Roma

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Liverpool striker Ian Rush celebrates as full-back Phil Neal scores the Liverpool goal during the 1984 European Cup final between Liverpool and Roma.
Ian Rush: ‘Our team spirit in 1984 was massive and I see it in Liverpool now’
Liverpool striker Ian Rush celebrates as full-back Phil Neal scores the Liverpool goal during the 1984 European Cup final between Liverpool and Roma.
A confessed admirer of the underdog tales of Robin Hood and Rocky Balboa, Jurgen Klopp is probably uncomfortable with Liverpool's status as strong favourites in Tuesday's Champions League semi-final, first leg against Roma.
Champions League: Inspired by Robin Hood and Rocky Balboa, Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp eyes glory for club
A confessed admirer of the underdog tales of Robin Hood and Rocky Balboa, Jurgen Klopp is probably uncomfortable with Liverpool's status as strong favourites in Tuesday's Champions League semi-final, first leg against Roma.
Every time Mohamed Salah scores, a roar booms around the streets and a city is consumed by unrestrained appreciation. This is not Anfield. This is not Liverpool. This is match day in Cairo, and it is a scene replicated across Egypt at least 41 times this season. In Bain El Sarayat in Giza, a predominantly student area of Egypt’s capital, murals of Salah adorn the walls. The students congregate at cafes, such as Bondouk, a short distance from Cairo University, anticipating Salah’s weekly goal dispatch. YouTube channels set up by Egyptian fans dedicated to the Liverpool forward are instantly updated. Social media trending is determined by his latest exceptional deed. “Salah is a role model for young people. The good thing about him is that he started from the bottom and worked hard to succeed,” says Islam Helmy, 20. “He comes from a village, and I’m from a village, too. I love him so much. I made my haircut and my beard just like him. “One of the happiest moments in my life was when he scored the penalty in Congo [which qualified Egypt to the World Cup]. I was sitting in the stadium right behind the goal. It was hysterical cheering.” To the Egyptian people, Salah is more than a talented footballer. He is symbol of hope for a generation healing the scars of social change, and the nature of his journey matters as much as his success. Salah emerged during a turbulent period in Egypt, honing his talent while young protesters took to the streets to force the overthrow of President Mubarak in January 2011. “The Egyptian people look up to Salah as the model of success they can’t achieve in their country,” says Mohamed Mokhtar, 34, a sales manager. “We have gone through a hard time after the revolution. There was a feeling of defeat. Salah proved to the people that you could succeed despite the hardships. Nobody has reached this success before.” Salah is outscoring Messi and is on course to re-write the Premier League record books Mahmoud Gaber, 31, adds: “The people felt that if you have a dream, you could fight to achieve it. We are in a country bleeding for anyone to succeed. When we find someone successful, we become excited for him.” Children in Cairo wear Liverpool colours bearing Salah’s name – the club has noted the upturn in web clicks from the region, with over 500,000 more Arabic Facebook fans since Salah signed in July 2017 – but this is ostensibly support for a player rather than the club. “Salah has become the idol of the people. A lot follow football because of him, even those who were not much interested, such as girls,” says Mohamed Ali Abdel Fattah, 36. Mohamed Abdel Ghafour, 20, echoes the fluctuating loyalties of African supporters. “I started to follow the Premier League more since Salah moved there. I used to support Man City but when Salah played to Liverpool I moved to support Liverpool,” he said. “He has raised the ceiling of ambition among of the young people. He raised the ceiling of my ambition. He made me believe that one can achieve anything if he worked hard and had self-confidence.” Salah was first noticed by El Mokawloon, widely known as Arab Contractors, as a 10-year-old while playing in the Nile Delta with Othmasoon. He came to attention in a youth competition organised by Pepsi Cola – a brand with which he retains a lucrative sponsorship. Salah (circled) with the El Mokawloon youth team for whom he scored 60 goals in two seasons El Mokawloon’s head of youth, Captain Rieu, took Salah to Cairo at 12 where he lived in a hotel and studied within the club’s premises for eight years, occupying a room overlooking the training ground until his sale to Basel in 2012. “What made the difference for Salah is that he has lived professionally since he was a child,” says Hamdy Nouh, Salah’s El Mokawloon youth coach. “The first time I saw him, he was very fast and played with his left leg. I told him, ‘I don’t want you in defence. I will instruct the players to send you the ball so you can build a counter attack using your speed’. “I also told him he would be a better player if he trained with his right leg. He listened to me.” The prolific goalscoring of this season may surprise former clubs Roma, Fiorentina, Chelsea and Basel, but it was evident as a teenager. Salah was named PFA Player of the Year on Sunday night Credit: PA “In two seasons, Salah scored 60 goals for the under-15 and under-14 team,” added Nouh. “He was always listening and smiling more than talking, always avoiding trouble and focusing on training,” another of Salah’s El Mokawloon’s coaches, Mohamed Abdel Aziz – known at the club as Zizo – said. “When other players were talking about their ambitious to move to Ahly or Zamalek [the top Egyptian football clubs] Salah and Mohamed Elnenny [now at Arsenal] used to say, ‘Our ambition is Europe’. “Not only junior players in the club look up to Salah as a role model, but all young people in Egypt, those who do not even play football. They want to be like Salah in commitment, hard work and morality.” Salah has scored for fun for club and country throughout a quite spectacular season fro the Egyptian Credit: Getty Images Whatever passions await Roma when they face the Kop on Tuesday, it will be echoed 2,000 miles away. “Salah has reached a place where no other Egyptian player has been,” says Mohamed Ahmed Fat’hy, 22, a student at Cairo University’s faculty of commerce. “I do not advise him to leave Liverpool. He is now Liverpool’s superstar, and the team needs him. He needs to stay two or three more seasons to complete the experiment. Salah has dreams with no limits. He already achieved many but is still looking for more, and we are with him.”
How PFA Player of the Year Mohamed Salah became an inspiration to the young in Egypt
Every time Mohamed Salah scores, a roar booms around the streets and a city is consumed by unrestrained appreciation. This is not Anfield. This is not Liverpool. This is match day in Cairo, and it is a scene replicated across Egypt at least 41 times this season. In Bain El Sarayat in Giza, a predominantly student area of Egypt’s capital, murals of Salah adorn the walls. The students congregate at cafes, such as Bondouk, a short distance from Cairo University, anticipating Salah’s weekly goal dispatch. YouTube channels set up by Egyptian fans dedicated to the Liverpool forward are instantly updated. Social media trending is determined by his latest exceptional deed. “Salah is a role model for young people. The good thing about him is that he started from the bottom and worked hard to succeed,” says Islam Helmy, 20. “He comes from a village, and I’m from a village, too. I love him so much. I made my haircut and my beard just like him. “One of the happiest moments in my life was when he scored the penalty in Congo [which qualified Egypt to the World Cup]. I was sitting in the stadium right behind the goal. It was hysterical cheering.” To the Egyptian people, Salah is more than a talented footballer. He is symbol of hope for a generation healing the scars of social change, and the nature of his journey matters as much as his success. Salah emerged during a turbulent period in Egypt, honing his talent while young protesters took to the streets to force the overthrow of President Mubarak in January 2011. “The Egyptian people look up to Salah as the model of success they can’t achieve in their country,” says Mohamed Mokhtar, 34, a sales manager. “We have gone through a hard time after the revolution. There was a feeling of defeat. Salah proved to the people that you could succeed despite the hardships. Nobody has reached this success before.” Salah is outscoring Messi and is on course to re-write the Premier League record books Mahmoud Gaber, 31, adds: “The people felt that if you have a dream, you could fight to achieve it. We are in a country bleeding for anyone to succeed. When we find someone successful, we become excited for him.” Children in Cairo wear Liverpool colours bearing Salah’s name – the club has noted the upturn in web clicks from the region, with over 500,000 more Arabic Facebook fans since Salah signed in July 2017 – but this is ostensibly support for a player rather than the club. “Salah has become the idol of the people. A lot follow football because of him, even those who were not much interested, such as girls,” says Mohamed Ali Abdel Fattah, 36. Mohamed Abdel Ghafour, 20, echoes the fluctuating loyalties of African supporters. “I started to follow the Premier League more since Salah moved there. I used to support Man City but when Salah played to Liverpool I moved to support Liverpool,” he said. “He has raised the ceiling of ambition among of the young people. He raised the ceiling of my ambition. He made me believe that one can achieve anything if he worked hard and had self-confidence.” Salah was first noticed by El Mokawloon, widely known as Arab Contractors, as a 10-year-old while playing in the Nile Delta with Othmasoon. He came to attention in a youth competition organised by Pepsi Cola – a brand with which he retains a lucrative sponsorship. Salah (circled) with the El Mokawloon youth team for whom he scored 60 goals in two seasons El Mokawloon’s head of youth, Captain Rieu, took Salah to Cairo at 12 where he lived in a hotel and studied within the club’s premises for eight years, occupying a room overlooking the training ground until his sale to Basel in 2012. “What made the difference for Salah is that he has lived professionally since he was a child,” says Hamdy Nouh, Salah’s El Mokawloon youth coach. “The first time I saw him, he was very fast and played with his left leg. I told him, ‘I don’t want you in defence. I will instruct the players to send you the ball so you can build a counter attack using your speed’. “I also told him he would be a better player if he trained with his right leg. He listened to me.” The prolific goalscoring of this season may surprise former clubs Roma, Fiorentina, Chelsea and Basel, but it was evident as a teenager. Salah was named PFA Player of the Year on Sunday night Credit: PA “In two seasons, Salah scored 60 goals for the under-15 and under-14 team,” added Nouh. “He was always listening and smiling more than talking, always avoiding trouble and focusing on training,” another of Salah’s El Mokawloon’s coaches, Mohamed Abdel Aziz – known at the club as Zizo – said. “When other players were talking about their ambitious to move to Ahly or Zamalek [the top Egyptian football clubs] Salah and Mohamed Elnenny [now at Arsenal] used to say, ‘Our ambition is Europe’. “Not only junior players in the club look up to Salah as a role model, but all young people in Egypt, those who do not even play football. They want to be like Salah in commitment, hard work and morality.” Salah has scored for fun for club and country throughout a quite spectacular season fro the Egyptian Credit: Getty Images Whatever passions await Roma when they face the Kop on Tuesday, it will be echoed 2,000 miles away. “Salah has reached a place where no other Egyptian player has been,” says Mohamed Ahmed Fat’hy, 22, a student at Cairo University’s faculty of commerce. “I do not advise him to leave Liverpool. He is now Liverpool’s superstar, and the team needs him. He needs to stay two or three more seasons to complete the experiment. Salah has dreams with no limits. He already achieved many but is still looking for more, and we are with him.”
