PSV Eindhoven

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Everton have opened talks with Marco Silva to become their new manager after formally ending Sam Allardyce’s acrimonious reign on a day the axe fell with frequency at Goodison Park. Director of football Steve Walsh was also dismissed within hours of Allardyce, along with the outgoing manager’s backroom staff. Walsh is replaced by Dutchman Marcel Brands, who immediately prioritised appointing the next head coach. Meetings with Silva’s representative were stepped up instantly. Silva was Everton’s first choice when Ronald Koeman was sacked in November, so there is no surprise his agent, Carlos Goncalves, was swiftly contacted with another recruitment process under way. Watford are seeking compensation from Everton so it may yet cost £8 million to settle differences with the Vicarage Road club, who reserve the right to pursue a Premier League complaint for an alleged ­illegal approach to their ex-coach dating back to before Silva’s sacking in January. Everton’s majority shareholder Farhad Moshiri had concluded due diligence on Silva before feeling compelled to appoint Allardyce. Everton want Marco Silva to replace Allardyce Credit: Reuters It is hoped Silva will bring youth, dynamism, ambition and a pacier style to Goodison Park, something the supporters feel was lost in a torturous campaign which has seen three managers try and fail to secure their position. Allardyce was called to a scheduled meeting with Moshiri in London at 8.30am yesterday. Confirmation of his dismissal came 75 minutes later. Newly appointed chief executive Denise Barrett-Baxendale explained why. “We have made the decision that, as part of our longer-term plan, we will be appointing a new manager this summer and will be commencing this process immediately,” she said. Allardyce leaves with neutrals offering more sympathy than Everton fans, who never wanted him before he was recruited and grew increasingly intolerant while he was in post. He was employed at a time when the club was genuinely threatened with relegation in the aftermath of a dismal summer of recruitment, and Koeman’s poor start to the season. England's World Cup 2018 squad - ranked David Unsworth was given the chance as a caretaker, but could not acquire the necessary points during a tough run of fixtures to convince he should be retained as head coach. Allardyce arrived just as Unsworth had overseen the most encouraging performance of the season – a 4-0 win over West Ham – and the controversy of who deserved credit for that victory summed up the divisiveness of reign. The new manager was in the stands, but Unsworth was still in charge. Evertonians partially understood why he was given the job short-term, but did not welcome his receiving an extra year on his contract. He made two significant signings in January, adding Theo Walcott and Cenk Tosun, but it irked Evertonians when exciting youngster Ademola Lookman moved to RB Leipzig on loan, where he performed well. Allardyce’s was not the only blood on the carpet on Wednesday. Six hours later, Everton announced Brands’ arrival and Walsh’s exit. Walsh was headhunted from Leicester City having been credited for overseeing their triumphant title season. Moshiri hoped he would be equally intuitive at Goodison Park, but the return on his investment last season was pitiful. Of last summer’s deals – costing in excess of £100 million – only goalkeeper Jordan Pickford was a success. Pick your England World Cup 2018 squad Now the Merseyside club turns to Dutchman Brands, 56, who joined PSV Eindhoven having previously been instrumental in transforming the fortunes of RKC Waalwijk and AZ Alkmaar. “It is a privilege to be joining Everton as director of football and I am incredibly excited to take on this challenge,” said Brands. “The fantastic passion of the fans for their club, the magnificent history of the club over the years and the ambition and purpose we have as people tasked with driving the club forward all mean that we need to be competing for honours against the Premier League elite. “It is only a challenge such as this which could have persuaded me to leave PSV.” Moshiri claimed Brands’ arrival will make the club “better and more equipped to challenge the top teams in the Premier League”. He needs the changes to work after some expensive missteps during his tenure so far. Since Moshiri invested in Everton, the club has sacked three managers – Roberto Martinez, Koeman and Allardyce. Wayne Rooney’s future should also become clearer by the end of this week. If it becomes clear to him the likely next manager does not see him as a key part of his plans, the former England captain may accept the offer to join DC United.
Everton open talks with Marco Silva after Sam Allardyce and director of football Steve Walsh are sacked
Everton have opened talks with Marco Silva to become their new manager after formally ending Sam Allardyce’s acrimonious reign on a day the axe fell with frequency at Goodison Park. Director of football Steve Walsh was also dismissed within hours of Allardyce, along with the outgoing manager’s backroom staff. Walsh is replaced by Dutchman Marcel Brands, who immediately prioritised appointing the next head coach. Meetings with Silva’s representative were stepped up instantly. Silva was Everton’s first choice when Ronald Koeman was sacked in November, so there is no surprise his agent, Carlos Goncalves, was swiftly contacted with another recruitment process under way. Watford are seeking compensation from Everton so it may yet cost £8 million to settle differences with the Vicarage Road club, who reserve the right to pursue a Premier League complaint for an alleged ­illegal approach to their ex-coach dating back to before Silva’s sacking in January. Everton’s majority shareholder Farhad Moshiri had concluded due diligence on Silva before feeling compelled to appoint Allardyce. Everton want Marco Silva to replace Allardyce Credit: Reuters It is hoped Silva will bring youth, dynamism, ambition and a pacier style to Goodison Park, something the supporters feel was lost in a torturous campaign which has seen three managers try and fail to secure their position. Allardyce was called to a scheduled meeting with Moshiri in London at 8.30am yesterday. Confirmation of his dismissal came 75 minutes later. Newly appointed chief executive Denise Barrett-Baxendale explained why. “We have made the decision that, as part of our longer-term plan, we will be appointing a new manager this summer and will be commencing this process immediately,” she said. Allardyce leaves with neutrals offering more sympathy than Everton fans, who never wanted him before he was recruited and grew increasingly intolerant while he was in post. He was employed at a time when the club was genuinely threatened with relegation in the aftermath of a dismal summer of recruitment, and Koeman’s poor start to the season. England's World Cup 2018 squad - ranked David Unsworth was given the chance as a caretaker, but could not acquire the necessary points during a tough run of fixtures to convince he should be retained as head coach. Allardyce arrived just as Unsworth had overseen the most encouraging performance of the season – a 4-0 win over West Ham – and the controversy of who deserved credit for that victory summed up the divisiveness of reign. The new manager was in the stands, but Unsworth was still in charge. Evertonians partially understood why he was given the job short-term, but did not welcome his receiving an extra year on his contract. He made two significant signings in January, adding Theo Walcott and Cenk Tosun, but it irked Evertonians when exciting youngster Ademola Lookman moved to RB Leipzig on loan, where he performed well. Allardyce’s was not the only blood on the carpet on Wednesday. Six hours later, Everton announced Brands’ arrival and Walsh’s exit. Walsh was headhunted from Leicester City having been credited for overseeing their triumphant title season. Moshiri hoped he would be equally intuitive at Goodison Park, but the return on his investment last season was pitiful. Of last summer’s deals – costing in excess of £100 million – only goalkeeper Jordan Pickford was a success. Pick your England World Cup 2018 squad Now the Merseyside club turns to Dutchman Brands, 56, who joined PSV Eindhoven having previously been instrumental in transforming the fortunes of RKC Waalwijk and AZ Alkmaar. “It is a privilege to be joining Everton as director of football and I am incredibly excited to take on this challenge,” said Brands. “The fantastic passion of the fans for their club, the magnificent history of the club over the years and the ambition and purpose we have as people tasked with driving the club forward all mean that we need to be competing for honours against the Premier League elite. “It is only a challenge such as this which could have persuaded me to leave PSV.” Moshiri claimed Brands’ arrival will make the club “better and more equipped to challenge the top teams in the Premier League”. He needs the changes to work after some expensive missteps during his tenure so far. Since Moshiri invested in Everton, the club has sacked three managers – Roberto Martinez, Koeman and Allardyce. Wayne Rooney’s future should also become clearer by the end of this week. If it becomes clear to him the likely next manager does not see him as a key part of his plans, the former England captain may accept the offer to join DC United.
Everton have opened talks with Marco Silva to become their new manager after formally ending Sam Allardyce’s acrimonious reign on a day the axe fell with frequency at Goodison Park. Director of football Steve Walsh was also dismissed within hours of Allardyce, along with the outgoing manager’s backroom staff. Walsh is replaced by Dutchman Marcel Brands, who immediately prioritised appointing the next head coach. Meetings with Silva’s representative were stepped up instantly. Silva was Everton’s first choice when Ronald Koeman was sacked in November, so there is no surprise his agent, Carlos Goncalves, was swiftly contacted with another recruitment process under way. Watford are seeking compensation from Everton so it may yet cost £8 million to settle differences with the Vicarage Road club, who reserve the right to pursue a Premier League complaint for an alleged ­illegal approach to their ex-coach dating back to before Silva’s sacking in January. Everton’s majority shareholder Farhad Moshiri had concluded due diligence on Silva before feeling compelled to appoint Allardyce. Everton want Marco Silva to replace Allardyce Credit: Reuters It is hoped Silva will bring youth, dynamism, ambition and a pacier style to Goodison Park, something the supporters feel was lost in a torturous campaign which has seen three managers try and fail to secure their position. Allardyce was called to a scheduled meeting with Moshiri in London at 8.30am yesterday. Confirmation of his dismissal came 75 minutes later. Newly appointed chief executive Denise Barrett-Baxendale explained why. “We have made the decision that, as part of our longer-term plan, we will be appointing a new manager this summer and will be commencing this process immediately,” she said. Allardyce leaves with neutrals offering more sympathy than Everton fans, who never wanted him before he was recruited and grew increasingly intolerant while he was in post. He was employed at a time when the club was genuinely threatened with relegation in the aftermath of a dismal summer of recruitment, and Koeman’s poor start to the season. England's World Cup 2018 squad - ranked David Unsworth was given the chance as a caretaker, but could not acquire the necessary points during a tough run of fixtures to convince he should be retained as head coach. Allardyce arrived just as Unsworth had overseen the most encouraging performance of the season – a 4-0 win over West Ham – and the controversy of who deserved credit for that victory summed up the divisiveness of reign. The new manager was in the stands, but Unsworth was still in charge. Evertonians partially understood why he was given the job short-term, but did not welcome his receiving an extra year on his contract. He made two significant signings in January, adding Theo Walcott and Cenk Tosun, but it irked Evertonians when exciting youngster Ademola Lookman moved to RB Leipzig on loan, where he performed well. Allardyce’s was not the only blood on the carpet on Wednesday. Six hours later, Everton announced Brands’ arrival and Walsh’s exit. Walsh was headhunted from Leicester City having been credited for overseeing their triumphant title season. Moshiri hoped he would be equally intuitive at Goodison Park, but the return on his investment last season was pitiful. Of last summer’s deals – costing in excess of £100 million – only goalkeeper Jordan Pickford was a success. Pick your England World Cup 2018 squad Now the Merseyside club turns to Dutchman Brands, 56, who joined PSV Eindhoven having previously been instrumental in transforming the fortunes of RKC Waalwijk and AZ Alkmaar. “It is a privilege to be joining Everton as director of football and I am incredibly excited to take on this challenge,” said Brands. “The fantastic passion of the fans for their club, the magnificent history of the club over the years and the ambition and purpose we have as people tasked with driving the club forward all mean that we need to be competing for honours against the Premier League elite. “It is only a challenge such as this which could have persuaded me to leave PSV.” Moshiri claimed Brands’ arrival will make the club “better and more equipped to challenge the top teams in the Premier League”. He needs the changes to work after some expensive missteps during his tenure so far. Since Moshiri invested in Everton, the club has sacked three managers – Roberto Martinez, Koeman and Allardyce. Wayne Rooney’s future should also become clearer by the end of this week. If it becomes clear to him the likely next manager does not see him as a key part of his plans, the former England captain may accept the offer to join DC United.
Everton open talks with Marco Silva after Sam Allardyce and director of football Steve Walsh are sacked
Everton have opened talks with Marco Silva to become their new manager after formally ending Sam Allardyce’s acrimonious reign on a day the axe fell with frequency at Goodison Park. Director of football Steve Walsh was also dismissed within hours of Allardyce, along with the outgoing manager’s backroom staff. Walsh is replaced by Dutchman Marcel Brands, who immediately prioritised appointing the next head coach. Meetings with Silva’s representative were stepped up instantly. Silva was Everton’s first choice when Ronald Koeman was sacked in November, so there is no surprise his agent, Carlos Goncalves, was swiftly contacted with another recruitment process under way. Watford are seeking compensation from Everton so it may yet cost £8 million to settle differences with the Vicarage Road club, who reserve the right to pursue a Premier League complaint for an alleged ­illegal approach to their ex-coach dating back to before Silva’s sacking in January. Everton’s majority shareholder Farhad Moshiri had concluded due diligence on Silva before feeling compelled to appoint Allardyce. Everton want Marco Silva to replace Allardyce Credit: Reuters It is hoped Silva will bring youth, dynamism, ambition and a pacier style to Goodison Park, something the supporters feel was lost in a torturous campaign which has seen three managers try and fail to secure their position. Allardyce was called to a scheduled meeting with Moshiri in London at 8.30am yesterday. Confirmation of his dismissal came 75 minutes later. Newly appointed chief executive Denise Barrett-Baxendale explained why. “We have made the decision that, as part of our longer-term plan, we will be appointing a new manager this summer and will be commencing this process immediately,” she said. Allardyce leaves with neutrals offering more sympathy than Everton fans, who never wanted him before he was recruited and grew increasingly intolerant while he was in post. He was employed at a time when the club was genuinely threatened with relegation in the aftermath of a dismal summer of recruitment, and Koeman’s poor start to the season. England's World Cup 2018 squad - ranked David Unsworth was given the chance as a caretaker, but could not acquire the necessary points during a tough run of fixtures to convince he should be retained as head coach. Allardyce arrived just as Unsworth had overseen the most encouraging performance of the season – a 4-0 win over West Ham – and the controversy of who deserved credit for that victory summed up the divisiveness of reign. The new manager was in the stands, but Unsworth was still in charge. Evertonians partially understood why he was given the job short-term, but did not welcome his receiving an extra year on his contract. He made two significant signings in January, adding Theo Walcott and Cenk Tosun, but it irked Evertonians when exciting youngster Ademola Lookman moved to RB Leipzig on loan, where he performed well. Allardyce’s was not the only blood on the carpet on Wednesday. Six hours later, Everton announced Brands’ arrival and Walsh’s exit. Walsh was headhunted from Leicester City having been credited for overseeing their triumphant title season. Moshiri hoped he would be equally intuitive at Goodison Park, but the return on his investment last season was pitiful. Of last summer’s deals – costing in excess of £100 million – only goalkeeper Jordan Pickford was a success. Pick your England World Cup 2018 squad Now the Merseyside club turns to Dutchman Brands, 56, who joined PSV Eindhoven having previously been instrumental in transforming the fortunes of RKC Waalwijk and AZ Alkmaar. “It is a privilege to be joining Everton as director of football and I am incredibly excited to take on this challenge,” said Brands. “The fantastic passion of the fans for their club, the magnificent history of the club over the years and the ambition and purpose we have as people tasked with driving the club forward all mean that we need to be competing for honours against the Premier League elite. “It is only a challenge such as this which could have persuaded me to leave PSV.” Moshiri claimed Brands’ arrival will make the club “better and more equipped to challenge the top teams in the Premier League”. He needs the changes to work after some expensive missteps during his tenure so far. Since Moshiri invested in Everton, the club has sacked three managers – Roberto Martinez, Koeman and Allardyce. Wayne Rooney’s future should also become clearer by the end of this week. If it becomes clear to him the likely next manager does not see him as a key part of his plans, the former England captain may accept the offer to join DC United.
Everton have sacked Steve Walsh as director of football on a day of departures at Goodison Park. Having confirmed Sam Allardyce’s departure earlier on Wednesdaday, Walsh has also paid the price for his horrific spending spree of last summer when only Jordan Pickford emerged with credit for a vast outlay exceeding £100 million. As expected, he has been replaced by Marcel Brands, who joins from PSV Eindhoven. Walsh was headhunted from Leicester City in 2016 having been credited for overseeing their triumphant title season. Majority shareholder Farhad Moshiri hoped Walsh would be equally intuitive at Goodison Park, but the return on his investment last season was pitiful. Now the Merseyside club turns to Dutchman Brands, 56, who joined PSV Eindhoven having previously been instrumental in transforming the fortunes of RKC Waalwijk and AZ Alkmaar. Everton owner Farhad Moshiri has sacked his manager and director of football today Credit: Alex Livesey/Getty Images “It is a privilege to be joining Everton as director of football and I am incredibly excited to take on this challenge,” said Brands. “The fantastic passion of the fans for their club, the magnificent history of the club over the years and the ambition and purpose we have as people tasked with driving the Club forward all mean that we need to be competing for honours against the Premier League elite. “It is no straightforward challenge but this must be our motivation each and every day. “I am looking forward to working with Farhad Moshiri and Chairman Bill Kenwright, whom I thank for entrusting me with this role and responsibility, and I am also looking forward to working with the Board of Directors and with our new CEO, Denise Barrett-Baxendale. I know we have very committed people here who want only the best for Everton. Marcel Brands joins Everton from PSV Credit: Edwin van Zandvoort/Soccrates/Getty Images “It is only a challenge such as this which could have persuaded me to leave PSV where I am indebted to the many people whose collective effort led to some great achievements. “Now we will look to build something really strong and lasting here at Everton.” Everton’s major shareholder, Farhad Moshiri, added: “Marcel’s record of achievement has cemented his reputation across Europe and I am extremely pleased that we will be bringing his drive, energy and expertise to Everton. Marcel Brands leaves PSV for @Everton. Now it’s your turn, Marcel. Good luck in England! �� pic.twitter.com/yqmRE1AXzd— PSV International (@psveindhoven) May 16, 2018 “It was clear to me in our conversations that he shares in the vision we have for the club and he has much to contribute in making us better and more equipped to challenge the top teams in the Premier League.” Chairman Bill Kenwright said: “His successful track record is there for all to see and having him here to help lead Everton forward is something which I’m sure will excite all Evertonians.” Brands first job is to secure the next manager, who is expected to be Marco Silva, the former Watford coach. New chief executive Denise Barrett-Baxendale said: “I know that Marcel will bring an unsurpassed level of quality and prowess to his work at Everton. “We will work alongside Marcel on the recruitment of a new manager, which is now our biggest focus.”
Everton sack Steve Walsh as director of football and welcome PSV's Marcel Brands
Everton have sacked Steve Walsh as director of football on a day of departures at Goodison Park. Having confirmed Sam Allardyce’s departure earlier on Wednesdaday, Walsh has also paid the price for his horrific spending spree of last summer when only Jordan Pickford emerged with credit for a vast outlay exceeding £100 million. As expected, he has been replaced by Marcel Brands, who joins from PSV Eindhoven. Walsh was headhunted from Leicester City in 2016 having been credited for overseeing their triumphant title season. Majority shareholder Farhad Moshiri hoped Walsh would be equally intuitive at Goodison Park, but the return on his investment last season was pitiful. Now the Merseyside club turns to Dutchman Brands, 56, who joined PSV Eindhoven having previously been instrumental in transforming the fortunes of RKC Waalwijk and AZ Alkmaar. Everton owner Farhad Moshiri has sacked his manager and director of football today Credit: Alex Livesey/Getty Images “It is a privilege to be joining Everton as director of football and I am incredibly excited to take on this challenge,” said Brands. “The fantastic passion of the fans for their club, the magnificent history of the club over the years and the ambition and purpose we have as people tasked with driving the Club forward all mean that we need to be competing for honours against the Premier League elite. “It is no straightforward challenge but this must be our motivation each and every day. “I am looking forward to working with Farhad Moshiri and Chairman Bill Kenwright, whom I thank for entrusting me with this role and responsibility, and I am also looking forward to working with the Board of Directors and with our new CEO, Denise Barrett-Baxendale. I know we have very committed people here who want only the best for Everton. Marcel Brands joins Everton from PSV Credit: Edwin van Zandvoort/Soccrates/Getty Images “It is only a challenge such as this which could have persuaded me to leave PSV where I am indebted to the many people whose collective effort led to some great achievements. “Now we will look to build something really strong and lasting here at Everton.” Everton’s major shareholder, Farhad Moshiri, added: “Marcel’s record of achievement has cemented his reputation across Europe and I am extremely pleased that we will be bringing his drive, energy and expertise to Everton. Marcel Brands leaves PSV for @Everton. Now it’s your turn, Marcel. Good luck in England! �� pic.twitter.com/yqmRE1AXzd— PSV International (@psveindhoven) May 16, 2018 “It was clear to me in our conversations that he shares in the vision we have for the club and he has much to contribute in making us better and more equipped to challenge the top teams in the Premier League.” Chairman Bill Kenwright said: “His successful track record is there for all to see and having him here to help lead Everton forward is something which I’m sure will excite all Evertonians.” Brands first job is to secure the next manager, who is expected to be Marco Silva, the former Watford coach. New chief executive Denise Barrett-Baxendale said: “I know that Marcel will bring an unsurpassed level of quality and prowess to his work at Everton. “We will work alongside Marcel on the recruitment of a new manager, which is now our biggest focus.”
Everton have sacked Steve Walsh as director of football on a day of departures at Goodison Park. Having confirmed Sam Allardyce’s departure earlier on Wednesdaday, Walsh has also paid the price for his horrific spending spree of last summer when only Jordan Pickford emerged with credit for a vast outlay exceeding £100 million. As expected, he has been replaced by Marcel Brands, who joins from PSV Eindhoven. Walsh was headhunted from Leicester City in 2016 having been credited for overseeing their triumphant title season. Majority shareholder Farhad Moshiri hoped Walsh would be equally intuitive at Goodison Park, but the return on his investment last season was pitiful. Now the Merseyside club turns to Dutchman Brands, 56, who joined PSV Eindhoven having previously been instrumental in transforming the fortunes of RKC Waalwijk and AZ Alkmaar. Everton owner Farhad Moshiri has sacked his manager and director of football today Credit: Alex Livesey/Getty Images “It is a privilege to be joining Everton as director of football and I am incredibly excited to take on this challenge,” said Brands. “The fantastic passion of the fans for their club, the magnificent history of the club over the years and the ambition and purpose we have as people tasked with driving the Club forward all mean that we need to be competing for honours against the Premier League elite. “It is no straightforward challenge but this must be our motivation each and every day. “I am looking forward to working with Farhad Moshiri and Chairman Bill Kenwright, whom I thank for entrusting me with this role and responsibility, and I am also looking forward to working with the Board of Directors and with our new CEO, Denise Barrett-Baxendale. I know we have very committed people here who want only the best for Everton. Marcel Brands joins Everton from PSV Credit: Edwin van Zandvoort/Soccrates/Getty Images “It is only a challenge such as this which could have persuaded me to leave PSV where I am indebted to the many people whose collective effort led to some great achievements. “Now we will look to build something really strong and lasting here at Everton.” Everton’s major shareholder, Farhad Moshiri, added: “Marcel’s record of achievement has cemented his reputation across Europe and I am extremely pleased that we will be bringing his drive, energy and expertise to Everton. Marcel Brands leaves PSV for @Everton. Now it’s your turn, Marcel. Good luck in England! �� pic.twitter.com/yqmRE1AXzd— PSV International (@psveindhoven) May 16, 2018 “It was clear to me in our conversations that he shares in the vision we have for the club and he has much to contribute in making us better and more equipped to challenge the top teams in the Premier League.” Chairman Bill Kenwright said: “His successful track record is there for all to see and having him here to help lead Everton forward is something which I’m sure will excite all Evertonians.” Brands first job is to secure the next manager, who is expected to be Marco Silva, the former Watford coach. New chief executive Denise Barrett-Baxendale said: “I know that Marcel will bring an unsurpassed level of quality and prowess to his work at Everton. “We will work alongside Marcel on the recruitment of a new manager, which is now our biggest focus.”
Everton sack Steve Walsh as director of football and welcome PSV's Marcel Brands
Everton have sacked Steve Walsh as director of football on a day of departures at Goodison Park. Having confirmed Sam Allardyce’s departure earlier on Wednesdaday, Walsh has also paid the price for his horrific spending spree of last summer when only Jordan Pickford emerged with credit for a vast outlay exceeding £100 million. As expected, he has been replaced by Marcel Brands, who joins from PSV Eindhoven. Walsh was headhunted from Leicester City in 2016 having been credited for overseeing their triumphant title season. Majority shareholder Farhad Moshiri hoped Walsh would be equally intuitive at Goodison Park, but the return on his investment last season was pitiful. Now the Merseyside club turns to Dutchman Brands, 56, who joined PSV Eindhoven having previously been instrumental in transforming the fortunes of RKC Waalwijk and AZ Alkmaar. Everton owner Farhad Moshiri has sacked his manager and director of football today Credit: Alex Livesey/Getty Images “It is a privilege to be joining Everton as director of football and I am incredibly excited to take on this challenge,” said Brands. “The fantastic passion of the fans for their club, the magnificent history of the club over the years and the ambition and purpose we have as people tasked with driving the Club forward all mean that we need to be competing for honours against the Premier League elite. “It is no straightforward challenge but this must be our motivation each and every day. “I am looking forward to working with Farhad Moshiri and Chairman Bill Kenwright, whom I thank for entrusting me with this role and responsibility, and I am also looking forward to working with the Board of Directors and with our new CEO, Denise Barrett-Baxendale. I know we have very committed people here who want only the best for Everton. Marcel Brands joins Everton from PSV Credit: Edwin van Zandvoort/Soccrates/Getty Images “It is only a challenge such as this which could have persuaded me to leave PSV where I am indebted to the many people whose collective effort led to some great achievements. “Now we will look to build something really strong and lasting here at Everton.” Everton’s major shareholder, Farhad Moshiri, added: “Marcel’s record of achievement has cemented his reputation across Europe and I am extremely pleased that we will be bringing his drive, energy and expertise to Everton. Marcel Brands leaves PSV for @Everton. Now it’s your turn, Marcel. Good luck in England! �� pic.twitter.com/yqmRE1AXzd— PSV International (@psveindhoven) May 16, 2018 “It was clear to me in our conversations that he shares in the vision we have for the club and he has much to contribute in making us better and more equipped to challenge the top teams in the Premier League.” Chairman Bill Kenwright said: “His successful track record is there for all to see and having him here to help lead Everton forward is something which I’m sure will excite all Evertonians.” Brands first job is to secure the next manager, who is expected to be Marco Silva, the former Watford coach. New chief executive Denise Barrett-Baxendale said: “I know that Marcel will bring an unsurpassed level of quality and prowess to his work at Everton. “We will work alongside Marcel on the recruitment of a new manager, which is now our biggest focus.”
Everton have sacked Steve Walsh as director of football on a day of departures at Goodison Park. Having confirmed Sam Allardyce’s departure earlier on Wednesdaday, Walsh has also paid the price for his horrific spending spree of last summer when only Jordan Pickford emerged with credit for a vast outlay exceeding £100 million. As expected, he has been replaced by Marcel Brands, who joins from PSV Eindhoven. Walsh was headhunted from Leicester City in 2016 having been credited for overseeing their triumphant title season. Majority shareholder Farhad Moshiri hoped Walsh would be equally intuitive at Goodison Park, but the return on his investment last season was pitiful. Now the Merseyside club turns to Dutchman Brands, 56, who joined PSV Eindhoven having previously been instrumental in transforming the fortunes of RKC Waalwijk and AZ Alkmaar. Everton owner Farhad Moshiri has sacked his manager and director of football today Credit: Alex Livesey/Getty Images “It is a privilege to be joining Everton as director of football and I am incredibly excited to take on this challenge,” said Brands. “The fantastic passion of the fans for their club, the magnificent history of the club over the years and the ambition and purpose we have as people tasked with driving the Club forward all mean that we need to be competing for honours against the Premier League elite. “It is no straightforward challenge but this must be our motivation each and every day. “I am looking forward to working with Farhad Moshiri and Chairman Bill Kenwright, whom I thank for entrusting me with this role and responsibility, and I am also looking forward to working with the Board of Directors and with our new CEO, Denise Barrett-Baxendale. I know we have very committed people here who want only the best for Everton. Marcel Brands joins Everton from PSV Credit: Edwin van Zandvoort/Soccrates/Getty Images “It is only a challenge such as this which could have persuaded me to leave PSV where I am indebted to the many people whose collective effort led to some great achievements. “Now we will look to build something really strong and lasting here at Everton.” Everton’s major shareholder, Farhad Moshiri, added: “Marcel’s record of achievement has cemented his reputation across Europe and I am extremely pleased that we will be bringing his drive, energy and expertise to Everton. Marcel Brands leaves PSV for @Everton. Now it’s your turn, Marcel. Good luck in England! �� pic.twitter.com/yqmRE1AXzd— PSV International (@psveindhoven) May 16, 2018 “It was clear to me in our conversations that he shares in the vision we have for the club and he has much to contribute in making us better and more equipped to challenge the top teams in the Premier League.” Chairman Bill Kenwright said: “His successful track record is there for all to see and having him here to help lead Everton forward is something which I’m sure will excite all Evertonians.” Brands first job is to secure the next manager, who is expected to be Marco Silva, the former Watford coach. New chief executive Denise Barrett-Baxendale said: “I know that Marcel will bring an unsurpassed level of quality and prowess to his work at Everton. “We will work alongside Marcel on the recruitment of a new manager, which is now our biggest focus.”
