Marathon

Marathon slideshow

Dr. Glen Ault, medical director for the Los Angeles Marathon, provides advice to runners taking part in next month's big run.
Running The LA Marathon Next Month? Tips On How To Prepare
Dr. Glen Ault, medical director for the Los Angeles Marathon, provides advice to runners taking part in next month's big run.
Dr. Glen Ault, medical director for the Los Angeles Marathon, provides advice to runners taking part in next month's big run.
Running The LA Marathon Next Month? Tips On How To Prepare
Dr. Glen Ault, medical director for the Los Angeles Marathon, provides advice to runners taking part in next month's big run.
Dr. Glen Ault, medical director for the Los Angeles Marathon, provides advice to runners taking part in next month's big run.
Running The LA Marathon Next Month? Tips On How To Prepare
Dr. Glen Ault, medical director for the Los Angeles Marathon, provides advice to runners taking part in next month's big run.
Dr. Glen Ault, medical director for the Los Angeles Marathon, provides advice to runners taking part in next month's big run.
Running The LA Marathon Next Month? Tips On How To Prepare
Dr. Glen Ault, medical director for the Los Angeles Marathon, provides advice to runners taking part in next month's big run.
Around 5,000 women from various walks of life came together to participate in 'Pinkathon' that was held in Nepal's capital Kathmandu on Saturday. The Pinkathon, organised to raise awareness about breast cancer, comprised of 21-kilometre-long half-marathon including 10-kilometre, 5-kilometre and 3-kilometre categories. 'Pinkathon,' which started in India, came to Nepal last year. The event saw the marathon venue flooded with participants wearing pink t-shirts to spread messages of change and healthier lifestyle. The initiative was established by Supermodel, Actor and fitness freak Milind Soman. 'Pinkathon' was developed to spread awareness on the importance of an active lifestyle among womenfolk and health issues that put their lives at risk. The event, which is held annually in 8 Indian cities, has set its footstep in Nepal too. Soman believes it will strengthen ties between the two neighbouring nations.
Women in pink take part in "Pinkathon" run
Around 5,000 women from various walks of life came together to participate in 'Pinkathon' that was held in Nepal's capital Kathmandu on Saturday. The Pinkathon, organised to raise awareness about breast cancer, comprised of 21-kilometre-long half-marathon including 10-kilometre, 5-kilometre and 3-kilometre categories. 'Pinkathon,' which started in India, came to Nepal last year. The event saw the marathon venue flooded with participants wearing pink t-shirts to spread messages of change and healthier lifestyle. The initiative was established by Supermodel, Actor and fitness freak Milind Soman. 'Pinkathon' was developed to spread awareness on the importance of an active lifestyle among womenfolk and health issues that put their lives at risk. The event, which is held annually in 8 Indian cities, has set its footstep in Nepal too. Soman believes it will strengthen ties between the two neighbouring nations.
<p>Riyadh hosts first international half-marathon</p>
Riyadh hosts first international half-marathon

Riyadh hosts first international half-marathon

<p>Riyadh hosts first international half-marathon</p>
Riyadh hosts first international half-marathon

Riyadh hosts first international half-marathon

<p>Riyadh hosts first international half-marathon</p>
Riyadh hosts first international half-marathon

Riyadh hosts first international half-marathon

<p>Riyadh hosts first international half-marathon</p>
Riyadh hosts first international half-marathon