Every time Mohamed Salah scores, a roar booms around the streets and a city is consumed by unrestrained appreciation. This is not Anfield. This is not Liverpool. This is match day in Cairo, and it is a scene replicated across Egypt at least 41 times this season. In Bain El Sarayat in Giza, a predominantly student area of Egypt’s capital, murals of Salah adorn the walls. The students congregate at cafes, such as Bondouk, a short distance from Cairo University, anticipating Salah’s weekly goal dispatch. YouTube channels set up by Egyptian fans dedicated to the Liverpool forward are instantly updated. Social media trending is determined by his latest exceptional deed. “Salah is a role model for young people. The good thing about him is that he started from the bottom and worked hard to succeed,” says Islam Helmy, 20. “He comes from a village, and I’m from a village, too. I love him so much. I made my haircut and my beard just like him. “One of the happiest moments in my life was when he scored the penalty in Congo [which qualified Egypt to the World Cup]. I was sitting in the stadium right behind the goal. It was hysterical cheering.” To the Egyptian people, Salah is more than a talented footballer. He is symbol of hope for a generation healing the scars of social change, and the nature of his journey matters as much as his success. Salah emerged during a turbulent period in Egypt, honing his talent while young protesters took to the streets to force the overthrow of President Mubarak in January 2011. “The Egyptian people look up to Salah as the model of success they can’t achieve in their country,” says Mohamed Mokhtar, 34, a sales manager. “We have gone through a hard time after the revolution. There was a feeling of defeat. Salah proved to the people that you could succeed despite the hardships. Nobody has reached this success before.” Salah is outscoring Messi and is on course to re-write the Premier League record books Mahmoud Gaber, 31, adds: “The people felt that if you have a dream, you could fight to achieve it. We are in a country bleeding for anyone to succeed. When we find someone successful, we become excited for him.” Children in Cairo wear Liverpool colours bearing Salah’s name – the club has noted the upturn in web clicks from the region, with over 500,000 more Arabic Facebook fans since Salah signed in July 2017 – but this is ostensibly support for a player rather than the club. “Salah has become the idol of the people. A lot follow football because of him, even those who were not much interested, such as girls,” says Mohamed Ali Abdel Fattah, 36. Mohamed Abdel Ghafour, 20, echoes the fluctuating loyalties of African supporters. “I started to follow the Premier League more since Salah moved there. I used to support Man City but when Salah played to Liverpool I moved to support Liverpool,” he said. “He has raised the ceiling of ambition among of the young people. He raised the ceiling of my ambition. He made me believe that one can achieve anything if he worked hard and had self-confidence.” Salah was first noticed by El Mokawloon, widely known as Arab Contractors, as a 10-year-old while playing in the Nile Delta with Othmasoon. He came to attention in a youth competition organised by Pepsi Cola – a brand with which he retains a lucrative sponsorship. Salah (circled) with the El Mokawloon youth team for whom he scored 60 goals in two seasons El Mokawloon’s head of youth, Captain Rieu, took Salah to Cairo at 12 where he lived in a hotel and studied within the club’s premises for eight years, occupying a room overlooking the training ground until his sale to Basel in 2012. “What made the difference for Salah is that he has lived professionally since he was a child,” says Hamdy Nouh, Salah’s El Mokawloon youth coach. “The first time I saw him, he was very fast and played with his left leg. I told him, ‘I don’t want you in defence. I will instruct the players to send you the ball so you can build a counter attack using your speed’. “I also told him he would be a better player if he trained with his right leg. He listened to me.” The prolific goalscoring of this season may surprise former clubs Roma, Fiorentina, Chelsea and Basel, but it was evident as a teenager. Salah was named PFA Player of the Year on Sunday night Credit: PA “In two seasons, Salah scored 60 goals for the under-15 and under-14 team,” added Nouh. “He was always listening and smiling more than talking, always avoiding trouble and focusing on training,” another of Salah’s El Mokawloon’s coaches, Mohamed Abdel Aziz – known at the club as Zizo – said. “When other players were talking about their ambitious to move to Ahly or Zamalek [the top Egyptian football clubs] Salah and Mohamed Elnenny [now at Arsenal] used to say, ‘Our ambition is Europe’. “Not only junior players in the club look up to Salah as a role model, but all young people in Egypt, those who do not even play football. They want to be like Salah in commitment, hard work and morality.” Salah has scored for fun for club and country throughout a quite spectacular season fro the Egyptian Credit: Getty Images Whatever passions await Roma when they face the Kop on Tuesday, it will be echoed 2,000 miles away. “Salah has reached a place where no other Egyptian player has been,” says Mohamed Ahmed Fat’hy, 22, a student at Cairo University’s faculty of commerce. “I do not advise him to leave Liverpool. He is now Liverpool’s superstar, and the team needs him. He needs to stay two or three more seasons to complete the experiment. Salah has dreams with no limits. He already achieved many but is still looking for more, and we are with him.”
How PFA Player of the Year Mohamed Salah became an inspiration to the young in Egypt
Every time Mohamed Salah scores, a roar booms around the streets and a city is consumed by unrestrained appreciation. This is not Anfield. This is not Liverpool. This is match day in Cairo, and it is a scene replicated across Egypt at least 41 times this season. In Bain El Sarayat in Giza, a predominantly student area of Egypt’s capital, murals of Salah adorn the walls. The students congregate at cafes, such as Bondouk, a short distance from Cairo University, anticipating Salah’s weekly goal dispatch. YouTube channels set up by Egyptian fans dedicated to the Liverpool forward are instantly updated. Social media trending is determined by his latest exceptional deed. “Salah is a role model for young people. The good thing about him is that he started from the bottom and worked hard to succeed,” says Islam Helmy, 20. “He comes from a village, and I’m from a village, too. I love him so much. I made my haircut and my beard just like him. “One of the happiest moments in my life was when he scored the penalty in Congo [which qualified Egypt to the World Cup]. I was sitting in the stadium right behind the goal. It was hysterical cheering.” To the Egyptian people, Salah is more than a talented footballer. He is symbol of hope for a generation healing the scars of social change, and the nature of his journey matters as much as his success. Salah emerged during a turbulent period in Egypt, honing his talent while young protesters took to the streets to force the overthrow of President Mubarak in January 2011. “The Egyptian people look up to Salah as the model of success they can’t achieve in their country,” says Mohamed Mokhtar, 34, a sales manager. “We have gone through a hard time after the revolution. There was a feeling of defeat. Salah proved to the people that you could succeed despite the hardships. Nobody has reached this success before.” Salah is outscoring Messi and is on course to re-write the Premier League record books Mahmoud Gaber, 31, adds: “The people felt that if you have a dream, you could fight to achieve it. We are in a country bleeding for anyone to succeed. When we find someone successful, we become excited for him.” Children in Cairo wear Liverpool colours bearing Salah’s name – the club has noted the upturn in web clicks from the region, with over 500,000 more Arabic Facebook fans since Salah signed in July 2017 – but this is ostensibly support for a player rather than the club. “Salah has become the idol of the people. A lot follow football because of him, even those who were not much interested, such as girls,” says Mohamed Ali Abdel Fattah, 36. Mohamed Abdel Ghafour, 20, echoes the fluctuating loyalties of African supporters. “I started to follow the Premier League more since Salah moved there. I used to support Man City but when Salah played to Liverpool I moved to support Liverpool,” he said. “He has raised the ceiling of ambition among of the young people. He raised the ceiling of my ambition. He made me believe that one can achieve anything if he worked hard and had self-confidence.” Salah was first noticed by El Mokawloon, widely known as Arab Contractors, as a 10-year-old while playing in the Nile Delta with Othmasoon. He came to attention in a youth competition organised by Pepsi Cola – a brand with which he retains a lucrative sponsorship. Salah (circled) with the El Mokawloon youth team for whom he scored 60 goals in two seasons El Mokawloon’s head of youth, Captain Rieu, took Salah to Cairo at 12 where he lived in a hotel and studied within the club’s premises for eight years, occupying a room overlooking the training ground until his sale to Basel in 2012. “What made the difference for Salah is that he has lived professionally since he was a child,” says Hamdy Nouh, Salah’s El Mokawloon youth coach. “The first time I saw him, he was very fast and played with his left leg. I told him, ‘I don’t want you in defence. I will instruct the players to send you the ball so you can build a counter attack using your speed’. “I also told him he would be a better player if he trained with his right leg. He listened to me.” The prolific goalscoring of this season may surprise former clubs Roma, Fiorentina, Chelsea and Basel, but it was evident as a teenager. Salah was named PFA Player of the Year on Sunday night Credit: PA “In two seasons, Salah scored 60 goals for the under-15 and under-14 team,” added Nouh. “He was always listening and smiling more than talking, always avoiding trouble and focusing on training,” another of Salah’s El Mokawloon’s coaches, Mohamed Abdel Aziz – known at the club as Zizo – said. “When other players were talking about their ambitious to move to Ahly or Zamalek [the top Egyptian football clubs] Salah and Mohamed Elnenny [now at Arsenal] used to say, ‘Our ambition is Europe’. “Not only junior players in the club look up to Salah as a role model, but all young people in Egypt, those who do not even play football. They want to be like Salah in commitment, hard work and morality.” Salah has scored for fun for club and country throughout a quite spectacular season fro the Egyptian Credit: Getty Images Whatever passions await Roma when they face the Kop on Tuesday, it will be echoed 2,000 miles away. “Salah has reached a place where no other Egyptian player has been,” says Mohamed Ahmed Fat’hy, 22, a student at Cairo University’s faculty of commerce. “I do not advise him to leave Liverpool. He is now Liverpool’s superstar, and the team needs him. He needs to stay two or three more seasons to complete the experiment. Salah has dreams with no limits. He already achieved many but is still looking for more, and we are with him.”
