Paralympics London 2012

Monday 18 June Emmeline Pankhurst: The Making of a Militant BBC Four, 7.30pm The life, times and legacy of Emmeline Pankhurst, the globally significant, inspiring and politically gifted pioneer of women’s rights, gets a rather hurried but accessible treatment. Presented by actress Sally Lindsay, the focus is on Pankhurst’s roots in Manchester and how a family background in radicalism imbued her with a deep commitment to political activism. If the characterisation of Pankhurst as “a working mum from Moss Side” doesn’t quite capture the life of upper-middle-class privilege that afforded Pankhurst the platform from which to conduct her campaigns, the depiction of her happy marriage to campaigning lawyer Dr Richard Pankhurst and busy home life give a more rounded view of her. At its best the film delivers a strong sense of Pankhurst’s genius for promoting the cause of women’s suffrage and how she came to believe that militancy – as enshrined in the slogan “deeds not words” – was the way forward when it came to challenging the intransigence of government. Contributors include her great-granddaughter Helen Pankhurst, who continues to fly the flag for women’s rights. Gerard O’Donovan Great American Railroad Journeys BBC Two, 7.00pm; not Wales In the last episode of the series, Michael Portillo foregoes the railway for a boat trip along the Saint Lawrence River before crossing the border into Canada to visit Kingston and Oshawa on the shores of Lake Ontario. GO The Family Farm BBC Two, 8.00pm Kate Humble presents this four-parter in which three families ditch the urban rat race in search of a better work-life balance and the experience of living and working on a sheep farm in Snowdonia. There’s an enjoyably competitive rivalry between the three families but the overall aim is to show just how tough and rewarding a farming life can be. GO Jamie’s Quick & Easy Food Channel 4, 8.00pm More speedily prepared five-ingredient recipes from Jamie Oliver. Here, he prepares a chorizo, salmon and artichoke bake, a tasty lamb hotpot, and a creamy chocolate affogato. GO Versailles BBC Two, 9.00pm It seems, after all, that rudimentary street lights and running water aren’t enough to keep those pesky Parisian peasants happy. As the public mood becomes ever more inflamed, King Louis’s (George Blagden) troubles deepen when news arrives that Cardinal Leto in Rome is determined to put the French king in his place. GO Snatches: Moments from Women’s Lives BBC Four, 10.00pm Royal Court Artistic Director Vicky Featherstone has curated a stellar line-up for eight 15-minute monologues exploring moments in the lives of women who have challenged the status quo. This week’s pair are Abi Morgan’s Compliance, in which Romola Garai recalls a meeting in a hotel room between an actress and a powerful producer; and Theresa Ikoko’s Outside, with Corrinne Skinner-Carter as a centenarian who is experiencing a revolution. GO Rebel Women: The Great Art Fightback BBC Four, 10.30pm This terrific documentary celebrates the grit, humour and determination of the generation of the political and provocative feminist artists who emerged, on both sides of the Atlantic, in the wake of the Sixties’ cultural revolutions. Among those featured are Judy Chicago, Margaret Harrison, Mary Kelly, Lubaina Himid, Rose English and Barbara Kruger. GO Twilight (2008) ★★★★☆ ITV2, 6.25pm Director Catherine Hardwicke (Thirteen) gets her teeth stuck into this enjoyable teenage vampire romance based on the popular Stephenie Meyer books. The heroine, Bella (Kristen Stewart), falls for a beautiful vampire, Edward (Robert Pattinson). Theirs is a touching relationship (if a slightly creepy one), but to consummate their love means they will perish. Be warned, though – the climax is surprisingly violent. Mamma Mia! (2008) ITV3, 8.00pm ★★★☆☆ This musical comedy set to Abba’s hits is pure escapism. It’s naff, but that’s its selling point, as stars Meryl Streep, Pierce Brosnan and Julie Walters place their tongues firmly in cheeks. At 59, Streep deserved more credit for doing the splits than for her role as a boho mother living on a Greek island whose daughter (Amanda Seyfried) tries to find out who her biological father is. The sequel is in cinemas on July 20. Now You See Me (2013) ★★★★☆ E4, 9.00pm A group of illusionists (Jesse Eisenberg, Woody Harrelson, Isla Fisher and Dave Franco) are encouraged to carry out a string of heists by a mysterious figure, while remaining ahead of FBI agent Rhodes (Mark Ruffalo), who is desperate to bring them to justice. Director Louis Leterrier tries to mimic the complex plots of films such as Inception, but with less success, though it’s reasonably entertaining. Tuesday 19 June The Super Squirrels Conviction: Murder in Suburbia BBC Two, 9.00pm True-crime fans will be gripped by the return of this nail-biting two-parter, which re-examines historic cases for potential miscarriages of justice. Shown on consecutive nights this week, the case in question concerns Glyn Razzell, found guilty of killing his estranged wife Linda in 2003. Despite the fact that Linda’s body has never been found, Razzell’s fuzzy alibi and some controversial forensic evidence concerning blood in the boot of Razzell’s car was enough to see him sentenced to life in prison. It’s these uncertain circumstances, along with Linda’s possible link to another known murderer, that convince Louise Shorter, head of reinvestigation charity Inside Justice, to delve into Razzell’s case anew. Aided by a panel of experts, a dogged but even-handed Shorter tests the evidence to its limits, poring over statements, pursuing witnesses and retracing steps to tie up loose ends. What makes this all so thrilling is that we’re right there alongside her, experiencing the sudden shifts from excitement to frustration as she does. Listening in on Shorter’s phone calls to a mostly composed Razzell proves particularly compelling, our sympathies swaying as he comes under scrutiny. TD The Super Squirrels BBC Two, 8.00pm The upshot of this lively look at the squirrel family is don’t underestimate the little rodents, as they burrow, climb and even fly their way across most of the globe. Keen to explore the squirrel’s skills, scientists test their subjects on a specially designed assault course. TD Trevor McDonald: Return To South Africa ITV, 9.00pm Honouring what would have been Nelson Mandela’s 100th birthday, Trevor McDonald heads for South Africa to see if its historic divisions have now been healed. In Soweto, Johannesburg, he finds evidence of a growing black middle class. Cape Town’s gulf between rich and poor, however, is still stark. TD Our Girl BBC One, 9.10pm 2-Section are in Belize as the soapy military drama continues. Riled up by criticism from Captain James (Ben Aldridge) over the death of her boyfriend Elvis, Georgie (Michelle Keegan) goes all out to prove herself in a jungle training exercise. TD A Year to Fall in Love Channel 4, 10.00pm Here’s a look at millennial dating habits, as this new show follows 20 singletons in their year-long quest for love. First, we meet performance artist Freddy, who is not a fan of apps, and 25-year-old Sophie, who is looking for a man with money. TD The Yorkshire Dales and the Lakes More4, 9.00pm The return of the warm-hearted series, which profiles those who live in the national parks. The star of the show is the rolling landscape, but its hard-working inhabitants have their own fascination, including champion sheep-breeder Arnold Lancaster, who built his farm up from nothing. TD Underfire: The Untold Story of Tony Vaccaro Sky Arts, 9.00pm A US infantryman during the Second World War, Tony Vaccaro smuggled a camera onto the battlefield and recorded its horrors in over 8,000 startling images. Here Vaccaro returns to Omaha Beach, where he landed on D-Day, while photographers discuss the impact of his work. TD The Late Late Show UK Special Sky One, 10.00pm James Corden brings his triumphant chat show home for a four-night run. The guests include Cher, Orlando Bloom, Cate Blanchett, Foo Fighters and Paul McCartney. TD Mr Smith Goes to Washington (1939, b/w) ★★★★★ TCM, 6.15pm The films of Frank Capra (It’s a Wonderful Life) are often dismissed as idealistic and sentimental. But there is another side to his work, much of which stays just the right side of the fine line that divides the American Dream from the American Nightmare. James Stewart plays a goofy country bumpkin who is shoehorned into a dead man’s shoes in the Senate. The film was nominated for 11 Oscars. Inside Man (2006) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 11.50pm This is a devilishly clever heist movie from director Spike Lee that hinges on a battle of wits between an ice-cool criminal (Clive Owen) and an unflappable hostage negotiator (Denzel Washington). The story has more twists than a Chubby Checker record but it opens with an elaborate New York bank robbery during which nothing, seemingly, is stolen. Jodie Foster, Willem Dafoe, Christopher Plummer and Chiwetel Ejiofor also star. Haywire (2011) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.05pm This slick spy thriller marked Steven Soderbergh’s 25th feature as a director. Mixed-martial-arts fighter and first-time actress Gina Carano stars as a super-soldier who’s on a mission to flush out a double agent who left her left for dead. Colleagues who fall under suspicion include her former partner (Channing Tatum), a drippy strategist (Ewan McGregor) and a dapper Irish colleague (Michael Fassbender). Wednesday 20 June Mortimer & Whitehouse: Gone Fishing Mortimer & Whitehouse: Gone Fishing BBC Two, 10.00pm The premise of this programme may sound familiar – two comedians go on a journey of discovery to beautiful locations – but, unlike Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon’s The Trip, this one features the real personalities, as opposed to fictionalised versions. Lifelong friends Paul Whitehouse and Bob Mortimer share more than a love of comedy, they have both suffered from heart disease. And so, for this funny and poignant six-part series, keen angler Whitehouse attempts to teach Mortimer, a complete novice, the peaceful art of fishing as an aid to his recovery – and maybe learn something new about each other along the way. In the first episode, they head to Norfolk to fish for tench, and there they talk candidly about everything from showbusiness to solitude and relationships. They also reveal how they recently came face to face with their own mortality. This is one of the few occasions that you get to see Mortimer and Whitehouse being themselves, without costumes and props – if you discount the fishing rods. And while there are underlying life-and-death issues in the show, its tone is celebratory, rather than mournful and is about seizing the moment. CM Mad About Elvis BBC One, 7.30pm It’s no surprise that each year tens of thousands of Elvis fans gather together to celebrate “The King”. But what is surprising is that, for the past 15 years, they have been doing so in the Welsh seaside town of Porthcawl. This documentary follows the larger-than-life characters who attend the Elvis festival, the biggest event of its kind in the world. CM The World’s Most Extraordinary Homes BBC Two, 8.00pm Some people do know how to build great homes, especially ones inspired by landscapes. Among the homes that architect Piers Taylor and actress Caroline Quentin come across in Norway for this series including a retreat that’s perched on rocks. CM Secrets of McDonalds: 50 Years of the Big Mac Channel 5, 9.00pm It’s hard to believe but that simple double burger from McDonald’s is 50 years old. To mark the occasion, this film takes a nostalgic look at the fast-food chain’s history, from its Californian origins to what it is today – the world’s largest restaurant chain, serving 69 million people daily. CM Britain’s Refugee Children Channel 4, 10.00pm Each year, a number of the world’s displaced and dispossessed people seek refuge in the UK. This film follows the progress of six refugee children over six months as they adapt to new lives in Cardiff and Newport. CM Hollywood Couples Sky Arts, 9.00pm As Hollywood love affairs go, Robert Taylor and Barbara Stanwyck’s got off to an intriguing start: they met on a blind date in 1936, where there was mutual attraction. But the film studio MGM did not want Taylor to be in a relationship at that time. They later changed their minds, and Taylor and Stanwyck’s union effectively became an arranged marriage. This enlightening film explores how, despite a series of affairs by Taylor, the union lasted for 12 years, and why it wasn’t a marriage of equals – Stanwyck called Taylor “Junior”, he called her “The Queen”. CM Big Beast: Last of the Giants Sky One, 9.00pm In some areas of life, size matters, but none more so than in the animal world. For this three-part series, biologist Patrick Aryee gets up close to some of the world’s largest creatures to explore why they evolved into giants. He begins by meeting a venomous Komodo dragon, the largest living lizard, armed only with small stick. CM The Abyss (1989) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.15pm Long before Avatar, James Cameron was cooking up innovative special effects for this sci-fi adventure in which oil rig workers (including Ed Harris and Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio) explore a marooned nuclear submarine. The ending seems tacked on from another movie, but Cameron makes up for it with some spectacular underwater action scenes – proof that effects can stay “special” if they’re imaginatively used. Memphis Belle (1990) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm It’s 1943, and the handsome American crew of Second World War B-17 bomber Memphis Belle, who are stationed in England, are anticipating their final mission – to fly over Nazi-occupied Europe. Full of nostalgia, this loosely based-on-real-events story exudes a romanticised view of heroism, but features an endearing cast, including Billy Zane, Sean Astin, John Lithgow, Eric Stoltz, and Harry Connick Jr. Looking for Eric (2009) ★★★★☆ London Live, 11.15pm Ken Loach plays a blinder with this affable study of a depressed postman (Steve Evets) who sorts his life out with the help of his imaginary mentor and idol Eric Cantona (playing himself). It’s not Loach’s most political work but it’s definitely one of his sunniest and funniest film. Evets and his postie pals, including the wonderful Meatballs (John Henshaw), keep the laughs coming, sending you away with daft grins on our faces. Thursday 21 June Outlander The Murder of Rhys Jones: Police Tapes ITV, 9.00pm Anyone who watched Jeff Pope’s hard-hitting drama series Little Boy Blue last year, based on the investigation into the murder of 11-year-old Rhys Jones in Liverpool on 22 August 2007, will know just how tragic and disturbing the circumstances surrounding this case were. Rhys, on his way home from football practice, was hit by a stray bullet and died when a teenager on a bicycle started shooting at rival gang members across a car park in Croxteth. To compound the horror, a veil of silence descended on the area as the youths involved, and in some cases their parents, conspired to conceal their identities by intimidating all around them. The only recourse open to investigating officers was to plant listening devices in the homes of the prime suspects in the hope that somehow, they would incriminate themselves. But that was only beginning. Here, presenter Susanna Reid gains unique access to the recordings, in which those responsible admit their part and the lengths they would go to cover up the crime. She also talks to Rhys’s parents, Mel and Steve Jones, about the impact their son’s murder has had on their lives. GO Supershoppers Channel 4, 8.00pm This week’s edition of the consumer show reveals how takeaway coffee from a machine often costs more than one made by a barista, plus how to track down the energy deals hidden by cost comparison sites. Hosts Anna Richardson and Sabrina Grant also explore whether whitening toothpastes really work. GO Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm It’s the last show of the series as Fred Sirieix showcases two more food businesses seeking investment: Naked Dough, a vegan-friendly pop-up in need of a permanent base; and Black Bear Burger, whose owners, already doing well enough to leave their day jobs behind, are looking for the funds to scale up. GO Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm There’s been some terrific drama already in this third series, and that continues in this episode as Laura (Katherine Parkinson) is forced to act quickly when synth Mia’s (Gemma Chan) speech at the commission provokes a shocking attack. GO The Double Life of George Michael Channel 5, 9.00pm This documentary examines the life of the hugely successful and famously generous pop star, and how he spent much of his life battling inner demons prior to early death in 2016. It’s followed at 11.05pm by The Nation’s Favourite George Michael Song. GO The Killers Live at the Royal Albert Hall Sky Arts, 9.00pm Brandon Flowers and his band got an ecstatic reception when they rocked the Royal Albert Hall in July 2009 during their tour of their third album Day & Age. This concert was recorded over two nights, and all of their hits up to that point feature in the set, including Somebody Told Me, When You Were Young, All These Things That I’ve Done and, of course, Mr Brightside. GO Outlander More4, 9.00pm The setting of this Celtic time-travel fantasy has moved firmly over to France, as the second series progresses. Now the Frasers have settled into high society in Paris and Jamie (Sam Heughan) gets a chance, at last, to infiltrate Jacobite circles when he gets an introduction to Bonnie Prince Charlie. Claire (Caitriona Balfe), meanwhile, gets a shock when she meets members of the Duke of Sandringham’s household and realises that an old enemy, presumed dead, may be alive after all. GO North to Alaska (1960) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.00pm “You just can’t trust women. No matter how honest they act, they all want to be wives,” cautions John Wayne in this rather silly western set during the gold rush. After finding gold, Wayne goes to fetch his partner’s fiancée from Seattle, only to find her married to someone else. So he returns with Angel (Capucine), a prostitute, instead. Inevitably, our hero falls for the beguiling lady. Stewart Granger co-stars. X-Men: The Last Stand (2006) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.55pm The third film in the superhero series sees director Brett Ratner take over the reins of the Marvel Comics franchise. When a cure for the mutants is invented, a war breaks out between them and humanity. This isn’t the trilogy’s high point, but that said, Hugh Jackman plays Wolverine to perfection, plus the special effects and dramatic set pieces definitely impress. The Bodyguard (1992) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.00pm Former Secret Service agent Frank Farmer (Kevin Costner) plays bodyguard to pop singer Rachel Marron (Whitney Houston), though he’s more used to protecting presidents than superstars. Sparks fly and security is compromised, but when a stalker gets serious, the job comes first. Houston’s fine soundtrack adds to the film’s emotional theatricality. The soundtrack album has become the fifth bestselling album of all time. Friday 22 June Cruising With Jane McDonald The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Screenwriter Hans Rosenfeldt still has a couple of tasks to complete in the final two episodes of his superior, if at times preposterous, Scandi-thriller, before it bows out for good next week. The over-arching riddle since Henrik Sabroe (Thure Lindhardt) joined the Danish cop shop in series three is what happened to his two daughters, who’d gone missing eight years ago.In tonight’s penultimate episode that question is answered at last, and of course it’s Henrik’s colleague and sometime lover, on-the-spectrum brainbox Saga Norén (Sofia Helin), who figures it out. But as we’ve seen over nearly four series of grisly murder, Rosenfeldt can’t usually be relied on for a happy ending. Then Rosenfeldt’s second task is having Saga figure out who’s killing people using the same methods deployed in government executions (stoning, electrocution, et al) before she becomes the next victim. Tonight, fans will be cheered to see Saga – so often a forlorn, misunderstood character – make solid progress in both the case and in therapy, which bodes well for her future. But this isn’t a cosy relationship drama, and rest assured there are lurid shocks that set us up for next week’s finale. VP The Crystal Maze Channel 4, 9.00pm This star-laden edition of the action game show sees Countdown’s maths genius Rachel Riley in a polite power struggle with skipper Judy Murray, mother of Andy, as she tries to dominate the decision-making. It adds a frisson to the proceedings that also include ex-footballer Wayne Bridge and Paralympian David Weir. VP Cruising with Jane McDonald Channel 5, 9.00pm In this first of a boozy two-parter set in South America, chanteuse Jane McDonald boards another cruise ship and samples Pisco sours and drinks whisky chilled by glacier ice. VP The Last Leg Channel 4, 10.00pm What started off as a spin-off for the 2012 Paralympics has rightly become a Friday night institution. Host Adam Hills returns to marshal the mix of silliness and satire that characterise this comedy chat show, aided by Alex Brooker, Josh Widdicombe and a gaggle of up-for-it celebrity guests. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.45pm Graham Norton will be kept on his toes as Cher graces his sofa for the first time in five years, with her suffer-no-fools attitude. She is joined by her Mamma Mia! co-star Christine Baranski. Also on the final live show of the series are Rupert Everett and Game of Thrones’ Natalie Dormer. VP Marvel’s Luke Cage Netflix, from today Superheroes have become a tiresome constant in film and on TV, but this action series, with a soulful black champion at its centre, is a welcome addition to the genre. Mike Colter returns for a second series as the pumped-up, titular New York action man. In the first episode he deals with the ramifications of last season’s climax in which he triumphed over evil but lost his anonymity. Now he’s being pestered for selfies as he tries to figure out his next move in an opening episode that’s directed by actress Lucy Liu. VP Isle of Wight Festival 2018 Sky Arts and Sky One, from 7.00pm The year’s biggest pop festival (in the absence of Glastonbury) celebrates its 50th anniversary with a line-up spanning the decades, from electro-rockers Depeche Mode to headliners The Killers. The coverage begins on Sky Arts at 7pm, with Nile Rodgers & Chic taking to the stage at 7.30pm. Kasabian will close out the first night on Sky Arts at 11pm. VP Victoria & Abdul (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Stephen Frears’ fascinating real-life tale about the extraordinary friendship between the ageing Queen Victoria (a sensational Judi Dench) and her young Muslim attendant Abdul Karim (Ali Fazal), known as “the Munshi”, is all nostalgia and inertia – a tale ablaze with historical import and contemporary resonance, reduced to commemorative biscuit tin proportions. Eddie Izzard co-stars. Mad Max (1979) ★★★★☆ ITV, 11.45pm An explosive breakthrough – literally. Improbable car stunts and pile-ups ensue as “mad” Max Rockatansky (Mel Gibson) attempts to police a dystopian Australia, where feral biker gangs rape and pillage at will. Director George Miller’s vision was “a silent movie with sound” and he drew inspiration for the film’s injuries and deaths from his time working as a doctor in a Sydney hospital. The film essentially founded Australia’s film industry. Sexy Beast (2000) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 12.10am Ben Kingsley is at his scariest in this tense and enthralling thriller as the gangster thug who wants to rob a well-guarded bank, and flies out to Spain to drag his retired associate Gary (a lobster-tanned Ray Winstone) back to work. But Gary is living a contented life with his wife (Amanda Redman) and has no intention of going back to his criminal life, forcing the two men into a battle of wills that ends in violence. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: Emmeline Pankhurst: The Making of a Militant and The Family Farm
Monday 18 June Emmeline Pankhurst: The Making of a Militant BBC Four, 7.30pm The life, times and legacy of Emmeline Pankhurst, the globally significant, inspiring and politically gifted pioneer of women’s rights, gets a rather hurried but accessible treatment. Presented by actress Sally Lindsay, the focus is on Pankhurst’s roots in Manchester and how a family background in radicalism imbued her with a deep commitment to political activism. If the characterisation of Pankhurst as “a working mum from Moss Side” doesn’t quite capture the life of upper-middle-class privilege that afforded Pankhurst the platform from which to conduct her campaigns, the depiction of her happy marriage to campaigning lawyer Dr Richard Pankhurst and busy home life give a more rounded view of her. At its best the film delivers a strong sense of Pankhurst’s genius for promoting the cause of women’s suffrage and how she came to believe that militancy – as enshrined in the slogan “deeds not words” – was the way forward when it came to challenging the intransigence of government. Contributors include her great-granddaughter Helen Pankhurst, who continues to fly the flag for women’s rights. Gerard O’Donovan Great American Railroad Journeys BBC Two, 7.00pm; not Wales In the last episode of the series, Michael Portillo foregoes the railway for a boat trip along the Saint Lawrence River before crossing the border into Canada to visit Kingston and Oshawa on the shores of Lake Ontario. GO The Family Farm BBC Two, 8.00pm Kate Humble presents this four-parter in which three families ditch the urban rat race in search of a better work-life balance and the experience of living and working on a sheep farm in Snowdonia. There’s an enjoyably competitive rivalry between the three families but the overall aim is to show just how tough and rewarding a farming life can be. GO Jamie’s Quick & Easy Food Channel 4, 8.00pm More speedily prepared five-ingredient recipes from Jamie Oliver. Here, he prepares a chorizo, salmon and artichoke bake, a tasty lamb hotpot, and a creamy chocolate affogato. GO Versailles BBC Two, 9.00pm It seems, after all, that rudimentary street lights and running water aren’t enough to keep those pesky Parisian peasants happy. As the public mood becomes ever more inflamed, King Louis’s (George Blagden) troubles deepen when news arrives that Cardinal Leto in Rome is determined to put the French king in his place. GO Snatches: Moments from Women’s Lives BBC Four, 10.00pm Royal Court Artistic Director Vicky Featherstone has curated a stellar line-up for eight 15-minute monologues exploring moments in the lives of women who have challenged the status quo. This week’s pair are Abi Morgan’s Compliance, in which Romola Garai recalls a meeting in a hotel room between an actress and a powerful producer; and Theresa Ikoko’s Outside, with Corrinne Skinner-Carter as a centenarian who is experiencing a revolution. GO Rebel Women: The Great Art Fightback BBC Four, 10.30pm This terrific documentary celebrates the grit, humour and determination of the generation of the political and provocative feminist artists who emerged, on both sides of the Atlantic, in the wake of the Sixties’ cultural revolutions. Among those featured are Judy Chicago, Margaret Harrison, Mary Kelly, Lubaina Himid, Rose English and Barbara Kruger. GO Twilight (2008) ★★★★☆ ITV2, 6.25pm Director Catherine Hardwicke (Thirteen) gets her teeth stuck into this enjoyable teenage vampire romance based on the popular Stephenie Meyer books. The heroine, Bella (Kristen Stewart), falls for a beautiful vampire, Edward (Robert Pattinson). Theirs is a touching relationship (if a slightly creepy one), but to consummate their love means they will perish. Be warned, though – the climax is surprisingly violent. Mamma Mia! (2008) ITV3, 8.00pm ★★★☆☆ This musical comedy set to Abba’s hits is pure escapism. It’s naff, but that’s its selling point, as stars Meryl Streep, Pierce Brosnan and Julie Walters place their tongues firmly in cheeks. At 59, Streep deserved more credit for doing the splits than for her role as a boho mother living on a Greek island whose daughter (Amanda Seyfried) tries to find out who her biological father is. The sequel is in cinemas on July 20. Now You See Me (2013) ★★★★☆ E4, 9.00pm A group of illusionists (Jesse Eisenberg, Woody Harrelson, Isla Fisher and Dave Franco) are encouraged to carry out a string of heists by a mysterious figure, while remaining ahead of FBI agent Rhodes (Mark Ruffalo), who is desperate to bring them to justice. Director Louis Leterrier tries to mimic the complex plots of films such as Inception, but with less success, though it’s reasonably entertaining. Tuesday 19 June The Super Squirrels Conviction: Murder in Suburbia BBC Two, 9.00pm True-crime fans will be gripped by the return of this nail-biting two-parter, which re-examines historic cases for potential miscarriages of justice. Shown on consecutive nights this week, the case in question concerns Glyn Razzell, found guilty of killing his estranged wife Linda in 2003. Despite the fact that Linda’s body has never been found, Razzell’s fuzzy alibi and some controversial forensic evidence concerning blood in the boot of Razzell’s car was enough to see him sentenced to life in prison. It’s these uncertain circumstances, along with Linda’s possible link to another known murderer, that convince Louise Shorter, head of reinvestigation charity Inside Justice, to delve into Razzell’s case anew. Aided by a panel of experts, a dogged but even-handed Shorter tests the evidence to its limits, poring over statements, pursuing witnesses and retracing steps to tie up loose ends. What makes this all so thrilling is that we’re right there alongside her, experiencing the sudden shifts from excitement to frustration as she does. Listening in on Shorter’s phone calls to a mostly composed Razzell proves particularly compelling, our sympathies swaying as he comes under scrutiny. TD The Super Squirrels BBC Two, 8.00pm The upshot of this lively look at the squirrel family is don’t underestimate the little rodents, as they burrow, climb and even fly their way across most of the globe. Keen to explore the squirrel’s skills, scientists test their subjects on a specially designed assault course. TD Trevor McDonald: Return To South Africa ITV, 9.00pm Honouring what would have been Nelson Mandela’s 100th birthday, Trevor McDonald heads for South Africa to see if its historic divisions have now been healed. In Soweto, Johannesburg, he finds evidence of a growing black middle class. Cape Town’s gulf between rich and poor, however, is still stark. TD Our Girl BBC One, 9.10pm 2-Section are in Belize as the soapy military drama continues. Riled up by criticism from Captain James (Ben Aldridge) over the death of her boyfriend Elvis, Georgie (Michelle Keegan) goes all out to prove herself in a jungle training exercise. TD A Year to Fall in Love Channel 4, 10.00pm Here’s a look at millennial dating habits, as this new show follows 20 singletons in their year-long quest for love. First, we meet performance artist Freddy, who is not a fan of apps, and 25-year-old Sophie, who is looking for a man with money. TD The Yorkshire Dales and the Lakes More4, 9.00pm The return of the warm-hearted series, which profiles those who live in the national parks. The star of the show is the rolling landscape, but its hard-working inhabitants have their own fascination, including champion sheep-breeder Arnold Lancaster, who built his farm up from nothing. TD Underfire: The Untold Story of Tony Vaccaro Sky Arts, 9.00pm A US infantryman during the Second World War, Tony Vaccaro smuggled a camera onto the battlefield and recorded its horrors in over 8,000 startling images. Here Vaccaro returns to Omaha Beach, where he landed on D-Day, while photographers discuss the impact of his work. TD The Late Late Show UK Special Sky One, 10.00pm James Corden brings his triumphant chat show home for a four-night run. The guests include Cher, Orlando Bloom, Cate Blanchett, Foo Fighters and Paul McCartney. TD Mr Smith Goes to Washington (1939, b/w) ★★★★★ TCM, 6.15pm The films of Frank Capra (It’s a Wonderful Life) are often dismissed as idealistic and sentimental. But there is another side to his work, much of which stays just the right side of the fine line that divides the American Dream from the American Nightmare. James Stewart plays a goofy country bumpkin who is shoehorned into a dead man’s shoes in the Senate. The film was nominated for 11 Oscars. Inside Man (2006) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 11.50pm This is a devilishly clever heist movie from director Spike Lee that hinges on a battle of wits between an ice-cool criminal (Clive Owen) and an unflappable hostage negotiator (Denzel Washington). The story has more twists than a Chubby Checker record but it opens with an elaborate New York bank robbery during which nothing, seemingly, is stolen. Jodie Foster, Willem Dafoe, Christopher Plummer and Chiwetel Ejiofor also star. Haywire (2011) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.05pm This slick spy thriller marked Steven Soderbergh’s 25th feature as a director. Mixed-martial-arts fighter and first-time actress Gina Carano stars as a super-soldier who’s on a mission to flush out a double agent who left her left for dead. Colleagues who fall under suspicion include her former partner (Channing Tatum), a drippy strategist (Ewan McGregor) and a dapper Irish colleague (Michael Fassbender). Wednesday 20 June Mortimer & Whitehouse: Gone Fishing Mortimer & Whitehouse: Gone Fishing BBC Two, 10.00pm The premise of this programme may sound familiar – two comedians go on a journey of discovery to beautiful locations – but, unlike Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon’s The Trip, this one features the real personalities, as opposed to fictionalised versions. Lifelong friends Paul Whitehouse and Bob Mortimer share more than a love of comedy, they have both suffered from heart disease. And so, for this funny and poignant six-part series, keen angler Whitehouse attempts to teach Mortimer, a complete novice, the peaceful art of fishing as an aid to his recovery – and maybe learn something new about each other along the way. In the first episode, they head to Norfolk to fish for tench, and there they talk candidly about everything from showbusiness to solitude and relationships. They also reveal how they recently came face to face with their own mortality. This is one of the few occasions that you get to see Mortimer and Whitehouse being themselves, without costumes and props – if you discount the fishing rods. And while there are underlying life-and-death issues in the show, its tone is celebratory, rather than mournful and is about seizing the moment. CM Mad About Elvis BBC One, 7.30pm It’s no surprise that each year tens of thousands of Elvis fans gather together to celebrate “The King”. But what is surprising is that, for the past 15 years, they have been doing so in the Welsh seaside town of Porthcawl. This documentary follows the larger-than-life characters who attend the Elvis festival, the biggest event of its kind in the world. CM The World’s Most Extraordinary Homes BBC Two, 8.00pm Some people do know how to build great homes, especially ones inspired by landscapes. Among the homes that architect Piers Taylor and actress Caroline Quentin come across in Norway for this series including a retreat that’s perched on rocks. CM Secrets of McDonalds: 50 Years of the Big Mac Channel 5, 9.00pm It’s hard to believe but that simple double burger from McDonald’s is 50 years old. To mark the occasion, this film takes a nostalgic look at the fast-food chain’s history, from its Californian origins to what it is today – the world’s largest restaurant chain, serving 69 million people daily. CM Britain’s Refugee Children Channel 4, 10.00pm Each year, a number of the world’s displaced and dispossessed people seek refuge in the UK. This film follows the progress of six refugee children over six months as they adapt to new lives in Cardiff and Newport. CM Hollywood Couples Sky Arts, 9.00pm As Hollywood love affairs go, Robert Taylor and Barbara Stanwyck’s got off to an intriguing start: they met on a blind date in 1936, where there was mutual attraction. But the film studio MGM did not want Taylor to be in a relationship at that time. They later changed their minds, and Taylor and Stanwyck’s union effectively became an arranged marriage. This enlightening film explores how, despite a series of affairs by Taylor, the union lasted for 12 years, and why it wasn’t a marriage of equals – Stanwyck called Taylor “Junior”, he called her “The Queen”. CM Big Beast: Last of the Giants Sky One, 9.00pm In some areas of life, size matters, but none more so than in the animal world. For this three-part series, biologist Patrick Aryee gets up close to some of the world’s largest creatures to explore why they evolved into giants. He begins by meeting a venomous Komodo dragon, the largest living lizard, armed only with small stick. CM The Abyss (1989) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.15pm Long before Avatar, James Cameron was cooking up innovative special effects for this sci-fi adventure in which oil rig workers (including Ed Harris and Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio) explore a marooned nuclear submarine. The ending seems tacked on from another movie, but Cameron makes up for it with some spectacular underwater action scenes – proof that effects can stay “special” if they’re imaginatively used. Memphis Belle (1990) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm It’s 1943, and the handsome American crew of Second World War B-17 bomber Memphis Belle, who are stationed in England, are anticipating their final mission – to fly over Nazi-occupied Europe. Full of nostalgia, this loosely based-on-real-events story exudes a romanticised view of heroism, but features an endearing cast, including Billy Zane, Sean Astin, John Lithgow, Eric Stoltz, and Harry Connick Jr. Looking for Eric (2009) ★★★★☆ London Live, 11.15pm Ken Loach plays a blinder with this affable study of a depressed postman (Steve Evets) who sorts his life out with the help of his imaginary mentor and idol Eric Cantona (playing himself). It’s not Loach’s most political work but it’s definitely one of his sunniest and funniest film. Evets and his postie pals, including the wonderful Meatballs (John Henshaw), keep the laughs coming, sending you away with daft grins on our faces. Thursday 21 June Outlander The Murder of Rhys Jones: Police Tapes ITV, 9.00pm Anyone who watched Jeff Pope’s hard-hitting drama series Little Boy Blue last year, based on the investigation into the murder of 11-year-old Rhys Jones in Liverpool on 22 August 2007, will know just how tragic and disturbing the circumstances surrounding this case were. Rhys, on his way home from football practice, was hit by a stray bullet and died when a teenager on a bicycle started shooting at rival gang members across a car park in Croxteth. To compound the horror, a veil of silence descended on the area as the youths involved, and in some cases their parents, conspired to conceal their identities by intimidating all around them. The only recourse open to investigating officers was to plant listening devices in the homes of the prime suspects in the hope that somehow, they would incriminate themselves. But that was only beginning. Here, presenter Susanna Reid gains unique access to the recordings, in which those responsible admit their part and the lengths they would go to cover up the crime. She also talks to Rhys’s parents, Mel and Steve Jones, about the impact their son’s murder has had on their lives. GO Supershoppers Channel 4, 8.00pm This week’s edition of the consumer show reveals how takeaway coffee from a machine often costs more than one made by a barista, plus how to track down the energy deals hidden by cost comparison sites. Hosts Anna Richardson and Sabrina Grant also explore whether whitening toothpastes really work. GO Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm It’s the last show of the series as Fred Sirieix showcases two more food businesses seeking investment: Naked Dough, a vegan-friendly pop-up in need of a permanent base; and Black Bear Burger, whose owners, already doing well enough to leave their day jobs behind, are looking for the funds to scale up. GO Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm There’s been some terrific drama already in this third series, and that continues in this episode as Laura (Katherine Parkinson) is forced to act quickly when synth Mia’s (Gemma Chan) speech at the commission provokes a shocking attack. GO The Double Life of George Michael Channel 5, 9.00pm This documentary examines the life of the hugely successful and famously generous pop star, and how he spent much of his life battling inner demons prior to early death in 2016. It’s followed at 11.05pm by The Nation’s Favourite George Michael Song. GO The Killers Live at the Royal Albert Hall Sky Arts, 9.00pm Brandon Flowers and his band got an ecstatic reception when they rocked the Royal Albert Hall in July 2009 during their tour of their third album Day & Age. This concert was recorded over two nights, and all of their hits up to that point feature in the set, including Somebody Told Me, When You Were Young, All These Things That I’ve Done and, of course, Mr Brightside. GO Outlander More4, 9.00pm The setting of this Celtic time-travel fantasy has moved firmly over to France, as the second series progresses. Now the Frasers have settled into high society in Paris and Jamie (Sam Heughan) gets a chance, at last, to infiltrate Jacobite circles when he gets an introduction to Bonnie Prince Charlie. Claire (Caitriona Balfe), meanwhile, gets a shock when she meets members of the Duke of Sandringham’s household and realises that an old enemy, presumed dead, may be alive after all. GO North to Alaska (1960) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.00pm “You just can’t trust women. No matter how honest they act, they all want to be wives,” cautions John Wayne in this rather silly western set during the gold rush. After finding gold, Wayne goes to fetch his partner’s fiancée from Seattle, only to find her married to someone else. So he returns with Angel (Capucine), a prostitute, instead. Inevitably, our hero falls for the beguiling lady. Stewart Granger co-stars. X-Men: The Last Stand (2006) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.55pm The third film in the superhero series sees director Brett Ratner take over the reins of the Marvel Comics franchise. When a cure for the mutants is invented, a war breaks out between them and humanity. This isn’t the trilogy’s high point, but that said, Hugh Jackman plays Wolverine to perfection, plus the special effects and dramatic set pieces definitely impress. The Bodyguard (1992) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.00pm Former Secret Service agent Frank Farmer (Kevin Costner) plays bodyguard to pop singer Rachel Marron (Whitney Houston), though he’s more used to protecting presidents than superstars. Sparks fly and security is compromised, but when a stalker gets serious, the job comes first. Houston’s fine soundtrack adds to the film’s emotional theatricality. The soundtrack album has become the fifth bestselling album of all time. Friday 22 June Cruising With Jane McDonald The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Screenwriter Hans Rosenfeldt still has a couple of tasks to complete in the final two episodes of his superior, if at times preposterous, Scandi-thriller, before it bows out for good next week. The over-arching riddle since Henrik Sabroe (Thure Lindhardt) joined the Danish cop shop in series three is what happened to his two daughters, who’d gone missing eight years ago.In tonight’s penultimate episode that question is answered at last, and of course it’s Henrik’s colleague and sometime lover, on-the-spectrum brainbox Saga Norén (Sofia Helin), who figures it out. But as we’ve seen over nearly four series of grisly murder, Rosenfeldt can’t usually be relied on for a happy ending. Then Rosenfeldt’s second task is having Saga figure out who’s killing people using the same methods deployed in government executions (stoning, electrocution, et al) before she becomes the next victim. Tonight, fans will be cheered to see Saga – so often a forlorn, misunderstood character – make solid progress in both the case and in therapy, which bodes well for her future. But this isn’t a cosy relationship drama, and rest assured there are lurid shocks that set us up for next week’s finale. VP The Crystal Maze Channel 4, 9.00pm This star-laden edition of the action game show sees Countdown’s maths genius Rachel Riley in a polite power struggle with skipper Judy Murray, mother of Andy, as she tries to dominate the decision-making. It adds a frisson to the proceedings that also include ex-footballer Wayne Bridge and Paralympian David Weir. VP Cruising with Jane McDonald Channel 5, 9.00pm In this first of a boozy two-parter set in South America, chanteuse Jane McDonald boards another cruise ship and samples Pisco sours and drinks whisky chilled by glacier ice. VP The Last Leg Channel 4, 10.00pm What started off as a spin-off for the 2012 Paralympics has rightly become a Friday night institution. Host Adam Hills returns to marshal the mix of silliness and satire that characterise this comedy chat show, aided by Alex Brooker, Josh Widdicombe and a gaggle of up-for-it celebrity guests. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.45pm Graham Norton will be kept on his toes as Cher graces his sofa for the first time in five years, with her suffer-no-fools attitude. She is joined by her Mamma Mia! co-star Christine Baranski. Also on the final live show of the series are Rupert Everett and Game of Thrones’ Natalie Dormer. VP Marvel’s Luke Cage Netflix, from today Superheroes have become a tiresome constant in film and on TV, but this action series, with a soulful black champion at its centre, is a welcome addition to the genre. Mike Colter returns for a second series as the pumped-up, titular New York action man. In the first episode he deals with the ramifications of last season’s climax in which he triumphed over evil but lost his anonymity. Now he’s being pestered for selfies as he tries to figure out his next move in an opening episode that’s directed by actress Lucy Liu. VP Isle of Wight Festival 2018 Sky Arts and Sky One, from 7.00pm The year’s biggest pop festival (in the absence of Glastonbury) celebrates its 50th anniversary with a line-up spanning the decades, from electro-rockers Depeche Mode to headliners The Killers. The coverage begins on Sky Arts at 7pm, with Nile Rodgers & Chic taking to the stage at 7.30pm. Kasabian will close out the first night on Sky Arts at 11pm. VP Victoria & Abdul (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Stephen Frears’ fascinating real-life tale about the extraordinary friendship between the ageing Queen Victoria (a sensational Judi Dench) and her young Muslim attendant Abdul Karim (Ali Fazal), known as “the Munshi”, is all nostalgia and inertia – a tale ablaze with historical import and contemporary resonance, reduced to commemorative biscuit tin proportions. Eddie Izzard co-stars. Mad Max (1979) ★★★★☆ ITV, 11.45pm An explosive breakthrough – literally. Improbable car stunts and pile-ups ensue as “mad” Max Rockatansky (Mel Gibson) attempts to police a dystopian Australia, where feral biker gangs rape and pillage at will. Director George Miller’s vision was “a silent movie with sound” and he drew inspiration for the film’s injuries and deaths from his time working as a doctor in a Sydney hospital. The film essentially founded Australia’s film industry. Sexy Beast (2000) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 12.10am Ben Kingsley is at his scariest in this tense and enthralling thriller as the gangster thug who wants to rob a well-guarded bank, and flies out to Spain to drag his retired associate Gary (a lobster-tanned Ray Winstone) back to work. But Gary is living a contented life with his wife (Amanda Redman) and has no intention of going back to his criminal life, forcing the two men into a battle of wills that ends in violence. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