Everton sack Steve Walsh as director of football and welcome PSV's Marcel Brands
Everton have sacked Steve Walsh as director of football on a day of departures at Goodison Park. Having confirmed Sam Allardyce’s departure earlier on Wednesdaday, Walsh has also paid the price for his horrific spending spree of last summer when only Jordan Pickford emerged with credit for a vast outlay exceeding £100 million. As expected, he has been replaced by Marcel Brands, who joins from PSV Eindhoven. Walsh was headhunted from Leicester City in 2016 having been credited for overseeing their triumphant title season. Majority shareholder Farhad Moshiri hoped Walsh would be equally intuitive at Goodison Park, but the return on his investment last season was pitiful. Now the Merseyside club turns to Dutchman Brands, 56, who joined PSV Eindhoven having previously been instrumental in transforming the fortunes of RKC Waalwijk and AZ Alkmaar. Everton owner Farhad Moshiri has sacked his manager and director of football today Credit: Alex Livesey/Getty Images “It is a privilege to be joining Everton as director of football and I am incredibly excited to take on this challenge,” said Brands. “The fantastic passion of the fans for their club, the magnificent history of the club over the years and the ambition and purpose we have as people tasked with driving the Club forward all mean that we need to be competing for honours against the Premier League elite. “It is no straightforward challenge but this must be our motivation each and every day. “I am looking forward to working with Farhad Moshiri and Chairman Bill Kenwright, whom I thank for entrusting me with this role and responsibility, and I am also looking forward to working with the Board of Directors and with our new CEO, Denise Barrett-Baxendale. I know we have very committed people here who want only the best for Everton. Marcel Brands joins Everton from PSV Credit: Edwin van Zandvoort/Soccrates/Getty Images “It is only a challenge such as this which could have persuaded me to leave PSV where I am indebted to the many people whose collective effort led to some great achievements. “Now we will look to build something really strong and lasting here at Everton.” Everton’s major shareholder, Farhad Moshiri, added: “Marcel’s record of achievement has cemented his reputation across Europe and I am extremely pleased that we will be bringing his drive, energy and expertise to Everton. Marcel Brands leaves PSV for @Everton. Now it’s your turn, Marcel. Good luck in England! �� pic.twitter.com/yqmRE1AXzd— PSV International (@psveindhoven) May 16, 2018 “It was clear to me in our conversations that he shares in the vision we have for the club and he has much to contribute in making us better and more equipped to challenge the top teams in the Premier League.” Chairman Bill Kenwright said: “His successful track record is there for all to see and having him here to help lead Everton forward is something which I’m sure will excite all Evertonians.” Brands first job is to secure the next manager, who is expected to be Marco Silva, the former Watford coach. New chief executive Denise Barrett-Baxendale said: “I know that Marcel will bring an unsurpassed level of quality and prowess to his work at Everton. “We will work alongside Marcel on the recruitment of a new manager, which is now our biggest focus.”
Mexicans can never be sure who will be playing for the national team under Juan Carlos Osorio. A different line-up has been deployed by Osorio in all 44 games in charge and now players are starting to question the tactical tinkering going into the World Cup. "It's time to stop with the experiments," goalkeeper Guillermo Ochoa said. "We have to focus on how we play as a team." Osorio, who replaced fan favorite Miguel Herrera in 2015, isn't budging. The Colombian has no plans to change the strategy because it carried Mexico to the World Cup as the top-place team in Concacaf qualifying for the first time in two decades. But changing formations depending on the opponent hasn't fared well in all competitions. World Cup 2018 | All you need to know "A lot of people said that the past few years have been good, but I'm not so sure about that," said Manuel Lapuente, who coached Mexico at the 1998 World Cup. "We were a failure in the Copa America Centenario. We failed at the Gold Cup and in the Confederations Cup. We did well in the qualifiers, but, guess what? We are not going to play against that kind of rival in Russia". The Mexicans were consigned to their worst-ever loss in the 2016 Copa America Centenario quarter-finals, trounced 7-0 by Chile. In a pair of semi-finals last year they were beaten 4-1 by Germany in the Confederations Cup and lost 1-0 to Jamaica in the Gold Cup. Progress for Mexico at the World Cup would be reaching the quarter-finals after failing to advance from the round of 16 at six successive editions. Only when the Mexicans hosted the World Cup did they make the last eight - in 1970 and 1986. Here's a closer look at the Mexico team: Coach Osorio, a former conditioning coach at Manchester United under Sir Alex Ferguson, won four league titles in Colombia and was managing Sao Paulo before taking over his first job as a national coach with Mexico in 2015. Osorio's success in Colombia, where he won the championship with Once Caldas and three more with Atletico Nacional, was based on the same tactical fluidity that he has brought to Mexico. His 44 games with Mexico have seen 29 wins, eight draws and seven losses. Mexico's national team coach Juan Carlos Osorio Credit: AFP Goalkeepers Guillermo Ochoa, who has made 92 appearances since his international debut in 2005, is renowned in Mexico for an outstanding save from Neymar's header at the 2014 World Cup. The 32-year-old "Memo," who plays for Standard Liege in Belgium, will be making the World Cup trip but he might not be guaranteed to start every game. Osorio is considering using either Jesus Corona or Alfredo Talavera in the final Group F game against Sweden because Ochoa can struggle dealing with crosses. Defenders Probably the weakest link in the team. Hector Moreno, who plays for Real Sociedad after a brief stint with Roma, is the strongest component of the back line. Osorio likes to play with three centre-backs, but only Moreno is a guaranteed starter. Nestor Araujo of Santos is uncertain for the tournament after sustaining a knee injury in a friendly against Croatia in March, while Carlos Salcedo injured his collarbone in the same match and is racing to be fit for Russia. Oswaldo Alanis, Hugo Ayala and Edson Alvarez could take over but all lack international experience. World Cup 2018 venues Midfielders This department is the team's strength. Hirving Lozano, who has scored 16 goals for PSV Eindhoven in the Dutch league, should start on the left wing. Carlos Vela, who joined Los Angeles FC from Real Sociedad last year, currently has the edge to start on the other flank rather than Jesus Corona of Porto. Andres Guardado (Real Betis) will play in the centre in his fourth World Cup alongside Hector Herrera, whose Porto teammate is set to be the defensive midfielder. Forwards Javier "Chicharito" Hernandez remains the main striker heading into the tournament, but Raul Jimenez is having a strong season with Benfica and giving the West Ham striker a run for his money. Oribe Peralta, who led Mexico to the gold medal at the 2012 London Olympics, is the third striker. Coach Osorio likes to use a formation with a withdrawn striker, a position where Giovani Dos Santos, Marco Fabian and Rodolfo Pizarro are contesting the starting position. World Cup predictor Group games Mexico open Group F against World Cup holders Germany on June 17 in Moscow where they have their tournament base. Then there's a trip to Rostov-on-Don to face South Korea on June 23, followed by a June 27 meeting with Sweden in Yekaterinburg.
Mexico World Cup 2018 squad: Latest player news and injury information
Mexicans can never be sure who will be playing for the national team under Juan Carlos Osorio. A different line-up has been deployed by Osorio in all 44 games in charge and now players are starting to question the tactical tinkering going into the World Cup. "It's time to stop with the experiments," goalkeeper Guillermo Ochoa said. "We have to focus on how we play as a team." Osorio, who replaced fan favorite Miguel Herrera in 2015, isn't budging. The Colombian has no plans to change the strategy because it carried Mexico to the World Cup as the top-place team in Concacaf qualifying for the first time in two decades. But changing formations depending on the opponent hasn't fared well in all competitions. World Cup 2018 | All you need to know "A lot of people said that the past few years have been good, but I'm not so sure about that," said Manuel Lapuente, who coached Mexico at the 1998 World Cup. "We were a failure in the Copa America Centenario. We failed at the Gold Cup and in the Confederations Cup. We did well in the qualifiers, but, guess what? We are not going to play against that kind of rival in Russia". The Mexicans were consigned to their worst-ever loss in the 2016 Copa America Centenario quarter-finals, trounced 7-0 by Chile. In a pair of semi-finals last year they were beaten 4-1 by Germany in the Confederations Cup and lost 1-0 to Jamaica in the Gold Cup. Progress for Mexico at the World Cup would be reaching the quarter-finals after failing to advance from the round of 16 at six successive editions. Only when the Mexicans hosted the World Cup did they make the last eight - in 1970 and 1986. Here's a closer look at the Mexico team: Coach Osorio, a former conditioning coach at Manchester United under Sir Alex Ferguson, won four league titles in Colombia and was managing Sao Paulo before taking over his first job as a national coach with Mexico in 2015. Osorio's success in Colombia, where he won the championship with Once Caldas and three more with Atletico Nacional, was based on the same tactical fluidity that he has brought to Mexico. His 44 games with Mexico have seen 29 wins, eight draws and seven losses. Mexico's national team coach Juan Carlos Osorio Credit: AFP Goalkeepers Guillermo Ochoa, who has made 92 appearances since his international debut in 2005, is renowned in Mexico for an outstanding save from Neymar's header at the 2014 World Cup. The 32-year-old "Memo," who plays for Standard Liege in Belgium, will be making the World Cup trip but he might not be guaranteed to start every game. Osorio is considering using either Jesus Corona or Alfredo Talavera in the final Group F game against Sweden because Ochoa can struggle dealing with crosses. Defenders Probably the weakest link in the team. Hector Moreno, who plays for Real Sociedad after a brief stint with Roma, is the strongest component of the back line. Osorio likes to play with three centre-backs, but only Moreno is a guaranteed starter. Nestor Araujo of Santos is uncertain for the tournament after sustaining a knee injury in a friendly against Croatia in March, while Carlos Salcedo injured his collarbone in the same match and is racing to be fit for Russia. Oswaldo Alanis, Hugo Ayala and Edson Alvarez could take over but all lack international experience. World Cup 2018 venues Midfielders This department is the team's strength. Hirving Lozano, who has scored 16 goals for PSV Eindhoven in the Dutch league, should start on the left wing. Carlos Vela, who joined Los Angeles FC from Real Sociedad last year, currently has the edge to start on the other flank rather than Jesus Corona of Porto. Andres Guardado (Real Betis) will play in the centre in his fourth World Cup alongside Hector Herrera, whose Porto teammate is set to be the defensive midfielder. Forwards Javier "Chicharito" Hernandez remains the main striker heading into the tournament, but Raul Jimenez is having a strong season with Benfica and giving the West Ham striker a run for his money. Oribe Peralta, who led Mexico to the gold medal at the 2012 London Olympics, is the third striker. Coach Osorio likes to use a formation with a withdrawn striker, a position where Giovani Dos Santos, Marco Fabian and Rodolfo Pizarro are contesting the starting position. World Cup predictor Group games Mexico open Group F against World Cup holders Germany on June 17 in Moscow where they have their tournament base. Then there's a trip to Rostov-on-Don to face South Korea on June 23, followed by a June 27 meeting with Sweden in Yekaterinburg.
Mexicans can never be sure who will be playing for the national team under Juan Carlos Osorio. A different line-up has been deployed by Osorio in all 44 games in charge and now players are starting to question the tactical tinkering going into the World Cup. "It's time to stop with the experiments," goalkeeper Guillermo Ochoa said. "We have to focus on how we play as a team." Osorio, who replaced fan favorite Miguel Herrera in 2015, isn't budging. The Colombian has no plans to change the strategy because it carried Mexico to the World Cup as the top-place team in Concacaf qualifying for the first time in two decades. But changing formations depending on the opponent hasn't fared well in all competitions. World Cup 2018 | All you need to know "A lot of people said that the past few years have been good, but I'm not so sure about that," said Manuel Lapuente, who coached Mexico at the 1998 World Cup. "We were a failure in the Copa America Centenario. We failed at the Gold Cup and in the Confederations Cup. We did well in the qualifiers, but, guess what? We are not going to play against that kind of rival in Russia". The Mexicans were consigned to their worst-ever loss in the 2016 Copa America Centenario quarter-finals, trounced 7-0 by Chile. In a pair of semi-finals last year they were beaten 4-1 by Germany in the Confederations Cup and lost 1-0 to Jamaica in the Gold Cup. Progress for Mexico at the World Cup would be reaching the quarter-finals after failing to advance from the round of 16 at six successive editions. Only when the Mexicans hosted the World Cup did they make the last eight - in 1970 and 1986. Here's a closer look at the Mexico team: Coach Osorio, a former conditioning coach at Manchester United under Sir Alex Ferguson, won four league titles in Colombia and was managing Sao Paulo before taking over his first job as a national coach with Mexico in 2015. Osorio's success in Colombia, where he won the championship with Once Caldas and three more with Atletico Nacional, was based on the same tactical fluidity that he has brought to Mexico. His 44 games with Mexico have seen 29 wins, eight draws and seven losses. Mexico's national team coach Juan Carlos Osorio Credit: AFP Goalkeepers Guillermo Ochoa, who has made 92 appearances since his international debut in 2005, is renowned in Mexico for an outstanding save from Neymar's header at the 2014 World Cup. The 32-year-old "Memo," who plays for Standard Liege in Belgium, will be making the World Cup trip but he might not be guaranteed to start every game. Osorio is considering using either Jesus Corona or Alfredo Talavera in the final Group F game against Sweden because Ochoa can struggle dealing with crosses. Defenders Probably the weakest link in the team. Hector Moreno, who plays for Real Sociedad after a brief stint with Roma, is the strongest component of the back line. Osorio likes to play with three centre-backs, but only Moreno is a guaranteed starter. Nestor Araujo of Santos is uncertain for the tournament after sustaining a knee injury in a friendly against Croatia in March, while Carlos Salcedo injured his collarbone in the same match and is racing to be fit for Russia. Oswaldo Alanis, Hugo Ayala and Edson Alvarez could take over but all lack international experience. World Cup 2018 venues Midfielders This department is the team's strength. Hirving Lozano, who has scored 16 goals for PSV Eindhoven in the Dutch league, should start on the left wing. Carlos Vela, who joined Los Angeles FC from Real Sociedad last year, currently has the edge to start on the other flank rather than Jesus Corona of Porto. Andres Guardado (Real Betis) will play in the centre in his fourth World Cup alongside Hector Herrera, whose Porto teammate is set to be the defensive midfielder. Forwards Javier "Chicharito" Hernandez remains the main striker heading into the tournament, but Raul Jimenez is having a strong season with Benfica and giving the West Ham striker a run for his money. Oribe Peralta, who led Mexico to the gold medal at the 2012 London Olympics, is the third striker. Coach Osorio likes to use a formation with a withdrawn striker, a position where Giovani Dos Santos, Marco Fabian and Rodolfo Pizarro are contesting the starting position. World Cup predictor Group games Mexico open Group F against World Cup holders Germany on June 17 in Moscow where they have their tournament base. Then there's a trip to Rostov-on-Don to face South Korea on June 23, followed by a June 27 meeting with Sweden in Yekaterinburg.
Mexico World Cup 2018 squad: Latest player news and injury information
Mexicans can never be sure who will be playing for the national team under Juan Carlos Osorio. A different line-up has been deployed by Osorio in all 44 games in charge and now players are starting to question the tactical tinkering going into the World Cup. "It's time to stop with the experiments," goalkeeper Guillermo Ochoa said. "We have to focus on how we play as a team." Osorio, who replaced fan favorite Miguel Herrera in 2015, isn't budging. The Colombian has no plans to change the strategy because it carried Mexico to the World Cup as the top-place team in Concacaf qualifying for the first time in two decades. But changing formations depending on the opponent hasn't fared well in all competitions. World Cup 2018 | All you need to know "A lot of people said that the past few years have been good, but I'm not so sure about that," said Manuel Lapuente, who coached Mexico at the 1998 World Cup. "We were a failure in the Copa America Centenario. We failed at the Gold Cup and in the Confederations Cup. We did well in the qualifiers, but, guess what? We are not going to play against that kind of rival in Russia". The Mexicans were consigned to their worst-ever loss in the 2016 Copa America Centenario quarter-finals, trounced 7-0 by Chile. In a pair of semi-finals last year they were beaten 4-1 by Germany in the Confederations Cup and lost 1-0 to Jamaica in the Gold Cup. Progress for Mexico at the World Cup would be reaching the quarter-finals after failing to advance from the round of 16 at six successive editions. Only when the Mexicans hosted the World Cup did they make the last eight - in 1970 and 1986. Here's a closer look at the Mexico team: Coach Osorio, a former conditioning coach at Manchester United under Sir Alex Ferguson, won four league titles in Colombia and was managing Sao Paulo before taking over his first job as a national coach with Mexico in 2015. Osorio's success in Colombia, where he won the championship with Once Caldas and three more with Atletico Nacional, was based on the same tactical fluidity that he has brought to Mexico. His 44 games with Mexico have seen 29 wins, eight draws and seven losses. Mexico's national team coach Juan Carlos Osorio Credit: AFP Goalkeepers Guillermo Ochoa, who has made 92 appearances since his international debut in 2005, is renowned in Mexico for an outstanding save from Neymar's header at the 2014 World Cup. The 32-year-old "Memo," who plays for Standard Liege in Belgium, will be making the World Cup trip but he might not be guaranteed to start every game. Osorio is considering using either Jesus Corona or Alfredo Talavera in the final Group F game against Sweden because Ochoa can struggle dealing with crosses. Defenders Probably the weakest link in the team. Hector Moreno, who plays for Real Sociedad after a brief stint with Roma, is the strongest component of the back line. Osorio likes to play with three centre-backs, but only Moreno is a guaranteed starter. Nestor Araujo of Santos is uncertain for the tournament after sustaining a knee injury in a friendly against Croatia in March, while Carlos Salcedo injured his collarbone in the same match and is racing to be fit for Russia. Oswaldo Alanis, Hugo Ayala and Edson Alvarez could take over but all lack international experience. World Cup 2018 venues Midfielders This department is the team's strength. Hirving Lozano, who has scored 16 goals for PSV Eindhoven in the Dutch league, should start on the left wing. Carlos Vela, who joined Los Angeles FC from Real Sociedad last year, currently has the edge to start on the other flank rather than Jesus Corona of Porto. Andres Guardado (Real Betis) will play in the centre in his fourth World Cup alongside Hector Herrera, whose Porto teammate is set to be the defensive midfielder. Forwards Javier "Chicharito" Hernandez remains the main striker heading into the tournament, but Raul Jimenez is having a strong season with Benfica and giving the West Ham striker a run for his money. Oribe Peralta, who led Mexico to the gold medal at the 2012 London Olympics, is the third striker. Coach Osorio likes to use a formation with a withdrawn striker, a position where Giovani Dos Santos, Marco Fabian and Rodolfo Pizarro are contesting the starting position. World Cup predictor Group games Mexico open Group F against World Cup holders Germany on June 17 in Moscow where they have their tournament base. Then there's a trip to Rostov-on-Don to face South Korea on June 23, followed by a June 27 meeting with Sweden in Yekaterinburg.
Chelsea are among the clubs taking a keen interest in Anthony Martial’s situation at Manchester United, but owner Roman Abramovich will once again have to wheel and deal his way through the transfer window. Abramovich is keen to spend big this summer, but is facing a shortfall between £50million and £70m if Chelsea fail to qualify for the Champions League and will have to sell players in order to satisfy Financial Fair Play rules. The club’s loan army could pay dividends, with Chelsea comfortably able to raise over £100million if they sell off some of the players who have spent time elsewhere. Despite the uncertainty over who will be Chelsea’s manager next season, with head coach Antonio Conte expected to leave, Abramovich is preparing to refresh the club’s squad following a difficult Premier League title defence. Other than trying to strengthen the defence and midfield, Chelsea will attempt to boost their forward options and are having to consider the possibility of what to do if Real Madrid make a big offer for Eden Hazard. Has Jose Mourinho changed tactically since his early managerial days? Martial, who can play anywhere across a front three, is viewed as a potential target if United cannot convince the Frenchman to stay at Old Trafford. His contract runs to 2019 and there is a ‘plus one’ option that means his value will not drop dramatically this summer. Juventus and Tottenham Hotspur have already shown an interest in Martial, with the Italians thought to be ready to pay £44m and that would comfortably fit into Chelsea’s budget – as would his salary with the 22-year-old currently thought to earn £65,000-a-week. Jose Mourinho would rather keep Martial at United and the club may not want to allow him to stay in the Premier League if he does leave, but the Portuguese has proved in the past that he is willing to let players join rivals for the right money. There are also good relations between United and Chelsea, following Nemanja Matic’s move to Old Trafford last summer and Mourinho has made no secret of his ongoing admiration of Willian. Chelsea still hope to convince Hazard to sign a new contract and stay at Stamford Bridge, but face an anxious wait to see if Real firm up their long-term interest with a serious offer. Contenders to replace Conte at Chelsea But Abramovich can easily raise the money to make up a possible Champions League shortfall and satisfy Financial Fair Play without having to sell off any of Chelsea’s stars. Borussia Dortmund are interested in signing Michy Batshuayi, who Chelsea value at around £50m, while Kurt Zouma and Kenedy would both command at least £20m each. The Blues would also expect to pocket up to £10m for individuals such as Marco van Ginkel, who has been at PSV Eindhoven, and Lucas Piazon, who is helping Fulham’s promotion bid. Ruben Loftus-Cheek and Tammy Abraham will not be sold, but Danny Drinkwater could leave Chelsea just one year after his move from Leicester City. West Ham United are one of the clubs ready to pay £30m for the midfielder. There are also doubts over the futures of David Luiz, who has been out injured after falling out with Conte, and Pedro Rodriguez, who has not been a regular starter this season. Antonio Conte and Roman Ibramovich look likely to part ways this summer Credit: getty images Financial Fair Play rules have limited Abramovich to a net outlay of £119m since 2014, which places the club sixth in the list of the Premier League’s highest spenders and shows how their business model has changed. Sources close to the Russian insist his commitment to ensuring Chelsea remain successful remains as strong as ever, but he is working under stricter parameters than Manchester City and United. Abramovich has been honoured by the Federation of Jewish communities of Russia for investing over £365m into Jewish communities in Russia, Israel and other countries around the world. FJCR president, Rabbi Alexander Boroda, has claimed that 80 per cent of the developments in Jewish life in Russia are thanks to Abramovich, saying: “He never talks about it, but I want to because people don’t understand who is the source of it is – and it is him.”
Chelsea consider targeting Anthony Martial if Manchester United cannot convince him to stay
Chelsea are among the clubs taking a keen interest in Anthony Martial’s situation at Manchester United, but owner Roman Abramovich will once again have to wheel and deal his way through the transfer window. Abramovich is keen to spend big this summer, but is facing a shortfall between £50million and £70m if Chelsea fail to qualify for the Champions League and will have to sell players in order to satisfy Financial Fair Play rules. The club’s loan army could pay dividends, with Chelsea comfortably able to raise over £100million if they sell off some of the players who have spent time elsewhere. Despite the uncertainty over who will be Chelsea’s manager next season, with head coach Antonio Conte expected to leave, Abramovich is preparing to refresh the club’s squad following a difficult Premier League title defence. Other than trying to strengthen the defence and midfield, Chelsea will attempt to boost their forward options and are having to consider the possibility of what to do if Real Madrid make a big offer for Eden Hazard. Has Jose Mourinho changed tactically since his early managerial days? Martial, who can play anywhere across a front three, is viewed as a potential target if United cannot convince the Frenchman to stay at Old Trafford. His contract runs to 2019 and there is a ‘plus one’ option that means his value will not drop dramatically this summer. Juventus and Tottenham Hotspur have already shown an interest in Martial, with the Italians thought to be ready to pay £44m and that would comfortably fit into Chelsea’s budget – as would his salary with the 22-year-old currently thought to earn £65,000-a-week. Jose Mourinho would rather keep Martial at United and the club may not want to allow him to stay in the Premier League if he does leave, but the Portuguese has proved in the past that he is willing to let players join rivals for the right money. There are also good relations between United and Chelsea, following Nemanja Matic’s move to Old Trafford last summer and Mourinho has made no secret of his ongoing admiration of Willian. Chelsea still hope to convince Hazard to sign a new contract and stay at Stamford Bridge, but face an anxious wait to see if Real firm up their long-term interest with a serious offer. Contenders to replace Conte at Chelsea But Abramovich can easily raise the money to make up a possible Champions League shortfall and satisfy Financial Fair Play without having to sell off any of Chelsea’s stars. Borussia Dortmund are interested in signing Michy Batshuayi, who Chelsea value at around £50m, while Kurt Zouma and Kenedy would both command at least £20m each. The Blues would also expect to pocket up to £10m for individuals such as Marco van Ginkel, who has been at PSV Eindhoven, and Lucas Piazon, who is helping Fulham’s promotion bid. Ruben Loftus-Cheek and Tammy Abraham will not be sold, but Danny Drinkwater could leave Chelsea just one year after his move from Leicester City. West Ham United are one of the clubs ready to pay £30m for the midfielder. There are also doubts over the futures of David Luiz, who has been out injured after falling out with Conte, and Pedro Rodriguez, who has not been a regular starter this season. Antonio Conte and Roman Ibramovich look likely to part ways this summer Credit: getty images Financial Fair Play rules have limited Abramovich to a net outlay of £119m since 2014, which places the club sixth in the list of the Premier League’s highest spenders and shows how their business model has changed. Sources close to the Russian insist his commitment to ensuring Chelsea remain successful remains as strong as ever, but he is working under stricter parameters than Manchester City and United. Abramovich has been honoured by the Federation of Jewish communities of Russia for investing over £365m into Jewish communities in Russia, Israel and other countries around the world. FJCR president, Rabbi Alexander Boroda, has claimed that 80 per cent of the developments in Jewish life in Russia are thanks to Abramovich, saying: “He never talks about it, but I want to because people don’t understand who is the source of it is – and it is him.”
Chelsea are among the clubs taking a keen interest in Anthony Martial’s situation at Manchester United, but owner Roman Abramovich will once again have to wheel and deal his way through the transfer window. Abramovich is keen to spend big this summer, but is facing a shortfall between £50million and £70m if Chelsea fail to qualify for the Champions League and will have to sell players in order to satisfy Financial Fair Play rules. The club’s loan army could pay dividends, with Chelsea comfortably able to raise over £100million if they sell off some of the players who have spent time elsewhere. Despite the uncertainty over who will be Chelsea’s manager next season, with head coach Antonio Conte expected to leave, Abramovich is preparing to refresh the club’s squad following a difficult Premier League title defence. Other than trying to strengthen the defence and midfield, Chelsea will attempt to boost their forward options and are having to consider the possibility of what to do if Real Madrid make a big offer for Eden Hazard. Has Jose Mourinho changed tactically since his early managerial days? Martial, who can play anywhere across a front three, is viewed as a potential target if United cannot convince the Frenchman to stay at Old Trafford. His contract runs to 2019 and there is a ‘plus one’ option that means his value will not drop dramatically this summer. Juventus and Tottenham Hotspur have already shown an interest in Martial, with the Italians thought to be ready to pay £44m and that would comfortably fit into Chelsea’s budget – as would his salary with the 22-year-old currently thought to earn £65,000-a-week. Jose Mourinho would rather keep Martial at United and the club may not want to allow him to stay in the Premier League if he does leave, but the Portuguese has proved in the past that he is willing to let players join rivals for the right money. There are also good relations between United and Chelsea, following Nemanja Matic’s move to Old Trafford last summer and Mourinho has made no secret of his ongoing admiration of Willian. Chelsea still hope to convince Hazard to sign a new contract and stay at Stamford Bridge, but face an anxious wait to see if Real firm up their long-term interest with a serious offer. Contenders to replace Conte at Chelsea But Abramovich can easily raise the money to make up a possible Champions League shortfall and satisfy Financial Fair Play without having to sell off any of Chelsea’s stars. Borussia Dortmund are interested in signing Michy Batshuayi, who Chelsea value at around £50m, while Kurt Zouma and Kenedy would both command at least £20m each. The Blues would also expect to pocket up to £10m for individuals such as Marco van Ginkel, who has been at PSV Eindhoven, and Lucas Piazon, who is helping Fulham’s promotion bid. Ruben Loftus-Cheek and Tammy Abraham will not be sold, but Danny Drinkwater could leave Chelsea just one year after his move from Leicester City. West Ham United are one of the clubs ready to pay £30m for the midfielder. There are also doubts over the futures of David Luiz, who has been out injured after falling out with Conte, and Pedro Rodriguez, who has not been a regular starter this season. Antonio Conte and Roman Ibramovich look likely to part ways this summer Credit: getty images Financial Fair Play rules have limited Abramovich to a net outlay of £119m since 2014, which places the club sixth in the list of the Premier League’s highest spenders and shows how their business model has changed. Sources close to the Russian insist his commitment to ensuring Chelsea remain successful remains as strong as ever, but he is working under stricter parameters than Manchester City and United. Abramovich has been honoured by the Federation of Jewish communities of Russia for investing over £365m into Jewish communities in Russia, Israel and other countries around the world. FJCR president, Rabbi Alexander Boroda, has claimed that 80 per cent of the developments in Jewish life in Russia are thanks to Abramovich, saying: “He never talks about it, but I want to because people don’t understand who is the source of it is – and it is him.”
Chelsea consider targeting Anthony Martial if Manchester United cannot convince him to stay
Chelsea are among the clubs taking a keen interest in Anthony Martial’s situation at Manchester United, but owner Roman Abramovich will once again have to wheel and deal his way through the transfer window. Abramovich is keen to spend big this summer, but is facing a shortfall between £50million and £70m if Chelsea fail to qualify for the Champions League and will have to sell players in order to satisfy Financial Fair Play rules. The club’s loan army could pay dividends, with Chelsea comfortably able to raise over £100million if they sell off some of the players who have spent time elsewhere. Despite the uncertainty over who will be Chelsea’s manager next season, with head coach Antonio Conte expected to leave, Abramovich is preparing to refresh the club’s squad following a difficult Premier League title defence. Other than trying to strengthen the defence and midfield, Chelsea will attempt to boost their forward options and are having to consider the possibility of what to do if Real Madrid make a big offer for Eden Hazard. Has Jose Mourinho changed tactically since his early managerial days? Martial, who can play anywhere across a front three, is viewed as a potential target if United cannot convince the Frenchman to stay at Old Trafford. His contract runs to 2019 and there is a ‘plus one’ option that means his value will not drop dramatically this summer. Juventus and Tottenham Hotspur have already shown an interest in Martial, with the Italians thought to be ready to pay £44m and that would comfortably fit into Chelsea’s budget – as would his salary with the 22-year-old currently thought to earn £65,000-a-week. Jose Mourinho would rather keep Martial at United and the club may not want to allow him to stay in the Premier League if he does leave, but the Portuguese has proved in the past that he is willing to let players join rivals for the right money. There are also good relations between United and Chelsea, following Nemanja Matic’s move to Old Trafford last summer and Mourinho has made no secret of his ongoing admiration of Willian. Chelsea still hope to convince Hazard to sign a new contract and stay at Stamford Bridge, but face an anxious wait to see if Real firm up their long-term interest with a serious offer. Contenders to replace Conte at Chelsea But Abramovich can easily raise the money to make up a possible Champions League shortfall and satisfy Financial Fair Play without having to sell off any of Chelsea’s stars. Borussia Dortmund are interested in signing Michy Batshuayi, who Chelsea value at around £50m, while Kurt Zouma and Kenedy would both command at least £20m each. The Blues would also expect to pocket up to £10m for individuals such as Marco van Ginkel, who has been at PSV Eindhoven, and Lucas Piazon, who is helping Fulham’s promotion bid. Ruben Loftus-Cheek and Tammy Abraham will not be sold, but Danny Drinkwater could leave Chelsea just one year after his move from Leicester City. West Ham United are one of the clubs ready to pay £30m for the midfielder. There are also doubts over the futures of David Luiz, who has been out injured after falling out with Conte, and Pedro Rodriguez, who has not been a regular starter this season. Antonio Conte and Roman Ibramovich look likely to part ways this summer Credit: getty images Financial Fair Play rules have limited Abramovich to a net outlay of £119m since 2014, which places the club sixth in the list of the Premier League’s highest spenders and shows how their business model has changed. Sources close to the Russian insist his commitment to ensuring Chelsea remain successful remains as strong as ever, but he is working under stricter parameters than Manchester City and United. Abramovich has been honoured by the Federation of Jewish communities of Russia for investing over £365m into Jewish communities in Russia, Israel and other countries around the world. FJCR president, Rabbi Alexander Boroda, has claimed that 80 per cent of the developments in Jewish life in Russia are thanks to Abramovich, saying: “He never talks about it, but I want to because people don’t understand who is the source of it is – and it is him.”