Every time Mohamed Salah scores, a roar booms around the streets and a city is consumed by unrestrained appreciation. This is not Anfield. This is not Liverpool. This is match day in Cairo, and it is a scene replicated across Egypt at least 41 times this season. In Bain El Sarayat in Giza, a predominantly student area of Egypt’s capital, murals of Salah adorn the walls. The students congregate at cafes, such as Bondouk, a short distance from Cairo University, anticipating Salah’s weekly goal dispatch. YouTube channels set up by Egyptian fans dedicated to the Liverpool forward are instantly updated. Social media trending is determined by his latest exceptional deed. “Salah is a role model for young people. The good thing about him is that he started from the bottom and worked hard to succeed,” says Islam Helmy, 20. “He comes from a village, and I’m from a village, too. I love him so much. I made my haircut and my beard just like him. “One of the happiest moments in my life was when he scored the penalty in Congo [which qualified Egypt to the World Cup]. I was sitting in the stadium right behind the goal. It was hysterical cheering.” To the Egyptian people, Salah is more than a talented footballer. He is symbol of hope for a generation healing the scars of social change, and the nature of his journey matters as much as his success. Salah emerged during a turbulent period in Egypt, honing his talent while young protesters took to the streets to force the overthrow of President Mubarak in January 2011. “The Egyptian people look up to Salah as the model of success they can’t achieve in their country,” says Mohamed Mokhtar, 34, a sales manager. “We have gone through a hard time after the revolution. There was a feeling of defeat. Salah proved to the people that you could succeed despite the hardships. Nobody has reached this success before.” Salah is outscoring Messi and is on course to re-write the Premier League record books Mahmoud Gaber, 31, adds: “The people felt that if you have a dream, you could fight to achieve it. We are in a country bleeding for anyone to succeed. When we find someone successful, we become excited for him.” Children in Cairo wear Liverpool colours bearing Salah’s name – the club has noted the upturn in web clicks from the region, with over 500,000 more Arabic Facebook fans since Salah signed in July 2017 – but this is ostensibly support for a player rather than the club. “Salah has become the idol of the people. A lot follow football because of him, even those who were not much interested, such as girls,” says Mohamed Ali Abdel Fattah, 36. Mohamed Abdel Ghafour, 20, echoes the fluctuating loyalties of African supporters. “I started to follow the Premier League more since Salah moved there. I used to support Man City but when Salah played to Liverpool I moved to support Liverpool,” he said. “He has raised the ceiling of ambition among of the young people. He raised the ceiling of my ambition. He made me believe that one can achieve anything if he worked hard and had self-confidence.” Salah was first noticed by El Mokawloon, widely known as Arab Contractors, as a 10-year-old while playing in the Nile Delta with Othmasoon. He came to attention in a youth competition organised by Pepsi Cola – a brand with which he retains a lucrative sponsorship. Salah (circled) with the El Mokawloon youth team for whom he scored 60 goals in two seasons El Mokawloon’s head of youth, Captain Rieu, took Salah to Cairo at 12 where he lived in a hotel and studied within the club’s premises for eight years, occupying a room overlooking the training ground until his sale to Basel in 2012. “What made the difference for Salah is that he has lived professionally since he was a child,” says Hamdy Nouh, Salah’s El Mokawloon youth coach. “The first time I saw him, he was very fast and played with his left leg. I told him, ‘I don’t want you in defence. I will instruct the players to send you the ball so you can build a counter attack using your speed’. “I also told him he would be a better player if he trained with his right leg. He listened to me.” The prolific goalscoring of this season may surprise former clubs Roma, Fiorentina, Chelsea and Basel, but it was evident as a teenager. Salah was named PFA Player of the Year on Sunday night Credit: PA “In two seasons, Salah scored 60 goals for the under-15 and under-14 team,” added Nouh. “He was always listening and smiling more than talking, always avoiding trouble and focusing on training,” another of Salah’s El Mokawloon’s coaches, Mohamed Abdel Aziz – known at the club as Zizo – said. “When other players were talking about their ambitious to move to Ahly or Zamalek [the top Egyptian football clubs] Salah and Mohamed Elnenny [now at Arsenal] used to say, ‘Our ambition is Europe’. “Not only junior players in the club look up to Salah as a role model, but all young people in Egypt, those who do not even play football. They want to be like Salah in commitment, hard work and morality.” Salah has scored for fun for club and country throughout a quite spectacular season fro the Egyptian Credit: Getty Images Whatever passions await Roma when they face the Kop on Tuesday, it will be echoed 2,000 miles away. “Salah has reached a place where no other Egyptian player has been,” says Mohamed Ahmed Fat’hy, 22, a student at Cairo University’s faculty of commerce. “I do not advise him to leave Liverpool. He is now Liverpool’s superstar, and the team needs him. He needs to stay two or three more seasons to complete the experiment. Salah has dreams with no limits. He already achieved many but is still looking for more, and we are with him.”
How PFA Player of the Year Mohamed Salah became an inspiration to the young in Egypt
Every time Mohamed Salah scores, a roar booms around the streets and a city is consumed by unrestrained appreciation. This is not Anfield. This is not Liverpool. This is match day in Cairo, and it is a scene replicated across Egypt at least 41 times this season. In Bain El Sarayat in Giza, a predominantly student area of Egypt’s capital, murals of Salah adorn the walls. The students congregate at cafes, such as Bondouk, a short distance from Cairo University, anticipating Salah’s weekly goal dispatch. YouTube channels set up by Egyptian fans dedicated to the Liverpool forward are instantly updated. Social media trending is determined by his latest exceptional deed. “Salah is a role model for young people. The good thing about him is that he started from the bottom and worked hard to succeed,” says Islam Helmy, 20. “He comes from a village, and I’m from a village, too. I love him so much. I made my haircut and my beard just like him. “One of the happiest moments in my life was when he scored the penalty in Congo [which qualified Egypt to the World Cup]. I was sitting in the stadium right behind the goal. It was hysterical cheering.” To the Egyptian people, Salah is more than a talented footballer. He is symbol of hope for a generation healing the scars of social change, and the nature of his journey matters as much as his success. Salah emerged during a turbulent period in Egypt, honing his talent while young protesters took to the streets to force the overthrow of President Mubarak in January 2011. “The Egyptian people look up to Salah as the model of success they can’t achieve in their country,” says Mohamed Mokhtar, 34, a sales manager. “We have gone through a hard time after the revolution. There was a feeling of defeat. Salah proved to the people that you could succeed despite the hardships. Nobody has reached this success before.” Salah is outscoring Messi and is on course to re-write the Premier League record books Mahmoud Gaber, 31, adds: “The people felt that if you have a dream, you could fight to achieve it. We are in a country bleeding for anyone to succeed. When we find someone successful, we become excited for him.” Children in Cairo wear Liverpool colours bearing Salah’s name – the club has noted the upturn in web clicks from the region, with over 500,000 more Arabic Facebook fans since Salah signed in July 2017 – but this is ostensibly support for a player rather than the club. “Salah has become the idol of the people. A lot follow football because of him, even those who were not much interested, such as girls,” says Mohamed Ali Abdel Fattah, 36. Mohamed Abdel Ghafour, 20, echoes the fluctuating loyalties of African supporters. “I started to follow the Premier League more since Salah moved there. I used to support Man City but when Salah played to Liverpool I moved to support Liverpool,” he said. “He has raised the ceiling of ambition among of the young people. He raised the ceiling of my ambition. He made me believe that one can achieve anything if he worked hard and had self-confidence.” Salah was first noticed by El Mokawloon, widely known as Arab Contractors, as a 10-year-old while playing in the Nile Delta with Othmasoon. He came to attention in a youth competition organised by Pepsi Cola – a brand with which he retains a lucrative sponsorship. Salah (circled) with the El Mokawloon youth team for whom he scored 60 goals in two seasons El Mokawloon’s head of youth, Captain Rieu, took Salah to Cairo at 12 where he lived in a hotel and studied within the club’s premises for eight years, occupying a room overlooking the training ground until his sale to Basel in 2012. “What made the difference for Salah is that he has lived professionally since he was a child,” says Hamdy Nouh, Salah’s El Mokawloon youth coach. “The first time I saw him, he was very fast and played with his left leg. I told him, ‘I don’t want you in defence. I will instruct the players to send you the ball so you can build a counter attack using your speed’. “I also told him he would be a better player if he trained with his right leg. He listened to me.” The prolific goalscoring of this season may surprise former clubs Roma, Fiorentina, Chelsea and Basel, but it was evident as a teenager. Salah was named PFA Player of the Year on Sunday night Credit: PA “In two seasons, Salah scored 60 goals for the under-15 and under-14 team,” added Nouh. “He was always listening and smiling more than talking, always avoiding trouble and focusing on training,” another of Salah’s El Mokawloon’s coaches, Mohamed Abdel Aziz – known at the club as Zizo – said. “When other players were talking about their ambitious to move to Ahly or Zamalek [the top Egyptian football clubs] Salah and Mohamed Elnenny [now at Arsenal] used to say, ‘Our ambition is Europe’. “Not only junior players in the club look up to Salah as a role model, but all young people in Egypt, those who do not even play football. They want to be like Salah in commitment, hard work and morality.” Salah has scored for fun for club and country throughout a quite spectacular season fro the Egyptian Credit: Getty Images Whatever passions await Roma when they face the Kop on Tuesday, it will be echoed 2,000 miles away. “Salah has reached a place where no other Egyptian player has been,” says Mohamed Ahmed Fat’hy, 22, a student at Cairo University’s faculty of commerce. “I do not advise him to leave Liverpool. He is now Liverpool’s superstar, and the team needs him. He needs to stay two or three more seasons to complete the experiment. Salah has dreams with no limits. He already achieved many but is still looking for more, and we are with him.”
