt it now given the volume of matches the big teams play and the reduced number of training sessions.  

As Napoli bring 'Sarri-ball' to Man City, a glossary of football's tactical systems

Ahead of Manchester City's Champions League match with Napoli, Telegraph Sport looks at the tactics that have helped the Serie A team make a scintillating start to the season.  Sarri-ball Where did it come from? 'Sarri-ball' is the name given to the brave, progressive tactics of Napoli manager Maurizio Sarri.  How does it work? The style of play was described by L'Equipe as "vertical tiki-taka", and is a possession-based style with plenty of short, quick passes but an emphasis on moving up the pitch quickly. In other words: "liquid football".  Así sale jugando Napoli pic.twitter.com/2mwus1n6dM— El Tano. (@ElTano_) August 1, 2017 How successful is it?  At present, Sarri-ball is working to devastating effect, with Napoli top of Serie A having won all eight of their league matches this season. In his first two seasons at Napoli, Sarri led the club to second and third placed finishes, but he has spent most of his managerial career in Italy's lower leagues.  Napoli are top of Serie A having made a perfect start to the season  Tiki-taka Where did it come from? A possession-based style of play that dates back to Johan Cruyff's all-conquering Barcelona team of the early 1990s, and was perfected by the Spanish national side that won three consecutive major tournaments between 2008 and 2012.  How does it work? Tiki-taka relies on highly technical players, who are all comfortable on the ball and can move opposition players out of position with patient and accurate passing.  It can also be a defensive tactic in the way that it suffocates opponents by depriving them off the ball and gradually drains their energy.  Man City 2 - 0 Stoke (Raheem Sterling, 19 min) As well as Spain, tiki-taka is most associated with Pep Guardiola's Barcelona team of the same 2008-2012 period. Guardiola though despises the term and said in 2013: "I loathe all that passing for the sake of it, all that tiki-taka. It's so much rubbish and has no purpose. You have to pass the ball with a clear intention, with the aim of making it into the opposition's goal. It's not about passing for the sake of it." Pep Guardiola claims to hate 'tiki-taka' How successful is it?  Hugely, in the case of Spain and Barcelona. Less so in the case of Arsenal, who over the last decade have employed a similar style.  The tactic has drawn criticism in recent years for its obsession with keeping possession, and when executed badly, tiki-taka has been described as 'sterile domination'.  Gegenpressing Where did it come from? The tactic of hounding opposition players as soon as possession is lost is another of Guardiola's hallmarks, but the term 'gegenpressing' was made popular by Jurgen Klopp's Borussia Dortmund team of 2008-2015. Arrigo Sacchi’s AC Milan team of the 1980s and 1990s also played with a highly effective counter-pressing style as they won consecutive European cups in 1989 and 1990.  How does it work? Guardiola's Barcelona employed the 'six-second rule' where his players were instructed to launch into high-intensity sprints to win the ball back in the immediate aftermath of having lost it.  The idea is that the whole team presses together to try and force their opponents into giving up the ball, and does so high up the pitch where losing possession is most costly.  Talking tactics: Liverpool's heavy metal football 02:02 How successful is it?  Dortmund and Barcelona enjoyed great success with their high press, while Mauricio Pochettino's Tottenham have used the tactic to great effect in the last few years.  