A look back: Lee Harvey Oswald assassinates President John F. Kennedy

The National Archives is releasing another 676 government documents related to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. It’s the third public release so far this year.

Last week, President Donald Trump ordered all remaining records released to the public. He also directed agencies to take another look at their proposed redactions and only withhold information in the rarest of circumstances.

This represents the first in a series of rolling releases pursuant to Trump’s directive.

Most of Friday’s release comprises 553 records from the CIA that previously were withheld in their entirety. There also are records from the Justice and Defense departments, the House Select Committee on Assassinations and the National Archives.

In the chaotic aftermath of the assassination, followed two days later by the murder of the shooter, Lee Harvey Oswald while in police custody, FBI Director J, Edgar Hoover vented his frustration in a formerly secret report found in the files. It opened: “There is nothing further on the Oswald case except that he is dead.”

But, reflecting on Oswald less than an hour after he died, Hoover already sensed theories would form about a conspiracy broader than the lone assassin.

“The thing I am concerned about, and so is (deputy attorney general) Mr. Katzenbach, is having something issued so we can convince the public that Oswald is the real assassin,” he said.

He also reported: “Last night we received a call from our Dallas office from a man talking in a calm voice and saying he was a member of a committee organized to kill Oswald.”

Hoover said he relayed that warning to Dallas police and was assured Oswald would be sufficiently protected. Oswald was shot dead the next day by Jack Ruby.

A document from 1975 contains a partial deposition by Richard Helms, a deputy CIA director under Kennedy who later became CIA chief, to the Rockefeller Commission, which was studying unauthorized CIA activities in domestic affairs. Commission lawyers appeared to be probing for information on what foreign leaders might have been the subject of assassination attempts by or on behalf of the CIA.

A lawyer asks Helms: “Is there any information involved with the assassination of President Kennedy which in any way shows that Lee Harvey Oswald was in some way a CIA agent or agent” — here the document ends, short of his answer.

 

The Warren Commission in 1964 concluded that Oswald had been the lone gunman, and another congressional probe in 1979 found no evidence to support the theory that the CIA had been involved. But other interpretations, some more creative than others, have persisted. (AP)

Here’s a look back at Lee Harvey Oswald as the National Archives releases more of the remaining documents.

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A look back: Lee Harvey Oswald assassinates President John F. Kennedy

Lee Harvey Oswald holds a Mannlicher-Carcano rifle and newspapers in a backyard. This photograph is one of the controversial backyard photos used in the assassination of John F. Kennedy investigation in 1963. (Photo: Corbis via Getty Images)

A look back: Lee Harvey Oswald assassinates President John F. Kennedy

Marina Nikolayevna Prusakova and Lee Harvey Oswald stand in a park in Russia. The couple would wed and move to the United States. (Photo: Corbis via Getty Images)

A look back: Lee Harvey Oswald assassinates President John F. Kennedy

Lee Harvey Oswald distributes “Hands Off Cuba” flyers on the streets of New Orleans, La. This photograph was used in the Kennedy assassination investigation. (Photo: Corbis via Getty Images)

A look back: Lee Harvey Oswald assassinates President John F. Kennedy

Lee Harvey Oswald in a police photo after being arrested for protesting U.S. policy in Cuba. On Nov. 22, 1963, he was arrested on charges of assassinating President John F. Kennedy and murdering a Dallas police officer. (Photo: Corbis via Getty Images)

A look back: Lee Harvey Oswald assassinates President John F. Kennedy

This is a copy of Lee Harvey Oswald’s visa application, released by the Cuban government following the testimony of former Cuban consul to Mexico City, Eusebio Azcue Lopez, before the International Tribunal: “Youth Accuse Imperialism”, Aug. 3, 1978. (Photo: Charles Tasnadi/AP)

A look back: Lee Harvey Oswald assassinates President John F. Kennedy

President John F. Kennedy and his wife Jacqueline Kennedy are greeted by an enthusiastic crowd upon their arrival at Dallas Love Field, on Nov. 22, 1963. Only a few hours later, the president was assassinated while riding in an open-top limousine through the city. (Photo: AP)

A look back: Lee Harvey Oswald assassinates President John F. Kennedy

A crowd awaits the presidential motorcade just prior to the assassination of President Kennedy at Dealey Plaza in Dallas, Texas. (Photo: Corbis via Getty Images)