Everton’s summer overhaul has gathered pace with PSV Eindhoven sporting director Marcel Brands confirming he is preparing to join the Merseyside club. The Dutchman will move to Everton to oversee changes in football operations. As well as manager Sam Allardyce seeking clarity on his future, current Director of Football Steve Walsh will need likewise. “Saying goodbye to the people at this club will be the hardest thing for me,” said Brands. “But it is correct. The first contact with Everton goes back to 2016. I have said, ‘no’ to beautiful clubs in Germany and I am with the best club in the Netherlands.” Brands will bring an extensive portfolio and is already believed to be targeting PSV Mexican winger Hirving Lozano and Ajax’s Hakin Ziyech. Once Brands is in place, there are likely to be fundamental changes, although manager Allardyce has not given up on winning the support of the Goodison faithful as he offered another defence of his reign by arguing he inherited ‘chaos’. Allardyce faces the Gwladys Street for the first time since the club encouraged its fans to rate the former England’s boss’ period in charge. “You win fans over by winning football matches and winning them in style,” said Allardyce, ahead of the visit of Newcastle. "You can only do what you do and work as hard as you possibly can with the squad and the players you have got to deliver what you can. That has been a difficult challenge.” Sam Allardyce has claimed credit for David Unsworth's final victory of his eight-game caretaker stint Credit: Getty Images Allardyce feels he deserves more credit for ending any relegation fears. “We have managed to overcome the chaos,” he said. “Even David Unsworth said he could not wait for the new manager to be appointed. He was in for (eight) games and he was saying before the West Ham game, ‘get me out of this position, get a new manager appointed because I am struggling to cope and these players have got no confidence’. That is where I came from.” Although Unsworth oversaw the final victory of his caretaker reign, Allardyce says that was due to his arrival. "I came in for West Ham and spoke to the players,” he said. “It helped have a positive affect. David does the last game and he gets the win. We both benefit from that and move forward. Where we have gone from there, I consider it my contribution, which is 30 points from 21 games, rather than 13 games, 12 points. I had a contribution to play in the victory over West Ham that day. I spoke to the players before the game. The players reacted. I’m not saying they reacted to what I said but they certainly reacted to a new manager on the door. “When a new manager comes in, even if he hasn’t taken a coaching session, the players go out and respond to it. They think, ‘I have got to prove that I deserve my place in the side’. That contributed to what was a great victory.”
With new sporting director imminent, Sam Allardyce waits to learn if he will be part of Everton overhaul
Everton’s summer overhaul has gathered pace with PSV Eindhoven sporting director Marcel Brands confirming he is preparing to join the Merseyside club. The Dutchman will move to Everton to oversee changes in football operations. As well as manager Sam Allardyce seeking clarity on his future, current Director of Football Steve Walsh will need likewise. “Saying goodbye to the people at this club will be the hardest thing for me,” said Brands. “But it is correct. The first contact with Everton goes back to 2016. I have said, ‘no’ to beautiful clubs in Germany and I am with the best club in the Netherlands.” Brands will bring an extensive portfolio and is already believed to be targeting PSV Mexican winger Hirving Lozano and Ajax’s Hakin Ziyech. Once Brands is in place, there are likely to be fundamental changes, although manager Allardyce has not given up on winning the support of the Goodison faithful as he offered another defence of his reign by arguing he inherited ‘chaos’. Allardyce faces the Gwladys Street for the first time since the club encouraged its fans to rate the former England’s boss’ period in charge. “You win fans over by winning football matches and winning them in style,” said Allardyce, ahead of the visit of Newcastle. "You can only do what you do and work as hard as you possibly can with the squad and the players you have got to deliver what you can. That has been a difficult challenge.” Sam Allardyce has claimed credit for David Unsworth's final victory of his eight-game caretaker stint Credit: Getty Images Allardyce feels he deserves more credit for ending any relegation fears. “We have managed to overcome the chaos,” he said. “Even David Unsworth said he could not wait for the new manager to be appointed. He was in for (eight) games and he was saying before the West Ham game, ‘get me out of this position, get a new manager appointed because I am struggling to cope and these players have got no confidence’. That is where I came from.” Although Unsworth oversaw the final victory of his caretaker reign, Allardyce says that was due to his arrival. "I came in for West Ham and spoke to the players,” he said. “It helped have a positive affect. David does the last game and he gets the win. We both benefit from that and move forward. Where we have gone from there, I consider it my contribution, which is 30 points from 21 games, rather than 13 games, 12 points. I had a contribution to play in the victory over West Ham that day. I spoke to the players before the game. The players reacted. I’m not saying they reacted to what I said but they certainly reacted to a new manager on the door. “When a new manager comes in, even if he hasn’t taken a coaching session, the players go out and respond to it. They think, ‘I have got to prove that I deserve my place in the side’. That contributed to what was a great victory.”
Marcel Brands, the PSV Eindhoven technical director, says he faces a ‘hard' choice whether to leave the Dutch club this summer amid ongoing interest from Everton. The Merseyside club continue to court Brands as yet another Goodison restructure seems inevitable at the end of the season. After PSV secured the Dutch championship over the weekend, Brands admitted interest in his services, while insisting walking away from the Eredivisie club will not be easy. “I have a contract at PSV. There is interest but is it hard to leave this beautiful place,” he told Fox Sport. “We are busy preparing for next season. We started doing so at the winter break. Now it’s time to relax and celebrate.” Such comments are unlikely to dissuade Everton’s majority shareholder Farhad Moshiri who has been analysing Brands' work for a considerable period. It is uncertain whether Everton's owner, Farhad Moshiri, right, is committed to his manager, Sam Allardyce, beyond the end of the season Credit: PAUL ELLIS/AFP/Getty Images Nevertheless, with Steve Walsh already in position as Goodison’s Director of Football, there continues to be a sense of ambiguity regarding the long-term positions of several key Everton figures. Chief Executive Robert Elstone’s imminent departure to Rugby’s Super League will create a significant opening, but it is inconceivable a figure of Brands' clout can be lured without the guarantee of authority to oversee a much-needed, thorough review of all footballing operations. That will do nothing to end uncertainty surrounding the position of Walsh, whose recruitment record since leaving Leicester for Everton has shown no sign of meeting the lofty expectations Moshiri set when buying the club. Points dropped from winning positions away from home Manager Sam Allardyce, meanwhile, has been unable to convince the sceptics among the club's fans that he should be considered anything more than a quick fix to the diabolical situation he inherited when Everton were flirting with a relegation fight. The Everton board knows if they stand by their manager going into next season, the disenchantment that has polluted this campaign will only subside if the club gets off to the most positive start imaginable – and even that would not prevent a summer of disillusionment for those anticipating and demanding a dynamic and fresh vision from the top of the club in response to a torturous year.
Everton target Marcel Brands admits leaving champions PSV would be hard
Marcel Brands, the PSV Eindhoven technical director, says he faces a ‘hard' choice whether to leave the Dutch club this summer amid ongoing interest from Everton. The Merseyside club continue to court Brands as yet another Goodison restructure seems inevitable at the end of the season. After PSV secured the Dutch championship over the weekend, Brands admitted interest in his services, while insisting walking away from the Eredivisie club will not be easy. “I have a contract at PSV. There is interest but is it hard to leave this beautiful place,” he told Fox Sport. “We are busy preparing for next season. We started doing so at the winter break. Now it’s time to relax and celebrate.” Such comments are unlikely to dissuade Everton’s majority shareholder Farhad Moshiri who has been analysing Brands' work for a considerable period. It is uncertain whether Everton's owner, Farhad Moshiri, right, is committed to his manager, Sam Allardyce, beyond the end of the season Credit: PAUL ELLIS/AFP/Getty Images Nevertheless, with Steve Walsh already in position as Goodison’s Director of Football, there continues to be a sense of ambiguity regarding the long-term positions of several key Everton figures. Chief Executive Robert Elstone’s imminent departure to Rugby’s Super League will create a significant opening, but it is inconceivable a figure of Brands' clout can be lured without the guarantee of authority to oversee a much-needed, thorough review of all footballing operations. That will do nothing to end uncertainty surrounding the position of Walsh, whose recruitment record since leaving Leicester for Everton has shown no sign of meeting the lofty expectations Moshiri set when buying the club. Points dropped from winning positions away from home Manager Sam Allardyce, meanwhile, has been unable to convince the sceptics among the club's fans that he should be considered anything more than a quick fix to the diabolical situation he inherited when Everton were flirting with a relegation fight. The Everton board knows if they stand by their manager going into next season, the disenchantment that has polluted this campaign will only subside if the club gets off to the most positive start imaginable – and even that would not prevent a summer of disillusionment for those anticipating and demanding a dynamic and fresh vision from the top of the club in response to a torturous year.
Marcel Brands, the PSV Eindhoven technical director, says he faces a ‘hard' choice whether to leave the Dutch club this summer amid ongoing interest from Everton. The Merseyside club continue to court Brands as yet another Goodison restructure seems inevitable at the end of the season. After PSV secured the Dutch championship over the weekend, Brands admitted interest in his services, while insisting walking away from the Eredivisie club will not be easy. “I have a contract at PSV. There is interest but is it hard to leave this beautiful place,” he told Fox Sport. “We are busy preparing for next season. We started doing so at the winter break. Now it’s time to relax and celebrate.” Such comments are unlikely to dissuade Everton’s majority shareholder Farhad Moshiri who has been analysing Brands' work for a considerable period. It is uncertain whether Everton's owner, Farhad Moshiri, right, is committed to his manager, Sam Allardyce, beyond the end of the season Credit: PAUL ELLIS/AFP/Getty Images Nevertheless, with Steve Walsh already in position as Goodison’s Director of Football, there continues to be a sense of ambiguity regarding the long-term positions of several key Everton figures. Chief Executive Robert Elstone’s imminent departure to Rugby’s Super League will create a significant opening, but it is inconceivable a figure of Brands' clout can be lured without the guarantee of authority to oversee a much-needed, thorough review of all footballing operations. That will do nothing to end uncertainty surrounding the position of Walsh, whose recruitment record since leaving Leicester for Everton has shown no sign of meeting the lofty expectations Moshiri set when buying the club. Points dropped from winning positions away from home Manager Sam Allardyce, meanwhile, has been unable to convince the sceptics among the club's fans that he should be considered anything more than a quick fix to the diabolical situation he inherited when Everton were flirting with a relegation fight. The Everton board knows if they stand by their manager going into next season, the disenchantment that has polluted this campaign will only subside if the club gets off to the most positive start imaginable – and even that would not prevent a summer of disillusionment for those anticipating and demanding a dynamic and fresh vision from the top of the club in response to a torturous year.
Everton target Marcel Brands admits leaving champions PSV would be hard
Marcel Brands, the PSV Eindhoven technical director, says he faces a ‘hard' choice whether to leave the Dutch club this summer amid ongoing interest from Everton. The Merseyside club continue to court Brands as yet another Goodison restructure seems inevitable at the end of the season. After PSV secured the Dutch championship over the weekend, Brands admitted interest in his services, while insisting walking away from the Eredivisie club will not be easy. “I have a contract at PSV. There is interest but is it hard to leave this beautiful place,” he told Fox Sport. “We are busy preparing for next season. We started doing so at the winter break. Now it’s time to relax and celebrate.” Such comments are unlikely to dissuade Everton’s majority shareholder Farhad Moshiri who has been analysing Brands' work for a considerable period. It is uncertain whether Everton's owner, Farhad Moshiri, right, is committed to his manager, Sam Allardyce, beyond the end of the season Credit: PAUL ELLIS/AFP/Getty Images Nevertheless, with Steve Walsh already in position as Goodison’s Director of Football, there continues to be a sense of ambiguity regarding the long-term positions of several key Everton figures. Chief Executive Robert Elstone’s imminent departure to Rugby’s Super League will create a significant opening, but it is inconceivable a figure of Brands' clout can be lured without the guarantee of authority to oversee a much-needed, thorough review of all footballing operations. That will do nothing to end uncertainty surrounding the position of Walsh, whose recruitment record since leaving Leicester for Everton has shown no sign of meeting the lofty expectations Moshiri set when buying the club. Points dropped from winning positions away from home Manager Sam Allardyce, meanwhile, has been unable to convince the sceptics among the club's fans that he should be considered anything more than a quick fix to the diabolical situation he inherited when Everton were flirting with a relegation fight. The Everton board knows if they stand by their manager going into next season, the disenchantment that has polluted this campaign will only subside if the club gets off to the most positive start imaginable – and even that would not prevent a summer of disillusionment for those anticipating and demanding a dynamic and fresh vision from the top of the club in response to a torturous year.
PSV Eindhoven regained the Eredivisie title with a 3-0 win against bitter rivals, Ajax.
PSV cruise to Dutch title with win over rivals Ajax
PSV Eindhoven regained the Eredivisie title with a 3-0 win against bitter rivals, Ajax.
PSV Eindhoven regained the Eredivisie title with a 3-0 win against bitter rivals, Ajax.
PSV cruise to Dutch title with win over rivals Ajax
PSV Eindhoven regained the Eredivisie title with a 3-0 win against bitter rivals, Ajax.
PSV Eindhoven regained the Eredivisie title with a 3-0 win against bitter rivals, Ajax.
PSV cruise to Dutch title with win over rivals Ajax
PSV Eindhoven regained the Eredivisie title with a 3-0 win against bitter rivals, Ajax.
PSV Eindhoven enjoyed the perfect day, regaining the Eredivisie title with a 3-0 win against bitter rivals, Ajax.
Play of the Day: PSV seal Eredivisie title in style
PSV Eindhoven enjoyed the perfect day, regaining the Eredivisie title with a 3-0 win against bitter rivals, Ajax.
PSV Eindhoven enjoyed the perfect day, regaining the Eredivisie title with a 3-0 win against bitter rivals, Ajax.
Play of the Day: PSV seal Eredivisie title in style
PSV Eindhoven enjoyed the perfect day, regaining the Eredivisie title with a 3-0 win against bitter rivals, Ajax.
PSV Eindhoven enjoyed the perfect day, regaining the Eredivisie title with a 3-0 win against bitter rivals, Ajax.
Play of the Day: PSV seal Eredivisie title in style
PSV Eindhoven enjoyed the perfect day, regaining the Eredivisie title with a 3-0 win against bitter rivals, Ajax.
PSV Eindhoven fans celebrate their team's Dutch title triumph with replicas of the league trophy
PSV Eindhoven fans celebrate their team's Dutch title triumph with replicas of the league trophy
PSV Eindhoven fans celebrate their team's Dutch title triumph with replicas of the league trophy
PSV Eindhoven fans celebrate their team's Dutch title triumph with replicas of the league trophy (AFP Photo/Olaf KRAAK)
PSV Eindhoven fans celebrate their team's Dutch title triumph with replicas of the league trophy
PSV Eindhoven fans celebrate their team's Dutch title triumph with replicas of the league trophy (AFP Photo/Olaf KRAAK)
56929602. Eindhoven (Netherlands), 15/04/2018.- Fans of PSV Eindhoven gather prior to the match against Ajax Amsterdam at the centre of Eindhoven, The Netherlands,15 April 2018. If PSV win the match they would clinch the title of the Dutch soccer League. (Países Bajos; Holanda) EFE/EPA/JASPER JUINEN
56929602. Eindhoven (Netherlands), 15/04/2018.- Fans of PSV Eindhoven gather prior to the match against Ajax Amsterdam at the centre of Eindhoven, The Netherlands,15 April 2018. If PSV win the match they would clinch the title of the Dutch soccer League. (Países Bajos; Holanda) EFE/EPA/JASPER JUINEN
56929602. Eindhoven (Netherlands), 15/04/2018.- Fans of PSV Eindhoven gather prior to the match against Ajax Amsterdam at the centre of Eindhoven, The Netherlands,15 April 2018. If PSV win the match they would clinch the title of the Dutch soccer League. (Países Bajos; Holanda) EFE/EPA/JASPER JUINEN
56929602. Eindhoven (Netherlands), 15/04/2018.- Fans of PSV Eindhoven gather prior to the match against Ajax Amsterdam at the centre of Eindhoven, The Netherlands,15 April 2018. If PSV win the match they would clinch the title of the Dutch soccer League. (Países Bajos; Holanda) EFE/EPA/JASPER JUINEN
56929602. Eindhoven (Netherlands), 15/04/2018.- Fans of PSV Eindhoven gather prior to the match against Ajax Amsterdam at the centre of Eindhoven, The Netherlands,15 April 2018. If PSV win the match they would clinch the title of the Dutch soccer League. (Países Bajos; Holanda) EFE/EPA/JASPER JUINEN
56929602. Eindhoven (Netherlands), 15/04/2018.- Fans of PSV Eindhoven gather prior to the match against Ajax Amsterdam at the centre of Eindhoven, The Netherlands,15 April 2018. If PSV win the match they would clinch the title of the Dutch soccer League. (Países Bajos; Holanda) EFE/EPA/JASPER JUINEN
AZ Alkmaar goalkeeper Marco Bizot will not want to see a replay of his attempted clearance in the 76th minute of the clash against PSV Eindhoven in the Eredivisie.
PSV stun AZ with remarkable comeback
AZ Alkmaar goalkeeper Marco Bizot will not want to see a replay of his attempted clearance in the 76th minute of the clash against PSV Eindhoven in the Eredivisie.
AZ Alkmaar goalkeeper Marco Bizot will not want to see a replay of his attempted clearance in the 76th minute of the clash against PSV Eindhoven in the Eredivisie.
PSV stun AZ with remarkable comeback
AZ Alkmaar goalkeeper Marco Bizot will not want to see a replay of his attempted clearance in the 76th minute of the clash against PSV Eindhoven in the Eredivisie.
AZ Alkmaar goalkeeper Marco Bizot will not want to see a replay of his attempted clearance in the 76th minute of the clash against PSV Eindhoven in the Eredivisie.
PSV stun AZ with remarkable comeback
AZ Alkmaar goalkeeper Marco Bizot will not want to see a replay of his attempted clearance in the 76th minute of the clash against PSV Eindhoven in the Eredivisie.
AZ Alkmaar goalkeeper Marco Bizot will not want to see a replay of his attempted clearance in the 76th minute of the clash against PSV Eindhoven in the Eredivisie.
Bumbling Bizot gifts PSV equaliser
AZ Alkmaar goalkeeper Marco Bizot will not want to see a replay of his attempted clearance in the 76th minute of the clash against PSV Eindhoven in the Eredivisie.
AZ Alkmaar goalkeeper Marco Bizot will not want to see a replay of his attempted clearance in the 76th minute of the clash against PSV Eindhoven in the Eredivisie.
Bumbling Bizot gifts PSV equaliser
AZ Alkmaar goalkeeper Marco Bizot will not want to see a replay of his attempted clearance in the 76th minute of the clash against PSV Eindhoven in the Eredivisie.
AZ Alkmaar goalkeeper Marco Bizot will not want to see a replay of his attempted clearance in the 76th minute of the clash against PSV Eindhoven in the Eredivisie.
Bumbling Bizot gifts PSV equaliser
AZ Alkmaar goalkeeper Marco Bizot will not want to see a replay of his attempted clearance in the 76th minute of the clash against PSV Eindhoven in the Eredivisie.
56793477. Alkmaar (Netherlands), 07/04/2018.- Luuk de Jong (L, on the ground) of PSV Eindhoven tries to score but fails during the Dutch Eredivisie match between AZ and PSV in Alkmaar, The Netherlands, 07 April 2018. (Países Bajos; Holanda) EFE/EPA/OLAF KRAAK
56793477. Alkmaar (Netherlands), 07/04/2018.- Luuk de Jong (L, on the ground) of PSV Eindhoven tries to score but fails during the Dutch Eredivisie match between AZ and PSV in Alkmaar, The Netherlands, 07 April 2018. (Países Bajos; Holanda) EFE/EPA/OLAF KRAAK
56793477. Alkmaar (Netherlands), 07/04/2018.- Luuk de Jong (L, on the ground) of PSV Eindhoven tries to score but fails during the Dutch Eredivisie match between AZ and PSV in Alkmaar, The Netherlands, 07 April 2018. (Países Bajos; Holanda) EFE/EPA/OLAF KRAAK
56793477. Alkmaar (Netherlands), 07/04/2018.- Marco van Ginkel (R) of PSV Eindhoven cheers with teammate Gaston Pereiro after scoring the 3-2 against AZ Alkmaar during the Dutch Eredivisie match between AZ and PSV in Alkmaar, The Netherlands, 07 April 2018. (Países Bajos; Holanda) EFE/EPA/OLAF KRAAK
56793477. Alkmaar (Netherlands), 07/04/2018.- Marco van Ginkel (R) of PSV Eindhoven cheers with teammate Gaston Pereiro after scoring the 3-2 against AZ Alkmaar during the Dutch Eredivisie match between AZ and PSV in Alkmaar, The Netherlands, 07 April 2018. (Países Bajos; Holanda) EFE/EPA/OLAF KRAAK
56793477. Alkmaar (Netherlands), 07/04/2018.- Marco van Ginkel (R) of PSV Eindhoven cheers with teammate Gaston Pereiro after scoring the 3-2 against AZ Alkmaar during the Dutch Eredivisie match between AZ and PSV in Alkmaar, The Netherlands, 07 April 2018. (Países Bajos; Holanda) EFE/EPA/OLAF KRAAK
Former Brazilian superstar Ronaldo has revealed he left Barcelona for Internazionale in 1997 after just 12 months, because he did not trust the board at Camp Nou. The 2002 World Cup winner swapped PSV Eindhoven for Catalonia in 1996 after exploding onto the scene in the Netherlands. During his first term at the Camp Nou, the now-41-year-old's goals per game ratio was impressive (he netted 34 in 37 in La Liga), but lasted only one campaign in Barcelona before moving on to Italy. It was hoped...
Ronaldo Reveals Reason Why He Ditched Barcelona for Inter After Only One Season
Former Brazilian superstar Ronaldo has revealed he left Barcelona for Internazionale in 1997 after just 12 months, because he did not trust the board at Camp Nou. The 2002 World Cup winner swapped PSV Eindhoven for Catalonia in 1996 after exploding onto the scene in the Netherlands. During his first term at the Camp Nou, the now-41-year-old's goals per game ratio was impressive (he netted 34 in 37 in La Liga), but lasted only one campaign in Barcelona before moving on to Italy. It was hoped...
Former Brazilian superstar Ronaldo has revealed he left Barcelona for Internazionale in 1997 after just 12 months, because he did not trust the board at Camp Nou. The 2002 World Cup winner swapped PSV Eindhoven for Catalonia in 1996 after exploding onto the scene in the Netherlands. During his first term at the Camp Nou, the now-41-year-old's goals per game ratio was impressive (he netted 34 in 37 in La Liga), but lasted only one campaign in Barcelona before moving on to Italy. It was hoped...
Ronaldo Reveals Reason Why He Ditched Barcelona for Inter After Only One Season
Former Brazilian superstar Ronaldo has revealed he left Barcelona for Internazionale in 1997 after just 12 months, because he did not trust the board at Camp Nou. The 2002 World Cup winner swapped PSV Eindhoven for Catalonia in 1996 after exploding onto the scene in the Netherlands. During his first term at the Camp Nou, the now-41-year-old's goals per game ratio was impressive (he netted 34 in 37 in La Liga), but lasted only one campaign in Barcelona before moving on to Italy. It was hoped...
Perennial Chelsea loanee Marco van Ginkel gives the lowdown on how his parent club keeps track of his progress at PSV Eindhoven.
Van Ginkel reveals what it's like to be a Chelsea loanee
Perennial Chelsea loanee Marco van Ginkel gives the lowdown on how his parent club keeps track of his progress at PSV Eindhoven.
Perennial Chelsea loanee Marco van Ginkel gives the lowdown on how his parent club keeps track of his progress at PSV Eindhoven.
Van Ginkel reveals what it's like to be a Chelsea loanee
Perennial Chelsea loanee Marco van Ginkel gives the lowdown on how his parent club keeps track of his progress at PSV Eindhoven.
Perennial Chelsea loanee Marco van Ginkel gives the lowdown on how his parent club keeps track of his progress at PSV Eindhoven.
Van Ginkel reveals what it's like to be a Chelsea loanee
Perennial Chelsea loanee Marco van Ginkel gives the lowdown on how his parent club keeps track of his progress at PSV Eindhoven.