Monday 18 June Emmeline Pankhurst: The Making of a Militant BBC Four, 7.30pm The life, times and legacy of Emmeline Pankhurst, the globally significant, inspiring and politically gifted pioneer of women’s rights, gets a rather hurried but accessible treatment. Presented by actress Sally Lindsay, the focus is on Pankhurst’s roots in Manchester and how a family background in radicalism imbued her with a deep commitment to political activism. If the characterisation of Pankhurst as “a working mum from Moss Side” doesn’t quite capture the life of upper-middle-class privilege that afforded Pankhurst the platform from which to conduct her campaigns, the depiction of her happy marriage to campaigning lawyer Dr Richard Pankhurst and busy home life give a more rounded view of her. At its best the film delivers a strong sense of Pankhurst’s genius for promoting the cause of women’s suffrage and how she came to believe that militancy – as enshrined in the slogan “deeds not words” – was the way forward when it came to challenging the intransigence of government. Contributors include her great-granddaughter Helen Pankhurst, who continues to fly the flag for women’s rights. Gerard O’Donovan Great American Railroad Journeys BBC Two, 7.00pm; not Wales In the last episode of the series, Michael Portillo foregoes the railway for a boat trip along the Saint Lawrence River before crossing the border into Canada to visit Kingston and Oshawa on the shores of Lake Ontario. GO The Family Farm BBC Two, 8.00pm Kate Humble presents this four-parter in which three families ditch the urban rat race in search of a better work-life balance and the experience of living and working on a sheep farm in Snowdonia. There’s an enjoyably competitive rivalry between the three families but the overall aim is to show just how tough and rewarding a farming life can be. GO Jamie’s Quick & Easy Food Channel 4, 8.00pm More speedily prepared five-ingredient recipes from Jamie Oliver. Here, he prepares a chorizo, salmon and artichoke bake, a tasty lamb hotpot, and a creamy chocolate affogato. GO Versailles BBC Two, 9.00pm It seems, after all, that rudimentary street lights and running water aren’t enough to keep those pesky Parisian peasants happy. As the public mood becomes ever more inflamed, King Louis’s (George Blagden) troubles deepen when news arrives that Cardinal Leto in Rome is determined to put the French king in his place. GO Snatches: Moments from Women’s Lives BBC Four, 10.00pm Royal Court Artistic Director Vicky Featherstone has curated a stellar line-up for eight 15-minute monologues exploring moments in the lives of women who have challenged the status quo. This week’s pair are Abi Morgan’s Compliance, in which Romola Garai recalls a meeting in a hotel room between an actress and a powerful producer; and Theresa Ikoko’s Outside, with Corrinne Skinner-Carter as a centenarian who is experiencing a revolution. GO Rebel Women: The Great Art Fightback BBC Four, 10.30pm This terrific documentary celebrates the grit, humour and determination of the generation of the political and provocative feminist artists who emerged, on both sides of the Atlantic, in the wake of the Sixties’ cultural revolutions. Among those featured are Judy Chicago, Margaret Harrison, Mary Kelly, Lubaina Himid, Rose English and Barbara Kruger. GO Twilight (2008) ★★★★☆ ITV2, 6.25pm Director Catherine Hardwicke (Thirteen) gets her teeth stuck into this enjoyable teenage vampire romance based on the popular Stephenie Meyer books. The heroine, Bella (Kristen Stewart), falls for a beautiful vampire, Edward (Robert Pattinson). Theirs is a touching relationship (if a slightly creepy one), but to consummate their love means they will perish. Be warned, though – the climax is surprisingly violent. Mamma Mia! (2008) ITV3, 8.00pm ★★★☆☆ This musical comedy set to Abba’s hits is pure escapism. It’s naff, but that’s its selling point, as stars Meryl Streep, Pierce Brosnan and Julie Walters place their tongues firmly in cheeks. At 59, Streep deserved more credit for doing the splits than for her role as a boho mother living on a Greek island whose daughter (Amanda Seyfried) tries to find out who her biological father is. The sequel is in cinemas on July 20. Now You See Me (2013) ★★★★☆ E4, 9.00pm A group of illusionists (Jesse Eisenberg, Woody Harrelson, Isla Fisher and Dave Franco) are encouraged to carry out a string of heists by a mysterious figure, while remaining ahead of FBI agent Rhodes (Mark Ruffalo), who is desperate to bring them to justice. Director Louis Leterrier tries to mimic the complex plots of films such as Inception, but with less success, though it’s reasonably entertaining. Tuesday 19 June The Super Squirrels Conviction: Murder in Suburbia BBC Two, 9.00pm True-crime fans will be gripped by the return of this nail-biting two-parter, which re-examines historic cases for potential miscarriages of justice. Shown on consecutive nights this week, the case in question concerns Glyn Razzell, found guilty of killing his estranged wife Linda in 2003. Despite the fact that Linda’s body has never been found, Razzell’s fuzzy alibi and some controversial forensic evidence concerning blood in the boot of Razzell’s car was enough to see him sentenced to life in prison. It’s these uncertain circumstances, along with Linda’s possible link to another known murderer, that convince Louise Shorter, head of reinvestigation charity Inside Justice, to delve into Razzell’s case anew. Aided by a panel of experts, a dogged but even-handed Shorter tests the evidence to its limits, poring over statements, pursuing witnesses and retracing steps to tie up loose ends. What makes this all so thrilling is that we’re right there alongside her, experiencing the sudden shifts from excitement to frustration as she does. Listening in on Shorter’s phone calls to a mostly composed Razzell proves particularly compelling, our sympathies swaying as he comes under scrutiny. TD The Super Squirrels BBC Two, 8.00pm The upshot of this lively look at the squirrel family is don’t underestimate the little rodents, as they burrow, climb and even fly their way across most of the globe. Keen to explore the squirrel’s skills, scientists test their subjects on a specially designed assault course. TD Trevor McDonald: Return To South Africa ITV, 9.00pm Honouring what would have been Nelson Mandela’s 100th birthday, Trevor McDonald heads for South Africa to see if its historic divisions have now been healed. In Soweto, Johannesburg, he finds evidence of a growing black middle class. Cape Town’s gulf between rich and poor, however, is still stark. TD Our Girl BBC One, 9.10pm 2-Section are in Belize as the soapy military drama continues. Riled up by criticism from Captain James (Ben Aldridge) over the death of her boyfriend Elvis, Georgie (Michelle Keegan) goes all out to prove herself in a jungle training exercise. TD A Year to Fall in Love Channel 4, 10.00pm Here’s a look at millennial dating habits, as this new show follows 20 singletons in their year-long quest for love. First, we meet performance artist Freddy, who is not a fan of apps, and 25-year-old Sophie, who is looking for a man with money. TD The Yorkshire Dales and the Lakes More4, 9.00pm The return of the warm-hearted series, which profiles those who live in the national parks. The star of the show is the rolling landscape, but its hard-working inhabitants have their own fascination, including champion sheep-breeder Arnold Lancaster, who built his farm up from nothing. TD Underfire: The Untold Story of Tony Vaccaro Sky Arts, 9.00pm A US infantryman during the Second World War, Tony Vaccaro smuggled a camera onto the battlefield and recorded its horrors in over 8,000 startling images. Here Vaccaro returns to Omaha Beach, where he landed on D-Day, while photographers discuss the impact of his work. TD The Late Late Show UK Special Sky One, 10.00pm James Corden brings his triumphant chat show home for a four-night run. The guests include Cher, Orlando Bloom, Cate Blanchett, Foo Fighters and Paul McCartney. TD Mr Smith Goes to Washington (1939, b/w) ★★★★★ TCM, 6.15pm The films of Frank Capra (It’s a Wonderful Life) are often dismissed as idealistic and sentimental. But there is another side to his work, much of which stays just the right side of the fine line that divides the American Dream from the American Nightmare. James Stewart plays a goofy country bumpkin who is shoehorned into a dead man’s shoes in the Senate. The film was nominated for 11 Oscars. Inside Man (2006) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 11.50pm This is a devilishly clever heist movie from director Spike Lee that hinges on a battle of wits between an ice-cool criminal (Clive Owen) and an unflappable hostage negotiator (Denzel Washington). The story has more twists than a Chubby Checker record but it opens with an elaborate New York bank robbery during which nothing, seemingly, is stolen. Jodie Foster, Willem Dafoe, Christopher Plummer and Chiwetel Ejiofor also star. Haywire (2011) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.05pm This slick spy thriller marked Steven Soderbergh’s 25th feature as a director. Mixed-martial-arts fighter and first-time actress Gina Carano stars as a super-soldier who’s on a mission to flush out a double agent who left her left for dead. Colleagues who fall under suspicion include her former partner (Channing Tatum), a drippy strategist (Ewan McGregor) and a dapper Irish colleague (Michael Fassbender). Wednesday 20 June Mortimer & Whitehouse: Gone Fishing Mortimer & Whitehouse: Gone Fishing BBC Two, 10.00pm The premise of this programme may sound familiar – two comedians go on a journey of discovery to beautiful locations – but, unlike Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon’s The Trip, this one features the real personalities, as opposed to fictionalised versions. Lifelong friends Paul Whitehouse and Bob Mortimer share more than a love of comedy, they have both suffered from heart disease. And so, for this funny and poignant six-part series, keen angler Whitehouse attempts to teach Mortimer, a complete novice, the peaceful art of fishing as an aid to his recovery – and maybe learn something new about each other along the way. In the first episode, they head to Norfolk to fish for tench, and there they talk candidly about everything from showbusiness to solitude and relationships. They also reveal how they recently came face to face with their own mortality. This is one of the few occasions that you get to see Mortimer and Whitehouse being themselves, without costumes and props – if you discount the fishing rods. And while there are underlying life-and-death issues in the show, its tone is celebratory, rather than mournful and is about seizing the moment. CM Mad About Elvis BBC One, 7.30pm It’s no surprise that each year tens of thousands of Elvis fans gather together to celebrate “The King”. But what is surprising is that, for the past 15 years, they have been doing so in the Welsh seaside town of Porthcawl. This documentary follows the larger-than-life characters who attend the Elvis festival, the biggest event of its kind in the world. CM The World’s Most Extraordinary Homes BBC Two, 8.00pm Some people do know how to build great homes, especially ones inspired by landscapes. Among the homes that architect Piers Taylor and actress Caroline Quentin come across in Norway for this series including a retreat that’s perched on rocks. CM Secrets of McDonalds: 50 Years of the Big Mac Channel 5, 9.00pm It’s hard to believe but that simple double burger from McDonald’s is 50 years old. To mark the occasion, this film takes a nostalgic look at the fast-food chain’s history, from its Californian origins to what it is today – the world’s largest restaurant chain, serving 69 million people daily. CM Britain’s Refugee Children Channel 4, 10.00pm Each year, a number of the world’s displaced and dispossessed people seek refuge in the UK. This film follows the progress of six refugee children over six months as they adapt to new lives in Cardiff and Newport. CM Hollywood Couples Sky Arts, 9.00pm As Hollywood love affairs go, Robert Taylor and Barbara Stanwyck’s got off to an intriguing start: they met on a blind date in 1936, where there was mutual attraction. But the film studio MGM did not want Taylor to be in a relationship at that time. They later changed their minds, and Taylor and Stanwyck’s union effectively became an arranged marriage. This enlightening film explores how, despite a series of affairs by Taylor, the union lasted for 12 years, and why it wasn’t a marriage of equals – Stanwyck called Taylor “Junior”, he called her “The Queen”. CM Big Beast: Last of the Giants Sky One, 9.00pm In some areas of life, size matters, but none more so than in the animal world. For this three-part series, biologist Patrick Aryee gets up close to some of the world’s largest creatures to explore why they evolved into giants. He begins by meeting a venomous Komodo dragon, the largest living lizard, armed only with small stick. CM The Abyss (1989) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.15pm Long before Avatar, James Cameron was cooking up innovative special effects for this sci-fi adventure in which oil rig workers (including Ed Harris and Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio) explore a marooned nuclear submarine. The ending seems tacked on from another movie, but Cameron makes up for it with some spectacular underwater action scenes – proof that effects can stay “special” if they’re imaginatively used. Memphis Belle (1990) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm It’s 1943, and the handsome American crew of Second World War B-17 bomber Memphis Belle, who are stationed in England, are anticipating their final mission – to fly over Nazi-occupied Europe. Full of nostalgia, this loosely based-on-real-events story exudes a romanticised view of heroism, but features an endearing cast, including Billy Zane, Sean Astin, John Lithgow, Eric Stoltz, and Harry Connick Jr. Looking for Eric (2009) ★★★★☆ London Live, 11.15pm Ken Loach plays a blinder with this affable study of a depressed postman (Steve Evets) who sorts his life out with the help of his imaginary mentor and idol Eric Cantona (playing himself). It’s not Loach’s most political work but it’s definitely one of his sunniest and funniest film. Evets and his postie pals, including the wonderful Meatballs (John Henshaw), keep the laughs coming, sending you away with daft grins on our faces. Thursday 21 June Outlander The Murder of Rhys Jones: Police Tapes ITV, 9.00pm Anyone who watched Jeff Pope’s hard-hitting drama series Little Boy Blue last year, based on the investigation into the murder of 11-year-old Rhys Jones in Liverpool on 22 August 2007, will know just how tragic and disturbing the circumstances surrounding this case were. Rhys, on his way home from football practice, was hit by a stray bullet and died when a teenager on a bicycle started shooting at rival gang members across a car park in Croxteth. To compound the horror, a veil of silence descended on the area as the youths involved, and in some cases their parents, conspired to conceal their identities by intimidating all around them. The only recourse open to investigating officers was to plant listening devices in the homes of the prime suspects in the hope that somehow, they would incriminate themselves. But that was only beginning. Here, presenter Susanna Reid gains unique access to the recordings, in which those responsible admit their part and the lengths they would go to cover up the crime. She also talks to Rhys’s parents, Mel and Steve Jones, about the impact their son’s murder has had on their lives. GO Supershoppers Channel 4, 8.00pm This week’s edition of the consumer show reveals how takeaway coffee from a machine often costs more than one made by a barista, plus how to track down the energy deals hidden by cost comparison sites. Hosts Anna Richardson and Sabrina Grant also explore whether whitening toothpastes really work. GO Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm It’s the last show of the series as Fred Sirieix showcases two more food businesses seeking investment: Naked Dough, a vegan-friendly pop-up in need of a permanent base; and Black Bear Burger, whose owners, already doing well enough to leave their day jobs behind, are looking for the funds to scale up. GO Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm There’s been some terrific drama already in this third series, and that continues in this episode as Laura (Katherine Parkinson) is forced to act quickly when synth Mia’s (Gemma Chan) speech at the commission provokes a shocking attack. GO The Double Life of George Michael Channel 5, 9.00pm This documentary examines the life of the hugely successful and famously generous pop star, and how he spent much of his life battling inner demons prior to early death in 2016. It’s followed at 11.05pm by The Nation’s Favourite George Michael Song. GO The Killers Live at the Royal Albert Hall Sky Arts, 9.00pm Brandon Flowers and his band got an ecstatic reception when they rocked the Royal Albert Hall in July 2009 during their tour of their third album Day & Age. This concert was recorded over two nights, and all of their hits up to that point feature in the set, including Somebody Told Me, When You Were Young, All These Things That I’ve Done and, of course, Mr Brightside. GO Outlander More4, 9.00pm The setting of this Celtic time-travel fantasy has moved firmly over to France, as the second series progresses. Now the Frasers have settled into high society in Paris and Jamie (Sam Heughan) gets a chance, at last, to infiltrate Jacobite circles when he gets an introduction to Bonnie Prince Charlie. Claire (Caitriona Balfe), meanwhile, gets a shock when she meets members of the Duke of Sandringham’s household and realises that an old enemy, presumed dead, may be alive after all. GO North to Alaska (1960) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.00pm “You just can’t trust women. No matter how honest they act, they all want to be wives,” cautions John Wayne in this rather silly western set during the gold rush. After finding gold, Wayne goes to fetch his partner’s fiancée from Seattle, only to find her married to someone else. So he returns with Angel (Capucine), a prostitute, instead. Inevitably, our hero falls for the beguiling lady. Stewart Granger co-stars. X-Men: The Last Stand (2006) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.55pm The third film in the superhero series sees director Brett Ratner take over the reins of the Marvel Comics franchise. When a cure for the mutants is invented, a war breaks out between them and humanity. This isn’t the trilogy’s high point, but that said, Hugh Jackman plays Wolverine to perfection, plus the special effects and dramatic set pieces definitely impress. The Bodyguard (1992) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.00pm Former Secret Service agent Frank Farmer (Kevin Costner) plays bodyguard to pop singer Rachel Marron (Whitney Houston), though he’s more used to protecting presidents than superstars. Sparks fly and security is compromised, but when a stalker gets serious, the job comes first. Houston’s fine soundtrack adds to the film’s emotional theatricality. The soundtrack album has become the fifth bestselling album of all time. Friday 22 June Cruising With Jane McDonald The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Screenwriter Hans Rosenfeldt still has a couple of tasks to complete in the final two episodes of his superior, if at times preposterous, Scandi-thriller, before it bows out for good next week. The over-arching riddle since Henrik Sabroe (Thure Lindhardt) joined the Danish cop shop in series three is what happened to his two daughters, who’d gone missing eight years ago.In tonight’s penultimate episode that question is answered at last, and of course it’s Henrik’s colleague and sometime lover, on-the-spectrum brainbox Saga Norén (Sofia Helin), who figures it out. But as we’ve seen over nearly four series of grisly murder, Rosenfeldt can’t usually be relied on for a happy ending. Then Rosenfeldt’s second task is having Saga figure out who’s killing people using the same methods deployed in government executions (stoning, electrocution, et al) before she becomes the next victim. Tonight, fans will be cheered to see Saga – so often a forlorn, misunderstood character – make solid progress in both the case and in therapy, which bodes well for her future. But this isn’t a cosy relationship drama, and rest assured there are lurid shocks that set us up for next week’s finale. VP The Crystal Maze Channel 4, 9.00pm This star-laden edition of the action game show sees Countdown’s maths genius Rachel Riley in a polite power struggle with skipper Judy Murray, mother of Andy, as she tries to dominate the decision-making. It adds a frisson to the proceedings that also include ex-footballer Wayne Bridge and Paralympian David Weir. VP Cruising with Jane McDonald Channel 5, 9.00pm In this first of a boozy two-parter set in South America, chanteuse Jane McDonald boards another cruise ship and samples Pisco sours and drinks whisky chilled by glacier ice. VP The Last Leg Channel 4, 10.00pm What started off as a spin-off for the 2012 Paralympics has rightly become a Friday night institution. Host Adam Hills returns to marshal the mix of silliness and satire that characterise this comedy chat show, aided by Alex Brooker, Josh Widdicombe and a gaggle of up-for-it celebrity guests. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.45pm Graham Norton will be kept on his toes as Cher graces his sofa for the first time in five years, with her suffer-no-fools attitude. She is joined by her Mamma Mia! co-star Christine Baranski. Also on the final live show of the series are Rupert Everett and Game of Thrones’ Natalie Dormer. VP Marvel’s Luke Cage Netflix, from today Superheroes have become a tiresome constant in film and on TV, but this action series, with a soulful black champion at its centre, is a welcome addition to the genre. Mike Colter returns for a second series as the pumped-up, titular New York action man. In the first episode he deals with the ramifications of last season’s climax in which he triumphed over evil but lost his anonymity. Now he’s being pestered for selfies as he tries to figure out his next move in an opening episode that’s directed by actress Lucy Liu. VP Isle of Wight Festival 2018 Sky Arts and Sky One, from 7.00pm The year’s biggest pop festival (in the absence of Glastonbury) celebrates its 50th anniversary with a line-up spanning the decades, from electro-rockers Depeche Mode to headliners The Killers. The coverage begins on Sky Arts at 7pm, with Nile Rodgers & Chic taking to the stage at 7.30pm. Kasabian will close out the first night on Sky Arts at 11pm. VP Victoria & Abdul (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Stephen Frears’ fascinating real-life tale about the extraordinary friendship between the ageing Queen Victoria (a sensational Judi Dench) and her young Muslim attendant Abdul Karim (Ali Fazal), known as “the Munshi”, is all nostalgia and inertia – a tale ablaze with historical import and contemporary resonance, reduced to commemorative biscuit tin proportions. Eddie Izzard co-stars. Mad Max (1979) ★★★★☆ ITV, 11.45pm An explosive breakthrough – literally. Improbable car stunts and pile-ups ensue as “mad” Max Rockatansky (Mel Gibson) attempts to police a dystopian Australia, where feral biker gangs rape and pillage at will. Director George Miller’s vision was “a silent movie with sound” and he drew inspiration for the film’s injuries and deaths from his time working as a doctor in a Sydney hospital. The film essentially founded Australia’s film industry. Sexy Beast (2000) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 12.10am Ben Kingsley is at his scariest in this tense and enthralling thriller as the gangster thug who wants to rob a well-guarded bank, and flies out to Spain to drag his retired associate Gary (a lobster-tanned Ray Winstone) back to work. But Gary is living a contented life with his wife (Amanda Redman) and has no intention of going back to his criminal life, forcing the two men into a battle of wills that ends in violence. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: Emmeline Pankhurst: The Making of a Militant and The Family Farm
Monday 18 June Emmeline Pankhurst: The Making of a Militant BBC Four, 7.30pm The life, times and legacy of Emmeline Pankhurst, the globally significant, inspiring and politically gifted pioneer of women’s rights, gets a rather hurried but accessible treatment. Presented by actress Sally Lindsay, the focus is on Pankhurst’s roots in Manchester and how a family background in radicalism imbued her with a deep commitment to political activism. If the characterisation of Pankhurst as “a working mum from Moss Side” doesn’t quite capture the life of upper-middle-class privilege that afforded Pankhurst the platform from which to conduct her campaigns, the depiction of her happy marriage to campaigning lawyer Dr Richard Pankhurst and busy home life give a more rounded view of her. At its best the film delivers a strong sense of Pankhurst’s genius for promoting the cause of women’s suffrage and how she came to believe that militancy – as enshrined in the slogan “deeds not words” – was the way forward when it came to challenging the intransigence of government. Contributors include her great-granddaughter Helen Pankhurst, who continues to fly the flag for women’s rights. Gerard O’Donovan Great American Railroad Journeys BBC Two, 7.00pm; not Wales In the last episode of the series, Michael Portillo foregoes the railway for a boat trip along the Saint Lawrence River before crossing the border into Canada to visit Kingston and Oshawa on the shores of Lake Ontario. GO The Family Farm BBC Two, 8.00pm Kate Humble presents this four-parter in which three families ditch the urban rat race in search of a better work-life balance and the experience of living and working on a sheep farm in Snowdonia. There’s an enjoyably competitive rivalry between the three families but the overall aim is to show just how tough and rewarding a farming life can be. GO Jamie’s Quick & Easy Food Channel 4, 8.00pm More speedily prepared five-ingredient recipes from Jamie Oliver. Here, he prepares a chorizo, salmon and artichoke bake, a tasty lamb hotpot, and a creamy chocolate affogato. GO Versailles BBC Two, 9.00pm It seems, after all, that rudimentary street lights and running water aren’t enough to keep those pesky Parisian peasants happy. As the public mood becomes ever more inflamed, King Louis’s (George Blagden) troubles deepen when news arrives that Cardinal Leto in Rome is determined to put the French king in his place. GO Snatches: Moments from Women’s Lives BBC Four, 10.00pm Royal Court Artistic Director Vicky Featherstone has curated a stellar line-up for eight 15-minute monologues exploring moments in the lives of women who have challenged the status quo. This week’s pair are Abi Morgan’s Compliance, in which Romola Garai recalls a meeting in a hotel room between an actress and a powerful producer; and Theresa Ikoko’s Outside, with Corrinne Skinner-Carter as a centenarian who is experiencing a revolution. GO Rebel Women: The Great Art Fightback BBC Four, 10.30pm This terrific documentary celebrates the grit, humour and determination of the generation of the political and provocative feminist artists who emerged, on both sides of the Atlantic, in the wake of the Sixties’ cultural revolutions. Among those featured are Judy Chicago, Margaret Harrison, Mary Kelly, Lubaina Himid, Rose English and Barbara Kruger. GO Twilight (2008) ★★★★☆ ITV2, 6.25pm Director Catherine Hardwicke (Thirteen) gets her teeth stuck into this enjoyable teenage vampire romance based on the popular Stephenie Meyer books. The heroine, Bella (Kristen Stewart), falls for a beautiful vampire, Edward (Robert Pattinson). Theirs is a touching relationship (if a slightly creepy one), but to consummate their love means they will perish. Be warned, though – the climax is surprisingly violent. Mamma Mia! (2008) ITV3, 8.00pm ★★★☆☆ This musical comedy set to Abba’s hits is pure escapism. It’s naff, but that’s its selling point, as stars Meryl Streep, Pierce Brosnan and Julie Walters place their tongues firmly in cheeks. At 59, Streep deserved more credit for doing the splits than for her role as a boho mother living on a Greek island whose daughter (Amanda Seyfried) tries to find out who her biological father is. The sequel is in cinemas on July 20. Now You See Me (2013) ★★★★☆ E4, 9.00pm A group of illusionists (Jesse Eisenberg, Woody Harrelson, Isla Fisher and Dave Franco) are encouraged to carry out a string of heists by a mysterious figure, while remaining ahead of FBI agent Rhodes (Mark Ruffalo), who is desperate to bring them to justice. Director Louis Leterrier tries to mimic the complex plots of films such as Inception, but with less success, though it’s reasonably entertaining. Tuesday 19 June The Super Squirrels Conviction: Murder in Suburbia BBC Two, 9.00pm True-crime fans will be gripped by the return of this nail-biting two-parter, which re-examines historic cases for potential miscarriages of justice. Shown on consecutive nights this week, the case in question concerns Glyn Razzell, found guilty of killing his estranged wife Linda in 2003. Despite the fact that Linda’s body has never been found, Razzell’s fuzzy alibi and some controversial forensic evidence concerning blood in the boot of Razzell’s car was enough to see him sentenced to life in prison. It’s these uncertain circumstances, along with Linda’s possible link to another known murderer, that convince Louise Shorter, head of reinvestigation charity Inside Justice, to delve into Razzell’s case anew. Aided by a panel of experts, a dogged but even-handed Shorter tests the evidence to its limits, poring over statements, pursuing witnesses and retracing steps to tie up loose ends. What makes this all so thrilling is that we’re right there alongside her, experiencing the sudden shifts from excitement to frustration as she does. Listening in on Shorter’s phone calls to a mostly composed Razzell proves particularly compelling, our sympathies swaying as he comes under scrutiny. TD The Super Squirrels BBC Two, 8.00pm The upshot of this lively look at the squirrel family is don’t underestimate the little rodents, as they burrow, climb and even fly their way across most of the globe. Keen to explore the squirrel’s skills, scientists test their subjects on a specially designed assault course. TD Trevor McDonald: Return To South Africa ITV, 9.00pm Honouring what would have been Nelson Mandela’s 100th birthday, Trevor McDonald heads for South Africa to see if its historic divisions have now been healed. In Soweto, Johannesburg, he finds evidence of a growing black middle class. Cape Town’s gulf between rich and poor, however, is still stark. TD Our Girl BBC One, 9.10pm 2-Section are in Belize as the soapy military drama continues. Riled up by criticism from Captain James (Ben Aldridge) over the death of her boyfriend Elvis, Georgie (Michelle Keegan) goes all out to prove herself in a jungle training exercise. TD A Year to Fall in Love Channel 4, 10.00pm Here’s a look at millennial dating habits, as this new show follows 20 singletons in their year-long quest for love. First, we meet performance artist Freddy, who is not a fan of apps, and 25-year-old Sophie, who is looking for a man with money. TD The Yorkshire Dales and the Lakes More4, 9.00pm The return of the warm-hearted series, which profiles those who live in the national parks. The star of the show is the rolling landscape, but its hard-working inhabitants have their own fascination, including champion sheep-breeder Arnold Lancaster, who built his farm up from nothing. TD Underfire: The Untold Story of Tony Vaccaro Sky Arts, 9.00pm A US infantryman during the Second World War, Tony Vaccaro smuggled a camera onto the battlefield and recorded its horrors in over 8,000 startling images. Here Vaccaro returns to Omaha Beach, where he landed on D-Day, while photographers discuss the impact of his work. TD The Late Late Show UK Special Sky One, 10.00pm James Corden brings his triumphant chat show home for a four-night run. The guests include Cher, Orlando Bloom, Cate Blanchett, Foo Fighters and Paul McCartney. TD Mr Smith Goes to Washington (1939, b/w) ★★★★★ TCM, 6.15pm The films of Frank Capra (It’s a Wonderful Life) are often dismissed as idealistic and sentimental. But there is another side to his work, much of which stays just the right side of the fine line that divides the American Dream from the American Nightmare. James Stewart plays a goofy country bumpkin who is shoehorned into a dead man’s shoes in the Senate. The film was nominated for 11 Oscars. Inside Man (2006) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 11.50pm This is a devilishly clever heist movie from director Spike Lee that hinges on a battle of wits between an ice-cool criminal (Clive Owen) and an unflappable hostage negotiator (Denzel Washington). The story has more twists than a Chubby Checker record but it opens with an elaborate New York bank robbery during which nothing, seemingly, is stolen. Jodie Foster, Willem Dafoe, Christopher Plummer and Chiwetel Ejiofor also star. Haywire (2011) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.05pm This slick spy thriller marked Steven Soderbergh’s 25th feature as a director. Mixed-martial-arts fighter and first-time actress Gina Carano stars as a super-soldier who’s on a mission to flush out a double agent who left her left for dead. Colleagues who fall under suspicion include her former partner (Channing Tatum), a drippy strategist (Ewan McGregor) and a dapper Irish colleague (Michael Fassbender). Wednesday 20 June Mortimer & Whitehouse: Gone Fishing Mortimer & Whitehouse: Gone Fishing BBC Two, 10.00pm The premise of this programme may sound familiar – two comedians go on a journey of discovery to beautiful locations – but, unlike Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon’s The Trip, this one features the real personalities, as opposed to fictionalised versions. Lifelong friends Paul Whitehouse and Bob Mortimer share more than a love of comedy, they have both suffered from heart disease. And so, for this funny and poignant six-part series, keen angler Whitehouse attempts to teach Mortimer, a complete novice, the peaceful art of fishing as an aid to his recovery – and maybe learn something new about each other along the way. In the first episode, they head to Norfolk to fish for tench, and there they talk candidly about everything from showbusiness to solitude and relationships. They also reveal how they recently came face to face with their own mortality. This is one of the few occasions that you get to see Mortimer and Whitehouse being themselves, without costumes and props – if you discount the fishing rods. And while there are underlying life-and-death issues in the show, its tone is celebratory, rather than mournful and is about seizing the moment. CM Mad About Elvis BBC One, 7.30pm It’s no surprise that each year tens of thousands of Elvis fans gather together to celebrate “The King”. But what is surprising is that, for the past 15 years, they have been doing so in the Welsh seaside town of Porthcawl. This documentary follows the larger-than-life characters who attend the Elvis festival, the biggest event of its kind in the world. CM The World’s Most Extraordinary Homes BBC Two, 8.00pm Some people do know how to build great homes, especially ones inspired by landscapes. Among the homes that architect Piers Taylor and actress Caroline Quentin come across in Norway for this series including a retreat that’s perched on rocks. CM Secrets of McDonalds: 50 Years of the Big Mac Channel 5, 9.00pm It’s hard to believe but that simple double burger from McDonald’s is 50 years old. To mark the occasion, this film takes a nostalgic look at the fast-food chain’s history, from its Californian origins to what it is today – the world’s largest restaurant chain, serving 69 million people daily. CM Britain’s Refugee Children Channel 4, 10.00pm Each year, a number of the world’s displaced and dispossessed people seek refuge in the UK. This film follows the progress of six refugee children over six months as they adapt to new lives in Cardiff and Newport. CM Hollywood Couples Sky Arts, 9.00pm As Hollywood love affairs go, Robert Taylor and Barbara Stanwyck’s got off to an intriguing start: they met on a blind date in 1936, where there was mutual attraction. But the film studio MGM did not want Taylor to be in a relationship at that time. They later changed their minds, and Taylor and Stanwyck’s union effectively became an arranged marriage. This enlightening film explores how, despite a series of affairs by Taylor, the union lasted for 12 years, and why it wasn’t a marriage of equals – Stanwyck called Taylor “Junior”, he called her “The Queen”. CM Big Beast: Last of the Giants Sky One, 9.00pm In some areas of life, size matters, but none more so than in the animal world. For this three-part series, biologist Patrick Aryee gets up close to some of the world’s largest creatures to explore why they evolved into giants. He begins by meeting a venomous Komodo dragon, the largest living lizard, armed only with small stick. CM The Abyss (1989) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.15pm Long before Avatar, James Cameron was cooking up innovative special effects for this sci-fi adventure in which oil rig workers (including Ed Harris and Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio) explore a marooned nuclear submarine. The ending seems tacked on from another movie, but Cameron makes up for it with some spectacular underwater action scenes – proof that effects can stay “special” if they’re imaginatively used. Memphis Belle (1990) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm It’s 1943, and the handsome American crew of Second World War B-17 bomber Memphis Belle, who are stationed in England, are anticipating their final mission – to