Every time Mohamed Salah scores, a roar booms around the streets and a city is consumed by unrestrained appreciation. This is not Anfield. This is not Liverpool. This is match day in Cairo, and it is a scene replicated across Egypt at least 41 times this season. In Bain El Sarayat in Giza, a predominantly student area of Egypt’s capital, murals of Salah adorn the walls. The students congregate at cafes, such as Bondouk, a short distance from Cairo University, anticipating Salah’s weekly goal dispatch. YouTube channels set up by Egyptian fans dedicated to the Liverpool forward are instantly updated. Social media trending is determined by his latest exceptional deed. “Salah is a role model for young people. The good thing about him is that he started from the bottom and worked hard to succeed,” says Islam Helmy, 20. “He comes from a village, and I’m from a village, too. I love him so much. I made my haircut and my beard just like him. “One of the happiest moments in my life was when he scored the penalty in Congo [which qualified Egypt to the World Cup]. I was sitting in the stadium right behind the goal. It was hysterical cheering.” To the Egyptian people, Salah is more than a talented footballer. He is symbol of hope for a generation healing the scars of social change, and the nature of his journey matters as much as his success. Salah emerged during a turbulent period in Egypt, honing his talent while young protesters took to the streets to force the overthrow of President Mubarak in January 2011. “The Egyptian people look up to Salah as the model of success they can’t achieve in their country,” says Mohamed Mokhtar, 34, a sales manager. “We have gone through a hard time after the revolution. There was a feeling of defeat. Salah proved to the people that you could succeed despite the hardships. Nobody has reached this success before.” Salah is outscoring Messi and is on course to re-write the Premier League record books Mahmoud Gaber, 31, adds: “The people felt that if you have a dream, you could fight to achieve it. We are in a country bleeding for anyone to succeed. When we find someone successful, we become excited for him.” Children in Cairo wear Liverpool colours bearing Salah’s name – the club has noted the upturn in web clicks from the region, with over 500,000 more Arabic Facebook fans since Salah signed in July 2017 – but this is ostensibly support for a player rather than the club. “Salah has become the idol of the people. A lot follow football because of him, even those who were not much interested, such as girls,” says Mohamed Ali Abdel Fattah, 36. Mohamed Abdel Ghafour, 20, echoes the fluctuating loyalties of African supporters. “I started to follow the Premier League more since Salah moved there. I used to support Man City but when Salah played to Liverpool I moved to support Liverpool,” he said. “He has raised the ceiling of ambition among of the young people. He raised the ceiling of my ambition. He made me believe that one can achieve anything if he worked hard and had self-confidence.” Salah was first noticed by El Mokawloon, widely known as Arab Contractors, as a 10-year-old while playing in the Nile Delta with Othmasoon. He came to attention in a youth competition organised by Pepsi Cola – a brand with which he retains a lucrative sponsorship. Salah (circled) with the El Mokawloon youth team for whom he scored 60 goals in two seasons El Mokawloon’s head of youth, Captain Rieu, took Salah to Cairo at 12 where he lived in a hotel and studied within the club’s premises for eight years, occupying a room overlooking the training ground until his sale to Basel in 2012. “What made the difference for Salah is that he has lived professionally since he was a child,” says Hamdy Nouh, Salah’s El Mokawloon youth coach. “The first time I saw him, he was very fast and played with his left leg. I told him, ‘I don’t want you in defence. I will instruct the players to send you the ball so you can build a counter attack using your speed’. “I also told him he would be a better player if he trained with his right leg. He listened to me.” The prolific goalscoring of this season may surprise former clubs Roma, Fiorentina, Chelsea and Basel, but it was evident as a teenager. Salah was named PFA Player of the Year on Sunday night Credit: PA “In two seasons, Salah scored 60 goals for the under-15 and under-14 team,” added Nouh. “He was always listening and smiling more than talking, always avoiding trouble and focusing on training,” another of Salah’s El Mokawloon’s coaches, Mohamed Abdel Aziz – known at the club as Zizo – said. “When other players were talking about their ambitious to move to Ahly or Zamalek [the top Egyptian football clubs] Salah and Mohamed Elnenny [now at Arsenal] used to say, ‘Our ambition is Europe’. “Not only junior players in the club look up to Salah as a role model, but all young people in Egypt, those who do not even play football. They want to be like Salah in commitment, hard work and morality.” Salah has scored for fun for club and country throughout a quite spectacular season fro the Egyptian Credit: Getty Images Whatever passions await Roma when they face the Kop on Tuesday, it will be echoed 2,000 miles away. “Salah has reached a place where no other Egyptian player has been,” says Mohamed Ahmed Fat’hy, 22, a student at Cairo University’s faculty of commerce. “I do not advise him to leave Liverpool. He is now Liverpool’s superstar, and the team needs him. He needs to stay two or three more seasons to complete the experiment. Salah has dreams with no limits. He already achieved many but is still looking for more, and we are with him.”
How PFA Player of the Year Mohamed Salah became an inspiration to the young in Egypt
Every time Mohamed Salah scores, a roar booms around the streets and a city is consumed by unrestrained appreciation. This is not Anfield. This is not Liverpool. This is match day in Cairo, and it is a scene replicated across Egypt at least 41 times this season. In Bain El Sarayat in Giza, a predominantly student area of Egypt’s capital, murals of Salah adorn the walls. The students congregate at cafes, such as Bondouk, a short distance from Cairo University, anticipating Salah’s weekly goal dispatch. YouTube channels set up by Egyptian fans dedicated to the Liverpool forward are instantly updated. Social media trending is determined by his latest exceptional deed. “Salah is a role model for young people. The good thing about him is that he started from the bottom and worked hard to succeed,” says Islam Helmy, 20. “He comes from a village, and I’m from a village, too. I love him so much. I made my haircut and my beard just like him. “One of the happiest moments in my life was when he scored the penalty in Congo [which qualified Egypt to the World Cup]. I was sitting in the stadium right behind the goal. It was hysterical cheering.” To the Egyptian people, Salah is more than a talented footballer. He is symbol of hope for a generation healing the scars of social change, and the nature of his journey matters as much as his success. Salah emerged during a turbulent period in Egypt, honing his talent while young protesters took to the streets to force the overthrow of President Mubarak in January 2011. “The Egyptian people look up to Salah as the model of success they can’t achieve in their country,” says Mohamed Mokhtar, 34, a sales manager. “We have gone through a hard time after the revolution. There was a feeling of defeat. Salah proved to the people that you could succeed despite the hardships. Nobody has reached this success before.” Salah is outscoring Messi and is on course to re-write the Premier League record books Mahmoud Gaber, 31, adds: “The people felt that if you have a dream, you could fight to achieve it. We are in a country bleeding for anyone to succeed. When we find someone successful, we become excited for him.” Children in Cairo wear Liverpool colours bearing Salah’s name – the club has noted the upturn in web clicks from the region, with over 500,000 more Arabic Facebook fans since Salah signed in July 2017 – but this is ostensibly support for a player rather than the club. “Salah has become the idol of the people. A lot follow football because of him, even those who were not much interested, such as girls,” says Mohamed Ali Abdel Fattah, 36. Mohamed Abdel Ghafour, 20, echoes the fluctuating loyalties of African supporters. “I started to follow the Premier League more since Salah moved there. I used to support Man City but when Salah played to Liverpool I moved to support Liverpool,” he said. “He has raised the ceiling of ambition among of the young people. He raised the ceiling of my ambition. He made me believe that one can achieve anything if he worked hard and had self-confidence.” Salah was first noticed by El Mokawloon, widely known as Arab Contractors, as a 10-year-old while playing in the Nile Delta with Othmasoon. He came to attention in a youth competition organised by Pepsi Cola – a brand with which he retains a lucrative sponsorship. Salah (circled) with the El Mokawloon youth team for whom he scored 60 goals in two seasons El Mokawloon’s head of youth, Captain Rieu, took Salah to Cairo at 12 where he lived in a hotel and studied within the club’s premises for eight years, occupying a room overlooking the training ground until his sale to Basel in 2012. “What made the difference for Salah is that he has lived professionally since he was a child,” says Hamdy Nouh, Salah’s El Mokawloon youth coach. “The first time I saw him, he was very fast and played with his left leg. I told him, ‘I don’t want you in defence. I will instruct the players to send you the ball so you can build a counter attack using your speed’. “I also told him he would be a better player if he trained with his right leg. He listened to me.” The prolific goalscoring of this season may surprise former clubs Roma, Fiorentina, Chelsea and Basel, but it was evident as a teenager. Salah was named PFA Player of the Year on Sunday night Credit: PA “In two seasons, Salah scored 60 goals for the under-15 and under-14 team,” added Nouh. “He was always listening and smiling more than talking, always avoiding trouble and focusing on training,” another of Salah’s El Mokawloon’s coaches, Mohamed Abdel Aziz – known at the club as Zizo – said. “When other players were talking about their ambitious to move to Ahly or Zamalek [the top Egyptian football clubs] Salah and Mohamed Elnenny [now at Arsenal] used to say, ‘Our ambition is Europe’. “Not only junior players in the club look up to Salah as a role model, but all young people in Egypt, those who do not even play football. They want to be like Salah in commitment, hard work and morality.” Salah has scored for fun for club and country throughout a quite spectacular season fro the Egyptian Credit: Getty Images Whatever passions await Roma when they face the Kop on Tuesday, it will be echoed 2,000 miles away. “Salah has reached a place where no other Egyptian player has been,” says Mohamed Ahmed Fat’hy, 22, a student at Cairo University’s faculty of commerce. “I do not advise him to leave Liverpool. He is now Liverpool’s superstar, and the team needs him. He needs to stay two or three more seasons to complete the experiment. Salah has dreams with no limits. He already achieved many but is still looking for more, and we are with him.”
Roma's head coach Eusebio Di Francesco has a reputation as an astute tactician with a talent for attractive attacking football (AFP Photo/FILIPPO MONTEFORTE)
Roma's head coach Eusebio Di Francesco has a reputation as an astute tactician with a talent for attractive attacking football
Roma's head coach Eusebio Di Francesco has a reputation as an astute tactician with a talent for attractive attacking football (AFP Photo/FILIPPO MONTEFORTE)
Roma's head coach Eusebio Di Francesco has a reputation as an astute tactician with a talent for attractive attacking football
Roma's head coach Eusebio Di Francesco has a reputation as an astute tactician with a talent for attractive attacking football
Roma's head coach Eusebio Di Francesco has a reputation as an astute tactician with a talent for attractive attacking football
<p>Klopp ready for &#39;different&#39; Roma test</p>
Klopp ready for 'different' Roma test

Klopp ready for 'different' Roma test

<p>Klopp ready for &#39;different&#39; Roma test</p>
Klopp ready for 'different' Roma test

Klopp ready for 'different' Roma test

His team were held at West Brom, but Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp feels his side are ready to bounce back.
Klopp ready for 'different' Roma test
His team were held at West Brom, but Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp feels his side are ready to bounce back.