Klopp's protege at Dortmund David Wagner meanwhile used a gegenpress-fuelled 4-2-3-1 system to achieve promotion to the Premier League with Huddersfield last season. Klopp has received criticism though for running his teams into the ground and causing them injury with the tactic.  Catenaccio Where did it come from? Italian for 'door-bolt', catenaccio is a defensive tactic that evolved in the 1960s with the addition of a 'libero' (sweeper) into a back four to make a back five.  The system has since become synonymous with defensively minded Italian national and club teams.  How does it work? The basic idea of catenaccio is that a team has four defenders who can focus solely on snapping away at the player they are marking, while the libero picks up any loose balls and acts as the spare man.  There is also an often overlooked attacking element to the system, which is that the libero allows the full-backs to get forward more and join in with attacks. In many ways, the system laid the foundations for the 3-5-2 system and the 3-4-3, which is currently en vogue.  Using catenaccio, Inter Milan won consecutive European cups in the 1960s How successful is it?  The Argentine manager, Helenio Herrera, is credited as the man who introduced catenaccio to the world, and his Inter Milan team of the 1960s won three Serie A titles and two European cups.  Other catenaccio-fuelled successes include the limited Greece side triumphing at Euro 2004 under Otto Rehhagel, and Giovanni Trapatonni winning the Portuguese Liga with Benfica a year later.  The Italian national side have enjoyed mixed results with catenaccio and have on occasion been criticised for leaning too heavily on the model at the expense of creativity. Barry Davies, you may remember, almost went into meltdown when an unnecessarily defensive-minded Italy were knocked out of the 2002 World Cup by South Korea. "And the Italians are out because they will not learn," the exasperated commentator lamented.  Four years later Marcelo Lippi leaned on catenaccio in the second round win against Australia when the Azzurri were reduced to 10 men en route to lifting the 2006 World Cup.  Totaalvoetbal Where did it come from? Ajax employed variants of the system from the early 20th century, while the Austrian 'Wunderteam' of the 1930s is accepted to be the first national team to play it.  Totaalvoetbal (or Total Football) really took off in the 1960s however, when Ajax manager Rinus Michels relaunched the system with Johan Cruyff as its figurehead. Michels then used the system with the Dutch national team at the 1974 World Cup.  Johann Cruyff was the key player in Ajax and Holland's Total Football teams of the 1970s How does it work? Total Football is predicated on the idea that every player can play in every position, allowing for constant inter-changing among players roaming around the pitch.  Cruyff for instance was nominally a centre-forward, but he was allowed - and encouraged - to pop up all over the pitch, safe in the knowledge that a team-mate could occupy the space where the main striker was supposed to be.  How successful is it?  As with many of these systems, a manager would only attempt Total Football if he had a group of exceptionally talented footballers. This was certainly the case with the Ajax and Dutch sides that played Total Football, with the former in particular achieving a huge amount of success - most notably winning the 1971 European Cup.  Cruyff employed many of the principles of Total Football when Barcelona manager between 1988 and 1996, but it would take a very brave manager to attempt it now given the volume of matches the big teams play and the reduced number of training sessions.  

