NBA

NBA Slideshow

NBA: Washington Wizards at Brooklyn Nets

Dec 12, 2017; Brooklyn, NY, USA; Brooklyn Nets guard Allen Crabbe (33) shoots as Washington Wizards guard Bradley Beal (3) defends during the third quarter at Barclays Center. Mandatory Credit: Anthony Gruppuso-USA TODAY Sports

NBA: Atlanta Hawks at Cleveland Cavaliers

Dec 12, 2017; Cleveland, OH, USA; Cleveland Cavaliers forward LeBron James (23) is hit in the head by Atlanta Hawks forward Taurean Prince (12) while driving to the basket in the fourth quarter at Quicken Loans Arena. Mandatory Credit: David Richard-USA TODAY Sports

NBA: Denver Nuggets at Detroit Pistons

Dec 12, 2017; Detroit, MI, USA; Denver Nuggets guard Jamal Murray (27) dribbles the ball against Detroit Pistons guard Reggie Jackson (1) during the first quarter at Little Caesars Arena. Mandatory Credit: Tim Fuller-USA TODAY Sports

NBA: San Antonio Spurs at Dallas Mavericks

Dec 12, 2017; Dallas, TX, USA; San Antonio Spurs forward Kawhi Leonard (2) runs back up the court during the second half against the Dallas Mavericks at the American Airlines Center. The Mavericks defeat the Spurs 95-89. Mandatory Credit: Jerome Miron-USA TODAY Sports

NBA: Los Angeles Lakers at New York Knicks

Dec 12, 2017; New York, NY, USA; Los Angeles Lakers guard Lonzo Ball (2) grabs a loose ball in front of New York Knicks forward Kristaps Porzingis (6) during the second half at Madison Square Garden. Mandatory Credit: Adam Hunger-USA TODAY Sports

NBA: San Antonio Spurs at Dallas Mavericks

Dec 12, 2017; Dallas, TX, USA; San Antonio Spurs forward Kawhi Leonard (2) runs back up the court during the second half against the Dallas Mavericks at the American Airlines Center. The Mavericks defeat the Spurs 95-89. Mandatory Credit: Jerome Miron-USA TODAY Sports

Top 10: Dec. 12th

Check out all the best plays from Tuesday night in the NBA with the Top 10.

Top 10: Dec. 12th

Check out all the best plays from Tuesday night in the NBA with the Top 10.

Top 10: Dec. 12th

Check out all the best plays from Tuesday night in the NBA with the Top 10.

Top 10: Dec. 12th

Check out all the best plays from Tuesday night in the NBA with the Top 10.

The most emotional NBA half-time show ever

The most emotional NBA half-time show ever

Watch the Knicks and Lakers make every shot for 2 straight minutes of game clock

The sequence lent to that feeling you get while watching competitive NBA games of breathless exhilaration.

Watch the Knicks and Lakers make every shot for 2 straight minutes of game clock

The sequence lent to that feeling you get while watching competitive NBA games of breathless exhilaration.

Watch the Knicks and Lakers make every shot for 2 straight minutes of game clock

The sequence lent to that feeling you get while watching competitive NBA games of breathless exhilaration.

Watch the Knicks and Lakers make every shot for 2 straight minutes of game clock

The sequence lent to that feeling you get while watching competitive NBA games of breathless exhilaration.

Watch: Soldier Comes Home to Surprise Children at Kings Game

Warning: If you have an aversion to heart-warming videos that might make you straight cry, please turn away immediately.

Now that that's out of the way, let's move on to one of the best videos from this NBA season. The Kings pulled two children, Austin and Brooke, on the court for what they thought was a regular promotion; they'd get blindfolded, spun around, try and find the Spurs' mascot for a prize, then return to their seats.

It was so, so much more than that. The children's father, U.S. Army Sargeant First Class Shawn Sullivan, was brought out onto the court while the children were blindfolded. He had just returned from an eight-month tour in Afghanistan, and it was the first time the kids had seen their dad since he left.