Roma players celebrate after their teammate Patrick Schick scored their side&#39;s third goal during a Serie A soccer match between Spal and AS Roma, at Paolo Mazza Stadium in Ferrara, Italy, Saturday, April 21, 2018. (Elisabetta Baracchi/ANSA via AP)
Roma players celebrate after their teammate Patrick Schick scored their side's third goal during a Serie A soccer match between Spal and AS Roma, at Paolo Mazza Stadium in Ferrara, Italy, Saturday, April 21, 2018. (Elisabetta Baracchi/ANSA via AP)
Roma players celebrate after their teammate Patrick Schick scored their side's third goal during a Serie A soccer match between Spal and AS Roma, at Paolo Mazza Stadium in Ferrara, Italy, Saturday, April 21, 2018. (Elisabetta Baracchi/ANSA via AP)
Mohamed Salah’s extraordinary debut season at Liverpool has been recognised with the Professional Footballers’ Association Player of the Year award. Salah received the accolade from his peers ahead of Manchester City’s Kevin De Bruyne, a fitting reward for a campaign in which he has matched the feats of Liverpool’s goalscoring legends. The Egyptian is the first Liverpool player since Ian Rush to score 40 goals in a season, and has also matched Luis Suarez’s record of 31 Premier League goals in a campaign. He may yet break Rush’s goal record of 47 in a season. He currently has 41 goals in just 46 appearance in all competitions. “It’s a big honour. I’ve worked hard and I’m very happy to win it,” Salah said at the ceremony on Sunday night. Asked what it meant to become the first Egyptian to win the award, he said: “Hopefully, I’m not the last one. I’m very proud to win.” Since his £39 million move from Roma, Salah has been a major influence in Jurgen Klopp’s side reaching the semi-finals of the Champions League, terrorising Premier League and European defences with his pace and exquisite finishing. Not only did he fend off the challenge of De Bruyne, but also fellow shortlisted nominees David Silva, David de Gea and Harry Kane. Salah is outscoring Messi and is on course to re-write the Premier League record books Salah said his ambitions for this season were far from over. “To break the Premier League record is something huge in England and all over in the world,” he said. “There are still three games to go. I want to break this record and also break the one for a 42-game season.” Salah attended yesterday’s award ceremony with Liverpool captain Jordan Henderson, a request the Egyptian made as he wanted to share the honour with his team-mates. Manager Klopp did not attend because he is preparing for tomorrow’s Champions League semi-final first leg with Salah’s former club, Roma, but he asked the senior members of his scouting and recruitment team to accompany Salah as he collected the honour. Sporting director Michael Edwards, chief scout Barry Hunter, head of scouting Dave Fallows and Liverpool’s Italian scout Paul Goldrick joined Salah at the Grosvenor House Hotel – Klopp delegating the credit for identifying the winger as the ideal addition to his squad last summer. Salah and Henderson remained in London on Sunday night prior to joining their team-mates for training this evening as preparations begin for Roma’s visit. Liverpool’s newest superstar is also a contender for the Football Writers’ award, announced on May 1. Mohamed Salah attended the event with Liverpool captain Jordan Henderson Manchester City will be disappointed De Bruyne missed out, but consoled Leroy Sane was named the PFA Young Player of the Year. German winger Sane, one of the most exciting young talents in Europe, has been consistently brilliant in assisting City’s title success. Chelsea Ladies forward Fran Kirby won the women’s Player of the Year award, while Lauren Hemp, of Bristol City, secured the young player prize. The PFA’s Merit Award went posthumously to Cyrille Regis, the former West Bromwich Albion forward who died aged 59 in January. This was recognition of his role in changing attitudes towards black footballers.
Mohamed Salah crowned PFA Player of the Year after sensational season for Liverpool
Mohamed Salah’s extraordinary debut season at Liverpool has been recognised with the Professional Footballers’ Association Player of the Year award. Salah received the accolade from his peers ahead of Manchester City’s Kevin De Bruyne, a fitting reward for a campaign in which he has matched the feats of Liverpool’s goalscoring legends. The Egyptian is the first Liverpool player since Ian Rush to score 40 goals in a season, and has also matched Luis Suarez’s record of 31 Premier League goals in a campaign. He may yet break Rush’s goal record of 47 in a season. He currently has 41 goals in just 46 appearance in all competitions. “It’s a big honour. I’ve worked hard and I’m very happy to win it,” Salah said at the ceremony on Sunday night. Asked what it meant to become the first Egyptian to win the award, he said: “Hopefully, I’m not the last one. I’m very proud to win.” Since his £39 million move from Roma, Salah has been a major influence in Jurgen Klopp’s side reaching the semi-finals of the Champions League, terrorising Premier League and European defences with his pace and exquisite finishing. Not only did he fend off the challenge of De Bruyne, but also fellow shortlisted nominees David Silva, David de Gea and Harry Kane. Salah is outscoring Messi and is on course to re-write the Premier League record books Salah said his ambitions for this season were far from over. “To break the Premier League record is something huge in England and all over in the world,” he said. “There are still three games to go. I want to break this record and also break the one for a 42-game season.” Salah attended yesterday’s award ceremony with Liverpool captain Jordan Henderson, a request the Egyptian made as he wanted to share the honour with his team-mates. Manager Klopp did not attend because he is preparing for tomorrow’s Champions League semi-final first leg with Salah’s former club, Roma, but he asked the senior members of his scouting and recruitment team to accompany Salah as he collected the honour. Sporting director Michael Edwards, chief scout Barry Hunter, head of scouting Dave Fallows and Liverpool’s Italian scout Paul Goldrick joined Salah at the Grosvenor House Hotel – Klopp delegating the credit for identifying the winger as the ideal addition to his squad last summer. Salah and Henderson remained in London on Sunday night prior to joining their team-mates for training this evening as preparations begin for Roma’s visit. Liverpool’s newest superstar is also a contender for the Football Writers’ award, announced on May 1. Mohamed Salah attended the event with Liverpool captain Jordan Henderson Manchester City will be disappointed De Bruyne missed out, but consoled Leroy Sane was named the PFA Young Player of the Year. German winger Sane, one of the most exciting young talents in Europe, has been consistently brilliant in assisting City’s title success. Chelsea Ladies forward Fran Kirby won the women’s Player of the Year award, while Lauren Hemp, of Bristol City, secured the young player prize. The PFA’s Merit Award went posthumously to Cyrille Regis, the former West Bromwich Albion forward who died aged 59 in January. This was recognition of his role in changing attitudes towards black footballers.
Mohamed Salah’s extraordinary debut season at Liverpool has been recognised with the Professional Footballers’ Association Player of the Year award. Salah received the accolade from his peers ahead of Manchester City’s Kevin De Bruyne, a fitting reward for a campaign in which he has matched the feats of Liverpool’s goalscoring legends. The Egyptian is the first Liverpool player since Ian Rush to score 40 goals in a season, and has also matched Luis Suarez’s record of 31 Premier League goals in a campaign. He may yet break Rush’s goal record of 47 in a season. He currently has 41 goals in just 46 appearance in all competitions. “It’s a big honour. I’ve worked hard and I’m very happy to win it,” Salah said at the ceremony on Sunday night. Asked what it meant to become the first Egyptian to win the award, he said: “Hopefully, I’m not the last one. I’m very proud to win.” Since his £39 million move from Roma, Salah has been a major influence in Jurgen Klopp’s side reaching the semi-finals of the Champions League, terrorising Premier League and European defences with his pace and exquisite finishing. Not only did he fend off the challenge of De Bruyne, but also fellow shortlisted nominees David Silva, David de Gea and Harry Kane. Salah is outscoring Messi and is on course to re-write the Premier League record books Salah said his ambitions for this season were far from over. “To break the Premier League record is something huge in England and all over in the world,” he said. “There are still three games to go. I want to break this record and also break the one for a 42-game season.” Salah attended yesterday’s award ceremony with Liverpool captain Jordan Henderson, a request the Egyptian made as he wanted to share the honour with his team-mates. Manager Klopp did not attend because he is preparing for tomorrow’s Champions League semi-final first leg with Salah’s former club, Roma, but he asked the senior members of his scouting and recruitment team to accompany Salah as he collected the honour. Sporting director Michael Edwards, chief scout Barry Hunter, head of scouting Dave Fallows and Liverpool’s Italian scout Paul Goldrick joined Salah at the Grosvenor House Hotel – Klopp delegating the credit for identifying the winger as the ideal addition to his squad last summer. Salah and Henderson remained in London on Sunday night prior to joining their team-mates for training this evening as preparations begin for Roma’s visit. Liverpool’s newest superstar is also a contender for the Football Writers’ award, announced on May 1. Mohamed Salah attended the event with Liverpool captain Jordan Henderson Manchester City will be disappointed De Bruyne missed out, but consoled Leroy Sane was named the PFA Young Player of the Year. German winger Sane, one of the most exciting young talents in Europe, has been consistently brilliant in assisting City’s title success. Chelsea Ladies forward Fran Kirby won the women’s Player of the Year award, while Lauren Hemp, of Bristol City, secured the young player prize. The PFA’s Merit Award went posthumously to Cyrille Regis, the former West Bromwich Albion forward who died aged 59 in January. This was recognition of his role in changing attitudes towards black footballers.
Mohamed Salah crowned PFA Player of the Year after sensational season for Liverpool
Mohamed Salah’s extraordinary debut season at Liverpool has been recognised with the Professional Footballers’ Association Player of the Year award. Salah received the accolade from his peers ahead of Manchester City’s Kevin De Bruyne, a fitting reward for a campaign in which he has matched the feats of Liverpool’s goalscoring legends. The Egyptian is the first Liverpool player since Ian Rush to score 40 goals in a season, and has also matched Luis Suarez’s record of 31 Premier League goals in a campaign. He may yet break Rush’s goal record of 47 in a season. He currently has 41 goals in just 46 appearance in all competitions. “It’s a big honour. I’ve worked hard and I’m very happy to win it,” Salah said at the ceremony on Sunday night. Asked what it meant to become the first Egyptian to win the award, he said: “Hopefully, I’m not the last one. I’m very proud to win.” Since his £39 million move from Roma, Salah has been a major influence in Jurgen Klopp’s side reaching the semi-finals of the Champions League, terrorising Premier League and European defences with his pace and exquisite finishing. Not only did he fend off the challenge of De Bruyne, but also fellow shortlisted nominees David Silva, David de Gea and Harry Kane. Salah is outscoring Messi and is on course to re-write the Premier League record books Salah said his ambitions for this season were far from over. “To break the Premier League record is something huge in England and all over in the world,” he said. “There are still three games to go. I want to break this record and also break the one for a 42-game season.” Salah attended yesterday’s award ceremony with Liverpool captain Jordan Henderson, a request the Egyptian made as he wanted to share the honour with his team-mates. Manager Klopp did not attend because he is preparing for tomorrow’s Champions League semi-final first leg with Salah’s former club, Roma, but he asked the senior members of his scouting and recruitment team to accompany Salah as he collected the honour. Sporting director Michael Edwards, chief scout Barry Hunter, head of scouting Dave Fallows and Liverpool’s Italian scout Paul Goldrick joined Salah at the Grosvenor House Hotel – Klopp delegating the credit for identifying the winger as the ideal addition to his squad last summer. Salah and Henderson remained in London on Sunday night prior to joining their team-mates for training this evening as preparations begin for Roma’s visit. Liverpool’s newest superstar is also a contender for the Football Writers’ award, announced on May 1. Mohamed Salah attended the event with Liverpool captain Jordan Henderson Manchester City will be disappointed De Bruyne missed out, but consoled Leroy Sane was named the PFA Young Player of the Year. German winger Sane, one of the most exciting young talents in Europe, has been consistently brilliant in assisting City’s title success. Chelsea Ladies forward Fran Kirby won the women’s Player of the Year award, while Lauren Hemp, of Bristol City, secured the young player prize. The PFA’s Merit Award went posthumously to Cyrille Regis, the former West Bromwich Albion forward who died aged 59 in January. This was recognition of his role in changing attitudes towards black footballers.