As Napoli bring 'Sarri-ball' to Man City, a glossary of football's tactical systems

Ahead of Manchester City's Champions League match with Napoli, Telegraph Sport looks at the tactics that have helped the Serie A team make a scintillating start to the season.  Sarri-ball Where did it come from? 'Sarri-ball' is the name given to the brave, progressive tactics of Napoli manager Maurizio Sarri.  How does it work? The style of play was described by L'Equipe as "vertical tiki-taka", and is a possession-based style with plenty of short, quick passes but an emphasis on moving up the pitch quickly. In other words: "liquid football".  Así sale jugando Napoli pic.twitter.com/2mwus1n6dM— El Tano. (@ElTano_) August 1, 2017 How successful is it?  At present, Sarri-ball is working to devastating effect, with Napoli top of Serie A having won all eight of their league matches this season. In his first two seasons at Napoli, Sarri led the club to second and third placed finishes, but he has spent most of his managerial career in Italy's lower leagues.  Napoli are top of Serie A having made a perfect start to the season  Tiki-taka Where did it come from? A possession-based style of play that dates back to Johan Cruyff's all-conquering Barcelona team of the early 1990s, and was perfected by the Spanish national side that won three consecutive major tournaments between 2008 and 2012.  How does it work? Tiki-taka relies on highly technical players, who are all comfortable on the ball and can move opposition players out of position with patient and accurate passing.  It can also be a defensive tactic in the way that it suffocates opponents by depriving them off the ball and gradually drains their energy.  Man City 2 - 0 Stoke (Raheem Sterling, 19 min) As well as Spain, tiki-taka is most associated with Pep Guardiola's Barcelona team of the same 2008-2012 period. Guardiola though despises the term and said in 2013: "I loathe all that passing for the sake of it, all that tiki-taka. It's so much rubbish and has no purpose. You have to pass the ball with a clear intention, with the aim of making it into the opposition's goal. It's not about passing for the sake of it." Pep Guardiola claims to hate 'tiki-taka' How successful is it?  Hugely, in the case of Spain and Barcelona. Less so in the case of Arsenal, who over the last decade have employed a similar style.  The tactic has drawn criticism in recent years for its obsession with keeping possession, and when executed badly, tiki-taka has been described as 'sterile domination'.  Gegenpressing Where did it come from? The tactic of hounding opposition players as soon as possession is lost is another of Guardiola's hallmarks, but the term 'gegenpressing' was made popular by Jurgen Klopp's Borussia Dortmund team of 2008-2015. Arrigo Sacchi’s AC Milan team of the 1980s and 1990s also played with a highly effective counter-pressing style as they won consecutive European cups in 1989 and 1990.  How does it work? Guardiola's Barcelona employed the 'six-second rule' where his players were instructed to launch into high-intensity sprints to win the ball back in the immediate aftermath of having lost it.  The idea is that the whole team presses together to try and force their opponents into giving up the ball, and does so high up the pitch where losing possession is most costly.  Talking tactics: Liverpool's heavy metal football 02:02 How successful is it?  Dortmund and Barcelona enjoyed great success with their high press, while Mauricio Pochettino's Tottenham have used the tactic to great effect in the last few years.  Klopp's protege at Dortmund David Wagner meanwhile used a gegenpress-fuelled 4-2-3-1 system to achieve promotion to the Premier League with Huddersfield last season. Klopp has received criticism though for running his teams into the ground and causing them injury with the tactic.  Catenaccio Where did it come from? Italian for 'door-bolt', catenaccio is a defensive tactic that evolved in the 1960s with the addition of a 'libero' (sweeper) into a back four to make a back five.  The system has since become synonymous with defensively minded Italian national and club teams.  How does it work? The basic idea of catenaccio is that a team has four defenders who can focus solely on snapping away at the player they are marking, while the libero picks up any loose balls and acts as the spare man.  There is also an often overlooked attacking element to the system, which is that the libero allows the full-backs to get forward more and join in with attacks. In many ways, the system laid the foundations for the 3-5-2 system and the 3-4-3, which is currently en vogue.  Using catenaccio, Inter Milan won consecutive European cups in the 1960s How successful is it?  The Argentine manager, Helenio Herrera, is credited as the man who introduced catenaccio to the world, and his Inter Milan team of the 1960s won three Serie A titles and two European cups.  Other catenaccio-fuelled successes include the limited Greece side triumphing at Euro 2004 under Otto Rehhagel, and Giovanni Trapatonni winning the Portuguese Liga with Benfica a year later.  The Italian national side have enjoyed mixed results with catenaccio and have on occasion been criticised for leaning too heavily on the model at the expense of creativity. Barry Davies, you may remember, almost went into meltdown when an unnecessarily defensive-minded Italy were knocked out of the 2002 World Cup by South Korea. "And the Italians are out because they will not learn," the exasperated commentator lamented.  Four years later Marcelo Lippi leaned on catenaccio in the second round win against Australia when the Azzurri were reduced to 10 men en route to lifting the 2006 World Cup.  Totaalvoetbal Where did it come from? Ajax employed variants of the system from the early 20th century, while the Austrian 'Wunderteam' of the 1930s is accepted to be the first national team to play it.  Totaalvoetbal (or Total Football) really took off in the 1960s however, when Ajax manager Rinus Michels relaunched the system with Johan Cruyff as its figurehead. Michels then used the system with the Dutch national team at the 1974 World Cup.  Johann Cruyff was the key player in Ajax and Holland's Total Football teams of the 1970s How does it work? Total Football is predicated on the idea that every player can play in every position, allowing for constant inter-changing among players roaming around the pitch.  Cruyff for instance was nominally a centre-forward, but he was allowed - and encouraged - to pop up all over the pitch, safe in the knowledge that a team-mate could occupy the space where the main striker was supposed to be.  How successful is it?  As with many of these systems, a manager would only attempt Total Football if he had a group of exceptionally talented footballers. This was certainly the case with the Ajax and Dutch sides that played Total Football, with the former in particular achieving a huge amount of success - most notably winning the 1971 European Cup.  Cruyff employed many of the principles of Total Football when Barcelona manager between 1988 and 1996, but it would take a very brave manager to attempt it now given the volume of matches the big teams play and the reduced number of training sessions.  