Check out Tyson Chandler and Devin Booker looking on with ear-to-ear smiles plastered on their faces. In this moment, we are all Tyson Chandler and Devin Booker.

Best of NBA: Mavericks spoil Kawhi Leonard's season debut

After being forced to change, Kelly Oubre suspects NBA can't handle 'too wavy' Supreme sleeve

Kelly Oubre said he doesn't get why he had to change his Supreme sleeve at halftime, but suspects too much waviness may be the culprit. 

Is Lonzo Ball Throwing Shade at Nas By Wearing This Sweatshirt to the Garden?

Lonzo Ball is making his Madison Square Garden debut on Tuesday night when the Lakers visit the Knicks. Never one to miss out on an opportunity to start a heated conversation over social media, Lonzo's wardrobe choice is sure to tick off some New York hip-hop pursists.

It appears Lonzo is wearing a sweatshirt with a picture of rap legend Nas' album cover for It Was Written on it, with one key difference: the sweatshirt has Lonzo's face where Nas' should be.

You'll recall that Lonzo previously made headlines by calling Nas, who grew up in the Crown Heights neighborhood of Brooklyn, "outdated."

"Don't nobody listen to Nas no more," Lonzo said on his family's Facebook television show Ball in the Family. "Real hip-hop is Migos, Future."

Ball has released some music of his own, including a freestyle of sorts over Drake's "Free Smoke."

Wearing a sweatshirt that may-or-may-not be throwing shade at a New York legend before his MSG debut must make Lonzo's father proud.

Marcus and Markieff Morris Paid For Christmas Gifts On Layaway At a Philadelphia Walmart

With Christmas two weeks away, the Morris twins are showing they are in the giving mood.

Marcus Morris of the Celtics and Markieff Morris of the Wizards decided to pay off the remaining balance for gifts put on layaway at a Northeast Philadelphia Walmart, according to ABC 11. The twins, who grew up in Philadelphia, put up $6,000, and on Monday, costumers were treated to the surprise of learning they no longer owed anything for their gifts.

Marcus and Markieff were unable to make it to the store to greet those who were on the receiving end of their generosity, but their mother Thomasine Morris was there to hand out the gifts, according to ABC 11.

"Even though we play in Boston, even though we play in Washington, Philly is still our family," Thomasine said according to ABC 11.

Marcus and Markieff, who are both in their seventh year in the league, will face off for the first time this year on Christmas when the Celtics host the Wizards.

The Thunder continue to struggle

CBS Sports NBA writer Reid Forgrave talks about how the Oklahoma City Thunder haven't done enough to stand out this season and how the team's issues could cause more than just Paul George to leave in the offseason.

The Thunder continue to struggle

CBS Sports NBA writer Reid Forgrave talks about how the Oklahoma City Thunder haven't done enough to stand out this season and how the team's issues could cause more than just Paul George to leave in the offseason.

The Thunder continue to struggle

CBS Sports NBA writer Reid Forgrave talks about how the Oklahoma City Thunder haven't done enough to stand out this season and how the team's issues could cause more than just Paul George to leave in the offseason.

The Thunder continue to struggle

CBS Sports NBA writer Reid Forgrave talks about how the Oklahoma City Thunder haven't done enough to stand out this season and how the team's issues could cause more than just Paul George to leave in the offseason.

Wizards Expect John Wall Back vs. Grizzlies After Knee Discomfort

The Washington Wizards say that John Wall could return to the lineup on Wednesday night against the Memphis Grizzlies, according to David Aldridge of Turner Sports.

Wall has not played since Nov. 22 due to discomfort and inflammation in his left knee. The injury initially occurred when he made contact with another player in the Nov. 7 loss to the Dallas Mavericks. He missed a game on Nov. 11 due to illness and migraines. He received IV fluids to deal with the sickness and he says that fluid built up in his knee.

Wall is averaging 20.3 points, 9.2 assists and 3.4 rebounds per game. Tim Frazier filled in for Wall in his absence and has started 10 games on the year.

