NBA

NBA Slideshow

Durant Enters Top 50 Scoring List

Kevin Durant sinks a jumper and enters the NBA Top 50 Scoring List.

Durant Enters Top 50 Scoring List

Kevin Durant sinks a jumper and enters the NBA Top 50 Scoring List.

Durant Enters Top 50 Scoring List

Kevin Durant sinks a jumper and enters the NBA Top 50 Scoring List.

Durant Enters Top 50 Scoring List

Kevin Durant sinks a jumper and enters the NBA Top 50 Scoring List.

NBA: Preseason-Portland Trail Blazers at Phoenix Suns

Oct 11, 2017; Phoenix, AZ, USA; Phoenix Suns guard Eric Bledsoe (2) stands on the court in the first half of the game against the Portland Trail Blazers at Talking Stick Resort Arena. Jennifer Stewart-USA TODAY Sports

NBA: Preseason-Portland Trail Blazers at Phoenix Suns

Oct 11, 2017; Phoenix, AZ, USA; Phoenix Suns guard Eric Bledsoe (2) stands on the court in the first half of the game against the Portland Trail Blazers at Talking Stick Resort Arena. Jennifer Stewart-USA TODAY Sports

NBA: Golden State Warriors at Memphis Grizzlies

Golden State Warriors guard Stephen Curry (30) argues with referee Scott Wall (31) during the second half against the Memphis Grizzlies at FedExForum, Oct 21, 2017; Memphis, TN, USA. Memphis defeated Golden State 111-101. Mandatory Credit: Justin Ford-USA TODAY Sports

NBA: Golden State Warriors at Memphis Grizzlies

Golden State Warriors guard Stephen Curry (30) reacts after being ejected from the game during the second half against the Memphis Grizzlies at FedExForum, Oct 21, 2017; Memphis, TN, USA. Memphis defeated Golden State 111-101. Mandatory Credit: Justin Ford-USA TODAY Sports

NBA: Golden State Warriors at Memphis Grizzlies

Golden State Warriors forward Kevin Durant (35) and guard Stephen Curry (30) are ejected during the second half against the Memphis Grizzlies at FedExForum, Oct 21, 2017; Memphis, TN, USA. Memphis defeated Golden State 111-101. Mandatory Credit: Justin Ford-USA TODAY Sports

NBA: Golden State Warriors at Memphis Grizzlies

Golden State Warriors guard Stephen Curry (30) argues with referee Scott Wall (31) during the second half against the Memphis Grizzlies at FedExForum, Oct 21, 2017; Memphis, TN, USA. Memphis defeated Golden State 111-101. Mandatory Credit: Justin Ford-USA TODAY Sports

NBA: Curry fined $50,000 for tossing mouthpiece

FILE - In this April 2, 2017, file photo, Phoenix Suns head coach Earl Watson reacts to a call by the officials during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Houston Rockets, in Phoenix. The Suns announced the firing of coach Earl Watson Sunday night, Oct. 22, 2017, after hours of meetings at the team's headquarters. Assistant coach Jay Triano, a former head coach of the Toronto Raptors, was named interim coach. (AP Photo/Ralph Freso, File)

FILE - In this April 2, 2017, file photo, Phoenix Suns head coach Earl Watson reacts to a call by the officials during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Houston Rockets, in Phoenix. The Suns announced the firing of coach Earl Watson Sunday night, Oct. 22, 2017, after hours of meetings at the team's headquarters. Assistant coach Jay Triano, a former head coach of the Toronto Raptors, was named interim coach. (AP Photo/Ralph Freso, File)

FILE - In this Oct. 18, 2017, file photo, Phoenix Suns coach Earl Watson reacts to a call during the first half of the team's NBA basketball game against the Portland Trail Blazers, in Phoenix. The Suns announced the firing of coach Earl Watson Sunday night, Oct. 22, 2017, after hours of meetings at the team's headquarters. Assistant coach Jay Triano, a former head coach of the Toronto Raptors, was named interim coach. (AP Photo/Matt York, File)

FILE - In this Oct. 18, 2017, file photo, Phoenix Suns coach Earl Watson reacts to a call during the first half of the team's NBA basketball game against the Portland Trail Blazers, in Phoenix. The Suns announced the firing of coach Earl Watson Sunday night, Oct. 22, 2017, after hours of meetings at the team's headquarters. Assistant coach Jay Triano, a former head coach of the Toronto Raptors, was named interim coach. (AP Photo/Matt York, File)