56695287. Eindhoven (Netherlands), 31/03/2018.- Thierry Ambrose (R) of NAC Breda fights for the ball with Jorrit Hendrix of PSV Eindhoven during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and NAC Breda in Eindhoven, The Netherlands, 31 March, 2018. (Baile de la Rosa, Países Bajos; Holanda) EFE/EPA/THOMAS BAKKER
56695287. Eindhoven (Netherlands), 31/03/2018.- Thierry Ambrose (R) of NAC Breda fights for the ball with Jorrit Hendrix of PSV Eindhoven during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and NAC Breda in Eindhoven, The Netherlands, 31 March, 2018. (Baile de la Rosa, Países Bajos; Holanda) EFE/EPA/THOMAS BAKKER
56695287. Eindhoven (Netherlands), 31/03/2018.- Thierry Ambrose (R) of NAC Breda fights for the ball with Jorrit Hendrix of PSV Eindhoven during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and NAC Breda in Eindhoven, The Netherlands, 31 March, 2018. (Baile de la Rosa, Países Bajos; Holanda) EFE/EPA/THOMAS BAKKER
56695287. Eindhoven (Netherlands), 31/03/2018.- Sadiq Umar (L) of NAC Breda fights for the ball with Daniel Schwaab of PSV Eindhoven during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and NAC Breda in Eindhoven, The Netherlands, 31 March, 2018. (Países Bajos; Holanda) EFE/EPA/THOMAS BAKKER
56695287. Eindhoven (Netherlands), 31/03/2018.- Sadiq Umar (L) of NAC Breda fights for the ball with Daniel Schwaab of PSV Eindhoven during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and NAC Breda in Eindhoven, The Netherlands, 31 March, 2018. (Países Bajos; Holanda) EFE/EPA/THOMAS BAKKER
56695287. Eindhoven (Netherlands), 31/03/2018.- Sadiq Umar (L) of NAC Breda fights for the ball with Daniel Schwaab of PSV Eindhoven during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and NAC Breda in Eindhoven, The Netherlands, 31 March, 2018. (Países Bajos; Holanda) EFE/EPA/THOMAS BAKKER
56695287. Eindhoven (Netherlands), 31/03/2018.- Marco van Ginkel of PSV Eindhoven scores a penalty during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and NAC Breda in Eindhoven, The Netherlands, 31 March, 2018. (Países Bajos; Holanda) EFE/EPA/THOMAS BAKKER
56695287. Eindhoven (Netherlands), 31/03/2018.- Marco van Ginkel of PSV Eindhoven scores a penalty during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and NAC Breda in Eindhoven, The Netherlands, 31 March, 2018. (Países Bajos; Holanda) EFE/EPA/THOMAS BAKKER
56695287. Eindhoven (Netherlands), 31/03/2018.- Marco van Ginkel of PSV Eindhoven scores a penalty during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and NAC Breda in Eindhoven, The Netherlands, 31 March, 2018. (Países Bajos; Holanda) EFE/EPA/THOMAS BAKKER
1. Can City break the Premier League's record points haul? Yes. City are on 81 points and need 15 more – five wins from their final eight games – to beat the record set by Chelsea in 2004-05 which, remarkably, was their first Premier League title triumph and came in Jose Mourinho’s first season as manager. But City should beat that and deservedly so. They have taken an incredible 2.7 points per game on average so far so, over a 38-match season, if they keep that up, will top 100 points. They have tricky fixtures – Tottenham Hotspur away and Manchester United at home – but their biggest opponent may be whether they are distracted by the Champions League or, indeed, step off the gas when the title is won. It does not feel like manager Pep Guardiola, who wants records as well as trophies, will allow that. 2. Can Mourinho banish the uncertainty over his tenure at Manchester United? United desperately hope so but, frankly, it is far from certain. Mourinho extended his contract earlier this year but is already showing familiar signs of discontent, unhappiness with his squad, murmurings over transfer dealings and that sense that the world is conspiring against him. Right now Mourinho is also doing little to dispel the theory that football has moved on and he has not and that, ultimately, United is therefore not the right job for him. It does not feel right. The Champions League exit to Sevilla was damaging and will not be easily forgotten but if he can win the FA Cup and finish second in the Premier League he can save face. Mourinho will start next season in charge of United, but will he finish it? 3. Can Liverpool finish as the best of the rest? Yes. Jurgen Klopp’s side have a growing sense of momentum. The Premier League win over Manchester City in January was a significant bridgehead in their progress. It showed they can be the best of the rest and, maybe, with the right recruitment in the summer, City’s nearest challengers next season. It will be fascinating to see what happens with the Champions League quarter-final between the two clubs. If – and a big if – Liverpool get through that, belief will soar. Salah is outscoring Messi and is on course to re-write the Premier League record books Mohamed Salah’s goal-scoring feats have been freakish and – possibly – have skewed Liverpool’s campaign but there is no doubt they feel like they are on the right track and are also building something sustainable. And playing some very good, attacking football along the way. 4. Can Chelsea salvage their hopes of Champions League qualification? If Chelsea beat Tottenham Hotspur – another big if – at Stamford Bridge on Sunday then they have a chance. Otherwise it seems they will finish outside the top four and not qualify for the Champions League. Certainly if they were to lose to Spurs then it would be all over and Chelsea’s decline since they sat in second place not so long ago has been alarming. Even so, and despite the fact that he is expected to leave at the end of the season, the team is still playing for manager Antonio Conte – as was shown in the recent FA Cup win over Leicester City. If anything Chelsea have been a little unlucky this season especially with their forwards. But the Spurs game is key and even then it might not be enough. 5. Who will win the Golden Boot? Harry Kane’s ankle injury has meant that Mohamed Salah is now the clear favourite to deny the Tottenham Hotspur striker a third successive Premier League Golden Boot award. Salah has pulled four goals ahead of Kane – with 28 – and with Sergio Aguero the nearest challenger on 21 goals. Given the remarkable scoring runs all three players are capable of going on then with eight games to left – seven for Liverpool – it is not yet over. But it is hard to see either Kane returning from injury in time to catch Salah or, just as importantly, the goals drying up for the Egyptian in Liverpool’s final few fixtures. If anything his goal-scoring rate is speeding up as the season progresses. The numbers for all three forwards are remarkable. 6. Can Burnley finish above Arsenal? Probably not. The gap is five points with eight games to go although, with back-to-back wins, Burnley have arrested the sense that their season was becoming a little becalmed after their extraordinary start to the campaign. Arsenal should stay ahead of them although, in saying that, Burnley only have two fixtures left against teams who are above them – Chelsea at home, who they beat on the opening day of the season, and, interestingly Arsenal away. Given Arsene Wenger is going to prioritise the Europa League to try and salvage Arsenal’s campaign and, he will hope, save his job then he could well continue to field weakened teams in the Premier League. It would then be up to Burnley to see whether they have enough to take advantage of that. 7. Can Allardyce prove he deserves a full season at Everton? It seems unlikely. The disenchantment among the supporters about Allardyce quickly re-surfaced and having pretty much banished fears of relegation in his first few games in charge, his job was done at Everton. Performances have been poor and Allardyce’s tactics have been criticised. The expectation is that the club will look for a new head coach, with the Portuguese pair of Marco Silva – who Everton of course tried to lure away from Watford before appointing Allardyce – and Shakhtar Donetsk’s Paulo Fonesca appearing to be the favourites to take over if the change is made. Sam Allardyce has not been a huge success at Everton Credit: Action Images It also seems that Everton might, in a wider clear-out, replace director of football Steve Walsh, who has overseen some poor signings, with PSV Eindhoven’s Marcel Brands linked with succeeding him. Feels like a fresh start is on its way. 8. Will all three promoted sides stay up for just the third time in Premier League history? With West Bromwich Albion appearing doomed and Stoke City grimly clinging on for now it would seem there will eventually only be one relegation place to settle. Southampton occupy it at present but, surely have enough to stay up under new manager Mark Hughes? None of the three promoted clubs – Brighton, Newcastle United or Huddersfield Town – are safe yet but Brighton appear the closest to making sure they stay up and are superbly organised by Chris Hughton. Rafael Benitez should also get enough out of Newcastle which makes Huddersfield, three points ahead of Southampton, the most vulnerable and sadly they might well go back down. Even so they have a happy knack of pulling off results and with their manager, David Wagner, their fans and there sense of togetherness they have a chance. 9. Will the unrest at West Ham cost them their Premier League status? We will know on Saturday. West Ham face Southampton at home and the loser of that fixture, if there is one, will be in deep trouble. Even a draw is tricky. In terms of the squad available to West Ham they should not be in trouble but the toxicity around the club has taken its toll. Five home games from of their last eight should be an advantage but it does not feel like that. Maybe, just maybe, the scenes during the defeat to Burnley will be a line in the sand moment. West Ham fan protests boils over at the London Stadium But what happens if West Ham fall behind against Southampton? It does not bear thinking about in terms of the fans' reaction. Saturday, even with seven games after that, could be make or break in deciding whether they can stay up. Even if they do a lot has to change in the way West Ham is run and not least with their stadium. 10. Can Hughes spark Southampton into life? Yes. Hughes may have been an underwhelming appointment for some Southampton fans but there is no doubt he is a highly-experienced and capable manager with an equally seasoned coaching staff. Appointing Hughes to the end of the season, initially, appeared a shrewd move for a club who has lost their way under Mauricio Pellegrino who, frankly, seemed out-of-his-depth. Southampton simply have too many good players to be in this position – although it has happened to teams before – but scoring goals remains a problem. Another concern is that they do not have the easiest of run-ins. It could still be touch and go for them and Saturday’s fixture away to West Ham United should be an indicator as to which way it is heading.
The 10 questions still to be answered this season ahead of the Premier League's return
1. Can City break the Premier League's record points haul? Yes. City are on 81 points and need 15 more – five wins from their final eight games – to beat the record set by Chelsea in 2004-05 which, remarkably, was their first Premier League title triumph and came in Jose Mourinho’s first season as manager. But City should beat that and deservedly so. They have taken an incredible 2.7 points per game on average so far so, over a 38-match season, if they keep that up, will top 100 points. They have tricky fixtures – Tottenham Hotspur away and Manchester United at home – but their biggest opponent may be whether they are distracted by the Champions League or, indeed, step off the gas when the title is won. It does not feel like manager Pep Guardiola, who wants records as well as trophies, will allow that. 2. Can Mourinho banish the uncertainty over his tenure at Manchester United? United desperately hope so but, frankly, it is far from certain. Mourinho extended his contract earlier this year but is already showing familiar signs of discontent, unhappiness with his squad, murmurings over transfer dealings and that sense that the world is conspiring against him. Right now Mourinho is also doing little to dispel the theory that football has moved on and he has not and that, ultimately, United is therefore not the right job for him. It does not feel right. The Champions League exit to Sevilla was damaging and will not be easily forgotten but if he can win the FA Cup and finish second in the Premier League he can save face. Mourinho will start next season in charge of United, but will he finish it? 3. Can Liverpool finish as the best of the rest? Yes. Jurgen Klopp’s side have a growing sense of momentum. The Premier League win over Manchester City in January was a significant bridgehead in their progress. It showed they can be the best of the rest and, maybe, with the right recruitment in the summer, City’s nearest challengers next season. It will be fascinating to see what happens with the Champions League quarter-final between the two clubs. If – and a big if – Liverpool get through that, belief will soar. Salah is outscoring Messi and is on course to re-write the Premier League record books Mohamed Salah’s goal-scoring feats have been freakish and – possibly – have skewed Liverpool’s campaign but there is no doubt they feel like they are on the right track and are also building something sustainable. And playing some very good, attacking football along the way. 4. Can Chelsea salvage their hopes of Champions League qualification? If Chelsea beat Tottenham Hotspur – another big if – at Stamford Bridge on Sunday then they have a chance. Otherwise it seems they will finish outside the top four and not qualify for the Champions League. Certainly if they were to lose to Spurs then it would be all over and Chelsea’s decline since they sat in second place not so long ago has been alarming. Even so, and despite the fact that he is expected to leave at the end of the season, the team is still playing for manager Antonio Conte – as was shown in the recent FA Cup win over Leicester City. If anything Chelsea have been a little unlucky this season especially with their forwards. But the Spurs game is key and even then it might not be enough. 5. Who will win the Golden Boot? Harry Kane’s ankle injury has meant that Mohamed Salah is now the clear favourite to deny the Tottenham Hotspur striker a third successive Premier League Golden Boot award. Salah has pulled four goals ahead of Kane – with 28 – and with Sergio Aguero the nearest challenger on 21 goals. Given the remarkable scoring runs all three players are capable of going on then with eight games to left – seven for Liverpool – it is not yet over. But it is hard to see either Kane returning from injury in time to catch Salah or, just as importantly, the goals drying up for the Egyptian in Liverpool’s final few fixtures. If anything his goal-scoring rate is speeding up as the season progresses. The numbers for all three forwards are remarkable. 6. Can Burnley finish above Arsenal? Probably not. The gap is five points with eight games to go although, with back-to-back wins, Burnley have arrested the sense that their season was becoming a little becalmed after their extraordinary start to the campaign. Arsenal should stay ahead of them although, in saying that, Burnley only have two fixtures left against teams who are above them – Chelsea at home, who they beat on the opening day of the season, and, interestingly Arsenal away. Given Arsene Wenger is going to prioritise the Europa League to try and salvage Arsenal’s campaign and, he will hope, save his job then he could well continue to field weakened teams in the Premier League. It would then be up to Burnley to see whether they have enough to take advantage of that. 7. Can Allardyce prove he deserves a full season at Everton? It seems unlikely. The disenchantment among the supporters about Allardyce quickly re-surfaced and having pretty much banished fears of relegation in his first few games in charge, his job was done at Everton. Performances have been poor and Allardyce’s tactics have been criticised. The expectation is that the club will look for a new head coach, with the Portuguese pair of Marco Silva – who Everton of course tried to lure away from Watford before appointing Allardyce – and Shakhtar Donetsk’s Paulo Fonesca appearing to be the favourites to take over if the change is made. Sam Allardyce has not been a huge success at Everton Credit: Action Images It also seems that Everton might, in a wider clear-out, replace director of football Steve Walsh, who has overseen some poor signings, with PSV Eindhoven’s Marcel Brands linked with succeeding him. Feels like a fresh start is on its way. 8. Will all three promoted sides stay up for just the third time in Premier League history? With West Bromwich Albion appearing doomed and Stoke City grimly clinging on for now it would seem there will eventually only be one relegation place to settle. Southampton occupy it at present but, surely have enough to stay up under new manager Mark Hughes? None of the three promoted clubs – Brighton, Newcastle United or Huddersfield Town – are safe yet but Brighton appear the closest to making sure they stay up and are superbly organised by Chris Hughton. Rafael Benitez should also get enough out of Newcastle which makes Huddersfield, three points ahead of Southampton, the most vulnerable and sadly they might well go back down. Even so they have a happy knack of pulling off results and with their manager, David Wagner, their fans and there sense of togetherness they have a chance. 9. Will the unrest at West Ham cost them their Premier League status? We will know on Saturday. West Ham face Southampton at home and the loser of that fixture, if there is one, will be in deep trouble. Even a draw is tricky. In terms of the squad available to West Ham they should not be in trouble but the toxicity around the club has taken its toll. Five home games from of their last eight should be an advantage but it does not feel like that. Maybe, just maybe, the scenes during the defeat to Burnley will be a line in the sand moment. West Ham fan protests boils over at the London Stadium But what happens if West Ham fall behind against Southampton? It does not bear thinking about in terms of the fans' reaction. Saturday, even with seven games after that, could be make or break in deciding whether they can stay up. Even if they do a lot has to change in the way West Ham is run and not least with their stadium. 10. Can Hughes spark Southampton into life? Yes. Hughes may have been an underwhelming appointment for some Southampton fans but there is no doubt he is a highly-experienced and capable manager with an equally seasoned coaching staff. Appointing Hughes to the end of the season, initially, appeared a shrewd move for a club who has lost their way under Mauricio Pellegrino who, frankly, seemed out-of-his-depth. Southampton simply have too many good players to be in this position – although it has happened to teams before – but scoring goals remains a problem. Another concern is that they do not have the easiest of run-ins. It could still be touch and go for them and Saturday’s fixture away to West Ham United should be an indicator as to which way it is heading.
1. Can City break the Premier League's record points haul? City are on 81 points and need 15 more – five wins from their final eight games – to beat the record set by Chelsea in 2004-05 which, remarkably, was their first Premier League title triumph and came in Jose Mourinho’s first season as manager. But City should beat that, and deservedly so. They have taken an incredible 2.7 points per game on average so far so, over a 38-match season, if they keep that up, will top 100 points. They have tricky fixtures – Tottenham Hotspur away and Manchester United at home – though their biggest opponent may be whether they are distracted by the Champions League or, perhaps, step off the gas when the title is won. But it does not feel like manager Pep Guardiola, who wants records as well as trophies, will allow that. 2. Can Mourinho banish the uncertainty over his tenure at Manchester United? United desperately hope so but it is far from clear. Mourinho extended his contract earlier this year but is already showing familiar signs of discontent, unhappiness with his squad, murmurings over transfer dealings and that sense the world is conspiring against him. Right now, Mourinho is also doing little to dispel the theory that football has moved on and he has not and that, ultimately, United is not the right job for him. It does not feel right. The Champions League exit to Sevilla was damaging and will not be easily forgotten but if he can win the FA Cup and finish second in the Premier League he can save face. Mourinho will start next season in charge of United, but will he finish it? 3. Can Liverpool finish as the best of the rest? Jurgen Klopp’s side have a growing sense of momentum. The Premier League win over Manchester City in January was a significant bridgehead in their progress. It showed they can be the best of the rest and, maybe, with the right recruitment in the summer, City’s nearest challengers next season. It will be fascinating to see what happens with the Champions League quarter-final between the two clubs. If – and it is a big if - Liverpool get through that, belief will soar. Salah is outscoring Messi and is on course to re-write the Premier League record books Mohamed Salah’s freakish goal-scoring feats have possibly skewed Liverpool’s campaign, but they appear to be are on the right track and are building something sustainable. And playing some very good, attacking football along the way. 4. Can Chelsea salvage their hopes of Champions League qualification? If - and it's a nother big if - Chelsea beat Tottenham Hotspur at Stamford Bridge on Sunday, they have a chance. Otherwise, it seems they will finish outside the top four and miss out on the Champions League. If they were to lose to Spurs, it would be all over and Chelsea’s decline since they sat in second place not so long ago has been alarming. Even so, and despite the fact that he is expected to leave at the end of the season, the team is still playing for manager Antonio Conte - as was shown in the recent FA Cup win over Leicester City. If anything, Chelsea have been a little unlucky this season especially with their forwards. But the Spurs game is key - and even then victory might not be enough. 5. Who will win the Golden Boot? Harry Kane’s ankle injury has meant that Mohamed Salah is now the clear favourite to deny the Tottenham Hotspur striker a third successive Premier League Golden Boot award. Salah has pulled four goals ahead of Kane – with 28 – and with Sergio Aguero the nearest challenger on 21 goals. Given the remarkable scoring runs, all three players are capable of going on then with eight games to left – seven for Liverpool – it is not yet over. But it is hard to see either Kane returning from injury in time to catch Salah or the goals drying up for the Egyptian in Liverpool’s final few fixtures. If anything, his goal-scoring rate is accelerating as the season progresses. The numbers for all three forwards are remarkable. 6. Can Burnley finish above Arsenal? The gap is five points with eight games to go, although, with back-to-back wins, Burnley have arrested the sense that their season was becoming becalmed after their extraordinary start to the campaign. Arsenal should stay ahead of them although Burnley only have two fixtures left against teams who are above them – Chelsea at home, who they beat on the opening day of the season, and, interestingly, Arsenal away. Given Arsene Wenger is going to prioritise the Europa League to try and salvage Arsenal’s campaign and, he will hope, save his job, then he could well continue to field weakened teams in the Premier League. It would then be up to Burnley to see whether they have enough to take advantage of that. 7. Can Allardyce prove he deserves a full season at Everton? The disenchantment among the supporters about Allardyce quickly re-surfaced, and having pretty much banished fears of relegation in his first few games in charge, his job was done at Everton. Performances have been poor and Allardyce’s tactics have been criticised. The expectation is that the club will look for a new head coach, with the Portuguese pair of Marco Silva – who Everton tried to lure away from Watford before appointing Allardyce – and Shakhtar Donetsk’s Paulo Fonesca appearing to be the favourites to take over. Sam Allardyce has not been a huge success at Everton Credit: Action Images It also seems that Everton might, in a wider clear-out, replace director of football Steve Walsh, who has overseen some poor signings, with PSV Eindhoven’s Marcel Brands. Feels like a fresh start is on its way. 8. Will all three promoted sides stay up for just the third time in Premier League history? With West Bromwich Albion appearing doomed and Stoke City grimly clinging on, it would seem there will eventually only be one relegation place to settle. Southampton occupy it at present but, surely have enough to stay up under new manager Mark Hughes. None of the promoted clubs – Brighton, Newcastle United or Huddersfield Town – are safe yet but Brighton appear the closest to making sure they stay up and are superbly organised by Chris Hughton. Rafa Benitez should also get enough out of Newcastle which makes Huddersfield, three points ahead of Southampton, the most vulnerable. Even so, they have a happy knack of pulling off results and, with their manager David Wagner, their fans and their sense of togetherness, they have a chance. 9. Will the unrest at West Ham cost them their Premier League status? We will know on Saturday. West Ham face Southampton at home and the loser, if there is one, will be in deep trouble. Even a draw is tricky. In terms of the squad available to West Ham, they should not be in trouble but the toxicity around the club has taken its toll. Five home games from of their last eight should be an advantage but it does not feel like that. Maybe, just maybe, the scenes during the defeat to Burnley will be a line in the sand moment. West Ham fan protests boils over at the London Stadium But what happens if West Ham fall behind against Southampton? It does not bear thinking about in terms of the fans reaction. Saturday, even with seven games after that, could be make or break in deciding whether they can stay up. Even if they do, a lot has to change in the way West Ham is run and not least with their stadium. 10. Can Hughes spark Southampton into life? Hughes may have been an underwhelming appointment for some Southampton fans but there is no doubt he is a highly-experienced and capable manager with an equally seasoned coaching staff. Appointing Hughes to the end of the season, initially, appeared a shrewd move for a club who have lost their way under Mauricio Pellegrino who, frankly, seemed out-of-his-depth. Southampton simply have too many good players to be in this position – although it has happened to teams before – but scoring goals remains a problem. Another concern is that they do not have the easiest of run-ins. It could still be touch and go for them and Saturday’s fixture away to West Ham United should be an indicator as to which way it is heading.
The 10 questions still to be answered this season ahead of the Premier League's return
1. Can City break the Premier League's record points haul? City are on 81 points and need 15 more – five wins from their final eight games – to beat the record set by Chelsea in 2004-05 which, remarkably, was their first Premier League title triumph and came in Jose Mourinho’s first season as manager. But City should beat that, and deservedly so. They have taken an incredible 2.7 points per game on average so far so, over a 38-match season, if they keep that up, will top 100 points. They have tricky fixtures – Tottenham Hotspur away and Manchester United at home – though their biggest opponent may be whether they are distracted by the Champions League or, perhaps, step off the gas when the title is won. But it does not feel like manager Pep Guardiola, who wants records as well as trophies, will allow that. 2. Can Mourinho banish the uncertainty over his tenure at Manchester United? United desperately hope so but it is far from clear. Mourinho extended his contract earlier this year but is already showing familiar signs of discontent, unhappiness with his squad, murmurings over transfer dealings and that sense the world is conspiring against him. Right now, Mourinho is also doing little to dispel the theory that football has moved on and he has not and that, ultimately, United is not the right job for him. It does not feel right. The Champions League exit to Sevilla was damaging and will not be easily forgotten but if he can win the FA Cup and finish second in the Premier League he can save face. Mourinho will start next season in charge of United, but will he finish it? 3. Can Liverpool finish as the best of the rest? Jurgen Klopp’s side have a growing sense of momentum. The Premier League win over Manchester City in January was a significant bridgehead in their progress. It showed they can be the best of the rest and, maybe, with the right recruitment in the summer, City’s nearest challengers next season. It will be fascinating to see what happens with the Champions League quarter-final between the two clubs. If – and it is a big if - Liverpool get through that, belief will soar. Salah is outscoring Messi and is on course to re-write the Premier League record books Mohamed Salah’s freakish goal-scoring feats have possibly skewed Liverpool’s campaign, but they appear to be are on the right track and are building something sustainable. And playing some very good, attacking football along the way. 4. Can Chelsea salvage their hopes of Champions League qualification? If - and it's a nother big if - Chelsea beat Tottenham Hotspur at Stamford Bridge on Sunday, they have a chance. Otherwise, it seems they will finish outside the top four and miss out on the Champions League. If they were to lose to Spurs, it would be all over and Chelsea’s decline since they sat in second place not so long ago has been alarming. Even so, and despite the fact that he is expected to leave at the end of the season, the team is still playing for manager Antonio Conte - as was shown in the recent FA Cup win over Leicester City. If anything, Chelsea have been a little unlucky this season especially with their forwards. But the Spurs game is key - and even then victory might not be enough. 5. Who will win the Golden Boot? Harry Kane’s ankle injury has meant that Mohamed Salah is now the clear favourite to deny the Tottenham Hotspur striker a third successive Premier League Golden Boot award. Salah has pulled four goals ahead of Kane – with 28 – and with Sergio Aguero the nearest challenger on 21 goals. Given the remarkable scoring runs, all three players are capable of going on then with eight games to left – seven for Liverpool – it is not yet over. But it is hard to see either Kane returning from injury in time to catch Salah or the goals drying up for the Egyptian in Liverpool’s final few fixtures. If anything, his goal-scoring rate is accelerating as the season progresses. The numbers for all three forwards are remarkable. 6. Can Burnley finish above Arsenal? The gap is five points with eight games to go, although, with back-to-back wins, Burnley have arrested the sense that their season was becoming becalmed after their extraordinary start to the campaign. Arsenal should stay ahead of them although Burnley only have two fixtures left against teams who are above them – Chelsea at home, who they beat on the opening day of the season, and, interestingly, Arsenal away. Given Arsene Wenger is going to prioritise the Europa League to try and salvage Arsenal’s campaign and, he will hope, save his job, then he could well continue to field weakened teams in the Premier League. It would then be up to Burnley to see whether they have enough to take advantage of that. 7. Can Allardyce prove he deserves a full season at Everton? The disenchantment among the supporters about Allardyce quickly re-surfaced, and having pretty much banished fears of relegation in his first few games in charge, his job was done at Everton. Performances have been poor and Allardyce’s tactics have been criticised. The expectation is that the club will look for a new head coach, with the Portuguese pair of Marco Silva – who Everton tried to lure away from Watford before appointing Allardyce – and Shakhtar Donetsk’s Paulo Fonesca appearing to be the favourites to take over. Sam Allardyce has not been a huge success at Everton Credit: Action Images It also seems that Everton might, in a wider clear-out, replace director of football Steve Walsh, who has overseen some poor signings, with PSV Eindhoven’s Marcel Brands. Feels like a fresh start is on its way. 8. Will all three promoted sides stay up for just the third time in Premier League history? With West Bromwich Albion appearing doomed and Stoke City grimly clinging on, it would seem there will eventually only be one relegation place to settle. Southampton occupy it at present but, surely have enough to stay up under new manager Mark Hughes. None of the promoted clubs – Brighton, Newcastle United or Huddersfield Town – are safe yet but Brighton appear the closest to making sure they stay up and are superbly organised by Chris Hughton. Rafa Benitez should also get enough out of Newcastle which makes Huddersfield, three points ahead of Southampton, the most vulnerable. Even so, they have a happy knack of pulling off results and, with their manager David Wagner, their fans and their sense of togetherness, they have a chance. 9. Will the unrest at West Ham cost them their Premier League status? We will know on Saturday. West Ham face Southampton at home and the loser, if there is one, will be in deep trouble. Even a draw is tricky. In terms of the squad available to West Ham, they should not be in trouble but the toxicity around the club has taken its toll. Five home games from of their last eight should be an advantage but it does not feel like that. Maybe, just maybe, the scenes during the defeat to Burnley will be a line in the sand moment. West Ham fan protests boils over at the London Stadium But what happens if West Ham fall behind against Southampton? It does not bear thinking about in terms of the fans reaction. Saturday, even with seven games after that, could be make or break in deciding whether they can stay up. Even if they do, a lot has to change in the way West Ham is run and not least with their stadium. 10. Can Hughes spark Southampton into life? Hughes may have been an underwhelming appointment for some Southampton fans but there is no doubt he is a highly-experienced and capable manager with an equally seasoned coaching staff. Appointing Hughes to the end of the season, initially, appeared a shrewd move for a club who have lost their way under Mauricio Pellegrino who, frankly, seemed out-of-his-depth. Southampton simply have too many good players to be in this position – although it has happened to teams before – but scoring goals remains a problem. Another concern is that they do not have the easiest of run-ins. It could still be touch and go for them and Saturday’s fixture away to West Ham United should be an indicator as to which way it is heading.
1. Can City break the Premier League's record points haul? City are on 81 points and need 15 more – five wins from their final eight games – to beat the record set by Chelsea in 2004-05 which, remarkably, was their first Premier League title triumph and came in Jose Mourinho’s first season as manager. But City should beat that, and deservedly so. They have taken an incredible 2.7 points per game on average so far so, over a 38-match season, if they keep that up, will top 100 points. They have tricky fixtures – Tottenham Hotspur away and Manchester United at home – though their biggest opponent may be whether they are distracted by the Champions League or, perhaps, step off the gas when the title is won. But it does not feel like manager Pep Guardiola, who wants records as well as trophies, will allow that. 2. Can Mourinho banish the uncertainty over his tenure at Manchester United? United desperately hope so but it is far from clear. Mourinho extended his contract earlier this year but is already showing familiar signs of discontent, unhappiness with his squad, murmurings over transfer dealings and that sense the world is conspiring against him. Right now, Mourinho is also doing little to dispel the theory that football has moved on and he has not and that, ultimately, United is not the right job for him. It does not feel right. The Champions League exit to Sevilla was damaging and will not be easily forgotten but if he can win the FA Cup and finish second in the Premier League he can save face. Mourinho will start next season in charge of United, but will he finish it? 3. Can Liverpool finish as the best of the rest? Jurgen Klopp’s side have a growing sense of momentum. The Premier League win over Manchester City in January was a significant bridgehead in their progress. It showed they can be the best of the rest and, maybe, with the right recruitment in the summer, City’s nearest challengers next season. It will be fascinating to see what happens with the Champions League quarter-final between the two clubs. If – and it is a big if - Liverpool get through that, belief will soar. Salah is outscoring Messi and is on course to re-write the Premier League record books Mohamed Salah’s freakish goal-scoring feats have possibly skewed Liverpool’s campaign, but they appear to be are on the right track and are building something sustainable. And playing some very good, attacking football along the way. 4. Can Chelsea salvage their hopes of Champions League qualification? If - and it's a nother big if - Chelsea beat Tottenham Hotspur at Stamford Bridge on Sunday, they have a chance. Otherwise, it seems they will finish outside the top four and miss out on the Champions League. If they were to lose to Spurs, it would be all over and Chelsea’s decline since they sat in second place not so long ago has been alarming. Even so, and despite the fact that he is expected to leave at the end of the season, the team is still playing for manager Antonio Conte - as was shown in the recent FA Cup win over Leicester City. If anything, Chelsea have been a little unlucky this season especially with their forwards. But the Spurs game is key - and even then victory might not be enough. 5. Who will win the Golden Boot? Harry Kane’s ankle injury has meant that Mohamed Salah is now the clear favourite to deny the Tottenham Hotspur striker a third successive Premier League Golden Boot award. Salah has pulled four goals ahead of Kane – with 28 – and with Sergio Aguero the nearest challenger on 21 goals. Given the remarkable scoring runs, all three players are capable of going on then with eight games to left – seven for Liverpool – it is not yet over. But it is hard to see either Kane returning from injury in time to catch Salah or the goals drying up for the Egyptian in Liverpool’s final few fixtures. If anything, his goal-scoring rate is accelerating as the season progresses. The numbers for all three forwards are remarkable. 6. Can Burnley finish above Arsenal? The gap is five points with eight games to go, although, with back-to-back wins, Burnley have arrested the sense that their season was becoming becalmed after their extraordinary start to the campaign. Arsenal should stay ahead of them although Burnley only have two fixtures left against teams who are above them – Chelsea at home, who they beat on the opening day of the season, and, interestingly, Arsenal away. Given Arsene Wenger is going to prioritise the Europa League to try and salvage Arsenal’s campaign and, he will hope, save his job, then he could well continue to field weakened teams in the Premier League. It would then be up to Burnley to see whether they have enough to take advantage of that. 7. Can Allardyce prove he deserves a full season at Everton? The disenchantment among the supporters about Allardyce quickly re-surfaced, and having pretty much banished fears of relegation in his first few games in charge, his job was done at Everton. Performances have been poor and Allardyce’s tactics have been criticised. The expectation is that the club will look for a new head coach, with the Portuguese pair of Marco Silva – who Everton tried to lure away from Watford before appointing Allardyce – and Shakhtar Donetsk’s Paulo Fonesca appearing to be the favourites to take over. Sam Allardyce has not been a huge success at Everton Credit: Action Images It also seems that Everton might, in a wider clear-out, replace director of football Steve Walsh, who has overseen some poor signings, with PSV Eindhoven’s Marcel Brands. Feels like a fresh start is on its way. 8. Will all three promoted sides stay up for just the third time in Premier League history? With West Bromwich Albion appearing doomed and Stoke City grimly clinging on, it would seem there will eventually only be one relegation place to settle. Southampton occupy it at present but, surely have enough to stay up under new manager Mark Hughes. None of the promoted clubs – Brighton, Newcastle United or Huddersfield Town – are safe yet but Brighton appear the closest to making sure they stay up and are superbly organised by Chris Hughton. Rafa Benitez should also get enough out of Newcastle which makes Huddersfield, three points ahead of Southampton, the most vulnerable. Even so, they have a happy knack of pulling off results and, with their manager David Wagner, their fans and their sense of togetherness, they have a chance. 9. Will the unrest at West Ham cost them their Premier League status? We will know on Saturday. West Ham face Southampton at home and the loser, if there is one, will be in deep trouble. Even a draw is tricky. In terms of the squad available to West Ham, they should not be in trouble but the toxicity around the club has taken its toll. Five home games from of their last eight should be an advantage but it does not feel like that. Maybe, just maybe, the scenes during the defeat to Burnley will be a line in the sand moment. West Ham fan protests boils over at the London Stadium But what happens if West Ham fall behind against Southampton? It does not bear thinking about in terms of the fans reaction. Saturday, even with seven games after that, could be make or break in deciding whether they can stay up. Even if they do, a lot has to change in the way West Ham is run and not least with their stadium. 10. Can Hughes spark Southampton into life? Hughes may have been an underwhelming appointment for some Southampton fans but there is no doubt he is a highly-experienced and capable manager with an equally seasoned coaching staff. Appointing Hughes to the end of the season, initially, appeared a shrewd move for a club who have lost their way under Mauricio Pellegrino who, frankly, seemed out-of-his-depth. Southampton simply have too many good players to be in this position – although it has happened to teams before – but scoring goals remains a problem. Another concern is that they do not have the easiest of run-ins. It could still be touch and go for them and Saturday’s fixture away to West Ham United should be an indicator as to which way it is heading.
