NBA

NBA Slideshow

FILE - This Sunday, Dec. 25, 2016 file photo shows Cleveland Cavaliers' LeBron James, left, and Golden State Warriors' Stephen Curry battling for a loose ball in the second half of an NBA basketball game, in Cleveland. The Warriors and Cavaliers are being penciled in to meet in the NBA Finals once again. They're going to drive most of the conversation this season, a fact that is not lost on the league or its TV partners. When the season tips off Tuesday, Cleveland will take the center stage first, followed by the Warriors. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)

FILE - This Thursday, Dec. 2, 2010, file photo shows Miami Heat forward LeBron James (6) shooting a free throw during the third quarter in an NBA basketball game against the Cleveland Cavaliers, in Cleveland. With the return of Boston Celtic's Kyrie Irving Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2017, in Cleveland, the fans will likely show their disfavor towards Irving. (AP Photo/David Richard, File)

FILE - This Thursday, Dec. 2, 2010, file photo shows Miami Heat forward LeBron James (6) shooting a free throw during the third quarter in an NBA basketball game against the Cleveland Cavaliers, in Cleveland. With the return of Boston Celtic's Kyrie Irving Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2017, in Cleveland, the fans will likely show their disfavor towards Irving. (AP Photo/David Richard, File)

FILE - In this March 19, 2017, file photo, Cleveland Cavaliers' LeBron James, left, greets Kyrie Irving during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Lakers in Los Angeles. Irving was traded to the Bostons Celtics and returns to Cleveland to play against the Cavaliers, on Tuesday, Oct. 17. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)

FILE - In this Thursday, Dec. 2, 2010, file photo, a fan displays her opinion of Miami Heat forward LeBron James return to Cleveland during the third quarter of an NBA basketball game against the Cleveland Cavaliers in Cleveland. With the return of Boston Celtic's Kyrie Irving on Tuesday, Oct. 17, 2017, in Cleveland, the fans will likely show their disfavor towards Irving. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)

FILE - In this Thursday, Dec. 2, 2010, file photo, a Cleveland Cavaliers fan yells at Miami Heat forward LeBron James (6) during the first quarter of an NBA basketball game in Cleveland. With the return of Boston Celtic's Kyrie Irving Tuesday, Oct. 17, 2017, in Cleveland, the fans will likely show their disfavor towards Irving. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)

LeBron Thinks Kyrie’s Return to Cleveland Won’t Be as Venomous as His

Kyrie Irving’s return to Cleveland on Tuesday won’t be nearly as dramatic as LeBron James’s first game as a visitor there, LeBron says.

In an interview with ESPN’s Rachel Nichols that aired Monday night, LeBron and new teammate Dwyane Wade quickly dismissed the idea that Irving would face the kind of abuse LeBron did as a member of the Heat in 2010.

“Do you think Kyrie is going to get anything similar?” Nichols asked. Before she even finished the question, LeBron and Wade answered in unison with an emphatic “Nooooooo.”

“Everybody’s good. Everybody’s good,” James said. “KD last year in Oklahoma City, Paul George going to go back to Indiana. D-Wade’s going to go to Chicago, Kyrie’s coming back to Cleveland. ... They will be fine. People were throwing batteries at us.”

Irving’s Celtics travel to Cleveland to face the Cavs in the first game of the new NBA season, 8 p.m. ET on Tuesday. The Warriors and Rockets play the late game at 10:30 ET.

Who has signed an NBA rookie contract extension, and how do they work?

Who has signed an NBA rookie contract extension, and how do they work?

Kendrick Perkins Signs With Cavs' G-League Affiliate

After being cut by the Cleveland Cavaliers on Saturday, NBA free agent center Kendrick Perkins has signed with the Canton Charge, the Cavs' G-League affiliate.

Kendrick Perkins Signs With Cavs' G-League Affiliate

After being cut by the Cleveland Cavaliers on Saturday, NBA free agent center Kendrick Perkins has signed with the Canton Charge, the Cavs' G-League affiliate.

Kendrick Perkins Signs With Cavs' G-League Affiliate

After being cut by the Cleveland Cavaliers on Saturday, NBA free agent center Kendrick Perkins has signed with the Canton Charge, the Cavs' G-League affiliate.

Kendrick Perkins Signs With Cavs' G-League Affiliate

After being cut by the Cleveland Cavaliers on Saturday, NBA free agent center Kendrick Perkins has signed with the Canton Charge, the Cavs' G-League affiliate.