Riyadh hosts first international half-marathon

The first Riyadh half marathon drew an international all-male field (AFP Photo/Fayez Nureldine)
The first Riyadh half marathon drew an international all-male field
The first Riyadh half marathon drew an international all-male field (AFP Photo/Fayez Nureldine)
The first Riyadh half marathon drew an international all-male field
The first Riyadh half marathon drew an international all-male field
The first Riyadh half marathon drew an international all-male field
The first Riyadh half marathon drew an international all-male field
The first Riyadh half marathon drew an international all-male field
The first Riyadh half marathon drew an international all-male field
The first Riyadh half marathon drew an international all-male field
The first Riyadh half marathon drew an international all-male field
The first Riyadh half marathon drew an international all-male field
Around 5,000 women from various walks of life came together to participate in &#39;Pinkathon&#39; that was held in Nepal&#39;s capital Kathmandu on Saturday. The Pinkathon, organised to raise awareness about breast cancer, comprised of 21-kilometre-long half-marathon including 10-kilometre, 5-kilometre and 3-kilometre categories. &#39;Pinkathon,&#39; which started in India, came to Nepal last year. The event saw the marathon venue flooded with participants wearing pink t-shirts to spread messages of change and healthier lifestyle. The initiative was established by Supermodel, Actor and fitness freak Milind Soman. &#39;Pinkathon&#39; was developed to spread awareness on the importance of an active lifestyle among womenfolk and health issues that put their lives at risk. The event, which is held annually in 8 Indian cities, has set its footstep in Nepal too. Soman believes it will strengthen ties between the two neighbouring nations.
Women in pink take part in "Pinkathon" run
Around 5,000 women from various walks of life came together to participate in 'Pinkathon' that was held in Nepal's capital Kathmandu on Saturday. The Pinkathon, organised to raise awareness about breast cancer, comprised of 21-kilometre-long half-marathon including 10-kilometre, 5-kilometre and 3-kilometre categories. 'Pinkathon,' which started in India, came to Nepal last year. The event saw the marathon venue flooded with participants wearing pink t-shirts to spread messages of change and healthier lifestyle. The initiative was established by Supermodel, Actor and fitness freak Milind Soman. 'Pinkathon' was developed to spread awareness on the importance of an active lifestyle among womenfolk and health issues that put their lives at risk. The event, which is held annually in 8 Indian cities, has set its footstep in Nepal too. Soman believes it will strengthen ties between the two neighbouring nations.
Around 5,000 women from various walks of life came together to participate in &#39;Pinkathon&#39; that was held in Nepal&#39;s capital Kathmandu on Saturday. The Pinkathon, organised to raise awareness about breast cancer, comprised of 21-kilometre-long half-marathon including 10-kilometre, 5-kilometre and 3-kilometre categories. &#39;Pinkathon,&#39; which started in India, came to Nepal last year. The event saw the marathon venue flooded with participants wearing pink t-shirts to spread messages of change and healthier lifestyle. The initiative was established by Supermodel, Actor and fitness freak Milind Soman. &#39;Pinkathon&#39; was developed to spread awareness on the importance of an active lifestyle among womenfolk and health issues that put their lives at risk. The event, which is held annually in 8 Indian cities, has set its footstep in Nepal too. Soman believes it will strengthen ties between the two neighbouring nations.
Women in pink take part in "Pinkathon" run
Around 5,000 women from various walks of life came together to participate in 'Pinkathon' that was held in Nepal's capital Kathmandu on Saturday. The Pinkathon, organised to raise awareness about breast cancer, comprised of 21-kilometre-long half-marathon including 10-kilometre, 5-kilometre and 3-kilometre categories. 'Pinkathon,' which started in India, came to Nepal last year. The event saw the marathon venue flooded with participants wearing pink t-shirts to spread messages of change and healthier lifestyle. The initiative was established by Supermodel, Actor and fitness freak Milind Soman. 'Pinkathon' was developed to spread awareness on the importance of an active lifestyle among womenfolk and health issues that put their lives at risk. The event, which is held annually in 8 Indian cities, has set its footstep in Nepal too. Soman believes it will strengthen ties between the two neighbouring nations.
Around 5,000 women from various walks of life came together to participate in &#39;Pinkathon&#39; that was held in Nepal&#39;s capital Kathmandu on Saturday. The Pinkathon, organised to raise awareness about breast cancer, comprised of 21-kilometre-long half-marathon including 10-kilometre, 5-kilometre and 3-kilometre categories. &#39;Pinkathon,&#39; which started in India, came to Nepal last year. The event saw the marathon venue flooded with participants wearing pink t-shirts to spread messages of change and healthier lifestyle. The initiative was established by Supermodel, Actor and fitness freak Milind Soman. &#39;Pinkathon&#39; was developed to spread awareness on the importance of an active lifestyle among womenfolk and health issues that put their lives at risk. The event, which is held annually in 8 Indian cities, has set its footstep in Nepal too. Soman believes it will strengthen ties between the two neighbouring nations.
Women in pink take part in "Pinkathon" run
Around 5,000 women from various walks of life came together to participate in 'Pinkathon' that was held in Nepal's capital Kathmandu on Saturday. The Pinkathon, organised to raise awareness about breast cancer, comprised of 21-kilometre-long half-marathon including 10-kilometre, 5-kilometre and 3-kilometre categories. 'Pinkathon,' which started in India, came to Nepal last year. The event saw the marathon venue flooded with participants wearing pink t-shirts to spread messages of change and healthier lifestyle. The initiative was established by Supermodel, Actor and fitness freak Milind Soman. 'Pinkathon' was developed to spread awareness on the importance of an active lifestyle among womenfolk and health issues that put their lives at risk. The event, which is held annually in 8 Indian cities, has set its footstep in Nepal too. Soman believes it will strengthen ties between the two neighbouring nations.
Athletes compete during the first Riyadh International Marathon, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia February 24, 2018. REUTERS/Faisal al Nasser
Athletes compete during the first Riyadh International Marathon, Riyadh
Athletes compete during the first Riyadh International Marathon, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia February 24, 2018. REUTERS/Faisal al Nasser
Athletes compete during the first Riyadh International Marathon, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia February 24, 2018. REUTERS/Faisal al Nasser
Athletes compete during the first Riyadh International Marathon, Riyadh
Athletes compete during the first Riyadh International Marathon, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia February 24, 2018. REUTERS/Faisal al Nasser
Athletes compete during the first Riyadh International Marathon, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia February 24, 2018. REUTERS/Faisal al Nasser
Athletes compete during the first Riyadh International Marathon, Riyadh
Athletes compete during the first Riyadh International Marathon, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia February 24, 2018. REUTERS/Faisal al Nasser
Athletes compete during the first Riyadh International Marathon, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia February 24, 2018. REUTERS/Faisal al Nasser
Athletes compete during the first Riyadh International Marathon, Riyadh
Athletes compete during the first Riyadh International Marathon, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia February 24, 2018. REUTERS/Faisal al Nasser
Saudi women watch the first Riyadh International Marathon, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia February 24, 2018. REUTERS/Faisal al Nasser
Saudi women watch the first Riyadh International Marathon, Riyadh
Saudi women watch the first Riyadh International Marathon, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia February 24, 2018. REUTERS/Faisal al Nasser
students are dancing the night to raise money for St. Luke&#39;s Children&#39;s hospital
Boise State Dance Marathon helping kids in need
students are dancing the night to raise money for St. Luke's Children's hospital
students are dancing the night to raise money for St. Luke's Children's hospital
Boise State Dance Marathon helping kids in need
students are dancing the night to raise money for St. Luke's Children's hospital
students are dancing the night to raise money for St. Luke&#39;s Children&#39;s hospital
Boise State Dance Marathon helping kids in need
students are dancing the night to raise money for St. Luke's Children's hospital
students are dancing the night to raise money for St. Luke&#39;s Children&#39;s hospital
Boise State Dance Marathon helping kids in need
students are dancing the night to raise money for St. Luke's Children's hospital
At 2:50pm on April 15, 2013, two bomb blasts turned the Boston Marathon finish line from a scene of triumph into a scene of tragedy--leaving three dead, hundreds injured, and a city gripped by heartbreak and terror. Less than five days later, the key suspects were identified and apprehended one dead, the other in custody. How did investigators transform the chaos of the bombing into a coherent trail of clues, pointing to the accused killers? NOVA follows the manhunt step by step, examining the r
Nova: Manhunt: Boston Bombers
At 2:50pm on April 15, 2013, two bomb blasts turned the Boston Marathon finish line from a scene of triumph into a scene of tragedy--leaving three dead, hundreds injured, and a city gripped by heartbreak and terror. Less than five days later, the key suspects were identified and apprehended one dead, the other in custody. How did investigators transform the chaos of the bombing into a coherent trail of clues, pointing to the accused killers? NOVA follows the manhunt step by step, examining the r
When you&#39;re running 26.2 miles, every ounce of weight counts. And now, Adidas is finding ways to reduce that load. The company believes its Adizero Sub2 could be the secret to breaking the two-hour marathon barrier.
Adidas looks to break the 2-hour marathon barrier with the Adizero Sub2
When you're running 26.2 miles, every ounce of weight counts. And now, Adidas is finding ways to reduce that load. The company believes its Adizero Sub2 could be the secret to breaking the two-hour marathon barrier.
When you&#39;re running 26.2 miles, every ounce of weight counts. And now, Adidas is finding ways to reduce that load. The company believes its Adizero Sub2 could be the secret to breaking the two-hour marathon barrier.
Adidas looks to break the 2-hour marathon barrier with the Adizero Sub2
When you're running 26.2 miles, every ounce of weight counts. And now, Adidas is finding ways to reduce that load. The company believes its Adizero Sub2 could be the secret to breaking the two-hour marathon barrier.
<p>Time is running out on the MLS offseason and, with it, commissioner Don Garber’s hope (and that of many fans) that the current round of expansion will be finalized before the league’s 23rd campaign kicks off.</p><p>The games begin March 3. The race to be named MLS’s 26th team, which actually could wind up being the 24th to take the field, now looks like it’s going to extend beyond that date.</p><p>But maybe not too far beyond.</p><p>Appearing on <a href="https://www.si.com/soccer/2018/01/24/don-garber-mls-expansion-columbus-aly-wagner-alexis-sanchez-barco-uswnt" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:SI TV’s Planet Fútbol show in late January" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">SI TV’s <i>Planet Fútbol</i> show in late January</a>, Garber said, “My guess is hopefully before the start of the season,” when asked when the next expansion club would be identified. Nashville was granted a franchise in mid-December and FC Cincinnati, the Sacramento Republic and a Detroit bid fronted by NBA owners Dan Gilbert and Tom Gores were vying for the second and final award of the round (which doesn’t include Miami).</p><p>Originally, MLS hoped to name both new teams before the end of 2017. Then, it hoped to have it done by the start of the ‘18 season. And Garber sounded optimistic last month it could happen.</p><p>“No issues there. Just dotting the Is and crossing the Ts,” he said.</p><p>But opening day approaches, there are no plans for an announcement and with Sacramento still looking for a new investor and Cincinnati involved in a public (and occasionally passionate) dialogue over its preferred West End stadium site, it appears this marathon still has a few miles to go.</p><p>“Although we haven’t finalized any deals and all of the finalist markets remain under consideration, we’ve made the most progress in Cincinnati,” MLS president and deputy commissioner Mark Abbott told SI.com on Friday.</p><p>Reflecting on Garber’s January comment, it turns out there are lots of Is to dot and a T to cross in “Cincinnati.” The USL club owned primarily by local insurance and financial services billionaire Carl Lindner III remains the heavy favorite.</p><p>“We don’t have, and don’t need to have, a fixed deadline, and we will wait until all of the necessary elements are in place before selecting the next club,” Abbott said. “Whether the announcement is in a few weeks or a couple months is dependent on finalizing the details, but I don’t anticipate that it will be an extended period of time.”</p><p>Cincinnati’s stadium situation is complex. The team has either three sites or no sites, depending on how particular you want to be. The clearest path to an arena runs through Oakley, a growing neighborhood about five miles northeast of central Cincinnati. The club will get $51 million in infrastructure funding in Oakley—FCC will finance construction of the stadium itself—and MLS typically is reluctant to turn its back on public money. But it also typically prefers to be closer to downtown, and the league would rather see FCC play in the West End or even in Newport, Kentucky, which is just across the Ohio river.</p><p>It’s possible the infrastructure funding could be available for the West End site (Hamilton County has agreed to pay for a 1,000-space parking garage), but building in such a densely populated area—the club would replace and relocate a high school football stadium—inevitably creates concern among residents. FCC president Jeff Berding, a former Cincinnati city councilman and Bengals executive, has faced a bit of heat at recent school board and community meetings.</p><p>Berding was unavailable to comment Friday.</p><p>Abbott said there was no handshake deal with FC Cincinnati in place that might allow the club to lobby for the West End site with maximum leverage. FCC already has several advantages in the expansion race, after all. It has the billionaire owner Sacramento needs and the commitment to build a new stadium still absent in Detroit. Even if FCC doesn’t secure the ideal site, it’s still the furthest along among the three finalists.</p><p>That doesn’t mean Sacramento has given up. Investor Kevin Nagle was unable to deliver a fully-funded proposal when meeting with MLS in December, and Republic suffered another blow when billionaire technology executive Meg Whitman bowed out as a minority owner soon thereafter. But multiple sources have confirmed <a href="http://www.sacbee.com/news/local/news-columns-blogs/city-beat/article200400399.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:a recent report in The Sacramento Bee" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">a recent report in <i>The Sacramento Bee</i></a> that Nagle has received expressions of interest from several potential partners, and he said he’s willing to step aside as the lead investor in order to make MLS happen. Nagle’s group already includes the San Francisco 49ers and several investors in the Sacramento Kings.</p><p>The league likes the market and Republic’s Railyard stadium plan, and even if FCC is awarded the next franchise, Sacramento immediately becomes a favorite to land No. 27 or 28. A lot of the hard work in California’s capital already has been done. No timeline has been announced for the awarding of those final two expansion slots, but it’s understood that the 12 cities that applied in January 2017 remain the ones under consideration.</p><p>If Cincinnati gets its team soon, it also becomes the most likely to kick off in 2019 and bring MLS back to an even number of members. MLS and FCC have looked at what Nippert Stadium might need to host league matches for a season or two, and the team already has some of the required technical infrastructure in place. Garber and David Beckham both said Miami would begin play in 2020. Nashville also isn’t too interested in rushing to take the field as it approaches its inaugural season in the USL (FCC is entering its third).</p><p>Los Angeles FC’s arrival this season leaves MLS at 23 teams. The league’s board of governors is scheduled to meet in mid April in Los Angeles.</p>
Next MLS Expansion Decision Likely to Come After Start of 2018 Season