FILE - This is a Sept. 25, 2017, file photo showing Jay Triano posed during the Phoenix Suns NBA basketball team media day in Phoenix. The Suns announced the firing of coach Earl Watson Sunday night, Oct. 22, 2017, after hours of meetings at the team's headquarters. Assistant coach Jay Triano, a former head coach of the Toronto Raptors, was named interim coach. (AP Photo/Rick Scuteri, File)

FILE - This is a Sept. 25, 2017, file photo showing Jay Triano posed during the Phoenix Suns NBA basketball team media day in Phoenix. The Suns announced the firing of coach Earl Watson Sunday night, Oct. 22, 2017, after hours of meetings at the team's headquarters. Assistant coach Jay Triano, a former head coach of the Toronto Raptors, was named interim coach. (AP Photo/Rick Scuteri, File)

Stephen Curry Fined, Not Suspended For Throwing Mouthguard

Stephen Curry has been fined $50,000 for throwing his mouthguard at a referee in Saturday’s game but won’t be suspended, the NBA announced Monday.

Stephen Curry Fined, Not Suspended For Throwing Mouthguard

Stephen Curry has been fined $50,000 for throwing his mouthguard at a referee in Saturday’s game but won’t be suspended, the NBA announced Monday.

Stephen Curry Fined, Not Suspended For Throwing Mouthguard

Stephen Curry has been fined $50,000 for throwing his mouthguard at a referee in Saturday’s game but won’t be suspended, the NBA announced Monday.

Stephen Curry Fined, Not Suspended For Throwing Mouthguard

Stephen Curry has been fined $50,000 for throwing his mouthguard at a referee in Saturday’s game but won’t be suspended, the NBA announced Monday.

NBA Says Officials Missed Two Calls at the End of Timberwolves vs. Thunder

Officials missed two calls at the end of Sunday's Timberwolves-Thunder game that would have prevented Andrew Wiggins' game-winning shot, according to the Last Two Minute Report.

The first call that the refs missed was when Timberwolves coach Tom Thibodeau tried calling a timeout after Carmelo Anthony hit a go-ahead three-pointer with 4.7 seconds left in the game. Minnesota had no timeouts remaining, and Thibodeau gesturing for a timeout should have been a technical foul. Thibodeau was behind the official when he tried to call the timeout, so the official did not see him, and by the time he could, Thibodeau was no longer gesturing for a timeout, but was waving his players up court.

The second call the NBA says was missed was an illegal screen by Karl-Anthony Towns. Wiggins had gotten the inbound pass near the sideline and as he got near half court, Towns set a screen on Paul George that knocked him out of the play and gave Wiggins separation to dribble into his shot. The league says that although Towns was not moving during the screen and had established his position within enough time, his stance was too wide, and the contact on the screen was with George's leg, which means it should have been called a foul.

Since neither of these calls were made at the time, Minnesota came away with a 115-113 road victory over Oklahoma City thanks to the three Wiggins banked in as time expired.

The 12 Biggest Surprises of the NBA Season So Far

Minnesota is 2-1 and plays the Pacers Tuesday and the 1-2 Thunder have their next game against the Pacers Wednesday.

Ben Simmons has started his NBA rookie season in high style.

Exclusive: Sports minister Tracey Crouch warns FA could lose funds and bidding power 