Liverpool&#39;s defensive collapse at West Brom shows off weaknesses that Roma might exploit
Liverpool's defensive collapse at West Brom shows off weaknesses that Roma might exploit
Liverpool's defensive collapse at West Brom shows off weaknesses that Roma might exploit
If Roma players notice Edin Dzeko skipping to board his flight to Merseyside with broader shoulders on Monday, it’s a fair assumption he has been reviewing the last 10 minutes of Liverpool’s defensive performance at The Hawthorns. Jake Livermore and Salomon Rondon may have authored Roma’s set-piece strategy as much as enacted Darren Moore’s. The habit of snatching a frustrating draw from the claws of a comfortable victory has been a frequent flaw through Jurgen Klopp’s reign, but so rare recently it appeared to be on the point of extinction since Virgil Van Dijk’s arrival. The defensive lapses against West Bromwich Albion were surprising but Van Dijk dismissed the suggestion a renewal of anxiety attacks will be taken into the Champions League. This is a Liverpool team with nine clean sheets in the 16 games since their last calamitous meeting with West Brom in the FA Cup. Van Dijk acknowledged the climax was unacceptable, but felt it wiser to see it as a ‘blip’ rather than revival of a trend. He says any confidence in Rome due to Liverpool’s reacquainting with defensive feebleness is misplaced. Why I&#39;m expecting a Liverpool vs Bayern final “I don’t worry at all,” said Van Dijk. “There is no need to stress. There is no reason to panic. They are fighting for their lives so in the end they are very direct, balls into the channel, work hard, trying to get fouls and free-kicks - and we didn’t deal with that how we should. “Everyone gets upset. No one wants to concede at the last, or even concede at all. The way we conceded those goals is something to be angry about. We need to be honest with ourselves and everyone was. We need to do better. You have to tell each other the truth you cannot be nice and happy when we want to achieve so much as a team as a club. A draw here is not good enough. “We need to keep doing what we did in the last games, recover and focus on Roma now. We need to switch on again and do the same things that we always did. I think we should be fine. It is a massive opportunity to get a good result on Tuesday.&quot; Virgil van Dijk preached calm after Liverpool&#39;s late lapses at the Hawthorns Credit: Action Images Such were the mitigating factors, namely a back four that had never previously started together, there was annoyance rather than concern as Danny Ings and Mohamed Salah’s goals failed to yield the three points which would have prevented the unwanted extension of Liverpool’s chase for top four confirmation. Klopp was in a sour mood because of substandard refereeing. Stuart Attwell was evidently not so charmed as everyone else by Ings’ ending a three year goal wait, refusing a penalty claim and tolerating a punch in the striker’s chest by Ahmed Hegazi. The Liverpool manager lamented what he called ‘wasted points’, but Liverpool were plodding rather than dynamic and Klopp&#39;s biggest concern is leaving the door ajar for Chelsea, who host the Merseysiders at Stamford Bridge for the rivals&#39; penultimate game. Prolonged European involvement has cost Liverpool four points from recent games at Everton and West Brom. Ensuring standards are not compromised when competing in multiple competitions is the next stage of Liverpool’s evolution. West Brom must ask themselves why this point did not mean more? How can a side win at Old Trafford and go unbeaten in three games against this Liverpool team, yet finish bottom of the Premier League? It’s rather like completing four London marathons but tripping up every time you try to finish 400 metres. Jurgen Klopp has concerns that Chelsea might steal back into the top four Credit: Press Association “Everyone around me at the club is giving everything,” insisted Moore. “In order to get what we did it is a collective effort and that&#39;s why I keep using the words ‘togetherness’ and ‘we’ because that&#39;s what we need until the end of the season.” Privately, even Moore must recognise a contradiction. The effort on display here and at Manchester United is commendable, but the notion everyone is pulling together for a final survival push suggests such application was unforgivably lacking when Tony Pulis and Alan Pardew were around. It is too late for the Baggies to help themselves, but if Roma score from a few corners over the next two weeks there may yet be an unlikely message of appreciation from their coach, Eusebio Di Francesco.
No need to panic over defensive lapses ahead of Roma test, says Liverpool defender Virgil van Dijk
If Roma players notice Edin Dzeko skipping to board his flight to Merseyside with broader shoulders on Monday, it’s a fair assumption he has been reviewing the last 10 minutes of Liverpool’s defensive performance at The Hawthorns. Jake Livermore and Salomon Rondon may have authored Roma’s set-piece strategy as much as enacted Darren Moore’s. The habit of snatching a frustrating draw from the claws of a comfortable victory has been a frequent flaw through Jurgen Klopp’s reign, but so rare recently it appeared to be on the point of extinction since Virgil Van Dijk’s arrival. The defensive lapses against West Bromwich Albion were surprising but Van Dijk dismissed the suggestion a renewal of anxiety attacks will be taken into the Champions League. This is a Liverpool team with nine clean sheets in the 16 games since their last calamitous meeting with West Brom in the FA Cup. Van Dijk acknowledged the climax was unacceptable, but felt it wiser to see it as a ‘blip’ rather than revival of a trend. He says any confidence in Rome due to Liverpool’s reacquainting with defensive feebleness is misplaced. Why I'm expecting a Liverpool vs Bayern final “I don’t worry at all,” said Van Dijk. “There is no need to stress. There is no reason to panic. They are fighting for their lives so in the end they are very direct, balls into the channel, work hard, trying to get fouls and free-kicks - and we didn’t deal with that how we should. “Everyone gets upset. No one wants to concede at the last, or even concede at all. The way we conceded those goals is something to be angry about. We need to be honest with ourselves and everyone was. We need to do better. You have to tell each other the truth you cannot be nice and happy when we want to achieve so much as a team as a club. A draw here is not good enough. “We need to keep doing what we did in the last games, recover and focus on Roma now. We need to switch on again and do the same things that we always did. I think we should be fine. It is a massive opportunity to get a good result on Tuesday." Virgil van Dijk preached calm after Liverpool's late lapses at the Hawthorns Credit: Action Images Such were the mitigating factors, namely a back four that had never previously started together, there was annoyance rather than concern as Danny Ings and Mohamed Salah’s goals failed to yield the three points which would have prevented the unwanted extension of Liverpool’s chase for top four confirmation. Klopp was in a sour mood because of substandard refereeing. Stuart Attwell was evidently not so charmed as everyone else by Ings’ ending a three year goal wait, refusing a penalty claim and tolerating a punch in the striker’s chest by Ahmed Hegazi. The Liverpool manager lamented what he called ‘wasted points’, but Liverpool were plodding rather than dynamic and Klopp's biggest concern is leaving the door ajar for Chelsea, who host the Merseysiders at Stamford Bridge for the rivals' penultimate game. Prolonged European involvement has cost Liverpool four points from recent games at Everton and West Brom. Ensuring standards are not compromised when competing in multiple competitions is the next stage of Liverpool’s evolution. West Brom must ask themselves why this point did not mean more? How can a side win at Old Trafford and go unbeaten in three games against this Liverpool team, yet finish bottom of the Premier League? It’s rather like completing four London marathons but tripping up every time you try to finish 400 metres. Jurgen Klopp has concerns that Chelsea might steal back into the top four Credit: Press Association “Everyone around me at the club is giving everything,” insisted Moore. “In order to get what we did it is a collective effort and that's why I keep using the words ‘togetherness’ and ‘we’ because that's what we need until the end of the season.” Privately, even Moore must recognise a contradiction. The effort on display here and at Manchester United is commendable, but the notion everyone is pulling together for a final survival push suggests such application was unforgivably lacking when Tony Pulis and Alan Pardew were around. It is too late for the Baggies to help themselves, but if Roma score from a few corners over the next two weeks there may yet be an unlikely message of appreciation from their coach, Eusebio Di Francesco.
If Roma players notice Edin Dzeko skipping to board his flight to Merseyside with broader shoulders on Monday, it’s a fair assumption he has been reviewing the last 10 minutes of Liverpool’s defensive performance at The Hawthorns. Jake Livermore and Salomon Rondon may have authored Roma’s set-piece strategy as much as enacted Darren Moore’s. The habit of snatching a frustrating draw from the claws of a comfortable victory has been a frequent flaw through Jurgen Klopp’s reign, but so rare recently it appeared to be on the point of extinction since Virgil Van Dijk’s arrival. The defensive lapses against West Bromwich Albion were surprising but Van Dijk dismissed the suggestion a renewal of anxiety attacks will be taken into the Champions League. This is a Liverpool team with nine clean sheets in the 16 games since their last calamitous meeting with West Brom in the FA Cup. Van Dijk acknowledged the climax was unacceptable, but felt it wiser to see it as a ‘blip’ rather than revival of a trend. He says any confidence in Rome due to Liverpool’s reacquainting with defensive feebleness is misplaced. Why I&#39;m expecting a Liverpool vs Bayern final “I don’t worry at all,” said Van Dijk. “There is no need to stress. There is no reason to panic. They are fighting for their lives so in the end they are very direct, balls into the channel, work hard, trying to get fouls and free-kicks - and we didn’t deal with that how we should. “Everyone gets upset. No one wants to concede at the last, or even concede at all. The way we conceded those goals is something to be angry about. We need to be honest with ourselves and everyone was. We need to do better. You have to tell each other the truth you cannot be nice and happy when we want to achieve so much as a team as a club. A draw here is not good enough. “We need to keep doing what we did in the last games, recover and focus on Roma now. We need to switch on again and do the same things that we always did. I think we should be fine. It is a massive opportunity to get a good result on Tuesday.&quot; Virgil van Dijk preached calm after Liverpool&#39;s late lapses at the Hawthorns Credit: Action Images Such were the mitigating factors, namely a back four that had never previously started together, there was annoyance rather than concern as Danny Ings and Mohamed Salah’s goals failed to yield the three points which would have prevented the unwanted extension of Liverpool’s chase for top four confirmation. Klopp was in a sour mood because of substandard refereeing. Stuart Attwell was evidently not so charmed as everyone else by Ings’ ending a three year goal wait, refusing a penalty claim and tolerating a punch in the striker’s chest by Ahmed Hegazi. The Liverpool manager lamented what he called ‘wasted points’, but Liverpool were plodding rather than dynamic and Klopp&#39;s biggest concern is leaving the door ajar for Chelsea, who host the Merseysiders at Stamford Bridge for the rivals&#39; penultimate game. Prolonged European involvement has cost Liverpool four points from recent games at Everton and West Brom. Ensuring standards are not compromised when competing in multiple competitions is the next stage of Liverpool’s evolution. West Brom must ask themselves why this point did not mean more? How can a side win at Old Trafford and go unbeaten in three games against this Liverpool team, yet finish bottom of the Premier League? It’s rather like completing four London marathons but tripping up every time you try to finish 400 metres. Jurgen Klopp has concerns that Chelsea might steal back into the top four Credit: Press Association “Everyone around me at the club is giving everything,” insisted Moore. “In order to get what we did it is a collective effort and that&#39;s why I keep using the words ‘togetherness’ and ‘we’ because that&#39;s what we need until the end of the season.” Privately, even Moore must recognise a contradiction. The effort on display here and at Manchester United is commendable, but the notion everyone is pulling together for a final survival push suggests such application was unforgivably lacking when Tony Pulis and Alan Pardew were around. It is too late for the Baggies to help themselves, but if Roma score from a few corners over the next two weeks there may yet be an unlikely message of appreciation from their coach, Eusebio Di Francesco.