Time is running out on the MLS offseason and, with it, commissioner Don Garber’s hope (and that of many fans) that the current round of expansion will be finalized before the league’s 23rd campaign kicks off.

The games begin March 3. The race to be named MLS’s 26th team, which actually could wind up being the 24th to take the field, now looks like it’s going to extend beyond that date.

But maybe not too far beyond.

Appearing on SI TV’s Planet Fútbol show in late January, Garber said, “My guess is hopefully before the start of the season,” when asked when the next expansion club would be identified. Nashville was granted a franchise in mid-December and FC Cincinnati, the Sacramento Republic and a Detroit bid fronted by NBA owners Dan Gilbert and Tom Gores were vying for the second and final award of the round (which doesn’t include Miami).

Originally, MLS hoped to name both new teams before the end of 2017. Then, it hoped to have it done by the start of the ‘18 season. And Garber sounded optimistic last month it could happen.

“No issues there. Just dotting the Is and crossing the Ts,” he said.

But opening day approaches, there are no plans for an announcement and with Sacramento still looking for a new investor and Cincinnati involved in a public (and occasionally passionate) dialogue over its preferred West End stadium site, it appears this marathon still has a few miles to go.

“Although we haven’t finalized any deals and all of the finalist markets remain under consideration, we’ve made the most progress in Cincinnati,” MLS president and deputy commissioner Mark Abbott told SI.com on Friday.

Reflecting on Garber’s January comment, it turns out there are lots of Is to dot and a T to cross in “Cincinnati.” The USL club owned primarily by local insurance and financial services billionaire Carl Lindner III remains the heavy favorite.

“We don’t have, and don’t need to have, a fixed deadline, and we will wait until all of the necessary elements are in place before selecting the next club,” Abbott said. “Whether the announcement is in a few weeks or a couple months is dependent on finalizing the details, but I don’t anticipate that it will be an extended period of time.”

Cincinnati’s stadium situation is complex. The team has either three sites or no sites, depending on how particular you want to be. The clearest path to an arena runs through Oakley, a growing neighborhood about five miles northeast of central Cincinnati. The club will get $51 million in infrastructure funding in Oakley—FCC will finance construction of the stadium itself—and MLS typically is reluctant to turn its back on public money. But it also typically prefers to be closer to downtown, and the league would rather see FCC play in the West End or even in Newport, Kentucky, which is just across the Ohio river.

It’s possible the infrastructure funding could be available for the West End site (Hamilton County has agreed to pay for a 1,000-space parking garage), but building in such a densely populated area—the club would replace and relocate a high school football stadium—inevitably creates concern among residents. FCC president Jeff Berding, a former Cincinnati city councilman and Bengals executive, has faced a bit of heat at recent school board and community meetings.

Berding was unavailable to comment Friday.

Abbott said there was no handshake deal with FC Cincinnati in place that might allow the club to lobby for the West End site with maximum leverage. FCC already has several advantages in the expansion race, after all. It has the billionaire owner Sacramento needs and the commitment to build a new stadium still absent in Detroit. Even if FCC doesn’t secure the ideal site, it’s still the furthest along among the three finalists.