PBT Extra: LeBron as MVP and other NBA postseason award predictions

I have Ben Simmons as Rookie of the Year, Rudy Gobert for Defensive Player of the Year.

PBT Extra: LeBron as MVP and other NBA postseason award predictions

I have Ben Simmons as Rookie of the Year, Rudy Gobert for Defensive Player of the Year.

Australian star Simmons set for NBA debut

Australian Ben Simmons (right) is regarded as a future superstar of the NBA.

Utah Jazz guard Dante Exum has suffered yet another injury in the NBA.

Exum suffers another cruel setback in NBA career

FILE - This Sunday, Dec. 25, 2016, file photo shows Cleveland Cavaliers' LeBron James, right, hugging Golden State Warriors' Stephen Curry before an NBA basketball game, in Cleveland. The Warriors and Cavaliers are being penciled in to meet in the NBA Finals once again. They're going to drive most of the conversation this season, a fact that is not lost on the league or its TV partners. When the season tips off Tuesday, Cleveland will take the center stage first, followed by the Warriors.(AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)

FILE - This Wednesday, June 7, 2017, file photo shows Golden State Warriors guard Stephen Curry (30) shootting in front of Cleveland Cavaliers forward LeBron James (23) during the second half of Game 3 of basketball's NBA Finals in Cleveland. Cavaliers Kyrie Irving watches. The Warriors and Cavaliers are being penciled in to meet in the NBA Finals once again. They're going to drive most of the conversation this season, a fact that is not lost on the league or its TV partners. When the season tips off Tuesday, Cleveland will take the center stage first, followed by the Warriors. (AP Photo/Ron Schwane, File)

FILE - In this June 7, 2017, file photo, Golden State Warriors forward Kevin Durant (35) defends Cleveland Cavaliers forward LeBron James (23) during the second half of Game 3 of basketball's NBA Finals in Cleveland. The Warriors and Cavaliers are being penciled in to meet in the NBA Finals once again. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)

Spurs coach Popovich calls Trump a 'soulless coward'

One of Donald Trump's most vocal critics – NBA great Gregg Popovich – took aim at the United States president on Monday.

Dante Exum Will Have Surgery on Injured Shoulder, No Timetable for Return

Jazz point guard Dante Exum will need surgery on his injured shoulder, the team announced Monday.

Exum separated his left shoulder while driving to the basket during a preseason game on Oct. 7. He’ll have surgery to stabilize the AC joint in the injured shoulder and the team will provide a timetable for his return after the procedure is performed.

The injury is potentially season-ending, which would be a major disappointment for Exum and the Jazz. He previously missed the entire 2015–16 season with a torn ACL suffered while playing for the Australian national team.

Exum played 66 games for the Jazz last year, starting 26, and averaged 6.2 points and 1.7 assists per game. Ricky Rubio, acquired in an offseason trade with the Timberwolves, will assume the point guard duties while Exum is out. Utah also has Raul Neto, who got the majority of the starts at point while Exum rehabbed his ACL.

File-This Oct. 13, 2017, file photo shows San Antonio Spurs forward LaMarcus Aldridge (12) looking to drive around Houston Rockets forward PJ Tucker (4) in the first half of an NBA preseason basketball game in Houston. The Spurs have reached agreement with Aldridge on an extension that will keep him under contract for an additional three years.(AP Photo/Michael Wyke, File)

Gregg Popovich Issues Blistering Takedown of ‘Soulless Coward’ Donald Trump

Spurs head coach Gregg Popovich has made no secret of his opinion of President Donald Trump, but he took his criticism to another level on Monday afternoon.

Trump held a press conference on Monday during which he claimed that many past presidents have not made phone calls to the families of military members killed in action. Whether he was just being astoundingly ignorant or was telling a massive lie, the comments made Popovich—an Air Force veteran—irate. Unsolicited, he called journalist Dave Zirin of The Nation to vent.

In addition to his military service, Popovich is now the head coach of Team USA. Luckily, his boss is Jerry Colangelo—not Trump.

NBA Preview 2017-18: Western Conference Predictions, Projected Finish

The NBA’s Western Conference once again looks to be the class of the NBA. The Houston Rockets added Chris Paul,... Read More »

NBA Eastern Conference Preview: Can Celtics' bold moves unseat Cavs?