As Napoli bring 'Sarri-ball' to Man City, a glossary of football's tactical systems

Ahead of Manchester City's Champions League match with Napoli, Telegraph Sport looks at the tactics that have helped the Serie A team make a scintillating start to the season.  Sarri-ball Where did it come from? 'Sarri-ball' is the name given to the brave, progressive tactics of Napoli manager Maurizio Sarri.  How does it work? The style of play was described by L'Equipe as "vertical tiki-taka", and is a possession-based style with plenty of short, quick passes but an emphasis on moving up the pitch quickly. In other words: "liquid football".  Así sale jugando Napoli pic.twitter.com/2mwus1n6dM— El Tano. (@ElTano_) August 1, 2017 How successful is it?  At present, Sarri-ball is working to devastating effect, with Napoli top of Serie A having won all eight of their league matches this season. In his first two seasons at Napoli, Sarri led the club to second and third placed finishes, but he has spent most of his managerial career in Italy's lower leagues.  Napoli are top of Serie A having made a perfect start to the season  Tiki-taka Where did it come from? A possession-based style of play that dates back to Johan Cruyff's all-conquering Barcelona team of the early 1990s, and was perfected by the Spanish national side that won three consecutive major tournaments between 2008 and 2012.  How does it work? Tiki-taka relies on highly technical players, who are all comfortable on the ball and can move opposition players out of position with patient and accurate passing.  It can also be a defensive tactic in the way that it suffocates opponents by depriving them off the ball and gradually drains their energy.  Man City 2 - 0 Stoke (Raheem Sterling, 19 min) As well as Spain, tiki-taka is most associated with Pep Guardiola's Barcelona team of the same 2008-2012 period. Guardiola though despises the term and said in 2013: "I loathe all that passing for the sake of it, all that tiki-taka. It's so much rubbish and has no purpose. You have to pass the ball with a clear intention, with the aim of making it into the opposition's goal. It's not about passing for the sake of it." Pep Guardiola claims to hate 'tiki-taka' How successful is it?  Hugely, in the case of Spain and Barcelona. Less so in the case of Arsenal, who over the last decade have employed a similar style.  The tactic has drawn criticism in recent years for its obsession with keeping possession, and when executed badly, tiki-taka has been described as 'sterile domination'.  Gegenpressing Where did it come from? The tactic of hounding opposition players as soon as possession is lost is another of Guardiola's hallmarks, but the term 'gegenpressing' was made popular by Jurgen Klopp's Borussia Dortmund team of 2008-2015. Arrigo Sacchi’s AC Milan team of the 1980s and 1990s also played with a highly effective counter-pressing style as they won consecutive European cups in 1989 and 1990.  How does it work? Guardiola's Barcelona employed the 'six-second rule' where his players were instructed to launch into high-intensity sprints to win the ball back in the immediate aftermath of having lost it.  The idea is that the whole team presses together to try and force their opponents into giving up the ball, and does so high up the pitch where losing possession is most costly.  Talking tactics: Liverpool's heavy metal football 02:02 How successful is it?  Dortmund and Barcelona enjoyed great success with their high press, while Mauricio Pochettino's Tottenham have used the tactic to great effect in the last few years.  Klopp's protege at Dortmund David Wagner meanwhile used a gegenpress-fuelled 4-2-3-1 system to achieve promotion to the Premier League with Huddersfield last season. Klopp has received criticism though for running his teams into the ground and causing them injury with the tactic.  Catenaccio Where did it come from? Italian for 'door-bolt', catenaccio is a defensive tactic that evolved in the 1960s with the addition of a 'libero' (sweeper) into a back four to make a back five.  The system has since become synonymous with defensively minded Italian national and club teams.  How does it work? The basic idea of catenaccio is that a team has four defenders who can focus solely on snapping away at the player they are marking, while the libero picks up any loose balls and acts as the spare man.  There is also an often overlooked attacking element to the system, which is that the libero allows the full-backs to get forward more and join in with attacks. In many ways, the system laid the foundations for the 3-5-2 system and the 3-4-3, which is currently en vogue.  Using catenaccio, Inter Milan won consecutive European cups in the 1960s How successful is it?  The Argentine manager, Helenio Herrera, is credited as the man who introduced catenaccio to the world, and his Inter Milan team of the 1960s won three Serie A titles and two European cups.  Other catenaccio-fuelled successes include the limited Greece side triumphing at Euro 2004 under Otto Rehhagel, and Giovanni Trapatonni winning the Portuguese Liga with Benfica a year later.  The Italian national side have enjoyed mixed results with catenaccio and have on occasion been criticised for leaning too heavily on the model at the expense of creativity. Barry Davies, you may remember, almost went into meltdown when an unnecessarily defensive-minded Italy were knocked out of the 2002 World Cup by South Korea. "And the Italians are out because they will not learn," the exasperated commentator lamented.  Four years later Marcelo Lippi leaned on catenaccio in the second round win against Australia when the Azzurri were reduced to 10 men en route to lifting the 2006 World Cup.  Totaalvoetbal Where did it come from? Ajax employed variants of the system from the early 20th century, while the Austrian 'Wunderteam' of the 1930s is accepted to be the first national team to play it.  Totaalvoetbal (or Total Football) really took off in the 1960s however, when Ajax manager Rinus Michels relaunched the system with Johan Cruyff as its figurehead. Michels then used the system with the Dutch national team at the 1974 World Cup.  Johann Cruyff was the key player in Ajax and Holland's Total Football teams of the 1970s How does it work? Total Football is predicated on the idea that every player can play in every position, allowing for constant inter-changing among players roaming around the pitch.  Cruyff for instance was nominally a centre-forward, but he was allowed - and encouraged - to pop up all over the pitch, safe in the knowledge that a team-mate could occupy the space where the main striker was supposed to be.  How successful is it?  As with many of these systems, a manager would only attempt Total Football if he had a group of exceptionally talented footballers. This was certainly the case with the Ajax and Dutch sides that played Total Football, with the former in particular achieving a huge amount of success - most notably winning the 1971 European Cup.  Cruyff employed many of the principles of Total Football when Barcelona manager between 1988 and 1996, but it would take a very brave manager to attempt it now given the volume of matches the big teams play and the reduced number of training sessions.  

