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Rugby Union - Hong Kong Sevens - Fiji v Russia - Hong Kong Stadium, Hong Kong, China - April 7, 2018 Fiji's Semi Kunatani runs to score a try. REUTERS/Bobby Yip
Hong Kong Sevens
Rugby Union - Hong Kong Sevens - Fiji v Russia - Hong Kong Stadium, Hong Kong, China - April 7, 2018 Fiji's Semi Kunatani runs to score a try. REUTERS/Bobby Yip
Rugby Union - Hong Kong Sevens - Fiji v Russia - Hong Kong Stadium, Hong Kong, China - April 7, 2018 Fiji's Semi Kunatani is blocked by Russia's Sergei Ianiushkin. REUTERS/Bobby Yip
Hong Kong Sevens
Rugby Union - Hong Kong Sevens - Fiji v Russia - Hong Kong Stadium, Hong Kong, China - April 7, 2018 Fiji's Semi Kunatani is blocked by Russia's Sergei Ianiushkin. REUTERS/Bobby Yip
Rugby Union - Hong Kong Sevens - Fiji v Russia - Hong Kong Stadium, Hong Kong, China - April 7, 2018 Fiji players cheer. REUTERS/Bobby Yip
Hong Kong Sevens
Rugby Union - Hong Kong Sevens - Fiji v Russia - Hong Kong Stadium, Hong Kong, China - April 7, 2018 Fiji players cheer. REUTERS/Bobby Yip
Sunday 4 February Endeavour ITV, 8.00pm With the likes of Black Mirror, we live in an age of increasingly inventive television, but sometimes what we all need is a nice straightforward period procedural to relax in front of on a Sunday night. Russell Lewis’s Endeavour, now returning for a fifth series, ticks all the boxes. There’s a solid cast, anchored by Shaun Evans, as the young, less grumpy, more awkward Endeavour Morse; some nice if occasionally a little precise period detail (although I did like the throwaway reference to boxer Freddie Mills); and a plot that’s just twisty enough to allow viewers to play “guess the killer”. This opening episode is a pretty bleak affair, centring around a missing Fabergé egg and a series of seemingly unlinked deaths which (topically) turn out to have their origins in a riotous stag party. Along the way, Endeavour deals with an eager but unwanted new underling (Poldark’s Lewis Peek) and crosses swords with a sharp-witted “good-time girl” (Charlotte Hope), who delivers some home truths about his tendency to put women on pedestals. Meanwhile, the wonderful Roger Allam continues to steal every scene as Detective Chief Inspector Fred Thursday. Really someone should just give him his own show. Sarah Hughes Six Nations Rugby Union: Italy v England ITV, 2.15pm Kicking off their defence of their title, England are at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome, where they face Italy. Eddie Jones’s prospects for winning an unprecedented three championships in a row have been given a major boost: Jack Nowell, Chris Robshaw, Maro Itoje and Mike Brown, who were all doubts, have all been miraculously passed fit. Italy gave the champions a scare at Twickenham last term by taking a 10-5 half-time lead, but England eventually prevailed 36-15, with Nowell and Danny Care among the scorers. Premier League Football: Liverpool v Tottenham Hotspur Sky Sports Main Event, 4.15pm Having bounced back from their defeat at Swansea with a 3-0 victory against Huddersfield – thanks to goals from Emre Can, Roberto Firmino and Mohamed Salah – Liverpool host Spurs, who are one place beneath them in fifth. When these sides met in October, two goals from Harry Kane (who else?) helped Spurs to a comprehensive 4-1 victory. Call the Midwife BBC One, 8.00pm Prepare for a real weepy as Nurse Crane (Linda Bassett) and Trixie (Helen George) try to find out what secret a pregnant mother and her family are hiding. Elsewhere, Shelagh (Laura Main) worries that her new au pair isn’t making friends. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm The eccentric yet compelling journey comes to an end as Silver Lady heads towards Inverness. Will bad weather and issues with batteries bring this great experiment to a halt? Inside Number 10 BBC Parliament, 8.00pm We know all about the pressures of being Prime Minister but what about those real-life Sir Humphrey Applebys, the Cabinet Secretaries, aka the powers behind the throne? This interesting new series sees Sue Cameron interview all five living former Cabinet Secretaries about the premierships of Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and David Cameron. McMafia BBC One, 9.00pm The action hots up considerably in this penultimate episode as Alex’s (James Norton) lies unravel. But it’s the Aleksei Serebryakov (as Alex’s father Dimitri) who continues to steal the show. Meanwhile, there’s an excellent vignette featuring nemesis Vadim (Merab Ninidze) chopping wood semi-clothed, presumably in homage to Vladimir Putin. Maltese: The Mafia Detective Channel 4, 10.00pm It might not be the most original series but this Italian import is among the most stylish. The setting is the Seventies and we open with a bang as maverick but honest cop Dario Maltese (Kim Rossi Stuart) finds himself dragged back to the corrupt Sicilian society he left years before. Arena: Stanley and his Daughters BBC Four, 10.00pm What is it really like to be the child of a genius? That question haunts the subjects of this fascinating film about the artist Stanley Spencer and his two daughters, Shirin and Unity. Now 91 and 87, Shirin and Unity were estranged for most of their lives after being separated as children. “I do feel that you were jealous of me for a time,” says Unity while Shirin looks askance. What follows is a complex and complicated story of art, betrayal, love and loss which also allows us to view Spencer’s work anew. American Football: Super Bowl LII Sky Sports Main Event, 11.00pm & BBC One, 11.15pm Hot dogs and Buffalo wings at the ready, as the New England Patriots, looking to win back-to-back Super Bowls, take on Philadelphia Eagles in Minneapolis at the US Bank Stadium. The New England Patriots overcame the Jackonsville Jaguars to set up a finale against the Eagles, who are playing in the showpiece for the first time since 2005, when they lost to the Pats. Much of the attention will be on the Patriots’ 40-year-old quarterback Tom Brady, who is attempting to become the first player to win six Super Bowl rings. Jane Eyre (1943, b/w) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 2.10pm Deep focus and shadows give Robert Stevenson’s version of Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel an extra tinge of Gothic atmosphere. Orson Welles, who provides his Mr Rochester with a hammy melancholy, is an omniscient presence but Joan Fontaine, who had a tendency to be outshone by more dynamic leading men (Cary Grant, Laurence Olivier), is formidable as Jane. Look out for Elizabeth Taylor as the ill-fated Helen Burns. Shark Tale (2004) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 4.40pm Some of Hollywood’s most famous actors, including Will Smith, Robert De Niro, Renée Zellweger, Jack Black and Angelina Jolie (as well as director Martin Scorsese) provide the voices in this comedy animation about a mafia shark family and a little wrasse (Smith) who becomes a hero after surviving a shark encounter. It’s not as good as Finding Nemo but much better than Ice Age. Plenty of gags for grown-ups, too. Yves Saint Laurent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.25am This window into the world of French fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent tells a compelling if not especially potent story. It was made with the blessing of his partner, Pierre Bergé, and charts almost the entire trip, from Saint Laurent’s upbringing in French Algeria to his rise to stardom at Christian Dior and the sexy, druggy, lucrative whirl that followed. Pierre Niney gives good doe-eyed fragility in the title role. Monday 5 February Moving On: Sue Johnston and Paula Wilcox star in Tuesday's episode Moving On BBC One, 2.15pm Jimmy McGovern’s long-running anthology series, beginning its ninth run with another five stories spread across a week, is an exemplar of daytime drama, unafraid to tackle difficult issues and frequently promoting the work of novice writers or directors. That it occasionally settles said issues a little too neatly is understandable – no one wants gale-force McGovern over tea and biscuits – but they reliably make a virtue of the short running-time to deliver intensity and coiled emotion. Stories later in the week (at 2.15pm every afternoon and 2.45pm on Friday) include Sue Johnston’s grieving widow seeking comfort in an unlikely place and Samantha Bond’s registrar forced to re-evaluate her own marriage after an unwelcome discovery. The gripping opener, however, is written by and stars Jodhi May as Rachel, a woman wrestling with the news that the teacher who abused her as a child is back working in the area. Sinead Cusack supplies doughty support as Rachel’s guilt-stricken mother, but May is hauntingly good as a woman torn between exposing her abuser and the potential impact that reopening old wounds may have on her marriage and children. Gabriel Tate My Life: Locked In Boy CBBC, 5.30pm This is a moving account of a 10-year-old whose cerebral palsy left him unable to communicate for eight years. Beginning with an alphabet board and his mother’s help, Jonathan now has a reading age beyond his years, writes poetry and is petitioning MPs to improve education for children with his condition. Horizon: My Amazing Brain: Richard’s War BBC Two, 9.00pm An extraordinary document of both personal fortitude and scientific endeavour, Fiona Lloyd-Davies’s film follows the recovery of her husband, former UN peacekeeper Richard Gray, from a stroke. Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Danny (Viveik Kalra) tries to thwart the plans of the terror cell, Omar (Mawaan Rizwan) takes matters into his own hands and Guy (Jack Davenport) faces powerful enemies. Once again packing its excitements into the closing minutes after a lengthy, patient build-up, this decent thriller concludes tomorrow. The Bulger Killers: Was Justice Done? Channel 4, 9.00pm Rather than reliving the terrible event itself, Matt Smith’s thoughtful film gathers together legal experts and those involved in the case to debate the sufficiency of the eight years served by John Venables and Robert Thompson for the murder of James Bulger in 1993. The X-Files Channel 5, 9.00pm After a patchy revival last year, The X Files rediscovers its mojo with an 11th series opener high on fun and intrigue. Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) lies hospitalised after a seizure, so Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) goes in search of their son as war looms between humans and aliens. Hull’s Headscarf Heroes BBC Four, 9.00pm Steve Humphries’s documentary meets the redoubtable Yvonne Blenkinsop, leader of the “headscarf” campaign against Hull’s trawler companies whose questionable attitude towards crew safety cost 58 lives in a series of tragedies in 1968. Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm In 2013, a gunman killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard. This documentary features an interview with the killer’s sister, still wrestling with his descent into violence. Rear Window (1954) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.40pm Wonderful in its simplicity and compelling in its execution, this belongs in the first rank of Hitchcock’s canon. The director presents a vignette of life through the lens of photographer L B “Jeff” Jeffries (James Stewart), immobilised by a broken leg during a blistering heatwave. Events take an interesting turn when he suspects one of his neighbours across the courtyard may have murdered his wife. Lincoln (2012) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Daniel Day-Lewis is on marvellous, and Oscar-winning, form as Abraham Lincoln, in Steven Spielberg’s intelligent, focused and robust film about the battle to abolish slavery. The film makes no attempt to cover the entire, unwieldy life of its subject. Instead, it dwells solely on the final months of Lincoln’s presidency, during which the political and personal stakes were never higher. Tommy Lee Jones co-stars. The Silence of the Lambs (1991) ★★★★★ Channel 5, 10.00pm Anthony Hopkins triumphs in this creepy thriller as the psychotic Dr Hannibal Lecter who is recruited by trainee FBI agent Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) to track down a serial killer nicknamed Buffalo Bill. No matter how many times you watch this film, Hopkins’s menacing performance – and his lip-smacking relish for human body parts – will always have you on the edge of your seat. Tuesday 6 February Flatpack Empire: James Futcher at SAPA aluminium factory Flatpack Empire BBC Two, 9.00pm There can’t be many urbanites in the UK who haven’t puzzled over the assembly instructions for a piece of Ikea furniture, let alone had the odd experience of being funnelled like a mouse in a maze through one of the firm’s vast depot-like stores. For this series, the Swedish company has granted a camera crew “worldwide access” – from their design headquarters in Sweden to Indian furniture factories and Polish sawmills – to film the £33 billion corporate Goliath’s global operations over the course of a year. Perhaps the biggest surprise (and certainly the thing that Ikea wants us most to know about) is their current move – unthinkable previously – into collaborations with prestige independent designers and other brands, such as audio giants Sonos and fashion designer Virgil Abloh. Among the more interesting is a project with British furniture designer Tom Dixon. “It’s not a sofa-bed, it’s a bed-sofa, but it’s really it’s a platform for living,” says Dixon, a mite grumpily, likening his role to that of a “benign parasite, where I can make a living out of this huge beast”. Maybe they’ll call the finished product “the bed bug” instead of the Swedish names that us Brits struggle to pronounce. Gerard O’Donovan Back in Time for Tea BBC Two, 8.00pm Sara Cox heads up this northern edition of the food-oriented time travel show. Tonight, the conditions that working class Yorkshire folk had to endure 100 years ago come as a shock for the Ellis family from Bradford, especially when one of them mistakes a mangle for a pasta maker. What Would Your Kid Do? ITV, 8.00pm Jason Manford puts parents’ knowledge of their offspring to the test, as children are filmed performing tasks exploring creativity, risk-taking and rule breaking while Mum and Dad have to predict what happens next. Simple and dependably entertaining. Elizabeth: Our Queen Channel 5, 9.00pm Documentaries about the Royal family seem to be appearing at an ever-increasing rate. And now here’s Channel 5’s sprawling eight-part entry, covering her life and reign and hearing from former prime ministers, friends, royal household members and special advisors. Portrait Artist of the Year 2018 Sky Arts, 8.00pm This week’s celebrity sitters are Game of Thrones star Conleth Hill, model Rachel Hunter and actor Stefanie Martini. But, as ever, it’s not so much the well-known faces as the gentle competitiveness and warm interaction between the contestants that makes this portrait painting competition so very engaging. Art, Passion & Power: The Story of the Royal Collection BBC Four, 9.00pm In the final episode of his series on the breathtaking treasures of the Royal Collection, Andrew Graham-Dixon meets the Prince of Wales and explores the last 150 years – when, as he puts it, “women took charge” and used art to help steer the monarchy through times of turbulent change. It’s also a period in which the Royal family’s changing tastes, from Fabergé eggs to the Queen Mother’s more “daring” art acquisitions, neatly demonstrate “the determined emergence of a modern monarchy”. Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm The fourth series of Reece Shearsmith and Steve Pemberton’s darkly comic anthology has been a creepy delight. In Tempting Fate they’ve kept one of the best for last, as a team of contractors clearing out a reclusive hoarder’s council flat unleash a terrible curse. 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Everything you’d expect from Michael Bay is here with bells on – the macho provocation, the sound and fury, and the diabolical pleasure in reducing everything to rubble and bloody mush. However, as a gruelling epitaph to lives wasted, this true-life Libyan shoot-’em-up starring John Krasinski is maddeningly effective and there’s a strange purity to it. Slumdog Millionaire (2008) ★★★★★ More4, 9.00pm Eight Oscars, seven Baftas and four Golden Globes cemented Danny Boyle’s energetic adaptation of Vikas Swarup’s novel Q & A as a triumph. The chaotic beauty of Mumbai is exuberantly brought to life to tell the story of an uneducated orphan (an endearing performance from Dev Patel) from the slums who is on the verge of winning a fortune on the Hindi version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. ’71 (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.50pm Jack O’Connell excels in a near-wordless role as a naive squaddie who gets stranded on the streets of Belfast in 1971 and must throw himself on the mercy of loyalist allies, who are no certain guarantees of sanctuary. It’s a tense, at times almost unbearable watch as we’re wrong-footed all the time by the combinations of terror, guilt, manoeuvring, expediency and revenge that motivate even the most minor of characters. Wednesday 7 February My Millionaire Migrant Boss My Millionaire Migrant Boss Channel 4, 9.00pm Initially, this one-off documentary – following Pakistani multi-millionaire Marwan Koukash as he puts four unemployed Brits through their paces for two weeks, before deciding whether or not to give them a job at his swanky Liverpool hotel – seems like an odd attempt to make The Apprentice on the Dole. But park that knee-jerk criticism right there because what actually unfolds is a thoughtful film in which the tough-but-likeable Koukash refuses to either play to the camera or write off his four eager contenders. That’s not to say that it’s all plain sailing: bubbly Georgia’s chronic unpunctuality soon causes issues, while Koukash, who grew up in a war zone, seems unsure of how to deal with 25-year-old Joe’s lack of confidence. The most entertaining moments, however, come in the hotelier’s relationship with the apparently lazy Heidi, who admits early on that she isn’t really sure why she has to have a job before adding: “I can’t really find out what I want to do.” A less interesting programme would have ensured that Heidi’s role was to infuriate both Koukash and the viewers at home – instead what emerges is surprisingly touching. Sarah Hughes Stacey Dooley: Face to Face with ISIS BBC Three, from 10.00am This harrowing film follows Shireen, a Yazidi woman, as she returns to Iraq with reporter Stacey Dooley for a reckoning with her past. The pair face down soldiers and officials, many of whom seem intent on ensuring that those past atrocities are never mentioned. The final confrontation between Shireen and Anmar, an Islamic State commander, sees the latter squirm blankly as the former finally and movingly gives voice to her pain. Eurovision: You Decide BBC Two, 7.30pm Six lucky contestants battle it out for the dubious honour of becoming Britain’s entrant to the 2018 Eurovision Song Contest. Among the hopefuls are a 16-year-old former Britain’s Got Talent finalist, two former The Voice UK contestants and a Eurovision backing singer. Kirstie and Phil’s Love It or List It Channel 4, 8.00pm The dynamic duo are in Windsor this week, where they meet the Farhall family who can’t decide whether they should sell their four-bedroom detached home. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This series about the history of fashion comes to an end with a look at the story behind Marie Antoinette’s famously risqué portrait in her chemise. Butchart unpicks the meaning behind the painting, looking at what the unhappy French queen was trying to convey while also considering how and why her intended message backfired. It’s a lovely conclusion to a hugely enjoyable series – here’s hoping for a swift return. The New Builds Are Coming: Battle in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Richard Macer’s topical documentary concludes with the focus shifting towards those responsible for the Cullham new builds. “Nobody has a right to a view,” states one architect. Maybe not, but as Macer talks to all involved, so it becomes increasingly clear that this is not an issue that can be easily solved. Girlfriends ITV, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama reaches its conclusion as Sue (Miranda Richardson) and Gail (Zoë Wanamaker) discover that Linda (Phyllis Logan) hasn’t exactly been honest with them about her relationship with her late husband. Harvey (1950, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am James Stewart stars as Elwood Dowd, a middle-aged, wide-eyed dreamer who spends his days getting tipsy with his best friend, a six-foot-three invisible white rabbit called Harvey. His sister Veta (an Oscar-winning Josephine Hull) tries to reform him and a comedy of errors ensues. Henry Koster’s adaptation of Mary Chase’s play is breezy, but has a lot to say about the importance of tolerance. Tango & Cash (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Bringing together two of Hollywood’s biggest action heroes, this silly shoot-’em-up is strangely appealing. Sylvester Stallone is Tango, a slick, sophisticated drug squad cop. Cash (Kurt Russell) is his uncultured rival on the force. And they don’t get on. But when they are framed and sent to prison, they’re forced to work together. It’s pure Eighties bombast, with Yazoo and Alice Cooper on the soundtrack. Harmonium (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.10pm Koji Fukada’s subtle, slow-burning thriller tells of how a family’s fragile domestic bliss is forever altered when an old friend comes to stay and teaches the daughter (Momone Shinokawa) to play the titular instrument. It’s an elegant and gripping film, with a tragic twist halfway through, and rightly won the prize in the Un Certain Regard section at the Cannes Film Festival. Thursday 8 February James Bulger: A Mother's Story James Bulger: a Mother’s Story ITV, 9.00pm Opening with the sound of Jon Venables describing in a matter-of-fact manner how he and fellow 10-year-old Robert Thompson beat and stoned toddler James Bulger to death on a railway track, this documentary relives one of the most horrifying murders of the last century in often very difficult detail. Structured around an interview between Trevor McDonald and Bulger’s mother, Denise Fergus, it exerts an awful grip while never quite deciphering the murder itself. Fergus recounts her unimaginable trauma, police and social workers describe their parts in the events and McDonald describes the trajectory of the case, from abduction to sentencing and an aftermath that has seen Fergus surround her house with CCTV cameras and Venables convicted of child pornography offences. The statements of the two killers – both, we are reminded, with troubled backgrounds – in particular are chilling: manipulative, jokey and fearful. The resilience and courage of Fergus, meanwhile, is admirable and unflinching some 25 years on: “The day I stop speaking about James,” she explains, “is the day I join him.” Gabriel Tate Death in Paradise BBC One, 9.00pm Another surreally absurd case for Jack Mooney (Ardal O’Hanlon), as the leader of a spiritual retreat is strangled while his fellow members are deep in group meditation. Trouble at the Zoo BBC Two, 9.00pm The images and stories that came out of Cumbria’s South Lakes Safari Zoo last year were deeply troubling, forcing management to step down in the face of evidence that almost 500 animals had died there in under four years. Jack Rampling’s challenging observational documentary follows staff trying to keep the institution open in the face of widespread scepticism and queries whether zoos have a place in modern society. Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 9.00pm Scraping the barrel scarcely covers this new series in which the erstwhile Supermarket Sweep host traverses the Sunshine State to check out Walt Disney World, shopping centres and spiritualists. Derry Girls Channel 4, 10.00pm One of the big comedy hits of the year so far, Lisa McGee’s evocative, ribald sitcom set during the Troubles ends with Erin (Saoirse-Monica Jackson) getting her big break as editor of the school magazine. But with great power comes great and largely unwanted responsibility. Nazi Victory: the Postwar Plan UKTV Play, from today Starting (confusingly enough) on the Yesterday channel next week, this engaging new series explores what might have happened in the event of a Nazi victory in the Second World War, from the fifth columnists planted in the United States through to his plans for concentration camps and national monuments in Britain. The latter forms the basis of this opening episode. Britannia Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Jez Butterworth’s compellingly berserk drama rampages through its fourth episode as Kerra (Kelly Reilly) is cast out by her father, King Pellenor, for parlaying with the Romans. How dare she betray the Cantii clan? He throws her to the mercy of the Druids – let’s just hope that she doesn’t meet the same fate as her mother. Meanwhile, former Druid Divis (Nikolaj Lie Kaas) suspects that there is more to General Aulus (David Morrissey) than meets the eye. Lucy (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm In this brilliant, bombastic sci-fi romp from Luc Besson, Scarlett Johansson (always worth watching) plays a drug mule who is dosed with an experimental substance that increases her brainpower by an untold degree. Space-time becomes a flick book, and Lucy’s the girl to rifle through its pages. Besson described it as La Femme Nikita plus Inception plus 2001: A Space Odyssey: that’s ambitious, egotistical, and mostly right. The Hurt Locker (2008) ★★★★☆ TCM, 9.00pm Kathryn Bigelow (Point Break) won the Best Director Oscar (the first woman to do so) for her blistering drama about a bomb disposal unit leading a perilous existence in Iraq. Jeremy Renner is outstanding as a reckless maverick who delights in putting himself in harm’s way, while the jittery cinematography stokes up the suspense to almost unbearable levels. Ralph Fiennes puts in a nice cameo as a military contractor. The Diary of a Teenage Girl (2015) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm This startling debut by Marielle Heller shows the funny side of a teenager’s explorations into her sexuality as a 15-year-old wannabe cartoonist Minnie (Bel Powley) seduces her mother’s 35-year-old boyfriend Monroe (Alexander Skarsgard). Heller’s nimble direction and clever script ensure that the film never paints either Minnie or Monroe entirely as victim or predator. Friday 9 February Winter Olympics 2018: the BBC presenting team Live Winter Olympics 2018 Opening Ceremony BBC One, 10.30am These are interesting times on the Korean peninsula, which will no doubt bring an added frisson to the Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony in Pyeongchang, South Korea. More than 3,000 athletes from 90 countries are expected to march in the ceremony, which will feature a historic moment when the North and South Korean teams march together under a unified flag. History is also being made with the disqualification of Russia from the contest due to its state-sponsored doping scandal, although, controversially, 169 Russian athletes will still compete under a designated Olympic flag. The setting for the occasion is the 35,000- seater Pyeongchang Olympic Stadium, and the following three hours of coverage comes from sure-footed BBC favourite Clare Balding, who’ll also present highlights on BBC Two at 7.00pm on BBC Two. Team GB has set its sights on a record five medals, including perhaps its first in skiing. It’s expected that North Korean artistes will perform at the ceremony in a spirit of cooperation, and while we can’t expect anything as glorious as Danny Boyle’s madcap mega-party for London 2012, we hope for a memorable kick-off to these historic Games. Vicki Power Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Actor Josh Hartnett joins his co-hosts to whip up a beloved ramen dish as the cookery show concludes its fifth series. Jamie Oliver prepares a game curry before trotting off with pal Jimmy Doherty to investigate a new method of farming. Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm Creepy noises and unexplained presences continue to unsettle incomer Matilda (Lydia Wilson) in this thriller. Determined to find out if she’s the child who disappeared from a Welsh backwater 24 years ago, Matilda begins to anger reluctant locals with her questions. Jamestown Sky One, 9.00pm A dramatic series of events in this episode provides an inkling of the high-stakes in store for season two of this glossy period piece based on the shipments of English brides to the American colonies in 1619. The opener sees Alice (Sophie Rundle) give birth and Jocelyn (Naomi Battrick) face tragedy. Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm The sharp-as-ever sitcom veers into sentimentality with the death of Rosario, the maid that Karen (Megan Mullally) loved to torment. But it’s nicely counterbalanced by Jack’s (Sean Hayes) hilarious funeral speech and a punchy cameo from Minnie Driver. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm There are performers on a well-deserved victory lap feature here. Debra Messing and Eric McCormack soak up praise for the Will & Grace revival (see preview, left), actress Saoirse Ronan basks in the glow of her third Oscar nod, and Keala Settle performs the Oscar-nominated This Is Me from The Greatest Showman. The Bold Type Amazon Prime, from today This fun comedy drama follows friends Jane (Katie Stevens), Kat (Aisha Dee) and Sutton (Meghann Fahy) working at a glossy magazine in New York. In the first episode, Jane is asked to write about her ex, while Kat attempts to convince an artist to be featured. Grand Prix Driver Amazon Prime, from today Michael Douglas narrates this behind-the-scenes look at McLaren’s F1 team during their difficult 2017 season. The four half-hour episodes take us inside McLaren’s mission control during troublesome test drives. Baywatch (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm Baywatch the TV show became a phenomenon, but everything about Baywatch the movie is big, brash and bombastic. Dwayne Johnson is preposterously buff in the role of chief lifeguard Mitch Buchannon, while Zac Efron as new recruit Matt Brody is in full-on idiot mode. A cameo by David Hasselhoff, however, appearing to the strains of Jimi Jamison’s theme I’ll Be Ready, will raise a smile. Looper (2012) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm It’s impossible not to be tickled by the playful logic of this sleek sci-fi film that ticks along with pocket-watch precision. Joseph Gordon-Levitt is a “looper” – an assassin whose targets are zapped back to him from 30 years in the future, before his contract expires and his final target is his future self. It sounds confusing, but works, and has a great cast that includes Emily Blunt, Bruce Willis and Piper Perabo. The Cabin in the Woods (2012) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.20pm Don’t be fooled by its young cast (including a pre-Thor Chris Hemsworth) and stereotypical teenage-horror appeal: Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard’s clever detonation of the scary movie is very good, with the genre’s most original plot twist in years. The story, however, is a classic one: five friends visit a cabin in the woods, where they encounter more than they bargained for. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
What's on TV tonight: new Endeavour, a weepy Call the Midwife and McMafia reaches boiling point
Sunday 4 February Endeavour ITV, 8.00pm With the likes of Black Mirror, we live in an age of increasingly inventive television, but sometimes what we all need is a nice straightforward period procedural to relax in front of on a Sunday night. Russell Lewis’s Endeavour, now returning for a fifth series, ticks all the boxes. There’s a solid cast, anchored by Shaun Evans, as the young, less grumpy, more awkward Endeavour Morse; some nice if occasionally a little precise period detail (although I did like the throwaway reference to boxer Freddie Mills); and a plot that’s just twisty enough to allow viewers to play “guess the killer”. This opening episode is a pretty bleak affair, centring around a missing Fabergé egg and a series of seemingly unlinked deaths which (topically) turn out to have their origins in a riotous stag party. Along the way, Endeavour deals with an eager but unwanted new underling (Poldark’s Lewis Peek) and crosses swords with a sharp-witted “good-time girl” (Charlotte Hope), who delivers some home truths about his tendency to put women on pedestals. Meanwhile, the wonderful Roger Allam continues to steal every scene as Detective Chief Inspector Fred Thursday. Really someone should just give him his own show. Sarah Hughes Six Nations Rugby Union: Italy v England ITV, 2.15pm Kicking off their defence of their title, England are at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome, where they face Italy. Eddie Jones’s prospects for winning an unprecedented three championships in a row have been given a major boost: Jack Nowell, Chris Robshaw, Maro Itoje and Mike Brown, who were all doubts, have all been miraculously passed fit. Italy gave the champions a scare at Twickenham last term by taking a 10-5 half-time lead, but England eventually prevailed 36-15, with Nowell and Danny Care among the scorers. Premier League Football: Liverpool v Tottenham Hotspur Sky Sports Main Event, 4.15pm Having bounced back from their defeat at Swansea with a 3-0 victory against Huddersfield – thanks to goals from Emre Can, Roberto Firmino and Mohamed Salah – Liverpool host Spurs, who are one place beneath them in fifth. When these sides met in October, two goals from Harry Kane (who else?) helped Spurs to a comprehensive 4-1 victory. Call the Midwife BBC One, 8.00pm Prepare for a real weepy as Nurse Crane (Linda Bassett) and Trixie (Helen George) try to find out what secret a pregnant mother and her family are hiding. Elsewhere, Shelagh (Laura Main) worries that her new au pair isn’t making friends. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm The eccentric yet compelling journey comes to an end as Silver Lady heads towards Inverness. Will bad weather and issues with batteries bring this great experiment to a halt? Inside Number 10 BBC Parliament, 8.00pm We know all about the pressures of being Prime Minister but what about those real-life Sir Humphrey Applebys, the Cabinet Secretaries, aka the powers behind the throne? This interesting new series sees Sue Cameron interview all five living former Cabinet Secretaries about the premierships of Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and David Cameron. McMafia BBC One, 9.00pm The action hots up considerably in this penultimate episode as Alex’s (James Norton) lies unravel. But it’s the Aleksei Serebryakov (as Alex’s father Dimitri) who continues to steal the show. Meanwhile, there’s an excellent vignette featuring nemesis Vadim (Merab Ninidze) chopping wood semi-clothed, presumably in homage to Vladimir Putin. Maltese: The Mafia Detective Channel 4, 10.00pm It might not be the most original series but this Italian import is among the most stylish. The setting is the Seventies and we open with a bang as maverick but honest cop Dario Maltese (Kim Rossi Stuart) finds himself dragged back to the corrupt Sicilian society he left years before. Arena: Stanley and his Daughters BBC Four, 10.00pm What is it really like to be the child of a genius? That question haunts the subjects of this fascinating film about the artist Stanley Spencer and his two daughters, Shirin and Unity. Now 91 and 87, Shirin and Unity were estranged for most of their lives after being separated as children. “I do feel that you were jealous of me for a time,” says Unity while Shirin looks askance. What follows is a complex and complicated story of art, betrayal, love and loss which also allows us to view Spencer’s work anew. American Football: Super Bowl LII Sky Sports Main Event, 11.00pm & BBC One, 11.15pm Hot dogs and Buffalo wings at the ready, as the New England Patriots, looking to win back-to-back Super Bowls, take on Philadelphia Eagles in Minneapolis at the US Bank Stadium. The New England Patriots overcame the Jackonsville Jaguars to set up a finale against the Eagles, who are playing in the showpiece for the first time since 2005, when they lost to the Pats. Much of the attention will be on the Patriots’ 40-year-old quarterback Tom Brady, who is attempting to become the first player to win six Super Bowl rings. Jane Eyre (1943, b/w) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 2.10pm Deep focus and shadows give Robert Stevenson’s version of Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel an extra tinge of Gothic atmosphere. Orson Welles, who provides his Mr Rochester with a hammy melancholy, is an omniscient presence but Joan Fontaine, who had a tendency to be outshone by more dynamic leading men (Cary Grant, Laurence Olivier), is formidable as Jane. Look out for Elizabeth Taylor as the ill-fated Helen Burns. Shark Tale (2004) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 4.40pm Some of Hollywood’s most famous actors, including Will Smith, Robert De Niro, Renée Zellweger, Jack Black and Angelina Jolie (as well as director Martin Scorsese) provide the voices in this comedy animation about a mafia shark family and a little wrasse (Smith) who becomes a hero after surviving a shark encounter. It’s not as good as Finding Nemo but much better than Ice Age. Plenty of gags for grown-ups, too. Yves Saint Laurent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.25am This window into the world of French fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent tells a compelling if not especially potent story. It was made with the blessing of his partner, Pierre Bergé, and charts almost the entire trip, from Saint Laurent’s upbringing in French Algeria to his rise to stardom at Christian Dior and the sexy, druggy, lucrative whirl that followed. Pierre Niney gives good doe-eyed fragility in the title role. Monday 5 February Moving On: Sue Johnston and Paula Wilcox star in Tuesday's episode Moving On BBC One, 2.15pm Jimmy McGovern’s long-running anthology series, beginning its ninth run with another five stories spread across a week, is an exemplar of daytime drama, unafraid to tackle difficult issues and frequently promoting the work of novice writers or directors. That it occasionally settles said issues a little too neatly is understandable – no one wants gale-force McGovern over tea and biscuits – but they reliably make a virtue of the short running-time to deliver intensity and coiled emotion. Stories later in the week (at 2.15pm every afternoon and 2.45pm on Friday) include Sue Johnston’s grieving widow seeking comfort in an unlikely place and Samantha Bond’s registrar forced to re-evaluate her own marriage after an unwelcome discovery. The gripping opener, however, is written by and stars Jodhi May as Rachel, a woman wrestling with the news that the teacher who abused her as a child is back working in the area. Sinead Cusack supplies doughty support as Rachel’s guilt-stricken mother, but May is hauntingly good as a woman torn between exposing her abuser and the potential impact that reopening old wounds may have on her marriage and children. Gabriel Tate My Life: Locked In Boy CBBC, 5.30pm This is a moving account of a 10-year-old whose cerebral palsy left him unable to communicate for eight years. Beginning with an alphabet board and his mother’s help, Jonathan now has a reading age beyond his years, writes poetry and is petitioning MPs to improve education for children with his condition. Horizon: My Amazing Brain: Richard’s War BBC Two, 9.00pm An extraordinary document of both personal fortitude and scientific endeavour, Fiona Lloyd-Davies’s film follows the recovery of her husband, former UN peacekeeper Richard Gray, from a stroke. Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Danny (Viveik Kalra) tries to thwart the plans of the terror cell, Omar (Mawaan Rizwan) takes matters into his own hands and Guy (Jack Davenport) faces powerful enemies. Once again packing its excitements into the closing minutes after a lengthy, patient build-up, this decent thriller concludes tomorrow. The Bulger Killers: Was Justice Done? Channel 4, 9.00pm Rather than reliving the terrible event itself, Matt Smith’s thoughtful film gathers together legal experts and those involved in the case to debate the sufficiency of the eight years served by John Venables and Robert Thompson for the murder of James Bulger in 1993. The X-Files Channel 5, 9.00pm After a patchy revival last year, The X Files rediscovers its mojo with an 11th series opener high on fun and intrigue. Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) lies hospitalised after a seizure, so Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) goes in search of their son as war looms between humans and aliens. Hull’s Headscarf Heroes BBC Four, 9.00pm Steve Humphries’s documentary meets the redoubtable Yvonne Blenkinsop, leader of the “headscarf” campaign against Hull’s trawler companies whose questionable attitude towards crew safety cost 58 lives in a series of tragedies in 1968. Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm In 2013, a gunman killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard. This documentary features an interview with the killer’s sister, still wrestling with his descent into violence. Rear Window (1954) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.40pm Wonderful in its simplicity and compelling in its execution, this belongs in the first rank of Hitchcock’s canon. The director presents a vignette of life through the lens of photographer L B “Jeff” Jeffries (James Stewart), immobilised by a broken leg during a blistering heatwave. Events take an interesting turn when he suspects one of his neighbours across the courtyard may have murdered his wife. Lincoln (2012) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Daniel Day-Lewis is on marvellous, and Oscar-winning, form as Abraham Lincoln, in Steven Spielberg’s intelligent, focused and robust film about the battle to abolish slavery. The film makes no attempt to cover the entire, unwieldy life of its subject. Instead, it dwells solely on the final months of Lincoln’s presidency, during which the political and personal stakes were never higher. Tommy Lee Jones co-stars. The Silence of the Lambs (1991) ★★★★★ Channel 5, 10.00pm Anthony Hopkins triumphs in this creepy thriller as the psychotic Dr Hannibal Lecter who is recruited by trainee FBI agent Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) to track down a serial killer nicknamed Buffalo Bill. No matter how many times you watch this film, Hopkins’s menacing performance – and his lip-smacking relish for human body parts – will always have you on the edge of your seat. Tuesday 6 February Flatpack Empire: James Futcher at SAPA aluminium factory Flatpack Empire BBC Two, 9.00pm There can’t be many urbanites in the UK who haven’t puzzled over the assembly instructions for a piece of Ikea furniture, let alone had the odd experience of being funnelled like a mouse in a maze through one of the firm’s vast depot-like stores. For this series, the Swedish company has granted a camera crew “worldwide access” – from their design headquarters in Sweden to Indian furniture factories and Polish sawmills – to film the £33 billion corporate Goliath’s global operations over the course of a year. Perhaps the biggest surprise (and certainly the thing that Ikea wants us most to know about) is their current move – unthinkable previously – into collaborations with prestige independent designers and other brands, such as audio giants Sonos and fashion designer Virgil Abloh. Among the more interesting is a project with British furniture designer Tom Dixon. “It’s not a sofa-bed, it’s a bed-sofa, but it’s really it’s a platform for living,” says Dixon, a mite grumpily, likening his role to that of a “benign parasite, where I can make a living out of this huge beast”. Maybe they’ll call the finished product “the bed bug” instead of the Swedish names that us Brits struggle to pronounce. Gerard O’Donovan Back in Time for Tea BBC Two, 8.00pm Sara Cox heads up this northern edition of the food-oriented time travel show. Tonight, the conditions that working class Yorkshire folk had to endure 100 years ago come as a shock for the Ellis family from Bradford, especially when one of them mistakes a mangle for a pasta maker. What Would Your Kid Do? ITV, 8.00pm Jason Manford puts parents’ knowledge of their offspring to the test, as children are filmed performing tasks exploring creativity, risk-taking and rule breaking while Mum and Dad have to predict what happens next. Simple and dependably entertaining. Elizabeth: Our Queen Channel 5, 9.00pm Documentaries about the Royal family seem to be appearing at an ever-increasing rate. And now here’s Channel 5’s sprawling eight-part entry, covering her life and reign and hearing from former prime ministers, friends, royal household members and special advisors. Portrait Artist of the Year 2018 Sky Arts, 8.00pm This week’s celebrity sitters are Game of Thrones star Conleth Hill, model Rachel Hunter and actor Stefanie Martini. But, as ever, it’s not so much the well-known faces as the gentle competitiveness and warm interaction between the contestants that makes this portrait painting competition so very engaging. Art, Passion & Power: The Story of the Royal Collection BBC Four, 9.00pm In the final episode of his series on the breathtaking treasures of the Royal Collection, Andrew Graham-Dixon meets the Prince of Wales and explores the last 150 years – when, as he puts it, “women took charge” and used art to help steer the monarchy through times of turbulent change. It’s also a period in which the Royal family’s changing tastes, from Fabergé eggs to the Queen Mother’s more “daring” art acquisitions, neatly demonstrate “the determined emergence of a modern monarchy”. Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm The fourth series of Reece Shearsmith and Steve Pemberton’s darkly comic anthology has been a creepy delight. In Tempting Fate they’ve kept one of the best for last, as a team of contractors clearing out a reclusive hoarder’s council flat unleash a terrible curse. 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Everything you’d expect from Michael Bay is here with bells on – the macho provocation, the sound and fury, and the diabolical pleasure in reducing everything to rubble and bloody mush. However, as a gruelling epitaph to lives wasted, this true-life Libyan shoot-’em-up starring John Krasinski is maddeningly effective and there’s a strange purity to it. Slumdog Millionaire (2008) ★★★★★ More4, 9.00pm Eight Oscars, seven Baftas and four Golden Globes cemented Danny Boyle’s energetic adaptation of Vikas Swarup’s novel Q & A as a triumph. The chaotic beauty of Mumbai is exuberantly brought to life to tell the story of an uneducated orphan (an endearing performance from Dev Patel) from the slums who is on the verge of winning a fortune on the Hindi version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. ’71 (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.50pm Jack O’Connell excels in a near-wordless role as a naive squaddie who gets stranded on the streets of Belfast in 1971 and must throw himself on the mercy of loyalist allies, who are no certain guarantees of sanctuary. It’s a tense, at times almost unbearable watch as we’re wrong-footed all the time by the combinations of terror, guilt, manoeuvring, expediency and revenge that motivate even the most minor of characters. Wednesday 7 February My Millionaire Migrant Boss My Millionaire Migrant Boss Channel 4, 9.00pm Initially, this one-off documentary – following Pakistani multi-millionaire Marwan Koukash as he puts four unemployed Brits through their paces for two weeks, before deciding whether or not to give them a job at his swanky Liverpool hotel – seems like an odd attempt to make The Apprentice on the Dole. But park that knee-jerk criticism right there because what actually unfolds is a thoughtful film in which the tough-but-likeable Koukash refuses to either play to the camera or write off his four eager contenders. That’s not to say that it’s all plain sailing: bubbly Georgia’s chronic unpunctuality soon causes issues, while Koukash, who grew up in a war zone, seems unsure of how to deal with 25-year-old Joe’s lack of confidence. The most entertaining moments, however, come in the hotelier’s relationship with the apparently lazy Heidi, who admits early on that she isn’t really sure why she has to have a job before adding: “I can’t really find out what I want to do.” A less interesting programme would have ensured that Heidi’s role was to infuriate both Koukash and the viewers at home – instead what emerges is surprisingly touching. Sarah Hughes Stacey Dooley: Face to Face with ISIS BBC Three, from 10.00am This harrowing film follows Shireen, a Yazidi woman, as she returns to Iraq with reporter Stacey Dooley for a reckoning with her past. The pair face down soldiers and officials, many of whom seem intent on ensuring that those past atrocities are never mentioned. The final confrontation between Shireen and Anmar, an Islamic State commander, sees the latter squirm blankly as the former finally and movingly gives voice to her pain. Eurovision: You Decide BBC Two, 7.30pm Six lucky contestants battle it out for the dubious honour of becoming Britain’s entrant to the 2018 Eurovision Song Contest. Among the hopefuls are a 16-year-old former Britain’s Got Talent finalist, two former The Voice UK contestants and a Eurovision backing singer. Kirstie and Phil’s Love It or List It Channel 4, 8.00pm The dynamic duo are in Windsor this week, where they meet the Farhall family who can’t decide whether they should sell their four-bedroom detached home. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This series about the history of fashion comes to an end with a look at the story behind Marie Antoinette’s famously risqué portrait in her chemise. Butchart unpicks the meaning behind the painting, looking at what the unhappy French queen was trying to convey while also considering how and why her intended message backfired. It’s a lovely conclusion to a hugely enjoyable series – here’s hoping for a swift return. The New Builds Are Coming: Battle in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Richard Macer’s topical documentary concludes with the focus shifting towards those responsible for the Cullham new builds. “Nobody has a right to a view,” states one architect. Maybe not, but as Macer talks to all involved, so it becomes increasingly clear that this is not an issue that can be easily solved. Girlfriends ITV, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama reaches its conclusion as Sue (Miranda Richardson) and Gail (Zoë Wanamaker) discover that Linda (Phyllis Logan) hasn’t exactly been honest with them about her relationship with her late husband. Harvey (1950, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am James Stewart stars as Elwood Dowd, a middle-aged, wide-eyed dreamer who spends his days getting tipsy with his best friend, a six-foot-three invisible white rabbit called Harvey. His sister Veta (an Oscar-winning Josephine Hull) tries to reform him and a comedy of errors ensues. Henry Koster’s adaptation of Mary Chase’s play is breezy, but has a lot to say about the importance of tolerance. Tango & Cash (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Bringing together two of Hollywood’s biggest action heroes, this silly shoot-’em-up is strangely appealing. Sylvester Stallone is Tango, a slick, sophisticated drug squad cop. Cash (Kurt Russell) is his uncultured rival on the force. And they don’t get on. But when they are framed and sent to prison, they’re forced to work together. It’s pure Eighties bombast, with Yazoo and Alice Cooper on the soundtrack. Harmonium (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.10pm Koji Fukada’s subtle, slow-burning thriller tells of how a family’s fragile domestic bliss is forever altered when an old friend comes to stay and teaches the daughter (Momone Shinokawa) to play the titular instrument. It’s an elegant and gripping film, with a tragic twist halfway through, and rightly won the prize in the Un Certain Regard section at the Cannes Film Festival. Thursday 8 February James Bulger: A Mother's Story James Bulger: a Mother’s Story ITV, 9.00pm Opening with the sound of Jon Venables describing in a matter-of-fact manner how he and fellow 10-year-old Robert Thompson beat and stoned toddler James Bulger to death on a railway track, this documentary relives one of the most horrifying murders of the last century in often very difficult detail. Structured around an interview between Trevor McDonald and Bulger’s mother, Denise Fergus, it exerts an awful grip while never quite deciphering the murder itself. Fergus recounts her unimaginable trauma, police and social workers describe their parts in the events and McDonald describes the trajectory of the case, from abduction to sentencing and an aftermath that has seen Fergus surround her house with CCTV cameras and Venables convicted of child pornography offences. The statements of the two killers – both, we are reminded, with troubled backgrounds – in particular are chilling: manipulative, jokey and fearful. The resilience and courage of Fergus, meanwhile, is admirable and unflinching some 25 years on: “The day I stop speaking about James,” she explains, “is the day I join him.” Gabriel Tate Death in Paradise BBC One, 9.00pm Another surreally absurd case for Jack Mooney (Ardal O’Hanlon), as the leader of a spiritual retreat is strangled while his fellow members are deep in group meditation. Trouble at the Zoo BBC Two, 9.00pm The images and stories that came out of Cumbria’s South Lakes Safari Zoo last year were deeply troubling, forcing management to step down in the face of evidence that almost 500 animals had died there in under four years. Jack Rampling’s challenging observational documentary follows staff trying to keep the institution open in the face of widespread scepticism and queries whether zoos have a place in modern society. Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 9.00pm Scraping the barrel scarcely covers this new series in which the erstwhile Supermarket Sweep host traverses the Sunshine State to check out Walt Disney World, shopping centres and spiritualists. Derry Girls Channel 4, 10.00pm One of the big comedy hits of the year so far, Lisa McGee’s evocative, ribald sitcom set during the Troubles ends with Erin (Saoirse-Monica Jackson) getting her big break as editor of the school magazine. But with great power comes great and largely unwanted responsibility. Nazi Victory: the Postwar Plan UKTV Play, from today Starting (confusingly enough) on the Yesterday channel next week, this engaging new series explores what might have happened in the event of a Nazi victory in the Second World War, from the fifth columnists planted in the United States through to his plans for concentration camps and national monuments in Britain. The latter forms the basis of this opening episode. Britannia Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Jez Butterworth’s compellingly berserk drama rampages through its fourth episode as Kerra (Kelly Reilly) is cast out by her father, King Pellenor, for parlaying with the Romans. How dare she betray the Cantii clan? He throws her to the mercy of the Druids – let’s just hope that she doesn’t meet the same fate as her mother. Meanwhile, former Druid Divis (Nikolaj Lie Kaas) suspects that there is more to General Aulus (David Morrissey) than meets the eye. Lucy (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm In this brilliant, bombastic sci-fi romp from Luc Besson, Scarlett Johansson (always worth watching) plays a drug mule who is dosed with an experimental substance that increases her brainpower by an untold degree. Space-time becomes a flick book, and Lucy’s the girl to rifle through its pages. Besson described it as La Femme Nikita plus Inception plus 2001: A Space Odyssey: that’s ambitious, egotistical, and mostly right. The Hurt Locker (2008) ★★★★☆ TCM, 9.00pm Kathryn Bigelow (Point Break) won the Best Director Oscar (the first woman to do so) for her blistering drama about a bomb disposal unit leading a perilous existence in Iraq. Jeremy Renner is outstanding as a reckless maverick who delights in putting himself in harm’s way, while the jittery cinematography stokes up the suspense to almost unbearable levels. Ralph Fiennes puts in a nice cameo as a military contractor. The Diary of a Teenage Girl (2015) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm This startling debut by Marielle Heller shows the funny side of a teenager’s explorations into her sexuality as a 15-year-old wannabe cartoonist Minnie (Bel Powley) seduces her mother’s 35-year-old boyfriend Monroe (Alexander Skarsgard). Heller’s nimble direction and clever script ensure that the film never paints either Minnie or Monroe entirely as victim or predator. Friday 9 February Winter Olympics 2018: the BBC presenting team Live Winter Olympics 2018 Opening Ceremony BBC One, 10.30am These are interesting times on the Korean peninsula, which will no doubt bring an added frisson to the Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony in Pyeongchang, South Korea. More than 3,000 athletes from 90 countries are expected to march in the ceremony, which will feature a historic moment when the North and South Korean teams march together under a unified flag. History is also being made with the disqualification of Russia from the contest due to its state-sponsored doping scandal, although, controversially, 169 Russian athletes will still compete under a designated Olympic flag. The setting for the occasion is the 35,000- seater Pyeongchang Olympic Stadium, and the following three hours of coverage comes from sure-footed BBC favourite Clare Balding, who’ll also present highlights on BBC Two at 7.00pm on BBC Two. Team GB has set its sights on a record five medals, including perhaps its first in skiing. It’s expected that North Korean artistes will perform at the ceremony in a spirit of cooperation, and while we can’t expect anything as glorious as Danny Boyle’s madcap mega-party for London 2012, we hope for a memorable kick-off to these historic Games. Vicki Power Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Actor Josh Hartnett joins his co-hosts to whip up a beloved ramen dish as the cookery show concludes its fifth series. Jamie Oliver prepares a game curry before trotting off with pal Jimmy Doherty to investigate a new method of farming. Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm Creepy noises and unexplained presences continue to unsettle incomer Matilda (Lydia Wilson) in this thriller. Determined to find out if she’s the child who disappeared from a Welsh backwater 24 years ago, Matilda begins to anger reluctant locals with her questions. Jamestown Sky One, 9.00pm A dramatic series of events in this episode provides an inkling of the high-stakes in store for season two of this glossy period piece based on the shipments of English brides to the American colonies in 1619. The opener sees Alice (Sophie Rundle) give birth and Jocelyn (Naomi Battrick) face tragedy. Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm The sharp-as-ever sitcom veers into sentimentality with the death of Rosario, the maid that Karen (Megan Mullally) loved to torment. But it’s nicely counterbalanced by Jack’s (Sean Hayes) hilarious funeral speech and a punchy cameo from Minnie Driver. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm There are performers on a well-deserved victory lap feature here. Debra Messing and Eric McCormack soak up praise for the Will & Grace revival (see preview, left), actress Saoirse Ronan basks in the glow of her third Oscar nod, and Keala Settle performs the Oscar-nominated This Is Me from The Greatest Showman. The Bold Type Amazon Prime, from today This fun comedy drama follows friends Jane (Katie Stevens), Kat (Aisha Dee) and Sutton (Meghann Fahy) working at a glossy magazine in New York. In the first episode, Jane is asked to write about her ex, while Kat attempts to convince an artist to be featured. Grand Prix Driver Amazon Prime, from today Michael Douglas narrates this behind-the-scenes look at McLaren’s F1 team during their difficult 2017 season. The four half-hour episodes take us inside McLaren’s mission control during troublesome test drives. Baywatch (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm Baywatch the TV show became a phenomenon, but everything about Baywatch the movie is big, brash and bombastic. Dwayne Johnson is preposterously buff in the role of chief lifeguard Mitch Buchannon, while Zac Efron as new recruit Matt Brody is in full-on idiot mode. A cameo by David Hasselhoff, however, appearing to the strains of Jimi Jamison’s theme I’ll Be Ready, will raise a smile. Looper (2012) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm It’s impossible not to be tickled by the playful logic of this sleek sci-fi film that ticks along with pocket-watch precision. Joseph Gordon-Levitt is a “looper” – an assassin whose targets are zapped back to him from 30 years in the future, before his contract expires and his final target is his future self. It sounds confusing, but works, and has a great cast that includes Emily Blunt, Bruce Willis and Piper Perabo. The Cabin in the Woods (2012) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.20pm Don’t be fooled by its young cast (including a pre-Thor Chris Hemsworth) and stereotypical teenage-horror appeal: Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard’s clever detonation of the scary movie is very good, with the genre’s most original plot twist in years. The story, however, is a classic one: five friends visit a cabin in the woods, where they encounter more than they bargained for. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
Sunday 4 February Endeavour ITV, 8.00pm With the likes of Black Mirror, we live in an age of increasingly inventive television, but sometimes what we all need is a nice straightforward period procedural to relax in front of on a Sunday night. Russell Lewis’s Endeavour, now returning for a fifth series, ticks all the boxes. There’s a solid cast, anchored by Shaun Evans, as the young, less grumpy, more awkward Endeavour Morse; some nice if occasionally a little precise period detail (although I did like the throwaway reference to boxer Freddie Mills); and a plot that’s just twisty enough to allow viewers to play “guess the killer”. This opening episode is a pretty bleak affair, centring around a missing Fabergé egg and a series of seemingly unlinked deaths which (topically) turn out to have their origins in a riotous stag party. Along the way, Endeavour deals with an eager but unwanted new underling (Poldark’s Lewis Peek) and crosses swords with a sharp-witted “good-time girl” (Charlotte Hope), who delivers some home truths about his tendency to put women on pedestals. Meanwhile, the wonderful Roger Allam continues to steal every scene as Detective Chief Inspector Fred Thursday. Really someone should just give him his own show. Sarah Hughes Six Nations Rugby Union: Italy v England ITV, 2.15pm Kicking off their defence of their title, England are at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome, where they face Italy. Eddie Jones’s prospects for winning an unprecedented three championships in a row have been given a major boost: Jack Nowell, Chris Robshaw, Maro Itoje and Mike Brown, who were all doubts, have all been miraculously passed fit. Italy gave the champions a scare at Twickenham last term by taking a 10-5 half-time lead, but England eventually prevailed 36-15, with Nowell and Danny Care among the scorers. Premier League Football: Liverpool v Tottenham Hotspur Sky Sports Main Event, 4.15pm Having bounced back from their defeat at Swansea with a 3-0 victory against Huddersfield – thanks to goals from Emre Can, Roberto Firmino and Mohamed Salah – Liverpool host Spurs, who are one place beneath them in fifth. When these sides met in October, two goals from Harry Kane (who else?) helped Spurs to a comprehensive 4-1 victory. Call the Midwife BBC One, 8.00pm Prepare for a real weepy as Nurse Crane (Linda Bassett) and Trixie (Helen George) try to find out what secret a pregnant mother and her family are hiding. Elsewhere, Shelagh (Laura Main) worries that her new au pair isn’t making friends. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm The eccentric yet compelling journey comes to an end as Silver Lady heads towards Inverness. Will bad weather and issues with batteries bring this great experiment to a halt? Inside Number 10 BBC Parliament, 8.00pm We know all about the pressures of being Prime Minister but what about those real-life Sir Humphrey Applebys, the Cabinet Secretaries, aka the powers behind the throne? This interesting new series sees Sue Cameron interview all five living former Cabinet Secretaries about the premierships of Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and David Cameron. McMafia BBC One, 9.00pm The action hots up considerably in this penultimate episode as Alex’s (James Norton) lies unravel. But it’s the Aleksei Serebryakov (as Alex’s father Dimitri) who continues to steal the show. Meanwhile, there’s an excellent vignette featuring nemesis Vadim (Merab Ninidze) chopping wood semi-clothed, presumably in homage to Vladimir Putin. Maltese: The Mafia Detective Channel 4, 10.00pm It might not be the most original series but this Italian import is among the most stylish. The setting is the Seventies and we open with a bang as maverick but honest cop Dario Maltese (Kim Rossi Stuart) finds himself dragged back to the corrupt Sicilian society he left years before. Arena: Stanley and his Daughters BBC Four, 10.00pm What is it really like to be the child of a genius? That question haunts the subjects of this fascinating film about the artist Stanley Spencer and his two daughters, Shirin and Unity. Now 91 and 87, Shirin and Unity were estranged for most of their lives after being separated as children. “I do feel that you were jealous of me for a time,” says Unity while Shirin looks askance. What follows is a complex and complicated story of art, betrayal, love and loss which also allows us to view Spencer’s work anew. American Football: Super Bowl LII Sky Sports Main Event, 11.00pm & BBC One, 11.15pm Hot dogs and Buffalo wings at the ready, as the New England Patriots, looking to win back-to-back Super Bowls, take on Philadelphia Eagles in Minneapolis at the US Bank Stadium. The New England Patriots overcame the Jackonsville Jaguars to set up a finale against the Eagles, who are playing in the showpiece for the first time since 2005, when they lost to the Pats. Much of the attention will be on the Patriots’ 40-year-old quarterback Tom Brady, who is attempting to become the first player to win six Super Bowl rings. Jane Eyre (1943, b/w) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 2.10pm Deep focus and shadows give Robert Stevenson’s version of Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel an extra tinge of Gothic atmosphere. Orson Welles, who provides his Mr Rochester with a hammy melancholy, is an omniscient presence but Joan Fontaine, who had a tendency to be outshone by more dynamic leading men (Cary Grant, Laurence Olivier), is formidable as Jane. Look out for Elizabeth Taylor as the ill-fated Helen Burns. Shark Tale (2004) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 4.40pm Some of Hollywood’s most famous actors, including Will Smith, Robert De Niro, Renée Zellweger, Jack Black and Angelina Jolie (as well as director Martin Scorsese) provide the voices in this comedy animation about a mafia shark family and a little wrasse (Smith) who becomes a hero after surviving a shark encounter. It’s not as good as Finding Nemo but much better than Ice Age. Plenty of gags for grown-ups, too. Yves Saint Laurent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.25am This window into the world of French fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent tells a compelling if not especially potent story. It was made with the blessing of his partner, Pierre Bergé, and charts almost the entire trip, from Saint Laurent’s upbringing in French Algeria to his rise to stardom at Christian Dior and the sexy, druggy, lucrative whirl that followed. Pierre Niney gives good doe-eyed fragility in the title role. Monday 5 February Moving On: Sue Johnston and Paula Wilcox star in Tuesday's episode Moving On BBC One, 2.15pm Jimmy McGovern’s long-running anthology series, beginning its ninth run with another five stories spread across a week, is an exemplar of daytime drama, unafraid to tackle difficult issues and frequently promoting the work of novice writers or directors. That it occasionally settles said issues a little too neatly is understandable – no one wants gale-force McGovern over tea and biscuits – but they reliably make a virtue of the short running-time to deliver intensity and coiled emotion. Stories later in the week (at 2.15pm every afternoon and 2.45pm on Friday) include Sue Johnston’s grieving widow seeking comfort in an unlikely place and Samantha Bond’s registrar forced to re-evaluate her own marriage after an unwelcome discovery. The gripping opener, however, is written by and stars Jodhi May as Rachel, a woman wrestling with the news that the teacher who abused her as a child is back working in the area. Sinead Cusack supplies doughty support as Rachel’s guilt-stricken mother, but May is hauntingly good as a woman torn between exposing her abuser and the potential impact that reopening old wounds may have on her marriage and children. Gabriel Tate My Life: Locked In Boy CBBC, 5.30pm This is a moving account of a 10-year-old whose cerebral palsy left him unable to communicate for eight years. Beginning with an alphabet board and his mother’s help, Jonathan now has a reading age beyond his years, writes poetry and is petitioning MPs to improve education for children with his condition. Horizon: My Amazing Brain: Richard’s War BBC Two, 9.00pm An extraordinary document of both personal fortitude and scientific endeavour, Fiona Lloyd-Davies’s film follows the recovery of her husband, former UN peacekeeper Richard Gray, from a stroke. Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Danny (Viveik Kalra) tries to thwart the plans of the terror cell, Omar (Mawaan Rizwan) takes matters into his own hands and Guy (Jack Davenport) faces powerful enemies. Once again packing its excitements into the closing minutes after a lengthy, patient build-up, this decent thriller concludes tomorrow. The Bulger Killers: Was Justice Done? Channel 4, 9.00pm Rather than reliving the terrible event itself, Matt Smith’s thoughtful film gathers together legal experts and those involved in the case to debate the sufficiency of the eight years served by John Venables and Robert Thompson for the murder of James Bulger in 1993. The X-Files Channel 5, 9.00pm After a patchy revival last year, The X Files rediscovers its mojo with an 11th series opener high on fun and intrigue. Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) lies hospitalised after a seizure, so Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) goes in search of their son as war looms between humans and aliens. Hull’s Headscarf Heroes BBC Four, 9.00pm Steve Humphries’s documentary meets the redoubtable Yvonne Blenkinsop, leader of the “headscarf” campaign against Hull’s trawler companies whose questionable attitude towards crew safety cost 58 lives in a series of tragedies in 1968. Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm In 2013, a gunman killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard. This documentary features an interview with the killer’s sister, still wrestling with his descent into violence. Rear Window (1954) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.40pm Wonderful in its simplicity and compelling in its execution, this belongs in the first rank of Hitchcock’s canon. The director presents a vignette of life through the lens of photographer L B “Jeff” Jeffries (James Stewart), immobilised by a broken leg during a blistering heatwave. Events take an interesting turn when he suspects one of his neighbours across the courtyard may have murdered his wife. Lincoln (2012) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Daniel Day-Lewis is on marvellous, and Oscar-winning, form as Abraham Lincoln, in Steven Spielberg’s intelligent, focused and robust film about the battle to abolish slavery. The film makes no attempt to cover the entire, unwieldy life of its subject. Instead, it dwells solely on the final months of Lincoln’s presidency, during which the political and personal stakes were never higher. Tommy Lee Jones co-stars. The Silence of the Lambs (1991) ★★★★★ Channel 5, 10.00pm Anthony Hopkins triumphs in this creepy thriller as the psychotic Dr Hannibal Lecter who is recruited by trainee FBI agent Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) to track down a serial killer nicknamed Buffalo Bill. No matter how many times you watch this film, Hopkins’s menacing performance – and his lip-smacking relish for human body parts – will always have you on the edge of your seat. Tuesday 6 February Flatpack Empire: James Futcher at SAPA aluminium factory Flatpack Empire BBC Two, 9.00pm There can’t be many urbanites in the UK who haven’t puzzled over the assembly instructions for a piece of Ikea furniture, let alone had the odd experience of being funnelled like a mouse in a maze through one of the firm’s vast depot-like stores. For this series, the Swedish company has granted a camera crew “worldwide access” – from their design headquarters in Sweden to Indian furniture factories and Polish sawmills – to film the £33 billion corporate Goliath’s global operations over the course of a year. Perhaps the biggest surprise (and certainly the thing that Ikea wants us most to know about) is their current move – unthinkable previously – into collaborations with prestige independent designers and other brands, such as audio giants Sonos and fashion designer Virgil Abloh. Among the more interesting is a project with British furniture designer Tom Dixon. “It’s not a sofa-bed, it’s a bed-sofa, but it’s really it’s a platform for living,” says Dixon, a mite grumpily, likening his role to that of a “benign parasite, where I can make a living out of this huge beast”. Maybe they’ll call the finished product “the bed bug” instead of the Swedish names that us Brits struggle to pronounce. Gerard O’Donovan Back in Time for Tea BBC Two, 8.00pm Sara Cox heads up this northern edition of the food-oriented time travel show. Tonight, the conditions that working class Yorkshire folk had to endure 100 years ago come as a shock for the Ellis family from Bradford, especially when one of them mistakes a mangle for a pasta maker. What Would Your Kid Do? ITV, 8.00pm Jason Manford puts parents’ knowledge of their offspring to the test, as children are filmed performing tasks exploring creativity, risk-taking and rule breaking while Mum and Dad have to predict what happens next. Simple and dependably entertaining. Elizabeth: Our Queen Channel 5, 9.00pm Documentaries about the Royal family seem to be appearing at an ever-increasing rate. And now here’s Channel 5’s sprawling eight-part entry, covering her life and reign and hearing from former prime ministers, friends, royal household members and special advisors. Portrait Artist of the Year 2018 Sky Arts, 8.00pm This week’s celebrity sitters are Game of Thrones star Conleth Hill, model Rachel Hunter and actor Stefanie Martini. But, as ever, it’s not so much the well-known faces as the gentle competitiveness and warm interaction between the contestants that makes this portrait painting competition so very engaging. Art, Passion & Power: The Story of the Royal Collection BBC Four, 9.00pm In the final episode of his series on the breathtaking treasures of the Royal Collection, Andrew Graham-Dixon meets the Prince of Wales and explores the last 150 years – when, as he puts it, “women took charge” and used art to help steer the monarchy through times of turbulent change. It’s also a period in which the Royal family’s changing tastes, from Fabergé eggs to the Queen Mother’s more “daring” art acquisitions, neatly demonstrate “the determined emergence of a modern monarchy”. Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm The fourth series of Reece Shearsmith and Steve Pemberton’s darkly comic anthology has been a creepy delight. In Tempting Fate they’ve kept one of the best for last, as a team of contractors clearing out a reclusive hoarder’s council flat unleash a terrible curse. 