fly over Nazi-occupied Europe. Full of nostalgia, this loosely based-on-real-events story exudes a romanticised view of heroism, but features an endearing cast, including Billy Zane, Sean Astin, John Lithgow, Eric Stoltz, and Harry Connick Jr. Looking for Eric (2009) ★★★★☆ London Live, 11.15pm Ken Loach plays a blinder with this affable study of a depressed postman (Steve Evets) who sorts his life out with the help of his imaginary mentor and idol Eric Cantona (playing himself). It’s not Loach’s most political work but it’s definitely one of his sunniest and funniest film. Evets and his postie pals, including the wonderful Meatballs (John Henshaw), keep the laughs coming, sending you away with daft grins on our faces. Thursday 21 June Outlander The Murder of Rhys Jones: Police Tapes ITV, 9.00pm Anyone who watched Jeff Pope’s hard-hitting drama series Little Boy Blue last year, based on the investigation into the murder of 11-year-old Rhys Jones in Liverpool on 22 August 2007, will know just how tragic and disturbing the circumstances surrounding this case were. Rhys, on his way home from football practice, was hit by a stray bullet and died when a teenager on a bicycle started shooting at rival gang members across a car park in Croxteth. To compound the horror, a veil of silence descended on the area as the youths involved, and in some cases their parents, conspired to conceal their identities by intimidating all around them. The only recourse open to investigating officers was to plant listening devices in the homes of the prime suspects in the hope that somehow, they would incriminate themselves. But that was only beginning. Here, presenter Susanna Reid gains unique access to the recordings, in which those responsible admit their part and the lengths they would go to cover up the crime. She also talks to Rhys’s parents, Mel and Steve Jones, about the impact their son’s murder has had on their lives. GO Supershoppers Channel 4, 8.00pm This week’s edition of the consumer show reveals how takeaway coffee from a machine often costs more than one made by a barista, plus how to track down the energy deals hidden by cost comparison sites. Hosts Anna Richardson and Sabrina Grant also explore whether whitening toothpastes really work. GO Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm It’s the last show of the series as Fred Sirieix showcases two more food businesses seeking investment: Naked Dough, a vegan-friendly pop-up in need of a permanent base; and Black Bear Burger, whose owners, already doing well enough to leave their day jobs behind, are looking for the funds to scale up. GO Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm There’s been some terrific drama already in this third series, and that continues in this episode as Laura (Katherine Parkinson) is forced to act quickly when synth Mia’s (Gemma Chan) speech at the commission provokes a shocking attack. GO The Double Life of George Michael Channel 5, 9.00pm This documentary examines the life of the hugely successful and famously generous pop star, and how he spent much of his life battling inner demons prior to early death in 2016. It’s followed at 11.05pm by The Nation’s Favourite George Michael Song. GO The Killers Live at the Royal Albert Hall Sky Arts, 9.00pm Brandon Flowers and his band got an ecstatic reception when they rocked the Royal Albert Hall in July 2009 during their tour of their third album Day & Age. This concert was recorded over two nights, and all of their hits up to that point feature in the set, including Somebody Told Me, When You Were Young, All These Things That I’ve Done and, of course, Mr Brightside. GO Outlander More4, 9.00pm The setting of this Celtic time-travel fantasy has moved firmly over to France, as the second series progresses. Now the Frasers have settled into high society in Paris and Jamie (Sam Heughan) gets a chance, at last, to infiltrate Jacobite circles when he gets an introduction to Bonnie Prince Charlie. Claire (Caitriona Balfe), meanwhile, gets a shock when she meets members of the Duke of Sandringham’s household and realises that an old enemy, presumed dead, may be alive after all. GO North to Alaska (1960) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.00pm “You just can’t trust women. No matter how honest they act, they all want to be wives,” cautions John Wayne in this rather silly western set during the gold rush. After finding gold, Wayne goes to fetch his partner’s fiancée from Seattle, only to find her married to someone else. So he returns with Angel (Capucine), a prostitute, instead. Inevitably, our hero falls for the beguiling lady. Stewart Granger co-stars. X-Men: The Last Stand (2006) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.55pm The third film in the superhero series sees director Brett Ratner take over the reins of the Marvel Comics franchise. When a cure for the mutants is invented, a war breaks out between them and humanity. This isn’t the trilogy’s high point, but that said, Hugh Jackman plays Wolverine to perfection, plus the special effects and dramatic set pieces definitely impress. The Bodyguard (1992) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.00pm Former Secret Service agent Frank Farmer (Kevin Costner) plays bodyguard to pop singer Rachel Marron (Whitney Houston), though he’s more used to protecting presidents than superstars. Sparks fly and security is compromised, but when a stalker gets serious, the job comes first. Houston’s fine soundtrack adds to the film’s emotional theatricality. The soundtrack album has become the fifth bestselling album of all time. Friday 22 June Cruising With Jane McDonald The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Screenwriter Hans Rosenfeldt still has a couple of tasks to complete in the final two episodes of his superior, if at times preposterous, Scandi-thriller, before it bows out for good next week. The over-arching riddle since Henrik Sabroe (Thure Lindhardt) joined the Danish cop shop in series three is what happened to his two daughters, who’d gone missing eight years ago.In tonight’s penultimate episode that question is answered at last, and of course it’s Henrik’s colleague and sometime lover, on-the-spectrum brainbox Saga Norén (Sofia Helin), who figures it out. But as we’ve seen over nearly four series of grisly murder, Rosenfeldt can’t usually be relied on for a happy ending. Then Rosenfeldt’s second task is having Saga figure out who’s killing people using the same methods deployed in government executions (stoning, electrocution, et al) before she becomes the next victim. Tonight, fans will be cheered to see Saga – so often a forlorn, misunderstood character – make solid progress in both the case and in therapy, which bodes well for her future. But this isn’t a cosy relationship drama, and rest assured there are lurid shocks that set us up for next week’s finale. VP The Crystal Maze Channel 4, 9.00pm This star-laden edition of the action game show sees Countdown’s maths genius Rachel Riley in a polite power struggle with skipper Judy Murray, mother of Andy, as she tries to dominate the decision-making. It adds a frisson to the proceedings that also include ex-footballer Wayne Bridge and Paralympian David Weir. VP Cruising with Jane McDonald Channel 5, 9.00pm In this first of a boozy two-parter set in South America, chanteuse Jane McDonald boards another cruise ship and samples Pisco sours and drinks whisky chilled by glacier ice. VP The Last Leg Channel 4, 10.00pm What started off as a spin-off for the 2012 Paralympics has rightly become a Friday night institution. Host Adam Hills returns to marshal the mix of silliness and satire that characterise this comedy chat show, aided by Alex Brooker, Josh Widdicombe and a gaggle of up-for-it celebrity guests. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.45pm Graham Norton will be kept on his toes as Cher graces his sofa for the first time in five years, with her suffer-no-fools attitude. She is joined by her Mamma Mia! co-star Christine Baranski. Also on the final live show of the series are Rupert Everett and Game of Thrones’ Natalie Dormer. VP Marvel’s Luke Cage Netflix, from today Superheroes have become a tiresome constant in film and on TV, but this action series, with a soulful black champion at its centre, is a welcome addition to the genre. Mike Colter returns for a second series as the pumped-up, titular New York action man. In the first episode he deals with the ramifications of last season’s climax in which he triumphed over evil but lost his anonymity. Now he’s being pestered for selfies as he tries to figure out his next move in an opening episode that’s directed by actress Lucy Liu. VP Isle of Wight Festival 2018 Sky Arts and Sky One, from 7.00pm The year’s biggest pop festival (in the absence of Glastonbury) celebrates its 50th anniversary with a line-up spanning the decades, from electro-rockers Depeche Mode to headliners The Killers. The coverage begins on Sky Arts at 7pm, with Nile Rodgers & Chic taking to the stage at 7.30pm. Kasabian will close out the first night on Sky Arts at 11pm. VP Victoria & Abdul (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Stephen Frears’ fascinating real-life tale about the extraordinary friendship between the ageing Queen Victoria (a sensational Judi Dench) and her young Muslim attendant Abdul Karim (Ali Fazal), known as “the Munshi”, is all nostalgia and inertia – a tale ablaze with historical import and contemporary resonance, reduced to commemorative biscuit tin proportions. Eddie Izzard co-stars. Mad Max (1979) ★★★★☆ ITV, 11.45pm An explosive breakthrough – literally. Improbable car stunts and pile-ups ensue as “mad” Max Rockatansky (Mel Gibson) attempts to police a dystopian Australia, where feral biker gangs rape and pillage at will. Director George Miller’s vision was “a silent movie with sound” and he drew inspiration for the film’s injuries and deaths from his time working as a doctor in a Sydney hospital. The film essentially founded Australia’s film industry. Sexy Beast (2000) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 12.10am Ben Kingsley is at his scariest in this tense and enthralling thriller as the gangster thug who wants to rob a well-guarded bank, and flies out to Spain to drag his retired associate Gary (a lobster-tanned Ray Winstone) back to work. But Gary is living a contented life with his wife (Amanda Redman) and has no intention of going back to his criminal life, forcing the two men into a battle of wills that ends in violence. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
Monday 18 June Emmeline Pankhurst: The Making of a Militant BBC Four, 7.30pm The life, times and legacy of Emmeline Pankhurst, the globally significant, inspiring and politically gifted pioneer of women’s rights, gets a rather hurried but accessible treatment. Presented by actress Sally Lindsay, the focus is on Pankhurst’s roots in Manchester and how a family background in radicalism imbued her with a deep commitment to political activism. If the characterisation of Pankhurst as “a working mum from Moss Side” doesn’t quite capture the life of upper-middle-class privilege that afforded Pankhurst the platform from which to conduct her campaigns, the depiction of her happy marriage to campaigning lawyer Dr Richard Pankhurst and busy home life give a more rounded view of her. At its best the film delivers a strong sense of Pankhurst’s genius for promoting the cause of women’s suffrage and how she came to believe that militancy – as enshrined in the slogan “deeds not words” – was the way forward when it came to challenging the intransigence of government. Contributors include her great-granddaughter Helen Pankhurst, who continues to fly the flag for women’s rights. Gerard O’Donovan Great American Railroad Journeys BBC Two, 7.00pm; not Wales In the last episode of the series, Michael Portillo foregoes the railway for a boat trip along the Saint Lawrence River before crossing the border into Canada to visit Kingston and Oshawa on the shores of Lake Ontario. GO The Family Farm BBC Two, 8.00pm Kate Humble presents this four-parter in which three families ditch the urban rat race in search of a better work-life balance and the experience of living and working on a sheep farm in Snowdonia. There’s an enjoyably competitive rivalry between the three families but the overall aim is to show just how tough and rewarding a farming life can be. GO Jamie’s Quick & Easy Food Channel 4, 8.00pm More speedily prepared five-ingredient recipes from Jamie Oliver. Here, he prepares a chorizo, salmon and artichoke bake, a tasty lamb hotpot, and a creamy chocolate affogato. GO Versailles BBC Two, 9.00pm It seems, after all, that rudimentary street lights and running water aren’t enough to keep those pesky Parisian peasants happy. As the public mood becomes ever more inflamed, King Louis’s (George Blagden) troubles deepen when news arrives that Cardinal Leto in Rome is determined to put the French king in his place. GO Snatches: Moments from Women’s Lives BBC Four, 10.00pm Royal Court Artistic Director Vicky Featherstone has curated a stellar line-up for eight 15-minute monologues exploring moments in the lives of women who have challenged the status quo. This week’s pair are Abi Morgan’s Compliance, in which Romola Garai recalls a meeting in a hotel room between an actress and a powerful producer; and Theresa Ikoko’s Outside, with Corrinne Skinner-Carter as a centenarian who is experiencing a revolution. GO Rebel Women: The Great Art Fightback BBC Four, 10.30pm This terrific documentary celebrates the grit, humour and determination of the generation of the political and provocative feminist artists who emerged, on both sides of the Atlantic, in the wake of the Sixties’ cultural revolutions. Among those featured are Judy Chicago, Margaret Harrison, Mary Kelly, Lubaina Himid, Rose English and Barbara Kruger. GO Twilight (2008) ★★★★☆ ITV2, 6.25pm Director Catherine Hardwicke (Thirteen) gets her teeth stuck into this enjoyable teenage vampire romance based on the popular Stephenie Meyer books. The heroine, Bella (Kristen Stewart), falls for a beautiful vampire, Edward (Robert Pattinson). Theirs is a touching relationship (if a slightly creepy one), but to consummate their love means they will perish. Be warned, though – the climax is surprisingly violent. Mamma Mia! (2008) ITV3, 8.00pm ★★★☆☆ This musical comedy set to Abba’s hits is pure escapism. It’s naff, but that’s its selling point, as stars Meryl Streep, Pierce Brosnan and Julie Walters place their tongues firmly in cheeks. At 59, Streep deserved more credit for doing the splits than for her role as a boho mother living on a Greek island whose daughter (Amanda Seyfried) tries to find out who her biological father is. The sequel is in cinemas on July 20. Now You See Me (2013) ★★★★☆ E4, 9.00pm A group of illusionists (Jesse Eisenberg, Woody Harrelson, Isla Fisher and Dave Franco) are encouraged to carry out a string of heists by a mysterious figure, while remaining ahead of FBI agent Rhodes (Mark Ruffalo), who is desperate to bring them to justice. Director Louis Leterrier tries to mimic the complex plots of films such as Inception, but with less success, though it’s reasonably entertaining. Tuesday 19 June The Super Squirrels Conviction: Murder in Suburbia BBC Two, 9.00pm True-crime fans will be gripped by the return of this nail-biting two-parter, which re-examines historic cases for potential miscarriages of justice. Shown on consecutive nights this week, the case in question concerns Glyn Razzell, found guilty of killing his estranged wife Linda in 2003. Despite the fact that Linda’s body has never been found, Razzell’s fuzzy alibi and some controversial forensic evidence concerning blood in the boot of Razzell’s car was enough to see him sentenced to life in prison. It’s these uncertain circumstances, along with Linda’s possible link to another known murderer, that convince Louise Shorter, head of reinvestigation charity Inside Justice, to delve into Razzell’s case anew. Aided by a panel of experts, a dogged but even-handed Shorter tests the evidence to its limits, poring over statements, pursuing witnesses and retracing steps to tie up loose ends. What makes this all so thrilling is that we’re right there alongside her, experiencing the sudden shifts from excitement to frustration as she does. Listening in on Shorter’s phone calls to a mostly composed Razzell proves particularly compelling, our sympathies swaying as he comes under scrutiny. TD The Super Squirrels BBC Two, 8.00pm The upshot of this lively look at the squirrel family is don’t underestimate the little rodents, as they burrow, climb and even fly their way across most of the globe. Keen to explore the squirrel’s skills, scientists test their subjects on a specially designed assault course. TD Trevor McDonald: Return To South Africa ITV, 9.00pm Honouring what would have been Nelson Mandela’s 100th birthday, Trevor McDonald heads for South Africa to see if its historic divisions have now been healed. In Soweto, Johannesburg, he finds evidence of a growing black middle class. Cape Town’s gulf between rich and poor, however, is still stark. TD Our Girl BBC One, 9.10pm 2-Section are in Belize as the soapy military drama continues. Riled up by criticism from Captain James (Ben Aldridge) over the death of her boyfriend Elvis, Georgie (Michelle Keegan) goes all out to prove herself in a jungle training exercise. TD A Year to Fall in Love Channel 4, 10.00pm Here’s a look at millennial dating habits, as this new show follows 20 singletons in their year-long quest for love. First, we meet performance artist Freddy, who is not a fan of apps, and 25-year-old Sophie, who is looking for a man with money. TD The Yorkshire Dales and the Lakes More4, 9.00pm The return of the warm-hearted series, which profiles those who live in the national parks. The star of the show is the rolling landscape, but its hard-working inhabitants have their own fascination, including champion sheep-breeder Arnold Lancaster, who built his farm up from nothing. TD Underfire: The Untold Story of Tony Vaccaro Sky Arts, 9.00pm A US infantryman during the Second World War, Tony Vaccaro smuggled a camera onto the battlefield and recorded its horrors in over 8,000 startling images. Here Vaccaro returns to Omaha Beach, where he landed on D-Day, while photographers discuss the impact of his work. TD The Late Late Show UK Special Sky One, 10.00pm James Corden brings his triumphant chat show home for a four-night run. The guests include Cher, Orlando Bloom, Cate Blanchett, Foo Fighters and Paul McCartney. TD Mr Smith Goes to Washington (1939, b/w) ★★★★★ TCM, 6.15pm The films of Frank Capra (It’s a Wonderful Life) are often dismissed as idealistic and sentimental. But there is another side to his work, much of which stays just the right side of the fine line that divides the American Dream from the American Nightmare. James Stewart plays a goofy country bumpkin who is shoehorned into a dead man’s shoes in the Senate. The film was nominated for 11 Oscars. Inside Man (2006) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 11.50pm This is a devilishly clever heist movie from director Spike Lee that hinges on a battle of wits between an ice-cool criminal (Clive Owen) and an unflappable hostage negotiator (Denzel Washington). The story has more twists than a Chubby Checker record but it opens with an elaborate New York bank robbery during which nothing, seemingly, is stolen. Jodie Foster, Willem Dafoe, Christopher Plummer and Chiwetel Ejiofor also star. Haywire (2011) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.05pm This slick spy thriller marked Steven Soderbergh’s 25th feature as a director. Mixed-martial-arts fighter and first-time actress Gina Carano stars as a super-soldier who’s on a mission to flush out a double agent who left her left for dead. Colleagues who fall under suspicion include her former partner (Channing Tatum), a drippy strategist (Ewan McGregor) and a dapper Irish colleague (Michael Fassbender). Wednesday 20 June Mortimer & Whitehouse: Gone Fishing Mortimer & Whitehouse: Gone Fishing BBC Two, 10.00pm The premise of this programme may sound familiar – two comedians go on a journey of discovery to beautiful locations – but, unlike Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon’s The Trip, this one features the real personalities, as opposed to fictionalised versions. Lifelong friends Paul Whitehouse and Bob Mortimer share more than a love of comedy, they have both suffered from heart disease. And so, for this funny and poignant six-part series, keen angler Whitehouse attempts to teach Mortimer, a complete novice, the peaceful art of fishing as an aid to his recovery – and maybe learn something new about each other along the way. In the first episode, they head to Norfolk to fish for tench, and there they talk candidly about everything from showbusiness to solitude and relationships. They also reveal how they recently came face to face with their own mortality. This is one of the few occasions that you get to see Mortimer and Whitehouse being themselves, without costumes and props – if you discount the fishing rods. And while there are underlying life-and-death issues in the show, its tone is celebratory, rather than mournful and is about seizing the moment. CM Mad About Elvis BBC One, 7.30pm It’s no surprise that each year tens of thousands of Elvis fans gather together to celebrate “The King”. But what is surprising is that, for the past 15 years, they have been doing so in the Welsh seaside town of Porthcawl. This documentary follows the larger-than-life characters who attend the Elvis festival, the biggest event of its kind in the world. CM The World’s Most Extraordinary Homes BBC Two, 8.00pm Some people do know how to build great homes, especially ones inspired by landscapes. Among the homes that architect Piers Taylor and actress Caroline Quentin come across in Norway for this series including a retreat that’s perched on rocks. CM Secrets of McDonalds: 50 Years of the Big Mac Channel 5, 9.00pm It’s hard to believe but that simple double burger from McDonald’s is 50 years old. To mark the occasion, this film takes a nostalgic look at the fast-food chain’s history, from its Californian origins to what it is today – the world’s largest restaurant chain, serving 69 million people daily. CM Britain’s Refugee Children Channel 4, 10.00pm Each year, a number of the world’s displaced and dispossessed people seek refuge in the UK. This film follows the progress of six refugee children over six months as they adapt to new lives in Cardiff and Newport. CM Hollywood Couples Sky Arts, 9.00pm As Hollywood love affairs go, Robert Taylor and Barbara Stanwyck’s got off to an intriguing start: they met on a blind date in 1936, where there was mutual attraction. But the film studio MGM did not want Taylor to be in a relationship at that time. They later changed their minds, and Taylor and Stanwyck’s union effectively became an arranged marriage. This enlightening film explores how, despite a series of affairs by Taylor, the union lasted for 12 years, and why it wasn’t a marriage of equals – Stanwyck called Taylor “Junior”, he called her “The Queen”. CM Big Beast: Last of the Giants Sky One, 9.00pm In some areas of life, size matters, but none more so than in the animal world. For this three-part series, biologist Patrick Aryee gets up close to some of the world’s largest creatures to explore why they evolved into giants. He begins by meeting a venomous Komodo dragon, the largest living lizard, armed only with small stick. CM The Abyss (1989) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.15pm Long before Avatar, James Cameron was cooking up innovative special effects for this sci-fi adventure in which oil rig workers (including Ed Harris and Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio) explore a marooned nuclear submarine. The ending seems tacked on from another movie, but Cameron makes up for it with some spectacular underwater action scenes – proof that effects can stay “special” if they’re imaginatively used. Memphis Belle (1990) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm It’s 1943, and the handsome American crew of Second World War B-17 bomber Memphis Belle, who are stationed in England, are anticipating their final mission – to fly over Nazi-occupied Europe. Full of nostalgia, this loosely based-on-real-events story exudes a romanticised view of heroism, but features an endearing cast, including Billy Zane, Sean Astin, John Lithgow, Eric Stoltz, and Harry Connick Jr. Looking for Eric (2009) ★★★★☆ London Live, 11.15pm Ken Loach plays a blinder with this affable study of a depressed postman (Steve Evets) who sorts his life out with the help of his imaginary mentor and idol Eric Cantona (playing himself). It’s not Loach’s most political work but it’s definitely one of his sunniest and funniest film. Evets and his postie pals, including the wonderful Meatballs (John Henshaw), keep the laughs coming, sending you away with daft grins on our faces. Thursday 21 June Outlander The Murder of Rhys Jones: Police Tapes ITV, 9.00pm Anyone who watched Jeff Pope’s hard-hitting drama series Little Boy Blue last year, based on the investigation into the murder of 11-year-old Rhys Jones in Liverpool on 22 August 2007, will know just how tragic and disturbing the circumstances surrounding this case were. Rhys, on his way home from football practice, was hit by a stray bullet and died when a teenager on a bicycle started shooting at rival gang members across a car park in Croxteth. To compound the horror, a veil of silence descended on the area as the youths involved, and in some cases their parents, conspired to conceal their identities by intimidating all around them. The only recourse open to investigating officers was to plant listening devices in the homes of the prime suspects in the hope that somehow, they would incriminate themselves. But that was only beginning. Here, presenter Susanna Reid gains unique access to the recordings, in which those responsible admit their part and the lengths they would go to cover up the crime. She also talks to Rhys’s parents, Mel and Steve Jones, about the impact their son’s murder has had on their lives. GO Supershoppers Channel 4, 8.00pm This week’s edition of the consumer show reveals how takeaway coffee from a machine often costs more than one made by a barista, plus how to track down the energy deals hidden by cost comparison sites. Hosts Anna Richardson and Sabrina Grant also explore whether whitening toothpastes really work. GO Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm It’s the last show of the series as Fred Sirieix showcases two more food businesses seeking investment: Naked Dough, a vegan-friendly pop-up in need of a permanent base; and Black Bear Burger, whose owners, already doing well enough to leave their day jobs behind, are looking for the funds to scale up. GO Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm There’s been some terrific drama already in this third series, and that continues in this episode as Laura (Katherine Parkinson) is forced to act quickly when synth Mia’s (Gemma Chan) speech at the commission provokes a shocking attack. GO The Double Life of George Michael Channel 5, 9.00pm This documentary examines the life of the hugely successful and famously generous pop star, and how he spent much of his life battling inner demons prior to early death in 2016. It’s followed at 11.05pm by The Nation’s Favourite George Michael Song. GO The Killers Live at the Royal Albert Hall Sky Arts, 9.00pm Brandon Flowers and his band got an ecstatic reception when they rocked the Royal Albert Hall in July 2009 during their tour of their third album Day & Age. This concert was recorded over two nights, and all of their hits up to that point feature in the set, including Somebody Told Me, When You Were Young, All These Things That I’ve Done and, of course, Mr Brightside. GO Outlander More4, 9.00pm The setting of this Celtic time-travel fantasy has moved firmly over to France, as the second series progresses. Now the Frasers have settled into high society in Paris and Jamie (Sam Heughan) gets a chance, at last, to infiltrate Jacobite circles when he gets an introduction to Bonnie Prince Charlie. Claire (Caitriona Balfe), meanwhile, gets a shock when she meets members of the Duke of Sandringham’s household and realises that an old enemy, presumed dead, may be alive after all. GO North to Alaska (1960) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.00pm “You just can’t trust women. No matter how honest they act, they all want to be wives,” cautions John Wayne in this rather silly western set during the gold rush. After finding gold, Wayne goes to fetch his partner’s fiancée from Seattle, only to find her married to someone else. So he returns with Angel (Capucine), a prostitute, instead. Inevitably, our hero falls for the beguiling lady. Stewart Granger co-stars. X-Men: The Last Stand (2006) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.55pm The third film in the superhero series sees director Brett Ratner take over the reins of the Marvel Comics franchise. When a cure for the mutants is invented, a war breaks out between them and humanity. This isn’t the trilogy’s high point, but that said, Hugh Jackman plays Wolverine to perfection, plus the special effects and dramatic set pieces definitely impress. The Bodyguard (1992) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.00pm Former Secret Service agent Frank Farmer (Kevin Costner) plays bodyguard to pop singer Rachel Marron (Whitney Houston), though he’s more used to protecting presidents than superstars. Sparks fly and security is compromised, but when a stalker gets serious, the job comes first. Houston’s fine soundtrack adds to the film’s emotional theatricality. The soundtrack album has become the fifth bestselling album of all time. Friday 22 June Cruising With Jane McDonald The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Screenwriter Hans Rosenfeldt still has a couple of tasks to complete in the final two episodes of his superior, if at times preposterous, Scandi-thriller, before it bows out for good next week. The over-arching riddle since Henrik Sabroe (Thure Lindhardt) joined the Danish cop shop in series three is what happened to his two daughters, who’d gone missing eight years ago.In tonight’s penultimate episode that question is answered at last, and of course it’s Henrik’s colleague and sometime lover, on-the-spectrum brainbox Saga Norén (Sofia Helin), who figures it out. But as we’ve seen over nearly four series of grisly murder, Rosenfeldt can’t usually be relied on for a happy ending. Then Rosenfeldt’s second task is having Saga figure out who’s killing people using the same methods deployed in government executions (stoning, electrocution, et al) before she becomes the next victim. Tonight, fans will be cheered to see Saga – so often a forlorn, misunderstood character – make solid progress in both the case and in therapy, which bodes well for her future. But this isn’t a cosy relationship drama, and rest assured there are lurid shocks that set us up for next week’s finale. VP The Crystal Maze Channel 4, 9.00pm This star-laden edition of the action game show sees Countdown’s maths genius Rachel Riley in a polite power struggle with skipper Judy Murray, mother of Andy, as she tries to dominate the decision-making. It adds a frisson to the proceedings that also include ex-footballer Wayne Bridge and Paralympian David Weir. VP Cruising with Jane McDonald Channel 5, 9.00pm In this first of a boozy two-parter set in South America, chanteuse Jane McDonald boards another cruise ship and samples Pisco sours and drinks whisky chilled by glacier ice. VP The Last Leg Channel 4, 10.00pm What started off as a spin-off for the 2012 Paralympics has rightly become a Friday night institution. Host Adam Hills returns to marshal the mix of silliness and satire that characterise this comedy chat show, aided by Alex Brooker, Josh Widdicombe and a gaggle of up-for-it celebrity guests. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.45pm Graham Norton will be kept on his toes as Cher graces his sofa for the first time in five years, with her suffer-no-fools attitude. She is joined by her Mamma Mia! co-star Christine Baranski. Also on the final live show of the series are Rupert Everett and Game of Thrones’ Natalie Dormer. VP Marvel’s Luke Cage Netflix, from today Superheroes have become a tiresome constant in film and on TV, but this action series, with a soulful black champion at its centre, is a welcome addition to the genre. Mike Colter returns for a second series as the pumped-up, titular New York action man. In the first episode he deals with the ramifications of last season’s climax in which he triumphed over evil but lost his anonymity. Now he’s being pestered for selfies as he tries to figure out his next move in an opening episode that’s directed by actress Lucy Liu. VP Isle of Wight Festival 2018 Sky Arts and Sky One, from 7.00pm The year’s biggest pop festival (in the absence of Glastonbury) celebrates its 50th anniversary with a line-up spanning the decades, from electro-rockers Depeche Mode to headliners The Killers. The coverage begins on Sky Arts at 7pm, with Nile Rodgers & Chic taking to the stage at 7.30pm. Kasabian will close out the first night on Sky Arts at 11pm. VP Victoria & Abdul (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Stephen Frears’ fascinating real-life tale about the extraordinary friendship between the ageing Queen Victoria (a sensational Judi Dench) and her young Muslim attendant Abdul Karim (Ali Fazal), known as “the Munshi”, is all nostalgia and inertia – a tale ablaze with historical import and contemporary resonance, reduced to commemorative biscuit tin proportions. Eddie Izzard co-stars. Mad Max (1979) ★★★★☆ ITV, 11.45pm An explosive breakthrough – literally. Improbable car stunts and pile-ups ensue as “mad” Max Rockatansky (Mel Gibson) attempts to police a dystopian Australia, where feral biker gangs rape and pillage at will. Director George Miller’s vision was “a silent movie with sound” and he drew inspiration for the film’s injuries and deaths from his time working as a doctor in a Sydney hospital. The film essentially founded Australia’s film industry. Sexy Beast (2000) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 12.10am Ben Kingsley is at his scariest in this tense and enthralling thriller as the gangster thug who wants to rob a well-guarded bank, and flies out to Spain to drag his retired associate Gary (a lobster-tanned Ray Winstone) back to work. But Gary is living a contented life with his wife (Amanda Redman) and has no intention of going back to his criminal life, forcing the two men into a battle of wills that ends in violence. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: Emmeline Pankhurst: The Making of a Militant and The Family Farm
Monday 18 June Emmeline Pankhurst: The Making of a Militant BBC Four, 7.30pm The life, times and legacy of Emmeline Pankhurst, the globally significant, inspiring and politically gifted pioneer of women’s rights, gets a rather hurried but accessible treatment. Presented by actress Sally Lindsay, the focus is on Pankhurst’s roots in Manchester and how a family background in radicalism imbued her with a deep commitment to political activism. If the characterisation of Pankhurst as “a working mum from Moss Side” doesn’t quite capture the life of upper-middle-class privilege that afforded Pankhurst the platform from which to conduct her campaigns, the depiction of her happy marriage to campaigning lawyer Dr Richard Pankhurst and busy home life give a more rounded view of her. At its best the film delivers a strong sense of Pankhurst’s genius for promoting the cause of women’s suffrage and how she came to believe that militancy – as enshrined in the slogan “deeds not words” – was the way forward when it came to challenging the intransigence of government. Contributors include her great-granddaughter Helen Pankhurst, who continues to fly the flag for women’s rights. Gerard O’Donovan Great American Railroad Journeys BBC Two, 7.00pm; not Wales In the last episode of the series, Michael Portillo foregoes the railway for a boat trip along the Saint Lawrence River before crossing the border into Canada to visit Kingston and Oshawa on the shores of Lake Ontario. GO The Family Farm BBC Two, 8.00pm Kate Humble presents this four-parter in which three families ditch the urban rat race in search of a better work-life balance and the experience of living and working on a sheep farm in Snowdonia. There’s an enjoyably competitive rivalry between the three families but the overall aim is to show just how tough and rewarding a farming life can be. GO Jamie’s Quick & Easy Food Channel 4, 8.00pm More speedily prepared five-ingredient recipes from Jamie Oliver. Here, he prepares a chorizo, salmon and artichoke bake, a tasty lamb hotpot, and a creamy chocolate affogato. GO Versailles BBC Two, 9.00pm It seems, after all, that rudimentary street lights and running water aren’t enough to keep those pesky Parisian peasants happy. As the public mood becomes ever more inflamed, King Louis’s (George Blagden) troubles deepen when news arrives that Cardinal Leto in Rome is determined to put the French king in his place. GO Snatches: Moments from Women’s Lives BBC Four, 10.00pm Royal Court Artistic Director Vicky Featherstone has curated a stellar line-up for eight 15-minute monologues exploring moments in the lives of women who have challenged the status quo. This week’s pair are Abi Morgan’s Compliance, in which Romola Garai recalls a meeting in a hotel room between an actress and a powerful producer; and Theresa Ikoko’s Outside, with Corrinne Skinner-Carter as a centenarian who is experiencing a revolution. GO Rebel Women: The Great Art Fightback BBC Four, 10.30pm This terrific documentary celebrates the grit, humour and determination of the generation of the political and provocative feminist artists who emerged, on both sides of the Atlantic, in the wake of the Sixties’ cultural revolutions. Among those featured are Judy Chicago, Margaret Harrison, Mary Kelly, Lubaina Himid, Rose English and Barbara Kruger. GO Twilight (2008) ★★★★☆ ITV2, 6.25pm Director Catherine Hardwicke (Thirteen) gets her teeth stuck into this enjoyable teenage vampire romance based on the popular Stephenie Meyer books. The heroine, Bella (Kristen Stewart), falls for a beautiful vampire, Edward (Robert Pattinson). Theirs is a touching relationship (if a slightly creepy one), but to consummate their love means they will perish. Be warned, though – the climax is surprisingly violent. Mamma Mia! (2008) ITV3, 8.00pm ★★★☆☆ This musical comedy set to Abba’s hits is pure escapism. It’s naff, but that’s its selling point, as stars Meryl Streep, Pierce Brosnan and Julie Walters place their tongues firmly in cheeks. At 59, Streep deserved more credit for doing the splits than for her role as a boho mother living on a Greek island whose daughter (Amanda Seyfried) tries to find out who her biological father is. The sequel is in cinemas on July 20. Now You See Me (2013) ★★★★☆ E4, 9.00pm A group of illusionists (Jesse Eisenberg, Woody Harrelson, Isla Fisher and Dave Franco) are encouraged to carry out a string of heists by a mysterious figure, while remaining ahead of FBI agent Rhodes (Mark Ruffalo), who is desperate to bring them to justice. Director Louis Leterrier tries to mimic the complex plots of films such as Inception, but with less success, though it’s reasonably entertaining. Tuesday 19 June The Super Squirrels Conviction: Murder in Suburbia BBC Two, 9.00pm True-crime fans will be gripped by the return of this nail-biting two-parter, which re-examines historic cases for potential miscarriages of justice. Shown on consecutive nights this week, the case in question concerns Glyn Razzell, found guilty of killing his estranged wife Linda in 2003. Despite the fact that Linda’s body has never been found, Razzell’s fuzzy alibi and some controversial forensic evidence concerning blood in the boot of Razzell’s car was enough to see him sentenced to life in prison. It’s these uncertain circumstances, along with Linda’s possible link to another known murderer, that convince Louise Shorter, head of reinvestigation charity Inside Justice, to delve into Razzell’s case anew. Aided by a panel of experts, a dogged but even-handed Shorter tests the evidence to its limits, poring over statements, pursuing witnesses and retracing steps to tie up loose ends. What makes this all so thrilling is that we’re right there alongside her, experiencing the sudden shifts from excitement to frustration as she does. Listening in on Shorter’s phone calls to a mostly composed Razzell proves particularly compelling, our sympathies swaying as he comes under scrutiny. TD The Super Squirrels BBC Two, 8.00pm The upshot of this lively look at the squirrel family is don’t underestimate the little rodents, as they burrow, climb and even fly their way across most of the globe. Keen to explore the squirrel’s skills, scientists test their subjects on a specially designed assault course. TD Trevor McDonald: Return To South Africa ITV, 9.00pm Honouring what would have been Nelson Mandela’s 100th birthday, Trevor McDonald heads for South Africa to see if its historic divisions have now been healed. In Soweto, Johannesburg, he finds evidence of a growing black middle class. Cape Town’s gulf between rich and poor, however, is still stark. TD Our Girl BBC One, 9.10pm 2-Section are in Belize as the soapy military drama continues. Riled up by criticism from Captain James (Ben Aldridge) over the death of her boyfriend Elvis, Georgie (Michelle Keegan) goes all out to prove herself in a jungle training exercise. TD A Year to Fall in Love Channel 4, 10.00pm Here’s a look at millennial dating habits, as this new show follows 20 singletons in their year-long quest for love. First, we meet performance artist Freddy, who is not a fan of apps, and 25-year-old Sophie, who is looking for a man with money. TD The Yorkshire Dales and the Lakes More4, 9.00pm The return of the warm-hearted series, which profiles those who live in the national parks. The star of the show is the rolling landscape, but its hard-working inhabitants have their own fascination, including champion sheep-breeder Arnold Lancaster, who built his farm up from nothing. TD Underfire: The Untold Story of Tony Vaccaro Sky Arts, 9.00pm A US infantryman during the Second World War, Tony Vaccaro smuggled a camera onto the battlefield and recorded its horrors in over 8,000 startling images. Here Vaccaro returns to Omaha Beach, where he landed on D-Day, while photographers discuss the impact of his work. TD The Late Late Show UK Special Sky One, 10.00pm James Corden brings his triumphant chat show home for a four-night run. The guests include Cher, Orlando Bloom, Cate Blanchett, Foo Fighters and Paul McCartney. TD Mr Smith Goes to Washington (1939, b/w) ★★★★★ TCM, 6.15pm The films of Frank Capra (It’s a Wonderful Life) are often dismissed as idealistic and sentimental. But there is another side to his work, much of which stays just the right side of the fine line that divides the American Dream from the American Nightmare. James Stewart plays a goofy country bumpkin who is shoehorned into a dead man’s shoes in the Senate. The film was nominated for 11 Oscars. Inside Man (2006) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 11.50pm This is a devilishly clever heist movie from director Spike Lee that hinges on a battle of wits between an ice-cool criminal (Clive Owen) and an unflappable hostage negotiator (Denzel Washington). The story has more twists than a Chubby Checker record but it opens with an elaborate New York bank robbery during which nothing, seemingly, is stolen. Jodie Foster, Willem Dafoe, Christopher Plummer and Chiwetel Ejiofor also star. Haywire (2011) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.05pm This slick spy thriller marked Steven Soderbergh’s 25th feature as a director. Mixed-martial-arts fighter and first-time actress Gina Carano stars as a super-soldier who’s on a mission to flush out a double agent who left her left for dead. Colleagues who fall under suspicion include her former partner (Channing Tatum), a drippy strategist (Ewan McGregor) and a dapper Irish colleague (Michael Fassbender). Wednesday 20 June Mortimer & Whitehouse: Gone Fishing Mortimer & Whitehouse: Gone Fishing BBC Two, 10.00pm The premise of this programme may sound familiar – two comedians go on a journey of discovery to beautiful locations – but, unlike Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon’s The Trip, this one features the real personalities, as opposed to fictionalised versions. Lifelong friends Paul Whitehouse and Bob Mortimer share more than a love of comedy, they have both suffered from heart disease. And so, for this funny and poignant six-part series, keen angler Whitehouse attempts to teach Mortimer, a complete novice, the peaceful art of fishing as an aid to his recovery – and maybe learn something new about each other along the way. In the first episode, they head to Norfolk to fish for tench, and there they talk candidly about everything from showbusiness to solitude and relationships. They also reveal how they recently came face to face with their own mortality. This is one of the few occasions that you get to see Mortimer and Whitehouse being themselves, without costumes and props – if you discount the fishing rods. And while there are underlying life-and-death issues in the show, its tone is celebratory, rather than mournful and is about seizing the moment. CM Mad About Elvis BBC One, 7.30pm It’s no surprise that each year tens of thousands of Elvis fans gather together to celebrate “The King”. But what is surprising is that, for the past 15 years, they have been doing so in the Welsh seaside town of Porthcawl. This documentary follows the larger-than-life characters who attend the Elvis festival, the biggest event of its kind in the world. CM The World’s Most Extraordinary Homes BBC Two, 8.00pm Some people do know how to build great homes, especially ones inspired by landscapes. Among the homes that architect Piers Taylor and actress Caroline Quentin come across in Norway for this series including a retreat that’s perched on rocks. CM Secrets of McDonalds: 50 Years of the Big Mac Channel 5, 9.00pm It’s hard to believe but that simple double burger from McDonald’s is 50 years old. To mark the occasion, this film takes a nostalgic look at the fast-food chain’s history, from its Californian origins to what it is today – the world’s largest restaurant chain, serving 69 million people daily. CM Britain’s Refugee Children Channel 4, 10.00pm Each year, a number of the world’s displaced and dispossessed people seek refuge in the UK. This film follows the progress of six refugee children over six months as they adapt to new lives in Cardiff and Newport. CM Hollywood Couples Sky Arts, 9.00pm As Hollywood love affairs go, Robert Taylor and Barbara Stanwyck’s got off to an intriguing start: they met on a blind date in 1936, where there was mutual attraction. But the film studio MGM did not want Taylor to be in a relationship at that time. They later changed their minds, and Taylor and Stanwyck’s union effectively became an arranged marriage. This enlightening film explores how, despite a series of affairs by Taylor, the union lasted for 12 years, and why it wasn’t a marriage of equals – Stanwyck called Taylor “Junior”, he called her “The Queen”. CM Big Beast: Last of the Giants Sky One, 9.00pm In some areas of life, size matters, but none more so than in the animal world. For this three-part series, biologist Patrick Aryee gets up close to some of the world’s largest creatures to explore why they evolved into giants. He begins by meeting a venomous Komodo dragon, the largest living lizard, armed only with small stick. CM The Abyss (1989) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.15pm Long before Avatar, James Cameron was cooking up innovative special effects for this sci-fi adventure in which oil rig workers (including Ed Harris and Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio) explore a marooned nuclear submarine. The ending seems tacked on from another movie, but Cameron makes up for it with some spectacular underwater action scenes – proof that effects can stay “special” if they’re imaginatively used. Memphis Belle (1990) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm It’s 1943, and the handsome American crew of Second World War B-17 bomber Memphis Belle, who are stationed in England, are anticipating their final mission – to fly over Nazi-occupied Europe. Full of nostalgia, this loosely based-on-real-events story exudes a romanticised view of heroism, but features an endearing cast, including Billy Zane, Sean Astin, John Lithgow, Eric Stoltz, and Harry Connick Jr. Looking for Eric (2009) ★★★★☆ London Live, 11.15pm Ken Loach plays a blinder with this affable study of a depressed postman (Steve Evets) who sorts his life out with the help of his imaginary mentor and idol Eric Cantona (playing himself). It’s not Loach’s most political work but it’s definitely one of his sunniest and funniest film. Evets and his postie pals, including the wonderful Meatballs (John Henshaw), keep the laughs coming, sending you away with daft grins on our faces. Thursday 21 June Outlander The Murder of Rhys Jones: Police Tapes ITV, 9.00pm Anyone who watched Jeff Pope’s hard-hitting drama series Little Boy Blue last year, based on the investigation into the murder of 11-year-old Rhys Jones in Liverpool on 22 August 2007, will know just how tragic and disturbing the circumstances surrounding this case were. Rhys, on his way home from football practice, was hit by a stray bullet and died when a teenager on a bicycle started shooting at rival gang members across a car park in Croxteth. To compound the horror, a veil of silence descended on the area as the youths involved, and in some cases their parents, conspired to conceal their identities by intimidating all around them. The only recourse open to investigating officers was to plant listening devices in the homes of the prime suspects in the hope that somehow, they would incriminate themselves. But that was only beginning. Here, presenter Susanna Reid gains unique access to the recordings, in which those responsible admit their part and the lengths they would go to cover up the crime. She also talks to Rhys’s parents, Mel and Steve Jones, about the impact their son’s murder has had on their lives. GO Supershoppers Channel 4, 8.00pm This week’s edition of the consumer show reveals how takeaway coffee from a machine often costs more than one made by a barista, plus how to track down the energy deals hidden by cost comparison sites. Hosts Anna Richardson and Sabrina Grant also explore whether whitening toothpastes really work. GO Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm It’s the last show of the series as Fred Sirieix showcases two more food businesses seeking investment: Naked Dough, a vegan-friendly pop-up in need of a permanent base; and Black Bear Burger, whose owners, already doing well enough to leave their day jobs behind, are looking for the funds to scale up. GO Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm There’s been some terrific drama already in this third series, and that continues in this episode as Laura (Katherine Parkinson) is forced to act quickly when synth Mia’s (Gemma Chan) speech at the commission provokes a shocking attack. GO The Double Life of George Michael Channel 5, 9.00pm This documentary examines the life of the hugely successful and famously generous pop star, and how he spent much of his life battling inner demons prior to early death in 2016. It’s followed at 11.05pm by The Nation’s Favourite George Michael Song. GO The Killers Live at the Royal Albert Hall Sky Arts, 9.00pm Brandon Flowers and his band got an ecstatic reception when they rocked the Royal Albert Hall in July 2009 during their tour of their third album Day & Age. This concert was recorded over two nights, and all of their hits up to that point feature in the set, including Somebody Told Me, When You Were Young, All These Things That I’ve Done and, of course, Mr Brightside. GO Outlander More4, 9.00pm The setting of this Celtic time-travel fantasy has moved firmly over to France, as the second series progresses. Now the Frasers have settled into high society in Paris and Jamie (Sam Heughan) gets a chance, at last, to infiltrate Jacobite circles when he gets an introduction to Bonnie Prince Charlie. Claire (Caitriona Balfe), meanwhile, gets a shock when she meets members of the Duke of Sandringham’s household and realises that an old enemy, presumed dead, may be alive after all. GO North to Alaska (1960) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.00pm “You just can’t trust women. No matter how honest they act, they all want to be wives,” cautions John Wayne in this rather silly western set during the gold rush. After finding gold, Wayne goes to fetch his partner’s fiancée from Seattle, only to find her married to someone else. So he returns with Angel (Capucine), a prostitute, instead. Inevitably, our hero falls for the beguiling lady. Stewart Granger co-stars. X-Men: The Last Stand (2006) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.55pm The third film in the superhero series sees director Brett Ratner take over the reins of the Marvel Comics franchise. When a cure for the mutants is invented, a war breaks out between them and humanity. This isn’t the trilogy’s high point, but that said, Hugh Jackman plays Wolverine to perfection, plus the special effects and dramatic set pieces definitely impress. The Bodyguard (1992) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.00pm Former Secret Service agent Frank Farmer (Kevin Costner) plays bodyguard to pop singer Rachel Marron (Whitney Houston), though he’s more used to protecting presidents than superstars. Sparks fly and security is compromised, but when a stalker gets serious, the job comes first. Houston’s fine soundtrack adds to the film’s emotional theatricality. The soundtrack album has become the fifth bestselling album of all time. Friday 22 June Cruising With Jane McDonald The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Screenwriter Hans Rosenfeldt still has a couple of tasks to complete in the final two episodes of his superior, if at times preposterous, Scandi-thriller, before it bows out for good next week. The over-arching riddle since Henrik Sabroe (Thure Lindhardt) joined the Danish cop shop in series three is what happened to his two daughters, who’d gone missing eight years ago.In tonight’s penultimate episode that question is answered at last, and of course it’s Henrik’s colleague and sometime lover, on-the-spectrum brainbox Saga Norén (Sofia Helin), who figures it out. But as we’ve seen over nearly four series of grisly murder, Rosenfeldt can’t usually be relied on for a happy ending. Then Rosenfeldt’s second task is having Saga figure out who’s killing people using the same methods deployed in government executions (stoning, electrocution, et al) before she becomes the next victim. Tonight, fans will be cheered to see Saga – so often a forlorn, misunderstood character – make solid progress in both the case and in therapy, which bodes well for her future. But this isn’t a cosy relationship drama, and rest assured there are lurid shocks that set us up for next week’s finale. VP The Crystal Maze Channel 4, 9.00pm This star-laden edition of the action game show sees Countdown’s maths genius Rachel Riley in a polite power struggle with skipper Judy Murray, mother of Andy, as she tries to dominate the decision-making. It adds a frisson to the proceedings that also include ex-footballer Wayne Bridge and Paralympian David Weir. VP Cruising with Jane McDonald Channel 5, 9.00pm In this first of a boozy two-parter set in South America, chanteuse Jane McDonald boards another cruise ship and samples Pisco sours and drinks whisky chilled by glacier ice. VP The Last Leg Channel 4, 10.00pm What started off as a spin-off for the 2012 Paralympics has rightly become a Friday night institution. Host Adam Hills returns to marshal the mix of silliness and satire that characterise this comedy chat show, aided by Alex Brooker, Josh Widdicombe and a gaggle of up-for-it celebrity guests. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.45pm Graham Norton will be kept on his toes as Cher graces his sofa for the first time in five years, with her suffer-no-fools attitude. She is joined by her Mamma Mia! co-star Christine Baranski. Also on the final live show of the series are Rupert Everett and Game of Thrones’ Natalie Dormer. VP Marvel’s Luke Cage Netflix, from today Superheroes have become a tiresome constant in film and on TV, but this action series, with a soulful black champion at its centre, is a welcome addition to the genre. Mike Colter returns for a second series as the pumped-up, titular New York action man. In the first episode he deals with the ramifications of last season’s climax in which he triumphed over evil but lost his anonymity. Now he’s being pestered for selfies as he tries to figure out his next move in an opening episode that’s directed by actress Lucy Liu. VP Isle of Wight Festival 2018 Sky Arts and Sky One, from 7.00pm The year’s biggest pop festival (in the absence of Glastonbury) celebrates its 50th anniversary with a line-up spanning the decades, from electro-rockers Depeche Mode to headliners The Killers. The coverage begins on Sky Arts at 7pm, with Nile Rodgers & Chic taking to the stage at 7.30pm. Kasabian will close out the first night on Sky Arts at 11pm. VP Victoria & Abdul (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Stephen Frears’ fascinating real-life tale about the extraordinary friendship between the ageing Queen Victoria (a sensational Judi Dench) and her young Muslim attendant Abdul Karim (Ali Fazal), known as “the Munshi”, is all nostalgia and inertia – a tale ablaze with historical import and contemporary resonance, reduced to commemorative biscuit tin proportions. Eddie Izzard co-stars. Mad Max (1979) ★★★★☆ ITV, 11.45pm An explosive breakthrough – literally. Improbable car stunts and pile-ups ensue as “mad” Max Rockatansky (Mel Gibson) attempts to police a dystopian Australia, where feral biker gangs rape and pillage at will. Director George Miller’s vision was “a silent movie with sound” and he drew inspiration for the film’s injuries and deaths from his time working as a doctor in a Sydney hospital. The film essentially founded Australia’s film industry. Sexy Beast (2000) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 12.10am Ben Kingsley is at his scariest in this tense and enthralling thriller as the gangster thug who wants to rob a well-guarded bank, and flies out to Spain to drag his retired associate Gary (a lobster-tanned Ray Winstone) back to work. But Gary is living a contented life with his wife (Amanda Redman) and has no intention of going back to his criminal life, forcing the two men into a battle of wills that ends in violence. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
Monday 18 June Emmeline Pankhurst: The Making of a Militant BBC Four, 7.30pm The life, times and legacy of Emmeline Pankhurst, the globally significant, inspiring and politically gifted pioneer of women’s rights, gets a rather hurried but accessible treatment. Presented by actress Sally Lindsay, the focus is on Pankhurst’s roots in Manchester and how a family background in radicalism imbued her with a deep commitment to political activism. If the characterisation of Pankhurst as “a working mum from Moss Side” doesn’t quite capture the life of upper-middle-class privilege that afforded Pankhurst the platform from which to conduct her campaigns, the depiction of her happy marriage to campaigning lawyer Dr Richard Pankhurst and busy home life give a more rounded view of her. At its best the film delivers a strong sense of Pankhurst’s genius for promoting the cause of women’s suffrage and how she came to believe that militancy – as enshrined in the slogan “deeds not words” – was the way forward when it came to challenging the intransigence of government. Contributors include her great-granddaughter Helen Pankhurst, who continues to fly the flag for women’s rights. Gerard O’Donovan Great American Railroad Journeys BBC Two, 7.00pm; not Wales In the last episode of the series, Michael Portillo foregoes the railway for a boat trip along the Saint Lawrence River before crossing the border into Canada to visit Kingston and Oshawa on the shores of Lake Ontario. GO The Family Farm BBC Two, 8.00pm Kate Humble presents this four-parter in which three families ditch the urban rat race in search of a better work-life balance and the experience of living and working on a sheep farm in Snowdonia. There’s an enjoyably competitive rivalry between the three families but the overall aim is to show just how tough and rewarding a farming life can be. GO Jamie’s Quick & Easy Food Channel 4, 8.00pm More speedily prepared five-ingredient recipes from Jamie Oliver. Here, he prepares a chorizo, salmon and artichoke bake, a tasty lamb hotpot, and a creamy chocolate affogato. GO Versailles BBC Two, 9.00pm It seems, after all, that rudimentary street lights and running water aren’t enough to keep those pesky Parisian peasants happy. As the public mood becomes ever more inflamed, King Louis’s (George Blagden) troubles deepen when news arrives that Cardinal Leto in Rome is determined to put the French king in his place. GO Snatches: Moments from Women’s Lives BBC Four, 10.00pm Royal Court Artistic Director Vicky Featherstone has curated a stellar line-up for eight 15-minute monologues exploring moments in the lives of women who have challenged the status quo. This week’s pair are Abi Morgan’s Compliance, in which Romola Garai recalls a meeting in a hotel room between an actress and a powerful producer; and Theresa Ikoko’s Outside, with Corrinne Skinner-Carter as a centenarian who is experiencing a revolution. GO Rebel Women: The Great Art Fightback BBC Four, 10.30pm This terrific documentary celebrates the grit, humour and determination of the generation of the political and provocative feminist artists who emerged, on both sides of the Atlantic, in the wake of the Sixties’ cultural revolutions. Among those featured are Judy Chicago, Margaret Harrison, Mary Kelly, Lubaina Himid, Rose English and Barbara Kruger. GO Twilight (2008) ★★★★☆ ITV2, 6.25pm Director Catherine Hardwicke (Thirteen) gets her teeth stuck into this enjoyable teenage vampire romance based on the popular Stephenie Meyer books. The heroine, Bella (Kristen Stewart), falls for a beautiful vampire, Edward (Robert Pattinson). Theirs is a touching relationship (if a slightly creepy one), but to consummate their love means they will perish. Be warned, though – the climax is surprisingly violent. Mamma Mia! (2008) ITV3, 8.00pm ★★★☆☆ This musical comedy set to Abba’s hits is pure escapism. It’s naff, but that’s its selling point, as stars Meryl Streep, Pierce Brosnan and Julie Walters place their tongues firmly in cheeks. At 59, Streep deserved more credit for doing the splits than for her role as a boho mother living on a Greek island whose daughter (Amanda Seyfried) tries to find out who her biological father is. The sequel is in cinemas on July 20. Now You See Me (2013) ★★★★☆ E4, 9.00pm A group of illusionists (Jesse Eisenberg, Woody Harrelson, Isla Fisher and Dave Franco) are encouraged to carry out a string of heists by a mysterious figure, while remaining ahead of FBI agent Rhodes (Mark Ruffalo), who is desperate to bring them to justice. Director Louis Leterrier tries to mimic the complex plots of films such as Inception, but with less success, though it’s reasonably entertaining. Tuesday 19 June The Super Squirrels Conviction: Murder in Suburbia BBC Two, 9.00pm True-crime fans will be gripped by the return of this nail-biting two-parter, which re-examines historic cases for potential miscarriages of justice. Shown on consecutive nights this week, the case in question concerns Glyn Razzell, found guilty of killing his estranged wife Linda in 2003. Despite the fact that Linda’s body has never been found, Razzell’s fuzzy alibi and some controversial forensic evidence concerning blood in the boot of Razzell’s car was enough to see him sentenced to life in prison. It’s these uncertain circumstances, along with Linda’s possible link to another known murderer, that convince Louise Shorter, head of reinvestigation charity Inside Justice, to delve into Razzell’s case anew. Aided by a panel of experts, a dogged but even-handed Shorter tests the evidence to its limits, poring over statements, pursuing witnesses and retracing steps to tie up loose ends. What makes this all so thrilling is that we’re right there alongside her, experiencing the sudden shifts from excitement to frustration as she does. Listening in on Shorter’s phone calls to a mostly composed Razzell proves particularly compelling, our sympathies swaying as he comes under scrutiny. TD The Super Squirrels BBC Two, 8.00pm The upshot of this lively look at the squirrel family is don’t underestimate the little rodents, as they burrow, climb and even fly their way across most of the globe. Keen to explore the squirrel’s skills, scientists test their subjects on a specially designed assault course. TD Trevor McDonald: Return To South Africa ITV, 9.00pm Honouring what would have been Nelson Mandela’s 100th birthday, Trevor McDonald heads for South Africa to see if its historic divisions have now been healed. In Soweto, Johannesburg, he finds evidence of a growing black middle class. Cape Town’s gulf between rich and poor, however, is still stark. TD Our Girl BBC One, 9.10pm 2-Section are in Belize as the soapy military drama continues. Riled up by criticism from Captain James (Ben Aldridge) over the death of her boyfriend Elvis, Georgie (Michelle Keegan) goes all out to prove herself in a jungle training exercise. TD A Year to Fall in Love Channel 4, 10.00pm Here’s a look at millennial dating habits, as this new show follows 20 singletons in their year-long quest for love. First, we meet performance artist Freddy, who is not a fan of apps, and 25-year-old Sophie, who is looking for a man with money. TD The Yorkshire Dales and the Lakes More4, 9.00pm The return of the warm-hearted series, which profiles those who live in the national parks. The star of the show is the rolling landscape, but its hard-working inhabitants have their own fascination, including champion sheep-breeder Arnold Lancaster, who built his farm up from nothing. TD Underfire: The Untold Story of Tony Vaccaro Sky Arts, 9.00pm A US infantryman during the Second World War, Tony Vaccaro smuggled a camera onto the battlefield and recorded its horrors in over 8,000 startling images. Here Vaccaro returns to Omaha Beach, where he landed on D-Day, while photographers discuss the impact of his work. TD The Late Late Show UK Special Sky One, 10.00pm James Corden brings his triumphant chat show home for a four-night run. The guests include Cher, Orlando Bloom, Cate Blanchett, Foo Fighters and Paul McCartney. TD Mr Smith Goes to Washington (1939, b/w) ★★★★★ TCM, 6.15pm The films of Frank Capra (It’s a Wonderful Life) are often dismissed as idealistic and sentimental. But there is another side to his work, much of which stays just the right side of the fine line that divides the American Dream from the American Nightmare. James Stewart plays a goofy country bumpkin who is shoehorned into a dead man’s shoes in the Senate. The film was nominated for 11 Oscars. Inside Man (2006) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 11.50pm This is a devilishly clever heist movie from director Spike Lee that hinges on a battle of wits between an ice-cool criminal (Clive Owen) and an unflappable hostage negotiator (Denzel Washington). The story has more twists than a Chubby Checker record but it opens with an elaborate New York bank robbery during which nothing, seemingly, is stolen. Jodie Foster, Willem Dafoe, Christopher Plummer and Chiwetel Ejiofor also star. Haywire (2011) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.05pm This slick spy thriller marked Steven Soderbergh’s 25th feature as a director. Mixed-martial-arts fighter and first-time actress Gina Carano stars as a super-soldier who’s on a mission to flush out a double agent who left her left for dead. Colleagues who fall under suspicion include her former partner (Channing Tatum), a drippy strategist (Ewan McGregor) and a dapper Irish colleague (Michael Fassbender). Wednesday 20 June Mortimer & Whitehouse: Gone Fishing Mortimer & Whitehouse: Gone Fishing BBC Two, 10.00pm The premise of this programme may sound familiar – two comedians go on a journey of discovery to beautiful locations – but, unlike Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon’s The Trip, this one features the real personalities, as opposed to fictionalised versions. Lifelong friends Paul Whitehouse and Bob Mortimer share more than a love of comedy, they have both suffered from heart disease. And so, for this funny and poignant six-part series, keen angler Whitehouse attempts to teach Mortimer, a complete novice, the peaceful art of fishing as an aid to his recovery – and maybe learn something new about each other along the way. In the first episode, they head to Norfolk to fish for tench, and there they talk candidly about everything from showbusiness to solitude and relationships. They also reveal how they recently came face to face with their own mortality. This is one of the few occasions that you get to see Mortimer and Whitehouse being themselves, without costumes and props – if you discount the fishing rods. And while there are underlying life-and-death issues in the show, its tone is celebratory, rather than mournful and is about seizing the moment. CM Mad About Elvis BBC One, 7.30pm It’s no surprise that each year tens of thousands of Elvis fans gather together to celebrate “The King”. But what is surprising is that, for the past 15 years, they have been doing so in the Welsh seaside town of Porthcawl. This documentary follows the larger-than-life characters who attend the Elvis festival, the biggest event of its kind in the world. CM The World’s Most Extraordinary Homes BBC Two, 8.00pm Some people do know how to build great homes, especially ones inspired by landscapes. Among the homes that architect Piers Taylor and actress Caroline Quentin come across in Norway for this series including a retreat that’s perched on rocks. CM Secrets of McDonalds: 50 Years of the Big Mac Channel 5, 9.00pm It’s hard to believe but that simple double burger from McDonald’s is 50 years old. To mark the occasion, this film takes a nostalgic look at the fast-food chain’s history, from its Californian origins to what it is today – the world’s largest restaurant chain, serving 69 million people daily. CM Britain’s Refugee Children Channel 4, 10.00pm Each year, a number of the world’s displaced and dispossessed people seek refuge in the UK. This film follows the progress of six refugee children over six months as they adapt to new lives in Cardiff and Newport. CM Hollywood Couples Sky Arts, 9.00pm As Hollywood love affairs go, Robert Taylor and Barbara Stanwyck’s got off to an intriguing start: they met on a blind date in 1936, where there was mutual attraction. But the film studio MGM did not want Taylor to be in a relationship at that time. They later changed their minds, and Taylor and Stanwyck’s union effectively became an arranged marriage. This enlightening film explores how, despite a series of affairs by Taylor, the union lasted for 12 years, and why it wasn’t a marriage of equals – Stanwyck called Taylor “Junior”, he called her “The Queen”. CM Big Beast: Last of the Giants Sky One, 9.00pm In some areas of life, size matters, but none more so than in the animal world. For this three-part series, biologist Patrick Aryee gets up close to some of the world’s largest creatures to explore why they evolved into giants. He begins by meeting a venomous Komodo dragon, the largest living lizard, armed only with small stick. CM The Abyss (1989) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.15pm Long before Avatar, James Cameron was cooking up innovative special effects for this sci-fi adventure in which oil rig workers (including Ed Harris and Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio) explore a marooned nuclear submarine. The ending seems tacked on from another movie, but Cameron makes up for it with some spectacular underwater action scenes – proof that effects can stay “special” if they’re imaginatively used. Memphis Belle (1990) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm It’s 1943, and the handsome American crew of Second World War B-17 bomber Memphis Belle, who are stationed in England, are anticipating their final mission – to fly over Nazi-occupied Europe. Full of nostalgia, this loosely based-on-real-events story exudes a romanticised view of heroism, but features an endearing cast, including Billy Zane, Sean Astin, John Lithgow, Eric Stoltz, and Harry Connick Jr. Looking for Eric (2009) ★★★★☆ London Live, 11.15pm Ken Loach plays a blinder with this affable study of a depressed postman (Steve Evets) who sorts his life out with the help of his imaginary mentor and idol Eric Cantona (playing himself). It’s not Loach’s most political work but it’s definitely one of his sunniest and funniest film. Evets and his postie pals, including the wonderful Meatballs (John Henshaw), keep the laughs coming, sending you away with daft grins on our faces. Thursday 21 June Outlander The Murder of Rhys Jones: Police Tapes ITV, 9.00pm Anyone who watched Jeff Pope’s hard-hitting drama series Little Boy Blue last year, based on the investigation into the murder of 11-year-old Rhys Jones in Liverpool on 22 August 2007, will know just how tragic and disturbing the circumstances surrounding this case were. Rhys, on his way home from football practice, was hit by a stray bullet and died when a teenager on a bicycle started shooting at rival gang members across a car park in Croxteth. To compound the horror, a veil of silence descended on the area as the youths involved, and in some cases their parents, conspired to conceal their identities by intimidating all around them. The only recourse open to investigating officers was to plant listening devices in the homes of the prime suspects in the hope that somehow, they would incriminate themselves. But that was only beginning. Here, presenter Susanna Reid gains unique access to the recordings, in which those responsible admit their part and the lengths they would go to cover up the crime. She also talks to Rhys’s parents, Mel and Steve Jones, about the impact their son’s murder has had on their lives. GO Supershoppers Channel 4, 8.00pm This week’s edition of the consumer show reveals how takeaway coffee from a machine often costs more than one made by a barista, plus how to track down the energy deals hidden by cost comparison sites. Hosts Anna Richardson and Sabrina Grant also explore whether whitening toothpastes really work. GO Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm It’s the last show of the series as Fred Sirieix showcases two more food businesses seeking investment: Naked Dough, a vegan-friendly pop-up in need of a permanent base; and Black Bear Burger, whose owners, already doing well enough to leave their day jobs behind, are looking for the funds to scale up. GO Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm There’s been some terrific drama already in this third series, and that continues in this episode as Laura (Katherine Parkinson) is forced to act quickly when synth Mia’s (Gemma Chan) speech at the commission provokes a shocking attack. GO The Double Life of George Michael Channel 5, 9.00pm This documentary examines the life of the hugely successful and famously generous pop star, and how he spent much of his life battling inner demons prior to early death in 2016. It’s followed at 11.05pm by The Nation’s Favourite George Michael Song. GO The Killers Live at the Royal Albert Hall Sky Arts, 9.00pm Brandon Flowers and his band got an ecstatic reception when they rocked the Royal Albert Hall in July 2009 during their tour of their third album Day & Age. This concert was recorded over two nights, and all of their hits up to that point feature in the set, including Somebody Told Me, When You Were Young, All These Things That I’ve Done and, of course, Mr Brightside. GO Outlander More4, 9.00pm The setting of this Celtic time-travel fantasy has moved firmly over to France, as the second series progresses. Now the Frasers have settled into high society in Paris and Jamie (Sam Heughan) gets a chance, at last, to infiltrate Jacobite circles when he gets an introduction to Bonnie Prince Charlie. Claire (Caitriona Balfe), meanwhile, gets a shock when she meets members of the Duke of Sandringham’s household and realises that an old enemy, presumed dead, may be alive after all. GO North to Alaska (1960) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.00pm “You just can’t trust women. No matter how honest they act, they all want to be wives,” cautions John Wayne in this rather silly western set during the gold rush. After finding gold, Wayne goes to fetch his partner’s fiancée from Seattle, only to find her married to someone else. So he returns with Angel (Capucine), a prostitute, instead. Inevitably, our hero falls for the beguiling lady. Stewart Granger co-stars. X-Men: The Last Stand (2006) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.55pm The third film in the superhero series sees director Brett Ratner take over the reins of the Marvel Comics franchise. When a cure for the mutants is invented, a war breaks out between them and humanity. This isn’t the trilogy’s high point, but that said, Hugh Jackman plays Wolverine to perfection, plus the special effects and dramatic set pieces definitely impress. The Bodyguard (1992) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.00pm Former Secret Service agent Frank Farmer (Kevin Costner) plays bodyguard to pop singer Rachel Marron (Whitney Houston), though he’s more used to protecting presidents than superstars. Sparks fly and security is compromised, but when a stalker gets serious, the job comes first. Houston’s fine soundtrack adds to the film’s emotional theatricality. The soundtrack album has become the fifth bestselling album of all time. Friday 22 June Cruising With Jane McDonald The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Screenwriter Hans Rosenfeldt still has a couple of tasks to complete in the final two episodes of his superior, if at times preposterous, Scandi-thriller, before it bows out for good next week. The over-arching riddle since Henrik Sabroe (Thure Lindhardt) joined the Danish cop shop in series three is what happened to his two daughters, who’d gone missing eight years ago.In tonight’s penultimate episode that question is answered at last, and of course it’s Henrik’s colleague and sometime lover, on-the-spectrum brainbox Saga Norén (Sofia Helin), who figures it out. But as we’ve seen over nearly four series of grisly murder, Rosenfeldt can’t usually be relied on for a happy ending. Then Rosenfeldt’s second task is having Saga figure out who’s killing people using the same methods deployed in government executions (stoning, electrocution, et al) before she becomes the next victim. Tonight, fans will be cheered to see Saga – so often a forlorn, misunderstood character – make solid progress in both the case and in therapy, which bodes well for her future. But this isn’t a cosy relationship drama, and rest assured there are lurid shocks that set us up for next week’s finale. VP The Crystal Maze Channel 4, 9.00pm This star-laden edition of the action game show sees Countdown’s maths genius Rachel Riley in a polite power struggle with skipper Judy Murray, mother of Andy, as she tries to dominate the decision-making. It adds a frisson to the proceedings that also include ex-footballer Wayne Bridge and Paralympian David Weir. VP Cruising with Jane McDonald Channel 5, 9.00pm In this first of a boozy two-parter set in South America, chanteuse Jane McDonald boards another cruise ship and samples Pisco sours and drinks whisky chilled by glacier ice. VP The Last Leg Channel 4, 10.00pm What started off as a spin-off for the 2012 Paralympics has rightly become a Friday night institution. Host Adam Hills returns to marshal the mix of silliness and satire that characterise this comedy chat show, aided by Alex Brooker, Josh Widdicombe and a gaggle of up-for-it celebrity guests. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.45pm Graham Norton will be kept on his toes as Cher graces his sofa for the first time in five years, with her suffer-no-fools attitude. She is joined by her Mamma Mia! co-star Christine Baranski. Also on the final live show of the series are Rupert Everett and Game of Thrones’ Natalie Dormer. VP Marvel’s Luke Cage Netflix, from today Superheroes have become a tiresome constant in film and on TV, but this action series, with a soulful black champion at its centre, is a welcome addition to the genre. Mike Colter returns for a second series as the pumped-up, titular New York action man. In the first episode he deals with the ramifications of last season’s climax in which he triumphed over evil but lost his anonymity. Now he’s being pestered for selfies as he tries to figure out his next move in an opening episode that’s directed by actress Lucy Liu. VP Isle of Wight Festival 2018 Sky Arts and Sky One, from 7.00pm The year’s biggest pop festival (in the absence of Glastonbury) celebrates its 50th anniversary with a line-up spanning the decades, from electro-rockers Depeche Mode to headliners The Killers. The coverage begins on Sky Arts at 7pm, with Nile Rodgers & Chic taking to the stage at 7.30pm. Kasabian will close out the first night on Sky Arts at 11pm. VP Victoria & Abdul (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Stephen Frears’ fascinating real-life tale about the extraordinary friendship between the ageing Queen Victoria (a sensational Judi Dench) and her young Muslim attendant Abdul Karim (Ali Fazal), known as “the Munshi”, is all nostalgia and inertia – a tale ablaze with historical import and contemporary resonance, reduced to commemorative biscuit tin proportions. Eddie Izzard co-stars. Mad Max (1979) ★★★★☆ ITV, 11.45pm An explosive breakthrough – literally. Improbable car stunts and pile-ups ensue as “mad” Max Rockatansky (Mel Gibson) attempts to police a dystopian Australia, where feral biker gangs rape and pillage at will. Director George Miller’s vision was “a silent movie with sound” and he drew inspiration for the film’s injuries and deaths from his time working as a doctor in a Sydney hospital. The film essentially founded Australia’s film industry. Sexy Beast (2000) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 12.10am Ben Kingsley is at his scariest in this tense and enthralling thriller as the gangster thug who wants to rob a well-guarded bank, and flies out to Spain to drag his retired associate Gary (a lobster-tanned Ray Winstone) back to work. But Gary is living a contented life with his wife (Amanda Redman) and has no intention of going back to his criminal life, forcing the two men into a battle of wills that ends in violence. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: Emmeline Pankhurst: The Making of a Militant and The Family Farm