Tracey Crouch on Monday warned Greg Clarke and Martin Glenn she was ready to strip the Football Association of all its public funding – and block it from bidding to host the game’s biggest events – if it failed to ensure the Mark Sampson scandal could never happen again. Sports minister Crouch refused to join calls for FA chairman Clarke and chief executive Glenn to resign or be fired over their handling of Sampson’s sacking as England Women manager and his racist abuse of Eni Aluko, but declined to offer them her backing either. Speaking at length for the first time about the wave of crises to engulf British sport since she became arguably the most powerful figure in the industry, Crouch also threatened the governing bodies of Olympic and Paralympic sports with a withdrawal of funding if they failed to address the athlete welfare scandal to have engulfed them. She told the Daily Telegraph: She was “absolutely” prepared to block the FA’s bid for the 2021 European Women’s Championship and future Euros, World Cups and Champions League finals if the FA did not “get themselves in order”. She found evidence submitted to a parliamentary inquiry about the FA’s handling of racism allegations against Sampson “shocking”.  She had already made her feelings clear to the governing body, with her branding its processes for dealing with discrimination complaints as “not fit for purpose”.  She was ready to strip national governing bodies of funding if they failed to stop athletes being physically and emotionally abused, even if it meant the country winning fewer medals. Her number-one priority was dealing with sport’s paedophile scandal and she was fighting for a change to the law. Tracey Crouch has some tough decisions to make  It is now almost a week since Sampson was found guilty at the third time of asking of racially abusing Aluko and her team-mate, Drew Spence, a decision that has seen the FA subjected to an unprecedented level of condemnation. The report emphasised, however, that it did not conclude that Sampson was a racist.  Crouch, herself an FA-qualified coach, had been among those to hit out at the governing body’s handling of the scandal and she went further on Monday by warning a repeat would risk punishment under the Government’s Code for Sports Governance that is about to come into force. Calling Clarke “wrong” to tell former NBA star John Amaechi that ministers were powerless to bring the FA to heel, she said: “If that had happened next year then there would be that opportunity for us to sit there and reflect on whether or not there was a funding consequence for that.” Confirming that “absolutely” on the table would also be a withdrawal of Government guarantees necessary for England to host major events, she added: “The FA have got to get themselves in order. “That does mean a change in culture within the Football Association. And I would expect them to reflect on that and to make it very clear that the Eni Aluko case-Sampson affair will not happen again.” Mark Sampson was sacked as England women's manager last month Crouch criticised Clarke, Glenn and FA technical director Dan Ashworth’s car-crash appearance in front of the Digital, Culture, Media & Sport select committee on Wednesday, which heard evidence from Aluko she branded “shocking”. That included allegations Glenn had tried to get her to issue a statement saying the FA was not institutionally racist – something Aluko described as “bordering on blackmail” – and claims a black actress hired for a role-play exercise with the England team had been deliberately chosen to make the striker look bad. Those accusations – compounded by revelations from an internal review into Aluko’s complaints which Crouch branded “not fit for purpose” – saw seven of the 11-strong select committee urge Clarke, Glenn and Ashworth, at the very least, to consider their positions. Refusing either to back the current FA leadership or call for their sacking either, Crouch said: “While I completely understand what people are saying, I don’t think it is for a minister to turn around and say that somebody should go in a governing body.” Football is not alone in having been engulfed by an athlete welfare scandal, with Olympic and Paralympic sports beset by accusations of bullying, discrimination and even sexual assault and child grooming in the past 18 months. Eni Aluko was the victim of racist abuse Again declaring millions of pounds of funding was “absolutely” in jeopardy if sports fail to crack down on a problem she said had left her feeling “devastated for the athletes” involved, Crouch warned: “If it means that, as a consequence of that, we don’t secure as many medals in the future then so be it. “Our athletes start at a very young age to achieve a dream of theirs, which is no different to any of us on a different career path. “They do not deserve to face bullying and harassment within that journey.” Crouch said she expected most – but not all – of the recommendations from the Government-commissioned Duty of Care in Sport Review to be adopted by governing bodies. She added of UK Sport’s famous ‘No Compromise’ approach: “I’ve always said that I support ‘No Compromise’ but not at any cost. The drive for medals is very important but that shouldn’t mean that you compromise good, decent behaviour.” At the top of Crouch’s inbox is still last year’s revelations of historic – and in some cases ongoing – child sexual abuse in the industry. Crouch confirmed she was lobbying hard for a change to the law to prevent coaches entering into a sexual relationship with someone under their care who is below the age of 18.