That doesn’t mean Sacramento has given up. Investor Kevin Nagle was unable to deliver a fully-funded proposal when meeting with MLS in December, and Republic suffered another blow when billionaire technology executive Meg Whitman bowed out as a minority owner soon thereafter. But multiple sources have confirmed a recent report in The Sacramento Bee that Nagle has received expressions of interest from several potential partners, and he said he’s willing to step aside as the lead investor in order to make MLS happen. Nagle’s group already includes the San Francisco 49ers and several investors in the Sacramento Kings.

The league likes the market and Republic’s Railyard stadium plan, and even if FCC is awarded the next franchise, Sacramento immediately becomes a favorite to land No. 27 or 28. A lot of the hard work in California’s capital already has been done. No timeline has been announced for the awarding of those final two expansion slots, but it’s understood that the 12 cities that applied in January 2017 remain the ones under consideration.

If Cincinnati gets its team soon, it also becomes the most likely to kick off in 2019 and bring MLS back to an even number of members. MLS and FCC have looked at what Nippert Stadium might need to host league matches for a season or two, and the team already has some of the required technical infrastructure in place. Garber and David Beckham both said Miami would begin play in 2020. Nashville also isn’t too interested in rushing to take the field as it approaches its inaugural season in the USL (FCC is entering its third).

Los Angeles FC’s arrival this season leaves MLS at 23 teams. The league’s board of governors is scheduled to meet in mid April in Los Angeles.