A look back: Lee Harvey Oswald assassinates President John F. Kennedy

President John F. Kennedy waves from his car in a motorcade approximately one minute before he was shot in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963. Riding with Kennedy are First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy, right, Nellie Connally, second from left, with her husband, Texas Gov. John Connally, on her left. The National Archives has until Oct. 26, 2017, to disclose the remaining files related to Kennedy’s assassination, unless President Donald Trump intervenes. (Photo: Jim Altgens/AP)

A look back: Lee Harvey Oswald assassinates President John F. Kennedy

President John F. Kennedy slumps down in the back seat of the presidential limousine as it speeds along Elm Street toward the Stemmons Freeway overpass, after he was fatally shot in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963. Jacqueline Kennedy leans over the president as Secret Service agent Clinton Hill rides on the back of the car. (Photo: Jim Altgens/AP)

A look back: Lee Harvey Oswald assassinates President John F. Kennedy

The view from the sixth-floor window of the Texas School Book Depository in Dallas, from which Lee Harvey Oswald is thought to have assassinated President John F. Kennedy, Nov. 22, 1963. This photograph was taken approximately one hour after the assassination. (Photo: Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

A look back: Lee Harvey Oswald assassinates President John F. Kennedy

An investigator removes from the Texas School Book Depository the rifle allegedly used to assassinate President Kennedy. (Photo: Corbis via Getty Images)

A look back: Lee Harvey Oswald assassinates President John F. Kennedy

An arrow points to the window where an assassin cut down President John F. Kennedy on Nov. 22, 1963, in Dallas. (Photo: Bettmann/Getty Images)

A look back: Lee Harvey Oswald assassinates President John F. Kennedy

This is an undated photo of J.D. Tippit, a member of the Dallas Police Department who was killed while looking for the alleged assassin of President John F. Kennedy in a Dallas theater on Nov. 22, 1963. Police arrested Lee Harvey Oswald in the theatre and filed murder charges against him in connection with Tippit’s death. (Photo: AP)

A look back: Lee Harvey Oswald assassinates President John F. Kennedy

A Dallas Police Department vehicle is parked in the 400 block of 10th Street (10th Street and Patton Avenue) in the Oak Cliff neighborhood of Dallas, in this undated image from 1963. According to federal government investigations, Dallas police officer J. D. Tippit was shot and killed by Lee Harvey Oswald at this spot after Tippit stopped Oswald for questioning shortly after the shooting of President John F. Kennedy. (Photo: Dallas Police Department/Dallas Municipal Archives/University of North Texas/Handout/Reuters)

A look back: Lee Harvey Oswald assassinates President John F. Kennedy

The movie theater where Lee Harvey Oswald was arrested after President John F. Kennedy was shot and killed in Dallas, Nov. 22, 1963. (Photo: AP)

A look back: Lee Harvey Oswald assassinates President John F. Kennedy

Police Lt. J.C. Day holds aloft the bolt-action rifle with telescopic sight that was allegedly used in the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, Dallas, Texas, on Nov. 22, 1963. (Photo: AP)

A look back: Lee Harvey Oswald assassinates President John F. Kennedy

Police closed down €˜Fair Play for Cuba Committee offices in New York and left it under guard Nov. 22, 1963, after jailing of Lee Harvey Oswald, its chairman, as prime suspect in assassination of President John. F. Kennedy. Oswald was a 24-year-old ex-Marine who spent three years in Russia trying to denounce his American citizenship. (Photo: Bettmann/Getty Images)

A look back: Lee Harvey Oswald assassinates President John F. Kennedy

Lee Harvey Oswald holds up his manacled hands as he is led thru the police station in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963, where he was being held as a suspect in the assassination of President John Kennedy. He was charged with murder in the killing of a Dallas policeman who sought to arrest him in a theater several miles from the assassination scene. (Photo: AP)

A look back: Lee Harvey Oswald assassinates President John F. Kennedy

Lee Harvey Oswald palm print taken on Nov. 22, 1963, the day President Kennedy was assassinated and the day Oswald, the alleged assassin, was arrested. The circled portion shows the print fragment that was on the cardboard box in the Texas School Book Depository, the site the assassin’s bullets were fired from according to the Warren Commission. Oswald was shot by Jack Ruby two days after this print was taken. (Photo: Corbis via Getty Images)