Exclusive: Sports minister Tracey Crouch warns FA could lose funds and bidding power 

Tracey Crouch on Monday warned Greg Clarke and Martin Glenn she was ready to strip the Football Association of all its public funding – and block it from bidding to host the game’s biggest events – if it failed to ensure the Mark Sampson scandal could never happen again. Sports minister Crouch refused to join calls for FA chairman Clarke and chief executive Glenn to resign or be fired over their handling of Sampson’s sacking as England Women manager and his racist abuse of Eni Aluko, but declined to offer them her backing either. Speaking at length for the first time about the wave of crises to engulf British sport since she became arguably the most powerful figure in the industry, Crouch also threatened the governing bodies of Olympic and Paralympic sports with a withdrawal of funding if they failed to address the athlete welfare scandal to have engulfed them. She told the Daily Telegraph: She was “absolutely” prepared to block the FA’s bid for the 2021 European Women’s Championship and future Euros, World Cups and Champions League finals if the FA did not “get themselves in order”. She found evidence submitted to a parliamentary inquiry about the FA’s handling of racism allegations against Sampson “shocking”.  She had already made her feelings clear to the governing body, with her branding its processes for dealing with discrimination complaints as “not fit for purpose”.  She was ready to strip national governing bodies of funding if they failed to stop athletes being physically and emotionally abused, even if it meant the country winning fewer medals. Her number-one priority was dealing with sport’s paedophile scandal and she was fighting for a change to the law. Tracey Crouch has some tough decisions to make  It is now almost a week since Sampson was found guilty at the third time of asking of racially abusing Aluko and her team-mate, Drew Spence, a decision that has seen the FA subjected to an unprecedented level of condemnation. The report emphasised, however, that it did not conclude that Sampson was a racist.  Crouch, herself an FA-qualified coach, had been among those to hit out at the governing body’s handling of the scandal and she went further on Monday by warning a repeat would risk punishment under the Government’s Code for Sports Governance that is about to come into force. Calling Clarke “wrong” to tell former NBA star John Amaechi that ministers were powerless to bring the FA to heel, she said: “If that had happened next year then there would be that opportunity for us to sit there and reflect on whether or not there was a funding consequence for that.” Confirming that “absolutely” on the table would also be a withdrawal of Government guarantees necessary for England to host major events, she added: “The FA have got to get themselves in order. “That does mean a change in culture within the Football Association. And I would expect them to reflect on that and to make it very clear that the Eni Aluko case-Sampson affair will not happen again.” Mark Sampson was sacked as England women's manager last month Crouch criticised Clarke, Glenn and FA technical director Dan Ashworth’s car-crash appearance in front of the Digital, Culture, Media & Sport select committee on Wednesday, which heard evidence from Aluko she branded “shocking”. That included allegations Glenn had tried to get her to issue a statement saying the FA was not institutionally racist – something Aluko described as “bordering on blackmail” – and claims a black actress hired for a role-play exercise with the England team had been deliberately chosen to make the striker look bad. Those accusations – compounded by revelations from an internal review into Aluko’s complaints which Crouch branded “not fit for purpose” – saw seven of the 11-strong select committee urge Clarke, Glenn and Ashworth, at the very least, to consider their positions. Refusing either to back the current FA leadership or call for their sacking either, Crouch said: “While I completely understand what people are saying, I don’t think it is for a minister to turn around and say that somebody should go in a governing body.” Football is not alone in having been engulfed by an athlete welfare scandal, with Olympic and Paralympic sports beset by accusations of bullying, discrimination and even sexual assault and child grooming in the past 18 months. Eni Aluko was the victim of racist abuse Again declaring millions of pounds of funding was “absolutely” in jeopardy if sports fail to crack down on a problem she said had left her feeling “devastated for the athletes” involved, Crouch warned: “If it means that, as a consequence of that, we don’t secure as many medals in the future then so be it. “Our athletes start at a very young age to achieve a dream of theirs, which is no different to any of us on a different career path. “They do not deserve to face bullying and harassment within that journey.” Crouch said she expected most – but not all – of the recommendations from the Government-commissioned Duty of Care in Sport Review to be adopted by governing bodies. She added of UK Sport’s famous ‘No Compromise’ approach: “I’ve always said that I support ‘No Compromise’ but not at any cost. The drive for medals is very important but that shouldn’t mean that you compromise good, decent behaviour.” At the top of Crouch’s inbox is still last year’s revelations of historic – and in some cases ongoing – child sexual abuse in the industry. Crouch confirmed she was lobbying hard for a change to the law to prevent coaches entering into a sexual relationship with someone under their care who is below the age of 18.