As Napoli bring 'Sarri-ball' to Man City, a glossary of football's tactical systems

Ahead of Manchester City's Champions League match with Napoli, Telegraph Sport looks at the tactics that have helped the Serie A team make a scintillating start to the season.  Sarri-ball Where did it come from? 'Sarri-ball' is the name given to the brave, progressive tactics of Napoli manager Maurizio Sarri.  How does it work? The style of play was described by L'Equipe as "vertical tiki-taka", and is a possession-based style with plenty of short, quick passes but an emphasis on moving up the pitch quickly. In other words: "liquid football".  Así sale jugando Napoli pic.twitter.com/2mwus1n6dM— El Tano. (@ElTano_) August 1, 2017 How successful is it?  At present, Sarri-ball is working to devastating effect, with Napoli top of Serie A having won all eight of their league matches this season. In his first two seasons at Napoli, Sarri led the club to second and third placed finishes, but he has spent most of his managerial career in Italy's lower leagues.  Napoli are top of Serie A having made a perfect start to the season  Tiki-taka Where did it come from? A possession-based style of play that dates back to Johan Cruyff's all-conquering Barcelona team of the early 1990s, and was perfected by the Spanish national side that won three consecutive major tournaments between 2008 and 2012.  How does it work? Tiki-taka relies on highly technical players, who are all comfortable on the ball and can move opposition players out of position with patient and accurate passing.  It can also be a defensive tactic in the way that it suffocates opponents by depriving them off the ball and gradually drains their energy.  Man City 2 - 0 Stoke (Raheem Sterling, 19 min) As well as Spain, tiki-taka is most associated with Pep Guardiola's Barcelona team of the same 2008-2012 period. Guardiola though despises the term and said in 2013: "I loathe all that passing for the sake of it, all that tiki-taka. It's so much rubbish and has no purpose. You have to pass the ball with a clear intention, with the aim of making it into the opposition's goal. It's not about passing for the sake of it." Pep Guardiola claims to hate 'tiki-taka' How successful is it?  Hugely, in the case of Spain and Barcelona. Less so in the case of Arsenal, who over the last decade have employed a similar style.  The tactic has drawn criticism in recent years for its obsession with keeping possession, and when executed badly, tiki-taka has been described as 'sterile domination'.  Gegenpressing Where did it come from? The tactic of hounding opposition players as soon as possession is lost is another of Guardiola's hallmarks, but the term 'gegenpressing' was made popular by Jurgen Klopp's Borussia Dortmund team of 2008-2015. Arrigo Sacchi’s AC Milan team of the 1980s and 1990s also played with a highly effective counter-pressing style as they won consecutive European cups in 1989 and 1990.  How does it work? Guardiola's Barcelona employed the 'six-second rule' where his players were instructed to launch into high-intensity sprints to win the ball back in the immediate aftermath of having lost it.  The idea is that the whole team presses together to try and force their opponents into giving up the ball, and does so high up the pitch where losing possession is most costly.  Talking tactics: Liverpool's heavy metal football 02:02 How successful is it?  Dortmund and Barcelona enjoyed great success with their high press, while Mauricio Pochettino's Tottenham have used the tactic to great effect in the last few years.  