Monday 18 June Emmeline Pankhurst: The Making of a Militant BBC Four, 7.30pm The life, times and legacy of Emmeline Pankhurst, the globally significant, inspiring and politically gifted pioneer of women’s rights, gets a rather hurried but accessible treatment. Presented by actress Sally Lindsay, the focus is on Pankhurst’s roots in Manchester and how a family background in radicalism imbued her with a deep commitment to political activism. If the characterisation of Pankhurst as “a working mum from Moss Side” doesn’t quite capture the life of upper-middle-class privilege that afforded Pankhurst the platform from which to conduct her campaigns, the depiction of her happy marriage to campaigning lawyer Dr Richard Pankhurst and busy home life give a more rounded view of her. At its best the film delivers a strong sense of Pankhurst’s genius for promoting the cause of women’s suffrage and how she came to believe that militancy – as enshrined in the slogan “deeds not words” – was the way forward when it came to challenging the intransigence of government. Contributors include her great-granddaughter Helen Pankhurst, who continues to fly the flag for women’s rights. Gerard O’Donovan Great American Railroad Journeys BBC Two, 7.00pm; not Wales In the last episode of the series, Michael Portillo foregoes the railway for a boat trip along the Saint Lawrence River before crossing the border into Canada to visit Kingston and Oshawa on the shores of Lake Ontario. GO The Family Farm BBC Two, 8.00pm Kate Humble presents this four-parter in which three families ditch the urban rat race in search of a better work-life balance and the experience of living and working on a sheep farm in Snowdonia. There’s an enjoyably competitive rivalry between the three families but the overall aim is to show just how tough and rewarding a farming life can be. GO Jamie’s Quick & Easy Food Channel 4, 8.00pm More speedily prepared five-ingredient recipes from Jamie Oliver. Here, he prepares a chorizo, salmon and artichoke bake, a tasty lamb hotpot, and a creamy chocolate affogato. GO Versailles BBC Two, 9.00pm It seems, after all, that rudimentary street lights and running water aren’t enough to keep those pesky Parisian peasants happy. As the public mood becomes ever more inflamed, King Louis’s (George Blagden) troubles deepen when news arrives that Cardinal Leto in Rome is determined to put the French king in his place. GO Snatches: Moments from Women’s Lives BBC Four, 10.00pm Royal Court Artistic Director Vicky Featherstone has curated a stellar line-up for eight 15-minute monologues exploring moments in the lives of women who have challenged the status quo. This week’s pair are Abi Morgan’s Compliance, in which Romola Garai recalls a meeting in a hotel room between an actress and a powerful producer; and Theresa Ikoko’s Outside, with Corrinne Skinner-Carter as a centenarian who is experiencing a revolution. GO Rebel Women: The Great Art Fightback BBC Four, 10.30pm This terrific documentary celebrates the grit, humour and determination of the generation of the political and provocative feminist artists who emerged, on both sides of the Atlantic, in the wake of the Sixties’ cultural revolutions. Among those featured are Judy Chicago, Margaret Harrison, Mary Kelly, Lubaina Himid, Rose English and Barbara Kruger. GO Twilight (2008) ★★★★☆ ITV2, 6.25pm Director Catherine Hardwicke (Thirteen) gets her teeth stuck into this enjoyable teenage vampire romance based on the popular Stephenie Meyer books. The heroine, Bella (Kristen Stewart), falls for a beautiful vampire, Edward (Robert Pattinson). Theirs is a touching relationship (if a slightly creepy one), but to consummate their love means they will perish. Be warned, though – the climax is surprisingly violent. Mamma Mia! (2008) ITV3, 8.00pm ★★★☆☆ This musical comedy set to Abba’s hits is pure escapism. It’s naff, but that’s its selling point, as stars Meryl Streep, Pierce Brosnan and Julie Walters place their tongues firmly in cheeks. At 59, Streep deserved more credit for doing the splits than for her role as a boho mother living on a Greek island whose daughter (Amanda Seyfried) tries to find out who her biological father is. The sequel is in cinemas on July 20. Now You See Me (2013) ★★★★☆ E4, 9.00pm A group of illusionists (Jesse Eisenberg, Woody Harrelson, Isla Fisher and Dave Franco) are encouraged to carry out a string of heists by a mysterious figure, while remaining ahead of FBI agent Rhodes (Mark Ruffalo), who is desperate to bring them to justice. Director Louis Leterrier tries to mimic the complex plots of films such as Inception, but with less success, though it’s reasonably entertaining. Tuesday 19 June The Super Squirrels Conviction: Murder in Suburbia BBC Two, 9.00pm True-crime fans will be gripped by the return of this nail-biting two-parter, which re-examines historic cases for potential miscarriages of justice. Shown on consecutive nights this week, the case in question concerns Glyn Razzell, found guilty of killing his estranged wife Linda in 2003. Despite the fact that Linda’s body has never been found, Razzell’s fuzzy alibi and some controversial forensic evidence concerning blood in the boot of Razzell’s car was enough to see him sentenced to life in prison. It’s these uncertain circumstances, along with Linda’s possible link to another known murderer, that convince Louise Shorter, head of reinvestigation charity Inside Justice, to delve into Razzell’s case anew. Aided by a panel of experts, a dogged but even-handed Shorter tests the evidence to its limits, poring over statements, pursuing witnesses and retracing steps to tie up loose ends. What makes this all so thrilling is that we’re right there alongside her, experiencing the sudden shifts from excitement to frustration as she does. Listening in on Shorter’s phone calls to a mostly composed Razzell proves particularly compelling, our sympathies swaying as he comes under scrutiny. TD The Super Squirrels BBC Two, 8.00pm The upshot of this lively look at the squirrel family is don’t underestimate the little rodents, as they burrow, climb and even fly their way across most of the globe. Keen to explore the squirrel’s skills, scientists test their subjects on a specially designed assault course. TD Trevor McDonald: Return To South Africa ITV, 9.00pm Honouring what would have been Nelson Mandela’s 100th birthday, Trevor McDonald heads for South Africa to see if its historic divisions have now been healed. In Soweto, Johannesburg, he finds evidence of a growing black middle class. Cape Town’s gulf between rich and poor, however, is still stark. TD Our Girl BBC One, 9.10pm 2-Section are in Belize as the soapy military drama continues. Riled up by criticism from Captain James (Ben Aldridge) over the death of her boyfriend Elvis, Georgie (Michelle Keegan) goes all out to prove herself in a jungle training exercise. TD A Year to Fall in Love Channel 4, 10.00pm Here’s a look at millennial dating habits, as this new show follows 20 singletons in their year-long quest for love. First, we meet performance artist Freddy, who is not a fan of apps, and 25-year-old Sophie, who is looking for a man with money. TD The Yorkshire Dales and the Lakes More4, 9.00pm The return of the warm-hearted series, which profiles those who live in the national parks. The star of the show is the rolling landscape, but its hard-working inhabitants have their own fascination, including champion sheep-breeder Arnold Lancaster, who built his farm up from nothing. TD Underfire: The Untold Story of Tony Vaccaro Sky Arts, 9.00pm A US infantryman during the Second World War, Tony Vaccaro smuggled a camera onto the battlefield and recorded its horrors in over 8,000 startling images. Here Vaccaro returns to Omaha Beach, where he landed on D-Day, while photographers discuss the impact of his work. TD The Late Late Show UK Special Sky One, 10.00pm James Corden brings his triumphant chat show home for a four-night run. The guests include Cher, Orlando Bloom, Cate Blanchett, Foo Fighters and Paul McCartney. TD Mr Smith Goes to Washington (1939, b/w) ★★★★★ TCM, 6.15pm The films of Frank Capra (It’s a Wonderful Life) are often dismissed as idealistic and sentimental. But there is another side to his work, much of which stays just the right side of the fine line that divides the American Dream from the American Nightmare. James Stewart plays a goofy country bumpkin who is shoehorned into a dead man’s shoes in the Senate. The film was nominated for 11 Oscars. Inside Man (2006) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 11.50pm This is a devilishly clever heist movie from director Spike Lee that hinges on a battle of wits between an ice-cool criminal (Clive Owen) and an unflappable hostage negotiator (Denzel Washington). The story has more twists than a Chubby Checker record but it opens with an elaborate New York bank robbery during which nothing, seemingly, is stolen. Jodie Foster, Willem Dafoe, Christopher Plummer and Chiwetel Ejiofor also star. Haywire (2011) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.05pm This slick spy thriller marked Steven Soderbergh’s 25th feature as a director. Mixed-martial-arts fighter and first-time actress Gina Carano stars as a super-soldier who’s on a mission to flush out a double agent who left her left for dead. Colleagues who fall under suspicion include her former partner (Channing Tatum), a drippy strategist (Ewan McGregor) and a dapper Irish colleague (Michael Fassbender). Wednesday 20 June Mortimer & Whitehouse: Gone Fishing Mortimer & Whitehouse: Gone Fishing BBC Two, 10.00pm The premise of this programme may sound familiar – two comedians go on a journey of discovery to beautiful locations – but, unlike Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon’s The Trip, this one features the real personalities, as opposed to fictionalised versions. Lifelong friends Paul Whitehouse and Bob Mortimer share more than a love of comedy, they have both suffered from heart disease. And so, for this funny and poignant six-part series, keen angler Whitehouse attempts to teach Mortimer, a complete novice, the peaceful art of fishing as an aid to his recovery – and maybe learn something new about each other along the way. In the first episode, they head to Norfolk to fish for tench, and there they talk candidly about everything from showbusiness to solitude and relationships. They also reveal how they recently came face to face with their own mortality. This is one of the few occasions that you get to see Mortimer and Whitehouse being themselves, without costumes and props – if you discount the fishing rods. And while there are underlying life-and-death issues in the show, its tone is celebratory, rather than mournful and is about seizing the moment. CM Mad About Elvis BBC One, 7.30pm It’s no surprise that each year tens of thousands of Elvis fans gather together to celebrate “The King”. But what is surprising is that, for the past 15 years, they have been doing so in the Welsh seaside town of Porthcawl. This documentary follows the larger-than-life characters who attend the Elvis festival, the biggest event of its kind in the world. CM The World’s Most Extraordinary Homes BBC Two, 8.00pm Some people do know how to build great homes, especially ones inspired by landscapes. Among the homes that architect Piers Taylor and actress Caroline Quentin come across in Norway for this series including a retreat that’s perched on rocks. CM Secrets of McDonalds: 50 Years of the Big Mac Channel 5, 9.00pm It’s hard to believe but that simple double burger from McDonald’s is 50 years old. To mark the occasion, this film takes a nostalgic look at the fast-food chain’s history, from its Californian origins to what it is today – the world’s largest restaurant chain, serving 69 million people daily. CM Britain’s Refugee Children Channel 4, 10.00pm Each year, a number of the world’s displaced and dispossessed people seek refuge in the UK. This film follows the progress of six refugee children over six months as they adapt to new lives in Cardiff and Newport. CM Hollywood Couples Sky Arts, 9.00pm As Hollywood love affairs go, Robert Taylor and Barbara Stanwyck’s got off to an intriguing start: they met on a blind date in 1936, where there was mutual attraction. But the film studio MGM did not want Taylor to be in a relationship at that time. They later changed their minds, and Taylor and Stanwyck’s union effectively became an arranged marriage. This enlightening film explores how, despite a series of affairs by Taylor, the union lasted for 12 years, and why it wasn’t a marriage of equals – Stanwyck called Taylor “Junior”, he called her “The Queen”. CM Big Beast: Last of the Giants Sky One, 9.00pm In some areas of life, size matters, but none more so than in the animal world. For this three-part series, biologist Patrick Aryee gets up close to some of the world’s largest creatures to explore why they evolved into giants. He begins by meeting a venomous Komodo dragon, the largest living lizard, armed only with small stick. CM The Abyss (1989) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.15pm Long before Avatar, James Cameron was cooking up innovative special effects for this sci-fi adventure in which oil rig workers (including Ed Harris and Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio) explore a marooned nuclear submarine. The ending seems tacked on from another movie, but Cameron makes up for it with some spectacular underwater action scenes – proof that effects can stay “special” if they’re imaginatively used. Memphis Belle (1990) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm It’s 1943, and the handsome American crew of Second World War B-17 bomber Memphis Belle, who are stationed in England, are anticipating their final mission – to fly over Nazi-occupied Europe. Full of nostalgia, this loosely based-on-real-events story exudes a romanticised view of heroism, but features an endearing cast, including Billy Zane, Sean Astin, John Lithgow, Eric Stoltz, and Harry Connick Jr. Looking for Eric (2009) ★★★★☆ London Live, 11.15pm Ken Loach plays a blinder with this affable study of a depressed postman (Steve Evets) who sorts his life out with the help of his imaginary mentor and idol Eric Cantona (playing himself). It’s not Loach’s most political work but it’s definitely one of his sunniest and funniest film. Evets and his postie pals, including the wonderful Meatballs (John Henshaw), keep the laughs coming, sending you away with daft grins on our faces. Thursday 21 June Outlander The Murder of Rhys Jones: Police Tapes ITV, 9.00pm Anyone who watched Jeff Pope’s hard-hitting drama series Little Boy Blue last year, based on the investigation into the murder of 11-year-old Rhys Jones in Liverpool on 22 August 2007, will know just how tragic and disturbing the circumstances surrounding this case were. Rhys, on his way home from football practice, was hit by a stray bullet and died when a teenager on a bicycle started shooting at rival gang members across a car park in Croxteth. To compound the horror, a veil of silence descended on the area as the youths involved, and in some cases their parents, conspired to conceal their identities by intimidating all around them. The only recourse open to investigating officers was to plant listening devices in the homes of the prime suspects in the hope that somehow, they would incriminate themselves. But that was only beginning. Here, presenter Susanna Reid gains unique access to the recordings, in which those responsible admit their part and the lengths they would go to cover up the crime. She also talks to Rhys’s parents, Mel and Steve Jones, about the impact their son’s murder has had on their lives. GO Supershoppers Channel 4, 8.00pm This week’s edition of the consumer show reveals how takeaway coffee from a machine often costs more than one made by a barista, plus how to track down the energy deals hidden by cost comparison sites. Hosts Anna Richardson and Sabrina Grant also explore whether whitening toothpastes really work. GO Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm It’s the last show of the series as Fred Sirieix showcases two more food businesses seeking investment: Naked Dough, a vegan-friendly pop-up in need of a permanent base; and Black Bear Burger, whose owners, already doing well enough to leave their day jobs behind, are looking for the funds to scale up. GO Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm There’s been some terrific drama already in this third series, and that continues in this episode as Laura (Katherine Parkinson) is forced to act quickly when synth Mia’s (Gemma Chan) speech at the commission provokes a shocking attack. GO The Double Life of George Michael Channel 5, 9.00pm This documentary examines the life of the hugely successful and famously generous pop star, and how he spent much of his life battling inner demons prior to early death in 2016. It’s followed at 11.05pm by The Nation’s Favourite George Michael Song. GO The Killers Live at the Royal Albert Hall Sky Arts, 9.00pm Brandon Flowers and his band got an ecstatic reception when they rocked the Royal Albert Hall in July 2009 during their tour of their third album Day & Age. This concert was recorded over two nights, and all of their hits up to that point feature in the set, including Somebody Told Me, When You Were Young, All These Things That I’ve Done and, of course, Mr Brightside. GO Outlander More4, 9.00pm The setting of this Celtic time-travel fantasy has moved firmly over to France, as the second series progresses. Now the Frasers have settled into high society in Paris and Jamie (Sam Heughan) gets a chance, at last, to infiltrate Jacobite circles when he gets an introduction to Bonnie Prince Charlie. Claire (Caitriona Balfe), meanwhile, gets a shock when she meets members of the Duke of Sandringham’s household and realises that an old enemy, presumed dead, may be alive after all. GO North to Alaska (1960) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.00pm “You just can’t trust women. No matter how honest they act, they all want to be wives,” cautions John Wayne in this rather silly western set during the gold rush. After finding gold, Wayne goes to fetch his partner’s fiancée from Seattle, only to find her married to someone else. So he returns with Angel (Capucine), a prostitute, instead. Inevitably, our hero falls for the beguiling lady. Stewart Granger co-stars. X-Men: The Last Stand (2006) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.55pm The third film in the superhero series sees director Brett Ratner take over the reins of the Marvel Comics franchise. When a cure for the mutants is invented, a war breaks out between them and humanity. This isn’t the trilogy’s high point, but that said, Hugh Jackman plays Wolverine to perfection, plus the special effects and dramatic set pieces definitely impress. The Bodyguard (1992) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.00pm Former Secret Service agent Frank Farmer (Kevin Costner) plays bodyguard to pop singer Rachel Marron (Whitney Houston), though he’s more used to protecting presidents than superstars. Sparks fly and security is compromised, but when a stalker gets serious, the job comes first. Houston’s fine soundtrack adds to the film’s emotional theatricality. The soundtrack album has become the fifth bestselling album of all time. Friday 22 June Cruising With Jane McDonald The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Screenwriter Hans Rosenfeldt still has a couple of tasks to complete in the final two episodes of his superior, if at times preposterous, Scandi-thriller, before it bows out for good next week. The over-arching riddle since Henrik Sabroe (Thure Lindhardt) joined the Danish cop shop in series three is what happened to his two daughters, who’d gone missing eight years ago.In tonight’s penultimate episode that question is answered at last, and of course it’s Henrik’s colleague and sometime lover, on-the-spectrum brainbox Saga Norén (Sofia Helin), who figures it out. But as we’ve seen over nearly four series of grisly murder, Rosenfeldt can’t usually be relied on for a happy ending. Then Rosenfeldt’s second task is having Saga figure out who’s killing people using the same methods deployed in government executions (stoning, electrocution, et al) before she becomes the next victim. Tonight, fans will be cheered to see Saga – so often a forlorn, misunderstood character – make solid progress in both the case and in therapy, which bodes well for her future. But this isn’t a cosy relationship drama, and rest assured there are lurid shocks that set us up for next week’s finale. VP The Crystal Maze Channel 4, 9.00pm This star-laden edition of the action game show sees Countdown’s maths genius Rachel Riley in a polite power struggle with skipper Judy Murray, mother of Andy, as she tries to dominate the decision-making. It adds a frisson to the proceedings that also include ex-footballer Wayne Bridge and Paralympian David Weir. VP Cruising with Jane McDonald Channel 5, 9.00pm In this first of a boozy two-parter set in South America, chanteuse Jane McDonald boards another cruise ship and samples Pisco sours and drinks whisky chilled by glacier ice. VP The Last Leg Channel 4, 10.00pm What started off as a spin-off for the 2012 Paralympics has rightly become a Friday night institution. Host Adam Hills returns to marshal the mix of silliness and satire that characterise this comedy chat show, aided by Alex Brooker, Josh Widdicombe and a gaggle of up-for-it celebrity guests. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.45pm Graham Norton will be kept on his toes as Cher graces his sofa for the first time in five years, with her suffer-no-fools attitude. She is joined by her Mamma Mia! co-star Christine Baranski. Also on the final live show of the series are Rupert Everett and Game of Thrones’ Natalie Dormer. VP Marvel’s Luke Cage Netflix, from today Superheroes have become a tiresome constant in film and on TV, but this action series, with a soulful black champion at its centre, is a welcome addition to the genre. Mike Colter returns for a second series as the pumped-up, titular New York action man. In the first episode he deals with the ramifications of last season’s climax in which he triumphed over evil but lost his anonymity. Now he’s being pestered for selfies as he tries to figure out his next move in an opening episode that’s directed by actress Lucy Liu. VP Isle of Wight Festival 2018 Sky Arts and Sky One, from 7.00pm The year’s biggest pop festival (in the absence of Glastonbury) celebrates its 50th anniversary with a line-up spanning the decades, from electro-rockers Depeche Mode to headliners The Killers. The coverage begins on Sky Arts at 7pm, with Nile Rodgers & Chic taking to the stage at 7.30pm. Kasabian will close out the first night on Sky Arts at 11pm. VP Victoria & Abdul (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Stephen Frears’ fascinating real-life tale about the extraordinary friendship between the ageing Queen Victoria (a sensational Judi Dench) and her young Muslim attendant Abdul Karim (Ali Fazal), known as “the Munshi”, is all nostalgia and inertia – a tale ablaze with historical import and contemporary resonance, reduced to commemorative biscuit tin proportions. Eddie Izzard co-stars. Mad Max (1979) ★★★★☆ ITV, 11.45pm An explosive breakthrough – literally. Improbable car stunts and pile-ups ensue as “mad” Max Rockatansky (Mel Gibson) attempts to police a dystopian Australia, where feral biker gangs rape and pillage at will. Director George Miller’s vision was “a silent movie with sound” and he drew inspiration for the film’s injuries and deaths from his time working as a doctor in a Sydney hospital. The film essentially founded Australia’s film industry. Sexy Beast (2000) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 12.10am Ben Kingsley is at his scariest in this tense and enthralling thriller as the gangster thug who wants to rob a well-guarded bank, and flies out to Spain to drag his retired associate Gary (a lobster-tanned Ray Winstone) back to work. But Gary is living a contented life with his wife (Amanda Redman) and has no intention of going back to his criminal life, forcing the two men into a battle of wills that ends in violence. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
Monday 18 June Emmeline Pankhurst: The Making of a Militant BBC Four, 7.30pm The life, times and legacy of Emmeline Pankhurst, the globally significant, inspiring and politically gifted pioneer of women’s rights, gets a rather hurried but accessible treatment. Presented by actress Sally Lindsay, the focus is on Pankhurst’s roots in Manchester and how a family background in radicalism imbued her with a deep commitment to political activism. If the characterisation of Pankhurst as “a working mum from Moss Side” doesn’t quite capture the life of upper-middle-class privilege that afforded Pankhurst the platform from which to conduct her campaigns, the depiction of her happy marriage to campaigning lawyer Dr Richard Pankhurst and busy home life give a more rounded view of her. At its best the film delivers a strong sense of Pankhurst’s genius for promoting the cause of women’s suffrage and how she came to believe that militancy – as enshrined in the slogan “deeds not words” – was the way forward when it came to challenging the intransigence of government. Contributors include her great-granddaughter Helen Pankhurst, who continues to fly the flag for women’s rights. Gerard O’Donovan Great American Railroad Journeys BBC Two, 7.00pm; not Wales In the last episode of the series, Michael Portillo foregoes the railway for a boat trip along the Saint Lawrence River before crossing the border into Canada to visit Kingston and Oshawa on the shores of Lake Ontario. GO The Family Farm BBC Two, 8.00pm Kate Humble presents this four-parter in which three families ditch the urban rat race in search of a better work-life balance and the experience of living and working on a sheep farm in Snowdonia. There’s an enjoyably competitive rivalry between the three families but the overall aim is to show just how tough and rewarding a farming life can be. GO Jamie’s Quick & Easy Food Channel 4, 8.00pm More speedily prepared five-ingredient recipes from Jamie Oliver. Here, he prepares a chorizo, salmon and artichoke bake, a tasty lamb hotpot, and a creamy chocolate affogato. GO Versailles BBC Two, 9.00pm It seems, after all, that rudimentary street lights and running water aren’t enough to keep those pesky Parisian peasants happy. As the public mood becomes ever more inflamed, King Louis’s (George Blagden) troubles deepen when news arrives that Cardinal Leto in Rome is determined to put the French king in his place. GO Snatches: Moments from Women’s Lives BBC Four, 10.00pm Royal Court Artistic Director Vicky Featherstone has curated a stellar line-up for eight 15-minute monologues exploring moments in the lives of women who have challenged the status quo. This week’s pair are Abi Morgan’s Compliance, in which Romola Garai recalls a meeting in a hotel room between an actress and a powerful producer; and Theresa Ikoko’s Outside, with Corrinne Skinner-Carter as a centenarian who is experiencing a revolution. GO Rebel Women: The Great Art Fightback BBC Four, 10.30pm This terrific documentary celebrates the grit, humour and determination of the generation of the political and provocative feminist artists who emerged, on both sides of the Atlantic, in the wake of the Sixties’ cultural revolutions. Among those featured are Judy Chicago, Margaret Harrison, Mary Kelly, Lubaina Himid, Rose English and Barbara Kruger. GO Twilight (2008) ★★★★☆ ITV2, 6.25pm Director Catherine Hardwicke (Thirteen) gets her teeth stuck into this enjoyable teenage vampire romance based on the popular Stephenie Meyer books. The heroine, Bella (Kristen Stewart), falls for a beautiful vampire, Edward (Robert Pattinson). Theirs is a touching relationship (if a slightly creepy one), but to consummate their love means they will perish. Be warned, though – the climax is surprisingly violent. Mamma Mia! (2008) ITV3, 8.00pm ★★★☆☆ This musical comedy set to Abba’s hits is pure escapism. It’s naff, but that’s its selling point, as stars Meryl Streep, Pierce Brosnan and Julie Walters place their tongues firmly in cheeks. At 59, Streep deserved more credit for doing the splits than for her role as a boho mother living on a Greek island whose daughter (Amanda Seyfried) tries to find out who her biological father is. The sequel is in cinemas on July 20. Now You See Me (2013) ★★★★☆ E4, 9.00pm A group of illusionists (Jesse Eisenberg, Woody Harrelson, Isla Fisher and Dave Franco) are encouraged to carry out a string of heists by a mysterious figure, while remaining ahead of FBI agent Rhodes (Mark Ruffalo), who is desperate to bring them to justice. Director Louis Leterrier tries to mimic the complex plots of films such as Inception, but with less success, though it’s reasonably entertaining. Tuesday 19 June The Super Squirrels Conviction: Murder in Suburbia BBC Two, 9.00pm True-crime fans will be gripped by the return of this nail-biting two-parter, which re-examines historic cases for potential miscarriages of justice. Shown on consecutive nights this week, the case in question concerns Glyn Razzell, found guilty of killing his estranged wife Linda in 2003. Despite the fact that Linda’s body has never been found, Razzell’s fuzzy alibi and some controversial forensic evidence concerning blood in the boot of Razzell’s car was enough to see him sentenced to life in prison. It’s these uncertain circumstances, along with Linda’s possible link to another known murderer, that convince Louise Shorter, head of reinvestigation charity Inside Justice, to delve into Razzell’s case anew. Aided by a panel of experts, a dogged but even-handed Shorter tests the evidence to its limits, poring over statements, pursuing witnesses and retracing steps to tie up loose ends. What makes this all so thrilling is that we’re right there alongside her, experiencing the sudden shifts from excitement to frustration as she does. Listening in on Shorter’s phone calls to a mostly composed Razzell proves particularly compelling, our sympathies swaying as he comes under scrutiny. TD The Super Squirrels BBC Two, 8.00pm The upshot of this lively look at the squirrel family is don’t underestimate the little rodents, as they burrow, climb and even fly their way across most of the globe. Keen to explore the squirrel’s skills, scientists test their subjects on a specially designed assault course. TD Trevor McDonald: Return To South Africa ITV, 9.00pm Honouring what would have been Nelson Mandela’s 100th birthday, Trevor McDonald heads for South Africa to see if its historic divisions have now been healed. In Soweto, Johannesburg, he finds evidence of a growing black middle class. Cape Town’s gulf between rich and poor, however, is still stark. TD Our Girl BBC One, 9.10pm 2-Section are in Belize as the soapy military drama continues. Riled up by criticism from Captain James (Ben Aldridge) over the death of her boyfriend Elvis, Georgie (Michelle Keegan) goes all out to prove herself in a jungle training exercise. TD A Year to Fall in Love Channel 4, 10.00pm Here’s a look at millennial dating habits, as this new show follows 20 singletons in their year-long quest for love. First, we meet performance artist Freddy, who is not a fan of apps, and 25-year-old Sophie, who is looking for a man with money. TD The Yorkshire Dales and the Lakes More4, 9.00pm The return of the warm-hearted series, which profiles those who live in the national parks. The star of the show is the rolling landscape, but its hard-working inhabitants have their own fascination, including champion sheep-breeder Arnold Lancaster, who built his farm up from nothing. TD Underfire: The Untold Story of Tony Vaccaro Sky Arts, 9.00pm A US infantryman during the Second World War, Tony Vaccaro smuggled a camera onto the battlefield and recorded its horrors in over 8,000 startling images. Here Vaccaro returns to Omaha Beach, where he landed on D-Day, while photographers discuss the impact of his work. TD The Late Late Show UK Special Sky One, 10.00pm James Corden brings his triumphant chat show home for a four-night run. The guests include Cher, Orlando Bloom, Cate Blanchett, Foo Fighters and Paul McCartney. TD Mr Smith Goes to Washington (1939, b/w) ★★★★★ TCM, 6.15pm The films of Frank Capra (It’s a Wonderful Life) are often dismissed as idealistic and sentimental. But there is another side to his work, much of which stays just the right side of the fine line that divides the American Dream from the American Nightmare. James Stewart plays a goofy country bumpkin who is shoehorned into a dead man’s shoes in the Senate. The film was nominated for 11 Oscars. Inside Man (2006) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 11.50pm This is a devilishly clever heist movie from director Spike Lee that hinges on a battle of wits between an ice-cool criminal (Clive Owen) and an unflappable hostage negotiator (Denzel Washington). The story has more twists than a Chubby Checker record but it opens with an elaborate New York bank robbery during which nothing, seemingly, is stolen. Jodie Foster, Willem Dafoe, Christopher Plummer and Chiwetel Ejiofor also star. Haywire (2011) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.05pm This slick spy thriller marked Steven Soderbergh’s 25th feature as a director. Mixed-martial-arts fighter and first-time actress Gina Carano stars as a super-soldier who’s on a mission to flush out a double agent who left her left for dead. Colleagues who fall under suspicion include her former partner (Channing Tatum), a drippy strategist (Ewan McGregor) and a dapper Irish colleague (Michael Fassbender). Wednesday 20 June Mortimer & Whitehouse: Gone Fishing Mortimer & Whitehouse: Gone Fishing BBC Two, 10.00pm The premise of this programme may sound familiar – two comedians go on a journey of discovery to beautiful locations – but, unlike Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon’s The Trip, this one features the real personalities, as opposed to fictionalised versions. Lifelong friends Paul Whitehouse and Bob Mortimer share more than a love of comedy, they have both suffered from heart disease. And so, for this funny and poignant six-part series, keen angler Whitehouse attempts to teach Mortimer, a complete novice, the peaceful art of fishing as an aid to his recovery – and maybe learn something new about each other along the way. In the first episode, they head to Norfolk to fish for tench, and there they talk candidly about everything from showbusiness to solitude and relationships. They also reveal how they recently came face to face with their own mortality. This is one of the few occasions that you get to see Mortimer and Whitehouse being themselves, without costumes and props – if you discount the fishing rods. And while there are underlying life-and-death issues in the show, its tone is celebratory, rather than mournful and is about seizing the moment. CM Mad About Elvis BBC One, 7.30pm It’s no surprise that each year tens of thousands of Elvis fans gather together to celebrate “The King”. But what is surprising is that, for the past 15 years, they have been doing so in the Welsh seaside town of Porthcawl. This documentary follows the larger-than-life characters who attend the Elvis festival, the biggest event of its kind in the world. CM The World’s Most Extraordinary Homes BBC Two, 8.00pm Some people do know how to build great homes, especially ones inspired by landscapes. Among the homes that architect Piers Taylor and actress Caroline Quentin come across in Norway for this series including a retreat that’s perched on rocks. CM Secrets of McDonalds: 50 Years of the Big Mac Channel 5, 9.00pm It’s hard to believe but that simple double burger from McDonald’s is 50 years old. To mark the occasion, this film takes a nostalgic look at the fast-food chain’s history, from its Californian origins to what it is today – the world’s largest restaurant chain, serving 69 million people daily. CM Britain’s Refugee Children Channel 4, 10.00pm Each year, a number of the world’s displaced and dispossessed people seek refuge in the UK. This film follows the progress of six refugee children over six months as they adapt to new lives in Cardiff and Newport. CM Hollywood Couples Sky Arts, 9.00pm As Hollywood love affairs go, Robert Taylor and Barbara Stanwyck’s got off to an intriguing start: they met on a blind date in 1936, where there was mutual attraction. But the film studio MGM did not want Taylor to be in a relationship at that time. They later changed their minds, and Taylor and Stanwyck’s union effectively became an arranged marriage. This enlightening film explores how, despite a series of affairs by Taylor, the union lasted for 12 years, and why it wasn’t a marriage of equals – Stanwyck called Taylor “Junior”, he called her “The Queen”. CM Big Beast: Last of the Giants Sky One, 9.00pm In some areas of life, size matters, but none more so than in the animal world. For this three-part series, biologist Patrick Aryee gets up close to some of the world’s largest creatures to explore why they evolved into giants. He begins by meeting a venomous Komodo dragon, the largest living lizard, armed only with small stick. CM The Abyss (1989) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.15pm Long before Avatar, James Cameron was cooking up innovative special effects for this sci-fi adventure in which oil rig workers (including Ed Harris and Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio) explore a marooned nuclear submarine. The ending seems tacked on from another movie, but Cameron makes up for it with some spectacular underwater action scenes – proof that effects can stay “special” if they’re imaginatively used. Memphis Belle (1990) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm It’s 1943, and the handsome American crew of Second World War B-17 bomber Memphis Belle, who are stationed in England, are anticipating their final mission – to fly over Nazi-occupied Europe. Full of nostalgia, this loosely based-on-real-events story exudes a romanticised view of heroism, but features an endearing cast, including Billy Zane, Sean Astin, John Lithgow, Eric Stoltz, and Harry Connick Jr. Looking for Eric (2009) ★★★★☆ London Live, 11.15pm Ken Loach plays a blinder with this affable study of a depressed postman (Steve Evets) who sorts his life out with the help of his imaginary mentor and idol Eric Cantona (playing himself). It’s not Loach’s most political work but it’s definitely one of his sunniest and funniest film. Evets and his postie pals, including the wonderful Meatballs (John Henshaw), keep the laughs coming, sending you away with daft grins on our faces. Thursday 21 June Outlander The Murder of Rhys Jones: Police Tapes ITV, 9.00pm Anyone who watched Jeff Pope’s hard-hitting drama series Little Boy Blue last year, based on the investigation into the murder of 11-year-old Rhys Jones in Liverpool on 22 August 2007, will know just how tragic and disturbing the circumstances surrounding this case were. Rhys, on his way home from football practice, was hit by a stray bullet and died when a teenager on a bicycle started shooting at rival gang members across a car park in Croxteth. To compound the horror, a veil of silence descended on the area as the youths involved, and in some cases their parents, conspired to conceal their identities by intimidating all around them. The only recourse open to investigating officers was to plant listening devices in the homes of the prime suspects in the hope that somehow, they would incriminate themselves. But that was only beginning. Here, presenter Susanna Reid gains unique access to the recordings, in which those responsible admit their part and the lengths they would go to cover up the crime. She also talks to Rhys’s parents, Mel and Steve Jones, about the impact their son’s murder has had on their lives. GO Supershoppers Channel 4, 8.00pm This week’s edition of the consumer show reveals how takeaway coffee from a machine often costs more than one made by a barista, plus how to track down the energy deals hidden by cost comparison sites. Hosts Anna Richardson and Sabrina Grant also explore whether whitening toothpastes really work. GO Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm It’s the last show of the series as Fred Sirieix showcases two more food businesses seeking investment: Naked Dough, a vegan-friendly pop-up in need of a permanent base; and Black Bear Burger, whose owners, already doing well enough to leave their day jobs behind, are looking for the funds to scale up. GO Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm There’s been some terrific drama already in this third series, and that continues in this episode as Laura (Katherine Parkinson) is forced to act quickly when synth Mia’s (Gemma Chan) speech at the commission provokes a shocking attack. GO The Double Life of George Michael Channel 5, 9.00pm This documentary examines the life of the hugely successful and famously generous pop star, and how he spent much of his life battling inner demons prior to early death in 2016. It’s followed at 11.05pm by The Nation’s Favourite George Michael Song. GO The Killers Live at the Royal Albert Hall Sky Arts, 9.00pm Brandon Flowers and his band got an ecstatic reception when they rocked the Royal Albert Hall in July 2009 during their tour of their third album Day & Age. This concert was recorded over two nights, and all of their hits up to that point feature in the set, including Somebody Told Me, When You Were Young, All These Things That I’ve Done and, of course, Mr Brightside. GO Outlander More4, 9.00pm The setting of this Celtic time-travel fantasy has moved firmly over to France, as the second series progresses. Now the Frasers have settled into high society in Paris and Jamie (Sam Heughan) gets a chance, at last, to infiltrate Jacobite circles when he gets an introduction to Bonnie Prince Charlie. Claire (Caitriona Balfe), meanwhile, gets a shock when she meets members of the Duke of Sandringham’s household and realises that an old enemy, presumed dead, may be alive after all. GO North to Alaska (1960) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.00pm “You just can’t trust women. No matter how honest they act, they all want to be wives,” cautions John Wayne in this rather silly western set during the gold rush. After finding gold, Wayne goes to fetch his partner’s fiancée from Seattle, only to find her married to someone else. So he returns with Angel (Capucine), a prostitute, instead. Inevitably, our hero falls for the beguiling lady. Stewart Granger co-stars. X-Men: The Last Stand (2006) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.55pm The third film in the superhero series sees director Brett Ratner take over the reins of the Marvel Comics franchise. When a cure for the mutants is invented, a war breaks out between them and humanity. This isn’t the trilogy’s high point, but that said, Hugh Jackman plays Wolverine to perfection, plus the special effects and dramatic set pieces definitely impress. The Bodyguard (1992) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.00pm Former Secret Service agent Frank Farmer (Kevin Costner) plays bodyguard to pop singer Rachel Marron (Whitney Houston), though he’s more used to protecting presidents than superstars. Sparks fly and security is compromised, but when a stalker gets serious, the job comes first. Houston’s fine soundtrack adds to the film’s emotional theatricality. The soundtrack album has become the fifth bestselling album of all time. Friday 22 June Cruising With Jane McDonald The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Screenwriter Hans Rosenfeldt still has a couple of tasks to complete in the final two episodes of his superior, if at times preposterous, Scandi-thriller, before it bows out for good next week. The over-arching riddle since Henrik Sabroe (Thure Lindhardt) joined the Danish cop shop in series three is what happened to his two daughters, who’d gone missing eight years ago.In tonight’s penultimate episode that question is answered at last, and of course it’s Henrik’s colleague and sometime lover, on-the-spectrum brainbox Saga Norén (Sofia Helin), who figures it out. But as we’ve seen over nearly four series of grisly murder, Rosenfeldt can’t usually be relied on for a happy ending. Then Rosenfeldt’s second task is having Saga figure out who’s killing people using the same methods deployed in government executions (stoning, electrocution, et al) before she becomes the next victim. Tonight, fans will be cheered to see Saga – so often a forlorn, misunderstood character – make solid progress in both the case and in therapy, which bodes well for her future. But this isn’t a cosy relationship drama, and rest assured there are lurid shocks that set us up for next week’s finale. VP The Crystal Maze Channel 4, 9.00pm This star-laden edition of the action game show sees Countdown’s maths genius Rachel Riley in a polite power struggle with skipper Judy Murray, mother of Andy, as she tries to dominate the decision-making. It adds a frisson to the proceedings that also include ex-footballer Wayne Bridge and Paralympian David Weir. VP Cruising with Jane McDonald Channel 5, 9.00pm In this first of a boozy two-parter set in South America, chanteuse Jane McDonald boards another cruise ship and samples Pisco sours and drinks whisky chilled by glacier ice. VP The Last Leg Channel 4, 10.00pm What started off as a spin-off for the 2012 Paralympics has rightly become a Friday night institution. Host Adam Hills returns to marshal the mix of silliness and satire that characterise this comedy chat show, aided by Alex Brooker, Josh Widdicombe and a gaggle of up-for-it celebrity guests. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.45pm Graham Norton will be kept on his toes as Cher graces his sofa for the first time in five years, with her suffer-no-fools attitude. She is joined by her Mamma Mia! co-star Christine Baranski. Also on the final live show of the series are Rupert Everett and Game of Thrones’ Natalie Dormer. VP Marvel’s Luke Cage Netflix, from today Superheroes have become a tiresome constant in film and on TV, but this action series, with a soulful black champion at its centre, is a welcome addition to the genre. Mike Colter returns for a second series as the pumped-up, titular New York action man. In the first episode he deals with the ramifications of last season’s climax in which he triumphed over evil but lost his anonymity. Now he’s being pestered for selfies as he tries to figure out his next move in an opening episode that’s directed by actress Lucy Liu. VP Isle of Wight Festival 2018 Sky Arts and Sky One, from 7.00pm The year’s biggest pop festival (in the absence of Glastonbury) celebrates its 50th anniversary with a line-up spanning the decades, from electro-rockers Depeche Mode to headliners The Killers. The coverage begins on Sky Arts at 7pm, with Nile Rodgers & Chic taking to the stage at 7.30pm. Kasabian will close out the first night on Sky Arts at 11pm. VP Victoria & Abdul (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Stephen Frears’ fascinating real-life tale about the extraordinary friendship between the ageing Queen Victoria (a sensational Judi Dench) and her young Muslim attendant Abdul Karim (Ali Fazal), known as “the Munshi”, is all nostalgia and inertia – a tale ablaze with historical import and contemporary resonance, reduced to commemorative biscuit tin proportions. Eddie Izzard co-stars. Mad Max (1979) ★★★★☆ ITV, 11.45pm An explosive breakthrough – literally. Improbable car stunts and pile-ups ensue as “mad” Max Rockatansky (Mel Gibson) attempts to police a dystopian Australia, where feral biker gangs rape and pillage at will. Director George Miller’s vision was “a silent movie with sound” and he drew inspiration for the film’s injuries and deaths from his time working as a doctor in a Sydney hospital. The film essentially founded Australia’s film industry. Sexy Beast (2000) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 12.10am Ben Kingsley is at his scariest in this tense and enthralling thriller as the gangster thug who wants to rob a well-guarded bank, and flies out to Spain to drag his retired associate Gary (a lobster-tanned Ray Winstone) back to work. But Gary is living a contented life with his wife (Amanda Redman) and has no intention of going back to his criminal life, forcing the two men into a battle of wills that ends in violence. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: Emmeline Pankhurst: The Making of a Militant and The Family Farm