Amid all the hikers, rock-climbers and sightseers, Snowdonia has been the setting this winter for an entirely different activity. John Farnworth, the multiple freestyle football world-record holder, has followed in the footsteps of Sir Edmund Hillary by using Mount Snowdon – the highest point in England and Wales - as a training location for his own assault this week on Mount Everest. The difference, however, is that Farnworth believes that it is possible to at least reach Base Camp of the world’s highest mountain – and hopefully much further – whilst juggling a football. And, yes, that means not letting the ball touch the ground at any active stage of a scheduled 10-day trek. It might sound outlandish, but Farnworth did previously also complete the London Marathon in 2011 whilst keeping a football in the air for the entire 26.2 mile route. After more than 12 hours without making a mistake, and being fuelled simply on water and wine gums, it was understandable that the last section should ultimately become a test of nerve rather than skill or simply physical endurance. “It would have been awful for something to go wrong after coming so far and I was really tense at the end,” says Farnworth. “But what I remember most is that there was a drunk guy suddenly approaching me as we came to the last bit. He was running directly at me and my brother had to just rugby tackle him to the floor. We should not get that up Mount Everest but the terrain will be much harder and the altitude at more than 5,000 metres is another slight unknown. &quot;We are planning for seven days to cover the route and three rest days.” Preparation for the challenge began six months ago and, as well as those visits to Snowdon, has included exercise sessions in an altitude chamber in London that replicates the thin air up Everest. Farnworth has also turned vegan in an attempt to improve his endurance and be better physically prepared for the conditions that await. As well as his nine world records – most recently for controlling a ball that was dropped from a height of 110 feet – Farnworth is a regular on CBBC and has performed for audiences ranging from Britain’s Got Talent to the Nou Camp and Barcelona’s training ground, where he met Neymar. Farnworth could not speak Portuguese and Neymar understands little English but he sensed an immediate connection. “Neymar’s a magician - and he watches freestyle for ideas,” says Farnworth. “The ball is a shared language and you could tell that he just loves football. If you pass him the ball, he starts doing tricks. &quot;It was interesting to see how playful he was because you don’t get that so much with English players.” For all his incredible close skill, Farnworth’s own football career reached a peak with playing for the Preston North End youth team and then Garforth Town in non-league, where he had the opportunity to play alongside Lee Sharpe. Garforth were then managed by Simon Clifford, the former Southampton coach and founder of Brazilian School Schools, and it was around the age of 20 that Farnworth decided to focus more on football freestyle. He can recall always doing kick-ups on the side-lines at school matches and, since 2006, has devoted himself totally to becoming the best freestyler in the world. Farnworth believes he can make it past base camp on Everest Credit: GEOFF PUGH “There are many other components to becoming a great footballer beyond mastery of the ball,” says Farnworth. “There is the awareness of what is going on around you and also the tactical side. The fitness is also very different – you use different muscles – but some of the greatest players like Neymar and Ronaldo have a freestyle background. “Once I decided what I wanted to, it was basically just a question of working at it. I trained every day for eight hours and, within six months, I was at a level where I could surprise myself. I enjoyed learning the different skills and challenging myself in that way.” There is another reason for the Everest expedition, which begins on Saturday, beyond simply the chance to set another rather unique record. Farnworth wants to raise money for the Alzheimer’s Society in memory of his grandfather, also John, was an inspiration in his career. John previously played for Accrington Stanley but, after suffering a brain haemorrhage and several strokes, had suffered with vascular dementia before dying last April. “He had such humility and was always cheerful despite what he was going through,” says Farnworth. “He also instilled a worth ethic in me to say that, if you are willing to put the time in, you can achieve things that might not have seemed possible. Freestyle football is no different in that than any other facet of life.” Donate here: http://www.justgiving.com/fund raising/everestfootball
Meet John Farnworth, the man attempting to juggle a football up Everest
Amid all the hikers, rock-climbers and sightseers, Snowdonia has been the setting this winter for an entirely different activity. John Farnworth, the multiple freestyle football world-record holder, has followed in the footsteps of Sir Edmund Hillary by using Mount Snowdon – the highest point in England and Wales - as a training location for his own assault this week on Mount Everest. The difference, however, is that Farnworth believes that it is possible to at least reach Base Camp of the world’s highest mountain – and hopefully much further – whilst juggling a football. And, yes, that means not letting the ball touch the ground at any active stage of a scheduled 10-day trek. It might sound outlandish, but Farnworth did previously also complete the London Marathon in 2011 whilst keeping a football in the air for the entire 26.2 mile route. After more than 12 hours without making a mistake, and being fuelled simply on water and wine gums, it was understandable that the last section should ultimately become a test of nerve rather than skill or simply physical endurance. “It would have been awful for something to go wrong after coming so far and I was really tense at the end,” says Farnworth. “But what I remember most is that there was a drunk guy suddenly approaching me as we came to the last bit. He was running directly at me and my brother had to just rugby tackle him to the floor. We should not get that up Mount Everest but the terrain will be much harder and the altitude at more than 5,000 metres is another slight unknown. "We are planning for seven days to cover the route and three rest days.” Preparation for the challenge began six months ago and, as well as those visits to Snowdon, has included exercise sessions in an altitude chamber in London that replicates the thin air up Everest. Farnworth has also turned vegan in an attempt to improve his endurance and be better physically prepared for the conditions that await. As well as his nine world records – most recently for controlling a ball that was dropped from a height of 110 feet – Farnworth is a regular on CBBC and has performed for audiences ranging from Britain’s Got Talent to the Nou Camp and Barcelona’s training ground, where he met Neymar. Farnworth could not speak Portuguese and Neymar understands little English but he sensed an immediate connection. “Neymar’s a magician - and he watches freestyle for ideas,” says Farnworth. “The ball is a shared language and you could tell that he just loves football. If you pass him the ball, he starts doing tricks. "It was interesting to see how playful he was because you don’t get that so much with English players.” For all his incredible close skill, Farnworth’s own football career reached a peak with playing for the Preston North End youth team and then Garforth Town in non-league, where he had the opportunity to play alongside Lee Sharpe. Garforth were then managed by Simon Clifford, the former Southampton coach and founder of Brazilian School Schools, and it was around the age of 20 that Farnworth decided to focus more on football freestyle. He can recall always doing kick-ups on the side-lines at school matches and, since 2006, has devoted himself totally to becoming the best freestyler in the world. Farnworth believes he can make it past base camp on Everest Credit: GEOFF PUGH “There are many other components to becoming a great footballer beyond mastery of the ball,” says Farnworth. “There is the awareness of what is going on around you and also the tactical side. The fitness is also very different – you use different muscles – but some of the greatest players like Neymar and Ronaldo have a freestyle background. “Once I decided what I wanted to, it was basically just a question of working at it. I trained every day for eight hours and, within six months, I was at a level where I could surprise myself. I enjoyed learning the different skills and challenging myself in that way.” There is another reason for the Everest expedition, which begins on Saturday, beyond simply the chance to set another rather unique record. Farnworth wants to raise money for the Alzheimer’s Society in memory of his grandfather, also John, was an inspiration in his career. John previously played for Accrington Stanley but, after suffering a brain haemorrhage and several strokes, had suffered with vascular dementia before dying last April. “He had such humility and was always cheerful despite what he was going through,” says Farnworth. “He also instilled a worth ethic in me to say that, if you are willing to put the time in, you can achieve things that might not have seemed possible. Freestyle football is no different in that than any other facet of life.” Donate here: http://www.justgiving.com/fund raising/everestfootball