Is Durant making a case for early season MVP?

CBS Sports NBA writer Reid Forgrave joins Chris Hassel to discuss if Kevin Durant is making an early season case for MVP especially since the absence of Steph Curry and Draymond Green.

Is Durant making a case for early season MVP?

CBS Sports NBA writer Reid Forgrave joins Chris Hassel to discuss if Kevin Durant is making an early season case for MVP especially since the absence of Steph Curry and Draymond Green.

Is Durant making a case for early season MVP?

CBS Sports NBA writer Reid Forgrave joins Chris Hassel to discuss if Kevin Durant is making an early season case for MVP especially since the absence of Steph Curry and Draymond Green.

Is Durant making a case for early season MVP?

CBS Sports NBA writer Reid Forgrave joins Chris Hassel to discuss if Kevin Durant is making an early season case for MVP especially since the absence of Steph Curry and Draymond Green.

Rockets stay hot since return of Chris Paul

CBS Sports NBA writer Reid Forgrave joins Chris Hassel to discuss the Houston Rockets' stunning performances since the return of Chris Paul.

Rockets stay hot since return of Chris Paul

CBS Sports NBA writer Reid Forgrave joins Chris Hassel to discuss the Houston Rockets' stunning performances since the return of Chris Paul.

Rockets stay hot since return of Chris Paul

CBS Sports NBA writer Reid Forgrave joins Chris Hassel to discuss the Houston Rockets' stunning performances since the return of Chris Paul.

Rockets stay hot since return of Chris Paul

CBS Sports NBA writer Reid Forgrave joins Chris Hassel to discuss the Houston Rockets' stunning performances since the return of Chris Paul.

LiAngelo, LaMelo Ball turn pro with club team in Lithuania

LaVar Ball, father of Los Angeles Lakers' Lonzo Ball, watches the Lakers play the Los Angeles Clippers during the second half of an NBA summer league basketball game, Friday, July 7, 2017, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)

Kyle Kuzma Q&A: Life as a Fan Favorite in Lakerland

Kyle Kuzma has taken the NBA by storm. The little-heralded rookie from the University of Utah was an afterthought at pick No. 27 in the 2017 NBA Draft, but—thanks partially to the struggle of fellow rookie Lonzo Ball—has become a fan favorite among the Laker faithful after a highly successful Summer League showing translated well to the regular season.

While you can tune into any given Lakers game and here a cascade of “KUZ” descending from the crowd, Kuzma hasn’t let the hype go to his head and is focused on his game. Kuzma, whose Lakers host the Timberwolves on Christmas, certainly looked like he was in the holiday spirit at the NBA Store in New York City.

The Crossover sat down with Kuzma to talk about All-Star Weekend coming to L.A., his potential participation in the Rising Stars Challenge, adjusting to the NBA and his native Flint, Michigan—which has been fighting a tainted water crisis for years now.

(This article has been condensed and edited for clarity.)

Kellen Becoats: What was the biggest challenge moving from Utah to NBA, basketball-wise and lifestyle-wise?

Kyle Kuzma: Lifestyle-wise, like L.A. in general, Utah is very conservative, very laid back and L.A. is nothing like that. So I would definitely say that. And basketball-wise, the NBA is just a different game than college is. There’s multiple factors.

KB: You obviously got drafted by one of the biggest franchises in the NBA. What’s it been like to get acclimated to the Lakers fanbase and what’s it like being a fan favorite?

KK: It’s cool to be a Laker, that’s basketball royalty in a sense. The best franchise in basketball, so to be drafted by them is pretty cool, pretty special. They’ve had so many great players play for them and just that I can be mentioned as a Laker is pretty cool. And the fan favorite portion is pretty cool. It’s definitely always good to have fan support. NBA players don’t necessarily have the support that I have and I really appreciate it.

KB: You guys have the All-Star Game coming to L.A. this year. What’s it going to be like bringing all the All-Stars in and having them in your city? And do you think you’ll participate in the Rising Stars Challenge and how cool would it be if you did?