NBA Eastern Conference Preview: Can Celtics' bold moves unseat Cavs?

NBA Eastern Conference Preview: Can Celtics' bold moves unseat Cavs?

NBA Eastern Conference Preview: Can Celtics' bold moves unseat Cavs?

NBA Eastern Conference Preview: Can Celtics' bold moves unseat Cavs?

Kyrie Irving and Gordon Hayward are now in Boston trying to help the Celtics unseat the Cavaliers.

NBA Western Conference Preview: Everyone's looking up at the Warriors

NBA Western Conference Preview: Everyone's looking up at the Warriors

NBA Western Conference Preview: Everyone's looking up at the Warriors

NBA Western Conference Preview: Everyone's looking up at the Warriors

NBA Western Conference Preview: Everyone's looking up at the Warriors

The Warriors are the favourites to win the West - and the entire thing - but the Timberwolves and Thunder make it more interesting.

NBA Preview: Five rookies to watch in 2017

NBA Preview: Five rookies to watch in 2017

NBA Preview: Five rookies to watch in 2017

Point guards dominated the 2017 NBA draft and they also feature heavily in our list of rookies to watch this season.

AP Exclusive: Corruption probe prompts reviews of NCAA teams

FILE - In this Jan. 24, 2015, file photo, an official holds an Adidas basketball during an NCAA college basketball game between Michigan State and Nebraska in Lincoln, Neb. The spate of arrests, the details of under-the-table bribes to teenagers and the expected downfall of one of the sports best-known coaches has triggered uncomfortable soul searching among universities that run the nations most prominent college basketball programs. A top Adidas marketing executive was among the 10 people arrested, after authorities spent two years untangling schemes, often bankrolled with money from apparel companies, to steer future NBA players toward particular sports agents and financial advisers. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)

FILE - In this Jan. 24, 2015, file photo, an official holds an Adidas basketball during an NCAA college basketball game between Michigan State and Nebraska in Lincoln, Neb. The spate of arrests, the details of under-the-table bribes to teenagers and the expected downfall of one of the sport’s best-known coaches has triggered uncomfortable soul searching among universities that run the nation’s most prominent college basketball programs. A top Adidas marketing executive was among the 10 people arrested, after authorities spent two years untangling schemes, often bankrolled with money from apparel companies, to steer future NBA players toward particular sports agents and financial advisers. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)

FILE - In this Jan. 24, 2015, file photo, an official holds an Adidas basketball during an NCAA college basketball game between Michigan State and Nebraska in Lincoln, Neb. The spate of arrests, the details of under-the-table bribes to teenagers and the expected downfall of one of the sport’s best-known coaches has triggered uncomfortable soul searching among universities that run the nation’s most prominent college basketball programs. A top Adidas marketing executive was among the 10 people arrested, after authorities spent two years untangling schemes, often bankrolled with money from apparel companies, to steer future NBA players toward particular sports agents and financial advisers. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)

Alex Rodriguez Discusses His Overwatch League Investment, Post-Baseball Life

Some athletes lay low after retirement. Perhaps they're unsure about what to do with their new free time, or maybe they're still coming to grips with their previously all-consuming playing life coming to an end.

Alex Rodriguez is not one of these athletes.

The former baseball star's on-field accomplishments are well-known—696 home runs, 2086 RBIs, 14 All-Star games and three MVPs—but Rodriguez's insatiable for desire for success didn't expire with his playing career. A-Rod is as visible as ever as an analyst for Fox Sports and a part-time "shark" on ABC's Shark Tank investment show.

He has also invested in NRG eSports, an esports organization that fields teams across multiple games, including CounterStrike, Rocket League and Overwatch. A-Rod is now a board member for NRG, which was founded late in 2015 by Gerard Kelly and Kings co-owners Mark Mastrov and Andy Miller, but he's not the only celebrity invested with NRG esports: Shaquille O'Neal, Jennifer Lopez, Marshawn Lynch, Michael Strahan and Jimmy Rollins are also significant investors.

The organization owns San Francisco's team for the much-anticipated Overwatch League, the brainchild of Activision Blizzard, which is set to begin in January with 12 teams representing nine American cities as well as London, Shanghai and Seoul.

What distinguishes Overwatch League from other esports competitions is, in a word, stability. Previously, esports teams and franchises have had ever-changing rosters and were not attached to a specific city, while Overwatch League franchises each represent one city, and players are signed to one-year contracts with a team. All games during Overwatch League's inaugural season will take place in Los Angeles, but the goal is for each franchise to have an esports-specific arena in their home city, creating the home-field advantage dynamic that is typical of traditional sports.