The 10 questions still to be answered this season ahead of the Premier League's return
1. Can City break the Premier League's record points haul? City are on 81 points and need 15 more – five wins from their final eight games – to beat the record set by Chelsea in 2004-05 which, remarkably, was their first Premier League title triumph and came in Jose Mourinho’s first season as manager. But City should beat that, and deservedly so. They have taken an incredible 2.7 points per game on average so far so, over a 38-match season, if they keep that up, will top 100 points. They have tricky fixtures – Tottenham Hotspur away and Manchester United at home – though their biggest opponent may be whether they are distracted by the Champions League or, perhaps, step off the gas when the title is won. But it does not feel like manager Pep Guardiola, who wants records as well as trophies, will allow that. 2. Can Mourinho banish the uncertainty over his tenure at Manchester United? United desperately hope so but it is far from clear. Mourinho extended his contract earlier this year but is already showing familiar signs of discontent, unhappiness with his squad, murmurings over transfer dealings and that sense the world is conspiring against him. Right now, Mourinho is also doing little to dispel the theory that football has moved on and he has not and that, ultimately, United is not the right job for him. It does not feel right. The Champions League exit to Sevilla was damaging and will not be easily forgotten but if he can win the FA Cup and finish second in the Premier League he can save face. Mourinho will start next season in charge of United, but will he finish it? 3. Can Liverpool finish as the best of the rest? Jurgen Klopp’s side have a growing sense of momentum. The Premier League win over Manchester City in January was a significant bridgehead in their progress. It showed they can be the best of the rest and, maybe, with the right recruitment in the summer, City’s nearest challengers next season. It will be fascinating to see what happens with the Champions League quarter-final between the two clubs. If – and it is a big if - Liverpool get through that, belief will soar. Salah is outscoring Messi and is on course to re-write the Premier League record books Mohamed Salah’s freakish goal-scoring feats have possibly skewed Liverpool’s campaign, but they appear to be are on the right track and are building something sustainable. And playing some very good, attacking football along the way. 4. Can Chelsea salvage their hopes of Champions League qualification? If - and it's a nother big if - Chelsea beat Tottenham Hotspur at Stamford Bridge on Sunday, they have a chance. Otherwise, it seems they will finish outside the top four and miss out on the Champions League. If they were to lose to Spurs, it would be all over and Chelsea’s decline since they sat in second place not so long ago has been alarming. Even so, and despite the fact that he is expected to leave at the end of the season, the team is still playing for manager Antonio Conte - as was shown in the recent FA Cup win over Leicester City. If anything, Chelsea have been a little unlucky this season especially with their forwards. But the Spurs game is key - and even then victory might not be enough. 5. Who will win the Golden Boot? Harry Kane’s ankle injury has meant that Mohamed Salah is now the clear favourite to deny the Tottenham Hotspur striker a third successive Premier League Golden Boot award. Salah has pulled four goals ahead of Kane – with 28 – and with Sergio Aguero the nearest challenger on 21 goals. Given the remarkable scoring runs, all three players are capable of going on then with eight games to left – seven for Liverpool – it is not yet over. But it is hard to see either Kane returning from injury in time to catch Salah or the goals drying up for the Egyptian in Liverpool’s final few fixtures. If anything, his goal-scoring rate is accelerating as the season progresses. The numbers for all three forwards are remarkable. 6. Can Burnley finish above Arsenal? The gap is five points with eight games to go, although, with back-to-back wins, Burnley have arrested the sense that their season was becoming becalmed after their extraordinary start to the campaign. Arsenal should stay ahead of them although Burnley only have two fixtures left against teams who are above them – Chelsea at home, who they beat on the opening day of the season, and, interestingly, Arsenal away. Given Arsene Wenger is going to prioritise the Europa League to try and salvage Arsenal’s campaign and, he will hope, save his job, then he could well continue to field weakened teams in the Premier League. It would then be up to Burnley to see whether they have enough to take advantage of that. 7. Can Allardyce prove he deserves a full season at Everton? The disenchantment among the supporters about Allardyce quickly re-surfaced, and having pretty much banished fears of relegation in his first few games in charge, his job was done at Everton. Performances have been poor and Allardyce’s tactics have been criticised. The expectation is that the club will look for a new head coach, with the Portuguese pair of Marco Silva – who Everton tried to lure away from Watford before appointing Allardyce – and Shakhtar Donetsk’s Paulo Fonesca appearing to be the favourites to take over. Sam Allardyce has not been a huge success at Everton Credit: Action Images It also seems that Everton might, in a wider clear-out, replace director of football Steve Walsh, who has overseen some poor signings, with PSV Eindhoven’s Marcel Brands. Feels like a fresh start is on its way. 8. Will all three promoted sides stay up for just the third time in Premier League history? With West Bromwich Albion appearing doomed and Stoke City grimly clinging on, it would seem there will eventually only be one relegation place to settle. Southampton occupy it at present but, surely have enough to stay up under new manager Mark Hughes. None of the promoted clubs – Brighton, Newcastle United or Huddersfield Town – are safe yet but Brighton appear the closest to making sure they stay up and are superbly organised by Chris Hughton. Rafa Benitez should also get enough out of Newcastle which makes Huddersfield, three points ahead of Southampton, the most vulnerable. Even so, they have a happy knack of pulling off results and, with their manager David Wagner, their fans and their sense of togetherness, they have a chance. 9. Will the unrest at West Ham cost them their Premier League status? We will know on Saturday. West Ham face Southampton at home and the loser, if there is one, will be in deep trouble. Even a draw is tricky. In terms of the squad available to West Ham, they should not be in trouble but the toxicity around the club has taken its toll. Five home games from of their last eight should be an advantage but it does not feel like that. Maybe, just maybe, the scenes during the defeat to Burnley will be a line in the sand moment. West Ham fan protests boils over at the London Stadium But what happens if West Ham fall behind against Southampton? It does not bear thinking about in terms of the fans reaction. Saturday, even with seven games after that, could be make or break in deciding whether they can stay up. Even if they do, a lot has to change in the way West Ham is run and not least with their stadium. 10. Can Hughes spark Southampton into life? Hughes may have been an underwhelming appointment for some Southampton fans but there is no doubt he is a highly-experienced and capable manager with an equally seasoned coaching staff. Appointing Hughes to the end of the season, initially, appeared a shrewd move for a club who have lost their way under Mauricio Pellegrino who, frankly, seemed out-of-his-depth. Southampton simply have too many good players to be in this position – although it has happened to teams before – but scoring goals remains a problem. Another concern is that they do not have the easiest of run-ins. It could still be touch and go for them and Saturday’s fixture away to West Ham United should be an indicator as to which way it is heading.
PSV Eindhoven extended their lead at the top of the Eredivisie to 10 points with a 3-0 win over VVV Venlo.
PSV 3-0 VVV Venlo
PSV Eindhoven extended their lead at the top of the Eredivisie to 10 points with a 3-0 win over VVV Venlo.
PSV Eindhoven extended their lead at the top of the Eredivisie to 10 points with a 3-0 win over VVV Venlo.
PSV 3-0 VVV Venlo
PSV Eindhoven extended their lead at the top of the Eredivisie to 10 points with a 3-0 win over VVV Venlo.
PSV Eindhoven extended their lead at the top of the Eredivisie to 10 points with a 3-0 win over VVV Venlo.
PSV 3-0 VVV Venlo
PSV Eindhoven extended their lead at the top of the Eredivisie to 10 points with a 3-0 win over VVV Venlo.
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Hirving Lozano of PSV competes for the ball with Clint Leemans of VVV Venlo during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
PSV v VVV Venlo - Eredivisie
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Hirving Lozano of PSV competes for the ball with Clint Leemans of VVV Venlo during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Hirving Lozano of PSV competes for the ball with Clint Leemans of VVV Venlo during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
PSV v VVV Venlo - Eredivisie
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Hirving Lozano of PSV competes for the ball with Clint Leemans of VVV Venlo during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Hirving Lozano of PSV competes for the ball with Jerold Promes of VVV Venlo during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
PSV v VVV Venlo - Eredivisie
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Hirving Lozano of PSV competes for the ball with Jerold Promes of VVV Venlo during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Marco van Ginkel of PSV celebrates scoring his teams second goal of the game with team mates during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
PSV v VVV Venlo - Eredivisie
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Marco van Ginkel of PSV celebrates scoring his teams second goal of the game with team mates during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Marco van Ginkel of PSV celebrates scoring his teams second goal of the game with team mates during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
PSV v VVV Venlo - Eredivisie
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Marco van Ginkel of PSV celebrates scoring his teams second goal of the game with team mates during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Marco van Ginkel of PSV celebrates scoring his teams second goal of the game with team mates during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
PSV v VVV Venlo - Eredivisie
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Marco van Ginkel of PSV celebrates scoring his teams second goal of the game with team mates during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Marco van Ginkel of PSV celebrates scoring his teams first goal of the game during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
PSV v VVV Venlo - Eredivisie
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Marco van Ginkel of PSV celebrates scoring his teams first goal of the game during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Marco van Ginkel of PSV celebrates scoring his teams first goal of the game with team mates during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
PSV v VVV Venlo - Eredivisie
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Marco van Ginkel of PSV celebrates scoring his teams first goal of the game with team mates during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Goalkeeper, Lars Unnerstall of VVV Venlo cant stop the header as Marco van Ginkel of PSV celebrates scoring his teams first goal of the game during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
PSV v VVV Venlo - Eredivisie
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Goalkeeper, Lars Unnerstall of VVV Venlo cant stop the header as Marco van Ginkel of PSV celebrates scoring his teams first goal of the game during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Marco van Ginkel of PSV celebrates scoring his teams first goal of the game with team mate Hirving Lozano during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
PSV v VVV Venlo - Eredivisie
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Marco van Ginkel of PSV celebrates scoring his teams first goal of the game with team mate Hirving Lozano during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Marco van Ginkel of PSV celebrates scoring his teams first goal of the game with team mate Hirving Lozano during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
PSV v VVV Venlo - Eredivisie
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Marco van Ginkel of PSV celebrates scoring his teams first goal of the game with team mate Hirving Lozano during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Goalkeeper, Lars Unnerstall of VVV Venlo cant stop the header as Marco van Ginkel of PSV celebrates scoring his teams first goal of the game during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
PSV v VVV Venlo - Eredivisie
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Goalkeeper, Lars Unnerstall of VVV Venlo cant stop the header as Marco van Ginkel of PSV celebrates scoring his teams first goal of the game during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Marco van Ginkel of PSV celebrates scoring his teams first goal of the game during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
PSV v VVV Venlo - Eredivisie
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Marco van Ginkel of PSV celebrates scoring his teams first goal of the game during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Marco van Ginkel of PSV celebrates scoring his teams first goal of the game during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
PSV v VVV Venlo - Eredivisie
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Marco van Ginkel of PSV celebrates scoring his teams first goal of the game during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Marco van Ginkel of PSV in action during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
PSV v VVV Venlo - Eredivisie
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Marco van Ginkel of PSV in action during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Marco van Ginkel of PSV celebrates scoring his teams first goal of the game with team mate Hirving Lozano during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
PSV v VVV Venlo - Eredivisie
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Marco van Ginkel of PSV celebrates scoring his teams first goal of the game with team mate Hirving Lozano during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Marco van Ginkel of PSV celebrates scoring his teams first goal of the game during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
PSV v VVV Venlo - Eredivisie
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Marco van Ginkel of PSV celebrates scoring his teams first goal of the game during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Marco van Ginkel of PSV celebrates scoring his teams first goal of the game with team mates during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
PSV v VVV Venlo - Eredivisie
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Marco van Ginkel of PSV celebrates scoring his teams first goal of the game with team mates during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Luuk de Jong of PSV battles for the ball with Nils Roseler of VVV Venlo during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
PSV v VVV Venlo - Eredivisie
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Luuk de Jong of PSV battles for the ball with Nils Roseler of VVV Venlo during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Marco van Ginkel of PSV battles for the ball with Nils Roseler and Leroy Labylle of VVV Venlo during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
PSV v VVV Venlo - Eredivisie
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Marco van Ginkel of PSV battles for the ball with Nils Roseler and Leroy Labylle of VVV Venlo during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Marco van Ginkel of PSV battles for the ball with Nils Roseler and Leroy Labylle of VVV Venlo during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
PSV v VVV Venlo - Eredivisie
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Marco van Ginkel of PSV battles for the ball with Nils Roseler and Leroy Labylle of VVV Venlo during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Marco van Ginkel of PSV battles for the ball with Nils Roseler and Leroy Labylle of VVV Venlo during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
PSV v VVV Venlo - Eredivisie
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Marco van Ginkel of PSV battles for the ball with Nils Roseler and Leroy Labylle of VVV Venlo during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Danny Post of VVV Venlo battles for the ball with Steven Bergwijn of PSV during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
PSV v VVV Venlo - Eredivisie
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Danny Post of VVV Venlo battles for the ball with Steven Bergwijn of PSV during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Danny Post of VVV Venlo battles for the ball with Steven Bergwijn of PSV during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
PSV v VVV Venlo - Eredivisie
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Danny Post of VVV Venlo battles for the ball with Steven Bergwijn of PSV during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Steven Bergwijn of PSV competes for the ball with Danny Post of VVV Venlo during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
PSV v VVV Venlo - Eredivisie
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Steven Bergwijn of PSV competes for the ball with Danny Post of VVV Venlo during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Steven Bergwijn of PSV reacts to a missed chance on goal during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
PSV v VVV Venlo - Eredivisie
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Steven Bergwijn of PSV reacts to a missed chance on goal during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Danny Post of VVV Venlo battles for the ball with Steven Bergwijn of PSV during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
PSV v VVV Venlo - Eredivisie
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Danny Post of VVV Venlo battles for the ball with Steven Bergwijn of PSV during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Bart Ramselaar of PSV competes for the ball with Moreno Rutten of VVV Venlo during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
PSV v VVV Venlo - Eredivisie
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Bart Ramselaar of PSV competes for the ball with Moreno Rutten of VVV Venlo during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Luuk de Jong of PSV gets past the tackle from Moreno Rutten of VVV Venlo during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
PSV v VVV Venlo - Eredivisie
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Luuk de Jong of PSV gets past the tackle from Moreno Rutten of VVV Venlo during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Luuk de Jong of PSV battles for the ball with Ralf Seuntjens of VVV Venlo during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
PSV v VVV Venlo - Eredivisie
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Luuk de Jong of PSV battles for the ball with Ralf Seuntjens of VVV Venlo during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Luuk de Jong of PSV in action during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
PSV v VVV Venlo - Eredivisie
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Luuk de Jong of PSV in action during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Luuk de Jong of PSV battles for the ball with Jerold Promes and Leroy Labylle of VVV Venlo during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
PSV v VVV Venlo - Eredivisie
EINDHOVEN, NETHERLANDS - MARCH 17: Luuk de Jong of PSV battles for the ball with Jerold Promes and Leroy Labylle of VVV Venlo during the Dutch Eredivisie match between PSV Eindhoven and VVV Venlo held at Philips Stadion on March 17, 2018 in Eindhoven, Netherlands. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
PSV Eindhoven suffered a shocking 5-0 defeat to relegation threaten Willem II in the Dutch Eredevisie.
Willem II 5 - 0 PSV
PSV Eindhoven suffered a shocking 5-0 defeat to relegation threaten Willem II in the Dutch Eredevisie.
PSV Eindhoven suffered a shocking 5-0 defeat to relegation threaten Willem II in the Dutch Eredevisie.
Willem II 5 - 0 PSV
PSV Eindhoven suffered a shocking 5-0 defeat to relegation threaten Willem II in the Dutch Eredevisie.
PSV Eindhoven suffered a shocking 5-0 defeat to relegation threaten Willem II in the Dutch Eredevisie.
Willem II 5 - 0 PSV
PSV Eindhoven suffered a shocking 5-0 defeat to relegation threaten Willem II in the Dutch Eredevisie.
56368620. Tilburg (Netherlands), 10/03/2018.- Fran Sol of Willem II thanks the fans after scoring against PSV Eindhoven during the Eredivisie match between Willem II and PSV in Tilburg, The Netherlands on 10 March 2018. (Países Bajos; Holanda) EFE/EPA/TOIN DAMEN
56368620. Tilburg (Netherlands), 10/03/2018.- Fran Sol of Willem II thanks the fans after scoring against PSV Eindhoven during the Eredivisie match between Willem II and PSV in Tilburg, The Netherlands on 10 March 2018. (Países Bajos; Holanda) EFE/EPA/TOIN DAMEN
56368620. Tilburg (Netherlands), 10/03/2018.- Fran Sol of Willem II thanks the fans after scoring against PSV Eindhoven during the Eredivisie match between Willem II and PSV in Tilburg, The Netherlands on 10 March 2018. (Países Bajos; Holanda) EFE/EPA/TOIN DAMEN
56368620. Tilburg (Netherlands), 10/03/2018.- Ben Rienstra (L) of Willem II scores the 1-0 lead against PSV Eindhoven during the Eredivisie match between Willem II and PSV in Tilburg, The Netherlands on 10 March 2018. (Países Bajos; Holanda) EFE/EPA/TOIN DAMEN
56368620. Tilburg (Netherlands), 10/03/2018.- Ben Rienstra (L) of Willem II scores the 1-0 lead against PSV Eindhoven during the Eredivisie match between Willem II and PSV in Tilburg, The Netherlands on 10 March 2018. (Países Bajos; Holanda) EFE/EPA/TOIN DAMEN
56368620. Tilburg (Netherlands), 10/03/2018.- Ben Rienstra (L) of Willem II scores the 1-0 lead against PSV Eindhoven during the Eredivisie match between Willem II and PSV in Tilburg, The Netherlands on 10 March 2018. (Países Bajos; Holanda) EFE/EPA/TOIN DAMEN
56368620. Tilburg (Netherlands), 10/03/2018.- Elmo Lieftink (above) of Willem II duels with Marco van Ginkel (below) of PSV Eindhoven during the Eredivisie match between Willem II and PSV in Tilburg, The Netherlands on 10 March 2018. (Países Bajos; Holanda) EFE/EPA/JASPER RUHE
56368620. Tilburg (Netherlands), 10/03/2018.- Elmo Lieftink (above) of Willem II duels with Marco van Ginkel (below) of PSV Eindhoven during the Eredivisie match between Willem II and PSV in Tilburg, The Netherlands on 10 March 2018. (Países Bajos; Holanda) EFE/EPA/JASPER RUHE
56368620. Tilburg (Netherlands), 10/03/2018.- Elmo Lieftink (above) of Willem II duels with Marco van Ginkel (below) of PSV Eindhoven during the Eredivisie match between Willem II and PSV in Tilburg, The Netherlands on 10 March 2018. (Países Bajos; Holanda) EFE/EPA/JASPER RUHE
Nobody mentioned Chris Hughton when Everton were looking for a new leader last October, but everyone can see that the Barclays Manager of the Month for February is above Sam Allardyce in the Premier League table as the sides meet at Goodison Park. Hughton is in his element at Brighton and Hove Albion, who have risen from 21st in the Championship to 10th in the top division since he was hired in December 2014. The fit is so natural that no-one in Sussex worries much about him being lost to a ‘bigger club.’ With 34 points from 29 games, Brighton could be within four points or so of securing another season in the Premier League after 34 years outside the top flight. Hughton, who today joins Pep Guardiola, Eddie Howe and David Wagner as winners of the monthly award in 2017-18, has been rewarded for the remarkable improvement shown by Brighton’s players since the 4-0 hammering at home by Chelsea on 20 January. From there they won three of their next four games, beating West Ham (3-1), Swansea (4-1) and Arsenal (2-1). Next weekend they face Manchester United at Old Trafford in the quarter-finals of the FA Cup. If the rest of the league saw only the goals when Chelsea came to visit, Hughton observed something deeper. He says: “What has helped enormously is that even in the Chelsea game, where arguably we saw one of the best individual performances by a player at the Amex [by Eden Hazard], we were just caught by an exceptional team and found it hard to get back in. “But the general sense was that we didn’t play too badly, and I think that helped, because it meant the confidence levels weren’t shattered. The team have not been embarrassed by the division. We’ve been in almost every game.” Chris Hughton, here with his coaching staff, has been named Premier League manager of the month Credit: Getty images But the upswing was remarkable, with 10 points from 12 and a surge away from the relegation zone. Hughton picks out “continuity” of selection and the spirit in his squad: “It’s also the influence of the players who are not playing. That group has been good all season - and that helps. But it is hard work. We’re having to raise our game for every game, and it’s demanding, but the players so far have shown a real aptitude - and a real desire to make sure we’re in this division next year.” Hughton was always alive to the bigger picture. He has lent his support to football’s prostate cancer awareness drive, noting that while white males are being diagnosed at a rate of one in eight, the ratio rises to one in four for black men. He calls the current diagnosis numbers “frightening.” His roots are in an older, more caring culture, but he is more and more at home in today’s game. He pays tribute too to his assistants, Paul Trollope and Paul Nevin, and sports science and medical departments. Ben Roberts, the goalkeeping coach, is credited with “most of the good work” in helping Mat Ryan to become a dependable Premier League keeper. Of Trollope, Hughton says: “He knows very much how I work, and he is one I would also listen to. One thing that will never change as a manager is that there is so much game stuff and management stuff to deal with that you want good information. Paul Nevin, who I brought in, worked with us at Norwich, and has come in as a first-team coach and has been a wonderful addition.” Brighton have won three of their last four games Credit: Getty images I ask about some of the players who have improved through the campaign, starting with Glenn Murray, who has 11 league goals. “I think he’s hungry,” Hughton says. “He spent time of course at Bournemouth and didn’t play as much as he’d have liked. He’s hungry to play.” And Lewis Dunk, who is not far away from England selection, though Burnley’s James Tarkowski and Leicester’s Harry Maguire may be ahead of him: “Yes. Alfie Mawson at Swansea is another good young player,” Hughton says. “Dunk is certainly good enough to be in that company.” And Pascal Gross, the playmaker: “He’s very flexible. He works for the team. We played predominantly a 4-4-2 the last couple of seasons. It’s very difficult to play 4-4-2 in this division, but the ideal one for us is a player who can press high, but predominantly is a No 10. He’s a hard-working player and a very football-intelligent player as well. Good background, good family background, and it didn’t take him long to settle in.” Davy Propper: “We had a feeling about Davy, but you just don’t know. He’d played in a couple of different positions. They [PSV Eindhoven, his former club] played a three in midfield. Certainly if you’re playing in a two in midfield in the Premier League it’s a different kind of role.” Propper plays alongside Dale Stephens, of whom Hughton says: “Dale is one player who, if you’d asked me at the start of the season, do I think he can play in the Premier League, I’d have said yes.” Lewis Dunk and Pascal Gross have been two of this season's success stories at Brighton Credit: Getty images Jose Izquierdo has benefitted from patient handling. Hughton says: “He’s a good story. He came in for what was a big fee for this club and has developed, by his hard work. He’s desperate to do well.” Ezequiel Schelotto has also progressed. “He came here as a very experienced player who’s played at some good clubs. And of course he had Bruno ahead of him.” To see his name missed off the list of candidates for ‘big’ jobs is of no concern to Hughton, who says: “No it doesn’t bother me. My managerial drive has always been about doing the best job I can. At the moment I’m taking great satisfaction from what we’ve built up here. “The most pleasing thing is to think about some of the players who’ve come through. Lewis Dunk, who I can remember watching two or three years before I got to to this club: a centre-half, playing at the Withdean [stadium], making the odd mistake, but full of enthusiasm. Dale Stephens, Solly March, Anthony Knockaert. They’re the bits I enjoy. So no, it doesn’t bother me. It’s not something I think about.” To tell him in August that he would reach early March with 34 points, in 10th position, would have pleased him. He smiles. “Absolutely. I would have been delighted with that one.”
Chris Hughton exclusive interview: 'I'm not bothered being overlooked for bigger jobs. My focus is on Brighton'
Nobody mentioned Chris Hughton when Everton were looking for a new leader last October, but everyone can see that the Barclays Manager of the Month for February is above Sam Allardyce in the Premier League table as the sides meet at Goodison Park. Hughton is in his element at Brighton and Hove Albion, who have risen from 21st in the Championship to 10th in the top division since he was hired in December 2014. The fit is so natural that no-one in Sussex worries much about him being lost to a ‘bigger club.’ With 34 points from 29 games, Brighton could be within four points or so of securing another season in the Premier League after 34 years outside the top flight. Hughton, who today joins Pep Guardiola, Eddie Howe and David Wagner as winners of the monthly award in 2017-18, has been rewarded for the remarkable improvement shown by Brighton’s players since the 4-0 hammering at home by Chelsea on 20 January. From there they won three of their next four games, beating West Ham (3-1), Swansea (4-1) and Arsenal (2-1). Next weekend they face Manchester United at Old Trafford in the quarter-finals of the FA Cup. If the rest of the league saw only the goals when Chelsea came to visit, Hughton observed something deeper. He says: “What has helped enormously is that even in the Chelsea game, where arguably we saw one of the best individual performances by a player at the Amex [by Eden Hazard], we were just caught by an exceptional team and found it hard to get back in. “But the general sense was that we didn’t play too badly, and I think that helped, because it meant the confidence levels weren’t shattered. The team have not been embarrassed by the division. We’ve been in almost every game.” Chris Hughton, here with his coaching staff, has been named Premier League manager of the month Credit: Getty images But the upswing was remarkable, with 10 points from 12 and a surge away from the relegation zone. Hughton picks out “continuity” of selection and the spirit in his squad: “It’s also the influence of the players who are not playing. That group has been good all season - and that helps. But it is hard work. We’re having to raise our game for every game, and it’s demanding, but the players so far have shown a real aptitude - and a real desire to make sure we’re in this division next year.” Hughton was always alive to the bigger picture. He has lent his support to football’s prostate cancer awareness drive, noting that while white males are being diagnosed at a rate of one in eight, the ratio rises to one in four for black men. He calls the current diagnosis numbers “frightening.” His roots are in an older, more caring culture, but he is more and more at home in today’s game. He pays tribute too to his assistants, Paul Trollope and Paul Nevin, and sports science and medical departments. Ben Roberts, the goalkeeping coach, is credited with “most of the good work” in helping Mat Ryan to become a dependable Premier League keeper. Of Trollope, Hughton says: “He knows very much how I work, and he is one I would also listen to. One thing that will never change as a manager is that there is so much game stuff and management stuff to deal with that you want good information. Paul Nevin, who I brought in, worked with us at Norwich, and has come in as a first-team coach and has been a wonderful addition.” Brighton have won three of their last four games Credit: Getty images I ask about some of the players who have improved through the campaign, starting with Glenn Murray, who has 11 league goals. “I think he’s hungry,” Hughton says. “He spent time of course at Bournemouth and didn’t play as much as he’d have liked. He’s hungry to play.” And Lewis Dunk, who is not far away from England selection, though Burnley’s James Tarkowski and Leicester’s Harry Maguire may be ahead of him: “Yes. Alfie Mawson at Swansea is another good young player,” Hughton says. “Dunk is certainly good enough to be in that company.” And Pascal Gross, the playmaker: “He’s very flexible. He works for the team. We played predominantly a 4-4-2 the last couple of seasons. It’s very difficult to play 4-4-2 in this division, but the ideal one for us is a player who can press high, but predominantly is a No 10. He’s a hard-working player and a very football-intelligent player as well. Good background, good family background, and it didn’t take him long to settle in.” Davy Propper: “We had a feeling about Davy, but you just don’t know. He’d played in a couple of different positions. They [PSV Eindhoven, his former club] played a three in midfield. Certainly if you’re playing in a two in midfield in the Premier League it’s a different kind of role.” Propper plays alongside Dale Stephens, of whom Hughton says: “Dale is one player who, if you’d asked me at the start of the season, do I think he can play in the Premier League, I’d have said yes.” Lewis Dunk and Pascal Gross have been two of this season's success stories at Brighton Credit: Getty images Jose Izquierdo has benefitted from patient handling. Hughton says: “He’s a good story. He came in for what was a big fee for this club and has developed, by his hard work. He’s desperate to do well.” Ezequiel Schelotto has also progressed. “He came here as a very experienced player who’s played at some good clubs. And of course he had Bruno ahead of him.” To see his name missed off the list of candidates for ‘big’ jobs is of no concern to Hughton, who says: “No it doesn’t bother me. My managerial drive has always been about doing the best job I can. At the moment I’m taking great satisfaction from what we’ve built up here. “The most pleasing thing is to think about some of the players who’ve come through. Lewis Dunk, who I can remember watching two or three years before I got to to this club: a centre-half, playing at the Withdean [stadium], making the odd mistake, but full of enthusiasm. Dale Stephens, Solly March, Anthony Knockaert. They’re the bits I enjoy. So no, it doesn’t bother me. It’s not something I think about.” To tell him in August that he would reach early March with 34 points, in 10th position, would have pleased him. He smiles. “Absolutely. I would have been delighted with that one.”