KK: It’d be very cool. Of course I would love to participate in it. It would definitely be one of those bucket-list goals, growing up always watching All-Star Weekend, the Rising Star Challenge was always big. It was the first event you would always see and it’d be really cool.

KB: I wanted to talk to you about Flint, how did growing up in Flint and being around it shape you into the person you are today?

KK: It shaped me a lot. Flint is a very tough place to live. The environment is definitely a different type of environment than anywhere else in the country, I feel like. But you know it made me who I am today. There’s a lot of temptation to be in the streets and get involved in a lot of the negative aspects of it, but I think it built a certain kind of toughness in me and I live with it every single day.

KB: I noticed that’s very much a part of your personality. You wrote ‘Flint’ on your Hyperdunks a few games ago and you have ‘Flintstones’ in your Twitter bio, just how proud are you to come from that community?

KK: Very proud. Being from Flint, especially in the basketball community is a big deal. Basketball in Flint, you’re pretty much like a God there if you play college basketball or are lucky enough to make it to the NBA. And I’m extremely proud, everybody from Flint has it tatted on them and it’s a really proud rich tradition to be from there.

KB: I was reading an article about you from the (University of) Utah newspaper and you were talking about your mom and just how proud you made her when you were at Utah and ultimately trying to get to the NBA. How much does family play a part in what you do?

KK: It plays a lot. Growing up, we didn’t really have a lot but we had each other. I try to do a lot of the things I do for them and try to support them as much as I can. My family and community really drive me to be something.

KB: What are your goals for this season and where do you ultimately want to be at the end of the season?

KK: My goal is to keep winning. It’s not really fun to lose, especially in this league when it can happen a lot to a young team. I just want to, as a team, just keep winning. And for myself, just have a healthy and consistent year and wherever that takes me, it takes me. I don’t really put goals like ‘I wanna get here.’ I just want to take it day by day and if that gets me somewhere high then it gets me somewhere high.

KB: My last question: Is there any added pressure being a rookie on the Lakers in such a large market? And do you think it will push you to be better by the end of the season?

KK: I think there’s a little pressure maybe but it’s a good pressure. L.A. is a big market and being a Laker is—you could be the 12th man on the Lakers and get more media and marketing than the third-best player anywhere in the NBA. So I definitely like it and it comes with a lot of responsibility.

Kyle Kuzma Q&A: Life as a Fan Favorite in Lakerland

Kyle Kuzma has taken the NBA by storm. The little-heralded rookie from the University of Utah was an afterthought at pick No. 27 in the 2017 NBA Draft, but—thanks partially to the struggle of fellow rookie Lonzo Ball—has become a fan favorite among the Laker faithful after a highly successful Summer League showing translated well to the regular season.

While you can tune into any given Lakers game and here a cascade of “KUZ” descending from the crowd, Kuzma hasn’t let the hype go to his head and is focused on his game. Kuzma, whose Lakers host the Timberwolves on Christmas, certainly looked like he was in the holiday spirit at the NBA Store in New York City.

The Crossover sat down with Kuzma to talk about All-Star Weekend coming to L.A., his potential participation in the Rising Stars Challenge, adjusting to the NBA and his native Flint, Michigan—which has been fighting a tainted water crisis for years now.

(This article has been condensed and edited for clarity.)

Kellen Becoats: What was the biggest challenge moving from Utah to NBA, basketball-wise and lifestyle-wise?

Kyle Kuzma: Lifestyle-wise, like L.A. in general, Utah is very conservative, very laid back and L.A. is nothing like that. So I would definitely say that. And basketball-wise, the NBA is just a different game than college is. There’s multiple factors.

KB: You obviously got drafted by one of the biggest franchises in the NBA. What’s it been like to get acclimated to the Lakers fanbase and what’s it like being a fan favorite?