San Francisco's roster was released last week, while the team name and logo were were released on Monday. SI.com caught up with Rodriguez and Miller to discuss the San Francisco Shock.

This interview was edited for length and clarity.

Daniel Rapaport: I must say, I quite like the logo and color scheme.

Andy Miller: We were up all night choosing different colors for our uniform. We went through the entire organization, and it was split 50/50 down the middle. We made a final decision, and I hope it's the right one. And the seismograph is a representation of the Bay Bridge.

DR: Will you be selling jerseys and t-shirts, like more traditional sports franchises?

AM: Absolutely. From a merchandising perspective, this is set up exactly like the NBA. [Activision] Blizzard is going to oversee the development of all the merch, and then we'll sell it in our market and they'll sell it internationally.

DR: Alex, how did you get involved with NRG?

Alex Rodriguez: First of all, Marc Mastrov and I have been partners for over 10 years. He was telling me about this for a while and how excited he was about the opportunity, the space, the growth. The numbers are incredible, so I just started reading about it, and it was pretty incredible and hard to believe. So I kept reading other articles and king of educating myself in the space. Then I saw NRG's management team and their track record so that's kind of how I got started. I've been in it for several years, I've become more involved, more comfortable with Andy and Marc and our executive team and the space.

I just really think this is the future. If you think about the investment of having an NFL or MLB team back in the 70's or 80's. Now, having any NFL or MLB property is an enormous deal. I think this has that type of potential if you fast forward five or 10 years.

AM: Our players were absolutely thrilled when Alex came on board, and they were even more thrilled when Marshawn and Jennifer Lopez came on board. Because these are folks outside of sports and more into pop culture, and their presence gives us exposure and credibility.

DR: What can you take from your experience in baseball and bring to the Shock?

AR: One of the things I'm excited about is mentorship. These kids are highly competitive, they're working long hours—I grew up in a clubhouse for the last 23 years. Winning players want to be around other winning players in the locker room, but also at the executive level. When the players look at our team, from the management team to our board to our brands to Michael Strahan, Jennifer Lopez, Andy, Mark and myself, we've had significant success in so many different ventures. I know that one of the biggest thrills that I ever had was playing for George Steinbrenner and then Hal Steinbrenner. Both of those guys are winners, and that's something that you take to heart when you're on the field.

And then physically and mentally, these guys are going to go through ups and downs. It'll be helpful to have us on board.

DR: Unlike other esports franchises, Overwatch League teams are attached to a city. How important is that in terms of building esports' influence and fostering loyal fans?

AM: It's really important, and it's one of the things that got us excited enough as a board to make the $20 million investment to buy the team.

Beforehand in esports, there really was no home team. Players would move around a lot, teams would come and go. But we're gonna be here now for a long time, so I think fans and sponsors alike, the whole ecosystem can finally say "Okay, we finally have something real and stable, and we can invest our time and money and emotions into this.

One other point on this. In that past, if you wanted to go watch an esports match, you'd have to go to a tournament far way, like in L.A. or New York or Berlin or Seoul or Krakow. These are really hard tickets to get. Now, you can grow up rooting for the San Francisco Shock and going to games with your friends and family.

DR: You had an incredible career and you made a great deal of money playing baseball. How much of your post-baseball activity is fueled by an undying competitiveness? Obviously it's different than going out and playing baseball, but in the investing world, you're still working with a team to produce results.

AR: For me, playing baseball for 23 years at the major league level, I had to be ultra focused and myopic in my thinking. I've always had a lot of passions and things that I wanted to follow, but I had to put them on hold because I was playing. I'm now involved in things that really interest me and have interested me for a really long time. Now, I'm fortunate enough to have the opportunity to get involved in these things that I've wanted to for decades. It's also important whom you get into business with—everything partnership I've built after baseball is something that I'm proud of, and NRG is at the top of that list.

DR: Of the American sports leagues, the NBA has been by-far the biggest investor in esports. Multiple teams own their own esports franchises, and league is launching a 2K League early next year. Why has the NBA been so much faster to embrace esports than, say, the NFL or MLB?