Monday 18 June Emmeline Pankhurst: The Making of a Militant BBC Four, 7.30pm The life, times and legacy of Emmeline Pankhurst, the globally significant, inspiring and politically gifted pioneer of women’s rights, gets a rather hurried but accessible treatment. Presented by actress Sally Lindsay, the focus is on Pankhurst’s roots in Manchester and how a family background in radicalism imbued her with a deep commitment to political activism. If the characterisation of Pankhurst as “a working mum from Moss Side” doesn’t quite capture the life of upper-middle-class privilege that afforded Pankhurst the platform from which to conduct her campaigns, the depiction of her happy marriage to campaigning lawyer Dr Richard Pankhurst and busy home life give a more rounded view of her. At its best the film delivers a strong sense of Pankhurst’s genius for promoting the cause of women’s suffrage and how she came to believe that militancy – as enshrined in the slogan “deeds not words” – was the way forward when it came to challenging the intransigence of government. Contributors include her great-granddaughter Helen Pankhurst, who continues to fly the flag for women’s rights. Gerard O’Donovan Great American Railroad Journeys BBC Two, 7.00pm; not Wales In the last episode of the series, Michael Portillo foregoes the railway for a boat trip along the Saint Lawrence River before crossing the border into Canada to visit Kingston and Oshawa on the shores of Lake Ontario. GO The Family Farm BBC Two, 8.00pm Kate Humble presents this four-parter in which three families ditch the urban rat race in search of a better work-life balance and the experience of living and working on a sheep farm in Snowdonia. There’s an enjoyably competitive rivalry between the three families but the overall aim is to show just how tough and rewarding a farming life can be. GO Jamie’s Quick & Easy Food Channel 4, 8.00pm More speedily prepared five-ingredient recipes from Jamie Oliver. Here, he prepares a chorizo, salmon and artichoke bake, a tasty lamb hotpot, and a creamy chocolate affogato. GO Versailles BBC Two, 9.00pm It seems, after all, that rudimentary street lights and running water aren’t enough to keep those pesky Parisian peasants happy. As the public mood becomes ever more inflamed, King Louis’s (George Blagden) troubles deepen when news arrives that Cardinal Leto in Rome is determined to put the French king in his place. GO Snatches: Moments from Women’s Lives BBC Four, 10.00pm Royal Court Artistic Director Vicky Featherstone has curated a stellar line-up for eight 15-minute monologues exploring moments in the lives of women who have challenged the status quo. This week’s pair are Abi Morgan’s Compliance, in which Romola Garai recalls a meeting in a hotel room between an actress and a powerful producer; and Theresa Ikoko’s Outside, with Corrinne Skinner-Carter as a centenarian who is experiencing a revolution. GO Rebel Women: The Great Art Fightback BBC Four, 10.30pm This terrific documentary celebrates the grit, humour and determination of the generation of the political and provocative feminist artists who emerged, on both sides of the Atlantic, in the wake of the Sixties’ cultural revolutions. Among those featured are Judy Chicago, Margaret Harrison, Mary Kelly, Lubaina Himid, Rose English and Barbara Kruger. GO Twilight (2008) ★★★★☆ ITV2, 6.25pm Director Catherine Hardwicke (Thirteen) gets her teeth stuck into this enjoyable teenage vampire romance based on the popular Stephenie Meyer books. The heroine, Bella (Kristen Stewart), falls for a beautiful vampire, Edward (Robert Pattinson). Theirs is a touching relationship (if a slightly creepy one), but to consummate their love means they will perish. Be warned, though – the climax is surprisingly violent. Mamma Mia! (2008) ITV3, 8.00pm ★★★☆☆ This musical comedy set to Abba’s hits is pure escapism. It’s naff, but that’s its selling point, as stars Meryl Streep, Pierce Brosnan and Julie Walters place their tongues firmly in cheeks. At 59, Streep deserved more credit for doing the splits than for her role as a boho mother living on a Greek island whose daughter (Amanda Seyfried) tries to find out who her biological father is. The sequel is in cinemas on July 20. Now You See Me (2013) ★★★★☆ E4, 9.00pm A group of illusionists (Jesse Eisenberg, Woody Harrelson, Isla Fisher and Dave Franco) are encouraged to carry out a string of heists by a mysterious figure, while remaining ahead of FBI agent Rhodes (Mark Ruffalo), who is desperate to bring them to justice. Director Louis Leterrier tries to mimic the complex plots of films such as Inception, but with less success, though it’s reasonably entertaining. Tuesday 19 June The Super Squirrels Conviction: Murder in Suburbia BBC Two, 9.00pm True-crime fans will be gripped by the return of this nail-biting two-parter, which re-examines historic cases for potential miscarriages of justice. Shown on consecutive nights this week, the case in question concerns Glyn Razzell, found guilty of killing his estranged wife Linda in 2003. Despite the fact that Linda’s body has never been found, Razzell’s fuzzy alibi and some controversial forensic evidence concerning blood in the boot of Razzell’s car was enough to see him sentenced to life in prison. It’s these uncertain circumstances, along with Linda’s possible link to another known murderer, that convince Louise Shorter, head of reinvestigation charity Inside Justice, to delve into Razzell’s case anew. Aided by a panel of experts, a dogged but even-handed Shorter tests the evidence to its limits, poring over statements, pursuing witnesses and retracing steps to tie up loose ends. What makes this all so thrilling is that we’re right there alongside her, experiencing the sudden shifts from excitement to frustration as she does. Listening in on Shorter’s phone calls to a mostly composed Razzell proves particularly compelling, our sympathies swaying as he comes under scrutiny. TD The Super Squirrels BBC Two, 8.00pm The upshot of this lively look at the squirrel family is don’t underestimate the little rodents, as they burrow, climb and even fly their way across most of the globe. Keen to explore the squirrel’s skills, scientists test their subjects on a specially designed assault course. TD Trevor McDonald: Return To South Africa ITV, 9.00pm Honouring what would have been Nelson Mandela’s 100th birthday, Trevor McDonald heads for South Africa to see if its historic divisions have now been healed. In Soweto, Johannesburg, he finds evidence of a growing black middle class. Cape Town’s gulf between rich and poor, however, is still stark. TD Our Girl BBC One, 9.10pm 2-Section are in Belize as the soapy military drama continues. Riled up by criticism from Captain James (Ben Aldridge) over the death of her boyfriend Elvis, Georgie (Michelle Keegan) goes all out to prove herself in a jungle training exercise. TD A Year to Fall in Love Channel 4, 10.00pm Here’s a look at millennial dating habits, as this new show follows 20 singletons in their year-long quest for love. First, we meet performance artist Freddy, who is not a fan of apps, and 25-year-old Sophie, who is looking for a man with money. TD The Yorkshire Dales and the Lakes More4, 9.00pm The return of the warm-hearted series, which profiles those who live in the national parks. The star of the show is the rolling landscape, but its hard-working inhabitants have their own fascination, including champion sheep-breeder Arnold Lancaster, who built his farm up from nothing. TD Underfire: The Untold Story of Tony Vaccaro Sky Arts, 9.00pm A US infantryman during the Second World War, Tony Vaccaro smuggled a camera onto the battlefield and recorded its horrors in over 8,000 startling images. Here Vaccaro returns to Omaha Beach, where he landed on D-Day, while photographers discuss the impact of his work. TD The Late Late Show UK Special Sky One, 10.00pm James Corden brings his triumphant chat show home for a four-night run. The guests include Cher, Orlando Bloom, Cate Blanchett, Foo Fighters and Paul McCartney. TD Mr Smith Goes to Washington (1939, b/w) ★★★★★ TCM, 6.15pm The films of Frank Capra (It’s a Wonderful Life) are often dismissed as idealistic and sentimental. But there is another side to his work, much of which stays just the right side of the fine line that divides the American Dream from the American Nightmare. James Stewart plays a goofy country bumpkin who is shoehorned into a dead man’s shoes in the Senate. The film was nominated for 11 Oscars. Inside Man (2006) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 11.50pm This is a devilishly clever heist movie from director Spike Lee that hinges on a battle of wits between an ice-cool criminal (Clive Owen) and an unflappable hostage negotiator (Denzel Washington). The story has more twists than a Chubby Checker record but it opens with an elaborate New York bank robbery during which nothing, seemingly, is stolen. Jodie Foster, Willem Dafoe, Christopher Plummer and Chiwetel Ejiofor also star. Haywire (2011) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.05pm This slick spy thriller marked Steven Soderbergh’s 25th feature as a director. Mixed-martial-arts fighter and first-time actress Gina Carano stars as a super-soldier who’s on a mission to flush out a double agent who left her left for dead. Colleagues who fall under suspicion include her former partner (Channing Tatum), a drippy strategist (Ewan McGregor) and a dapper Irish colleague (Michael Fassbender). Wednesday 20 June Mortimer & Whitehouse: Gone Fishing Mortimer & Whitehouse: Gone Fishing BBC Two, 10.00pm The premise of this programme may sound familiar – two comedians go on a journey of discovery to beautiful locations – but, unlike Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon’s The Trip, this one features the real personalities, as opposed to fictionalised versions. Lifelong friends Paul Whitehouse and Bob Mortimer share more than a love of comedy, they have both suffered from heart disease. And so, for this funny and poignant six-part series, keen angler Whitehouse attempts to teach Mortimer, a complete novice, the peaceful art of fishing as an aid to his recovery – and maybe learn something new about each other along the way. In the first episode, they head to Norfolk to fish for tench, and there they talk candidly about everything from showbusiness to solitude and relationships. They also reveal how they recently came face to face with their own mortality. This is one of the few occasions that you get to see Mortimer and Whitehouse being themselves, without costumes and props – if you discount the fishing rods. And while there are underlying life-and-death issues in the show, its tone is celebratory, rather than mournful and is about seizing the moment. CM Mad About Elvis BBC One, 7.30pm It’s no surprise that each year tens of thousands of Elvis fans gather together to celebrate “The King”. But what is surprising is that, for the past 15 years, they have been doing so in the Welsh seaside town of Porthcawl. This documentary follows the larger-than-life characters who attend the Elvis festival, the biggest event of its kind in the world. CM The World’s Most Extraordinary Homes BBC Two, 8.00pm Some people do know how to build great homes, especially ones inspired by landscapes. Among the homes that architect Piers Taylor and actress Caroline Quentin come across in Norway for this series including a retreat that’s perched on rocks. CM Secrets of McDonalds: 50 Years of the Big Mac Channel 5, 9.00pm It’s hard to believe but that simple double burger from McDonald’s is 50 years old. To mark the occasion, this film takes a nostalgic look at the fast-food chain’s history, from its Californian origins to what it is today – the world’s largest restaurant chain, serving 69 million people daily. CM Britain’s Refugee Children Channel 4, 10.00pm Each year, a number of the world’s displaced and dispossessed people seek refuge in the UK. This film follows the progress of six refugee children over six months as they adapt to new lives in Cardiff and Newport. CM Hollywood Couples Sky Arts, 9.00pm As Hollywood love affairs go, Robert Taylor and Barbara Stanwyck’s got off to an intriguing start: they met on a blind date in 1936, where there was mutual attraction. But the film studio MGM did not want Taylor to be in a relationship at that time. They later changed their minds, and Taylor and Stanwyck’s union effectively became an arranged marriage. This enlightening film explores how, despite a series of affairs by Taylor, the union lasted for 12 years, and why it wasn’t a marriage of equals – Stanwyck called Taylor “Junior”, he called her “The Queen”. CM Big Beast: Last of the Giants Sky One, 9.00pm In some areas of life, size matters, but none more so than in the animal world. For this three-part series, biologist Patrick Aryee gets up close to some of the world’s largest creatures to explore why they evolved into giants. He begins by meeting a venomous Komodo dragon, the largest living lizard, armed only with small stick. CM The Abyss (1989) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.15pm Long before Avatar, James Cameron was cooking up innovative special effects for this sci-fi adventure in which oil rig workers (including Ed Harris and Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio) explore a marooned nuclear submarine. The ending seems tacked on from another movie, but Cameron makes up for it with some spectacular underwater action scenes – proof that effects can stay “special” if they’re imaginatively used. Memphis Belle (1990) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm It’s 1943, and the handsome American crew of Second World War B-17 bomber Memphis Belle, who are stationed in England, are anticipating their final mission – to fly over Nazi-occupied Europe. Full of nostalgia, this loosely based-on-real-events story exudes a romanticised view of heroism, but features an endearing cast, including Billy Zane, Sean Astin, John Lithgow, Eric Stoltz, and Harry Connick Jr. Looking for Eric (2009) ★★★★☆ London Live, 11.15pm Ken Loach plays a blinder with this affable study of a depressed postman (Steve Evets) who sorts his life out with the help of his imaginary mentor and idol Eric Cantona (playing himself). It’s not Loach’s most political work but it’s definitely one of his sunniest and funniest film. Evets and his postie pals, including the wonderful Meatballs (John Henshaw), keep the laughs coming, sending you away with daft grins on our faces. Thursday 21 June Outlander The Murder of Rhys Jones: Police Tapes ITV, 9.00pm Anyone who watched Jeff Pope’s hard-hitting drama series Little Boy Blue last year, based on the investigation into the murder of 11-year-old Rhys Jones in Liverpool on 22 August 2007, will know just how tragic and disturbing the circumstances surrounding this case were. Rhys, on his way home from football practice, was hit by a stray bullet and died when a teenager on a bicycle started shooting at rival gang members across a car park in Croxteth. To compound the horror, a veil of silence descended on the area as the youths involved, and in some cases their parents, conspired to conceal their identities by intimidating all around them. The only recourse open to investigating officers was to plant listening devices in the homes of the prime suspects in the hope that somehow, they would incriminate themselves. But that was only beginning. Here, presenter Susanna Reid gains unique access to the recordings, in which those responsible admit their part and the lengths they would go to cover up the crime. She also talks to Rhys’s parents, Mel and Steve Jones, about the impact their son’s murder has had on their lives. GO Supershoppers Channel 4, 8.00pm This week’s edition of the consumer show reveals how takeaway coffee from a machine often costs more than one made by a barista, plus how to track down the energy deals hidden by cost comparison sites. Hosts Anna Richardson and Sabrina Grant also explore whether whitening toothpastes really work. GO Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm It’s the last show of the series as Fred Sirieix showcases two more food businesses seeking investment: Naked Dough, a vegan-friendly pop-up in need of a permanent base; and Black Bear Burger, whose owners, already doing well enough to leave their day jobs behind, are looking for the funds to scale up. GO Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm There’s been some terrific drama already in this third series, and that continues in this episode as Laura (Katherine Parkinson) is forced to act quickly when synth Mia’s (Gemma Chan) speech at the commission provokes a shocking attack. GO The Double Life of George Michael Channel 5, 9.00pm This documentary examines the life of the hugely successful and famously generous pop star, and how he spent much of his life battling inner demons prior to early death in 2016. It’s followed at 11.05pm by The Nation’s Favourite George Michael Song. GO The Killers Live at the Royal Albert Hall Sky Arts, 9.00pm Brandon Flowers and his band got an ecstatic reception when they rocked the Royal Albert Hall in July 2009 during their tour of their third album Day & Age. This concert was recorded over two nights, and all of their hits up to that point feature in the set, including Somebody Told Me, When You Were Young, All These Things That I’ve Done and, of course, Mr Brightside. GO Outlander More4, 9.00pm The setting of this Celtic time-travel fantasy has moved firmly over to France, as the second series progresses. Now the Frasers have settled into high society in Paris and Jamie (Sam Heughan) gets a chance, at last, to infiltrate Jacobite circles when he gets an introduction to Bonnie Prince Charlie. Claire (Caitriona Balfe), meanwhile, gets a shock when she meets members of the Duke of Sandringham’s household and realises that an old enemy, presumed dead, may be alive after all. GO North to Alaska (1960) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.00pm “You just can’t trust women. No matter how honest they act, they all want to be wives,” cautions John Wayne in this rather silly western set during the gold rush. After finding gold, Wayne goes to fetch his partner’s fiancée from Seattle, only to find her married to someone else. So he returns with Angel (Capucine), a prostitute, instead. Inevitably, our hero falls for the beguiling lady. Stewart Granger co-stars. X-Men: The Last Stand (2006) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.55pm The third film in the superhero series sees director Brett Ratner take over the reins of the Marvel Comics franchise. When a cure for the mutants is invented, a war breaks out between them and humanity. This isn’t the trilogy’s high point, but that said, Hugh Jackman plays Wolverine to perfection, plus the special effects and dramatic set pieces definitely impress. The Bodyguard (1992) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.00pm Former Secret Service agent Frank Farmer (Kevin Costner) plays bodyguard to pop singer Rachel Marron (Whitney Houston), though he’s more used to protecting presidents than superstars. Sparks fly and security is compromised, but when a stalker gets serious, the job comes first. Houston’s fine soundtrack adds to the film’s emotional theatricality. The soundtrack album has become the fifth bestselling album of all time. Friday 22 June Cruising With Jane McDonald The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Screenwriter Hans Rosenfeldt still has a couple of tasks to complete in the final two episodes of his superior, if at times preposterous, Scandi-thriller, before it bows out for good next week. The over-arching riddle since Henrik Sabroe (Thure Lindhardt) joined the Danish cop shop in series three is what happened to his two daughters, who’d gone missing eight years ago.In tonight’s penultimate episode that question is answered at last, and of course it’s Henrik’s colleague and sometime lover, on-the-spectrum brainbox Saga Norén (Sofia Helin), who figures it out. But as we’ve seen over nearly four series of grisly murder, Rosenfeldt can’t usually be relied on for a happy ending. Then Rosenfeldt’s second task is having Saga figure out who’s killing people using the same methods deployed in government executions (stoning, electrocution, et al) before she becomes the next victim. Tonight, fans will be cheered to see Saga – so often a forlorn, misunderstood character – make solid progress in both the case and in therapy, which bodes well for her future. But this isn’t a cosy relationship drama, and rest assured there are lurid shocks that set us up for next week’s finale. VP The Crystal Maze Channel 4, 9.00pm This star-laden edition of the action game show sees Countdown’s maths genius Rachel Riley in a polite power struggle with skipper Judy Murray, mother of Andy, as she tries to dominate the decision-making. It adds a frisson to the proceedings that also include ex-footballer Wayne Bridge and Paralympian David Weir. VP Cruising with Jane McDonald Channel 5, 9.00pm In this first of a boozy two-parter set in South America, chanteuse Jane McDonald boards another cruise ship and samples Pisco sours and drinks whisky chilled by glacier ice. VP The Last Leg Channel 4, 10.00pm What started off as a spin-off for the 2012 Paralympics has rightly become a Friday night institution. Host Adam Hills returns to marshal the mix of silliness and satire that characterise this comedy chat show, aided by Alex Brooker, Josh Widdicombe and a gaggle of up-for-it celebrity guests. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.45pm Graham Norton will be kept on his toes as Cher graces his sofa for the first time in five years, with her suffer-no-fools attitude. She is joined by her Mamma Mia! co-star Christine Baranski. Also on the final live show of the series are Rupert Everett and Game of Thrones’ Natalie Dormer. VP Marvel’s Luke Cage Netflix, from today Superheroes have become a tiresome constant in film and on TV, but this action series, with a soulful black champion at its centre, is a welcome addition to the genre. Mike Colter returns for a second series as the pumped-up, titular New York action man. In the first episode he deals with the ramifications of last season’s climax in which he triumphed over evil but lost his anonymity. Now he’s being pestered for selfies as he tries to figure out his next move in an opening episode that’s directed by actress Lucy Liu. VP Isle of Wight Festival 2018 Sky Arts and Sky One, from 7.00pm The year’s biggest pop festival (in the absence of Glastonbury) celebrates its 50th anniversary with a line-up spanning the decades, from electro-rockers Depeche Mode to headliners The Killers. The coverage begins on Sky Arts at 7pm, with Nile Rodgers & Chic taking to the stage at 7.30pm. Kasabian will close out the first night on Sky Arts at 11pm. VP Victoria & Abdul (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Stephen Frears’ fascinating real-life tale about the extraordinary friendship between the ageing Queen Victoria (a sensational Judi Dench) and her young Muslim attendant Abdul Karim (Ali Fazal), known as “the Munshi”, is all nostalgia and inertia – a tale ablaze with historical import and contemporary resonance, reduced to commemorative biscuit tin proportions. Eddie Izzard co-stars. Mad Max (1979) ★★★★☆ ITV, 11.45pm An explosive breakthrough – literally. Improbable car stunts and pile-ups ensue as “mad” Max Rockatansky (Mel Gibson) attempts to police a dystopian Australia, where feral biker gangs rape and pillage at will. Director George Miller’s vision was “a silent movie with sound” and he drew inspiration for the film’s injuries and deaths from his time working as a doctor in a Sydney hospital. The film essentially founded Australia’s film industry. Sexy Beast (2000) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 12.10am Ben Kingsley is at his scariest in this tense and enthralling thriller as the gangster thug who wants to rob a well-guarded bank, and flies out to Spain to drag his retired associate Gary (a lobster-tanned Ray Winstone) back to work. But Gary is living a contented life with his wife (Amanda Redman) and has no intention of going back to his criminal life, forcing the two men into a battle of wills that ends in violence. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
UK Sport chair Dame Katherine Grainger warns of 'shrinking pot' of money for Olympic and Paralympic squads
UK Sport chair Dame Katherine Grainger warns of 'shrinking pot' of money for Olympic and Paralympic squads
UK Sport chair Dame Katherine Grainger warns of 'shrinking pot' of money for Olympic and Paralympic squads
UK Sport chair Dame Katherine Grainger warns of 'shrinking pot' of money for Olympic and Paralympic squads
UK Sport chair Dame Katherine Grainger warns of 'shrinking pot' of money for Olympic and Paralympic squads
UK Sport chair Dame Katherine Grainger warns of 'shrinking pot' of money for Olympic and Paralympic squads
UK Sport chair Dame Katherine Grainger warns of 'shrinking pot' of money for Olympic and Paralympic squads
UK Sport chair Dame Katherine Grainger warns of 'shrinking pot' of money for Olympic and Paralympic squads
UK Sport chair Dame Katherine Grainger warns of 'shrinking pot' of money for Olympic and Paralympic squads
UK Sport chair Dame Katherine Grainger warns of 'shrinking pot' of money for Olympic and Paralympic squads
UK Sport chair Dame Katherine Grainger warns of 'shrinking pot' of money for Olympic and Paralympic squads
UK Sport chair Dame Katherine Grainger warns of 'shrinking pot' of money for Olympic and Paralympic squads
The construction site of the New National Stadium, main stadium of Tokyo 2020 Olympics and Paralympics, is seen in Tokyo, Japan December 22, 2017. REUTERS/Issei Kato
The construction site of the New National Stadium, main stadium of Tokyo 2020 Olympics and Paralympics, is seen in Tokyo, Japan
The construction site of the New National Stadium, main stadium of Tokyo 2020 Olympics and Paralympics, is seen in Tokyo, Japan December 22, 2017. REUTERS/Issei Kato
How Ellie Simmonds rediscovered her love for swimming after almost quitting before Rio 2016 Paralympics
How Ellie Simmonds rediscovered her love for swimming after almost quitting before Rio 2016 Paralympics
How Ellie Simmonds rediscovered her love for swimming after almost quitting before Rio 2016 Paralympics
The construction site of the New National Stadium, main stadium of Tokyo 2020 Olympics and Paralympics, is seen in Tokyo, Japan December 22, 2017. REUTERS/Issei Kato
The construction site of the New National Stadium, main stadium of Tokyo 2020 Olympics and Paralympics, is seen in Tokyo, Japan
The construction site of the New National Stadium, main stadium of Tokyo 2020 Olympics and Paralympics, is seen in Tokyo, Japan December 22, 2017. REUTERS/Issei Kato
Prince Harry will marry Meghan Markle on Saturday at St George's Chapel, in one of the most anticipated events of the year. Since the moment he was born, the Prince's life has been recorded, photographed and documented. The public seemingly know everything there is to know about him. We were there for his parents' divorce and his mother’s death. We are all aware of his will-they-won't-they relationships, his job, that one time he wore a swastika and that other time he went to Las Vagas and got his kit off. But there is plenty we don't know about the prince. Here are 31 facts about the groom for you to impress fellow revellers with at your wedding-watching party. Prince Harry during a teacher training session at Eccles Rugby Club, Salford Credit: Rex Features When he started nursery school in London aged three, Prince Harry didn't automatically get on well with the other children and was reportedly picked on by bullies. His kind-heartedness started early. He owned a lop-eared rabbit that lived in a hutch in the stable yard at Highgrove. The young prince would also spend hours tending to the sheep on the country estate. Harry met his ex-girlfriend Cressida Bonas through his cousin Princess Eugenie in May 2012. Prince Harry and Cressida Bonas are actually related, albeit very distantly. She is rumoured to be Prince Harry’s ninth cousin through King Charles II. Harry had the idea for, and spearheaded, the Invictus Games: a Paralympic-style multi sport event for wounded, injured or sick servicemen and women. In 1997 he travelled to South Africa with his father where he met Nelson Mandela and watched the Spice Girls perform. In the Army, he was known as "Captain Wales". As a British prince, he doesn’t have a fixed surname and so instead used the name of the area over which his father holds title, as a territorial suffix in place of a surname. He’s a dab hand at the Fifa video game, which we know because he told the Press in an interview while out in Afghanistan, saying, "You can ask the guys, I thrash them at Fifa the whole time". Game on, Harry. He will not be reading this article. Not only because obviously there’s not a lot about himself he doesn’t know, but because neither he nor William take any pleasure in reading articles about themselves and try to avoid it if they can. He really hates Twitter. Poor man. One of his middle names is David. The other two are Charles and Albert. Aged 18, he spent his gap year in Australia and Lesotho. While in Australia, he spent time working, as his father had done, on a cattle station and participating in the Young England vs Young Australia Polo Test Match. In 2007-2008 he served for 77 days in Helmand, Afghanistan. He was pulled out after the publication of the story in an Australian magazine. He returned to Afghanistan for a 20-week deployment in 2012-2013 with the Army Air Corps He studied geography, art history and art at A-Level and left school with a B in art and a D in geography - enough to get him into Sandhurst. He produced the documentary film The Forgotten Kingdom during his gap year in Lesotho, where he also visited Mants’ase Children’s Home near Mohale’s Hoek. He was educated at Eton College, famous for having graduates from the world of politics and business. He has his own coat of arms, granted to him on his 18th birthday. On the 10th anniversary of his mother’s death, he gave a speech at the Thanksgiving Service in which he said: "What is far more important to us now is how she is remembered as she was: fun-loving, generous, down-to-earth, entirely genuine." Prince Harry also has his own monogram. It’s a lovely curly "H" with a crown on the top. When commenting on the Las Vegas naked picture scandal, Prince Harry said that "at the end of the day I probably let myself down, I let my family down, I let other people down," but also that "I was in a private area and there should have been a certain amount of privacy that should have been expected." Quite right, too. In an interview with NBC News, Harry said he would never stop wondering about the night that his mother died and what happened in that tunnel. There was an American TV show called I Wanna Marry Harry, in which 12 women were led to believe that they were competing for Prince Harry's affections. The Harry in question was an actor, so they weren't. Apparently he can fix a broken cable TV – which would come in very handy for anyone struggling to watch I Wanna Marry Harry. While visiting a temporary home in Valparaiso in Chile, he noticed a family’s TV cable wasn’t working and fixed it. He supports Arsenal Football Club. When he was a child, Princess Diana took William and Harry around homeless projects and Aids wards in the hope that it would give them an understanding of people’s emotions, insecurities and of people's hopes and dreams. As part of the Walking With The Wounded South Pole Allied Challenge of 2013, Harry became the first member of the royal family to reach the South Pole. He has named himself "the Funcle" (that's "Fun" "Uncle", for those of you wondering) of Prince George. When Prince Harry presented the rings at his brother’s wedding, he carried them in the cuff of his tunic as his military uniform didn’t have any pockets. Prince Harry was a supporter rather than a best man during the wedding. Apparently royal weddings don’t have a best man. Following training at the Royal Military Academy in Sandhurst, he was commissioned as a second lieutenant into the Blues and Royals of the Household Cavalry Regiment. Harry has three medals to his name: an Operation Service Medal for Afghanistan, Queen Elizabeth II Golden Jubilee Medal and Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal. Royal wedding | Read more
31 things you didn't know about Prince Harry
Prince Harry will marry Meghan Markle on Saturday at St George's Chapel, in one of the most anticipated events of the year. Since the moment he was born, the Prince's life has been recorded, photographed and documented. The public seemingly know everything there is to know about him. We were there for his parents' divorce and his mother’s death. We are all aware of his will-they-won't-they relationships, his job, that one time he wore a swastika and that other time he went to Las Vagas and got his kit off. But there is plenty we don't know about the prince. Here are 31 facts about the groom for you to impress fellow revellers with at your wedding-watching party. Prince Harry during a teacher training session at Eccles Rugby Club, Salford Credit: Rex Features When he started nursery school in London aged three, Prince Harry didn't automatically get on well with the other children and was reportedly picked on by bullies. His kind-heartedness started early. He owned a lop-eared rabbit that lived in a hutch in the stable yard at Highgrove. The young prince would also spend hours tending to the sheep on the country estate. Harry met his ex-girlfriend Cressida Bonas through his cousin Princess Eugenie in May 2012. Prince Harry and Cressida Bonas are actually related, albeit very distantly. She is rumoured to be Prince Harry’s ninth cousin through King Charles II. Harry had the idea for, and spearheaded, the Invictus Games: a Paralympic-style multi sport event for wounded, injured or sick servicemen and women. In 1997 he travelled to South Africa with his father where he met Nelson Mandela and watched the Spice Girls perform. In the Army, he was known as "Captain Wales". As a British prince, he doesn’t have a fixed surname and so instead used the name of the area over which his father holds title, as a territorial suffix in place of a surname. He’s a dab hand at the Fifa video game, which we know because he told the Press in an interview while out in Afghanistan, saying, "You can ask the guys, I thrash them at Fifa the whole time". Game on, Harry. He will not be reading this article. Not only because obviously there’s not a lot about himself he doesn’t know, but because neither he nor William take any pleasure in reading articles about themselves and try to avoid it if they can. He really hates Twitter. Poor man. One of his middle names is David. The other two are Charles and Albert. Aged 18, he spent his gap year in Australia and Lesotho. While in Australia, he spent time working, as his father had done, on a cattle station and participating in the Young England vs Young Australia Polo Test Match. In 2007-2008 he served for 77 days in Helmand, Afghanistan. He was pulled out after the publication of the story in an Australian magazine. He returned to Afghanistan for a 20-week deployment in 2012-2013 with the Army Air Corps He studied geography, art history and art at A-Level and left school with a B in art and a D in geography - enough to get him into Sandhurst. He produced the documentary film The Forgotten Kingdom during his gap year in Lesotho, where he also visited Mants’ase Children’s Home near Mohale’s Hoek. He was educated at Eton College, famous for having graduates from the world of politics and business. He has his own coat of arms, granted to him on his 18th birthday. On the 10th anniversary of his mother’s death, he gave a speech at the Thanksgiving Service in which he said: "What is far more important to us now is how she is remembered as she was: fun-loving, generous, down-to-earth, entirely genuine." Prince Harry also has his own monogram. It’s a lovely curly "H" with a crown on the top. When commenting on the Las Vegas naked picture scandal, Prince Harry said that "at the end of the day I probably let myself down, I let my family down, I let other people down," but also that "I was in a private area and there should have been a certain amount of privacy that should have been expected." Quite right, too. In an interview with NBC News, Harry said he would never stop wondering about the night that his mother died and what happened in that tunnel. There was an American TV show called I Wanna Marry Harry, in which 12 women were led to believe that they were competing for Prince Harry's affections. The Harry in question was an actor, so they weren't. Apparently he can fix a broken cable TV – which would come in very handy for anyone struggling to watch I Wanna Marry Harry. While visiting a temporary home in Valparaiso in Chile, he noticed a family’s TV cable wasn’t working and fixed it. He supports Arsenal Football Club. When he was a child, Princess Diana took William and Harry around homeless projects and Aids wards in the hope that it would give them an understanding of people’s emotions, insecurities and of people's hopes and dreams. As part of the Walking With The Wounded South Pole Allied Challenge of 2013, Harry became the first member of the royal family to reach the South Pole. He has named himself "the Funcle" (that's "Fun" "Uncle", for those of you wondering) of Prince George. When Prince Harry presented the rings at his brother’s wedding, he carried them in the cuff of his tunic as his military uniform didn’t have any pockets. Prince Harry was a supporter rather than a best man during the wedding. Apparently royal weddings don’t have a best man. Following training at the Royal Military Academy in Sandhurst, he was commissioned as a second lieutenant into the Blues and Royals of the Household Cavalry Regiment. Harry has three medals to his name: an Operation Service Medal for Afghanistan, Queen Elizabeth II Golden Jubilee Medal and Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal. Royal wedding | Read more
Prince Harry will marry Meghan Markle on Saturday at St George's Chapel, in one of the most anticipated events of the year. Since the moment he was born, the Prince's life has been recorded, photographed and documented. The public seemingly know everything there is to know about him. We were there for his parents' divorce and his mother’s death. We are all aware of his will-they-won't-they relationships, his job, that one time he wore a swastika and that other time he went to Las Vagas and got his kit off. But there is plenty we don't know about the prince. Here are 31 facts about the groom for you to impress fellow revellers with at your wedding-watching party. Prince Harry during a teacher training session at Eccles Rugby Club, Salford Credit: Rex Features When he started nursery school in London aged three, Prince Harry didn't automatically get on well with the other children and was reportedly picked on by bullies. His kind-heartedness started early. He owned a lop-eared rabbit that lived in a hutch in the stable yard at Highgrove. The young prince would also spend hours tending to the sheep on the country estate. Harry met his ex-girlfriend Cressida Bonas through his cousin Princess Eugenie in May 2012. Prince Harry and Cressida Bonas are actually related, albeit very distantly. She is rumoured to be Prince Harry’s ninth cousin through King Charles II. Harry had the idea for, and spearheaded, the Invictus Games: a Paralympic-style multi sport event for wounded, injured or sick servicemen and women. In 1997 he travelled to South Africa with his father where he met Nelson Mandela and watched the Spice Girls perform. In the Army, he was known as "Captain Wales". As a British prince, he doesn’t have a fixed surname and so instead used the name of the area over which his father holds title, as a territorial suffix in place of a surname. He’s a dab hand at the Fifa video game, which we know because he told the Press in an interview while out in Afghanistan, saying, "You can ask the guys, I thrash them at Fifa the whole time". Game on, Harry. He will not be reading this article. Not only because obviously there’s not a lot about himself he doesn’t know, but because neither he nor William take any pleasure in reading articles about themselves and try to avoid it if they can. He really hates Twitter. Poor man. One of his middle names is David. The other two are Charles and Albert. Aged 18, he spent his gap year in Australia and Lesotho. While in Australia, he spent time working, as his father had done, on a cattle station and participating in the Young England vs Young Australia Polo Test Match. In 2007-2008 he served for 77 days in Helmand, Afghanistan. He was pulled out after the publication of the story in an Australian magazine. He returned to Afghanistan for a 20-week deployment in 2012-2013 with the Army Air Corps He studied geography, art history and art at A-Level and left school with a B in art and a D in geography - enough to get him into Sandhurst. He produced the documentary film The Forgotten Kingdom during his gap year in Lesotho, where he also visited Mants’ase Children’s Home near Mohale’s Hoek. He was educated at Eton College, famous for having graduates from the world of politics and business. He has his own coat of arms, granted to him on his 18th birthday. On the 10th anniversary of his mother’s death, he gave a speech at the Thanksgiving Service in which he said: "What is far more important to us now is how she is remembered as she was: fun-loving, generous, down-to-earth, entirely genuine." Prince Harry also has his own monogram. It’s a lovely curly "H" with a crown on the top. When commenting on the Las Vegas naked picture scandal, Prince Harry said that "at the end of the day I probably let myself down, I let my family down, I let other people down," but also that "I was in a private area and there should have been a certain amount of privacy that should have been expected." Quite right, too. In an interview with NBC News, Harry said he would never stop wondering about the night that his mother died and what happened in that tunnel. There was an American TV show called I Wanna Marry Harry, in which 12 women were led to believe that they were competing for Prince Harry's affections. The Harry in question was an actor, so they weren't. Apparently he can fix a broken cable TV – which would come in very handy for anyone struggling to watch I Wanna Marry Harry. While visiting a temporary home in Valparaiso in Chile, he noticed a family’s TV cable wasn’t working and fixed it. He supports Arsenal Football Club. When he was a child, Princess Diana took William and Harry around homeless projects and Aids wards in the hope that it would give them an understanding of people’s emotions, insecurities and of people's hopes and dreams. As part of the Walking With The Wounded South Pole Allied Challenge of 2013, Harry became the first member of the royal family to reach the South Pole. He has named himself "the Funcle" (that's "Fun" "Uncle", for those of you wondering) of Prince George. When Prince Harry presented the rings at his brother’s wedding, he carried them in the cuff of his tunic as his military uniform didn’t have any pockets. Prince Harry was a supporter rather than a best man during the wedding. Apparently royal weddings don’t have a best man. Following training at the Royal Military Academy in Sandhurst, he was commissioned as a second lieutenant into the Blues and Royals of the Household Cavalry Regiment. Harry has three medals to his name: an Operation Service Medal for Afghanistan, Queen Elizabeth II Golden Jubilee Medal and Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal. Royal wedding | Read more