Exclusive: Sports minister Tracey Crouch warns FA could lose funds and bidding power 

Tracey Crouch on Monday warned Greg Clarke and Martin Glenn she was ready to strip the Football Association of all its public funding – and block it from bidding to host the game’s biggest events – if it failed to ensure the Mark Sampson scandal could never happen again. Sports minister Crouch refused to join calls for FA chairman Clarke and chief executive Glenn to resign or be fired over their handling of Sampson’s sacking as England Women manager and his racist abuse of Eni Aluko, but declined to offer them her backing either. Speaking at length for the first time about the wave of crises to engulf British sport since she became arguably the most powerful figure in the industry, Crouch also threatened the governing bodies of Olympic and Paralympic sports with a withdrawal of funding if they failed to address the athlete welfare scandal to have engulfed them. She told the Daily Telegraph: She was “absolutely” prepared to block the FA’s bid for the 2021 European Women’s Championship and future Euros, World Cups and Champions League finals if the FA did not “get themselves in order”. She found evidence submitted to a parliamentary inquiry about the FA’s handling of racism allegations against Sampson “shocking”.  She had already made her feelings clear to the governing body, with her branding its processes for dealing with discrimination complaints as “not fit for purpose”.  She was ready to strip national governing bodies of funding if they failed to stop athletes being physically and emotionally abused, even if it meant the country winning fewer medals. Her number-one priority was dealing with sport’s paedophile scandal and she was fighting for a change to the law. Tracey Crouch has some tough decisions to make  It is now almost a week since Sampson was found guilty at the third time of asking of racially abusing Aluko and her team-mate, Drew Spence, a decision that has seen the FA subjected to an unprecedented level of condemnation. The report emphasised, however, that it did not conclude that Sampson was a racist.  Crouch, herself an FA-qualified coach, had been among those to hit out at the governing body’s handling of the scandal and she went further on Monday by warning a repeat would risk punishment under the Government’s Code for Sports Governance that is about to come into force. Calling Clarke “wrong” to tell former NBA star John Amaechi that ministers were powerless to bring the FA to heel, she said: “If that had happened next year then there would be that opportunity for us to sit there and reflect on whether or not there was a funding consequence for that.” Confirming that “absolutely” on the table would also be a withdrawal of Government guarantees necessary for England to host major events, she added: “The FA have got to get themselves in order. “That does mean a change in culture within the Football Association. And I would expect them to reflect on that and to make it very clear that the Eni Aluko case-Sampson affair will not happen again.” Mark Sampson was sacked as England women's manager last month Crouch criticised Clarke, Glenn and FA technical director Dan Ashworth’s car-crash appearance in front of the Digital, Culture, Media & Sport select committee on Wednesday, which heard evidence from Aluko she branded “shocking”. That included allegations Glenn had tried to get her to issue a statement saying the FA was not institutionally racist – something Aluko described as “bordering on blackmail” – and claims a black actress hired for a role-play exercise with the England team had been deliberately chosen to make the striker look bad. Those accusations – compounded by revelations from an internal review into Aluko’s complaints which Crouch branded “not fit for purpose” – saw seven of the 11-strong select committee urge Clarke, Glenn and Ashworth, at the very least, to consider their positions. Refusing either to back the current FA leadership or call for their sacking either, Crouch said: “While I completely understand what people are saying, I don’t think it is for a minister to turn around and say that somebody should go in a governing body.” Football is not alone in having been engulfed by an athlete welfare scandal, with Olympic and Paralympic sports beset by accusations of bullying, discrimination and even sexual assault and child grooming in the past 18 months. Eni Aluko was the victim of racist abuse Again declaring millions of pounds of funding was “absolutely” in jeopardy if sports fail to crack down on a problem she said had left her feeling “devastated for the athletes” involved, Crouch warned: “If it means that, as a consequence of that, we don’t secure as many medals in the future then so be it. “Our athletes start at a very young age to achieve a dream of theirs, which is no different to any of us on a different career path. “They do not deserve to face bullying and harassment within that journey.” Crouch said she expected most – but not all – of the recommendations from the Government-commissioned Duty of Care in Sport Review to be adopted by governing bodies. She added of UK Sport’s famous ‘No Compromise’ approach: “I’ve always said that I support ‘No Compromise’ but not at any cost. The drive for medals is very important but that shouldn’t mean that you compromise good, decent behaviour.” At the top of Crouch’s inbox is still last year’s revelations of historic – and in some cases ongoing – child sexual abuse in the industry. Crouch confirmed she was lobbying hard for a change to the law to prevent coaches entering into a sexual relationship with someone under their care who is below the age of 18.