AM: Both the [NBA] owners and Adam [Silver, the league's commissioner] have been incredibly forward thinking. There's a lot of overlap between the gamer and the NBA fan and the product that the NBA puts out there. Plus there are a lot of NBA players who are gamers now. De'Aaron Fox, one of our first-round picks this year, is sponsored by HyperX Gaming, which NRG is also sponsored by. We're just seeing more and more overlap.

Another reason is that the NFL and MLB are played outside. NBA games are in an arena. As an arena owner, when you see these giant crowd that are going to esports matches and tournaments, you're seeing an opportunity to host events and sell seats. And we've seen that not just with the Sixers, but we've also seen Madison Square Garden bought Counter Logic Gaming because MSG hosted the League Of Legends finals, and they saw the crowds and the excitement and the energy around it, so they wanted to get closer to it.

Last week, [Silver] said he would like to see the NBA and NBA broadcasts be a little more like Twitch in terms of having a lot of screens for you to track stats and message other fans. It's more interactive, more customizable. You can create a personalized experience of how you want to watch. I think we're gonna see a lot of that fast-paced, multiplatform, multitasking approach to NBA coverage to keep the younger generation interested.

DR: Last question—Alex, I can't let you go without asking for a Yankees prediction.

AR: I'm an independent journalist now! I have to do my best to remove rooting interest.

DR: I can give you lessons, if you'd like.

AR: I'd like that.

Alex Rodriguez Discusses His Overwatch League Investment, Post-Baseball Life

Some athletes lay low after retirement. Perhaps they're unsure about what to do with their new free time, or maybe they're still coming to grips with their previously all-consuming playing life coming to an end.

Alex Rodriguez is not one of these athletes.

The former baseball star's on-field accomplishments are well-known—696 home runs, 2086 RBIs, 14 All-Star games and three MVPs—but Rodriguez's insatiable for desire for success didn't expire with his playing career. A-Rod is as visible as ever as an analyst for Fox Sports and a part-time "shark" on ABC's Shark Tank investment show.

He has also invested in NRG eSports, an esports organization that fields teams across multiple games, including CounterStrike, Rocket League and Overwatch. A-Rod is now a board member for NRG, which was founded late in 2015 by Gerard Kelly and Kings co-owners Mark Mastrov and Andy Miller, but he's not the only celebrity invested with NRG esports: Shaquille O'Neal, Jennifer Lopez, Marshawn Lynch, Michael Strahan and Jimmy Rollins are also significant investors.

The organization owns San Francisco's team for the much-anticipated Overwatch League, the brainchild of Activision Blizzard, which is set to begin in January with 12 teams representing nine American cities as well as London, Shanghai and Seoul.

What distinguishes Overwatch League from other esports competitions is, in a word, stability. Previously, esports teams and franchises have had ever-changing rosters and were not attached to a specific city, while Overwatch League franchises each represent one city, and players are signed to one-year contracts with a team. All games during Overwatch League's inaugural season will take place in Los Angeles, but the goal is for each franchise to have an esports-specific arena in their home city, creating the home-field advantage dynamic that is typical of traditional sports.

San Francisco's roster was released last week, while the team name and logo were were released on Monday. SI.com caught up with Rodriguez and Miller to discuss the San Francisco Shock.

This interview was edited for length and clarity.

Daniel Rapaport: I must say, I quite like the logo and color scheme.

Andy Miller: We were up all night choosing different colors for our uniform. We went through the entire organization, and it was split 50/50 down the middle. We made a final decision, and I hope it's the right one. And the seismograph is a representation of the Bay Bridge.

DR: Will you be selling jerseys and t-shirts, like more traditional sports franchises?

AM: Absolutely. From a merchandising perspective, this is set up exactly like the NBA. [Activision] Blizzard is going to oversee the development of all the merch, and then we'll sell it in our market and they'll sell it internationally.

DR: Alex, how did you get involved with NRG?

Alex Rodriguez: First of all, Marc Mastrov and I have been partners for over 10 years. He was telling me about this for a while and how excited he was about the opportunity, the space, the growth. The numbers are incredible, so I just started reading about it, and it was pretty incredible and hard to believe. So I kept reading other articles and king of educating myself in the space. Then I saw NRG's management team and their track record so that's kind of how I got started. I've been in it for several years, I've become more involved, more comfortable with Andy and Marc and our executive team and the space.

I just really think this is the future. If you think about the investment of having an NFL or MLB team back in the 70's or 80's. Now, having any NFL or MLB property is an enormous deal. I think this has that type of potential if you fast forward five or 10 years.