Amid all the hikers, rock-climbers and sightseers, Snowdonia has been the setting this winter for an entirely different activity. John Farnworth, the multiple freestyle football world-record holder, has followed in the footsteps of Sir Edmund Hillary by using Mount Snowdon – the highest point in England and Wales - as a training location for his own assault this week on Mount Everest. The difference, however, is that Farnworth believes that it is possible to at least reach Base Camp of the world’s highest mountain – and hopefully much further – whilst juggling a football. And, yes, that means not letting the ball touch the ground at any active stage of a scheduled 10-day trek. It might sound outlandish, but Farnworth did previously also complete the London Marathon in 2011 whilst keeping a football in the air for the entire 26.2 mile route. After more than 12 hours without making a mistake, and being fuelled simply on water and wine gums, it was understandable that the last section should ultimately become a test of nerve rather than skill or simply physical endurance. “It would have been awful for something to go wrong after coming so far and I was really tense at the end,” says Farnworth. “But what I remember most is that there was a drunk guy suddenly approaching me as we came to the last bit. He was running directly at me and my brother had to just rugby tackle him to the floor. We should not get that up Mount Everest but the terrain will be much harder and the altitude at more than 5,000 metres is another slight unknown. &quot;We are planning for seven days to cover the route and three rest days.” Preparation for the challenge began six months ago and, as well as those visits to Snowdon, has included exercise sessions in an altitude chamber in London that replicates the thin air up Everest. Farnworth has also turned vegan in an attempt to improve his endurance and be better physically prepared for the conditions that await. As well as his nine world records – most recently for controlling a ball that was dropped from a height of 110 feet – Farnworth is a regular on CBBC and has performed for audiences ranging from Britain’s Got Talent to the Nou Camp and Barcelona’s training ground, where he met Neymar. Farnworth could not speak Portuguese and Neymar understands little English but he sensed an immediate connection. “Neymar’s a magician - and he watches freestyle for ideas,” says Farnworth. “The ball is a shared language and you could tell that he just loves football. If you pass him the ball, he starts doing tricks. &quot;It was interesting to see how playful he was because you don’t get that so much with English players.” For all his incredible close skill, Farnworth’s own football career reached a peak with playing for the Preston North End youth team and then Garforth Town in non-league, where he had the opportunity to play alongside Lee Sharpe. Garforth were then managed by Simon Clifford, the former Southampton coach and founder of Brazilian School Schools, and it was around the age of 20 that Farnworth decided to focus more on football freestyle. He can recall always doing kick-ups on the side-lines at school matches and, since 2006, has devoted himself totally to becoming the best freestyler in the world. Farnworth believes he can make it past base camp on Everest Credit: GEOFF PUGH “There are many other components to becoming a great footballer beyond mastery of the ball,” says Farnworth. “There is the awareness of what is going on around you and also the tactical side. The fitness is also very different – you use different muscles – but some of the greatest players like Neymar and Ronaldo have a freestyle background. “Once I decided what I wanted to, it was basically just a question of working at it. I trained every day for eight hours and, within six months, I was at a level where I could surprise myself. I enjoyed learning the different skills and challenging myself in that way.” There is another reason for the Everest expedition, which begins on Saturday, beyond simply the chance to set another rather unique record. Farnworth wants to raise money for the Alzheimer’s Society in memory of his grandfather, also John, was an inspiration in his career. John previously played for Accrington Stanley but, after suffering a brain haemorrhage and several strokes, had suffered with vascular dementia before dying last April. “He had such humility and was always cheerful despite what he was going through,” says Farnworth. “He also instilled a worth ethic in me to say that, if you are willing to put the time in, you can achieve things that might not have seemed possible. Freestyle football is no different in that than any other facet of life.” Donate here: http://www.justgiving.com/fund raising/everestfootball
Meet John Farnworth, the man attempting to juggle a football up Everest
Amid all the hikers, rock-climbers and sightseers, Snowdonia has been the setting this winter for an entirely different activity. John Farnworth, the multiple freestyle football world-record holder, has followed in the footsteps of Sir Edmund Hillary by using Mount Snowdon – the highest point in England and Wales - as a training location for his own assault this week on Mount Everest. The difference, however, is that Farnworth believes that it is possible to at least reach Base Camp of the world’s highest mountain – and hopefully much further – whilst juggling a football. And, yes, that means not letting the ball touch the ground at any active stage of a scheduled 10-day trek. It might sound outlandish, but Farnworth did previously also complete the London Marathon in 2011 whilst keeping a football in the air for the entire 26.2 mile route. After more than 12 hours without making a mistake, and being fuelled simply on water and wine gums, it was understandable that the last section should ultimately become a test of nerve rather than skill or simply physical endurance. “It would have been awful for something to go wrong after coming so far and I was really tense at the end,” says Farnworth. “But what I remember most is that there was a drunk guy suddenly approaching me as we came to the last bit. He was running directly at me and my brother had to just rugby tackle him to the floor. We should not get that up Mount Everest but the terrain will be much harder and the altitude at more than 5,000 metres is another slight unknown. "We are planning for seven days to cover the route and three rest days.” Preparation for the challenge began six months ago and, as well as those visits to Snowdon, has included exercise sessions in an altitude chamber in London that replicates the thin air up Everest. Farnworth has also turned vegan in an attempt to improve his endurance and be better physically prepared for the conditions that await. As well as his nine world records – most recently for controlling a ball that was dropped from a height of 110 feet – Farnworth is a regular on CBBC and has performed for audiences ranging from Britain’s Got Talent to the Nou Camp and Barcelona’s training ground, where he met Neymar. Farnworth could not speak Portuguese and Neymar understands little English but he sensed an immediate connection. “Neymar’s a magician - and he watches freestyle for ideas,” says Farnworth. “The ball is a shared language and you could tell that he just loves football. If you pass him the ball, he starts doing tricks. "It was interesting to see how playful he was because you don’t get that so much with English players.” For all his incredible close skill, Farnworth’s own football career reached a peak with playing for the Preston North End youth team and then Garforth Town in non-league, where he had the opportunity to play alongside Lee Sharpe. Garforth were then managed by Simon Clifford, the former Southampton coach and founder of Brazilian School Schools, and it was around the age of 20 that Farnworth decided to focus more on football freestyle. He can recall always doing kick-ups on the side-lines at school matches and, since 2006, has devoted himself totally to becoming the best freestyler in the world. Farnworth believes he can make it past base camp on Everest Credit: GEOFF PUGH “There are many other components to becoming a great footballer beyond mastery of the ball,” says Farnworth. “There is the awareness of what is going on around you and also the tactical side. The fitness is also very different – you use different muscles – but some of the greatest players like Neymar and Ronaldo have a freestyle background. “Once I decided what I wanted to, it was basically just a question of working at it. I trained every day for eight hours and, within six months, I was at a level where I could surprise myself. I enjoyed learning the different skills and challenging myself in that way.” There is another reason for the Everest expedition, which begins on Saturday, beyond simply the chance to set another rather unique record. Farnworth wants to raise money for the Alzheimer’s Society in memory of his grandfather, also John, was an inspiration in his career. John previously played for Accrington Stanley but, after suffering a brain haemorrhage and several strokes, had suffered with vascular dementia before dying last April. “He had such humility and was always cheerful despite what he was going through,” says Farnworth. “He also instilled a worth ethic in me to say that, if you are willing to put the time in, you can achieve things that might not have seemed possible. Freestyle football is no different in that than any other facet of life.” Donate here: http://www.justgiving.com/fund raising/everestfootball
Why Marathon Petroleum’s Refining Margin Rose
Why Marathon Petroleum’s Refining Margin Rose
Why Marathon Petroleum’s Refining Margin Rose
<p>Some of the 6,000 runners in the Publix A1A Marathon observe a moment of silence prior to the race for the victims of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting on Sunday, Feb. 18, 2018. (Photo: Joe Cavaretta/Sun Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images) </p>
Mourning those lost in the Parkland school shooting