31 things you didn't know about Prince Harry
Prince Harry will marry Meghan Markle on Saturday at St George's Chapel, in one of the most anticipated events of the year. Since the moment he was born, the Prince's life has been recorded, photographed and documented. The public seemingly know everything there is to know about him. We were there for his parents' divorce and his mother’s death. We are all aware of his will-they-won't-they relationships, his job, that one time he wore a swastika and that other time he went to Las Vagas and got his kit off. But there is plenty we don't know about the prince. Here are 31 facts about the groom for you to impress fellow revellers with at your wedding-watching party. Prince Harry during a teacher training session at Eccles Rugby Club, Salford Credit: Rex Features When he started nursery school in London aged three, Prince Harry didn't automatically get on well with the other children and was reportedly picked on by bullies. His kind-heartedness started early. He owned a lop-eared rabbit that lived in a hutch in the stable yard at Highgrove. The young prince would also spend hours tending to the sheep on the country estate. Harry met his ex-girlfriend Cressida Bonas through his cousin Princess Eugenie in May 2012. Prince Harry and Cressida Bonas are actually related, albeit very distantly. She is rumoured to be Prince Harry’s ninth cousin through King Charles II. Harry had the idea for, and spearheaded, the Invictus Games: a Paralympic-style multi sport event for wounded, injured or sick servicemen and women. In 1997 he travelled to South Africa with his father where he met Nelson Mandela and watched the Spice Girls perform. In the Army, he was known as "Captain Wales". As a British prince, he doesn’t have a fixed surname and so instead used the name of the area over which his father holds title, as a territorial suffix in place of a surname. He’s a dab hand at the Fifa video game, which we know because he told the Press in an interview while out in Afghanistan, saying, "You can ask the guys, I thrash them at Fifa the whole time". Game on, Harry. He will not be reading this article. Not only because obviously there’s not a lot about himself he doesn’t know, but because neither he nor William take any pleasure in reading articles about themselves and try to avoid it if they can. He really hates Twitter. Poor man. One of his middle names is David. The other two are Charles and Albert. Aged 18, he spent his gap year in Australia and Lesotho. While in Australia, he spent time working, as his father had done, on a cattle station and participating in the Young England vs Young Australia Polo Test Match. In 2007-2008 he served for 77 days in Helmand, Afghanistan. He was pulled out after the publication of the story in an Australian magazine. He returned to Afghanistan for a 20-week deployment in 2012-2013 with the Army Air Corps He studied geography, art history and art at A-Level and left school with a B in art and a D in geography - enough to get him into Sandhurst. He produced the documentary film The Forgotten Kingdom during his gap year in Lesotho, where he also visited Mants’ase Children’s Home near Mohale’s Hoek. He was educated at Eton College, famous for having graduates from the world of politics and business. He has his own coat of arms, granted to him on his 18th birthday. On the 10th anniversary of his mother’s death, he gave a speech at the Thanksgiving Service in which he said: "What is far more important to us now is how she is remembered as she was: fun-loving, generous, down-to-earth, entirely genuine." Prince Harry also has his own monogram. It’s a lovely curly "H" with a crown on the top. When commenting on the Las Vegas naked picture scandal, Prince Harry said that "at the end of the day I probably let myself down, I let my family down, I let other people down," but also that "I was in a private area and there should have been a certain amount of privacy that should have been expected." Quite right, too. In an interview with NBC News, Harry said he would never stop wondering about the night that his mother died and what happened in that tunnel. There was an American TV show called I Wanna Marry Harry, in which 12 women were led to believe that they were competing for Prince Harry's affections. The Harry in question was an actor, so they weren't. Apparently he can fix a broken cable TV – which would come in very handy for anyone struggling to watch I Wanna Marry Harry. While visiting a temporary home in Valparaiso in Chile, he noticed a family’s TV cable wasn’t working and fixed it. He supports Arsenal Football Club. When he was a child, Princess Diana took William and Harry around homeless projects and Aids wards in the hope that it would give them an understanding of people’s emotions, insecurities and of people's hopes and dreams. As part of the Walking With The Wounded South Pole Allied Challenge of 2013, Harry became the first member of the royal family to reach the South Pole. He has named himself "the Funcle" (that's "Fun" "Uncle", for those of you wondering) of Prince George. When Prince Harry presented the rings at his brother’s wedding, he carried them in the cuff of his tunic as his military uniform didn’t have any pockets. Prince Harry was a supporter rather than a best man during the wedding. Apparently royal weddings don’t have a best man. Following training at the Royal Military Academy in Sandhurst, he was commissioned as a second lieutenant into the Blues and Royals of the Household Cavalry Regiment. Harry has three medals to his name: an Operation Service Medal for Afghanistan, Queen Elizabeth II Golden Jubilee Medal and Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal. Royal wedding | Read more
 Dame Tessa Jowell’s dying wish that NHS cancer patients be offered experimental methods of treatment will be granted as part of her “lasting legacy”, ministers have announced. Theresa May agreed a new £20 million fund to fight the disease as she paid tribute to the “inspirational” Labour grandee, who has died aged 70 a year after being diagnosed with brain cancer. As leading politicians from across the political divide and from the world of sport united in praise of the “heroically brave” former culture secretary and Olympics minister, her family said she had passed away in the arms of her husband and two children. Her daughter-in-law Ella Mills said her family had told her she would “live forever in the centre of their souls”. Jeremy Hunt, the Health Secretary, said that “her legacy will be lives saved and heartbreak averted for thousands of other families” as his department arranged the rollout of a series of treatments Dame Tessa had called for. The Prime Minister praised her “dignity and courage” in confronting “a terrible disease”. Matt’s extraordinary Mum passed away last night. She was lying in Matt, his sister Jess, and their Dad’s arms, as they told her that she would live forever in the centre of their souls. I’ve never seen love like I have since becoming part of this family. Tessa was the warmest and kindest soul, she welcomed me so generously into their family, and no matter what she has achieved in her life - and she achieved an extraordinary amount - I know her family are the thing that made her most proud. They were the complete core of her life and I’m honored to be part of it. Thank you for giving me Matt, Tessa, and for teaching us all so much about love, kindness, optimism and courage. The bravery you showed this past year was like nothing I have ever seen and I will be inspired by it every day of my life. Matt carries every bit of your goodness, drive, compassion and love, and I’ll look after him forever. xxxx A post shared by Deliciously Ella (@deliciouslyella) on May 13, 2018 at 12:43am PDT Dame Tessa, who spent her final months campaigning for better cancer care, died “peacefully” at her Warwickshire home on Saturday night after suffering a brain haemorrhage the previous day that left her in a coma. Ms Mills, who is the wife of Dame Tessa’s son, wrote in a tribute posted online: “She was lying in Matt, his sister Jess, and their Dad's arms, as they told her that she would live forever in the centre of their souls. “I've never seen love like I have since becoming part of this family. Tessa was the warmest and kindest soul...the bravery you showed this past year was like nothing I have ever seen and I will be inspired by it every day of my life.” Tony Blair, the former prime minister, said: "Tessa had passion, determination and simple human decency in greater measure than any person I have ever known. She was an inspiration to work with, and a joy to be near. She was the most wise of counsellors, the most loyal and supportive of colleagues, and the best of friends.” In a speech which moved fellow peers to tears and resulted in a standing ovation in the House of Lords in January, Dame Tessa described how she was diagnosed with a rare glioblastoma multiforme tumour in May last year. She said she had been on her way to deliver a talk in east London and: “I got into a taxi but couldn't speak. I had two powerful seizures. I was taken to hospital. Two days later, I was told that I had a brain tumour.” A week later she had surgery to remove the tumour, followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, which failed to prevent its return. She made her speech in the Lords wearing an electronic skull cap that fired electrical currents at her tumour. The Government today announces that it is doubling investment in brain cancer research from £20m to £40m for what will be known as the Tessa Jowell Brain Cancer Research Fund, which will total £65m when existing private donations are taken into account. An annual Tessa Jowell global symposium will be launched in the UK to bring together the world’s leading experts on brain cancer in the search for new treatments. Tessa Jowell with Gordon Brown and Denise Lewis, outside 10 Downing Street, with the torch for the 2008 Beijing Olympics Credit: Ian Walton/Getty Images The NHS will also roll out nationally a “gold standard” brain cancer diagnosis test, involving the use of dye to identify tumours, which had until now only been available in half of cancer units, as highlighted by Dame Tessa. Hospitals will also accelerate the use of so-called adaptive trials, in which several treatments can be tried at once to increase the chance of success, in line with another of Dame Tessa’s requests. Ministers have stopped short of re-introducing the so-called Saatchi Bill, sponsored by Lord Saatchi following his wife’s death from ovarian cancer, which would have changed the law to allow the use of untested treatments at patients’ request. Dame Tessa had said in her speech to the House of Lords: “I am not afraid, but I am fearful that this new and important approach may be put into the 'too difficult' box. "I hope this debate will give hope to other cancer patients like me so that we can live well with cancer, not just be dying of it." Answering her call, Mrs May said: “I hope that the actions we are taking now and in the future to improve care and research for those confronting a terrible disease will form part of the lasting legacy of an inspirational woman." Tessa Jowell and David Beckham celebrate as London are named hosts of the 2012 Olympic Games, in Singapore in July 2005 Credit: John Gichigi/Getty Images Lord Sebastian Coe, president of the IAAF and former chairman of the London organising committee of the Olympic Games, said that without Dame Tessa’s contribution the UK would not have won the 2012 bid. "Her contribution to the Olympic and Paralympic Games is easily defined - quite simply, without Tessa there would have been no London 2012, and without Tessa they would not have been the success they were,” he added. "No politician deserves greater credit for the Games. She showed unflinching tenacity in persuading the Prime Minister and the Cabinet that the Government should throw its full weight behind the bid." Tessa Jowell with Denis Healey, then Chancellor of the Exchequer, at a 1978 press conference in Ilford North, where they were campaigning in support of Jowell Credit: PA Chair of UK Sport and Olympic gold medal winner Dame Katherine Grainger said: "Her accomplishments are enormous but just as impressive is how she achieved them: with decency, determination, guts and grace. “Others have already noted how there would have been no London 2012 without Tessa’s vision and drive. Tessa was a true believer in the power and inspiration of sport, for which all of us who benefited from her support and conviction will be eternally grateful. Her legacy lives on.” Dame Tessa's family said there will be a small private funeral followed by a public memorial service at a later date.
Dame Tessa Jowell's 'legacy' will be the cancer treatments she campaigned for, ministers announce
Dame Tessa Jowell’s dying wish that NHS cancer patients be offered experimental methods of treatment will be granted as part of her “lasting legacy”, ministers have announced. Theresa May agreed a new £20 million fund to fight the disease as she paid tribute to the “inspirational” Labour grandee, who has died aged 70 a year after being diagnosed with brain cancer. As leading politicians from across the political divide and from the world of sport united in praise of the “heroically brave” former culture secretary and Olympics minister, her family said she had passed away in the arms of her husband and two children. Her daughter-in-law Ella Mills said her family had told her she would “live forever in the centre of their souls”. Jeremy Hunt, the Health Secretary, said that “her legacy will be lives saved and heartbreak averted for thousands of other families” as his department arranged the rollout of a series of treatments Dame Tessa had called for. The Prime Minister praised her “dignity and courage” in confronting “a terrible disease”. Matt’s extraordinary Mum passed away last night. She was lying in Matt, his sister Jess, and their Dad’s arms, as they told her that she would live forever in the centre of their souls. I’ve never seen love like I have since becoming part of this family. Tessa was the warmest and kindest soul, she welcomed me so generously into their family, and no matter what she has achieved in her life - and she achieved an extraordinary amount - I know her family are the thing that made her most proud. They were the complete core of her life and I’m honored to be part of it. Thank you for giving me Matt, Tessa, and for teaching us all so much about love, kindness, optimism and courage. The bravery you showed this past year was like nothing I have ever seen and I will be inspired by it every day of my life. Matt carries every bit of your goodness, drive, compassion and love, and I’ll look after him forever. xxxx A post shared by Deliciously Ella (@deliciouslyella) on May 13, 2018 at 12:43am PDT Dame Tessa, who spent her final months campaigning for better cancer care, died “peacefully” at her Warwickshire home on Saturday night after suffering a brain haemorrhage the previous day that left her in a coma. Ms Mills, who is the wife of Dame Tessa’s son, wrote in a tribute posted online: “She was lying in Matt, his sister Jess, and their Dad's arms, as they told her that she would live forever in the centre of their souls. “I've never seen love like I have since becoming part of this family. Tessa was the warmest and kindest soul...the bravery you showed this past year was like nothing I have ever seen and I will be inspired by it every day of my life.” Tony Blair, the former prime minister, said: "Tessa had passion, determination and simple human decency in greater measure than any person I have ever known. She was an inspiration to work with, and a joy to be near. She was the most wise of counsellors, the most loyal and supportive of colleagues, and the best of friends.” In a speech which moved fellow peers to tears and resulted in a standing ovation in the House of Lords in January, Dame Tessa described how she was diagnosed with a rare glioblastoma multiforme tumour in May last year. She said she had been on her way to deliver a talk in east London and: “I got into a taxi but couldn't speak. I had two powerful seizures. I was taken to hospital. Two days later, I was told that I had a brain tumour.” A week later she had surgery to remove the tumour, followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, which failed to prevent its return. She made her speech in the Lords wearing an electronic skull cap that fired electrical currents at her tumour. The Government today announces that it is doubling investment in brain cancer research from £20m to £40m for what will be known as the Tessa Jowell Brain Cancer Research Fund, which will total £65m when existing private donations are taken into account. An annual Tessa Jowell global symposium will be launched in the UK to bring together the world’s leading experts on brain cancer in the search for new treatments. Tessa Jowell with Gordon Brown and Denise Lewis, outside 10 Downing Street, with the torch for the 2008 Beijing Olympics Credit: Ian Walton/Getty Images The NHS will also roll out nationally a “gold standard” brain cancer diagnosis test, involving the use of dye to identify tumours, which had until now only been available in half of cancer units, as highlighted by Dame Tessa. Hospitals will also accelerate the use of so-called adaptive trials, in which several treatments can be tried at once to increase the chance of success, in line with another of Dame Tessa’s requests. Ministers have stopped short of re-introducing the so-called Saatchi Bill, sponsored by Lord Saatchi following his wife’s death from ovarian cancer, which would have changed the law to allow the use of untested treatments at patients’ request. Dame Tessa had said in her speech to the House of Lords: “I am not afraid, but I am fearful that this new and important approach may be put into the 'too difficult' box. "I hope this debate will give hope to other cancer patients like me so that we can live well with cancer, not just be dying of it." Answering her call, Mrs May said: “I hope that the actions we are taking now and in the future to improve care and research for those confronting a terrible disease will form part of the lasting legacy of an inspirational woman." Tessa Jowell and David Beckham celebrate as London are named hosts of the 2012 Olympic Games, in Singapore in July 2005 Credit: John Gichigi/Getty Images Lord Sebastian Coe, president of the IAAF and former chairman of the London organising committee of the Olympic Games, said that without Dame Tessa’s contribution the UK would not have won the 2012 bid. "Her contribution to the Olympic and Paralympic Games is easily defined - quite simply, without Tessa there would have been no London 2012, and without Tessa they would not have been the success they were,” he added. "No politician deserves greater credit for the Games. She showed unflinching tenacity in persuading the Prime Minister and the Cabinet that the Government should throw its full weight behind the bid." Tessa Jowell with Denis Healey, then Chancellor of the Exchequer, at a 1978 press conference in Ilford North, where they were campaigning in support of Jowell Credit: PA Chair of UK Sport and Olympic gold medal winner Dame Katherine Grainger said: "Her accomplishments are enormous but just as impressive is how she achieved them: with decency, determination, guts and grace. “Others have already noted how there would have been no London 2012 without Tessa’s vision and drive. Tessa was a true believer in the power and inspiration of sport, for which all of us who benefited from her support and conviction will be eternally grateful. Her legacy lives on.” Dame Tessa's family said there will be a small private funeral followed by a public memorial service at a later date.
 Dame Tessa Jowell’s dying wish that NHS cancer patients be offered experimental methods of treatment will be granted as part of her “lasting legacy”, ministers have announced. Theresa May agreed a new £20 million fund to fight the disease as she paid tribute to the “inspirational” Labour grandee, who has died aged 70 a year after being diagnosed with brain cancer. As leading politicians from across the political divide and from the world of sport united in praise of the “heroically brave” former culture secretary and Olympics minister, her family said she had passed away in the arms of her husband and two children. Her daughter-in-law Ella Mills said her family had told her she would “live forever in the centre of their souls”. Jeremy Hunt, the Health Secretary, said that “her legacy will be lives saved and heartbreak averted for thousands of other families” as his department arranged the rollout of a series of treatments Dame Tessa had called for. The Prime Minister praised her “dignity and courage” in confronting “a terrible disease”. Matt’s extraordinary Mum passed away last night. She was lying in Matt, his sister Jess, and their Dad’s arms, as they told her that she would live forever in the centre of their souls. I’ve never seen love like I have since becoming part of this family. Tessa was the warmest and kindest soul, she welcomed me so generously into their family, and no matter what she has achieved in her life - and she achieved an extraordinary amount - I know her family are the thing that made her most proud. They were the complete core of her life and I’m honored to be part of it. Thank you for giving me Matt, Tessa, and for teaching us all so much about love, kindness, optimism and courage. The bravery you showed this past year was like nothing I have ever seen and I will be inspired by it every day of my life. Matt carries every bit of your goodness, drive, compassion and love, and I’ll look after him forever. xxxx A post shared by Deliciously Ella (@deliciouslyella) on May 13, 2018 at 12:43am PDT Dame Tessa, who spent her final months campaigning for better cancer care, died “peacefully” at her Warwickshire home on Saturday night after suffering a brain haemorrhage the previous day that left her in a coma. Ms Mills, who is the wife of Dame Tessa’s son, wrote in a tribute posted online: “She was lying in Matt, his sister Jess, and their Dad's arms, as they told her that she would live forever in the centre of their souls. “I've never seen love like I have since becoming part of this family. Tessa was the warmest and kindest soul...the bravery you showed this past year was like nothing I have ever seen and I will be inspired by it every day of my life.” Tony Blair, the former prime minister, said: "Tessa had passion, determination and simple human decency in greater measure than any person I have ever known. She was an inspiration to work with, and a joy to be near. She was the most wise of counsellors, the most loyal and supportive of colleagues, and the best of friends.” In a speech which moved fellow peers to tears and resulted in a standing ovation in the House of Lords in January, Dame Tessa described how she was diagnosed with a rare glioblastoma multiforme tumour in May last year. She said she had been on her way to deliver a talk in east London and: “I got into a taxi but couldn't speak. I had two powerful seizures. I was taken to hospital. Two days later, I was told that I had a brain tumour.” A week later she had surgery to remove the tumour, followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, which failed to prevent its return. She made her speech in the Lords wearing an electronic skull cap that fired electrical currents at her tumour. The Government today announces that it is doubling investment in brain cancer research from £20m to £40m for what will be known as the Tessa Jowell Brain Cancer Research Fund, which will total £65m when existing private donations are taken into account. An annual Tessa Jowell global symposium will be launched in the UK to bring together the world’s leading experts on brain cancer in the search for new treatments. Tessa Jowell with Gordon Brown and Denise Lewis, outside 10 Downing Street, with the torch for the 2008 Beijing Olympics Credit: Ian Walton/Getty Images The NHS will also roll out nationally a “gold standard” brain cancer diagnosis test, involving the use of dye to identify tumours, which had until now only been available in half of cancer units, as highlighted by Dame Tessa. Hospitals will also accelerate the use of so-called adaptive trials, in which several treatments can be tried at once to increase the chance of success, in line with another of Dame Tessa’s requests. Ministers have stopped short of re-introducing the so-called Saatchi Bill, sponsored by Lord Saatchi following his wife’s death from ovarian cancer, which would have changed the law to allow the use of untested treatments at patients’ request. Dame Tessa had said in her speech to the House of Lords: “I am not afraid, but I am fearful that this new and important approach may be put into the 'too difficult' box. "I hope this debate will give hope to other cancer patients like me so that we can live well with cancer, not just be dying of it." Answering her call, Mrs May said: “I hope that the actions we are taking now and in the future to improve care and research for those confronting a terrible disease will form part of the lasting legacy of an inspirational woman." Tessa Jowell and David Beckham celebrate as London are named hosts of the 2012 Olympic Games, in Singapore in July 2005 Credit: John Gichigi/Getty Images Lord Sebastian Coe, president of the IAAF and former chairman of the London organising committee of the Olympic Games, said that without Dame Tessa’s contribution the UK would not have won the 2012 bid. "Her contribution to the Olympic and Paralympic Games is easily defined - quite simply, without Tessa there would have been no London 2012, and without Tessa they would not have been the success they were,” he added. "No politician deserves greater credit for the Games. She showed unflinching tenacity in persuading the Prime Minister and the Cabinet that the Government should throw its full weight behind the bid." Tessa Jowell with Denis Healey, then Chancellor of the Exchequer, at a 1978 press conference in Ilford North, where they were campaigning in support of Jowell Credit: PA Chair of UK Sport and Olympic gold medal winner Dame Katherine Grainger said: "Her accomplishments are enormous but just as impressive is how she achieved them: with decency, determination, guts and grace. “Others have already noted how there would have been no London 2012 without Tessa’s vision and drive. Tessa was a true believer in the power and inspiration of sport, for which all of us who benefited from her support and conviction will be eternally grateful. Her legacy lives on.” Dame Tessa's family said there will be a small private funeral followed by a public memorial service at a later date.
Dame Tessa Jowell's 'legacy' will be the cancer treatments she campaigned for, ministers announce
Dame Tessa Jowell’s dying wish that NHS cancer patients be offered experimental methods of treatment will be granted as part of her “lasting legacy”, ministers have announced. Theresa May agreed a new £20 million fund to fight the disease as she paid tribute to the “inspirational” Labour grandee, who has died aged 70 a year after being diagnosed with brain cancer. As leading politicians from across the political divide and from the world of sport united in praise of the “heroically brave” former culture secretary and Olympics minister, her family said she had passed away in the arms of her husband and two children. Her daughter-in-law Ella Mills said her family had told her she would “live forever in the centre of their souls”. Jeremy Hunt, the Health Secretary, said that “her legacy will be lives saved and heartbreak averted for thousands of other families” as his department arranged the rollout of a series of treatments Dame Tessa had called for. The Prime Minister praised her “dignity and courage” in confronting “a terrible disease”. Matt’s extraordinary Mum passed away last night. She was lying in Matt, his sister Jess, and their Dad’s arms, as they told her that she would live forever in the centre of their souls. I’ve never seen love like I have since becoming part of this family. Tessa was the warmest and kindest soul, she welcomed me so generously into their family, and no matter what she has achieved in her life - and she achieved an extraordinary amount - I know her family are the thing that made her most proud. They were the complete core of her life and I’m honored to be part of it. Thank you for giving me Matt, Tessa, and for teaching us all so much about love, kindness, optimism and courage. The bravery you showed this past year was like nothing I have ever seen and I will be inspired by it every day of my life. Matt carries every bit of your goodness, drive, compassion and love, and I’ll look after him forever. xxxx A post shared by Deliciously Ella (@deliciouslyella) on May 13, 2018 at 12:43am PDT Dame Tessa, who spent her final months campaigning for better cancer care, died “peacefully” at her Warwickshire home on Saturday night after suffering a brain haemorrhage the previous day that left her in a coma. Ms Mills, who is the wife of Dame Tessa’s son, wrote in a tribute posted online: “She was lying in Matt, his sister Jess, and their Dad's arms, as they told her that she would live forever in the centre of their souls. “I've never seen love like I have since becoming part of this family. Tessa was the warmest and kindest soul...the bravery you showed this past year was like nothing I have ever seen and I will be inspired by it every day of my life.” Tony Blair, the former prime minister, said: "Tessa had passion, determination and simple human decency in greater measure than any person I have ever known. She was an inspiration to work with, and a joy to be near. She was the most wise of counsellors, the most loyal and supportive of colleagues, and the best of friends.” In a speech which moved fellow peers to tears and resulted in a standing ovation in the House of Lords in January, Dame Tessa described how she was diagnosed with a rare glioblastoma multiforme tumour in May last year. She said she had been on her way to deliver a talk in east London and: “I got into a taxi but couldn't speak. I had two powerful seizures. I was taken to hospital. Two days later, I was told that I had a brain tumour.” A week later she had surgery to remove the tumour, followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, which failed to prevent its return. She made her speech in the Lords wearing an electronic skull cap that fired electrical currents at her tumour. The Government today announces that it is doubling investment in brain cancer research from £20m to £40m for what will be known as the Tessa Jowell Brain Cancer Research Fund, which will total £65m when existing private donations are taken into account. An annual Tessa Jowell global symposium will be launched in the UK to bring together the world’s leading experts on brain cancer in the search for new treatments. Tessa Jowell with Gordon Brown and Denise Lewis, outside 10 Downing Street, with the torch for the 2008 Beijing Olympics Credit: Ian Walton/Getty Images The NHS will also roll out nationally a “gold standard” brain cancer diagnosis test, involving the use of dye to identify tumours, which had until now only been available in half of cancer units, as highlighted by Dame Tessa. Hospitals will also accelerate the use of so-called adaptive trials, in which several treatments can be tried at once to increase the chance of success, in line with another of Dame Tessa’s requests. Ministers have stopped short of re-introducing the so-called Saatchi Bill, sponsored by Lord Saatchi following his wife’s death from ovarian cancer, which would have changed the law to allow the use of untested treatments at patients’ request. Dame Tessa had said in her speech to the House of Lords: “I am not afraid, but I am fearful that this new and important approach may be put into the 'too difficult' box. "I hope this debate will give hope to other cancer patients like me so that we can live well with cancer, not just be dying of it." Answering her call, Mrs May said: “I hope that the actions we are taking now and in the future to improve care and research for those confronting a terrible disease will form part of the lasting legacy of an inspirational woman." Tessa Jowell and David Beckham celebrate as London are named hosts of the 2012 Olympic Games, in Singapore in July 2005 Credit: John Gichigi/Getty Images Lord Sebastian Coe, president of the IAAF and former chairman of the London organising committee of the Olympic Games, said that without Dame Tessa’s contribution the UK would not have won the 2012 bid. "Her contribution to the Olympic and Paralympic Games is easily defined - quite simply, without Tessa there would have been no London 2012, and without Tessa they would not have been the success they were,” he added. "No politician deserves greater credit for the Games. She showed unflinching tenacity in persuading the Prime Minister and the Cabinet that the Government should throw its full weight behind the bid." Tessa Jowell with Denis Healey, then Chancellor of the Exchequer, at a 1978 press conference in Ilford North, where they were campaigning in support of Jowell Credit: PA Chair of UK Sport and Olympic gold medal winner Dame Katherine Grainger said: "Her accomplishments are enormous but just as impressive is how she achieved them: with decency, determination, guts and grace. “Others have already noted how there would have been no London 2012 without Tessa’s vision and drive. Tessa was a true believer in the power and inspiration of sport, for which all of us who benefited from her support and conviction will be eternally grateful. Her legacy lives on.” Dame Tessa's family said there will be a small private funeral followed by a public memorial service at a later date.
 Dame Tessa Jowell’s dying wish that NHS cancer patients be offered experimental methods of treatment will be granted as part of her “lasting legacy”, ministers have announced. Theresa May agreed a new £20 million fund to fight the disease as she paid tribute to the “inspirational” Labour grandee, who has died aged 70 a year after being diagnosed with brain cancer. As leading politicians from across the political divide and from the world of sport united in praise of the “heroically brave” former culture secretary and Olympics minister, her family said she had passed away in the arms of her husband and two children. Her daughter-in-law Ella Mills said her family had told her she would “live forever in the centre of their souls”. Jeremy Hunt, the Health Secretary, said that “her legacy will be lives saved and heartbreak averted for thousands of other families” as his department arranged the rollout of a series of treatments Dame Tessa had called for. The Prime Minister praised her “dignity and courage” in confronting “a terrible disease”. Matt’s extraordinary Mum passed away last night. She was lying in Matt, his sister Jess, and their Dad’s arms, as they told her that she would live forever in the centre of their souls. I’ve never seen love like I have since becoming part of this family. Tessa was the warmest and kindest soul, she welcomed me so generously into their family, and no matter what she has achieved in her life - and she achieved an extraordinary amount - I know her family are the thing that made her most proud. They were the complete core of her life and I’m honored to be part of it. Thank you for giving me Matt, Tessa, and for teaching us all so much about love, kindness, optimism and courage. The bravery you showed this past year was like nothing I have ever seen and I will be inspired by it every day of my life. Matt carries every bit of your goodness, drive, compassion and love, and I’ll look after him forever. xxxx A post shared by Deliciously Ella (@deliciouslyella) on May 13, 2018 at 12:43am PDT Dame Tessa, who spent her final months campaigning for better cancer care, died “peacefully” at her Warwickshire home on Saturday night after suffering a brain haemorrhage the previous day that left her in a coma. Ms Mills, who is the wife of Dame Tessa’s son, wrote in a tribute posted online: “She was lying in Matt, his sister Jess, and their Dad's arms, as they told her that she would live forever in the centre of their souls. “I've never seen love like I have since becoming part of this family. Tessa was the warmest and kindest soul...the bravery you showed this past year was like nothing I have ever seen and I will be inspired by it every day of my life.” Tony Blair, the former prime minister, said: "Tessa had passion, determination and simple human decency in greater measure than any person I have ever known. She was an inspiration to work with, and a joy to be near. She was the most wise of counsellors, the most loyal and supportive of colleagues, and the best of friends.” In a speech which moved fellow peers to tears and resulted in a standing ovation in the House of Lords in January, Dame Tessa described how she was diagnosed with a rare glioblastoma multiforme tumour in May last year. She said she had been on her way to deliver a talk in east London and: “I got into a taxi but couldn't speak. I had two powerful seizures. I was taken to hospital. Two days later, I was told that I had a brain tumour.” A week later she had surgery to remove the tumour, followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, which failed to prevent its return. She made her speech in the Lords wearing an electronic skull cap that fired electrical currents at her tumour. The Government today announces that it is doubling investment in brain cancer research from £20m to £40m for what will be known as the Tessa Jowell Brain Cancer Research Fund, which will total £65m when existing private donations are taken into account. An annual Tessa Jowell global symposium will be launched in the UK to bring together the world’s leading experts on brain cancer in the search for new treatments. Tessa Jowell with Gordon Brown and Denise Lewis, outside 10 Downing Street, with the torch for the 2008 Beijing Olympics Credit: Ian Walton/Getty Images The NHS will also roll out nationally a “gold standard” brain cancer diagnosis test, involving the use of dye to identify tumours, which had until now only been available in half of cancer units, as highlighted by Dame Tessa. Hospitals will also accelerate the use of so-called adaptive trials, in which several treatments can be tried at once to increase the chance of success, in line with another of Dame Tessa’s requests. Ministers have stopped short of re-introducing the so-called Saatchi Bill, sponsored by Lord Saatchi following his wife’s death from ovarian cancer, which would have changed the law to allow the use of untested treatments at patients’ request. Dame Tessa had said in her speech to the House of Lords: “I am not afraid, but I am fearful that this new and important approach may be put into the 'too difficult' box. "I hope this debate will give hope to other cancer patients like me so that we can live well with cancer, not just be dying of it." Answering her call, Mrs May said: “I hope that the actions we are taking now and in the future to improve care and research for those confronting a terrible disease will form part of the lasting legacy of an inspirational woman." Tessa Jowell and David Beckham celebrate as London are named hosts of the 2012 Olympic Games, in Singapore in July 2005 Credit: John Gichigi/Getty Images Lord Sebastian Coe, president of the IAAF and former chairman of the London organising committee of the Olympic Games, said that without Dame Tessa’s contribution the UK would not have won the 2012 bid. "Her contribution to the Olympic and Paralympic Games is easily defined - quite simply, without Tessa there would have been no London 2012, and without Tessa they would not have been the success they were,” he added. "No politician deserves greater credit for the Games. She showed unflinching tenacity in persuading the Prime Minister and the Cabinet that the Government should throw its full weight behind the bid." Tessa Jowell with Denis Healey, then Chancellor of the Exchequer, at a 1978 press conference in Ilford North, where they were campaigning in support of Jowell Credit: PA Chair of UK Sport and Olympic gold medal winner Dame Katherine Grainger said: "Her accomplishments are enormous but just as impressive is how she achieved them: with decency, determination, guts and grace. “Others have already noted how there would have been no London 2012 without Tessa’s vision and drive. Tessa was a true believer in the power and inspiration of sport, for which all of us who benefited from her support and conviction will be eternally grateful. Her legacy lives on.” Dame Tessa's family said there will be a small private funeral followed by a public memorial service at a later date.