Klopp's protege at Dortmund David Wagner meanwhile used a gegenpress-fuelled 4-2-3-1 system to achieve promotion to the Premier League with Huddersfield last season. Klopp has received criticism though for running his teams into the ground and causing them injury with the tactic.  Catenaccio Where did it come from? Italian for 'door-bolt', catenaccio is a defensive tactic that evolved in the 1960s with the addition of a 'libero' (sweeper) into a back four to make a back five.  The system has since become synonymous with defensively minded Italian national and club teams.  How does it work? The basic idea of catenaccio is that a team has four defenders who can focus solely on snapping away at the player they are marking, while the libero picks up any loose balls and acts as the spare man.  There is also an often overlooked attacking element to the system, which is that the libero allows the full-backs to get forward more and join in with attacks. In many ways, the system laid the foundations for the 3-5-2 system and the 3-4-3, which is currently en vogue.  Using catenaccio, Inter Milan won consecutive European cups in the 1960s How successful is it?  The Argentine manager, Helenio Herrera, is credited as the man who introduced catenaccio to the world, and his Inter Milan team of the 1960s won three Serie A titles and two European cups.  Other catenaccio-fuelled successes include the limited Greece side triumphing at Euro 2004 under Otto Rehhagel, and Giovanni Trapatonni winning the Portuguese Liga with Benfica a year later.  The Italian national side have enjoyed mixed results with catenaccio and have on occasion been criticised for leaning too heavily on the model at the expense of creativity. Barry Davies, you may remember, almost went into meltdown when an unnecessarily defensive-minded Italy were knocked out of the 2002 World Cup by South Korea. "And the Italians are out because they will not learn," the exasperated commentator lamented.  Four years later Marcelo Lippi leaned on catenaccio in the second round win against Australia when the Azzurri were reduced to 10 men en route to lifting the 2006 World Cup.  Totaalvoetbal Where did it come from? Ajax employed variants of the system from the early 20th century, while the Austrian 'Wunderteam' of the 1930s is accepted to be the first national team to play it.  Totaalvoetbal (or Total Football) really took off in the 1960s however, when Ajax manager Rinus Michels relaunched the system with Johan Cruyff as its figurehead. Michels then used the system with the Dutch national team at the 1974 World Cup.  Johann Cruyff was the key player in Ajax and Holland's Total Football teams of the 1970s How does it work? Total Football is predicated on the idea that every player can play in every position, allowing for constant inter-changing among players roaming around the pitch.  Cruyff for instance was nominally a centre-forward, but he was allowed - and encouraged - to pop up all over the pitch, safe in the knowledge that a team-mate could occupy the space where the main striker was supposed to be.  How successful is it?  As with many of these systems, a manager would only attempt Total Football if he had a group of exceptionally talented footballers. This was certainly the case with the Ajax and Dutch sides that played Total Football, with the former in particular achieving a huge amount of success - most notably winning the 1971 European Cup.  Cruyff employed many of the principles of Total Football when Barcelona manager between 1988 and 1996, but it would take a very brave manager to attempt it now given the volume of matches the big teams play and the reduced number of training sessions.  