Some of the 6,000 runners in the Publix A1A Marathon observe a moment of silence prior to the race for the victims of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting on Sunday, Feb. 18, 2018. (Photo: Joe Cavaretta/Sun Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images)

Marathon Petroleum’s Segmental Earnings in 4Q17
Marathon Petroleum’s Segmental Earnings in 4Q17
Marathon Petroleum’s Segmental Earnings in 4Q17
Klang marathon runner to be taken off life support, family & friends urged to say goodbye
Klang marathon runner to be taken off life support, family & friends urged to say goodbye
Klang marathon runner to be taken off life support, family & friends urged to say goodbye
Ang was knocked down in a case of hit-and-run while participating in the Klang City International Marathon in December last year. — Picture via Facebook/Marathon Malaysia
Amid sombre mood, family of comatose marathon runner remains hopeful
Ang was knocked down in a case of hit-and-run while participating in the Klang City International Marathon in December last year. — Picture via Facebook/Marathon Malaysia
Analyst Ratings for Marathon Petroleum: Mixed Sentiments
Analyst Ratings for Marathon Petroleum: Mixed Sentiments
Analyst Ratings for Marathon Petroleum: Mixed Sentiments
Marathon Petroleum’s Capital Expenditure and Growth Trajectory
Marathon Petroleum’s Capital Expenditure and Growth Trajectory
Marathon Petroleum’s Capital Expenditure and Growth Trajectory
Kylie Jenner is widely reported to have sent Snapchat’s share price tumbling with just 18 words on Thursday evening, marking one of the most expensive tweets on record. “Sooo [sic] does anyone else not open Snapchat anymore? Or is it just me… ugh this is so sad,” The 22-year-old asked her 24.5 million Twitter followers. Shortly after, Snapchat’s value nosedived by $1.3bn. Miss Jenner, the youngest of the Kardashian clan (the daughter of Kris and sibling to Kim, Khloe, Kourtney and Kendall) is living proof that the widely mocked #influencer crowd is a force to be reckoned with. Analysts have questioned whether the drop in price is down to Miss Jenner&#39;s tweet or the widespread outrage among users following its recent redesign and an analyst&#39;s warning note. But Jenner&#39;s tweet hit the web before the markets opened yesterday and could be behind the slide in pre-trading. In any case, her tweet was likely read more times than the Citi investors&#39; memo. There are plenty of examples where similar off-the-cuff statements have wreaked havoc in the business world. Here are some of the most expensive 180-character statements on record. sooo does anyone else not open Snapchat anymore? Or is it just me... ugh this is so sad.— Kylie Jenner (@KylieJenner) February 21, 2018 Fake White House bomb tweet shaves $136.5bn off US stock market When hackers broke into the Associated Press Twitter account and announced that two bombs had exploded at the White House, injuring Barack Obama, more than $136.5bn was wiped off the US stock market. The losses corrected themselves but it took several minutes before the tweet was confirmed to be fake. The US was at the time on high alert, having just witnessed a terrorist attack on the Boston marathon just a week before. This Associated Press tweet wiped $135bn off the US stock market Donald Trump&#39;s F-35 tweet knocks $4bn off Lockheed Martin The aerospace and defence company lost $4bn in value in within two hours of Mr Trump attacking the company for allowing its F-25 fighter jet programme to get “out of control”. The project - which is expected to cost $1.5 trillion dollars over its 50-year lifetime including in service support - has come under fire for being overly costly, slow and failing to meet initial expectations. The F-35 program and cost is out of control. Billions of dollars can and will be saved on military (and other) purchases after January 20th.— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) December 12, 2016 Elon Musk tweet wipes $580m off Samsung SDI In June 2016, rumours were swirling that Samsung would supply Tesla with solar batteries for its line of luxury electric cars. But founder Elon Musk took to Twitter to clear things up, a move that would cost the South Korean manufacturer dearly. “Would like to clarify that Tesla is working exclusively with Panasonic for Model 3 cells. News articles claiming otherwise are incorrect,” Musk tweeted. The announcement wiped 8.5pc from Samsung SDI’s market capitalisation on the South Korean stock exchange, the equivalent of around $580 million. Would like to clarify that Tesla is working exclusively with Panasonic for Model 3 cells. News articles claiming otherwise are incorrect.— Elon Musk (@elonmusk) June 8, 2016 Startup&#39;s tweet knocks $8bn off Twitter In a perfect example of irony, a tweet shaved $8bn off Twitter’s share price after a little-known tech startup called Selerity announced its poor set of results in 2015, hours ahead of an official announcement. The ill-fated tweet spooked investors, mostly due to the surprise factor. Typically, announcements will be made after markets close, to allow time for the dust to settle and avoid a buying or selling frenzy. #BREAKING: Twitter Inc. $TWTR Q1 Non-GAAP EPS beats estimates, $0.07 vs. $0.04 expected— Selerity (@Selerity) April 28, 2015 Nasdaq tweet causes JP Morgan to dip 3.6pc In October 2014, JPMorgan dropped as much as 3.6 percent after Nasdaq tweeted out a report that showed profit and expenses missed analysts’ estimates, ahead of its formal announcement. Published three hours early, the company were unable to spin their results in a more palatable manner, sparking a share-selling frenzy. Passenger video wipes $1bn off American Airlines A video which was shared on Twitter showing a passenger being forcibly removed from a United Airlines flight wiped $1 billion off its value on April 12 2017, a day after the clip went viral. The clip showed a bloodied doctor David Dao, 69, being dragged off the plane when he refused to give up his seat on an overbooked flight for a member of staff on a partner airline. CEO Oscar Munoz later apologised for the way Dr Dao was handled and pledged to review passenger policies.
Kylie Jenner 'so sad' about Snapchat: the most expensive tweets on record
Kylie Jenner is widely reported to have sent Snapchat’s share price tumbling with just 18 words on Thursday evening, marking one of the most expensive tweets on record. “Sooo [sic] does anyone else not open Snapchat anymore? Or is it just me… ugh this is so sad,” The 22-year-old asked her 24.5 million Twitter followers. Shortly after, Snapchat’s value nosedived by $1.3bn. Miss Jenner, the youngest of the Kardashian clan (the daughter of Kris and sibling to Kim, Khloe, Kourtney and Kendall) is living proof that the widely mocked #influencer crowd is a force to be reckoned with. Analysts have questioned whether the drop in price is down to Miss Jenner's tweet or the widespread outrage among users following its recent redesign and an analyst's warning note. But Jenner's tweet hit the web before the markets opened yesterday and could be behind the slide in pre-trading. In any case, her tweet was likely read more times than the Citi investors' memo. There are plenty of examples where similar off-the-cuff statements have wreaked havoc in the business world. Here are some of the most expensive 180-character statements on record. sooo does anyone else not open Snapchat anymore? Or is it just me... ugh this is so sad.— Kylie Jenner (@KylieJenner) February 21, 2018 Fake White House bomb tweet shaves $136.5bn off US stock market When hackers broke into the Associated Press Twitter account and announced that two bombs had exploded at the White House, injuring Barack Obama, more than $136.5bn was wiped off the US stock market. The losses corrected themselves but it took several minutes before the tweet was confirmed to be fake. The US was at the time on high alert, having just witnessed a terrorist attack on the Boston marathon just a week before. This Associated Press tweet wiped $135bn off the US stock market Donald Trump's F-35 tweet knocks $4bn off Lockheed Martin The aerospace and defence company lost $4bn in value in within two hours of Mr Trump attacking the company for allowing its F-25 fighter jet programme to get “out of control”. The project - which is expected to cost $1.5 trillion dollars over its 50-year lifetime including in service support - has come under fire for being overly costly, slow and failing to meet initial expectations. The F-35 program and cost is out of control. Billions of dollars can and will be saved on military (and other) purchases after January 20th.— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) December 12, 2016 Elon Musk tweet wipes $580m off Samsung SDI In June 2016, rumours were swirling that Samsung would supply Tesla with solar batteries for its line of luxury electric cars. But founder Elon Musk took to Twitter to clear things up, a move that would cost the South Korean manufacturer dearly. “Would like to clarify that Tesla is working exclusively with Panasonic for Model 3 cells. News articles claiming otherwise are incorrect,” Musk tweeted. The announcement wiped 8.5pc from Samsung SDI’s market capitalisation on the South Korean stock exchange, the equivalent of around $580 million. Would like to clarify that Tesla is working exclusively with Panasonic for Model 3 cells. News articles claiming otherwise are incorrect.— Elon Musk (@elonmusk) June 8, 2016 Startup's tweet knocks $8bn off Twitter In a perfect example of irony, a tweet shaved $8bn off Twitter’s share price after a little-known tech startup called Selerity announced its poor set of results in 2015, hours ahead of an official announcement. The ill-fated tweet spooked investors, mostly due to the surprise factor. Typically, announcements will be made after markets close, to allow time for the dust to settle and avoid a buying or selling frenzy. #BREAKING: Twitter Inc. $TWTR Q1 Non-GAAP EPS beats estimates, $0.07 vs. $0.04 expected— Selerity (@Selerity) April 28, 2015 Nasdaq tweet causes JP Morgan to dip 3.6pc In October 2014, JPMorgan dropped as much as 3.6 percent after Nasdaq tweeted out a report that showed profit and expenses missed analysts’ estimates, ahead of its formal announcement. Published three hours early, the company were unable to spin their results in a more palatable manner, sparking a share-selling frenzy. Passenger video wipes $1bn off American Airlines A video which was shared on Twitter showing a passenger being forcibly removed from a United Airlines flight wiped $1 billion off its value on April 12 2017, a day after the clip went viral. The clip showed a bloodied doctor David Dao, 69, being dragged off the plane when he refused to give up his seat on an overbooked flight for a member of staff on a partner airline. CEO Oscar Munoz later apologised for the way Dr Dao was handled and pledged to review passenger policies.