Dame Tessa Jowell's 'legacy' will be the cancer treatments she campaigned for, ministers announce
Dame Tessa Jowell’s dying wish that NHS cancer patients be offered experimental methods of treatment will be granted as part of her “lasting legacy”, ministers have announced. Theresa May agreed a new £20 million fund to fight the disease as she paid tribute to the “inspirational” Labour grandee, who has died aged 70 a year after being diagnosed with brain cancer. As leading politicians from across the political divide and from the world of sport united in praise of the “heroically brave” former culture secretary and Olympics minister, her family said she had passed away in the arms of her husband and two children. Her daughter-in-law Ella Mills said her family had told her she would “live forever in the centre of their souls”. Jeremy Hunt, the Health Secretary, said that “her legacy will be lives saved and heartbreak averted for thousands of other families” as his department arranged the rollout of a series of treatments Dame Tessa had called for. The Prime Minister praised her “dignity and courage” in confronting “a terrible disease”. Matt’s extraordinary Mum passed away last night. She was lying in Matt, his sister Jess, and their Dad’s arms, as they told her that she would live forever in the centre of their souls. I’ve never seen love like I have since becoming part of this family. Tessa was the warmest and kindest soul, she welcomed me so generously into their family, and no matter what she has achieved in her life - and she achieved an extraordinary amount - I know her family are the thing that made her most proud. They were the complete core of her life and I’m honored to be part of it. Thank you for giving me Matt, Tessa, and for teaching us all so much about love, kindness, optimism and courage. The bravery you showed this past year was like nothing I have ever seen and I will be inspired by it every day of my life. Matt carries every bit of your goodness, drive, compassion and love, and I’ll look after him forever. xxxx A post shared by Deliciously Ella (@deliciouslyella) on May 13, 2018 at 12:43am PDT Dame Tessa, who spent her final months campaigning for better cancer care, died “peacefully” at her Warwickshire home on Saturday night after suffering a brain haemorrhage the previous day that left her in a coma. Ms Mills, who is the wife of Dame Tessa’s son, wrote in a tribute posted online: “She was lying in Matt, his sister Jess, and their Dad's arms, as they told her that she would live forever in the centre of their souls. “I've never seen love like I have since becoming part of this family. Tessa was the warmest and kindest soul...the bravery you showed this past year was like nothing I have ever seen and I will be inspired by it every day of my life.” Tony Blair, the former prime minister, said: "Tessa had passion, determination and simple human decency in greater measure than any person I have ever known. She was an inspiration to work with, and a joy to be near. She was the most wise of counsellors, the most loyal and supportive of colleagues, and the best of friends.” In a speech which moved fellow peers to tears and resulted in a standing ovation in the House of Lords in January, Dame Tessa described how she was diagnosed with a rare glioblastoma multiforme tumour in May last year. She said she had been on her way to deliver a talk in east London and: “I got into a taxi but couldn't speak. I had two powerful seizures. I was taken to hospital. Two days later, I was told that I had a brain tumour.” A week later she had surgery to remove the tumour, followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, which failed to prevent its return. She made her speech in the Lords wearing an electronic skull cap that fired electrical currents at her tumour. The Government today announces that it is doubling investment in brain cancer research from £20m to £40m for what will be known as the Tessa Jowell Brain Cancer Research Fund, which will total £65m when existing private donations are taken into account. An annual Tessa Jowell global symposium will be launched in the UK to bring together the world’s leading experts on brain cancer in the search for new treatments. Tessa Jowell with Gordon Brown and Denise Lewis, outside 10 Downing Street, with the torch for the 2008 Beijing Olympics Credit: Ian Walton/Getty Images The NHS will also roll out nationally a “gold standard” brain cancer diagnosis test, involving the use of dye to identify tumours, which had until now only been available in half of cancer units, as highlighted by Dame Tessa. Hospitals will also accelerate the use of so-called adaptive trials, in which several treatments can be tried at once to increase the chance of success, in line with another of Dame Tessa’s requests. Ministers have stopped short of re-introducing the so-called Saatchi Bill, sponsored by Lord Saatchi following his wife’s death from ovarian cancer, which would have changed the law to allow the use of untested treatments at patients’ request. Dame Tessa had said in her speech to the House of Lords: “I am not afraid, but I am fearful that this new and important approach may be put into the 'too difficult' box. "I hope this debate will give hope to other cancer patients like me so that we can live well with cancer, not just be dying of it." Answering her call, Mrs May said: “I hope that the actions we are taking now and in the future to improve care and research for those confronting a terrible disease will form part of the lasting legacy of an inspirational woman." Tessa Jowell and David Beckham celebrate as London are named hosts of the 2012 Olympic Games, in Singapore in July 2005 Credit: John Gichigi/Getty Images Lord Sebastian Coe, president of the IAAF and former chairman of the London organising committee of the Olympic Games, said that without Dame Tessa’s contribution the UK would not have won the 2012 bid. "Her contribution to the Olympic and Paralympic Games is easily defined - quite simply, without Tessa there would have been no London 2012, and without Tessa they would not have been the success they were,” he added. "No politician deserves greater credit for the Games. She showed unflinching tenacity in persuading the Prime Minister and the Cabinet that the Government should throw its full weight behind the bid." Tessa Jowell with Denis Healey, then Chancellor of the Exchequer, at a 1978 press conference in Ilford North, where they were campaigning in support of Jowell Credit: PA Chair of UK Sport and Olympic gold medal winner Dame Katherine Grainger said: "Her accomplishments are enormous but just as impressive is how she achieved them: with decency, determination, guts and grace. “Others have already noted how there would have been no London 2012 without Tessa’s vision and drive. Tessa was a true believer in the power and inspiration of sport, for which all of us who benefited from her support and conviction will be eternally grateful. Her legacy lives on.” Dame Tessa's family said there will be a small private funeral followed by a public memorial service at a later date.
 Dame Tessa Jowell’s dying wish that NHS cancer patients be offered experimental methods of treatment will be granted as part of her “lasting legacy”, ministers have announced. Theresa May agreed a new £20 million fund to fight the disease as she paid tribute to the “inspirational” Labour grandee, who has died aged 70 a year after being diagnosed with brain cancer. As leading politicians from across the political divide and from the world of sport united in praise of the “heroically brave” former culture secretary and Olympics minister, her family said she had passed away in the arms of her husband and two children. Her daughter-in-law Ella Mills said her family had told her she would “live forever in the centre of their souls”. Jeremy Hunt, the Health Secretary, said that “her legacy will be lives saved and heartbreak averted for thousands of other families” as his department arranged the rollout of a series of treatments Dame Tessa had called for. The Prime Minister praised her “dignity and courage” in confronting “a terrible disease”. Matt’s extraordinary Mum passed away last night. She was lying in Matt, his sister Jess, and their Dad’s arms, as they told her that she would live forever in the centre of their souls. I’ve never seen love like I have since becoming part of this family. Tessa was the warmest and kindest soul, she welcomed me so generously into their family, and no matter what she has achieved in her life - and she achieved an extraordinary amount - I know her family are the thing that made her most proud. They were the complete core of her life and I’m honored to be part of it. Thank you for giving me Matt, Tessa, and for teaching us all so much about love, kindness, optimism and courage. The bravery you showed this past year was like nothing I have ever seen and I will be inspired by it every day of my life. Matt carries every bit of your goodness, drive, compassion and love, and I’ll look after him forever. xxxx A post shared by Deliciously Ella (@deliciouslyella) on May 13, 2018 at 12:43am PDT Dame Tessa, who spent her final months campaigning for better cancer care, died “peacefully” at her Warwickshire home on Saturday night after suffering a brain haemorrhage the previous day that left her in a coma. Ms Mills, who is the wife of Dame Tessa’s son, wrote in a tribute posted online: “She was lying in Matt, his sister Jess, and their Dad's arms, as they told her that she would live forever in the centre of their souls. “I've never seen love like I have since becoming part of this family. Tessa was the warmest and kindest soul...the bravery you showed this past year was like nothing I have ever seen and I will be inspired by it every day of my life.” Tony Blair, the former prime minister, said: "Tessa had passion, determination and simple human decency in greater measure than any person I have ever known. She was an inspiration to work with, and a joy to be near. She was the most wise of counsellors, the most loyal and supportive of colleagues, and the best of friends.” In a speech which moved fellow peers to tears and resulted in a standing ovation in the House of Lords in January, Dame Tessa described how she was diagnosed with a rare glioblastoma multiforme tumour in May last year. She said she had been on her way to deliver a talk in east London and: “I got into a taxi but couldn't speak. I had two powerful seizures. I was taken to hospital. Two days later, I was told that I had a brain tumour.” A week later she had surgery to remove the tumour, followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, which failed to prevent its return. She made her speech in the Lords wearing an electronic skull cap that fired electrical currents at her tumour. The Government today announces that it is doubling investment in brain cancer research from £20m to £40m for what will be known as the Tessa Jowell Brain Cancer Research Fund, which will total £65m when existing private donations are taken into account. An annual Tessa Jowell global symposium will be launched in the UK to bring together the world’s leading experts on brain cancer in the search for new treatments. Tessa Jowell with Gordon Brown and Denise Lewis, outside 10 Downing Street, with the torch for the 2008 Beijing Olympics Credit: Ian Walton/Getty Images The NHS will also roll out nationally a “gold standard” brain cancer diagnosis test, involving the use of dye to identify tumours, which had until now only been available in half of cancer units, as highlighted by Dame Tessa. Hospitals will also accelerate the use of so-called adaptive trials, in which several treatments can be tried at once to increase the chance of success, in line with another of Dame Tessa’s requests. Ministers have stopped short of re-introducing the so-called Saatchi Bill, sponsored by Lord Saatchi following his wife’s death from ovarian cancer, which would have changed the law to allow the use of untested treatments at patients’ request. Dame Tessa had said in her speech to the House of Lords: “I am not afraid, but I am fearful that this new and important approach may be put into the 'too difficult' box. "I hope this debate will give hope to other cancer patients like me so that we can live well with cancer, not just be dying of it." Answering her call, Mrs May said: “I hope that the actions we are taking now and in the future to improve care and research for those confronting a terrible disease will form part of the lasting legacy of an inspirational woman." Tessa Jowell and David Beckham celebrate as London are named hosts of the 2012 Olympic Games, in Singapore in July 2005 Credit: John Gichigi/Getty Images Lord Sebastian Coe, president of the IAAF and former chairman of the London organising committee of the Olympic Games, said that without Dame Tessa’s contribution the UK would not have won the 2012 bid. "Her contribution to the Olympic and Paralympic Games is easily defined - quite simply, without Tessa there would have been no London 2012, and without Tessa they would not have been the success they were,” he added. "No politician deserves greater credit for the Games. She showed unflinching tenacity in persuading the Prime Minister and the Cabinet that the Government should throw its full weight behind the bid." Tessa Jowell with Denis Healey, then Chancellor of the Exchequer, at a 1978 press conference in Ilford North, where they were campaigning in support of Jowell Credit: PA Chair of UK Sport and Olympic gold medal winner Dame Katherine Grainger said: "Her accomplishments are enormous but just as impressive is how she achieved them: with decency, determination, guts and grace. “Others have already noted how there would have been no London 2012 without Tessa’s vision and drive. Tessa was a true believer in the power and inspiration of sport, for which all of us who benefited from her support and conviction will be eternally grateful. Her legacy lives on.” Dame Tessa's family said there will be a small private funeral followed by a public memorial service at a later date.
Dame Tessa Jowell's 'legacy' will be the cancer treatments she campaigned for, ministers announce
Dame Tessa Jowell’s dying wish that NHS cancer patients be offered experimental methods of treatment will be granted as part of her “lasting legacy”, ministers have announced. Theresa May agreed a new £20 million fund to fight the disease as she paid tribute to the “inspirational” Labour grandee, who has died aged 70 a year after being diagnosed with brain cancer. As leading politicians from across the political divide and from the world of sport united in praise of the “heroically brave” former culture secretary and Olympics minister, her family said she had passed away in the arms of her husband and two children. Her daughter-in-law Ella Mills said her family had told her she would “live forever in the centre of their souls”. Jeremy Hunt, the Health Secretary, said that “her legacy will be lives saved and heartbreak averted for thousands of other families” as his department arranged the rollout of a series of treatments Dame Tessa had called for. The Prime Minister praised her “dignity and courage” in confronting “a terrible disease”. Matt’s extraordinary Mum passed away last night. She was lying in Matt, his sister Jess, and their Dad’s arms, as they told her that she would live forever in the centre of their souls. I’ve never seen love like I have since becoming part of this family. Tessa was the warmest and kindest soul, she welcomed me so generously into their family, and no matter what she has achieved in her life - and she achieved an extraordinary amount - I know her family are the thing that made her most proud. They were the complete core of her life and I’m honored to be part of it. Thank you for giving me Matt, Tessa, and for teaching us all so much about love, kindness, optimism and courage. The bravery you showed this past year was like nothing I have ever seen and I will be inspired by it every day of my life. Matt carries every bit of your goodness, drive, compassion and love, and I’ll look after him forever. xxxx A post shared by Deliciously Ella (@deliciouslyella) on May 13, 2018 at 12:43am PDT Dame Tessa, who spent her final months campaigning for better cancer care, died “peacefully” at her Warwickshire home on Saturday night after suffering a brain haemorrhage the previous day that left her in a coma. Ms Mills, who is the wife of Dame Tessa’s son, wrote in a tribute posted online: “She was lying in Matt, his sister Jess, and their Dad's arms, as they told her that she would live forever in the centre of their souls. “I've never seen love like I have since becoming part of this family. Tessa was the warmest and kindest soul...the bravery you showed this past year was like nothing I have ever seen and I will be inspired by it every day of my life.” Tony Blair, the former prime minister, said: "Tessa had passion, determination and simple human decency in greater measure than any person I have ever known. She was an inspiration to work with, and a joy to be near. She was the most wise of counsellors, the most loyal and supportive of colleagues, and the best of friends.” In a speech which moved fellow peers to tears and resulted in a standing ovation in the House of Lords in January, Dame Tessa described how she was diagnosed with a rare glioblastoma multiforme tumour in May last year. She said she had been on her way to deliver a talk in east London and: “I got into a taxi but couldn't speak. I had two powerful seizures. I was taken to hospital. Two days later, I was told that I had a brain tumour.” A week later she had surgery to remove the tumour, followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, which failed to prevent its return. She made her speech in the Lords wearing an electronic skull cap that fired electrical currents at her tumour. The Government today announces that it is doubling investment in brain cancer research from £20m to £40m for what will be known as the Tessa Jowell Brain Cancer Research Fund, which will total £65m when existing private donations are taken into account. An annual Tessa Jowell global symposium will be launched in the UK to bring together the world’s leading experts on brain cancer in the search for new treatments. Tessa Jowell with Gordon Brown and Denise Lewis, outside 10 Downing Street, with the torch for the 2008 Beijing Olympics Credit: Ian Walton/Getty Images The NHS will also roll out nationally a “gold standard” brain cancer diagnosis test, involving the use of dye to identify tumours, which had until now only been available in half of cancer units, as highlighted by Dame Tessa. Hospitals will also accelerate the use of so-called adaptive trials, in which several treatments can be tried at once to increase the chance of success, in line with another of Dame Tessa’s requests. Ministers have stopped short of re-introducing the so-called Saatchi Bill, sponsored by Lord Saatchi following his wife’s death from ovarian cancer, which would have changed the law to allow the use of untested treatments at patients’ request. Dame Tessa had said in her speech to the House of Lords: “I am not afraid, but I am fearful that this new and important approach may be put into the 'too difficult' box. "I hope this debate will give hope to other cancer patients like me so that we can live well with cancer, not just be dying of it." Answering her call, Mrs May said: “I hope that the actions we are taking now and in the future to improve care and research for those confronting a terrible disease will form part of the lasting legacy of an inspirational woman." Tessa Jowell and David Beckham celebrate as London are named hosts of the 2012 Olympic Games, in Singapore in July 2005 Credit: John Gichigi/Getty Images Lord Sebastian Coe, president of the IAAF and former chairman of the London organising committee of the Olympic Games, said that without Dame Tessa’s contribution the UK would not have won the 2012 bid. "Her contribution to the Olympic and Paralympic Games is easily defined - quite simply, without Tessa there would have been no London 2012, and without Tessa they would not have been the success they were,” he added. "No politician deserves greater credit for the Games. She showed unflinching tenacity in persuading the Prime Minister and the Cabinet that the Government should throw its full weight behind the bid." Tessa Jowell with Denis Healey, then Chancellor of the Exchequer, at a 1978 press conference in Ilford North, where they were campaigning in support of Jowell Credit: PA Chair of UK Sport and Olympic gold medal winner Dame Katherine Grainger said: "Her accomplishments are enormous but just as impressive is how she achieved them: with decency, determination, guts and grace. “Others have already noted how there would have been no London 2012 without Tessa’s vision and drive. Tessa was a true believer in the power and inspiration of sport, for which all of us who benefited from her support and conviction will be eternally grateful. Her legacy lives on.” Dame Tessa's family said there will be a small private funeral followed by a public memorial service at a later date.
For this year's contest Russia once again picked Yuliya Samoilova -- who performed at the opening ceremony to the 2014 Sochi Winter Paralympics -- to represent the country
For this year's contest Russia once again picked Yuliya Samoilova -- who performed at the opening ceremony to the 2014 Sochi Winter Paralympics -- to represent the country
For this year's contest Russia once again picked Yuliya Samoilova -- who performed at the opening ceremony to the 2014 Sochi Winter Paralympics -- to represent the country
Snow sports are acting as a valuable life-changing tool for people with additional needs and mental health problems. Since its launch in 2011 Snowbility has helped over 10,000 people to gain from both the physical and psychological benefits of skiing and snowboarding. With a slogan, “It’s cool to be different,” the company welcomes students from all walks of life, backgrounds and with various needs and problems, including learning disabilities and autism, and encourages them to get involved with winter sports. Snowbility, which was founded by keen skier and ski development coach Richard Fetherston, is based at The Snow Centre in Hemel Hempstead, an indoor real-snow slope 20 minutes outside of London. It offers the opportunity to learn in the safe and stable environment of the indoor centre throughout the year, providing many of its students with an experience they might otherwise not have felt confident enough to try. “We aim to enrich the lives of our students, parents, carers and teachers we work with, by giving people with additional needs and rehabilitation challenges the opportunity to develop both emotionally and physically through skiing and snowboarding,” said Richard. Snowbility works with students of all ages Credit: snowbility The carefully selected and experienced team at Snowbility are all qualified instructors and are either BASI (British Association of Snowsports Instructors) or IASI (Irish Association of Snowsports Instructors) registered. “We have a team of fully qualified ski and snowboard instructors with the knowledge, experience and passion to provide tailor-made coaching for a wide range of complex physical, psychological and mental health needs, including learning disabilities, autism, dyspraxia and deafness,” said Richard. Snowbility’s approach to teaching skiing and snowboarding technique is integrated with other skills such as social interaction, confidence, self-esteem, concentration and motivation. The flexible coaching methods used by the team help every student in a different way. Britain's top indoor slopes “My son has had a wonderful relationship with his ski team and it has given him confidence to cope with being on a ski slope, which he otherwise wouldn’t have been able to, had he just gone skiing with a school,” said Tanya James, whose son Santino is mildly autistic and has hypermobility syndrome. “It’s helped him with his balance and coordination in a very fun and sporting way,” said Tanya. It’s the best job in the worldRichard Fetherston, Snowbility The coaches aim to give their students a sense of achievement and pride through a personalised learning programme suited to their individual needs. Through this achievement Richard believes it enhances their social, emotional and communication skills, while also improving fitness. The Snow Centre is a safe indoor haven for learning to ski and snowboarding Credit: ross woodhall “Once we get our pupils skiing and their families start to see the changes, then they all benefit; everyone gets involved. It’s truly humbling to see lives change in such a positive way,” said Richard. Richard and his staff are calling for more exposure of the dramatic improvement snow sports can bring to the lives of people with additional needs. Recently one of its students, George, who has Glaucoma, Sturge-Weber syndrome and is on the autistic spectrum appeared on the BBC to tell his story of how skiing has helped him shape his hopes and dreams for the future. “I’d probably like to help people to learn to ski, but also get famous and maybe one day go to the Olympics or the Paralympics,” said George when asked what he’d like to do with his new skiing skills. “Socially it has given him so much confidence, because now he is a skier,” said George’s mother Gina. “It’s the best job in the world. As a team we like nothing more than seeing the progress of our students, people like George,” said Richard. Snowbility caters for pupils of all ages from children as young as five years old to adults over the age of 65. It runs lessons, both private and group, seven days a week at The Snow Centre. Booking are available through the website and an application form.
Snow sports used to combat disabilities and mental health issues in the UK
Snow sports are acting as a valuable life-changing tool for people with additional needs and mental health problems. Since its launch in 2011 Snowbility has helped over 10,000 people to gain from both the physical and psychological benefits of skiing and snowboarding. With a slogan, “It’s cool to be different,” the company welcomes students from all walks of life, backgrounds and with various needs and problems, including learning disabilities and autism, and encourages them to get involved with winter sports. Snowbility, which was founded by keen skier and ski development coach Richard Fetherston, is based at The Snow Centre in Hemel Hempstead, an indoor real-snow slope 20 minutes outside of London. It offers the opportunity to learn in the safe and stable environment of the indoor centre throughout the year, providing many of its students with an experience they might otherwise not have felt confident enough to try. “We aim to enrich the lives of our students, parents, carers and teachers we work with, by giving people with additional needs and rehabilitation challenges the opportunity to develop both emotionally and physically through skiing and snowboarding,” said Richard. Snowbility works with students of all ages Credit: snowbility The carefully selected and experienced team at Snowbility are all qualified instructors and are either BASI (British Association of Snowsports Instructors) or IASI (Irish Association of Snowsports Instructors) registered. “We have a team of fully qualified ski and snowboard instructors with the knowledge, experience and passion to provide tailor-made coaching for a wide range of complex physical, psychological and mental health needs, including learning disabilities, autism, dyspraxia and deafness,” said Richard. Snowbility’s approach to teaching skiing and snowboarding technique is integrated with other skills such as social interaction, confidence, self-esteem, concentration and motivation. The flexible coaching methods used by the team help every student in a different way. Britain's top indoor slopes “My son has had a wonderful relationship with his ski team and it has given him confidence to cope with being on a ski slope, which he otherwise wouldn’t have been able to, had he just gone skiing with a school,” said Tanya James, whose son Santino is mildly autistic and has hypermobility syndrome. “It’s helped him with his balance and coordination in a very fun and sporting way,” said Tanya. It’s the best job in the worldRichard Fetherston, Snowbility The coaches aim to give their students a sense of achievement and pride through a personalised learning programme suited to their individual needs. Through this achievement Richard believes it enhances their social, emotional and communication skills, while also improving fitness. The Snow Centre is a safe indoor haven for learning to ski and snowboarding Credit: ross woodhall “Once we get our pupils skiing and their families start to see the changes, then they all benefit; everyone gets involved. It’s truly humbling to see lives change in such a positive way,” said Richard. Richard and his staff are calling for more exposure of the dramatic improvement snow sports can bring to the lives of people with additional needs. Recently one of its students, George, who has Glaucoma, Sturge-Weber syndrome and is on the autistic spectrum appeared on the BBC to tell his story of how skiing has helped him shape his hopes and dreams for the future. “I’d probably like to help people to learn to ski, but also get famous and maybe one day go to the Olympics or the Paralympics,” said George when asked what he’d like to do with his new skiing skills. “Socially it has given him so much confidence, because now he is a skier,” said George’s mother Gina. “It’s the best job in the world. As a team we like nothing more than seeing the progress of our students, people like George,” said Richard. Snowbility caters for pupils of all ages from children as young as five years old to adults over the age of 65. It runs lessons, both private and group, seven days a week at The Snow Centre. Booking are available through the website and an application form.
Snow sports are acting as a valuable life-changing tool for people with additional needs and mental health problems. Since its launch in 2011 Snowbility has helped over 10,000 people to gain from both the physical and psychological benefits of skiing and snowboarding. With a slogan, “It’s cool to be different,” the company welcomes students from all walks of life, backgrounds and with various needs and problems, including learning disabilities and autism, and encourages them to get involved with winter sports. Snowbility, which was founded by keen skier and ski development coach Richard Fetherston, is based at The Snow Centre in Hemel Hempstead, an indoor real-snow slope 20 minutes outside of London. It offers the opportunity to learn in the safe and stable environment of the indoor centre throughout the year, providing many of its students with an experience they might otherwise not have felt confident enough to try. “We aim to enrich the lives of our students, parents, carers and teachers we work with, by giving people with additional needs and rehabilitation challenges the opportunity to develop both emotionally and physically through skiing and snowboarding,” said Richard. Snowbility works with students of all ages Credit: snowbility The carefully selected and experienced team at Snowbility are all qualified instructors and are either BASI (British Association of Snowsports Instructors) or IASI (Irish Association of Snowsports Instructors) registered. “We have a team of fully qualified ski and snowboard instructors with the knowledge, experience and passion to provide tailor-made coaching for a wide range of complex physical, psychological and mental health needs, including learning disabilities, autism, dyspraxia and deafness,” said Richard. Snowbility’s approach to teaching skiing and snowboarding technique is integrated with other skills such as social interaction, confidence, self-esteem, concentration and motivation. The flexible coaching methods used by the team help every student in a different way. Britain's top indoor slopes “My son has had a wonderful relationship with his ski team and it has given him confidence to cope with being on a ski slope, which he otherwise wouldn’t have been able to, had he just gone skiing with a school,” said Tanya James, whose son Santino is mildly autistic and has hypermobility syndrome. “It’s helped him with his balance and coordination in a very fun and sporting way,” said Tanya. It’s the best job in the worldRichard Fetherston, Snowbility The coaches aim to give their students a sense of achievement and pride through a personalised learning programme suited to their individual needs. Through this achievement Richard believes it enhances their social, emotional and communication skills, while also improving fitness. The Snow Centre is a safe indoor haven for learning to ski and snowboarding Credit: ross woodhall “Once we get our pupils skiing and their families start to see the changes, then they all benefit; everyone gets involved. It’s truly humbling to see lives change in such a positive way,” said Richard. Richard and his staff are calling for more exposure of the dramatic improvement snow sports can bring to the lives of people with additional needs. Recently one of its students, George, who has Glaucoma, Sturge-Weber syndrome and is on the autistic spectrum appeared on the BBC to tell his story of how skiing has helped him shape his hopes and dreams for the future. “I’d probably like to help people to learn to ski, but also get famous and maybe one day go to the Olympics or the Paralympics,” said George when asked what he’d like to do with his new skiing skills. “Socially it has given him so much confidence, because now he is a skier,” said George’s mother Gina. “It’s the best job in the world. As a team we like nothing more than seeing the progress of our students, people like George,” said Richard. Snowbility caters for pupils of all ages from children as young as five years old to adults over the age of 65. It runs lessons, both private and group, seven days a week at The Snow Centre. Booking are available through the website and an application form.
Snow sports used to combat disabilities and mental health issues in the UK
Snow sports are acting as a valuable life-changing tool for people with additional needs and mental health problems. Since its launch in 2011 Snowbility has helped over 10,000 people to gain from both the physical and psychological benefits of skiing and snowboarding. With a slogan, “It’s cool to be different,” the company welcomes students from all walks of life, backgrounds and with various needs and problems, including learning disabilities and autism, and encourages them to get involved with winter sports. Snowbility, which was founded by keen skier and ski development coach Richard Fetherston, is based at The Snow Centre in Hemel Hempstead, an indoor real-snow slope 20 minutes outside of London. It offers the opportunity to learn in the safe and stable environment of the indoor centre throughout the year, providing many of its students with an experience they might otherwise not have felt confident enough to try. “We aim to enrich the lives of our students, parents, carers and teachers we work with, by giving people with additional needs and rehabilitation challenges the opportunity to develop both emotionally and physically through skiing and snowboarding,” said Richard. Snowbility works with students of all ages Credit: snowbility The carefully selected and experienced team at Snowbility are all qualified instructors and are either BASI (British Association of Snowsports Instructors) or IASI (Irish Association of Snowsports Instructors) registered. “We have a team of fully qualified ski and snowboard instructors with the knowledge, experience and passion to provide tailor-made coaching for a wide range of complex physical, psychological and mental health needs, including learning disabilities, autism, dyspraxia and deafness,” said Richard. Snowbility’s approach to teaching skiing and snowboarding technique is integrated with other skills such as social interaction, confidence, self-esteem, concentration and motivation. The flexible coaching methods used by the team help every student in a different way. Britain's top indoor slopes “My son has had a wonderful relationship with his ski team and it has given him confidence to cope with being on a ski slope, which he otherwise wouldn’t have been able to, had he just gone skiing with a school,” said Tanya James, whose son Santino is mildly autistic and has hypermobility syndrome. “It’s helped him with his balance and coordination in a very fun and sporting way,” said Tanya. It’s the best job in the worldRichard Fetherston, Snowbility The coaches aim to give their students a sense of achievement and pride through a personalised learning programme suited to their individual needs. Through this achievement Richard believes it enhances their social, emotional and communication skills, while also improving fitness. The Snow Centre is a safe indoor haven for learning to ski and snowboarding Credit: ross woodhall “Once we get our pupils skiing and their families start to see the changes, then they all benefit; everyone gets involved. It’s truly humbling to see lives change in such a positive way,” said Richard. Richard and his staff are calling for more exposure of the dramatic improvement snow sports can bring to the lives of people with additional needs. Recently one of its students, George, who has Glaucoma, Sturge-Weber syndrome and is on the autistic spectrum appeared on the BBC to tell his story of how skiing has helped him shape his hopes and dreams for the future. “I’d probably like to help people to learn to ski, but also get famous and maybe one day go to the Olympics or the Paralympics,” said George when asked what he’d like to do with his new skiing skills. “Socially it has given him so much confidence, because now he is a skier,” said George’s mother Gina. “It’s the best job in the world. As a team we like nothing more than seeing the progress of our students, people like George,” said Richard. Snowbility caters for pupils of all ages from children as young as five years old to adults over the age of 65. It runs lessons, both private and group, seven days a week at The Snow Centre. Booking are available through the website and an application form.
Snow sports are acting as a valuable life-changing tool for people with additional needs and mental health problems. Since its launch in 2011 Snowbility has helped over 10,000 people to gain from both the physical and psychological benefits of skiing and snowboarding. With a slogan, “It’s cool to be different,” the company welcomes students from all walks of life, backgrounds and with various needs and problems, including learning disabilities and autism, and encourages them to get involved with winter sports. Snowbility, which was founded by keen skier and ski development coach Richard Fetherston, is based at The Snow Centre in Hemel Hempstead, an indoor real-snow slope 20 minutes outside of London. It offers the opportunity to learn in the safe and stable environment of the indoor centre throughout the year, providing many of its students with an experience they might otherwise not have felt confident enough to try. “We aim to enrich the lives of our students, parents, carers and teachers we work with, by giving people with additional needs and rehabilitation challenges the opportunity to develop both emotionally and physically through skiing and snowboarding,” said Richard. Snowbility works with students of all ages Credit: snowbility The carefully selected and experienced team at Snowbility are all qualified instructors and are either BASI (British Association of Snowsports Instructors) or IASI (Irish Association of Snowsports Instructors) registered. “We have a team of fully qualified ski and snowboard instructors with the knowledge, experience and passion to provide tailor-made coaching for a wide range of complex physical, psychological and mental health needs, including learning disabilities, autism, dyspraxia and deafness,” said Richard. Snowbility’s approach to teaching skiing and snowboarding technique is integrated with other skills such as social interaction, confidence, self-esteem, concentration and motivation. The flexible coaching methods used by the team help every student in a different way. Britain's top indoor slopes “My son has had a wonderful relationship with his ski team and it has given him confidence to cope with being on a ski slope, which he otherwise wouldn’t have been able to, had he just gone skiing with a school,” said Tanya James, whose son Santino is mildly autistic and has hypermobility syndrome. “It’s helped him with his balance and coordination in a very fun and sporting way,” said Tanya. It’s the best job in the worldRichard Fetherston, Snowbility The coaches aim to give their students a sense of achievement and pride through a personalised learning programme suited to their individual needs. Through this achievement Richard believes it enhances their social, emotional and communication skills, while also improving fitness. The Snow Centre is a safe indoor haven for learning to ski and snowboarding Credit: ross woodhall “Once we get our pupils skiing and their families start to see the changes, then they all benefit; everyone gets involved. It’s truly humbling to see lives change in such a positive way,” said Richard. Richard and his staff are calling for more exposure of the dramatic improvement snow sports can bring to the lives of people with additional needs. Recently one of its students, George, who has Glaucoma, Sturge-Weber syndrome and is on the autistic spectrum appeared on the BBC to tell his story of how skiing has helped him shape his hopes and dreams for the future. “I’d probably like to help people to learn to ski, but also get famous and maybe one day go to the Olympics or the Paralympics,” said George when asked what he’d like to do with his new skiing skills. “Socially it has given him so much confidence, because now he is a skier,” said George’s mother Gina. “It’s the best job in the world. As a team we like nothing more than seeing the progress of our students, people like George,” said Richard. Snowbility caters for pupils of all ages from children as young as five years old to adults over the age of 65. It runs lessons, both private and group, seven days a week at The Snow Centre. Booking are available through the website and an application form.
Snow sports used to combat disabilities and mental health issues in the UK
Snow sports are acting as a valuable life-changing tool for people with additional needs and mental health problems. Since its launch in 2011 Snowbility has helped over 10,000 people to gain from both the physical and psychological benefits of skiing and snowboarding. With a slogan, “It’s cool to be different,” the company welcomes students from all walks of life, backgrounds and with various needs and problems, including learning disabilities and autism, and encourages them to get involved with winter sports. Snowbility, which was founded by keen skier and ski development coach Richard Fetherston, is based at The Snow Centre in Hemel Hempstead, an indoor real-snow slope 20 minutes outside of London. It offers the opportunity to learn in the safe and stable environment of the indoor centre throughout the year, providing many of its students with an experience they might otherwise not have felt confident enough to try. “We aim to enrich the lives of our students, parents, carers and teachers we work with, by giving people with additional needs and rehabilitation challenges the opportunity to develop both emotionally and physically through skiing and snowboarding,” said Richard. Snowbility works with students of all ages Credit: snowbility The carefully selected and experienced team at Snowbility are all qualified instructors and are either BASI (British Association of Snowsports Instructors) or IASI (Irish Association of Snowsports Instructors) registered. “We have a team of fully qualified ski and snowboard instructors with the knowledge, experience and passion to provide tailor-made coaching for a wide range of complex physical, psychological and mental health needs, including learning disabilities, autism, dyspraxia and deafness,” said Richard. Snowbility’s approach to teaching skiing and snowboarding technique is integrated with other skills such as social interaction, confidence, self-esteem, concentration and motivation. The flexible coaching methods used by the team help every student in a different way. Britain's top indoor slopes “My son has had a wonderful relationship with his ski team and it has given him confidence to cope with being on a ski slope, which he otherwise wouldn’t have been able to, had he just gone skiing with a school,” said Tanya James, whose son Santino is mildly autistic and has hypermobility syndrome. “It’s helped him with his balance and coordination in a very fun and sporting way,” said Tanya. It’s the best job in the worldRichard Fetherston, Snowbility The coaches aim to give their students a sense of achievement and pride through a personalised learning programme suited to their individual needs. Through this achievement Richard believes it enhances their social, emotional and communication skills, while also improving fitness. The Snow Centre is a safe indoor haven for learning to ski and snowboarding Credit: ross woodhall “Once we get our pupils skiing and their families start to see the changes, then they all benefit; everyone gets involved. It’s truly humbling to see lives change in such a positive way,” said Richard. Richard and his staff are calling for more exposure of the dramatic improvement snow sports can bring to the lives of people with additional needs. Recently one of its students, George, who has Glaucoma, Sturge-Weber syndrome and is on the autistic spectrum appeared on the BBC to tell his story of how skiing has helped him shape his hopes and dreams for the future. “I’d probably like to help people to learn to ski, but also get famous and maybe one day go to the Olympics or the Paralympics,” said George when asked what he’d like to do with his new skiing skills. “Socially it has given him so much confidence, because now he is a skier,” said George’s mother Gina. “It’s the best job in the world. As a team we like nothing more than seeing the progress of our students, people like George,” said Richard. Snowbility caters for pupils of all ages from children as young as five years old to adults over the age of 65. It runs lessons, both private and group, seven days a week at The Snow Centre. Booking are available through the website and an application form.
<p>At a Buckingham Palace event for Olympic and Paralympics heroes, the Duchess of Cambridge revealed her daughter’s love of horses.<br><br>Rider Natasha Baker <a href="http://www.horseandhound.co.uk/news/princess-charlotte-loves-horses-riding-601799" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:revealed" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">revealed</a>: ‘I asked her how the children were and she said Charlotte is really enjoying her riding, which is great to hear and I said we may see her here on a line-up in 20 years time.’<br><br>She added: ‘She emphasised that Charlotte has this passion about horses and although she doesn’t echo it, she’ll do her best to champion and encourage it.’ <em>[Photo: Getty]</em><br></p>
She has a very special talent

At a Buckingham Palace event for Olympic and Paralympics heroes, the Duchess of Cambridge revealed her daughter’s love of horses.

Rider Natasha Baker revealed: ‘I asked her how the children were and she said Charlotte is really enjoying her riding, which is great to hear and I said we may see her here on a line-up in 20 years time.’

She added: ‘She emphasised that Charlotte has this passion about horses and although she doesn’t echo it, she’ll do her best to champion and encourage it.’ [Photo: Getty]

President Trump is under fire after saying the Paralympics were 'a little tough to watch'. .
Paralympics 'tough to watch': Trump
President Trump is under fire after saying the Paralympics were 'a little tough to watch'. .
President Trump is under fire after saying the Paralympics were 'a little tough to watch'. .
Paralympics 'tough to watch': Trump
President Trump is under fire after saying the Paralympics were 'a little tough to watch'. .

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