Nobody mentioned Chris Hughton when Everton were looking for a new leader last October, but everyone can see that the Barclays Manager of the Month for February is above Sam Allardyce in the Premier League table as the sides meet at Goodison Park. Hughton is in his element at Brighton and Hove Albion, who have risen from 21st in the Championship to 10th in the top division since he was hired in December 2014. The fit is so natural that no-one in Sussex worries much about him being lost to a ‘bigger club.’ With 34 points from 29 games, Brighton could be within four points or so of securing another season in the Premier League after 34 years outside the top flight. Hughton, who today joins Pep Guardiola, Eddie Howe and David Wagner as winners of the monthly award in 2017-18, has been rewarded for the remarkable improvement shown by Brighton’s players since the 4-0 hammering at home by Chelsea on 20 January. From there they won three of their next four games, beating West Ham (3-1), Swansea (4-1) and Arsenal (2-1). Next weekend they face Manchester United at Old Trafford in the quarter-finals of the FA Cup. If the rest of the league saw only the goals when Chelsea came to visit, Hughton observed something deeper. He says: “What has helped enormously is that even in the Chelsea game, where arguably we saw one of the best individual performances by a player at the Amex [by Eden Hazard], we were just caught by an exceptional team and found it hard to get back in. “But the general sense was that we didn’t play too badly, and I think that helped, because it meant the confidence levels weren’t shattered. The team have not been embarrassed by the division. We’ve been in almost every game.” Chris Hughton, here with his coaching staff, has been named Premier League manager of the month Credit: Getty images But the upswing was remarkable, with 10 points from 12 and a surge away from the relegation zone. Hughton picks out “continuity” of selection and the spirit in his squad: “It’s also the influence of the players who are not playing. That group has been good all season - and that helps. But it is hard work. We’re having to raise our game for every game, and it’s demanding, but the players so far have shown a real aptitude - and a real desire to make sure we’re in this division next year.” Hughton was always alive to the bigger picture. He has lent his support to football’s prostate cancer awareness drive, noting that while white males are being diagnosed at a rate of one in eight, the ratio rises to one in four for black men. He calls the current diagnosis numbers “frightening.” His roots are in an older, more caring culture, but he is more and more at home in today’s game. He pays tribute too to his assistants, Paul Trollope and Paul Nevin, and sports science and medical departments. Ben Roberts, the goalkeeping coach, is credited with “most of the good work” in helping Mat Ryan to become a dependable Premier League keeper. Of Trollope, Hughton says: “He knows very much how I work, and he is one I would also listen to. One thing that will never change as a manager is that there is so much game stuff and management stuff to deal with that you want good information. Paul Nevin, who I brought in, worked with us at Norwich, and has come in as a first-team coach and has been a wonderful addition.” Brighton have won three of their last four games Credit: Getty images I ask about some of the players who have improved through the campaign, starting with Glenn Murray, who has 11 league goals. “I think he’s hungry,” Hughton says. “He spent time of course at Bournemouth and didn’t play as much as he’d have liked. He’s hungry to play.” And Lewis Dunk, who is not far away from England selection, though Burnley’s James Tarkowski and Leicester’s Harry Maguire may be ahead of him: “Yes. Alfie Mawson at Swansea is another good young player,” Hughton says. “Dunk is certainly good enough to be in that company.” And Pascal Gross, the playmaker: “He’s very flexible. He works for the team. We played predominantly a 4-4-2 the last couple of seasons. It’s very difficult to play 4-4-2 in this division, but the ideal one for us is a player who can press high, but predominantly is a No 10. He’s a hard-working player and a very football-intelligent player as well. Good background, good family background, and it didn’t take him long to settle in.” Davy Propper: “We had a feeling about Davy, but you just don’t know. He’d played in a couple of different positions. They [PSV Eindhoven, his former club] played a three in midfield. Certainly if you’re playing in a two in midfield in the Premier League it’s a different kind of role.” Propper plays alongside Dale Stephens, of whom Hughton says: “Dale is one player who, if you’d asked me at the start of the season, do I think he can play in the Premier League, I’d have said yes.” Lewis Dunk and Pascal Gross have been two of this season's success stories at Brighton Credit: Getty images Jose Izquierdo has benefitted from patient handling. Hughton says: “He’s a good story. He came in for what was a big fee for this club and has developed, by his hard work. He’s desperate to do well.” Ezequiel Schelotto has also progressed. “He came here as a very experienced player who’s played at some good clubs. And of course he had Bruno ahead of him.” To see his name missed off the list of candidates for ‘big’ jobs is of no concern to Hughton, who says: “No it doesn’t bother me. My managerial drive has always been about doing the best job I can. At the moment I’m taking great satisfaction from what we’ve built up here. “The most pleasing thing is to think about some of the players who’ve come through. Lewis Dunk, who I can remember watching two or three years before I got to to this club: a centre-half, playing at the Withdean [stadium], making the odd mistake, but full of enthusiasm. Dale Stephens, Solly March, Anthony Knockaert. They’re the bits I enjoy. So no, it doesn’t bother me. It’s not something I think about.” To tell him in August that he would reach early March with 34 points, in 10th position, would have pleased him. He smiles. “Absolutely. I would have been delighted with that one.”
Chris Hughton exclusive interview: 'I'm not bothered being overlooked for bigger jobs. My focus is on Brighton'
Nobody mentioned Chris Hughton when Everton were looking for a new leader last October, but everyone can see that the Barclays Manager of the Month for February is above Sam Allardyce in the Premier League table as the sides meet at Goodison Park. Hughton is in his element at Brighton and Hove Albion, who have risen from 21st in the Championship to 10th in the top division since he was hired in December 2014. The fit is so natural that no-one in Sussex worries much about him being lost to a ‘bigger club.’ With 34 points from 29 games, Brighton could be within four points or so of securing another season in the Premier League after 34 years outside the top flight. Hughton, who today joins Pep Guardiola, Eddie Howe and David Wagner as winners of the monthly award in 2017-18, has been rewarded for the remarkable improvement shown by Brighton’s players since the 4-0 hammering at home by Chelsea on 20 January. From there they won three of their next four games, beating West Ham (3-1), Swansea (4-1) and Arsenal (2-1). Next weekend they face Manchester United at Old Trafford in the quarter-finals of the FA Cup. If the rest of the league saw only the goals when Chelsea came to visit, Hughton observed something deeper. He says: “What has helped enormously is that even in the Chelsea game, where arguably we saw one of the best individual performances by a player at the Amex [by Eden Hazard], we were just caught by an exceptional team and found it hard to get back in. “But the general sense was that we didn’t play too badly, and I think that helped, because it meant the confidence levels weren’t shattered. The team have not been embarrassed by the division. We’ve been in almost every game.” Chris Hughton, here with his coaching staff, has been named Premier League manager of the month Credit: Getty images But the upswing was remarkable, with 10 points from 12 and a surge away from the relegation zone. Hughton picks out “continuity” of selection and the spirit in his squad: “It’s also the influence of the players who are not playing. That group has been good all season - and that helps. But it is hard work. We’re having to raise our game for every game, and it’s demanding, but the players so far have shown a real aptitude - and a real desire to make sure we’re in this division next year.” Hughton was always alive to the bigger picture. He has lent his support to football’s prostate cancer awareness drive, noting that while white males are being diagnosed at a rate of one in eight, the ratio rises to one in four for black men. He calls the current diagnosis numbers “frightening.” His roots are in an older, more caring culture, but he is more and more at home in today’s game. He pays tribute too to his assistants, Paul Trollope and Paul Nevin, and sports science and medical departments. Ben Roberts, the goalkeeping coach, is credited with “most of the good work” in helping Mat Ryan to become a dependable Premier League keeper. Of Trollope, Hughton says: “He knows very much how I work, and he is one I would also listen to. One thing that will never change as a manager is that there is so much game stuff and management stuff to deal with that you want good information. Paul Nevin, who I brought in, worked with us at Norwich, and has come in as a first-team coach and has been a wonderful addition.” Brighton have won three of their last four games Credit: Getty images I ask about some of the players who have improved through the campaign, starting with Glenn Murray, who has 11 league goals. “I think he’s hungry,” Hughton says. “He spent time of course at Bournemouth and didn’t play as much as he’d have liked. He’s hungry to play.” And Lewis Dunk, who is not far away from England selection, though Burnley’s James Tarkowski and Leicester’s Harry Maguire may be ahead of him: “Yes. Alfie Mawson at Swansea is another good young player,” Hughton says. “Dunk is certainly good enough to be in that company.” And Pascal Gross, the playmaker: “He’s very flexible. He works for the team. We played predominantly a 4-4-2 the last couple of seasons. It’s very difficult to play 4-4-2 in this division, but the ideal one for us is a player who can press high, but predominantly is a No 10. He’s a hard-working player and a very football-intelligent player as well. Good background, good family background, and it didn’t take him long to settle in.” Davy Propper: “We had a feeling about Davy, but you just don’t know. He’d played in a couple of different positions. They [PSV Eindhoven, his former club] played a three in midfield. Certainly if you’re playing in a two in midfield in the Premier League it’s a different kind of role.” Propper plays alongside Dale Stephens, of whom Hughton says: “Dale is one player who, if you’d asked me at the start of the season, do I think he can play in the Premier League, I’d have said yes.” Lewis Dunk and Pascal Gross have been two of this season's success stories at Brighton Credit: Getty images Jose Izquierdo has benefitted from patient handling. Hughton says: “He’s a good story. He came in for what was a big fee for this club and has developed, by his hard work. He’s desperate to do well.” Ezequiel Schelotto has also progressed. “He came here as a very experienced player who’s played at some good clubs. And of course he had Bruno ahead of him.” To see his name missed off the list of candidates for ‘big’ jobs is of no concern to Hughton, who says: “No it doesn’t bother me. My managerial drive has always been about doing the best job I can. At the moment I’m taking great satisfaction from what we’ve built up here. “The most pleasing thing is to think about some of the players who’ve come through. Lewis Dunk, who I can remember watching two or three years before I got to to this club: a centre-half, playing at the Withdean [stadium], making the odd mistake, but full of enthusiasm. Dale Stephens, Solly March, Anthony Knockaert. They’re the bits I enjoy. So no, it doesn’t bother me. It’s not something I think about.” To tell him in August that he would reach early March with 34 points, in 10th position, would have pleased him. He smiles. “Absolutely. I would have been delighted with that one.”
Nobody mentioned Chris Hughton when Everton were looking for a new leader last October, but everyone can see that the Barclays Manager of the Month for February is above Sam Allardyce in the Premier League table as the sides meet at Goodison Park. Hughton is in his element at Brighton and Hove Albion, who have risen from 21st in the Championship to 10th in the top division since he was hired in December 2014. The fit is so natural that no-one in Sussex worries much about him being lost to a ‘bigger club.’ With 34 points from 29 games, Brighton could be within four points or so of securing another season in the Premier League after 34 years outside the top flight. Hughton, who today joins Pep Guardiola, Eddie Howe and David Wagner as winners of the monthly award in 2017-18, has been rewarded for the remarkable improvement shown by Brighton’s players since the 4-0 hammering at home by Chelsea on 20 January. From there they won three of their next four games, beating West Ham (3-1), Swansea (4-1) and Arsenal (2-1). Next weekend they face Manchester United at Old Trafford in the quarter-finals of the FA Cup. If the rest of the league saw only the goals when Chelsea came to visit, Hughton observed something deeper. He says: “What has helped enormously is that even in the Chelsea game, where arguably we saw one of the best individual performances by a player at the Amex [by Eden Hazard], we were just caught by an exceptional team and found it hard to get back in. “But the general sense was that we didn’t play too badly, and I think that helped, because it meant the confidence levels weren’t shattered. The team have not been embarrassed by the division. We’ve been in almost every game.” Chris Hughton, here with his coaching staff, has been named Premier League manager of the month Credit: Getty images But the upswing was remarkable, with 10 points from 12 and a surge away from the relegation zone. Hughton picks out “continuity” of selection and the spirit in his squad: “It’s also the influence of the players who are not playing. That group has been good all season - and that helps. But it is hard work. We’re having to raise our game for every game, and it’s demanding, but the players so far have shown a real aptitude - and a real desire to make sure we’re in this division next year.” Hughton was always alive to the bigger picture. He has lent his support to football’s prostate cancer awareness drive, noting that while white males are being diagnosed at a rate of one in eight, the ratio rises to one in four for black men. He calls the current diagnosis numbers “frightening.” His roots are in an older, more caring culture, but he is more and more at home in today’s game. He pays tribute too to his assistants, Paul Trollope and Paul Nevin, and sports science and medical departments. Ben Roberts, the goalkeeping coach, is credited with “most of the good work” in helping Mat Ryan to become a dependable Premier League keeper. Of Trollope, Hughton says: “He knows very much how I work, and he is one I would also listen to. One thing that will never change as a manager is that there is so much game stuff and management stuff to deal with that you want good information. Paul Nevin, who I brought in, worked with us at Norwich, and has come in as a first-team coach and has been a wonderful addition.” Brighton have won three of their last four games Credit: Getty images I ask about some of the players who have improved through the campaign, starting with Glenn Murray, who has 11 league goals. “I think he’s hungry,” Hughton says. “He spent time of course at Bournemouth and didn’t play as much as he’d have liked. He’s hungry to play.” And Lewis Dunk, who is not far away from England selection, though Burnley’s James Tarkowski and Leicester’s Harry Maguire may be ahead of him: “Yes. Alfie Mawson at Swansea is another good young player,” Hughton says. “Dunk is certainly good enough to be in that company.” And Pascal Gross, the playmaker: “He’s very flexible. He works for the team. We played predominantly a 4-4-2 the last couple of seasons. It’s very difficult to play 4-4-2 in this division, but the ideal one for us is a player who can press high, but predominantly is a No 10. He’s a hard-working player and a very football-intelligent player as well. Good background, good family background, and it didn’t take him long to settle in.” Davy Propper: “We had a feeling about Davy, but you just don’t know. He’d played in a couple of different positions. They [PSV Eindhoven, his former club] played a three in midfield. Certainly if you’re playing in a two in midfield in the Premier League it’s a different kind of role.” Propper plays alongside Dale Stephens, of whom Hughton says: “Dale is one player who, if you’d asked me at the start of the season, do I think he can play in the Premier League, I’d have said yes.” Lewis Dunk and Pascal Gross have been two of this season's success stories at Brighton Credit: Getty images Jose Izquierdo has benefitted from patient handling. Hughton says: “He’s a good story. He came in for what was a big fee for this club and has developed, by his hard work. He’s desperate to do well.” Ezequiel Schelotto has also progressed. “He came here as a very experienced player who’s played at some good clubs. And of course he had Bruno ahead of him.” To see his name missed off the list of candidates for ‘big’ jobs is of no concern to Hughton, who says: “No it doesn’t bother me. My managerial drive has always been about doing the best job I can. At the moment I’m taking great satisfaction from what we’ve built up here. “The most pleasing thing is to think about some of the players who’ve come through. Lewis Dunk, who I can remember watching two or three years before I got to to this club: a centre-half, playing at the Withdean [stadium], making the odd mistake, but full of enthusiasm. Dale Stephens, Solly March, Anthony Knockaert. They’re the bits I enjoy. So no, it doesn’t bother me. It’s not something I think about.” To tell him in August that he would reach early March with 34 points, in 10th position, would have pleased him. He smiles. “Absolutely. I would have been delighted with that one.”
Chris Hughton exclusive interview: 'I'm not bothered being overlooked for bigger jobs. My focus is on Brighton'
Nobody mentioned Chris Hughton when Everton were looking for a new leader last October, but everyone can see that the Barclays Manager of the Month for February is above Sam Allardyce in the Premier League table as the sides meet at Goodison Park. Hughton is in his element at Brighton and Hove Albion, who have risen from 21st in the Championship to 10th in the top division since he was hired in December 2014. The fit is so natural that no-one in Sussex worries much about him being lost to a ‘bigger club.’ With 34 points from 29 games, Brighton could be within four points or so of securing another season in the Premier League after 34 years outside the top flight. Hughton, who today joins Pep Guardiola, Eddie Howe and David Wagner as winners of the monthly award in 2017-18, has been rewarded for the remarkable improvement shown by Brighton’s players since the 4-0 hammering at home by Chelsea on 20 January. From there they won three of their next four games, beating West Ham (3-1), Swansea (4-1) and Arsenal (2-1). Next weekend they face Manchester United at Old Trafford in the quarter-finals of the FA Cup. If the rest of the league saw only the goals when Chelsea came to visit, Hughton observed something deeper. He says: “What has helped enormously is that even in the Chelsea game, where arguably we saw one of the best individual performances by a player at the Amex [by Eden Hazard], we were just caught by an exceptional team and found it hard to get back in. “But the general sense was that we didn’t play too badly, and I think that helped, because it meant the confidence levels weren’t shattered. The team have not been embarrassed by the division. We’ve been in almost every game.” Chris Hughton, here with his coaching staff, has been named Premier League manager of the month Credit: Getty images But the upswing was remarkable, with 10 points from 12 and a surge away from the relegation zone. Hughton picks out “continuity” of selection and the spirit in his squad: “It’s also the influence of the players who are not playing. That group has been good all season - and that helps. But it is hard work. We’re having to raise our game for every game, and it’s demanding, but the players so far have shown a real aptitude - and a real desire to make sure we’re in this division next year.” Hughton was always alive to the bigger picture. He has lent his support to football’s prostate cancer awareness drive, noting that while white males are being diagnosed at a rate of one in eight, the ratio rises to one in four for black men. He calls the current diagnosis numbers “frightening.” His roots are in an older, more caring culture, but he is more and more at home in today’s game. He pays tribute too to his assistants, Paul Trollope and Paul Nevin, and sports science and medical departments. Ben Roberts, the goalkeeping coach, is credited with “most of the good work” in helping Mat Ryan to become a dependable Premier League keeper. Of Trollope, Hughton says: “He knows very much how I work, and he is one I would also listen to. One thing that will never change as a manager is that there is so much game stuff and management stuff to deal with that you want good information. Paul Nevin, who I brought in, worked with us at Norwich, and has come in as a first-team coach and has been a wonderful addition.” Brighton have won three of their last four games Credit: Getty images I ask about some of the players who have improved through the campaign, starting with Glenn Murray, who has 11 league goals. “I think he’s hungry,” Hughton says. “He spent time of course at Bournemouth and didn’t play as much as he’d have liked. He’s hungry to play.” And Lewis Dunk, who is not far away from England selection, though Burnley’s James Tarkowski and Leicester’s Harry Maguire may be ahead of him: “Yes. Alfie Mawson at Swansea is another good young player,” Hughton says. “Dunk is certainly good enough to be in that company.” And Pascal Gross, the playmaker: “He’s very flexible. He works for the team. We played predominantly a 4-4-2 the last couple of seasons. It’s very difficult to play 4-4-2 in this division, but the ideal one for us is a player who can press high, but predominantly is a No 10. He’s a hard-working player and a very football-intelligent player as well. Good background, good family background, and it didn’t take him long to settle in.” Davy Propper: “We had a feeling about Davy, but you just don’t know. He’d played in a couple of different positions. They [PSV Eindhoven, his former club] played a three in midfield. Certainly if you’re playing in a two in midfield in the Premier League it’s a different kind of role.” Propper plays alongside Dale Stephens, of whom Hughton says: “Dale is one player who, if you’d asked me at the start of the season, do I think he can play in the Premier League, I’d have said yes.” Lewis Dunk and Pascal Gross have been two of this season's success stories at Brighton Credit: Getty images Jose Izquierdo has benefitted from patient handling. Hughton says: “He’s a good story. He came in for what was a big fee for this club and has developed, by his hard work. He’s desperate to do well.” Ezequiel Schelotto has also progressed. “He came here as a very experienced player who’s played at some good clubs. And of course he had Bruno ahead of him.” To see his name missed off the list of candidates for ‘big’ jobs is of no concern to Hughton, who says: “No it doesn’t bother me. My managerial drive has always been about doing the best job I can. At the moment I’m taking great satisfaction from what we’ve built up here. “The most pleasing thing is to think about some of the players who’ve come through. Lewis Dunk, who I can remember watching two or three years before I got to to this club: a centre-half, playing at the Withdean [stadium], making the odd mistake, but full of enthusiasm. Dale Stephens, Solly March, Anthony Knockaert. They’re the bits I enjoy. So no, it doesn’t bother me. It’s not something I think about.” To tell him in August that he would reach early March with 34 points, in 10th position, would have pleased him. He smiles. “Absolutely. I would have been delighted with that one.”
Nobody mentioned Chris Hughton when Everton were looking for a new leader last October, but everyone can see that the Barclays Manager of the Month for February is above Sam Allardyce in the Premier League table as the sides meet at Goodison Park. Hughton is in his element at Brighton and Hove Albion, who have risen from 21st in the Championship to 10th in the top division since he was hired in December 2014. The fit is so natural that no-one in Sussex worries much about him being lost to a ‘bigger club.’ With 34 points from 29 games, Brighton could be within four points or so of securing another season in the Premier League after 34 years outside the top flight. Hughton, who today joins Pep Guardiola, Eddie Howe and David Wagner as winners of the monthly award in 2017-18, has been rewarded for the remarkable improvement shown by Brighton’s players since the 4-0 hammering at home by Chelsea on 20 January. From there they won three of their next four games, beating West Ham (3-1), Swansea (4-1) and Arsenal (2-1). Next weekend they face Manchester United at Old Trafford in the quarter-finals of the FA Cup. If the rest of the league saw only the goals when Chelsea came to visit, Hughton observed something deeper. He says: “What has helped enormously is that even in the Chelsea game, where arguably we saw one of the best individual performances by a player at the Amex [by Eden Hazard], we were just caught by an exceptional team and found it hard to get back in. “But the general sense was that we didn’t play too badly, and I think that helped, because it meant the confidence levels weren’t shattered. The team have not been embarrassed by the division. We’ve been in almost every game.” Chris Hughton, here with his coaching staff, has been named Premier League manager of the month Credit: Getty images But the upswing was remarkable, with 10 points from 12 and a surge away from the relegation zone. Hughton picks out “continuity” of selection and the spirit in his squad: “It’s also the influence of the players who are not playing. That group has been good all season - and that helps. But it is hard work. We’re having to raise our game for every game, and it’s demanding, but the players so far have shown a real aptitude - and a real desire to make sure we’re in this division next year.” Hughton was always alive to the bigger picture. He has lent his support to football’s prostate cancer awareness drive, noting that while white males are being diagnosed at a rate of one in eight, the ratio rises to one in four for black men. He calls the current diagnosis numbers “frightening.” His roots are in an older, more caring culture, but he is more and more at home in today’s game. He pays tribute too to his assistants, Paul Trollope and Paul Nevin, and sports science and medical departments. Ben Roberts, the goalkeeping coach, is credited with “most of the good work” in helping Mat Ryan to become a dependable Premier League keeper. Of Trollope, Hughton says: “He knows very much how I work, and he is one I would also listen to. One thing that will never change as a manager is that there is so much game stuff and management stuff to deal with that you want good information. Paul Nevin, who I brought in, worked with us at Norwich, and has come in as a first-team coach and has been a wonderful addition.” Brighton have won three of their last four games Credit: Getty images I ask about some of the players who have improved through the campaign, starting with Glenn Murray, who has 11 league goals. “I think he’s hungry,” Hughton says. “He spent time of course at Bournemouth and didn’t play as much as he’d have liked. He’s hungry to play.” And Lewis Dunk, who is not far away from England selection, though Burnley’s James Tarkowski and Leicester’s Harry Maguire may be ahead of him: “Yes. Alfie Mawson at Swansea is another good young player,” Hughton says. “Dunk is certainly good enough to be in that company.” And Pascal Gross, the playmaker: “He’s very flexible. He works for the team. We played predominantly a 4-4-2 the last couple of seasons. It’s very difficult to play 4-4-2 in this division, but the ideal one for us is a player who can press high, but predominantly is a No 10. He’s a hard-working player and a very football-intelligent player as well. Good background, good family background, and it didn’t take him long to settle in.” Davy Propper: “We had a feeling about Davy, but you just don’t know. He’d played in a couple of different positions. They [PSV Eindhoven, his former club] played a three in midfield. Certainly if you’re playing in a two in midfield in the Premier League it’s a different kind of role.” Propper plays alongside Dale Stephens, of whom Hughton says: “Dale is one player who, if you’d asked me at the start of the season, do I think he can play in the Premier League, I’d have said yes.” Lewis Dunk and Pascal Gross have been two of this season's success stories at Brighton Credit: Getty images Jose Izquierdo has benefitted from patient handling. Hughton says: “He’s a good story. He came in for what was a big fee for this club and has developed, by his hard work. He’s desperate to do well.” Ezequiel Schelotto has also progressed. “He came here as a very experienced player who’s played at some good clubs. And of course he had Bruno ahead of him.” To see his name missed off the list of candidates for ‘big’ jobs is of no concern to Hughton, who says: “No it doesn’t bother me. My managerial drive has always been about doing the best job I can. At the moment I’m taking great satisfaction from what we’ve built up here. “The most pleasing thing is to think about some of the players who’ve come through. Lewis Dunk, who I can remember watching two or three years before I got to to this club: a centre-half, playing at the Withdean [stadium], making the odd mistake, but full of enthusiasm. Dale Stephens, Solly March, Anthony Knockaert. They’re the bits I enjoy. So no, it doesn’t bother me. It’s not something I think about.” To tell him in August that he would reach early March with 34 points, in 10th position, would have pleased him. He smiles. “Absolutely. I would have been delighted with that one.”
Chris Hughton exclusive interview: 'I'm not bothered being overlooked for bigger jobs. My focus is on Brighton'
Nobody mentioned Chris Hughton when Everton were looking for a new leader last October, but everyone can see that the Barclays Manager of the Month for February is above Sam Allardyce in the Premier League table as the sides meet at Goodison Park. Hughton is in his element at Brighton and Hove Albion, who have risen from 21st in the Championship to 10th in the top division since he was hired in December 2014. The fit is so natural that no-one in Sussex worries much about him being lost to a ‘bigger club.’ With 34 points from 29 games, Brighton could be within four points or so of securing another season in the Premier League after 34 years outside the top flight. Hughton, who today joins Pep Guardiola, Eddie Howe and David Wagner as winners of the monthly award in 2017-18, has been rewarded for the remarkable improvement shown by Brighton’s players since the 4-0 hammering at home by Chelsea on 20 January. From there they won three of their next four games, beating West Ham (3-1), Swansea (4-1) and Arsenal (2-1). Next weekend they face Manchester United at Old Trafford in the quarter-finals of the FA Cup. If the rest of the league saw only the goals when Chelsea came to visit, Hughton observed something deeper. He says: “What has helped enormously is that even in the Chelsea game, where arguably we saw one of the best individual performances by a player at the Amex [by Eden Hazard], we were just caught by an exceptional team and found it hard to get back in. “But the general sense was that we didn’t play too badly, and I think that helped, because it meant the confidence levels weren’t shattered. The team have not been embarrassed by the division. We’ve been in almost every game.” Chris Hughton, here with his coaching staff, has been named Premier League manager of the month Credit: Getty images But the upswing was remarkable, with 10 points from 12 and a surge away from the relegation zone. Hughton picks out “continuity” of selection and the spirit in his squad: “It’s also the influence of the players who are not playing. That group has been good all season - and that helps. But it is hard work. We’re having to raise our game for every game, and it’s demanding, but the players so far have shown a real aptitude - and a real desire to make sure we’re in this division next year.” Hughton was always alive to the bigger picture. He has lent his support to football’s prostate cancer awareness drive, noting that while white males are being diagnosed at a rate of one in eight, the ratio rises to one in four for black men. He calls the current diagnosis numbers “frightening.” His roots are in an older, more caring culture, but he is more and more at home in today’s game. He pays tribute too to his assistants, Paul Trollope and Paul Nevin, and sports science and medical departments. Ben Roberts, the goalkeeping coach, is credited with “most of the good work” in helping Mat Ryan to become a dependable Premier League keeper. Of Trollope, Hughton says: “He knows very much how I work, and he is one I would also listen to. One thing that will never change as a manager is that there is so much game stuff and management stuff to deal with that you want good information. Paul Nevin, who I brought in, worked with us at Norwich, and has come in as a first-team coach and has been a wonderful addition.” Brighton have won three of their last four games Credit: Getty images I ask about some of the players who have improved through the campaign, starting with Glenn Murray, who has 11 league goals. “I think he’s hungry,” Hughton says. “He spent time of course at Bournemouth and didn’t play as much as he’d have liked. He’s hungry to play.” And Lewis Dunk, who is not far away from England selection, though Burnley’s James Tarkowski and Leicester’s Harry Maguire may be ahead of him: “Yes. Alfie Mawson at Swansea is another good young player,” Hughton says. “Dunk is certainly good enough to be in that company.” And Pascal Gross, the playmaker: “He’s very flexible. He works for the team. We played predominantly a 4-4-2 the last couple of seasons. It’s very difficult to play 4-4-2 in this division, but the ideal one for us is a player who can press high, but predominantly is a No 10. He’s a hard-working player and a very football-intelligent player as well. Good background, good family background, and it didn’t take him long to settle in.” Davy Propper: “We had a feeling about Davy, but you just don’t know. He’d played in a couple of different positions. They [PSV Eindhoven, his former club] played a three in midfield. Certainly if you’re playing in a two in midfield in the Premier League it’s a different kind of role.” Propper plays alongside Dale Stephens, of whom Hughton says: “Dale is one player who, if you’d asked me at the start of the season, do I think he can play in the Premier League, I’d have said yes.” Lewis Dunk and Pascal Gross have been two of this season's success stories at Brighton Credit: Getty images Jose Izquierdo has benefitted from patient handling. Hughton says: “He’s a good story. He came in for what was a big fee for this club and has developed, by his hard work. He’s desperate to do well.” Ezequiel Schelotto has also progressed. “He came here as a very experienced player who’s played at some good clubs. And of course he had Bruno ahead of him.” To see his name missed off the list of candidates for ‘big’ jobs is of no concern to Hughton, who says: “No it doesn’t bother me. My managerial drive has always been about doing the best job I can. At the moment I’m taking great satisfaction from what we’ve built up here. “The most pleasing thing is to think about some of the players who’ve come through. Lewis Dunk, who I can remember watching two or three years before I got to to this club: a centre-half, playing at the Withdean [stadium], making the odd mistake, but full of enthusiasm. Dale Stephens, Solly March, Anthony Knockaert. They’re the bits I enjoy. So no, it doesn’t bother me. It’s not something I think about.” To tell him in August that he would reach early March with 34 points, in 10th position, would have pleased him. He smiles. “Absolutely. I would have been delighted with that one.”