Kylie Jenner is widely reported to have sent Snapchat’s share price tumbling with just 18 words on Thursday evening, marking one of the most expensive tweets on record. “Sooo [sic] does anyone else not open Snapchat anymore? Or is it just me… ugh this is so sad,” The 22-year-old asked her 24.5 million Twitter followers. Shortly after, Snapchat’s value nosedived by $1.3bn. Miss Jenner, the youngest of the Kardashian clan (the daughter of Kris and sibling to Kim, Khloe, Kourtney and Kendall) is living proof that the widely mocked #influencer crowd is a force to be reckoned with. Analysts have questioned whether the drop in price is down to Miss Jenner&#39;s tweet or the widespread outrage among users following its recent redesign and an analyst&#39;s warning note. But Jenner&#39;s tweet hit the web before the markets opened yesterday and could be behind the slide in pre-trading. In any case, her tweet was likely read more times than the Citi investors&#39; memo. There are plenty of examples where similar off-the-cuff statements have wreaked havoc in the business world. Here are some of the most expensive 180-character statements on record. sooo does anyone else not open Snapchat anymore? Or is it just me... ugh this is so sad.— Kylie Jenner (@KylieJenner) February 21, 2018 Fake White House bomb tweet shaves $136.5bn off US stock market When hackers broke into the Associated Press Twitter account and announced that two bombs had exploded at the White House, injuring Barack Obama, more than $136.5bn was wiped off the US stock market. The losses corrected themselves but it took several minutes before the tweet was confirmed to be fake. The US was at the time on high alert, having just witnessed a terrorist attack on the Boston marathon just a week before. This Associated Press tweet wiped $135bn off the US stock market Donald Trump&#39;s F-35 tweet knocks $4bn off Lockheed Martin The aerospace and defence company lost $4bn in value in within two hours of Mr Trump attacking the company for allowing its F-25 fighter jet programme to get “out of control”. The project - which is expected to cost $1.5 trillion dollars over its 50-year lifetime including in service support - has come under fire for being overly costly, slow and failing to meet initial expectations. The F-35 program and cost is out of control. Billions of dollars can and will be saved on military (and other) purchases after January 20th.— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) December 12, 2016 Elon Musk tweet wipes $580m off Samsung SDI In June 2016, rumours were swirling that Samsung would supply Tesla with solar batteries for its line of luxury electric cars. But founder Elon Musk took to Twitter to clear things up, a move that would cost the South Korean manufacturer dearly. “Would like to clarify that Tesla is working exclusively with Panasonic for Model 3 cells. News articles claiming otherwise are incorrect,” Musk tweeted. The announcement wiped 8.5pc from Samsung SDI’s market capitalisation on the South Korean stock exchange, the equivalent of around $580 million. Would like to clarify that Tesla is working exclusively with Panasonic for Model 3 cells. News articles claiming otherwise are incorrect.— Elon Musk (@elonmusk) June 8, 2016 Startup&#39;s tweet knocks $8bn off Twitter In a perfect example of irony, a tweet shaved $8bn off Twitter’s share price after a little-known tech startup called Selerity announced its poor set of results in 2015, hours ahead of an official announcement. The ill-fated tweet spooked investors, mostly due to the surprise factor. Typically, announcements will be made after markets close, to allow time for the dust to settle and avoid a buying or selling frenzy. #BREAKING: Twitter Inc. $TWTR Q1 Non-GAAP EPS beats estimates, $0.07 vs. $0.04 expected— Selerity (@Selerity) April 28, 2015 Nasdaq tweet causes JP Morgan to dip 3.6pc In October 2014, JPMorgan dropped as much as 3.6 percent after Nasdaq tweeted out a report that showed profit and expenses missed analysts’ estimates, ahead of its formal announcement. Published three hours early, the company were unable to spin their results in a more palatable manner, sparking a share-selling frenzy. Passenger video wipes $1bn off American Airlines A video which was shared on Twitter showing a passenger being forcibly removed from a United Airlines flight wiped $1 billion off its value on April 12 2017, a day after the clip went viral. The clip showed a bloodied doctor David Dao, 69, being dragged off the plane when he refused to give up his seat on an overbooked flight for a member of staff on a partner airline. CEO Oscar Munoz later apologised for the way Dr Dao was handled and pledged to review passenger policies.
Kylie Jenner 'so sad' about Snapchat: the most expensive tweets on record
Kylie Jenner is widely reported to have sent Snapchat’s share price tumbling with just 18 words on Thursday evening, marking one of the most expensive tweets on record. “Sooo [sic] does anyone else not open Snapchat anymore? Or is it just me… ugh this is so sad,” The 22-year-old asked her 24.5 million Twitter followers. Shortly after, Snapchat’s value nosedived by $1.3bn. Miss Jenner, the youngest of the Kardashian clan (the daughter of Kris and sibling to Kim, Khloe, Kourtney and Kendall) is living proof that the widely mocked #influencer crowd is a force to be reckoned with. Analysts have questioned whether the drop in price is down to Miss Jenner's tweet or the widespread outrage among users following its recent redesign and an analyst's warning note. But Jenner's tweet hit the web before the markets opened yesterday and could be behind the slide in pre-trading. In any case, her tweet was likely read more times than the Citi investors' memo. There are plenty of examples where similar off-the-cuff statements have wreaked havoc in the business world. Here are some of the most expensive 180-character statements on record. sooo does anyone else not open Snapchat anymore? Or is it just me... ugh this is so sad.— Kylie Jenner (@KylieJenner) February 21, 2018 Fake White House bomb tweet shaves $136.5bn off US stock market When hackers broke into the Associated Press Twitter account and announced that two bombs had exploded at the White House, injuring Barack Obama, more than $136.5bn was wiped off the US stock market. The losses corrected themselves but it took several minutes before the tweet was confirmed to be fake. The US was at the time on high alert, having just witnessed a terrorist attack on the Boston marathon just a week before. This Associated Press tweet wiped $135bn off the US stock market Donald Trump's F-35 tweet knocks $4bn off Lockheed Martin The aerospace and defence company lost $4bn in value in within two hours of Mr Trump attacking the company for allowing its F-25 fighter jet programme to get “out of control”. The project - which is expected to cost $1.5 trillion dollars over its 50-year lifetime including in service support - has come under fire for being overly costly, slow and failing to meet initial expectations. The F-35 program and cost is out of control. Billions of dollars can and will be saved on military (and other) purchases after January 20th.— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) December 12, 2016 Elon Musk tweet wipes $580m off Samsung SDI In June 2016, rumours were swirling that Samsung would supply Tesla with solar batteries for its line of luxury electric cars. But founder Elon Musk took to Twitter to clear things up, a move that would cost the South Korean manufacturer dearly. “Would like to clarify that Tesla is working exclusively with Panasonic for Model 3 cells. News articles claiming otherwise are incorrect,” Musk tweeted. The announcement wiped 8.5pc from Samsung SDI’s market capitalisation on the South Korean stock exchange, the equivalent of around $580 million. Would like to clarify that Tesla is working exclusively with Panasonic for Model 3 cells. News articles claiming otherwise are incorrect.— Elon Musk (@elonmusk) June 8, 2016 Startup's tweet knocks $8bn off Twitter In a perfect example of irony, a tweet shaved $8bn off Twitter’s share price after a little-known tech startup called Selerity announced its poor set of results in 2015, hours ahead of an official announcement. The ill-fated tweet spooked investors, mostly due to the surprise factor. Typically, announcements will be made after markets close, to allow time for the dust to settle and avoid a buying or selling frenzy. #BREAKING: Twitter Inc. $TWTR Q1 Non-GAAP EPS beats estimates, $0.07 vs. $0.04 expected— Selerity (@Selerity) April 28, 2015 Nasdaq tweet causes JP Morgan to dip 3.6pc In October 2014, JPMorgan dropped as much as 3.6 percent after Nasdaq tweeted out a report that showed profit and expenses missed analysts’ estimates, ahead of its formal announcement. Published three hours early, the company were unable to spin their results in a more palatable manner, sparking a share-selling frenzy. Passenger video wipes $1bn off American Airlines A video which was shared on Twitter showing a passenger being forcibly removed from a United Airlines flight wiped $1 billion off its value on April 12 2017, a day after the clip went viral. The clip showed a bloodied doctor David Dao, 69, being dragged off the plane when he refused to give up his seat on an overbooked flight for a member of staff on a partner airline. CEO Oscar Munoz later apologised for the way Dr Dao was handled and pledged to review passenger policies.

What to read next

By using Yahoo you agree that Yahoo and partners may use Cookies for personalisation and other purposes