No need to panic over defensive lapses ahead of Roma test, says Liverpool defender Virgil van Dijk
If Roma players notice Edin Dzeko skipping to board his flight to Merseyside with broader shoulders on Monday, it’s a fair assumption he has been reviewing the last 10 minutes of Liverpool’s defensive performance at The Hawthorns. Jake Livermore and Salomon Rondon may have authored Roma’s set-piece strategy as much as enacted Darren Moore’s. The habit of snatching a frustrating draw from the claws of a comfortable victory has been a frequent flaw through Jurgen Klopp’s reign, but so rare recently it appeared to be on the point of extinction since Virgil Van Dijk’s arrival. The defensive lapses against West Bromwich Albion were surprising but Van Dijk dismissed the suggestion a renewal of anxiety attacks will be taken into the Champions League. This is a Liverpool team with nine clean sheets in the 16 games since their last calamitous meeting with West Brom in the FA Cup. Van Dijk acknowledged the climax was unacceptable, but felt it wiser to see it as a ‘blip’ rather than revival of a trend. He says any confidence in Rome due to Liverpool’s reacquainting with defensive feebleness is misplaced. Why I'm expecting a Liverpool vs Bayern final “I don’t worry at all,” said Van Dijk. “There is no need to stress. There is no reason to panic. They are fighting for their lives so in the end they are very direct, balls into the channel, work hard, trying to get fouls and free-kicks - and we didn’t deal with that how we should. “Everyone gets upset. No one wants to concede at the last, or even concede at all. The way we conceded those goals is something to be angry about. We need to be honest with ourselves and everyone was. We need to do better. You have to tell each other the truth you cannot be nice and happy when we want to achieve so much as a team as a club. A draw here is not good enough. “We need to keep doing what we did in the last games, recover and focus on Roma now. We need to switch on again and do the same things that we always did. I think we should be fine. It is a massive opportunity to get a good result on Tuesday." Virgil van Dijk preached calm after Liverpool's late lapses at the Hawthorns Credit: Action Images Such were the mitigating factors, namely a back four that had never previously started together, there was annoyance rather than concern as Danny Ings and Mohamed Salah’s goals failed to yield the three points which would have prevented the unwanted extension of Liverpool’s chase for top four confirmation. Klopp was in a sour mood because of substandard refereeing. Stuart Attwell was evidently not so charmed as everyone else by Ings’ ending a three year goal wait, refusing a penalty claim and tolerating a punch in the striker’s chest by Ahmed Hegazi. The Liverpool manager lamented what he called ‘wasted points’, but Liverpool were plodding rather than dynamic and Klopp's biggest concern is leaving the door ajar for Chelsea, who host the Merseysiders at Stamford Bridge for the rivals' penultimate game. Prolonged European involvement has cost Liverpool four points from recent games at Everton and West Brom. Ensuring standards are not compromised when competing in multiple competitions is the next stage of Liverpool’s evolution. West Brom must ask themselves why this point did not mean more? How can a side win at Old Trafford and go unbeaten in three games against this Liverpool team, yet finish bottom of the Premier League? It’s rather like completing four London marathons but tripping up every time you try to finish 400 metres. Jurgen Klopp has concerns that Chelsea might steal back into the top four Credit: Press Association “Everyone around me at the club is giving everything,” insisted Moore. “In order to get what we did it is a collective effort and that's why I keep using the words ‘togetherness’ and ‘we’ because that's what we need until the end of the season.” Privately, even Moore must recognise a contradiction. The effort on display here and at Manchester United is commendable, but the notion everyone is pulling together for a final survival push suggests such application was unforgivably lacking when Tony Pulis and Alan Pardew were around. It is too late for the Baggies to help themselves, but if Roma score from a few corners over the next two weeks there may yet be an unlikely message of appreciation from their coach, Eusebio Di Francesco.
No need to panic over defensive lapses ahead of Roma test, says Liverpool defender Virgil van Dijk
No need to panic over defensive lapses ahead of Roma test, says Liverpool defender Virgil van Dijk
No need to panic over defensive lapses ahead of Roma test, says Liverpool defender Virgil van Dijk
No need to panic over defensive lapses ahead of Roma test, says Liverpool defender Virgil van Dijk
No need to panic over defensive lapses ahead of Roma test, says Liverpool defender Virgil van Dijk
No need to panic over defensive lapses ahead of Roma test, says Liverpool defender Virgil van Dijk
If Roma players notice Edin Dzeko skipping to board his flight to Merseyside with broader shoulders on Monday, it’s a fair assumption he has been reviewing the last 10 minutes of Liverpool’s defensive performance at The Hawthorns. Jake Livermore and Salomon Rondon may have authored Roma’s set-piece strategy as much as enacted Darren Moore’s. The habit of snatching a frustrating draw from the claws of a comfortable victory has been a frequent flaw through Jurgen Klopp’s reign, but so rare recently it appeared to be on the point of extinction since Virgil Van Dijk’s arrival. The defensive lapses against West Bromwich Albion were surprising but Van Dijk dismissed the suggestion a renewal of anxiety attacks will be taken into the Champions League. This is a Liverpool team with nine clean sheets in the 16 games since their last calamitous meeting with West Brom in the FA Cup. Van Dijk acknowledged the climax was unacceptable, but felt it wiser to see it as a ‘blip’ rather than revival of a trend. He says any confidence in Rome due to Liverpool’s reacquainting with defensive feebleness is misplaced. Why I&#39;m expecting a Liverpool vs Bayern final “I don’t worry at all,” said Van Dijk. “There is no need to stress. There is no reason to panic. They are fighting for their lives so in the end they are very direct, balls into the channel, work hard, trying to get fouls and free-kicks - and we didn’t deal with that how we should. “Everyone gets upset. No one wants to concede at the last, or even concede at all. The way we conceded those goals is something to be angry about. We need to be honest with ourselves and everyone was. We need to do better. You have to tell each other the truth you cannot be nice and happy when we want to achieve so much as a team as a club. A draw here is not good enough. “We need to keep doing what we did in the last games, recover and focus on Roma now. We need to switch on again and do the same things that we always did. I think we should be fine. It is a massive opportunity to get a good result on Tuesday.&quot; Virgil van Dijk preached calm after Liverpool&#39;s late lapses at the Hawthorns Credit: Action Images Such were the mitigating factors, namely a back four that had never previously started together, there was annoyance rather than concern as Danny Ings and Mohamed Salah’s goals failed to yield the three points which would have prevented the unwanted extension of Liverpool’s chase for top four confirmation. Klopp was in a sour mood because of substandard refereeing. Stuart Attwell was evidently not so charmed as everyone else by Ings’ ending a three year goal wait, refusing a penalty claim and tolerating a punch in the striker’s chest by Ahmed Hegazi. The Liverpool manager lamented what he called ‘wasted points’, but Liverpool were plodding rather than dynamic and Klopp&#39;s biggest concern is leaving the door ajar for Chelsea, who host the Merseysiders at Stamford Bridge for the rivals&#39; penultimate game. Prolonged European involvement has cost Liverpool four points from recent games at Everton and West Brom. Ensuring standards are not compromised when competing in multiple competitions is the next stage of Liverpool’s evolution. West Brom must ask themselves why this point did not mean more? How can a side win at Old Trafford and go unbeaten in three games against this Liverpool team, yet finish bottom of the Premier League? It’s rather like completing four London marathons but tripping up every time you try to finish 400 metres. Jurgen Klopp has concerns that Chelsea might steal back into the top four Credit: Press Association “Everyone around me at the club is giving everything,” insisted Moore. “In order to get what we did it is a collective effort and that&#39;s why I keep using the words ‘togetherness’ and ‘we’ because that&#39;s what we need until the end of the season.” Privately, even Moore must recognise a contradiction. The effort on display here and at Manchester United is commendable, but the notion everyone is pulling together for a final survival push suggests such application was unforgivably lacking when Tony Pulis and Alan Pardew were around. It is too late for the Baggies to help themselves, but if Roma score from a few corners over the next two weeks there may yet be an unlikely message of appreciation from their coach, Eusebio Di Francesco.
No need to panic over defensive lapses ahead of Roma test, says Liverpool defender Virgil van Dijk
If Roma players notice Edin Dzeko skipping to board his flight to Merseyside with broader shoulders on Monday, it’s a fair assumption he has been reviewing the last 10 minutes of Liverpool’s defensive performance at The Hawthorns. Jake Livermore and Salomon Rondon may have authored Roma’s set-piece strategy as much as enacted Darren Moore’s. The habit of snatching a frustrating draw from the claws of a comfortable victory has been a frequent flaw through Jurgen Klopp’s reign, but so rare recently it appeared to be on the point of extinction since Virgil Van Dijk’s arrival. The defensive lapses against West Bromwich Albion were surprising but Van Dijk dismissed the suggestion a renewal of anxiety attacks will be taken into the Champions League. This is a Liverpool team with nine clean sheets in the 16 games since their last calamitous meeting with West Brom in the FA Cup. Van Dijk acknowledged the climax was unacceptable, but felt it wiser to see it as a ‘blip’ rather than revival of a trend. He says any confidence in Rome due to Liverpool’s reacquainting with defensive feebleness is misplaced. Why I'm expecting a Liverpool vs Bayern final “I don’t worry at all,” said Van Dijk. “There is no need to stress. There is no reason to panic. They are fighting for their lives so in the end they are very direct, balls into the channel, work hard, trying to get fouls and free-kicks - and we didn’t deal with that how we should. “Everyone gets upset. No one wants to concede at the last, or even concede at all. The way we conceded those goals is something to be angry about. We need to be honest with ourselves and everyone was. We need to do better. You have to tell each other the truth you cannot be nice and happy when we want to achieve so much as a team as a club. A draw here is not good enough. “We need to keep doing what we did in the last games, recover and focus on Roma now. We need to switch on again and do the same things that we always did. I think we should be fine. It is a massive opportunity to get a good result on Tuesday." Virgil van Dijk preached calm after Liverpool's late lapses at the Hawthorns Credit: Action Images Such were the mitigating factors, namely a back four that had never previously started together, there was annoyance rather than concern as Danny Ings and Mohamed Salah’s goals failed to yield the three points which would have prevented the unwanted extension of Liverpool’s chase for top four confirmation. Klopp was in a sour mood because of substandard refereeing. Stuart Attwell was evidently not so charmed as everyone else by Ings’ ending a three year goal wait, refusing a penalty claim and tolerating a punch in the striker’s chest by Ahmed Hegazi. The Liverpool manager lamented what he called ‘wasted points’, but Liverpool were plodding rather than dynamic and Klopp's biggest concern is leaving the door ajar for Chelsea, who host the Merseysiders at Stamford Bridge for the rivals' penultimate game. Prolonged European involvement has cost Liverpool four points from recent games at Everton and West Brom. Ensuring standards are not compromised when competing in multiple competitions is the next stage of Liverpool’s evolution. West Brom must ask themselves why this point did not mean more? How can a side win at Old Trafford and go unbeaten in three games against this Liverpool team, yet finish bottom of the Premier League? It’s rather like completing four London marathons but tripping up every time you try to finish 400 metres. Jurgen Klopp has concerns that Chelsea might steal back into the top four Credit: Press Association “Everyone around me at the club is giving everything,” insisted Moore. “In order to get what we did it is a collective effort and that's why I keep using the words ‘togetherness’ and ‘we’ because that's what we need until the end of the season.” Privately, even Moore must recognise a contradiction. The effort on display here and at Manchester United is commendable, but the notion everyone is pulling together for a final survival push suggests such application was unforgivably lacking when Tony Pulis and Alan Pardew were around. It is too late for the Baggies to help themselves, but if Roma score from a few corners over the next two weeks there may yet be an unlikely message of appreciation from their coach, Eusebio Di Francesco.