Exclusive: Sports minister Tracey Crouch warns FA could lose funds and bidding power 

Tracey Crouch on Monday warned Greg Clarke and Martin Glenn she was ready to strip the Football Association of all its public funding – and block it from bidding to host the game’s biggest events – if it failed to ensure the Mark Sampson scandal could never happen again. Sports minister Crouch refused to join calls for FA chairman Clarke and chief executive Glenn to resign or be fired over their handling of Sampson’s sacking as England Women manager and his racist abuse of Eni Aluko, but declined to offer them her backing either. Speaking at length for the first time about the wave of crises to engulf British sport since she became arguably the most powerful figure in the industry, Crouch also threatened the governing bodies of Olympic and Paralympic sports with a withdrawal of funding if they failed to address the athlete welfare scandal to have engulfed them. She told the Daily Telegraph: She was “absolutely” prepared to block the FA’s bid for the 2021 European Women’s Championship and future Euros, World Cups and Champions League finals if the FA did not “get themselves in order”. She found evidence submitted to a parliamentary inquiry about the FA’s handling of racism allegations against Sampson “shocking”.  She had already made her feelings clear to the governing body, with her branding its processes for dealing with discrimination complaints as “not fit for purpose”.  She was ready to strip national governing bodies of funding if they failed to stop athletes being physically and emotionally abused, even if it meant the country winning fewer medals. Her number-one priority was dealing with sport’s paedophile scandal and she was fighting for a change to the law. Tracey Crouch has some tough decisions to make  It is now almost a week since Sampson was found guilty at the third time of asking of racially abusing Aluko and her team-mate, Drew Spence, a decision that has seen the FA subjected to an unprecedented level of condemnation. The report emphasised, however, that it did not conclude that Sampson was a racist.  Crouch, herself an FA-qualified coach, had been among those to hit out at the governing body’s handling of the scandal and she went further on Monday by warning a repeat would risk punishment under the Government’s Code for Sports Governance that is about to come into force. Calling Clarke “wrong” to tell former NBA star John Amaechi that ministers were powerless to bring the FA to heel, she said: “If that had happened next year then there would be that opportunity for us to sit there and reflect on whether or not there was a funding consequence for that.” Confirming that “absolutely” on the table would also be a withdrawal of Government guarantees necessary for England to host major events, she added: “The FA have got to get themselves in order. “That does mean a change in culture within the Football Association. And I would expect them to reflect on that and to make it very clear that the Eni Aluko case-Sampson affair will not happen again.” Mark Sampson was sacked as England women's manager last month Crouch criticised Clarke, Glenn and FA technical director Dan Ashworth’s car-crash appearance in front of the Digital, Culture, Media & Sport select committee on Wednesday, which heard evidence from Aluko she branded “shocking”. That included allegations Glenn had tried to get her to issue a statement saying the FA was not institutionally racist – something Aluko described as “bordering on blackmail” – and claims a black actress hired for a role-play exercise with the England team had been deliberately chosen to make the striker look bad. Those accusations – compounded by revelations from an internal review into Aluko’s complaints which Crouch branded “not fit for purpose” – saw seven of the 11-strong select committee urge Clarke, Glenn and Ashworth, at the very least, to consider their positions. Refusing either to back the current FA leadership or call for their sacking either, Crouch said: “While I completely understand what people are saying, I don’t think it is for a minister to turn around and say that somebody should go in a governing body.” Football is not alone in having been engulfed by an athlete welfare scandal, with Olympic and Paralympic sports beset by accusations of bullying, discrimination and even sexual assault and child grooming in the past 18 months. Eni Aluko was the victim of racist abuse Again declaring millions of pounds of funding was “absolutely” in jeopardy if sports fail to crack down on a problem she said had left her feeling “devastated for the athletes” involved, Crouch warned: “If it means that, as a consequence of that, we don’t secure as many medals in the future then so be it. “Our athletes start at a very young age to achieve a dream of theirs, which is no different to any of us on a different career path. “They do not deserve to face bullying and harassment within that journey.” Crouch said she expected most – but not all – of the recommendations from the Government-commissioned Duty of Care in Sport Review to be adopted by governing bodies. She added of UK Sport’s famous ‘No Compromise’ approach: “I’ve always said that I support ‘No Compromise’ but not at any cost. The drive for medals is very important but that shouldn’t mean that you compromise good, decent behaviour.” At the top of Crouch’s inbox is still last year’s revelations of historic – and in some cases ongoing – child sexual abuse in the industry. Crouch confirmed she was lobbying hard for a change to the law to prevent coaches entering into a sexual relationship with someone under their care who is below the age of 18.