AM: Our players were absolutely thrilled when Alex came on board, and they were even more thrilled when Marshawn and Jennifer Lopez came on board. Because these are folks outside of sports and more into pop culture, and their presence gives us exposure and credibility.

DR: What can you take from your experience in baseball and bring to the Shock?

AR: One of the things I'm excited about is mentorship. These kids are highly competitive, they're working long hours—I grew up in a clubhouse for the last 23 years. Winning players want to be around other winning players in the locker room, but also at the executive level. When the players look at our team, from the management team to our board to our brands to Michael Strahan, Jennifer Lopez, Andy, Mark and myself, we've had significant success in so many different ventures. I know that one of the biggest thrills that I ever had was playing for George Steinbrenner and then Hal Steinbrenner. Both of those guys are winners, and that's something that you take to heart when you're on the field.

And then physically and mentally, these guys are going to go through ups and downs. It'll be helpful to have us on board.

DR: Unlike other esports franchises, Overwatch League teams are attached to a city. How important is that in terms of building esports' influence and fostering loyal fans?

AM: It's really important, and it's one of the things that got us excited enough as a board to make the $20 million investment to buy the team.

Beforehand in esports, there really was no home team. Players would move around a lot, teams would come and go. But we're gonna be here now for a long time, so I think fans and sponsors alike, the whole ecosystem can finally say "Okay, we finally have something real and stable, and we can invest our time and money and emotions into this.

One other point on this. In that past, if you wanted to go watch an esports match, you'd have to go to a tournament far way, like in L.A. or New York or Berlin or Seoul or Krakow. These are really hard tickets to get. Now, you can grow up rooting for the San Francisco Shock and going to games with your friends and family.

DR: You had an incredible career and you made a great deal of money playing baseball. How much of your post-baseball activity is fueled by an undying competitiveness? Obviously it's different than going out and playing baseball, but in the investing world, you're still working with a team to produce results.

AR: For me, playing baseball for 23 years at the major league level, I had to be ultra focused and myopic in my thinking. I've always had a lot of passions and things that I wanted to follow, but I had to put them on hold because I was playing. I'm now involved in things that really interest me and have interested me for a really long time. Now, I'm fortunate enough to have the opportunity to get involved in these things that I've wanted to for decades. It's also important whom you get into business with—everything partnership I've built after baseball is something that I'm proud of, and NRG is at the top of that list.

DR: Of the American sports leagues, the NBA has been by-far the biggest investor in esports. Multiple teams own their own esports franchises, and league is launching a 2K League early next year. Why has the NBA been so much faster to embrace esports than, say, the NFL or MLB?

AM: Both the [NBA] owners and Adam [Silver, the league's commissioner] have been incredibly forward thinking. There's a lot of overlap between the gamer and the NBA fan and the product that the NBA puts out there. Plus there are a lot of NBA players who are gamers now. De'Aaron Fox, one of our first-round picks this year, is sponsored by HyperX Gaming, which NRG is also sponsored by. We're just seeing more and more overlap.

Another reason is that the NFL and MLB are played outside. NBA games are in an arena. As an arena owner, when you see these giant crowd that are going to esports matches and tournaments, you're seeing an opportunity to host events and sell seats. And we've seen that not just with the Sixers, but we've also seen Madison Square Garden bought Counter Logic Gaming because MSG hosted the League Of Legends finals, and they saw the crowds and the excitement and the energy around it, so they wanted to get closer to it.

Last week, [Silver] said he would like to see the NBA and NBA broadcasts be a little more like Twitch in terms of having a lot of screens for you to track stats and message other fans. It's more interactive, more customizable. You can create a personalized experience of how you want to watch. I think we're gonna see a lot of that fast-paced, multiplatform, multitasking approach to NBA coverage to keep the younger generation interested.

DR: Last question—Alex, I can't let you go without asking for a Yankees prediction.

AR: I'm an independent journalist now! I have to do my best to remove rooting interest.

DR: I can give you lessons, if you'd like.

AR: I'd like that.

FILE - This Sept. 25, 2017 file photo shows Cleveland Cavaliers' LeBron James answering questions during the NBA basketball team media day in Independence, Ohio. James tested his injured left ankle during a portion of practice Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017 but it’s still not known if he’ll play in Cleveland’s season opener. (AP Photo/Ron Schwane, file)

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