Inter Milan's captain forward Mauro Icardi (L) shows his jersey to supporters as he celebrates with teammates at the end of the Italian Serie A football match against AC Milan October 15, 2017

Inter Milan's captain forward Mauro Icardi (L) shows his jersey to supporters as he celebrates with teammates at the end of the Italian Serie A football match against AC Milan October 15, 2017 (AFP Photo/MIGUEL MEDINA)

Inter Milan's captain forward Mauro Icardi (L) shows his jersey to supporters as he celebrates with teammates at the end of the Italian Serie A football match against AC Milan October 15, 2017

AFC Cup 2017: Bengaluru FC vs FC Istiklol - Final spot up for grabs as Blues look to script a turnaround

The Blues are all set to take on the Tajik champions in the Inter-Zonal final second leg, with a spot in the final on offer....

AFC Cup 2017: Bengaluru FC vs FC Istiklol - Final spot up for grabs as Blues look to script a turnaround

The Blues are all set to take on the Tajik champions in the Inter-Zonal final second leg, with a spot in the final on offer....

AFC Cup 2017: Bengaluru FC vs FC Istiklol - Final spot up for grabs as Blues look to script a turnaround

The Blues are all set to take on the Tajik champions in the Inter-Zonal final second leg, with a spot in the final on offer....

AFC Cup 2017: Bengaluru FC vs FC Istiklol - Final spot up for grabs as Blues look to script a turnaround

The Blues are all set to take on the Tajik champions in the Inter-Zonal final second leg, with a spot in the final on offer....

AFC Cup 2017: Bengaluru FC vs FC Istiklol - Final spot up for grabs as Blues look to script a turnaround

The Blues are all set to take on the Tajik champions in the Inter-Zonal final second leg, with a spot in the final on offer....

AFC Cup 2017: Bengaluru FC vs FC Istiklol - Final spot up for grabs as Blues look to script a turnaround

The Blues are all set to take on the Tajik champions in the Inter-Zonal final second leg, with a spot in the final on offer....

AFC Cup 2017: Bengaluru FC vs FC Istiklol - Final spot up for grabs as Blues look to script a turnaround

The Blues are all set to take on the Tajik champions in the Inter-Zonal final second leg, with a spot in the final on offer....

AFC Cup 2017: Bengaluru FC vs FC Istiklol - Final spot up for grabs as Blues look to script a turnaround

The Blues are all set to take on the Tajik champions in the Inter-Zonal final second leg, with a spot in the final on offer....

Jose Mourinho: I'm certain I will not end my career at Manchester United

Jose Mourinho has ruled out spending the rest of his career at Manchester United. The United manager said in an interview with French television that he was certain he would work elsewhere. Mourinho was appointed by United in May 2016 and led the club to the Europa League title last season. His side are vying with neighbours Manchester City for top spot in the Premier League this term, but Mourinho is keeping his future options open. He told TF1's Telefoot programme: "The only thing I can say is that I'm still a coach with worries, with ambitions, and with the desire to do new things. "And I don't believe... no, I'm sure that I won't end my career here." Asked if that meant at Manchester United, Mourinho said: "Yes." Neymar left speechless by PSG move 00:35 Mourinho was responding to the question of whether he might one day be tempted to join Paris St Germain. The club that broke the world transfer record by paying £200.6million to bring in Neymar from Barcelona in the summer have previously been linked with the Portuguese. And Mourinho explained his son has taken the French capital giants to his heart. "The other day, my son who lives in London went to Paris and not to Manchester to watch the match," Mourinho said. PSG shirt sales rose by 10 per cent on the day Neymar signed Credit: AFP/Getty Images Asked why his son chose that option, Mourinho said: "Because at the moment in Paris there is something special. Magic, quality, youth, it's fantastic." Former translator Mourinho, who showed his multilingual skills by conducting the interview in French, has previously had high-profile spells in charge of Porto, Chelsea, Inter Milan and Real Madrid.