Stephen Curry Fined $50,000 But Not Suspended for Throwing Mouthguard

Stephen Curry has been fined $50,000 for throwing his mouthguard at a referee in Saturday’s game but won’t be suspended, the NBA announced Monday.

Curry threw the mouthpiece in frustration after failing to draw a foul call on a drive to the hoop in the final minute of the Warriors’ 111–101 loss to the Grizzlies and was ejected. He said after the game that he didn’t mean to hit the ref with the throw.

Kevin Durant was also ejected after appearing to direct an obscene gesture at the Memphis crowd. It turns out he was just reminding them he’s finally a champion and actually pointed toward his ring finger.

Andre Iguodala yelled at the referee during the incident and was fined $15,000 as a result.

This is the second time Curry has been fined for tossing his mouthguard. During Game 6 of the 2016 NBA Finals, Curry threw his mouthpiece into the stands after he fouled out, earning him a $25,000 fine.

The Warriors are back in action against the Mavericks in Dallas on Monday night.

NBA fines Curry and Iguodala for incident in Memphis

Following shootaround on Monday, Steph Curry said that a suspension is not necessary. The league office agrees with the two-time MVP...

Ben Simmons has started his NBA rookie season in high style.

'NBA 2K18' all-time tournament: Seeding field, setting stage for historic matchups

Which franchise is the greatest in the history of the NBA? We begin the process of finding out with "NBA 2K18."

'NBA 2K18' all-time tournament: Seeding field, setting stage for historic matchups

'NBA 2K18' all-time tournament: Seeding field, setting stage for historic matchups

'NBA 2K18' all-time tournament: Seeding field, setting stage for historic matchups

Which franchise is the greatest in the history of the NBA? We begin the process of finding out with "NBA 2K18."

'NBA 2K18' all-time tournament: Seeding field, setting stage for historic matchups

Which franchise is the greatest in the history of the NBA? We begin the process of finding out with "NBA 2K18."

'NBA 2K18' all-time tournament: Seeding field, setting stage for historic matchups

Which franchise is the greatest in the history of the NBA? We begin the process of finding out with "NBA 2K18."

'NBA 2K18' all-time tournament: Seeding field, setting stage for historic matchups

'NBA 2K18' all-time tournament: Seeding field, setting stage for historic matchups

'NBA 2K18' all-time tournament: Seeding field, setting stage for historic matchups

Which franchise is the greatest in the history of the NBA? We begin the process of finding out with "NBA 2K18."

Opening week affects MVP odds of Ben Simmons, Joel Embiid

Ben Simmons had himself a historic first week in the NBA and as a result, his MVP odds have changed substantially.

Ben Simmons has started his NBA rookie season in the style of some of the greats.

NBA: Philadelphia 76ers at Toronto Raptors

FILE PHOTO: Philadelphia 76ers guard Ben Simmons (25) drives to the basket over Toronto Raptors center Jakob Poeltl (42) in the first quarter at Air Canada Centre, Oct 21, 2017; Toronto, Ontario, CAN. Mandatory Credit: Nick Turchiaro-USA TODAY Sports

NBA: Australia's Simmons backing up hype in rookie season

NBA: Australia's Simmons backing up hype in rookie season

NBA: Philadelphia 76ers at Toronto Raptors

FILE PHOTO: Philadelphia 76ers guard Ben Simmons (25) drives to the basket over Toronto Raptors center Jakob Poeltl (42) in the first quarter at Air Canada Centre, Oct 21, 2017; Toronto, Ontario, CAN. Mandatory Credit: Nick Turchiaro-USA TODAY Sports

NBA: New York Knicks at Philadelphia 76ers

FILE PHOTO: Philadelphia 76ers forward Ben Simmons (25) balances a ball before a game against the New York Knicks at Wells Fargo Center, Jan 11, 2017; Philadelphia, PA, USA. Mandatory Credit: Bill Streicher-USA TODAY Sports

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