Oleksandr Zinchenko has been given a small but important role in Manchester City’s formidable season although the Ukraine international, who is set to play in the League Cup final against Arsenal on Sunday, notes that he is often mistaken for someone much more famous. It is that distinctive fair hair that causes some to confuse him with the side’s leading player Kevin De Bruyne and there has been more than one misunderstanding, he says, since he became a member of Pep Guardiola’s first team squad this season. “I've heard it all the time, trust me,” says Zinchenko. “Everyone calls me 'Kev'. When I'm getting the bus, the fans are shouting 'Kev, can I have a picture?' Then I turn and they're like ‘Oh, it's not Kevin’. “From afar maybe we look like twins, but when we are together, I don't think so. I am more beautiful than him, definitely.” “From afar maybe we look like twins... but I am more beautiful" Credit: Getty A sense of humour required, and a sense of perspective for a 21-year-old making his way slowly but surely in the Premier League’s most formidable team. The serious injury to Benjamin Mendy gave Zinchenko a chance to stake a claim at left-back and having played in the three previous rounds of the EFL Cup, he should start against Arsenal at Wembley with Fabien Delph suspended. As a converted wing-back who cost less than £2 million from the Russian Premier League side FC Ufa in the summer of 2016, he is one of City’s less expensive acquisitions. His career began at Shakhtar Donetsk but ended in dispute when, as a teenager, he asked to leave and was held to his contract. With the war in the Ukraine coming, his parents moved to the Russian city of Ufa when he was 16 and once there his contract with Shakhtar prevented him from signing for Rubin Kazan – a stand-off that stopped Zinchenko playing for 18 months before he joined Ufa. “In Shakhtar, the situation was very difficult for me. I had two years left on my contract and they told me I had to continue with them. My dream was to play in the first team but you can imagine how difficult that was then because their team was Fernandinho, Douglas Costa, [Henrikh] Mkhitaryan. It was an unbelievable team. "For the Ukrainian guys it was very difficult to break into the team I said to them not to worry that I would be there for two more years. They said if you don’t want to sign, you cannot play for us, even for the youth team. So for about four months, I just ran around the pitch for every training session. I didn’t play. I was exiled on my own. "Then the season finished and we moved because the situation was very difficult in Ukraine because of the war. That’s why my parents moved." Zinchenko says it is hard for Ukraine players to make the leap to the Premier League Credit: AFP/Getty Images Andrei Shevchenko, the country’s greatest footballer of modern times, and Zinchenko’s hero, told him the Premier League would be tough and that he had to compete in training every day. Zinchenko is passionate about what he regards as the untapped talent in Ukraine, a consequence, he says of the unwillingness of clubs to let players go and an attendant lack of confidence in those footballers. “Two years ago they [Shakhtar] lost the Uefa Youth League Under-19 final to Chelsea. This is my age-group, my team, born in 1996, I know everyone there because I played with them for five years. They are huge talents. Trust me, everyone is good enough to play in Europe but they have long contracts with Shakhtar or Dynamo Kiev and they cannot move. Maybe they want to they cannot because the clubs close block the way." He played on loan last season at PSV Eindhoven which helped him adapt to life in western Europe, and he confesses to one culture shock in particular. “In Holland, everyone can sauna together - both women and men - and everyone is naked. For us, it's very, very strange. In Ukraine and Russia, it's not possible. Nobody understands it when I talk about this in Ukraine and Russia. It's strange when you see the son, maybe seven years old, his mum, his grandmother, grandfather - all together naked. Come on now. It's about mentality. That's what I mean. I'm learning every day.” Zinchenko has already had a hard road to the Premier League – war, contract disputes, sauna surprises – but he is a tough character. “One per cent talent, 99 per cent hard work” is his view of what it takes, although you do have to be good to play for Guardiola. He would like to see more Ukrainians make the leap but says it is harder than people think. “I keep in touch with Andrei Yarmolenko who plays for Dortmund. I've asked what the most difficult part of it is and of course it's the language. You are more comfortable when you can talk with your team-mates, joke with them. If you just sit in silence, it's very difficult. I think people are scared to move over here.”
Oleksandr Zinchenko on the hard journey he has taken to Man City - and being mistaken for team-mate 'Kev'
Oleksandr Zinchenko has been given a small but important role in Manchester City’s formidable season although the Ukraine international, who is set to play in the League Cup final against Arsenal on Sunday, notes that he is often mistaken for someone much more famous. It is that distinctive fair hair that causes some to confuse him with the side’s leading player Kevin De Bruyne and there has been more than one misunderstanding, he says, since he became a member of Pep Guardiola’s first team squad this season. “I've heard it all the time, trust me,” says Zinchenko. “Everyone calls me 'Kev'. When I'm getting the bus, the fans are shouting 'Kev, can I have a picture?' Then I turn and they're like ‘Oh, it's not Kevin’. “From afar maybe we look like twins, but when we are together, I don't think so. I am more beautiful than him, definitely.” “From afar maybe we look like twins... but I am more beautiful" Credit: Getty A sense of humour required, and a sense of perspective for a 21-year-old making his way slowly but surely in the Premier League’s most formidable team. The serious injury to Benjamin Mendy gave Zinchenko a chance to stake a claim at left-back and having played in the three previous rounds of the EFL Cup, he should start against Arsenal at Wembley with Fabien Delph suspended. As a converted wing-back who cost less than £2 million from the Russian Premier League side FC Ufa in the summer of 2016, he is one of City’s less expensive acquisitions. His career began at Shakhtar Donetsk but ended in dispute when, as a teenager, he asked to leave and was held to his contract. With the war in the Ukraine coming, his parents moved to the Russian city of Ufa when he was 16 and once there his contract with Shakhtar prevented him from signing for Rubin Kazan – a stand-off that stopped Zinchenko playing for 18 months before he joined Ufa. “In Shakhtar, the situation was very difficult for me. I had two years left on my contract and they told me I had to continue with them. My dream was to play in the first team but you can imagine how difficult that was then because their team was Fernandinho, Douglas Costa, [Henrikh] Mkhitaryan. It was an unbelievable team. "For the Ukrainian guys it was very difficult to break into the team I said to them not to worry that I would be there for two more years. They said if you don’t want to sign, you cannot play for us, even for the youth team. So for about four months, I just ran around the pitch for every training session. I didn’t play. I was exiled on my own. "Then the season finished and we moved because the situation was very difficult in Ukraine because of the war. That’s why my parents moved." Zinchenko says it is hard for Ukraine players to make the leap to the Premier League Credit: AFP/Getty Images Andrei Shevchenko, the country’s greatest footballer of modern times, and Zinchenko’s hero, told him the Premier League would be tough and that he had to compete in training every day. Zinchenko is passionate about what he regards as the untapped talent in Ukraine, a consequence, he says of the unwillingness of clubs to let players go and an attendant lack of confidence in those footballers. “Two years ago they [Shakhtar] lost the Uefa Youth League Under-19 final to Chelsea. This is my age-group, my team, born in 1996, I know everyone there because I played with them for five years. They are huge talents. Trust me, everyone is good enough to play in Europe but they have long contracts with Shakhtar or Dynamo Kiev and they cannot move. Maybe they want to they cannot because the clubs close block the way." He played on loan last season at PSV Eindhoven which helped him adapt to life in western Europe, and he confesses to one culture shock in particular. “In Holland, everyone can sauna together - both women and men - and everyone is naked. For us, it's very, very strange. In Ukraine and Russia, it's not possible. Nobody understands it when I talk about this in Ukraine and Russia. It's strange when you see the son, maybe seven years old, his mum, his grandmother, grandfather - all together naked. Come on now. It's about mentality. That's what I mean. I'm learning every day.” Zinchenko has already had a hard road to the Premier League – war, contract disputes, sauna surprises – but he is a tough character. “One per cent talent, 99 per cent hard work” is his view of what it takes, although you do have to be good to play for Guardiola. He would like to see more Ukrainians make the leap but says it is harder than people think. “I keep in touch with Andrei Yarmolenko who plays for Dortmund. I've asked what the most difficult part of it is and of course it's the language. You are more comfortable when you can talk with your team-mates, joke with them. If you just sit in silence, it's very difficult. I think people are scared to move over here.”
Oleksandr Zinchenko has been given a small but important role in Manchester City’s formidable season although the Ukraine international, who is set to play in the League Cup final against Arsenal on Sunday, notes that he is often mistaken for someone much more famous. It is that distinctive fair hair that causes some to confuse him with the side’s leading player Kevin De Bruyne and there has been more than one misunderstanding, he says, since he became a member of Pep Guardiola’s first team squad this season. “I've heard it all the time, trust me,” says Zinchenko. “Everyone calls me 'Kev'. When I'm getting the bus, the fans are shouting 'Kev, can I have a picture?' Then I turn and they're like ‘Oh, it's not Kevin’. “From afar maybe we look like twins, but when we are together, I don't think so. I am more beautiful than him, definitely.” “From afar maybe we look like twins... but I am more beautiful" Credit: Getty A sense of humour required, and a sense of perspective for a 21-year-old making his way slowly but surely in the Premier League’s most formidable team. The serious injury to Benjamin Mendy gave Zinchenko a chance to stake a claim at left-back and having played in the three previous rounds of the EFL Cup, he should start against Arsenal at Wembley with Fabien Delph suspended. As a converted wing-back who cost less than £2 million from the Russian Premier League side FC Ufa in the summer of 2016, he is one of City’s less expensive acquisitions. His career began at Shakhtar Donetsk but ended in dispute when, as a teenager, he asked to leave and was held to his contract. With the war in the Ukraine coming, his parents moved to the Russian city of Ufa when he was 16 and once there his contract with Shakhtar prevented him from signing for Rubin Kazan – a stand-off that stopped Zinchenko playing for 18 months before he joined Ufa. “In Shakhtar, the situation was very difficult for me. I had two years left on my contract and they told me I had to continue with them. My dream was to play in the first team but you can imagine how difficult that was then because their team was Fernandinho, Douglas Costa, [Henrikh] Mkhitaryan. It was an unbelievable team. "For the Ukrainian guys it was very difficult to break into the team I said to them not to worry that I would be there for two more years. They said if you don’t want to sign, you cannot play for us, even for the youth team. So for about four months, I just ran around the pitch for every training session. I didn’t play. I was exiled on my own. "Then the season finished and we moved because the situation was very difficult in Ukraine because of the war. That’s why my parents moved." Zinchenko says it is hard for Ukraine players to make the leap to the Premier League Credit: AFP/Getty Images Andrei Shevchenko, the country’s greatest footballer of modern times, and Zinchenko’s hero, told him the Premier League would be tough and that he had to compete in training every day. Zinchenko is passionate about what he regards as the untapped talent in Ukraine, a consequence, he says of the unwillingness of clubs to let players go and an attendant lack of confidence in those footballers. “Two years ago they [Shakhtar] lost the Uefa Youth League Under-19 final to Chelsea. This is my age-group, my team, born in 1996, I know everyone there because I played with them for five years. They are huge talents. Trust me, everyone is good enough to play in Europe but they have long contracts with Shakhtar or Dynamo Kiev and they cannot move. Maybe they want to they cannot because the clubs close block the way." He played on loan last season at PSV Eindhoven which helped him adapt to life in western Europe, and he confesses to one culture shock in particular. “In Holland, everyone can sauna together - both women and men - and everyone is naked. For us, it's very, very strange. In Ukraine and Russia, it's not possible. Nobody understands it when I talk about this in Ukraine and Russia. It's strange when you see the son, maybe seven years old, his mum, his grandmother, grandfather - all together naked. Come on now. It's about mentality. That's what I mean. I'm learning every day.” Zinchenko has already had a hard road to the Premier League – war, contract disputes, sauna surprises – but he is a tough character. “One per cent talent, 99 per cent hard work” is his view of what it takes, although you do have to be good to play for Guardiola. He would like to see more Ukrainians make the leap but says it is harder than people think. “I keep in touch with Andrei Yarmolenko who plays for Dortmund. I've asked what the most difficult part of it is and of course it's the language. You are more comfortable when you can talk with your team-mates, joke with them. If you just sit in silence, it's very difficult. I think people are scared to move over here.”
Oleksandr Zinchenko on the hard journey he has taken to Man City - and being mistaken for team-mate 'Kev'
Oleksandr Zinchenko has been given a small but important role in Manchester City’s formidable season although the Ukraine international, who is set to play in the League Cup final against Arsenal on Sunday, notes that he is often mistaken for someone much more famous. It is that distinctive fair hair that causes some to confuse him with the side’s leading player Kevin De Bruyne and there has been more than one misunderstanding, he says, since he became a member of Pep Guardiola’s first team squad this season. “I've heard it all the time, trust me,” says Zinchenko. “Everyone calls me 'Kev'. When I'm getting the bus, the fans are shouting 'Kev, can I have a picture?' Then I turn and they're like ‘Oh, it's not Kevin’. “From afar maybe we look like twins, but when we are together, I don't think so. I am more beautiful than him, definitely.” “From afar maybe we look like twins... but I am more beautiful" Credit: Getty A sense of humour required, and a sense of perspective for a 21-year-old making his way slowly but surely in the Premier League’s most formidable team. The serious injury to Benjamin Mendy gave Zinchenko a chance to stake a claim at left-back and having played in the three previous rounds of the EFL Cup, he should start against Arsenal at Wembley with Fabien Delph suspended. As a converted wing-back who cost less than £2 million from the Russian Premier League side FC Ufa in the summer of 2016, he is one of City’s less expensive acquisitions. His career began at Shakhtar Donetsk but ended in dispute when, as a teenager, he asked to leave and was held to his contract. With the war in the Ukraine coming, his parents moved to the Russian city of Ufa when he was 16 and once there his contract with Shakhtar prevented him from signing for Rubin Kazan – a stand-off that stopped Zinchenko playing for 18 months before he joined Ufa. “In Shakhtar, the situation was very difficult for me. I had two years left on my contract and they told me I had to continue with them. My dream was to play in the first team but you can imagine how difficult that was then because their team was Fernandinho, Douglas Costa, [Henrikh] Mkhitaryan. It was an unbelievable team. "For the Ukrainian guys it was very difficult to break into the team I said to them not to worry that I would be there for two more years. They said if you don’t want to sign, you cannot play for us, even for the youth team. So for about four months, I just ran around the pitch for every training session. I didn’t play. I was exiled on my own. "Then the season finished and we moved because the situation was very difficult in Ukraine because of the war. That’s why my parents moved." Zinchenko says it is hard for Ukraine players to make the leap to the Premier League Credit: AFP/Getty Images Andrei Shevchenko, the country’s greatest footballer of modern times, and Zinchenko’s hero, told him the Premier League would be tough and that he had to compete in training every day. Zinchenko is passionate about what he regards as the untapped talent in Ukraine, a consequence, he says of the unwillingness of clubs to let players go and an attendant lack of confidence in those footballers. “Two years ago they [Shakhtar] lost the Uefa Youth League Under-19 final to Chelsea. This is my age-group, my team, born in 1996, I know everyone there because I played with them for five years. They are huge talents. Trust me, everyone is good enough to play in Europe but they have long contracts with Shakhtar or Dynamo Kiev and they cannot move. Maybe they want to they cannot because the clubs close block the way." He played on loan last season at PSV Eindhoven which helped him adapt to life in western Europe, and he confesses to one culture shock in particular. “In Holland, everyone can sauna together - both women and men - and everyone is naked. For us, it's very, very strange. In Ukraine and Russia, it's not possible. Nobody understands it when I talk about this in Ukraine and Russia. It's strange when you see the son, maybe seven years old, his mum, his grandmother, grandfather - all together naked. Come on now. It's about mentality. That's what I mean. I'm learning every day.” Zinchenko has already had a hard road to the Premier League – war, contract disputes, sauna surprises – but he is a tough character. “One per cent talent, 99 per cent hard work” is his view of what it takes, although you do have to be good to play for Guardiola. He would like to see more Ukrainians make the leap but says it is harder than people think. “I keep in touch with Andrei Yarmolenko who plays for Dortmund. I've asked what the most difficult part of it is and of course it's the language. You are more comfortable when you can talk with your team-mates, joke with them. If you just sit in silence, it's very difficult. I think people are scared to move over here.”
Oleksandr Zinchenko has been given a small but important role in Manchester City’s formidable season although the Ukraine international, who is set to play in the League Cup final against Arsenal on Sunday, notes that he is often mistaken for someone much more famous. It is that distinctive fair hair that causes some to confuse him with the side’s leading player Kevin De Bruyne and there has been more than one misunderstanding, he says, since he became a member of Pep Guardiola’s first team squad this season. “I've heard it all the time, trust me,” says Zinchenko. “Everyone calls me 'Kev'. When I'm getting the bus, the fans are shouting 'Kev, can I have a picture?' Then I turn and they're like ‘Oh, it's not Kevin’. “From afar maybe we look like twins, but when we are together, I don't think so. I am more beautiful than him, definitely.” “From afar maybe we look like twins... but I am more beautiful" Credit: Getty A sense of humour required, and a sense of perspective for a 21-year-old making his way slowly but surely in the Premier League’s most formidable team. The serious injury to Benjamin Mendy gave Zinchenko a chance to stake a claim at left-back and having played in the three previous rounds of the EFL Cup, he should start against Arsenal at Wembley with Fabien Delph suspended. As a converted wing-back who cost less than £2 million from the Russian Premier League side FC Ufa in the summer of 2016, he is one of City’s less expensive acquisitions. His career began at Shakhtar Donetsk but ended in dispute when, as a teenager, he asked to leave and was held to his contract. With the war in the Ukraine coming, his parents moved to the Russian city of Ufa when he was 16 and once there his contract with Shakhtar prevented him from signing for Rubin Kazan – a stand-off that stopped Zinchenko playing for 18 months before he joined Ufa. “In Shakhtar, the situation was very difficult for me. I had two years left on my contract and they told me I had to continue with them. My dream was to play in the first team but you can imagine how difficult that was then because their team was Fernandinho, Douglas Costa, [Henrikh] Mkhitaryan. It was an unbelievable team. "For the Ukrainian guys it was very difficult to break into the team I said to them not to worry that I would be there for two more years. They said if you don’t want to sign, you cannot play for us, even for the youth team. So for about four months, I just ran around the pitch for every training session. I didn’t play. I was exiled on my own. "Then the season finished and we moved because the situation was very difficult in Ukraine because of the war. That’s why my parents moved." Zinchenko says it is hard for Ukraine players to make the leap to the Premier League Credit: AFP/Getty Images Andrei Shevchenko, the country’s greatest footballer of modern times, and Zinchenko’s hero, told him the Premier League would be tough and that he had to compete in training every day. Zinchenko is passionate about what he regards as the untapped talent in Ukraine, a consequence, he says of the unwillingness of clubs to let players go and an attendant lack of confidence in those footballers. “Two years ago they [Shakhtar] lost the Uefa Youth League Under-19 final to Chelsea. This is my age-group, my team, born in 1996, I know everyone there because I played with them for five years. They are huge talents. Trust me, everyone is good enough to play in Europe but they have long contracts with Shakhtar or Dynamo Kiev and they cannot move. Maybe they want to they cannot because the clubs close block the way." He played on loan last season at PSV Eindhoven which helped him adapt to life in western Europe, and he confesses to one culture shock in particular. “In Holland, everyone can sauna together - both women and men - and everyone is naked. For us, it's very, very strange. In Ukraine and Russia, it's not possible. Nobody understands it when I talk about this in Ukraine and Russia. It's strange when you see the son, maybe seven years old, his mum, his grandmother, grandfather - all together naked. Come on now. It's about mentality. That's what I mean. I'm learning every day.” Zinchenko has already had a hard road to the Premier League – war, contract disputes, sauna surprises – but he is a tough character. “One per cent talent, 99 per cent hard work” is his view of what it takes, although you do have to be good to play for Guardiola. He would like to see more Ukrainians make the leap but says it is harder than people think. “I keep in touch with Andrei Yarmolenko who plays for Dortmund. I've asked what the most difficult part of it is and of course it's the language. You are more comfortable when you can talk with your team-mates, joke with them. If you just sit in silence, it's very difficult. I think people are scared to move over here.”
Oleksandr Zinchenko on the hard journey he has taken to Man City - and being mistaken for team-mate 'Kev'
Oleksandr Zinchenko has been given a small but important role in Manchester City’s formidable season although the Ukraine international, who is set to play in the League Cup final against Arsenal on Sunday, notes that he is often mistaken for someone much more famous. It is that distinctive fair hair that causes some to confuse him with the side’s leading player Kevin De Bruyne and there has been more than one misunderstanding, he says, since he became a member of Pep Guardiola’s first team squad this season. “I've heard it all the time, trust me,” says Zinchenko. “Everyone calls me 'Kev'. When I'm getting the bus, the fans are shouting 'Kev, can I have a picture?' Then I turn and they're like ‘Oh, it's not Kevin’. “From afar maybe we look like twins, but when we are together, I don't think so. I am more beautiful than him, definitely.” “From afar maybe we look like twins... but I am more beautiful" Credit: Getty A sense of humour required, and a sense of perspective for a 21-year-old making his way slowly but surely in the Premier League’s most formidable team. The serious injury to Benjamin Mendy gave Zinchenko a chance to stake a claim at left-back and having played in the three previous rounds of the EFL Cup, he should start against Arsenal at Wembley with Fabien Delph suspended. As a converted wing-back who cost less than £2 million from the Russian Premier League side FC Ufa in the summer of 2016, he is one of City’s less expensive acquisitions. His career began at Shakhtar Donetsk but ended in dispute when, as a teenager, he asked to leave and was held to his contract. With the war in the Ukraine coming, his parents moved to the Russian city of Ufa when he was 16 and once there his contract with Shakhtar prevented him from signing for Rubin Kazan – a stand-off that stopped Zinchenko playing for 18 months before he joined Ufa. “In Shakhtar, the situation was very difficult for me. I had two years left on my contract and they told me I had to continue with them. My dream was to play in the first team but you can imagine how difficult that was then because their team was Fernandinho, Douglas Costa, [Henrikh] Mkhitaryan. It was an unbelievable team. "For the Ukrainian guys it was very difficult to break into the team I said to them not to worry that I would be there for two more years. They said if you don’t want to sign, you cannot play for us, even for the youth team. So for about four months, I just ran around the pitch for every training session. I didn’t play. I was exiled on my own. "Then the season finished and we moved because the situation was very difficult in Ukraine because of the war. That’s why my parents moved." Zinchenko says it is hard for Ukraine players to make the leap to the Premier League Credit: AFP/Getty Images Andrei Shevchenko, the country’s greatest footballer of modern times, and Zinchenko’s hero, told him the Premier League would be tough and that he had to compete in training every day. Zinchenko is passionate about what he regards as the untapped talent in Ukraine, a consequence, he says of the unwillingness of clubs to let players go and an attendant lack of confidence in those footballers. “Two years ago they [Shakhtar] lost the Uefa Youth League Under-19 final to Chelsea. This is my age-group, my team, born in 1996, I know everyone there because I played with them for five years. They are huge talents. Trust me, everyone is good enough to play in Europe but they have long contracts with Shakhtar or Dynamo Kiev and they cannot move. Maybe they want to they cannot because the clubs close block the way." He played on loan last season at PSV Eindhoven which helped him adapt to life in western Europe, and he confesses to one culture shock in particular. “In Holland, everyone can sauna together - both women and men - and everyone is naked. For us, it's very, very strange. In Ukraine and Russia, it's not possible. Nobody understands it when I talk about this in Ukraine and Russia. It's strange when you see the son, maybe seven years old, his mum, his grandmother, grandfather - all together naked. Come on now. It's about mentality. That's what I mean. I'm learning every day.” Zinchenko has already had a hard road to the Premier League – war, contract disputes, sauna surprises – but he is a tough character. “One per cent talent, 99 per cent hard work” is his view of what it takes, although you do have to be good to play for Guardiola. He would like to see more Ukrainians make the leap but says it is harder than people think. “I keep in touch with Andrei Yarmolenko who plays for Dortmund. I've asked what the most difficult part of it is and of course it's the language. You are more comfortable when you can talk with your team-mates, joke with them. If you just sit in silence, it's very difficult. I think people are scared to move over here.”
Of all the big name managers taking their teams into the quarter-finals of the FA Cup, only one has won it as a player. Brighton manager Chris Hughton lifted the FA Cup for Tottenham Hotspur in 1981 and 1982, and was a losing finalist in 1987. Hughton went some way to avenging his personal 1987 disappointment by leading his Seagulls side to a fifth-round victory over Coventry City, who famously beat Spurs 31 years ago. And now Brighton have the chance to settle a famous old score of their own after being drawn to face Manchester United in the last eight. Brighton lost the 1983 FA Cup final to United after a replay, having drawn the first game at Wembley 2-2 when Gordon Smith famously squandered a chance to win it. Hughton says the final stages of the FA Cup are 'as exciting as ever' Credit: Action Images via Reuters That was the last time Brighton were a top-flight club and Hughton is now combining a bid to stay in the Premier League with the club’s best Cup run since 1986. “I don’t think my own FA Cup record gives me an advantage or an edge, but what I do know is what it means to win it,” said Hughton. “The ’81 Cup final was probably the highlight of my career, so I do know how exciting it is to get there. “Building up to this game against Coventry, a lot of the talk was about the ’87 Cup final, which, of course, I played in and we lost. It has been clear that is still a massive moment in the history of Coventry and you always look forwards to those moments. “People at Brighton still remember ’83 and everything that went with it and that’s because, irrespective of all the changes, it’s still a big moment. “When foreign managers come here, that’s what they know about - the magic of this cup competition. We’ve been very much brought up on it and however much we think it is changing, which it is, I think when you get to the latter stages it’s as exciting as ever.” Hughton made nine changes for the visit of League Two Coventry and saw record signing Jurgen Locadia score on his debut and Leonardo Ulloa net for the first time since returning to Brighton on loan from Leicester City. Connor Goldson was on target in between the two strikers. But Hughton may have to field a stronger side for the trip to Old Trafford, having acknowledged that Brighton had been given a relatively comfortable path to the last eight against Crystal Palace, Middlesbrough and Coventry. “I do think we’ve been lucky,” said Hughton. “Palace here, Middlesbrough away, we have had the squad to be able to make changes and still get through. “At this moment, I don’t know how many changes I will make moving forwards. When you are in a quarter-final, you are one game away from a semi-final so there is a lot to think about.” Hughton will certainly have a selection dilemma among his forwards for the remainder of the season, with top scorer Glenn Murray now facing competition from Locadia and Ulloa. Jurgen Locadia scored Brighton's first on Saturday Credit: REUTERS “It’s probably the only area in the squad that we’ve got a lot of players,” said Hughton. “When you think we’ve got the two that played against Coventry, then Glenn, Tomer (Hemed) and Sam Baldock, we’ve got a lot of options and I knew that would cause some headaches. “But it’s such a vitally important area of the pitch that I wanted those options. Yes, it makes life a bit harder but it’s good to have those options. “We are on a good run at the moment and we have got a good changing room, and a lot of players who are involved. At the moment, we have that good feel.” On £14million signing from PSV Eindhoven, Locadia, Hughton added: “You bring a player in because you watch him and you know the type of player he is, but we are still learning about him. You really learn in the game because training is different, they all train well.”
Brighton manager Chris Hughton ready to settle another old score - the 1983 FA Cup final - in Man Utd clash
Of all the big name managers taking their teams into the quarter-finals of the FA Cup, only one has won it as a player. Brighton manager Chris Hughton lifted the FA Cup for Tottenham Hotspur in 1981 and 1982, and was a losing finalist in 1987. Hughton went some way to avenging his personal 1987 disappointment by leading his Seagulls side to a fifth-round victory over Coventry City, who famously beat Spurs 31 years ago. And now Brighton have the chance to settle a famous old score of their own after being drawn to face Manchester United in the last eight. Brighton lost the 1983 FA Cup final to United after a replay, having drawn the first game at Wembley 2-2 when Gordon Smith famously squandered a chance to win it. Hughton says the final stages of the FA Cup are 'as exciting as ever' Credit: Action Images via Reuters That was the last time Brighton were a top-flight club and Hughton is now combining a bid to stay in the Premier League with the club’s best Cup run since 1986. “I don’t think my own FA Cup record gives me an advantage or an edge, but what I do know is what it means to win it,” said Hughton. “The ’81 Cup final was probably the highlight of my career, so I do know how exciting it is to get there. “Building up to this game against Coventry, a lot of the talk was about the ’87 Cup final, which, of course, I played in and we lost. It has been clear that is still a massive moment in the history of Coventry and you always look forwards to those moments. “People at Brighton still remember ’83 and everything that went with it and that’s because, irrespective of all the changes, it’s still a big moment. “When foreign managers come here, that’s what they know about - the magic of this cup competition. We’ve been very much brought up on it and however much we think it is changing, which it is, I think when you get to the latter stages it’s as exciting as ever.” Hughton made nine changes for the visit of League Two Coventry and saw record signing Jurgen Locadia score on his debut and Leonardo Ulloa net for the first time since returning to Brighton on loan from Leicester City. Connor Goldson was on target in between the two strikers. But Hughton may have to field a stronger side for the trip to Old Trafford, having acknowledged that Brighton had been given a relatively comfortable path to the last eight against Crystal Palace, Middlesbrough and Coventry. “I do think we’ve been lucky,” said Hughton. “Palace here, Middlesbrough away, we have had the squad to be able to make changes and still get through. “At this moment, I don’t know how many changes I will make moving forwards. When you are in a quarter-final, you are one game away from a semi-final so there is a lot to think about.” Hughton will certainly have a selection dilemma among his forwards for the remainder of the season, with top scorer Glenn Murray now facing competition from Locadia and Ulloa. Jurgen Locadia scored Brighton's first on Saturday Credit: REUTERS “It’s probably the only area in the squad that we’ve got a lot of players,” said Hughton. “When you think we’ve got the two that played against Coventry, then Glenn, Tomer (Hemed) and Sam Baldock, we’ve got a lot of options and I knew that would cause some headaches. “But it’s such a vitally important area of the pitch that I wanted those options. Yes, it makes life a bit harder but it’s good to have those options. “We are on a good run at the moment and we have got a good changing room, and a lot of players who are involved. At the moment, we have that good feel.” On £14million signing from PSV Eindhoven, Locadia, Hughton added: “You bring a player in because you watch him and you know the type of player he is, but we are still learning about him. You really learn in the game because training is different, they all train well.”