KK: It’s cool to be a Laker, that’s basketball royalty in a sense. The best franchise in basketball, so to be drafted by them is pretty cool, pretty special. They’ve had so many great players play for them and just that I can be mentioned as a Laker is pretty cool. And the fan favorite portion is pretty cool. It’s definitely always good to have fan support. NBA players don’t necessarily have the support that I have and I really appreciate it.

KB: You guys have the All-Star Game coming to L.A. this year. What’s it going to be like bringing all the All-Stars in and having them in your city? And do you think you’ll participate in the Rising Stars Challenge and how cool would it be if you did?

KK: It’d be very cool. Of course I would love to participate in it. It would definitely be one of those bucket-list goals, growing up always watching All-Star Weekend, the Rising Star Challenge was always big. It was the first event you would always see and it’d be really cool.

KB: I wanted to talk to you about Flint, how did growing up in Flint and being around it shape you into the person you are today?

KK: It shaped me a lot. Flint is a very tough place to live. The environment is definitely a different type of environment than anywhere else in the country, I feel like. But you know it made me who I am today. There’s a lot of temptation to be in the streets and get involved in a lot of the negative aspects of it, but I think it built a certain kind of toughness in me and I live with it every single day.

KB: I noticed that’s very much a part of your personality. You wrote ‘Flint’ on your Hyperdunks a few games ago and you have ‘Flintstones’ in your Twitter bio, just how proud are you to come from that community?

KK: Very proud. Being from Flint, especially in the basketball community is a big deal. Basketball in Flint, you’re pretty much like a God there if you play college basketball or are lucky enough to make it to the NBA. And I’m extremely proud, everybody from Flint has it tatted on them and it’s a really proud rich tradition to be from there.

KB: I was reading an article about you from the (University of) Utah newspaper and you were talking about your mom and just how proud you made her when you were at Utah and ultimately trying to get to the NBA. How much does family play a part in what you do?

KK: It plays a lot. Growing up, we didn’t really have a lot but we had each other. I try to do a lot of the things I do for them and try to support them as much as I can. My family and community really drive me to be something.

KB: What are your goals for this season and where do you ultimately want to be at the end of the season?

KK: My goal is to keep winning. It’s not really fun to lose, especially in this league when it can happen a lot to a young team. I just want to, as a team, just keep winning. And for myself, just have a healthy and consistent year and wherever that takes me, it takes me. I don’t really put goals like ‘I wanna get here.’ I just want to take it day by day and if that gets me somewhere high then it gets me somewhere high.

KB: My last question: Is there any added pressure being a rookie on the Lakers in such a large market? And do you think it will push you to be better by the end of the season?

KK: I think there’s a little pressure maybe but it’s a good pressure. L.A. is a big market and being a Laker is—you could be the 12th man on the Lakers and get more media and marketing than the third-best player anywhere in the NBA. So I definitely like it and it comes with a lot of responsibility.

NBA Draft watch: Deandre Ayton, Collin Sexton both live up to hype in Alabama vs. Arizona matchup

Alabama's Collin Sexton and Arizona's Deandre Ayton didn't wage a one-on-one battle Saturday night, but they did reinforce their strengths and give scouts plenty to think about ahead of the 2018 NBA Draft.

Man pleads not guilty to killing former NBA player Wright

MEMPHIS, TN - JANUARY 3: Lorenzen Wright #42 of the Memphis Grizzlies goes up for a dunk during a game against the Utah Jazz at FedexForum on January 3, 2005 in Memphis, Tennessee. (Photo by Joe Murphy/NBAE via Getty Images)

NBA Draft watch: DeAndre Ayton, Collin Sexton both live up to hype in Alabama vs. Arizona matchup

NBA Draft watch: DeAndre Ayton, Collin Sexton both live up to hype in Alabama vs. Arizona matchup

NBA Draft watch: DeAndre Ayton, Collin Sexton both live up to hype in Alabama vs. Arizona matchup

NBA Draft watch: DeAndre Ayton, Collin Sexton both live up to hype in Alabama vs. Arizona matchup

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