A look back: Lee Harvey Oswald assassinates President John F. Kennedy

District Attorney Bill Alexander holds an affidavit charging Lee Harvey Oswald with the assassination of President John F. Kennedy on Nov. 22, 1963. (Photo: Bettmann/Getty Images)

A look back: Lee Harvey Oswald assassinates President John F. Kennedy

Lee Harvey Oswald, accused of assassinating former President John F. Kennedy, is pictured with Dallas police Sgt. Warren, right, and a fellow officer in Dallas, in this handout image taken on Nov. 22, 1963. (Photo: Dallas Police Department/Dallas Municipal Archives/University of North Texas/Handout/Reuters)

A look back: Lee Harvey Oswald assassinates President John F. Kennedy

Newspaper announcing John F. Kennedy’s assassination. (Photo: Herb Scharfman/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images)

A look back: Lee Harvey Oswald assassinates President John F. Kennedy

The Dallas Police Department mug shots of Lee Harvey Oswald following his arrest for possible involvement in the John F. Kennedy assassination and the murder of Officer J.D. Tippit. (Photo: Corbis via Getty Images)

A look back: Lee Harvey Oswald assassinates President John F. Kennedy

Lee Harvey Oswald, center, is shown in custody at a Dallas police station, Nov. 23, 1963. Oswald is accused in the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. Others are unidentified. (Photo: AP)

A look back: Lee Harvey Oswald assassinates President John F. Kennedy

The street across from the Dallas criminal courts building on Nov. 23, 1963, which houses the county jail, is lined with people hoping for a glimpse of Lee Harvey Oswald, accused of assassinating President John Kennedy, should he be moved from the city jail. The building is near the one, background, from which the fatal shots were fired. (Photo: AP)

A look back: Lee Harvey Oswald assassinates President John F. Kennedy

Guards escort Lee Harvey Oswald during a press conference two days after his arrest in conjunction with the assassination of President Kennedy in Dallas, Texas on Nov. 24, 1963. Oswald was shot by local night club owner Jack Ruby during the press conference. (Photo: Corbis via Getty Images)

A look back: Lee Harvey Oswald assassinates President John F. Kennedy

Lee Harvey Oswald, assassin of President John F. Kennedy, reacts as Dallas night club owner Jack Ruby, foreground, shoots at him from point blank range in a corridor of Dallas police headquarters, Nov. 24, 1963. At left is Detective Jim Leavelle. Leavelle wanted to secretly take Oswald out the side door of Dallas police headquarters. His boss wanted to keep a promise to reporters. So Leavelle handcuffed himself to President Kennedy’s assasin, stepped into a crowded basement and became an accidental part of history. (Photo: Dallas Times-Herald, Bob Jackson/AP)

A look back: Lee Harvey Oswald assassinates President John F. Kennedy

Dallas police struggle with Jack Ruby, after the nightclub owner shoots the alleged assassin Lee Harvey Oswald in a corridor of Dallas police headquarters, Nov. 24, 1963. The officer in the foreground holds the gun Ruby used. (Photo: Bettmann/Getty Images)

A look back: Lee Harvey Oswald assassinates President John F. Kennedy

Lee Harvey Oswald, accussed assassin of President John F. Kennedy, is rushed into Parkland Hospital in Dallas, Nov. 24, 1963. Nightclub owner Jack Ruby shot and killed Oswald as he was being transferred through the city jail’s underground garage. Parkland Hospital also treated President Kennedy’s fatal wounds two days earlier. (Photo: Ted Powers/AP)

A look back: Lee Harvey Oswald assassinates President John F. Kennedy

Nightclub owner Jack Ruby is led through the Dallas city jail on his way to his arraignment in Dallas on Nov. 24, 1963. Ruby was charged in the murder of Lee Harvey Oswald, the suspect accused of assassinating President John F. Kennedy. Others are unidentified. (Photo: AP)

A look back: Lee Harvey Oswald assassinates President John F. Kennedy

Marina Oswald, wife of Lee Harvey Oswald, arrives with her daughter, June, at the Parkland Hospital in Dallas, Texas, where her husband died after being fatally shot by nightclub owner Jack Ruby, on Nov. 24, 1963. (Photo: AP)

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