Of all the big name managers taking their teams into the quarter-finals of the FA Cup, only one has won it as a player. Brighton manager Chris Hughton lifted the FA Cup for Tottenham Hotspur in 1981 and 1982, and was a losing finalist in 1987. Hughton went some way to avenging his personal 1987 disappointment by leading his Seagulls side to a fifth-round victory over Coventry City, who famously beat Spurs 31 years ago. And now Brighton have the chance to settle a famous old score of their own after being drawn to face Manchester United in the last eight. Brighton lost the 1983 FA Cup final to United after a replay, having drawn the first game at Wembley 2-2 when Gordon Smith famously squandered a chance to win it. Hughton says the final stages of the FA Cup are 'as exciting as ever' Credit: Action Images via Reuters That was the last time Brighton were a top-flight club and Hughton is now combining a bid to stay in the Premier League with the club’s best Cup run since 1986. “I don’t think my own FA Cup record gives me an advantage or an edge, but what I do know is what it means to win it,” said Hughton. “The ’81 Cup final was probably the highlight of my career, so I do know how exciting it is to get there. “Building up to this game against Coventry, a lot of the talk was about the ’87 Cup final, which, of course, I played in and we lost. It has been clear that is still a massive moment in the history of Coventry and you always look forwards to those moments. “People at Brighton still remember ’83 and everything that went with it and that’s because, irrespective of all the changes, it’s still a big moment. “When foreign managers come here, that’s what they know about - the magic of this cup competition. We’ve been very much brought up on it and however much we think it is changing, which it is, I think when you get to the latter stages it’s as exciting as ever.” Hughton made nine changes for the visit of League Two Coventry and saw record signing Jurgen Locadia score on his debut and Leonardo Ulloa net for the first time since returning to Brighton on loan from Leicester City. Connor Goldson was on target in between the two strikers. But Hughton may have to field a stronger side for the trip to Old Trafford, having acknowledged that Brighton had been given a relatively comfortable path to the last eight against Crystal Palace, Middlesbrough and Coventry. “I do think we’ve been lucky,” said Hughton. “Palace here, Middlesbrough away, we have had the squad to be able to make changes and still get through. “At this moment, I don’t know how many changes I will make moving forwards. When you are in a quarter-final, you are one game away from a semi-final so there is a lot to think about.” Hughton will certainly have a selection dilemma among his forwards for the remainder of the season, with top scorer Glenn Murray now facing competition from Locadia and Ulloa. Jurgen Locadia scored Brighton's first on Saturday Credit: REUTERS “It’s probably the only area in the squad that we’ve got a lot of players,” said Hughton. “When you think we’ve got the two that played against Coventry, then Glenn, Tomer (Hemed) and Sam Baldock, we’ve got a lot of options and I knew that would cause some headaches. “But it’s such a vitally important area of the pitch that I wanted those options. Yes, it makes life a bit harder but it’s good to have those options. “We are on a good run at the moment and we have got a good changing room, and a lot of players who are involved. At the moment, we have that good feel.” On £14million signing from PSV Eindhoven, Locadia, Hughton added: “You bring a player in because you watch him and you know the type of player he is, but we are still learning about him. You really learn in the game because training is different, they all train well.”
Brighton manager Chris Hughton ready to settle another old score - the 1983 FA Cup final - in Man Utd clash
Of all the big name managers taking their teams into the quarter-finals of the FA Cup, only one has won it as a player. Brighton manager Chris Hughton lifted the FA Cup for Tottenham Hotspur in 1981 and 1982, and was a losing finalist in 1987. Hughton went some way to avenging his personal 1987 disappointment by leading his Seagulls side to a fifth-round victory over Coventry City, who famously beat Spurs 31 years ago. And now Brighton have the chance to settle a famous old score of their own after being drawn to face Manchester United in the last eight. Brighton lost the 1983 FA Cup final to United after a replay, having drawn the first game at Wembley 2-2 when Gordon Smith famously squandered a chance to win it. Hughton says the final stages of the FA Cup are 'as exciting as ever' Credit: Action Images via Reuters That was the last time Brighton were a top-flight club and Hughton is now combining a bid to stay in the Premier League with the club’s best Cup run since 1986. “I don’t think my own FA Cup record gives me an advantage or an edge, but what I do know is what it means to win it,” said Hughton. “The ’81 Cup final was probably the highlight of my career, so I do know how exciting it is to get there. “Building up to this game against Coventry, a lot of the talk was about the ’87 Cup final, which, of course, I played in and we lost. It has been clear that is still a massive moment in the history of Coventry and you always look forwards to those moments. “People at Brighton still remember ’83 and everything that went with it and that’s because, irrespective of all the changes, it’s still a big moment. “When foreign managers come here, that’s what they know about - the magic of this cup competition. We’ve been very much brought up on it and however much we think it is changing, which it is, I think when you get to the latter stages it’s as exciting as ever.” Hughton made nine changes for the visit of League Two Coventry and saw record signing Jurgen Locadia score on his debut and Leonardo Ulloa net for the first time since returning to Brighton on loan from Leicester City. Connor Goldson was on target in between the two strikers. But Hughton may have to field a stronger side for the trip to Old Trafford, having acknowledged that Brighton had been given a relatively comfortable path to the last eight against Crystal Palace, Middlesbrough and Coventry. “I do think we’ve been lucky,” said Hughton. “Palace here, Middlesbrough away, we have had the squad to be able to make changes and still get through. “At this moment, I don’t know how many changes I will make moving forwards. When you are in a quarter-final, you are one game away from a semi-final so there is a lot to think about.” Hughton will certainly have a selection dilemma among his forwards for the remainder of the season, with top scorer Glenn Murray now facing competition from Locadia and Ulloa. Jurgen Locadia scored Brighton's first on Saturday Credit: REUTERS “It’s probably the only area in the squad that we’ve got a lot of players,” said Hughton. “When you think we’ve got the two that played against Coventry, then Glenn, Tomer (Hemed) and Sam Baldock, we’ve got a lot of options and I knew that would cause some headaches. “But it’s such a vitally important area of the pitch that I wanted those options. Yes, it makes life a bit harder but it’s good to have those options. “We are on a good run at the moment and we have got a good changing room, and a lot of players who are involved. At the moment, we have that good feel.” On £14million signing from PSV Eindhoven, Locadia, Hughton added: “You bring a player in because you watch him and you know the type of player he is, but we are still learning about him. You really learn in the game because training is different, they all train well.”
Of all the big name managers taking their teams into the quarter-finals of the FA Cup, only one has won it as a player. Brighton manager Chris Hughton lifted the FA Cup for Tottenham Hotspur in 1981 and 1982, and was a losing finalist in 1987. Hughton went some way to avenging his personal 1987 disappointment by leading his Seagulls side to a fifth-round victory over Coventry City, who famously beat Spurs 31 years ago. And now Brighton have the chance to settle a famous old score of their own after being drawn to face Manchester United in the last eight. Brighton lost the 1983 FA Cup final to United after a replay, having drawn the first game at Wembley 2-2 when Gordon Smith famously squandered a chance to win it. Hughton says the final stages of the FA Cup are 'as exciting as ever' Credit: Action Images via Reuters That was the last time Brighton were a top-flight club and Hughton is now combining a bid to stay in the Premier League with the club’s best Cup run since 1986. “I don’t think my own FA Cup record gives me an advantage or an edge, but what I do know is what it means to win it,” said Hughton. “The ’81 Cup final was probably the highlight of my career, so I do know how exciting it is to get there. “Building up to this game against Coventry, a lot of the talk was about the ’87 Cup final, which, of course, I played in and we lost. It has been clear that is still a massive moment in the history of Coventry and you always look forwards to those moments. “People at Brighton still remember ’83 and everything that went with it and that’s because, irrespective of all the changes, it’s still a big moment. “When foreign managers come here, that’s what they know about - the magic of this cup competition. We’ve been very much brought up on it and however much we think it is changing, which it is, I think when you get to the latter stages it’s as exciting as ever.” Hughton made nine changes for the visit of League Two Coventry and saw record signing Jurgen Locadia score on his debut and Leonardo Ulloa net for the first time since returning to Brighton on loan from Leicester City. Connor Goldson was on target in between the two strikers. But Hughton may have to field a stronger side for the trip to Old Trafford, having acknowledged that Brighton had been given a relatively comfortable path to the last eight against Crystal Palace, Middlesbrough and Coventry. “I do think we’ve been lucky,” said Hughton. “Palace here, Middlesbrough away, we have had the squad to be able to make changes and still get through. “At this moment, I don’t know how many changes I will make moving forwards. When you are in a quarter-final, you are one game away from a semi-final so there is a lot to think about.” Hughton will certainly have a selection dilemma among his forwards for the remainder of the season, with top scorer Glenn Murray now facing competition from Locadia and Ulloa. Jurgen Locadia scored Brighton's first on Saturday Credit: REUTERS “It’s probably the only area in the squad that we’ve got a lot of players,” said Hughton. “When you think we’ve got the two that played against Coventry, then Glenn, Tomer (Hemed) and Sam Baldock, we’ve got a lot of options and I knew that would cause some headaches. “But it’s such a vitally important area of the pitch that I wanted those options. Yes, it makes life a bit harder but it’s good to have those options. “We are on a good run at the moment and we have got a good changing room, and a lot of players who are involved. At the moment, we have that good feel.” On £14million signing from PSV Eindhoven, Locadia, Hughton added: “You bring a player in because you watch him and you know the type of player he is, but we are still learning about him. You really learn in the game because training is different, they all train well.”
Brighton manager Chris Hughton ready to settle another old score - the 1983 FA Cup final - in Man Utd clash
Of all the big name managers taking their teams into the quarter-finals of the FA Cup, only one has won it as a player. Brighton manager Chris Hughton lifted the FA Cup for Tottenham Hotspur in 1981 and 1982, and was a losing finalist in 1987. Hughton went some way to avenging his personal 1987 disappointment by leading his Seagulls side to a fifth-round victory over Coventry City, who famously beat Spurs 31 years ago. And now Brighton have the chance to settle a famous old score of their own after being drawn to face Manchester United in the last eight. Brighton lost the 1983 FA Cup final to United after a replay, having drawn the first game at Wembley 2-2 when Gordon Smith famously squandered a chance to win it. Hughton says the final stages of the FA Cup are 'as exciting as ever' Credit: Action Images via Reuters That was the last time Brighton were a top-flight club and Hughton is now combining a bid to stay in the Premier League with the club’s best Cup run since 1986. “I don’t think my own FA Cup record gives me an advantage or an edge, but what I do know is what it means to win it,” said Hughton. “The ’81 Cup final was probably the highlight of my career, so I do know how exciting it is to get there. “Building up to this game against Coventry, a lot of the talk was about the ’87 Cup final, which, of course, I played in and we lost. It has been clear that is still a massive moment in the history of Coventry and you always look forwards to those moments. “People at Brighton still remember ’83 and everything that went with it and that’s because, irrespective of all the changes, it’s still a big moment. “When foreign managers come here, that’s what they know about - the magic of this cup competition. We’ve been very much brought up on it and however much we think it is changing, which it is, I think when you get to the latter stages it’s as exciting as ever.” Hughton made nine changes for the visit of League Two Coventry and saw record signing Jurgen Locadia score on his debut and Leonardo Ulloa net for the first time since returning to Brighton on loan from Leicester City. Connor Goldson was on target in between the two strikers. But Hughton may have to field a stronger side for the trip to Old Trafford, having acknowledged that Brighton had been given a relatively comfortable path to the last eight against Crystal Palace, Middlesbrough and Coventry. “I do think we’ve been lucky,” said Hughton. “Palace here, Middlesbrough away, we have had the squad to be able to make changes and still get through. “At this moment, I don’t know how many changes I will make moving forwards. When you are in a quarter-final, you are one game away from a semi-final so there is a lot to think about.” Hughton will certainly have a selection dilemma among his forwards for the remainder of the season, with top scorer Glenn Murray now facing competition from Locadia and Ulloa. Jurgen Locadia scored Brighton's first on Saturday Credit: REUTERS “It’s probably the only area in the squad that we’ve got a lot of players,” said Hughton. “When you think we’ve got the two that played against Coventry, then Glenn, Tomer (Hemed) and Sam Baldock, we’ve got a lot of options and I knew that would cause some headaches. “But it’s such a vitally important area of the pitch that I wanted those options. Yes, it makes life a bit harder but it’s good to have those options. “We are on a good run at the moment and we have got a good changing room, and a lot of players who are involved. At the moment, we have that good feel.” On £14million signing from PSV Eindhoven, Locadia, Hughton added: “You bring a player in because you watch him and you know the type of player he is, but we are still learning about him. You really learn in the game because training is different, they all train well.”
Luuk de Jong had the simplest of tasks to double PSV Eindhoven's lead in their Eredivisie match against Heerenveen, after a defensive error from 17-year-old Kik Pierie gifted him a one-on-one opportunity.
Defensive error from Heerenveen gifts goal to PSV's de Jong
Luuk de Jong had the simplest of tasks to double PSV Eindhoven's lead in their Eredivisie match against Heerenveen, after a defensive error from 17-year-old Kik Pierie gifted him a one-on-one opportunity.
Luuk de Jong had the simplest of tasks to double PSV Eindhoven's lead in their Eredivisie match against Heerenveen, after a defensive error from 17-year-old Kik Pierie gifted him a one-on-one opportunity.
Defensive error from Heerenveen gifts goal to PSV's de Jong
Luuk de Jong had the simplest of tasks to double PSV Eindhoven's lead in their Eredivisie match against Heerenveen, after a defensive error from 17-year-old Kik Pierie gifted him a one-on-one opportunity.
Luuk de Jong had the simplest of tasks to double PSV Eindhoven's lead in their Eredivisie match against Heerenveen, after a defensive error from 17-year-old Kik Pierie gifted him a one-on-one opportunity.
Defensive error from Heerenveen gifts goal to PSV's de Jong
Luuk de Jong had the simplest of tasks to double PSV Eindhoven's lead in their Eredivisie match against Heerenveen, after a defensive error from 17-year-old Kik Pierie gifted him a one-on-one opportunity.
Heerenveen goalkeeper Martin Hansen pulled off a miracle save from Luuk de Jong to deny hosts PSV Eindhoven victory in the Eredivisie on Saturday.
Heerenveen keeper pulls off miracle save to deny PSV victory
Heerenveen goalkeeper Martin Hansen pulled off a miracle save from Luuk de Jong to deny hosts PSV Eindhoven victory in the Eredivisie on Saturday.
Heerenveen goalkeeper Martin Hansen pulled off a miracle save from Luuk de Jong to deny hosts PSV Eindhoven victory in the Eredivisie on Saturday.
Heerenveen keeper pulls off miracle save to deny PSV victory
Heerenveen goalkeeper Martin Hansen pulled off a miracle save from Luuk de Jong to deny hosts PSV Eindhoven victory in the Eredivisie on Saturday.
Heerenveen goalkeeper Martin Hansen pulled off a miracle save from Luuk de Jong to deny hosts PSV Eindhoven victory in the Eredivisie on Saturday.
Heerenveen keeper pulls off miracle save to deny PSV victory
Heerenveen goalkeeper Martin Hansen pulled off a miracle save from Luuk de Jong to deny hosts PSV Eindhoven victory in the Eredivisie on Saturday.
Many of the Brighton fans packed into the Amex Stadium on Saturday will still remember the immortal words ‘And Smith must score’ and those who do not may soon be getting a history lesson if the club’s Cup run continues. The last time Brighton were a top-flight club, they reached the final of the FA Cup in 1983 and lost in a replay to Manchester United. Gordon Smith has the dubious honour of being the man, referred to in the famous radio commentary, who should have won the first game for Brighton. There was even a fanzine named after him. Brighton may still be a couple of games away from the final, but a first quarter-final place for 32 years, in the season they are back in the top flight, has got the club’s supporters dreaming of another Wembley appearance and a chance to finally avenge Smith’s miss. Unlike at other grounds in this season’s FA Cup, there were no large sections of empty seats at the Amex, despite the fact Brighton were entertaining League Two opposition. Manager Chris Hughton made nine changes for the visit of Coventry City, but there was never much prospect of an upset. Jurgen Locadia celebrates scoring his first goal for the club Credit: Getty Images Record signing Jurgen Locadia scored on his Brighton debut, while Leonardo Ulloa netted for the first time since returning to the club on loan from Leicester City. Locadia should really have finished with a hat-trick, as the £15million buy from PSV Eindhoven made a lively start to his Seagulls career. He hit the post in just the fifth minute with a hooked shot from a corner that Coventry failed to clear, but found the net 10 minutes later. Anthony Knockaert, who Coventry’s defenders could not cope with, sent in a low cross from the right and the ball was deflected into the path of Locadia, who made no mistake from eight yards. Just two minutes before Locadia’s opener, Coventry had gone within inches of breaking the deadlock. Jordan Shipley’s corner was met by Johnson Clarke-Harris, but his header rattled the crossbar. Goldson's goal was his first in two years Credit: Getty Images Locadia was presented with a great chance to double his and Brighton’s tally in the 23rd minute, but he completely missed the ball with the goal gaping. And shortly afterwards, he somehow diverted the ball wide after sliding to meet a low cross into the area from Markus Suttner. “To get off mark early was good for Jurgen,” said Hughton. “He is here to score goals. He has a flexibility about him, but we are still learning about him. You saw that in his game as he was drifting out. He came to us in January and had had a good first half of the season in Holland.” Coventry were punished further with 11 minutes of the first half remaining. Another Suttner delivery found the head of Connor Goldson, who made no mistake. The goal was Goldson’s first for almost two years, during which time he underwent heart surgery. Hughton swapped his goalkeeper at the break, sending on Niki Maenpaa to replace the injured Tim Krul, but it was Coventry’s Lee Burge who was soon picking the ball out of his net again. Just after the hour mark, Bruno’s high cross found Ulloa and the Argentine directed his header past Burge to chalk up his first goal of the season. Johnson Clarke-Harris (L) celebrates getting a consolation goal for Coventry with Jordan Ponticelli Credit: PA For Coventry, this season’s FA Cup has provided some relief and distraction from years of turmoil at the hands of controversial owners Sisu. The 1987 winners beat Stoke City and Milton Keynes Dons to reach the fifth round and they at least sent their travelling army home with something to cheer from their day out in Brighton. Burge pumped forwards a long clearance that made its way into the Brighton penalty area. Goldson tried to head clear, but the ball fell to Clarke-Harris, who rifled a shot into the net to send the Coventry fans wild. “I thought we were good,” said Coventry manager Mark Robins. “It has been a positive experience for us and, hopefully, it can help us have a strong finish in League Two.”
Brighton 3 Coventry 1: Jurgen Locadia debut goal helps hosts into quarter-final
Many of the Brighton fans packed into the Amex Stadium on Saturday will still remember the immortal words ‘And Smith must score’ and those who do not may soon be getting a history lesson if the club’s Cup run continues. The last time Brighton were a top-flight club, they reached the final of the FA Cup in 1983 and lost in a replay to Manchester United. Gordon Smith has the dubious honour of being the man, referred to in the famous radio commentary, who should have won the first game for Brighton. There was even a fanzine named after him. Brighton may still be a couple of games away from the final, but a first quarter-final place for 32 years, in the season they are back in the top flight, has got the club’s supporters dreaming of another Wembley appearance and a chance to finally avenge Smith’s miss. Unlike at other grounds in this season’s FA Cup, there were no large sections of empty seats at the Amex, despite the fact Brighton were entertaining League Two opposition. Manager Chris Hughton made nine changes for the visit of Coventry City, but there was never much prospect of an upset. Jurgen Locadia celebrates scoring his first goal for the club Credit: Getty Images Record signing Jurgen Locadia scored on his Brighton debut, while Leonardo Ulloa netted for the first time since returning to the club on loan from Leicester City. Locadia should really have finished with a hat-trick, as the £15million buy from PSV Eindhoven made a lively start to his Seagulls career. He hit the post in just the fifth minute with a hooked shot from a corner that Coventry failed to clear, but found the net 10 minutes later. Anthony Knockaert, who Coventry’s defenders could not cope with, sent in a low cross from the right and the ball was deflected into the path of Locadia, who made no mistake from eight yards. Just two minutes before Locadia’s opener, Coventry had gone within inches of breaking the deadlock. Jordan Shipley’s corner was met by Johnson Clarke-Harris, but his header rattled the crossbar. Goldson's goal was his first in two years Credit: Getty Images Locadia was presented with a great chance to double his and Brighton’s tally in the 23rd minute, but he completely missed the ball with the goal gaping. And shortly afterwards, he somehow diverted the ball wide after sliding to meet a low cross into the area from Markus Suttner. “To get off mark early was good for Jurgen,” said Hughton. “He is here to score goals. He has a flexibility about him, but we are still learning about him. You saw that in his game as he was drifting out. He came to us in January and had had a good first half of the season in Holland.” Coventry were punished further with 11 minutes of the first half remaining. Another Suttner delivery found the head of Connor Goldson, who made no mistake. The goal was Goldson’s first for almost two years, during which time he underwent heart surgery. Hughton swapped his goalkeeper at the break, sending on Niki Maenpaa to replace the injured Tim Krul, but it was Coventry’s Lee Burge who was soon picking the ball out of his net again. Just after the hour mark, Bruno’s high cross found Ulloa and the Argentine directed his header past Burge to chalk up his first goal of the season. Johnson Clarke-Harris (L) celebrates getting a consolation goal for Coventry with Jordan Ponticelli Credit: PA For Coventry, this season’s FA Cup has provided some relief and distraction from years of turmoil at the hands of controversial owners Sisu. The 1987 winners beat Stoke City and Milton Keynes Dons to reach the fifth round and they at least sent their travelling army home with something to cheer from their day out in Brighton. Burge pumped forwards a long clearance that made its way into the Brighton penalty area. Goldson tried to head clear, but the ball fell to Clarke-Harris, who rifled a shot into the net to send the Coventry fans wild. “I thought we were good,” said Coventry manager Mark Robins. “It has been a positive experience for us and, hopefully, it can help us have a strong finish in League Two.”
Many of the Brighton fans packed into the Amex Stadium on Saturday will still remember the immortal words ‘And Smith must score’ and those who do not may soon be getting a history lesson if the club’s Cup run continues. The last time Brighton were a top-flight club, they reached the final of the FA Cup in 1983 and lost in a replay to Manchester United. Gordon Smith has the dubious honour of being the man, referred to in the famous radio commentary, who should have won the first game for Brighton. There was even a fanzine named after him. Brighton may still be a couple of games away from the final, but a first quarter-final place for 32 years, in the season they are back in the top flight, has got the club’s supporters dreaming of another Wembley appearance and a chance to finally avenge Smith’s miss. Unlike at other grounds in this season’s FA Cup, there were no large sections of empty seats at the Amex, despite the fact Brighton were entertaining League Two opposition. Manager Chris Hughton made nine changes for the visit of Coventry City, but there was never much prospect of an upset. Jurgen Locadia celebrates scoring his first goal for the club Credit: Getty Images Record signing Jurgen Locadia scored on his Brighton debut, while Leonardo Ulloa netted for the first time since returning to the club on loan from Leicester City. Locadia should really have finished with a hat-trick, as the £15million buy from PSV Eindhoven made a lively start to his Seagulls career. He hit the post in just the fifth minute with a hooked shot from a corner that Coventry failed to clear, but found the net 10 minutes later. Anthony Knockaert, who Coventry’s defenders could not cope with, sent in a low cross from the right and the ball was deflected into the path of Locadia, who made no mistake from eight yards. Just two minutes before Locadia’s opener, Coventry had gone within inches of breaking the deadlock. Jordan Shipley’s corner was met by Johnson Clarke-Harris, but his header rattled the crossbar. Goldson's goal was his first in two years Credit: Getty Images Locadia was presented with a great chance to double his and Brighton’s tally in the 23rd minute, but he completely missed the ball with the goal gaping. And shortly afterwards, he somehow diverted the ball wide after sliding to meet a low cross into the area from Markus Suttner. “To get off mark early was good for Jurgen,” said Hughton. “He is here to score goals. He has a flexibility about him, but we are still learning about him. You saw that in his game as he was drifting out. He came to us in January and had had a good first half of the season in Holland.” Coventry were punished further with 11 minutes of the first half remaining. Another Suttner delivery found the head of Connor Goldson, who made no mistake. The goal was Goldson’s first for almost two years, during which time he underwent heart surgery. Hughton swapped his goalkeeper at the break, sending on Niki Maenpaa to replace the injured Tim Krul, but it was Coventry’s Lee Burge who was soon picking the ball out of his net again. Just after the hour mark, Bruno’s high cross found Ulloa and the Argentine directed his header past Burge to chalk up his first goal of the season. Johnson Clarke-Harris (L) celebrates getting a consolation goal for Coventry with Jordan Ponticelli Credit: PA For Coventry, this season’s FA Cup has provided some relief and distraction from years of turmoil at the hands of controversial owners Sisu. The 1987 winners beat Stoke City and Milton Keynes Dons to reach the fifth round and they at least sent their travelling army home with something to cheer from their day out in Brighton. Burge pumped forwards a long clearance that made its way into the Brighton penalty area. Goldson tried to head clear, but the ball fell to Clarke-Harris, who rifled a shot into the net to send the Coventry fans wild. “I thought we were good,” said Coventry manager Mark Robins. “It has been a positive experience for us and, hopefully, it can help us have a strong finish in League Two.”
Brighton 3 Coventry 1: Jurgen Locadia debut goal helps hosts into quarter-final
Many of the Brighton fans packed into the Amex Stadium on Saturday will still remember the immortal words ‘And Smith must score’ and those who do not may soon be getting a history lesson if the club’s Cup run continues. The last time Brighton were a top-flight club, they reached the final of the FA Cup in 1983 and lost in a replay to Manchester United. Gordon Smith has the dubious honour of being the man, referred to in the famous radio commentary, who should have won the first game for Brighton. There was even a fanzine named after him. Brighton may still be a couple of games away from the final, but a first quarter-final place for 32 years, in the season they are back in the top flight, has got the club’s supporters dreaming of another Wembley appearance and a chance to finally avenge Smith’s miss. Unlike at other grounds in this season’s FA Cup, there were no large sections of empty seats at the Amex, despite the fact Brighton were entertaining League Two opposition. Manager Chris Hughton made nine changes for the visit of Coventry City, but there was never much prospect of an upset. Jurgen Locadia celebrates scoring his first goal for the club Credit: Getty Images Record signing Jurgen Locadia scored on his Brighton debut, while Leonardo Ulloa netted for the first time since returning to the club on loan from Leicester City. Locadia should really have finished with a hat-trick, as the £15million buy from PSV Eindhoven made a lively start to his Seagulls career. He hit the post in just the fifth minute with a hooked shot from a corner that Coventry failed to clear, but found the net 10 minutes later. Anthony Knockaert, who Coventry’s defenders could not cope with, sent in a low cross from the right and the ball was deflected into the path of Locadia, who made no mistake from eight yards. Just two minutes before Locadia’s opener, Coventry had gone within inches of breaking the deadlock. Jordan Shipley’s corner was met by Johnson Clarke-Harris, but his header rattled the crossbar. Goldson's goal was his first in two years Credit: Getty Images Locadia was presented with a great chance to double his and Brighton’s tally in the 23rd minute, but he completely missed the ball with the goal gaping. And shortly afterwards, he somehow diverted the ball wide after sliding to meet a low cross into the area from Markus Suttner. “To get off mark early was good for Jurgen,” said Hughton. “He is here to score goals. He has a flexibility about him, but we are still learning about him. You saw that in his game as he was drifting out. He came to us in January and had had a good first half of the season in Holland.” Coventry were punished further with 11 minutes of the first half remaining. Another Suttner delivery found the head of Connor Goldson, who made no mistake. The goal was Goldson’s first for almost two years, during which time he underwent heart surgery. Hughton swapped his goalkeeper at the break, sending on Niki Maenpaa to replace the injured Tim Krul, but it was Coventry’s Lee Burge who was soon picking the ball out of his net again. Just after the hour mark, Bruno’s high cross found Ulloa and the Argentine directed his header past Burge to chalk up his first goal of the season. Johnson Clarke-Harris (L) celebrates getting a consolation goal for Coventry with Jordan Ponticelli Credit: PA For Coventry, this season’s FA Cup has provided some relief and distraction from years of turmoil at the hands of controversial owners Sisu. The 1987 winners beat Stoke City and Milton Keynes Dons to reach the fifth round and they at least sent their travelling army home with something to cheer from their day out in Brighton. Burge pumped forwards a long clearance that made its way into the Brighton penalty area. Goldson tried to head clear, but the ball fell to Clarke-Harris, who rifled a shot into the net to send the Coventry fans wild. “I thought we were good,” said Coventry manager Mark Robins. “It has been a positive experience for us and, hopefully, it can help us have a strong finish in League Two.”

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