Jose Mourinho: I'm certain I will not end my career at Manchester United

Jose Mourinho has ruled out spending the rest of his career at Manchester United. The United manager said in an interview with French television that he was certain he would work elsewhere. Mourinho was appointed by United in May 2016 and led the club to the Europa League title last season. His side are vying with neighbours Manchester City for top spot in the Premier League this term, but Mourinho is keeping his future options open. He told TF1's Telefoot programme: "The only thing I can say is that I'm still a coach with worries, with ambitions, and with the desire to do new things. "And I don't believe... no, I'm sure that I won't end my career here." Asked if that meant at Manchester United, Mourinho said: "Yes." Neymar left speechless by PSG move 00:35 Mourinho was responding to the question of whether he might one day be tempted to join Paris St Germain. The club that broke the world transfer record by paying £200.6million to bring in Neymar from Barcelona in the summer have previously been linked with the Portuguese. And Mourinho explained his son has taken the French capital giants to his heart. "The other day, my son who lives in London went to Paris and not to Manchester to watch the match," Mourinho said. PSG shirt sales rose by 10 per cent on the day Neymar signed Credit: AFP/Getty Images Asked why his son chose that option, Mourinho said: "Because at the moment in Paris there is something special. Magic, quality, youth, it's fantastic." Former translator Mourinho, who showed his multilingual skills by conducting the interview in French, has previously had high-profile spells in charge of Porto, Chelsea, Inter Milan and Real Madrid.

Spalletti hails Inter's derby hero Icardi as 'complete striker'

Spalletti hails Inter's derby hero Icardi as 'complete striker'

Spalletti hails Inter's derby hero Icardi as 'complete striker'

Spalletti hails Inter's derby hero Icardi as 'complete striker'

Serie A - Inter Milan vs AC Milan

Soccer Football - Serie A - Inter Milan vs AC Milan - San Siro, Milan, Italy - October 15, 2017 Inter Milan's Mauro Icardi celebrates scoring their first goal REUTERS/Alberto Lingria

Milan CEO Fassone backs Montella after derby loss

The AC Milan head coach got a vote of confidence after seeing his side fall short against rivals Inter

Milan CEO Fassone backs Montella after derby loss

The AC Milan head coach got a vote of confidence after seeing his side fall short against rivals Inter

Spalletti hails complete Icardi performance in Milan derby

Luciano Spalletto hailed Mauro Icardi's complete performance after the Argentine's hat-trick helped Inter to a 3-2 win over city rivals Milan in the derby on Sunday.

Spalletti hails complete Icardi performance in Milan derby

Luciano Spalletto hailed Mauro Icardi's complete performance after the Argentine's hat-trick helped Inter to a 3-2 win over city rivals Milan in the derby on Sunday.

Spalletti hails complete Icardi performance in Milan derby

Luciano Spalletto hailed Mauro Icardi's complete performance after the Argentine's hat-trick helped Inter to a 3-2 win over city rivals Milan in the derby on Sunday.

We didn't deserve to lose - Milan coach Montella

AC Milan head coach Vincenzo Montella admits his side are all disappointed after their 3-2 loss to Inter Milan because they felt they didn't deseve to lose the game

We didn't deserve to lose - Milan coach Montella

AC Milan head coach Vincenzo Montella admits his side are all disappointed after their 3-2 loss to Inter Milan because they felt they didn't deseve to lose the game

We didn't deserve to lose - Milan coach Montella

AC Milan head coach Vincenzo Montella admits his side are all disappointed after their 3-2 loss to Inter Milan because they felt they didn't deseve to lose the game

Spalletti hails Inter's derby hero Icardi as 'complete striker'

The Argentine won rich praise from his head coach after his day hat-trick sunk AC Milan at San Siro

Spalletti hails Inter's derby hero Icardi as 'complete striker'

The Argentine won rich praise from his head coach after his day hat-trick sunk AC Milan at San Siro

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