No need to panic over defensive lapses ahead of Roma test, says Liverpool defender Virgil van Dijk
No need to panic over defensive lapses ahead of Roma test, says Liverpool defender Virgil van Dijk
No need to panic over defensive lapses ahead of Roma test, says Liverpool defender Virgil van Dijk
Virgil van Dijk confident Liverpool will be back to their best against Roma
Virgil van Dijk confident Liverpool will be back to their best against Roma
Virgil van Dijk confident Liverpool will be back to their best against Roma
Virgil van Dijk confident Liverpool will be back to their best against Roma
Virgil van Dijk confident Liverpool will be back to their best against Roma
Virgil van Dijk confident Liverpool will be back to their best against Roma
Virgil van Dijk, right, and Jürgen Klopp agreed that Liverpool will need to pull their socks up when they face Roma in the Champions League.
Virgil van Dijk confident Liverpool will be back to their best against Roma
Virgil van Dijk, right, and Jürgen Klopp agreed that Liverpool will need to pull their socks up when they face Roma in the Champions League.
<p>How Roma plan to stop Liverpool&#39;s Mohamed Salah - Manolas</p>
How Roma plan to stop Liverpool's Mohamed Salah - Manolas

How Roma plan to stop Liverpool's Mohamed Salah - Manolas

<p>How Roma plan to stop Liverpool&#39;s Mohamed Salah - Manolas</p>
How Roma plan to stop Liverpool's Mohamed Salah - Manolas

How Roma plan to stop Liverpool's Mohamed Salah - Manolas

The Giallorossi face a stern test when they come up against their former player who already has 41 goals to his credit
How Roma plan to stop Liverpool's Mohamed Salah - Manolas
The Giallorossi face a stern test when they come up against their former player who already has 41 goals to his credit
The 37-year-old has backed the Egypt international to continue his blistering form when the Reds clash with the Giallorossi
‘Salah is impossible to stop‘ - Riise warns AS Roma ahead of Liverpool tie
The 37-year-old has backed the Egypt international to continue his blistering form when the Reds clash with the Giallorossi
The 37-year-old has backed the Egypt international to continue his blistering form when the Reds clash with the Giallorossi
‘Salah is impossible to stop‘ - Riise warns AS Roma ahead of Liverpool tie
The 37-year-old has backed the Egypt international to continue his blistering form when the Reds clash with the Giallorossi
<p>‘Salah is impossible to stop‘ - Riise warns AS Roma ahead of Liverpool tie</p>
‘Salah is impossible to stop‘ - Riise warns AS Roma ahead of Liverpool tie

‘Salah is impossible to stop‘ - Riise warns AS Roma ahead of Liverpool tie

<p>‘Salah is impossible to stop‘ - Riise warns AS Roma ahead of Liverpool tie</p>
‘Salah is impossible to stop‘ - Riise warns AS Roma ahead of Liverpool tie

‘Salah is impossible to stop‘ - Riise warns AS Roma ahead of Liverpool tie

The Giallorossi face a stern test when they come up against their former player who already has 41 goals to his credit
How Roma plan to stop Liverpool's Mohamed Salah - Manolas
The Giallorossi face a stern test when they come up against their former player who already has 41 goals to his credit
The Giallorossi face a stern test when they come up against their former player who already has 41 goals to his credit
How Roma plan to stop Liverpool's Mohamed Salah - Manolas
The Giallorossi face a stern test when they come up against their former player who already has 41 goals to his credit
The Giallorossi face a stern test when they come up against their former player who already has 41 goals to his credit
How Roma plan to stop Liverpool's Mohamed Salah - Manolas
The Giallorossi face a stern test when they come up against their former player who already has 41 goals to his credit
Rome (Italy), 22/04/2018.- Lazio players celebrate their win after the Italian Serie A soccer match between SS Lazio and UC Sampdoria at Olimpico stadium in Rome, Italy, 22 April 2018. (Roma, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANGELO CARCONI
Rome (Italy), 22/04/2018.- Lazio players celebrate their win after the Italian Serie A soccer match between SS Lazio and UC Sampdoria at Olimpico stadium in Rome, Italy, 22 April 2018. (Roma, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANGELO CARCONI
Rome (Italy), 22/04/2018.- Lazio players celebrate their win after the Italian Serie A soccer match between SS Lazio and UC Sampdoria at Olimpico stadium in Rome, Italy, 22 April 2018. (Roma, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANGELO CARCONI
London (United Kingdom), 22/04/2018.- Chelsea&#39;s Emerson (2-L) in action against Southampton&#39;s Oriol Romeu (R) during the English FA Cup semi final soccer match between Chelsea FC and Southampton FC at Wembley in London, Britain 22 April 2018. (Londres, Roma) EFE/EPA/GERRY PENNY EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or &#39;live&#39; services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications
London (United Kingdom), 22/04/2018.- Chelsea's Emerson (2-L) in action against Southampton's Oriol Romeu (R) during the English FA Cup semi final soccer match between Chelsea FC and Southampton FC at Wembley in London, Britain 22 April 2018. (Londres, Roma) EFE/EPA/GERRY PENNY EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or 'live' services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications
London (United Kingdom), 22/04/2018.- Chelsea's Emerson (2-L) in action against Southampton's Oriol Romeu (R) during the English FA Cup semi final soccer match between Chelsea FC and Southampton FC at Wembley in London, Britain 22 April 2018. (Londres, Roma) EFE/EPA/GERRY PENNY EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or 'live' services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications
Rome (Italy), 22/04/2018.- Lazio&#39;s Ciro Immobile (C) celebrates with team mates after scoring a goal during the Italian Serie A soccer match between SS Lazio and UC Sampdoria at Olimpico stadium in Rome, Italy, 22 April 2018. (Roma, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANGELO CARCONI
Rome (Italy), 22/04/2018.- Lazio's Ciro Immobile (C) celebrates with team mates after scoring a goal during the Italian Serie A soccer match between SS Lazio and UC Sampdoria at Olimpico stadium in Rome, Italy, 22 April 2018. (Roma, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANGELO CARCONI
Rome (Italy), 22/04/2018.- Lazio's Ciro Immobile (C) celebrates with team mates after scoring a goal during the Italian Serie A soccer match between SS Lazio and UC Sampdoria at Olimpico stadium in Rome, Italy, 22 April 2018. (Roma, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANGELO CARCONI
London (United Kingdom), 22/04/2018.- Chelsea&#39;s Olivier Giroud (back) in action against Southampton&#39;s Oriol Romeu (front) during the English FA Cup semi final soccer match between Chelsea FC and Southampton FC at Wembley in London, Britain 22 April 2018. (Londres, Roma) EFE/EPA/GERRY PENNY EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or &#39;live&#39; services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications
London (United Kingdom), 22/04/2018.- Chelsea's Olivier Giroud (back) in action against Southampton's Oriol Romeu (front) during the English FA Cup semi final soccer match between Chelsea FC and Southampton FC at Wembley in London, Britain 22 April 2018. (Londres, Roma) EFE/EPA/GERRY PENNY EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or 'live' services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications
London (United Kingdom), 22/04/2018.- Chelsea's Olivier Giroud (back) in action against Southampton's Oriol Romeu (front) during the English FA Cup semi final soccer match between Chelsea FC and Southampton FC at Wembley in London, Britain 22 April 2018. (Londres, Roma) EFE/EPA/GERRY PENNY EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or 'live' services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications
London (United Kingdom), 22/04/2018.- Chelsea&#39;s Emerson (2-L) in action against Southampton&#39;s Oriol Romeu (R) during the English FA Cup semi final soccer match between Chelsea FC and Southampton FC at Wembley in London, Britain 22 April 2018. (Londres, Roma) EFE/EPA/GERRY PENNY EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or &#39;live&#39; services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications
London (United Kingdom), 22/04/2018.- Chelsea's Emerson (2-L) in action against Southampton's Oriol Romeu (R) during the English FA Cup semi final soccer match between Chelsea FC and Southampton FC at Wembley in London, Britain 22 April 2018. (Londres, Roma) EFE/EPA/GERRY PENNY EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or 'live' services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications
London (United Kingdom), 22/04/2018.- Chelsea's Emerson (2-L) in action against Southampton's Oriol Romeu (R) during the English FA Cup semi final soccer match between Chelsea FC and Southampton FC at Wembley in London, Britain 22 April 2018. (Londres, Roma) EFE/EPA/GERRY PENNY EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or 'live' services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications
Rome (Italy), 22/04/2018.- Lazio&#39;s Ciro Immobile (L) celebrates with team mates after scoring a goal during the Italian Serie A soccer match between SS Lazio and UC Sampdoria at Olimpico stadium in Rome, Italy, 22 April 2018. (Roma, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANGELO CARCONI
Rome (Italy), 22/04/2018.- Lazio's Ciro Immobile (L) celebrates with team mates after scoring a goal during the Italian Serie A soccer match between SS Lazio and UC Sampdoria at Olimpico stadium in Rome, Italy, 22 April 2018. (Roma, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANGELO CARCONI
Rome (Italy), 22/04/2018.- Lazio's Ciro Immobile (L) celebrates with team mates after scoring a goal during the Italian Serie A soccer match between SS Lazio and UC Sampdoria at Olimpico stadium in Rome, Italy, 22 April 2018. (Roma, Italia) EFE/EPA/ANGELO CARCONI

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