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Everything you’d expect from Michael Bay is here with bells on – the macho provocation, the sound and fury, and the diabolical pleasure in reducing everything to rubble and bloody mush. However, as a gruelling epitaph to lives wasted, this true-life Libyan shoot-’em-up starring John Krasinski is maddeningly effective and there’s a strange purity to it. Slumdog Millionaire (2008) ★★★★★ More4, 9.00pm Eight Oscars, seven Baftas and four Golden Globes cemented Danny Boyle’s energetic adaptation of Vikas Swarup’s novel Q & A as a triumph. The chaotic beauty of Mumbai is exuberantly brought to life to tell the story of an uneducated orphan (an endearing performance from Dev Patel) from the slums who is on the verge of winning a fortune on the Hindi version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. ’71 (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.50pm Jack O’Connell excels in a near-wordless role as a naive squaddie who gets stranded on the streets of Belfast in 1971 and must throw himself on the mercy of loyalist allies, who are no certain guarantees of sanctuary. It’s a tense, at times almost unbearable watch as we’re wrong-footed all the time by the combinations of terror, guilt, manoeuvring, expediency and revenge that motivate even the most minor of characters. Wednesday 7 February My Millionaire Migrant Boss My Millionaire Migrant Boss Channel 4, 9.00pm Initially, this one-off documentary – following Pakistani multi-millionaire Marwan Koukash as he puts four unemployed Brits through their paces for two weeks, before deciding whether or not to give them a job at his swanky Liverpool hotel – seems like an odd attempt to make The Apprentice on the Dole. But park that knee-jerk criticism right there because what actually unfolds is a thoughtful film in which the tough-but-likeable Koukash refuses to either play to the camera or write off his four eager contenders. That’s not to say that it’s all plain sailing: bubbly Georgia’s chronic unpunctuality soon causes issues, while Koukash, who grew up in a war zone, seems unsure of how to deal with 25-year-old Joe’s lack of confidence. The most entertaining moments, however, come in the hotelier’s relationship with the apparently lazy Heidi, who admits early on that she isn’t really sure why she has to have a job before adding: “I can’t really find out what I want to do.” A less interesting programme would have ensured that Heidi’s role was to infuriate both Koukash and the viewers at home – instead what emerges is surprisingly touching. Sarah Hughes Stacey Dooley: Face to Face with ISIS BBC Three, from 10.00am This harrowing film follows Shireen, a Yazidi woman, as she returns to Iraq with reporter Stacey Dooley for a reckoning with her past. The pair face down soldiers and officials, many of whom seem intent on ensuring that those past atrocities are never mentioned. The final confrontation between Shireen and Anmar, an Islamic State commander, sees the latter squirm blankly as the former finally and movingly gives voice to her pain. Eurovision: You Decide BBC Two, 7.30pm Six lucky contestants battle it out for the dubious honour of becoming Britain’s entrant to the 2018 Eurovision Song Contest. Among the hopefuls are a 16-year-old former Britain’s Got Talent finalist, two former The Voice UK contestants and a Eurovision backing singer. Kirstie and Phil’s Love It or List It Channel 4, 8.00pm The dynamic duo are in Windsor this week, where they meet the Farhall family who can’t decide whether they should sell their four-bedroom detached home. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This series about the history of fashion comes to an end with a look at the story behind Marie Antoinette’s famously risqué portrait in her chemise. Butchart unpicks the meaning behind the painting, looking at what the unhappy French queen was trying to convey while also considering how and why her intended message backfired. It’s a lovely conclusion to a hugely enjoyable series – here’s hoping for a swift return. The New Builds Are Coming: Battle in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Richard Macer’s topical documentary concludes with the focus shifting towards those responsible for the Cullham new builds. “Nobody has a right to a view,” states one architect. Maybe not, but as Macer talks to all involved, so it becomes increasingly clear that this is not an issue that can be easily solved. Girlfriends ITV, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama reaches its conclusion as Sue (Miranda Richardson) and Gail (Zoë Wanamaker) discover that Linda (Phyllis Logan) hasn’t exactly been honest with them about her relationship with her late husband. Harvey (1950, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am James Stewart stars as Elwood Dowd, a middle-aged, wide-eyed dreamer who spends his days getting tipsy with his best friend, a six-foot-three invisible white rabbit called Harvey. His sister Veta (an Oscar-winning Josephine Hull) tries to reform him and a comedy of errors ensues. Henry Koster’s adaptation of Mary Chase’s play is breezy, but has a lot to say about the importance of tolerance. Tango & Cash (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Bringing together two of Hollywood’s biggest action heroes, this silly shoot-’em-up is strangely appealing. Sylvester Stallone is Tango, a slick, sophisticated drug squad cop. Cash (Kurt Russell) is his uncultured rival on the force. And they don’t get on. But when they are framed and sent to prison, they’re forced to work together. It’s pure Eighties bombast, with Yazoo and Alice Cooper on the soundtrack. Harmonium (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.10pm Koji Fukada’s subtle, slow-burning thriller tells of how a family’s fragile domestic bliss is forever altered when an old friend comes to stay and teaches the daughter (Momone Shinokawa) to play the titular instrument. It’s an elegant and gripping film, with a tragic twist halfway through, and rightly won the prize in the Un Certain Regard section at the Cannes Film Festival. Thursday 8 February James Bulger: A Mother's Story James Bulger: a Mother’s Story ITV, 9.00pm Opening with the sound of Jon Venables describing in a matter-of-fact manner how he and fellow 10-year-old Robert Thompson beat and stoned toddler James Bulger to death on a railway track, this documentary relives one of the most horrifying murders of the last century in often very difficult detail. Structured around an interview between Trevor McDonald and Bulger’s mother, Denise Fergus, it exerts an awful grip while never quite deciphering the murder itself. Fergus recounts her unimaginable trauma, police and social workers describe their parts in the events and McDonald describes the trajectory of the case, from abduction to sentencing and an aftermath that has seen Fergus surround her house with CCTV cameras and Venables convicted of child pornography offences. The statements of the two killers – both, we are reminded, with troubled backgrounds – in particular are chilling: manipulative, jokey and fearful. The resilience and courage of Fergus, meanwhile, is admirable and unflinching some 25 years on: “The day I stop speaking about James,” she explains, “is the day I join him.” Gabriel Tate Death in Paradise BBC One, 9.00pm Another surreally absurd case for Jack Mooney (Ardal O’Hanlon), as the leader of a spiritual retreat is strangled while his fellow members are deep in group meditation. Trouble at the Zoo BBC Two, 9.00pm The images and stories that came out of Cumbria’s South Lakes Safari Zoo last year were deeply troubling, forcing management to step down in the face of evidence that almost 500 animals had died there in under four years. Jack Rampling’s challenging observational documentary follows staff trying to keep the institution open in the face of widespread scepticism and queries whether zoos have a place in modern society. Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 9.00pm Scraping the barrel scarcely covers this new series in which the erstwhile Supermarket Sweep host traverses the Sunshine State to check out Walt Disney World, shopping centres and spiritualists. Derry Girls Channel 4, 10.00pm One of the big comedy hits of the year so far, Lisa McGee’s evocative, ribald sitcom set during the Troubles ends with Erin (Saoirse-Monica Jackson) getting her big break as editor of the school magazine. But with great power comes great and largely unwanted responsibility. Nazi Victory: the Postwar Plan UKTV Play, from today Starting (confusingly enough) on the Yesterday channel next week, this engaging new series explores what might have happened in the event of a Nazi victory in the Second World War, from the fifth columnists planted in the United States through to his plans for concentration camps and national monuments in Britain. The latter forms the basis of this opening episode. Britannia Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Jez Butterworth’s compellingly berserk drama rampages through its fourth episode as Kerra (Kelly Reilly) is cast out by her father, King Pellenor, for parlaying with the Romans. How dare she betray the Cantii clan? He throws her to the mercy of the Druids – let’s just hope that she doesn’t meet the same fate as her mother. Meanwhile, former Druid Divis (Nikolaj Lie Kaas) suspects that there is more to General Aulus (David Morrissey) than meets the eye. Lucy (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm In this brilliant, bombastic sci-fi romp from Luc Besson, Scarlett Johansson (always worth watching) plays a drug mule who is dosed with an experimental substance that increases her brainpower by an untold degree. Space-time becomes a flick book, and Lucy’s the girl to rifle through its pages. Besson described it as La Femme Nikita plus Inception plus 2001: A Space Odyssey: that’s ambitious, egotistical, and mostly right. The Hurt Locker (2008) ★★★★☆ TCM, 9.00pm Kathryn Bigelow (Point Break) won the Best Director Oscar (the first woman to do so) for her blistering drama about a bomb disposal unit leading a perilous existence in Iraq. Jeremy Renner is outstanding as a reckless maverick who delights in putting himself in harm’s way, while the jittery cinematography stokes up the suspense to almost unbearable levels. Ralph Fiennes puts in a nice cameo as a military contractor. The Diary of a Teenage Girl (2015) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm This startling debut by Marielle Heller shows the funny side of a teenager’s explorations into her sexuality as a 15-year-old wannabe cartoonist Minnie (Bel Powley) seduces her mother’s 35-year-old boyfriend Monroe (Alexander Skarsgard). Heller’s nimble direction and clever script ensure that the film never paints either Minnie or Monroe entirely as victim or predator. Friday 9 February Winter Olympics 2018: the BBC presenting team Live Winter Olympics 2018 Opening Ceremony BBC One, 10.30am These are interesting times on the Korean peninsula, which will no doubt bring an added frisson to the Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony in Pyeongchang, South Korea. More than 3,000 athletes from 90 countries are expected to march in the ceremony, which will feature a historic moment when the North and South Korean teams march together under a unified flag. History is also being made with the disqualification of Russia from the contest due to its state-sponsored doping scandal, although, controversially, 169 Russian athletes will still compete under a designated Olympic flag. The setting for the occasion is the 35,000- seater Pyeongchang Olympic Stadium, and the following three hours of coverage comes from sure-footed BBC favourite Clare Balding, who’ll also present highlights on BBC Two at 7.00pm on BBC Two. Team GB has set its sights on a record five medals, including perhaps its first in skiing. It’s expected that North Korean artistes will perform at the ceremony in a spirit of cooperation, and while we can’t expect anything as glorious as Danny Boyle’s madcap mega-party for London 2012, we hope for a memorable kick-off to these historic Games. Vicki Power Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Actor Josh Hartnett joins his co-hosts to whip up a beloved ramen dish as the cookery show concludes its fifth series. Jamie Oliver prepares a game curry before trotting off with pal Jimmy Doherty to investigate a new method of farming. Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm Creepy noises and unexplained presences continue to unsettle incomer Matilda (Lydia Wilson) in this thriller. Determined to find out if she’s the child who disappeared from a Welsh backwater 24 years ago, Matilda begins to anger reluctant locals with her questions. Jamestown Sky One, 9.00pm A dramatic series of events in this episode provides an inkling of the high-stakes in store for season two of this glossy period piece based on the shipments of English brides to the American colonies in 1619. The opener sees Alice (Sophie Rundle) give birth and Jocelyn (Naomi Battrick) face tragedy. Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm The sharp-as-ever sitcom veers into sentimentality with the death of Rosario, the maid that Karen (Megan Mullally) loved to torment. But it’s nicely counterbalanced by Jack’s (Sean Hayes) hilarious funeral speech and a punchy cameo from Minnie Driver. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm There are performers on a well-deserved victory lap feature here. Debra Messing and Eric McCormack soak up praise for the Will & Grace revival (see preview, left), actress Saoirse Ronan basks in the glow of her third Oscar nod, and Keala Settle performs the Oscar-nominated This Is Me from The Greatest Showman. The Bold Type Amazon Prime, from today This fun comedy drama follows friends Jane (Katie Stevens), Kat (Aisha Dee) and Sutton (Meghann Fahy) working at a glossy magazine in New York. In the first episode, Jane is asked to write about her ex, while Kat attempts to convince an artist to be featured. Grand Prix Driver Amazon Prime, from today Michael Douglas narrates this behind-the-scenes look at McLaren’s F1 team during their difficult 2017 season. The four half-hour episodes take us inside McLaren’s mission control during troublesome test drives. Baywatch (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm Baywatch the TV show became a phenomenon, but everything about Baywatch the movie is big, brash and bombastic. Dwayne Johnson is preposterously buff in the role of chief lifeguard Mitch Buchannon, while Zac Efron as new recruit Matt Brody is in full-on idiot mode. A cameo by David Hasselhoff, however, appearing to the strains of Jimi Jamison’s theme I’ll Be Ready, will raise a smile. Looper (2012) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm It’s impossible not to be tickled by the playful logic of this sleek sci-fi film that ticks along with pocket-watch precision. Joseph Gordon-Levitt is a “looper” – an assassin whose targets are zapped back to him from 30 years in the future, before his contract expires and his final target is his future self. It sounds confusing, but works, and has a great cast that includes Emily Blunt, Bruce Willis and Piper Perabo. The Cabin in the Woods (2012) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.20pm Don’t be fooled by its young cast (including a pre-Thor Chris Hemsworth) and stereotypical teenage-horror appeal: Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard’s clever detonation of the scary movie is very good, with the genre’s most original plot twist in years. The story, however, is a classic one: five friends visit a cabin in the woods, where they encounter more than they bargained for. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
What's on TV tonight: new Endeavour, a weepy Call the Midwife and McMafia reaches boiling point
Sunday 4 February Endeavour ITV, 8.00pm With the likes of Black Mirror, we live in an age of increasingly inventive television, but sometimes what we all need is a nice straightforward period procedural to relax in front of on a Sunday night. Russell Lewis’s Endeavour, now returning for a fifth series, ticks all the boxes. There’s a solid cast, anchored by Shaun Evans, as the young, less grumpy, more awkward Endeavour Morse; some nice if occasionally a little precise period detail (although I did like the throwaway reference to boxer Freddie Mills); and a plot that’s just twisty enough to allow viewers to play “guess the killer”. This opening episode is a pretty bleak affair, centring around a missing Fabergé egg and a series of seemingly unlinked deaths which (topically) turn out to have their origins in a riotous stag party. Along the way, Endeavour deals with an eager but unwanted new underling (Poldark’s Lewis Peek) and crosses swords with a sharp-witted “good-time girl” (Charlotte Hope), who delivers some home truths about his tendency to put women on pedestals. Meanwhile, the wonderful Roger Allam continues to steal every scene as Detective Chief Inspector Fred Thursday. Really someone should just give him his own show. Sarah Hughes Six Nations Rugby Union: Italy v England ITV, 2.15pm Kicking off their defence of their title, England are at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome, where they face Italy. Eddie Jones’s prospects for winning an unprecedented three championships in a row have been given a major boost: Jack Nowell, Chris Robshaw, Maro Itoje and Mike Brown, who were all doubts, have all been miraculously passed fit. Italy gave the champions a scare at Twickenham last term by taking a 10-5 half-time lead, but England eventually prevailed 36-15, with Nowell and Danny Care among the scorers. Premier League Football: Liverpool v Tottenham Hotspur Sky Sports Main Event, 4.15pm Having bounced back from their defeat at Swansea with a 3-0 victory against Huddersfield – thanks to goals from Emre Can, Roberto Firmino and Mohamed Salah – Liverpool host Spurs, who are one place beneath them in fifth. When these sides met in October, two goals from Harry Kane (who else?) helped Spurs to a comprehensive 4-1 victory. Call the Midwife BBC One, 8.00pm Prepare for a real weepy as Nurse Crane (Linda Bassett) and Trixie (Helen George) try to find out what secret a pregnant mother and her family are hiding. Elsewhere, Shelagh (Laura Main) worries that her new au pair isn’t making friends. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm The eccentric yet compelling journey comes to an end as Silver Lady heads towards Inverness. Will bad weather and issues with batteries bring this great experiment to a halt? Inside Number 10 BBC Parliament, 8.00pm We know all about the pressures of being Prime Minister but what about those real-life Sir Humphrey Applebys, the Cabinet Secretaries, aka the powers behind the throne? This interesting new series sees Sue Cameron interview all five living former Cabinet Secretaries about the premierships of Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and David Cameron. McMafia BBC One, 9.00pm The action hots up considerably in this penultimate episode as Alex’s (James Norton) lies unravel. But it’s the Aleksei Serebryakov (as Alex’s father Dimitri) who continues to steal the show. Meanwhile, there’s an excellent vignette featuring nemesis Vadim (Merab Ninidze) chopping wood semi-clothed, presumably in homage to Vladimir Putin. Maltese: The Mafia Detective Channel 4, 10.00pm It might not be the most original series but this Italian import is among the most stylish. The setting is the Seventies and we open with a bang as maverick but honest cop Dario Maltese (Kim Rossi Stuart) finds himself dragged back to the corrupt Sicilian society he left years before. Arena: Stanley and his Daughters BBC Four, 10.00pm What is it really like to be the child of a genius? That question haunts the subjects of this fascinating film about the artist Stanley Spencer and his two daughters, Shirin and Unity. Now 91 and 87, Shirin and Unity were estranged for most of their lives after being separated as children. “I do feel that you were jealous of me for a time,” says Unity while Shirin looks askance. What follows is a complex and complicated story of art, betrayal, love and loss which also allows us to view Spencer’s work anew. American Football: Super Bowl LII Sky Sports Main Event, 11.00pm & BBC One, 11.15pm Hot dogs and Buffalo wings at the ready, as the New England Patriots, looking to win back-to-back Super Bowls, take on Philadelphia Eagles in Minneapolis at the US Bank Stadium. The New England Patriots overcame the Jackonsville Jaguars to set up a finale against the Eagles, who are playing in the showpiece for the first time since 2005, when they lost to the Pats. Much of the attention will be on the Patriots’ 40-year-old quarterback Tom Brady, who is attempting to become the first player to win six Super Bowl rings. Jane Eyre (1943, b/w) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 2.10pm Deep focus and shadows give Robert Stevenson’s version of Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel an extra tinge of Gothic atmosphere. Orson Welles, who provides his Mr Rochester with a hammy melancholy, is an omniscient presence but Joan Fontaine, who had a tendency to be outshone by more dynamic leading men (Cary Grant, Laurence Olivier), is formidable as Jane. Look out for Elizabeth Taylor as the ill-fated Helen Burns. Shark Tale (2004) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 4.40pm Some of Hollywood’s most famous actors, including Will Smith, Robert De Niro, Renée Zellweger, Jack Black and Angelina Jolie (as well as director Martin Scorsese) provide the voices in this comedy animation about a mafia shark family and a little wrasse (Smith) who becomes a hero after surviving a shark encounter. It’s not as good as Finding Nemo but much better than Ice Age. Plenty of gags for grown-ups, too. Yves Saint Laurent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.25am This window into the world of French fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent tells a compelling if not especially potent story. It was made with the blessing of his partner, Pierre Bergé, and charts almost the entire trip, from Saint Laurent’s upbringing in French Algeria to his rise to stardom at Christian Dior and the sexy, druggy, lucrative whirl that followed. Pierre Niney gives good doe-eyed fragility in the title role. Monday 5 February Moving On: Sue Johnston and Paula Wilcox star in Tuesday's episode Moving On BBC One, 2.15pm Jimmy McGovern’s long-running anthology series, beginning its ninth run with another five stories spread across a week, is an exemplar of daytime drama, unafraid to tackle difficult issues and frequently promoting the work of novice writers or directors. That it occasionally settles said issues a little too neatly is understandable – no one wants gale-force McGovern over tea and biscuits – but they reliably make a virtue of the short running-time to deliver intensity and coiled emotion. Stories later in the week (at 2.15pm every afternoon and 2.45pm on Friday) include Sue Johnston’s grieving widow seeking comfort in an unlikely place and Samantha Bond’s registrar forced to re-evaluate her own marriage after an unwelcome discovery. The gripping opener, however, is written by and stars Jodhi May as Rachel, a woman wrestling with the news that the teacher who abused her as a child is back working in the area. Sinead Cusack supplies doughty support as Rachel’s guilt-stricken mother, but May is hauntingly good as a woman torn between exposing her abuser and the potential impact that reopening old wounds may have on her marriage and children. Gabriel Tate My Life: Locked In Boy CBBC, 5.30pm This is a moving account of a 10-year-old whose cerebral palsy left him unable to communicate for eight years. Beginning with an alphabet board and his mother’s help, Jonathan now has a reading age beyond his years, writes poetry and is petitioning MPs to improve education for children with his condition. Horizon: My Amazing Brain: Richard’s War BBC Two, 9.00pm An extraordinary document of both personal fortitude and scientific endeavour, Fiona Lloyd-Davies’s film follows the recovery of her husband, former UN peacekeeper Richard Gray, from a stroke. Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Danny (Viveik Kalra) tries to thwart the plans of the terror cell, Omar (Mawaan Rizwan) takes matters into his own hands and Guy (Jack Davenport) faces powerful enemies. Once again packing its excitements into the closing minutes after a lengthy, patient build-up, this decent thriller concludes tomorrow. The Bulger Killers: Was Justice Done? Channel 4, 9.00pm Rather than reliving the terrible event itself, Matt Smith’s thoughtful film gathers together legal experts and those involved in the case to debate the sufficiency of the eight years served by John Venables and Robert Thompson for the murder of James Bulger in 1993. The X-Files Channel 5, 9.00pm After a patchy revival last year, The X Files rediscovers its mojo with an 11th series opener high on fun and intrigue. Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) lies hospitalised after a seizure, so Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) goes in search of their son as war looms between humans and aliens. Hull’s Headscarf Heroes BBC Four, 9.00pm Steve Humphries’s documentary meets the redoubtable Yvonne Blenkinsop, leader of the “headscarf” campaign against Hull’s trawler companies whose questionable attitude towards crew safety cost 58 lives in a series of tragedies in 1968. Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm In 2013, a gunman killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard. This documentary features an interview with the killer’s sister, still wrestling with his descent into violence. Rear Window (1954) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.40pm Wonderful in its simplicity and compelling in its execution, this belongs in the first rank of Hitchcock’s canon. The director presents a vignette of life through the lens of photographer L B “Jeff” Jeffries (James Stewart), immobilised by a broken leg during a blistering heatwave. Events take an interesting turn when he suspects one of his neighbours across the courtyard may have murdered his wife. Lincoln (2012) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Daniel Day-Lewis is on marvellous, and Oscar-winning, form as Abraham Lincoln, in Steven Spielberg’s intelligent, focused and robust film about the battle to abolish slavery. The film makes no attempt to cover the entire, unwieldy life of its subject. Instead, it dwells solely on the final months of Lincoln’s presidency, during which the political and personal stakes were never higher. Tommy Lee Jones co-stars. The Silence of the Lambs (1991) ★★★★★ Channel 5, 10.00pm Anthony Hopkins triumphs in this creepy thriller as the psychotic Dr Hannibal Lecter who is recruited by trainee FBI agent Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) to track down a serial killer nicknamed Buffalo Bill. No matter how many times you watch this film, Hopkins’s menacing performance – and his lip-smacking relish for human body parts – will always have you on the edge of your seat. Tuesday 6 February Flatpack Empire: James Futcher at SAPA aluminium factory Flatpack Empire BBC Two, 9.00pm There can’t be many urbanites in the UK who haven’t puzzled over the assembly instructions for a piece of Ikea furniture, let alone had the odd experience of being funnelled like a mouse in a maze through one of the firm’s vast depot-like stores. For this series, the Swedish company has granted a camera crew “worldwide access” – from their design headquarters in Sweden to Indian furniture factories and Polish sawmills – to film the £33 billion corporate Goliath’s global operations over the course of a year. Perhaps the biggest surprise (and certainly the thing that Ikea wants us most to know about) is their current move – unthinkable previously – into collaborations with prestige independent designers and other brands, such as audio giants Sonos and fashion designer Virgil Abloh. Among the more interesting is a project with British furniture designer Tom Dixon. “It’s not a sofa-bed, it’s a bed-sofa, but it’s really it’s a platform for living,” says Dixon, a mite grumpily, likening his role to that of a “benign parasite, where I can make a living out of this huge beast”. Maybe they’ll call the finished product “the bed bug” instead of the Swedish names that us Brits struggle to pronounce. Gerard O’Donovan Back in Time for Tea BBC Two, 8.00pm Sara Cox heads up this northern edition of the food-oriented time travel show. Tonight, the conditions that working class Yorkshire folk had to endure 100 years ago come as a shock for the Ellis family from Bradford, especially when one of them mistakes a mangle for a pasta maker. What Would Your Kid Do? ITV, 8.00pm Jason Manford puts parents’ knowledge of their offspring to the test, as children are filmed performing tasks exploring creativity, risk-taking and rule breaking while Mum and Dad have to predict what happens next. Simple and dependably entertaining. Elizabeth: Our Queen Channel 5, 9.00pm Documentaries about the Royal family seem to be appearing at an ever-increasing rate. And now here’s Channel 5’s sprawling eight-part entry, covering her life and reign and hearing from former prime ministers, friends, royal household members and special advisors. Portrait Artist of the Year 2018 Sky Arts, 8.00pm This week’s celebrity sitters are Game of Thrones star Conleth Hill, model Rachel Hunter and actor Stefanie Martini. But, as ever, it’s not so much the well-known faces as the gentle competitiveness and warm interaction between the contestants that makes this portrait painting competition so very engaging. Art, Passion & Power: The Story of the Royal Collection BBC Four, 9.00pm In the final episode of his series on the breathtaking treasures of the Royal Collection, Andrew Graham-Dixon meets the Prince of Wales and explores the last 150 years – when, as he puts it, “women took charge” and used art to help steer the monarchy through times of turbulent change. It’s also a period in which the Royal family’s changing tastes, from Fabergé eggs to the Queen Mother’s more “daring” art acquisitions, neatly demonstrate “the determined emergence of a modern monarchy”. Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm The fourth series of Reece Shearsmith and Steve Pemberton’s darkly comic anthology has been a creepy delight. In Tempting Fate they’ve kept one of the best for last, as a team of contractors clearing out a reclusive hoarder’s council flat unleash a terrible curse. 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Everything you’d expect from Michael Bay is here with bells on – the macho provocation, the sound and fury, and the diabolical pleasure in reducing everything to rubble and bloody mush. However, as a gruelling epitaph to lives wasted, this true-life Libyan shoot-’em-up starring John Krasinski is maddeningly effective and there’s a strange purity to it. Slumdog Millionaire (2008) ★★★★★ More4, 9.00pm Eight Oscars, seven Baftas and four Golden Globes cemented Danny Boyle’s energetic adaptation of Vikas Swarup’s novel Q & A as a triumph. The chaotic beauty of Mumbai is exuberantly brought to life to tell the story of an uneducated orphan (an endearing performance from Dev Patel) from the slums who is on the verge of winning a fortune on the Hindi version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. ’71 (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.50pm Jack O’Connell excels in a near-wordless role as a naive squaddie who gets stranded on the streets of Belfast in 1971 and must throw himself on the mercy of loyalist allies, who are no certain guarantees of sanctuary. It’s a tense, at times almost unbearable watch as we’re wrong-footed all the time by the combinations of terror, guilt, manoeuvring, expediency and revenge that motivate even the most minor of characters. Wednesday 7 February My Millionaire Migrant Boss My Millionaire Migrant Boss Channel 4, 9.00pm Initially, this one-off documentary – following Pakistani multi-millionaire Marwan Koukash as he puts four unemployed Brits through their paces for two weeks, before deciding whether or not to give them a job at his swanky Liverpool hotel – seems like an odd attempt to make The Apprentice on the Dole. But park that knee-jerk criticism right there because what actually unfolds is a thoughtful film in which the tough-but-likeable Koukash refuses to either play to the camera or write off his four eager contenders. That’s not to say that it’s all plain sailing: bubbly Georgia’s chronic unpunctuality soon causes issues, while Koukash, who grew up in a war zone, seems unsure of how to deal with 25-year-old Joe’s lack of confidence. The most entertaining moments, however, come in the hotelier’s relationship with the apparently lazy Heidi, who admits early on that she isn’t really sure why she has to have a job before adding: “I can’t really find out what I want to do.” A less interesting programme would have ensured that Heidi’s role was to infuriate both Koukash and the viewers at home – instead what emerges is surprisingly touching. Sarah Hughes Stacey Dooley: Face to Face with ISIS BBC Three, from 10.00am This harrowing film follows Shireen, a Yazidi woman, as she returns to Iraq with reporter Stacey Dooley for a reckoning with her past. The pair face down soldiers and officials, many of whom seem intent on ensuring that those past atrocities are never mentioned. The final confrontation between Shireen and Anmar, an Islamic State commander, sees the latter squirm blankly as the former finally and movingly gives voice to her pain. Eurovision: You Decide BBC Two, 7.30pm Six lucky contestants battle it out for the dubious honour of becoming Britain’s entrant to the 2018 Eurovision Song Contest. Among the hopefuls are a 16-year-old former Britain’s Got Talent finalist, two former The Voice UK contestants and a Eurovision backing singer. Kirstie and Phil’s Love It or List It Channel 4, 8.00pm The dynamic duo are in Windsor this week, where they meet the Farhall family who can’t decide whether they should sell their four-bedroom detached home. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This series about the history of fashion comes to an end with a look at the story behind Marie Antoinette’s famously risqué portrait in her chemise. Butchart unpicks the meaning behind the painting, looking at what the unhappy French queen was trying to convey while also considering how and why her intended message backfired. It’s a lovely conclusion to a hugely enjoyable series – here’s hoping for a swift return. The New Builds Are Coming: Battle in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Richard Macer’s topical documentary concludes with the focus shifting towards those responsible for the Cullham new builds. “Nobody has a right to a view,” states one architect. Maybe not, but as Macer talks to all involved, so it becomes increasingly clear that this is not an issue that can be easily solved. Girlfriends ITV, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama reaches its conclusion as Sue (Miranda Richardson) and Gail (Zoë Wanamaker) discover that Linda (Phyllis Logan) hasn’t exactly been honest with them about her relationship with her late husband. Harvey (1950, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am James Stewart stars as Elwood Dowd, a middle-aged, wide-eyed dreamer who spends his days getting tipsy with his best friend, a six-foot-three invisible white rabbit called Harvey. His sister Veta (an Oscar-winning Josephine Hull) tries to reform him and a comedy of errors ensues. Henry Koster’s adaptation of Mary Chase’s play is breezy, but has a lot to say about the importance of tolerance. Tango & Cash (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Bringing together two of Hollywood’s biggest action heroes, this silly shoot-’em-up is strangely appealing. Sylvester Stallone is Tango, a slick, sophisticated drug squad cop. Cash (Kurt Russell) is his uncultured rival on the force. And they don’t get on. But when they are framed and sent to prison, they’re forced to work together. It’s pure Eighties bombast, with Yazoo and Alice Cooper on the soundtrack. Harmonium (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.10pm Koji Fukada’s subtle, slow-burning thriller tells of how a family’s fragile domestic bliss is forever altered when an old friend comes to stay and teaches the daughter (Momone Shinokawa) to play the titular instrument. It’s an elegant and gripping film, with a tragic twist halfway through, and rightly won the prize in the Un Certain Regard section at the Cannes Film Festival. Thursday 8 February James Bulger: A Mother's Story James Bulger: a Mother’s Story ITV, 9.00pm Opening with the sound of Jon Venables describing in a matter-of-fact manner how he and fellow 10-year-old Robert Thompson beat and stoned toddler James Bulger to death on a railway track, this documentary relives one of the most horrifying murders of the last century in often very difficult detail. Structured around an interview between Trevor McDonald and Bulger’s mother, Denise Fergus, it exerts an awful grip while never quite deciphering the murder itself. Fergus recounts her unimaginable trauma, police and social workers describe their parts in the events and McDonald describes the trajectory of the case, from abduction to sentencing and an aftermath that has seen Fergus surround her house with CCTV cameras and Venables convicted of child pornography offences. The statements of the two killers – both, we are reminded, with troubled backgrounds – in particular are chilling: manipulative, jokey and fearful. The resilience and courage of Fergus, meanwhile, is admirable and unflinching some 25 years on: “The day I stop speaking about James,” she explains, “is the day I join him.” Gabriel Tate Death in Paradise BBC One, 9.00pm Another surreally absurd case for Jack Mooney (Ardal O’Hanlon), as the leader of a spiritual retreat is strangled while his fellow members are deep in group meditation. Trouble at the Zoo BBC Two, 9.00pm The images and stories that came out of Cumbria’s South Lakes Safari Zoo last year were deeply troubling, forcing management to step down in the face of evidence that almost 500 animals had died there in under four years. Jack Rampling’s challenging observational documentary follows staff trying to keep the institution open in the face of widespread scepticism and queries whether zoos have a place in modern society. Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 9.00pm Scraping the barrel scarcely covers this new series in which the erstwhile Supermarket Sweep host traverses the Sunshine State to check out Walt Disney World, shopping centres and spiritualists. Derry Girls Channel 4, 10.00pm One of the big comedy hits of the year so far, Lisa McGee’s evocative, ribald sitcom set during the Troubles ends with Erin (Saoirse-Monica Jackson) getting her big break as editor of the school magazine. But with great power comes great and largely unwanted responsibility. Nazi Victory: the Postwar Plan UKTV Play, from today Starting (confusingly enough) on the Yesterday channel next week, this engaging new series explores what might have happened in the event of a Nazi victory in the Second World War, from the fifth columnists planted in the United States through to his plans for concentration camps and national monuments in Britain. The latter forms the basis of this opening episode. Britannia Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Jez Butterworth’s compellingly berserk drama rampages through its fourth episode as Kerra (Kelly Reilly) is cast out by her father, King Pellenor, for parlaying with the Romans. How dare she betray the Cantii clan? He throws her to the mercy of the Druids – let’s just hope that she doesn’t meet the same fate as her mother. Meanwhile, former Druid Divis (Nikolaj Lie Kaas) suspects that there is more to General Aulus (David Morrissey) than meets the eye. Lucy (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm In this brilliant, bombastic sci-fi romp from Luc Besson, Scarlett Johansson (always worth watching) plays a drug mule who is dosed with an experimental substance that increases her brainpower by an untold degree. Space-time becomes a flick book, and Lucy’s the girl to rifle through its pages. Besson described it as La Femme Nikita plus Inception plus 2001: A Space Odyssey: that’s ambitious, egotistical, and mostly right. The Hurt Locker (2008) ★★★★☆ TCM, 9.00pm Kathryn Bigelow (Point Break) won the Best Director Oscar (the first woman to do so) for her blistering drama about a bomb disposal unit leading a perilous existence in Iraq. Jeremy Renner is outstanding as a reckless maverick who delights in putting himself in harm’s way, while the jittery cinematography stokes up the suspense to almost unbearable levels. Ralph Fiennes puts in a nice cameo as a military contractor. The Diary of a Teenage Girl (2015) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm This startling debut by Marielle Heller shows the funny side of a teenager’s explorations into her sexuality as a 15-year-old wannabe cartoonist Minnie (Bel Powley) seduces her mother’s 35-year-old boyfriend Monroe (Alexander Skarsgard). Heller’s nimble direction and clever script ensure that the film never paints either Minnie or Monroe entirely as victim or predator. Friday 9 February Winter Olympics 2018: the BBC presenting team Live Winter Olympics 2018 Opening Ceremony BBC One, 10.30am These are interesting times on the Korean peninsula, which will no doubt bring an added frisson to the Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony in Pyeongchang, South Korea. More than 3,000 athletes from 90 countries are expected to march in the ceremony, which will feature a historic moment when the North and South Korean teams march together under a unified flag. History is also being made with the disqualification of Russia from the contest due to its state-sponsored doping scandal, although, controversially, 169 Russian athletes will still compete under a designated Olympic flag. The setting for the occasion is the 35,000- seater Pyeongchang Olympic Stadium, and the following three hours of coverage comes from sure-footed BBC favourite Clare Balding, who’ll also present highlights on BBC Two at 7.00pm on BBC Two. Team GB has set its sights on a record five medals, including perhaps its first in skiing. It’s expected that North Korean artistes will perform at the ceremony in a spirit of cooperation, and while we can’t expect anything as glorious as Danny Boyle’s madcap mega-party for London 2012, we hope for a memorable kick-off to these historic Games. Vicki Power Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Actor Josh Hartnett joins his co-hosts to whip up a beloved ramen dish as the cookery show concludes its fifth series. Jamie Oliver prepares a game curry before trotting off with pal Jimmy Doherty to investigate a new method of farming. Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm Creepy noises and unexplained presences continue to unsettle incomer Matilda (Lydia Wilson) in this thriller. Determined to find out if she’s the child who disappeared from a Welsh backwater 24 years ago, Matilda begins to anger reluctant locals with her questions. Jamestown Sky One, 9.00pm A dramatic series of events in this episode provides an inkling of the high-stakes in store for season two of this glossy period piece based on the shipments of English brides to the American colonies in 1619. The opener sees Alice (Sophie Rundle) give birth and Jocelyn (Naomi Battrick) face tragedy. Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm The sharp-as-ever sitcom veers into sentimentality with the death of Rosario, the maid that Karen (Megan Mullally) loved to torment. But it’s nicely counterbalanced by Jack’s (Sean Hayes) hilarious funeral speech and a punchy cameo from Minnie Driver. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm There are performers on a well-deserved victory lap feature here. Debra Messing and Eric McCormack soak up praise for the Will & Grace revival (see preview, left), actress Saoirse Ronan basks in the glow of her third Oscar nod, and Keala Settle performs the Oscar-nominated This Is Me from The Greatest Showman. The Bold Type Amazon Prime, from today This fun comedy drama follows friends Jane (Katie Stevens), Kat (Aisha Dee) and Sutton (Meghann Fahy) working at a glossy magazine in New York. In the first episode, Jane is asked to write about her ex, while Kat attempts to convince an artist to be featured. Grand Prix Driver Amazon Prime, from today Michael Douglas narrates this behind-the-scenes look at McLaren’s F1 team during their difficult 2017 season. The four half-hour episodes take us inside McLaren’s mission control during troublesome test drives. Baywatch (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm Baywatch the TV show became a phenomenon, but everything about Baywatch the movie is big, brash and bombastic. Dwayne Johnson is preposterously buff in the role of chief lifeguard Mitch Buchannon, while Zac Efron as new recruit Matt Brody is in full-on idiot mode. A cameo by David Hasselhoff, however, appearing to the strains of Jimi Jamison’s theme I’ll Be Ready, will raise a smile. Looper (2012) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm It’s impossible not to be tickled by the playful logic of this sleek sci-fi film that ticks along with pocket-watch precision. Joseph Gordon-Levitt is a “looper” – an assassin whose targets are zapped back to him from 30 years in the future, before his contract expires and his final target is his future self. It sounds confusing, but works, and has a great cast that includes Emily Blunt, Bruce Willis and Piper Perabo. The Cabin in the Woods (2012) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.20pm Don’t be fooled by its young cast (including a pre-Thor Chris Hemsworth) and stereotypical teenage-horror appeal: Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard’s clever detonation of the scary movie is very good, with the genre’s most original plot twist in years. The story, however, is a classic one: five friends visit a cabin in the woods, where they encounter more than they bargained for. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
Saturday 3 February Hard Sun BBC One, 9.30pm Five weeks in, and the BBC’s relentlessly dark, eye-wateringly violent thriller is not making much more sense than it did at the outset. All we really know is that those unlikely cops Hicks (Jim Sturgess) and Renko (Agyness Deyn) are still racing around London trying to outsmart MI5, using their belief that the world will end in a little under five years to justify doing indescribably horrible things to some indescribably horrible people. The bloody opening to this episode (suffice to say it involves an ice axe) follows on from last week’s ending in which uber-spook Grace Morrigan (Nikki Amuka-Bird) helpfully gave Renko’s psychopath son Daniel (Jojo Macari) details of who it was that raped his mother at the age 14, with predictable consequences. And guess who’s given the job of investigating the case? That’s the sort of circular plotting that gives Neil Cross’s drama its pace, intensity and throbbing sense of paranoia. But the only thing that’s truly mysterious here is how Hicks and Renko, with the security forces still breathing down their necks in pursuit of the flashdrive containing “proof” of the impending apocalypse, have any time left for the day job. Gerard O’Donovan Hugh’s Wild West BBC Two, 6.00pm; NI, 6.30pm; Wales, 5.30pm Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall heads for the Somerset Levels to witness a spectacular “murmuration” of starlings. He also discovers how one native species of butterfly was rescued from the brink of extinction. The Voice UK ITV, 8.00pm The singing contest’s second series on ITV continues to plod along, with singer Olly Murs making no great impact on the show, as yet. The blind auditions enter their fifth week with more contestants hoping that their performances will be enough to make the coaches spin their chairs. Casualty BBC One, 8.20pm Jeremy Hunt may not have predicted this year’s winter NHS crisis, but the writers of Casualty did. Here, the emergency department is in gridlock, with trolleys blocking corridors and ambulances queuing outside to admit patients. It’s just as well then that new junior doctor Bea Kinsella (Michelle Fox) is keen to get stuck in. Or is it? Grand Tours of Scotland’s Lochs BBC Two, 8.30pm In an unexpectedly explosive edition, Paul Murton visits Loch Shin, where a meteor hit the Highlands 1.2 billion years ago. Then, at Kylesku, he recalls how Britain’s “X Men” helped to destroy one of Germany’s greatest battleships during the Second World War. Johnny Cash’s Bitter Tears Sky Arts, 9.00pm This documentary celebrates one of the Man in Black’s lesser-known works, his 1964 album Bitter Tears: Ballads of the American Indian. It was a pioneering – and at the time controversial – album, which he used to draw attention to the long-running oppression of America’s native peoples. The film also covers the making of a commemorative tribute album by Emmylou Harris, Steve Earle, Kris Kristofferson and other country music stars. Spiral BBC Four, 9.00pm & 10.00pm The sixth series of this wonderfully gritty French policier, that’s been fraught even by its own standards, comes to a nail-biting climax. As gangster Drissa Camara (Narcisse Mame-Zollo) is betrayed over a gold deal, Captain Laure (Caroline Proust) and her detective team get the break they need in the Mercier case and lawyer Joséphine (Audrey Fleurot) realises that sticking to her story could place her in real jeopardy. Hamlet (1948, b/w) ★★★★★ London Live, 3.00pm This version of Shakespeare’s Hamlet was adapted and directed by Laurence Olivier, who also starred as the troubled Prince of Denmark. Despite winning the Academy Award for Best Picture, purists felt that Olivier had taken liberties with the text, condensing four hours into two and removing the characters of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. But the action remains tight and Olivier is magnificent. Suffragette (2015) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Never mind the respectable cast and period costumes – Sarah Gavron’s fiery film about the fight for women’s suffrage is far from genteel. Carey Mulligan is on form showing the transformation of Maud from bystander to activist with riveting emotional precision. As Abi Morgan’s script strips away the reasons for her to fall back into line, her nerve soars through the roof. The Talented Mr Ripley (1999) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.30pm Anthony Minghella’s glossy take on Patricia Highsmith’s novel is an engaging noir thriller with a pitch-perfect ending. New York wannabe Tom Ripley’s life changes when he begins lusting after the lifestyle of an errant playboy (Jude Law) in Italy. Matt Damon is suitably sinister in the lead role, with Philip Seymour Hoffman equally as magnificent as a bulldozer who ruptures Tom’s cosy idyll. Sunday 4 February Endeavour: Shaun Evans and Roger Allam Endeavour ITV, 8.00pm With the likes of Black Mirror, we live in an age of increasingly inventive television, but sometimes what we all need is a nice straightforward period procedural to relax in front of on a Sunday night. Russell Lewis’s Endeavour, now returning for a fifth series, ticks all the boxes. There’s a solid cast, anchored by Shaun Evans, as the young, less grumpy, more awkward Endeavour Morse; some nice if occasionally a little precise period detail (although I did like the throwaway reference to boxer Freddie Mills); and a plot that’s just twisty enough to allow viewers to play “guess the killer”. This opening episode is a pretty bleak affair, centring around a missing Fabergé egg and a series of seemingly unlinked deaths which (topically) turn out to have their origins in a riotous stag party. Along the way, Endeavour deals with an eager but unwanted new underling (Poldark’s Lewis Peek) and crosses swords with a sharp-witted “good-time girl” (Charlotte Hope), who delivers some home truths about his tendency to put women on pedestals. Meanwhile, the wonderful Roger Allam continues to steal every scene as Detective Chief Inspector Fred Thursday. Really someone should just give him his own show. Sarah Hughes Six Nations Rugby Union: Italy v England ITV, 2.15pm Kicking off their defence of their title, England are at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome, where they face Italy. Eddie Jones’s prospects for winning an unprecedented three championships in a row have been given a major boost: Jack Nowell, Chris Robshaw, Maro Itoje and Mike Brown, who were all doubts, have all been miraculously passed fit. Italy gave the champions a scare at Twickenham last term by taking a 10-5 half-time lead, but England eventually prevailed 36-15, with Nowell and Danny Care among the scorers. Premier League Football: Liverpool v Tottenham Hotspur Sky Sports Main Event, 4.15pm Having bounced back from their defeat at Swansea with a 3-0 victory against Huddersfield – thanks to goals from Emre Can, Roberto Firmino and Mohamed Salah – Liverpool host Spurs, who are one place beneath them in fifth. When these sides met in October, two goals from Harry Kane (who else?) helped Spurs to a comprehensive 4-1 victory. Call the Midwife BBC One, 8.00pm Prepare for a real weepy as Nurse Crane (Linda Bassett) and Trixie (Helen George) try to find out what secret a pregnant mother and her family are hiding. Elsewhere, Shelagh (Laura Main) worries that her new au pair isn’t making friends. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm The eccentric yet compelling journey comes to an end as Silver Lady heads towards Inverness. Will bad weather and issues with batteries bring this great experiment to a halt? Inside Number 10 BBC Parliament, 8.00pm We know all about the pressures of being Prime Minister but what about those real-life Sir Humphrey Applebys, the Cabinet Secretaries, aka the powers behind the throne? This interesting new series sees Sue Cameron interview all five living former Cabinet Secretaries about the premierships of Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and David Cameron. McMafia BBC One, 9.00pm The action hots up considerably in this penultimate episode as Alex’s (James Norton) lies unravel. But it’s the Aleksei Serebryakov (as Alex’s father Dimitri) who continues to steal the show. Meanwhile, there’s an excellent vignette featuring nemesis Vadim (Merab Ninidze) chopping wood semi-clothed, presumably in homage to Vladimir Putin. Maltese: The Mafia Detective Channel 4, 10.00pm It might not be the most original series but this Italian import is among the most stylish. The setting is the Seventies and we open with a bang as maverick but honest cop Dario Maltese (Kim Rossi Stuart) finds himself dragged back to the corrupt Sicilian society he left years before. Arena: Stanley and his Daughters BBC Four, 10.00pm What is it really like to be the child of a genius? That question haunts the subjects of this fascinating film about the artist Stanley Spencer and his two daughters, Shirin and Unity. Now 91 and 87, Shirin and Unity were estranged for most of their lives after being separated as children. “I do feel that you were jealous of me for a time,” says Unity while Shirin looks askance. What follows is a complex and complicated story of art, betrayal, love and loss which also allows us to view Spencer’s work anew. American Football: Super Bowl LII Sky Sports Main Event, 11.00pm & BBC One, 11.15pm Hot dogs and Buffalo wings at the ready, as the New England Patriots, looking to win back-to-back Super Bowls, take on Philadelphia Eagles in Minneapolis at the US Bank Stadium. The New England Patriots overcame the Jackonsville Jaguars to set up a finale against the Eagles, who are playing in the showpiece for the first time since 2005, when they lost to the Pats. Much of the attention will be on the Patriots’ 40-year-old quarterback Tom Brady, who is attempting to become the first player to win six Super Bowl rings. Jane Eyre (1943, b/w) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 2.10pm Deep focus and shadows give Robert Stevenson’s version of Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel an extra tinge of Gothic atmosphere. Orson Welles, who provides his Mr Rochester with a hammy melancholy, is an omniscient presence but Joan Fontaine, who had a tendency to be outshone by more dynamic leading men (Cary Grant, Laurence Olivier), is formidable as Jane. Look out for Elizabeth Taylor as the ill-fated Helen Burns. Shark Tale (2004) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 4.40pm Some of Hollywood’s most famous actors, including Will Smith, Robert De Niro, Renée Zellweger, Jack Black and Angelina Jolie (as well as director Martin Scorsese) provide the voices in this comedy animation about a mafia shark family and a little wrasse (Smith) who becomes a hero after surviving a shark encounter. It’s not as good as Finding Nemo but much better than Ice Age. Plenty of gags for grown-ups, too. Yves Saint Laurent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.25am This window into the world of French fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent tells a compelling if not especially potent story. It was made with the blessing of his partner, Pierre Bergé, and charts almost the entire trip, from Saint Laurent’s upbringing in French Algeria to his rise to stardom at Christian Dior and the sexy, druggy, lucrative whirl that followed. Pierre Niney gives good doe-eyed fragility in the title role. Monday 5 February Moving On: Sue Johnston and Paula Wilcox star in Tuesday's episode Moving On BBC One, 2.15pm Jimmy McGovern’s long-running anthology series, beginning its ninth run with another five stories spread across a week, is an exemplar of daytime drama, unafraid to tackle difficult issues and frequently promoting the work of novice writers or directors. That it occasionally settles said issues a little too neatly is understandable – no one wants gale-force McGovern over tea and biscuits – but they reliably make a virtue of the short running-time to deliver intensity and coiled emotion. Stories later in the week (at 2.15pm every afternoon and 2.45pm on Friday) include Sue Johnston’s grieving widow seeking comfort in an unlikely place and Samantha Bond’s registrar forced to re-evaluate her own marriage after an unwelcome discovery. The gripping opener, however, is written by and stars Jodhi May as Rachel, a woman wrestling with the news that the teacher who abused her as a child is back working in the area. Sinead Cusack supplies doughty support as Rachel’s guilt-stricken mother, but May is hauntingly good as a woman torn between exposing her abuser and the potential impact that reopening old wounds may have on her marriage and children. Gabriel Tate My Life: Locked In Boy CBBC, 5.30pm This is a moving account of a 10-year-old whose cerebral palsy left him unable to communicate for eight years. Beginning with an alphabet board and his mother’s help, Jonathan now has a reading age beyond his years, writes poetry and is petitioning MPs to improve education for children with his condition. Horizon: My Amazing Brain: Richard’s War BBC Two, 9.00pm An extraordinary document of both personal fortitude and scientific endeavour, Fiona Lloyd-Davies’s film follows the recovery of her husband, former UN peacekeeper Richard Gray, from a stroke. Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Danny (Viveik Kalra) tries to thwart the plans of the terror cell, Omar (Mawaan Rizwan) takes matters into his own hands and Guy (Jack Davenport) faces powerful enemies. Once again packing its excitements into the closing minutes after a lengthy, patient build-up, this decent thriller concludes tomorrow. The Bulger Killers: Was Justice Done? Channel 4, 9.00pm Rather than reliving the terrible event itself, Matt Smith’s thoughtful film gathers together legal experts and those involved in the case to debate the sufficiency of the eight years served by John Venables and Robert Thompson for the murder of James Bulger in 1993. The X-Files Channel 5, 9.00pm After a patchy revival last year, The X Files rediscovers its mojo with an 11th series opener high on fun and intrigue. Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) lies hospitalised after a seizure, so Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) goes in search of their son as war looms between humans and aliens. Hull’s Headscarf Heroes BBC Four, 9.00pm Steve Humphries’s documentary meets the redoubtable Yvonne Blenkinsop, leader of the “headscarf” campaign against Hull’s trawler companies whose questionable attitude towards crew safety cost 58 lives in a series of tragedies in 1968. Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm In 2013, a gunman killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard. This documentary features an interview with the killer’s sister, still wrestling with his descent into violence. Rear Window (1954) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.40pm Wonderful in its simplicity and compelling in its execution, this belongs in the first rank of Hitchcock’s canon. The director presents a vignette of life through the lens of photographer L B “Jeff” Jeffries (James Stewart), immobilised by a broken leg during a blistering heatwave. Events take an interesting turn when he suspects one of his neighbours across the courtyard may have murdered his wife. Lincoln (2012) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Daniel Day-Lewis is on marvellous, and Oscar-winning, form as Abraham Lincoln, in Steven Spielberg’s intelligent, focused and robust film about the battle to abolish slavery. The film makes no attempt to cover the entire, unwieldy life of its subject. Instead, it dwells solely on the final months of Lincoln’s presidency, during which the political and personal stakes were never higher. Tommy Lee Jones co-stars. The Silence of the Lambs (1991) ★★★★★ Channel 5, 10.00pm Anthony Hopkins triumphs in this creepy thriller as the psychotic Dr Hannibal Lecter who is recruited by trainee FBI agent Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) to track down a serial killer nicknamed Buffalo Bill. No matter how many times you watch this film, Hopkins’s menacing performance – and his lip-smacking relish for human body parts – will always have you on the edge of your seat. Tuesday 6 February Flatpack Empire: James Futcher at SAPA aluminium factory Flatpack Empire BBC Two, 9.00pm There can’t be many urbanites in the UK who haven’t puzzled over the assembly instructions for a piece of Ikea furniture, let alone had the odd experience of being funnelled like a mouse in a maze through one of the firm’s vast depot-like stores. For this series, the Swedish company has granted a camera crew “worldwide access” – from their design headquarters in Sweden to Indian furniture factories and Polish sawmills – to film the £33 billion corporate Goliath’s global operations over the course of a year. Perhaps the biggest surprise (and certainly the thing that Ikea wants us most to know about) is their current move – unthinkable previously – into collaborations with prestige independent designers and other brands, such as audio giants Sonos and fashion designer Virgil Abloh. Among the more interesting is a project with British furniture designer Tom Dixon. “It’s not a sofa-bed, it’s a bed-sofa, but it’s really it’s a platform for living,” says Dixon, a mite grumpily, likening his role to that of a “benign parasite, where I can make a living out of this huge beast”. Maybe they’ll call the finished product “the bed bug” instead of the Swedish names that us Brits struggle to pronounce. Gerard O’Donovan Back in Time for Tea BBC Two, 8.00pm Sara Cox heads up this northern edition of the food-oriented time travel show. Tonight, the conditions that working class Yorkshire folk had to endure 100 years ago come as a shock for the Ellis family from Bradford, especially when one of them mistakes a mangle for a pasta maker. What Would Your Kid Do? ITV, 8.00pm Jason Manford puts parents’ knowledge of their offspring to the test, as children are filmed performing tasks exploring creativity, risk-taking and rule breaking while Mum and Dad have to predict what happens next. Simple and dependably entertaining. Elizabeth: Our Queen Channel 5, 9.00pm Documentaries about the Royal family seem to be appearing at an ever-increasing rate. And now here’s Channel 5’s sprawling eight-part entry, covering her life and reign and hearing from former prime ministers, friends, royal household members and special advisors. Portrait Artist of the Year 2018 Sky Arts, 8.00pm This week’s celebrity sitters are Game of Thrones star Conleth Hill, model Rachel Hunter and actor Stefanie Martini. But, as ever, it’s not so much the well-known faces as the gentle competitiveness and warm interaction between the contestants that makes this portrait painting competition so very engaging. Art, Passion & Power: The Story of the Royal Collection BBC Four, 9.00pm In the final episode of his series on the breathtaking treasures of the Royal Collection, Andrew Graham-Dixon meets the Prince of Wales and explores the last 150 years – when, as he puts it, “women took charge” and used art to help steer the monarchy through times of turbulent change. It’s also a period in which the Royal family’s changing tastes, from Fabergé eggs to the Queen Mother’s more “daring” art acquisitions, neatly demonstrate “the determined emergence of a modern monarchy”. Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm The fourth series of Reece Shearsmith and Steve Pemberton’s darkly comic anthology has been a creepy delight. In Tempting Fate they’ve kept one of the best for last, as a team of contractors clearing out a reclusive hoarder’s council flat unleash a terrible curse. 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Everything you’d expect from Michael Bay is here with bells on – the macho provocation, the sound and fury, and the diabolical pleasure in reducing everything to rubble and bloody mush. However, as a gruelling epitaph to lives wasted, this true-life Libyan shoot-’em-up starring John Krasinski is maddeningly effective and there’s a strange purity to it. Slumdog Millionaire (2008) ★★★★★ More4, 9.00pm Eight Oscars, seven Baftas and four Golden Globes cemented Danny Boyle’s energetic adaptation of Vikas Swarup’s novel Q & A as a triumph. The chaotic beauty of Mumbai is exuberantly brought to life to tell the story of an uneducated orphan (an endearing performance from Dev Patel) from the slums who is on the verge of winning a fortune on the Hindi version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. ’71 (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.50pm Jack O’Connell excels in a near-wordless role as a naive squaddie who gets stranded on the streets of Belfast in 1971 and must throw himself on the mercy of loyalist allies, who are no certain guarantees of sanctuary. It’s a tense, at times almost unbearable watch as we’re wrong-footed all the time by the combinations of terror, guilt, manoeuvring, expediency and revenge that motivate even the most minor of characters. Wednesday 7 February My Millionaire Migrant Boss My Millionaire Migrant Boss Channel 4, 9.00pm Initially, this one-off documentary – following Pakistani multi-millionaire Marwan Koukash as he puts four unemployed Brits through their paces for two weeks, before deciding whether or not to give them a job at his swanky Liverpool hotel – seems like an odd attempt to make The Apprentice on the Dole. But park that knee-jerk criticism right there because what actually unfolds is a thoughtful film in which the tough-but-likeable Koukash refuses to either play to the camera or write off his four eager contenders. That’s not to say that it’s all plain sailing: bubbly Georgia’s chronic unpunctuality soon causes issues, while Koukash, who grew up in a war zone, seems unsure of how to deal with 25-year-old Joe’s lack of confidence. The most entertaining moments, however, come in the hotelier’s relationship with the apparently lazy Heidi, who admits early on that she isn’t really sure why she has to have a job before adding: “I can’t really find out what I want to do.” A less interesting programme would have ensured that Heidi’s role was to infuriate both Koukash and the viewers at home – instead what emerges is surprisingly touching. Sarah Hughes Stacey Dooley: Face to Face with ISIS BBC Three, from 10.00am This harrowing film follows Shireen, a Yazidi woman, as she returns to Iraq with reporter Stacey Dooley for a reckoning with her past. The pair face down soldiers and officials, many of whom seem intent on ensuring that those past atrocities are never mentioned. The final confrontation between Shireen and Anmar, an Islamic State commander, sees the latter squirm blankly as the former finally and movingly gives voice to her pain. Eurovision: You Decide BBC Two, 7.30pm Six lucky contestants battle it out for the dubious honour of becoming Britain’s entrant to the 2018 Eurovision Song Contest. Among the hopefuls are a 16-year-old former Britain’s Got Talent finalist, two former The Voice UK contestants and a Eurovision backing singer. Kirstie and Phil’s Love It or List It Channel 4, 8.00pm The dynamic duo are in Windsor this week, where they meet the Farhall family who can’t decide whether they should sell their four-bedroom detached home. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This series about the history of fashion comes to an end with a look at the story behind Marie Antoinette’s famously risqué portrait in her chemise. Butchart unpicks the meaning behind the painting, looking at what the unhappy French queen was trying to convey while also considering how and why her intended message backfired. It’s a lovely conclusion to a hugely enjoyable series – here’s hoping for a swift return. The New Builds Are Coming: Battle in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Richard Macer’s topical documentary concludes with the focus shifting towards those responsible for the Cullham new builds. “Nobody has a right to a view,” states one architect. Maybe not, but as Macer talks to all involved, so it becomes increasingly clear that this is not an issue that can be easily solved. Girlfriends ITV, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama reaches its conclusion as Sue (Miranda Richardson) and Gail (Zoë Wanamaker) discover that Linda (Phyllis Logan) hasn’t exactly been honest with them about her relationship with her late husband. Harvey (1950, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am James Stewart stars as Elwood Dowd, a middle-aged, wide-eyed dreamer who spends his days getting tipsy with his best friend, a six-foot-three invisible white rabbit called Harvey. His sister Veta (an Oscar-winning Josephine Hull) tries to reform him and a comedy of errors ensues. Henry Koster’s adaptation of Mary Chase’s play is breezy, but has a lot to say about the importance of tolerance. Tango & Cash (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Bringing together two of Hollywood’s biggest action heroes, this silly shoot-’em-up is strangely appealing. Sylvester Stallone is Tango, a slick, sophisticated drug squad cop. Cash (Kurt Russell) is his uncultured rival on the force. And they don’t get on. But when they are framed and sent to prison, they’re forced to work together. It’s pure Eighties bombast, with Yazoo and Alice Cooper on the soundtrack. Harmonium (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.10pm Koji Fukada’s subtle, slow-burning thriller tells of how a family’s fragile domestic bliss is forever altered when an old friend comes to stay and teaches the daughter (Momone Shinokawa) to play the titular instrument. It’s an elegant and gripping film, with a tragic twist halfway through, and rightly won the prize in the Un Certain Regard section at the Cannes Film Festival. Thursday 8 February James Bulger: A Mother's Story James Bulger: a Mother’s Story ITV, 9.00pm Opening with the sound of Jon Venables describing in a matter-of-fact manner how he and fellow 10-year-old Robert Thompson beat and stoned toddler James Bulger to death on a railway track, this documentary relives one of the most horrifying murders of the last century in often very difficult detail. Structured around an interview between Trevor McDonald and Bulger’s mother, Denise Fergus, it exerts an awful grip while never quite deciphering the murder itself. Fergus recounts her unimaginable trauma, police and social workers describe their parts in the events and McDonald describes the trajectory of the case, from abduction to sentencing and an aftermath that has seen Fergus surround her house with CCTV cameras and Venables convicted of child pornography offences. The statements of the two killers – both, we are reminded, with troubled backgrounds – in particular are chilling: manipulative, jokey and fearful. The resilience and courage of Fergus, meanwhile, is admirable and unflinching some 25 years on: “The day I stop speaking about James,” she explains, “is the day I join him.” Gabriel Tate Death in Paradise BBC One, 9.00pm Another surreally absurd case for Jack Mooney (Ardal O’Hanlon), as the leader of a spiritual retreat is strangled while his fellow members are deep in group meditation. Trouble at the Zoo BBC Two, 9.00pm The images and stories that came out of Cumbria’s South Lakes Safari Zoo last year were deeply troubling, forcing management to step down in the face of evidence that almost 500 animals had died there in under four years. Jack Rampling’s challenging observational documentary follows staff trying to keep the institution open in the face of widespread scepticism and queries whether zoos have a place in modern society. Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 9.00pm Scraping the barrel scarcely covers this new series in which the erstwhile Supermarket Sweep host traverses the Sunshine State to check out Walt Disney World, shopping centres and spiritualists. Derry Girls Channel 4, 10.00pm One of the big comedy hits of the year so far, Lisa McGee’s evocative, ribald sitcom set during the Troubles ends with Erin (Saoirse-Monica Jackson) getting her big break as editor of the school magazine. But with great power comes great and largely unwanted responsibility. Nazi Victory: the Postwar Plan UKTV Play, from today Starting (confusingly enough) on the Yesterday channel next week, this engaging new series explores what might have happened in the event of a Nazi victory in the Second World War, from the fifth columnists planted in the United States through to his plans for concentration camps and national monuments in Britain. The latter forms the basis of this opening episode. Britannia Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Jez Butterworth’s compellingly berserk drama rampages through its fourth episode as Kerra (Kelly Reilly) is cast out by her father, King Pellenor, for parlaying with the Romans. How dare she betray the Cantii clan? He throws her to the mercy of the Druids – let’s just hope that she doesn’t meet the same fate as her mother. Meanwhile, former Druid Divis (Nikolaj Lie Kaas) suspects that there is more to General Aulus (David Morrissey) than meets the eye. Lucy (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm In this brilliant, bombastic sci-fi romp from Luc Besson, Scarlett Johansson (always worth watching) plays a drug mule who is dosed with an experimental substance that increases her brainpower by an untold degree. Space-time becomes a flick book, and Lucy’s the girl to rifle through its pages. Besson described it as La Femme Nikita plus Inception plus 2001: A Space Odyssey: that’s ambitious, egotistical, and mostly right. The Hurt Locker (2008) ★★★★☆ TCM, 9.00pm Kathryn Bigelow (Point Break) won the Best Director Oscar (the first woman to do so) for her blistering drama about a bomb disposal unit leading a perilous existence in Iraq. Jeremy Renner is outstanding as a reckless maverick who delights in putting himself in harm’s way, while the jittery cinematography stokes up the suspense to almost unbearable levels. Ralph Fiennes puts in a nice cameo as a military contractor. The Diary of a Teenage Girl (2015) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm This startling debut by Marielle Heller shows the funny side of a teenager’s explorations into her sexuality as a 15-year-old wannabe cartoonist Minnie (Bel Powley) seduces her mother’s 35-year-old boyfriend Monroe (Alexander Skarsgard). Heller’s nimble direction and clever script ensure that the film never paints either Minnie or Monroe entirely as victim or predator. Friday 9 February Winter Olympics 2018: the BBC presenting team Live Winter Olympics 2018 Opening Ceremony BBC One, 10.30am These are interesting times on the Korean peninsula, which will no doubt bring an added frisson to the Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony in Pyeongchang, South Korea. More than 3,000 athletes from 90 countries are expected to march in the ceremony, which will feature a historic moment when the North and South Korean teams march together under a unified flag. History is also being made with the disqualification of Russia from the contest due to its state-sponsored doping scandal, although, controversially, 169 Russian athletes will still compete under a designated Olympic flag. The setting for the occasion is the 35,000- seater Pyeongchang Olympic Stadium, and the following three hours of coverage comes from sure-footed BBC favourite Clare Balding, who’ll also present highlights on BBC Two at 7.00pm on BBC Two. Team GB has set its sights on a record five medals, including perhaps its first in skiing. It’s expected that North Korean artistes will perform at the ceremony in a spirit of cooperation, and while we can’t expect anything as glorious as Danny Boyle’s madcap mega-party for London 2012, we hope for a memorable kick-off to these historic Games. Vicki Power Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Actor Josh Hartnett joins his co-hosts to whip up a beloved ramen dish as the cookery show concludes its fifth series. Jamie Oliver prepares a game curry before trotting off with pal Jimmy Doherty to investigate a new method of farming. Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm Creepy noises and unexplained presences continue to unsettle incomer Matilda (Lydia Wilson) in this thriller. Determined to find out if she’s the child who disappeared from a Welsh backwater 24 years ago, Matilda begins to anger reluctant locals with her questions. Jamestown Sky One, 9.00pm A dramatic series of events in this episode provides an inkling of the high-stakes in store for season two of this glossy period piece based on the shipments of English brides to the American colonies in 1619. The opener sees Alice (Sophie Rundle) give birth and Jocelyn (Naomi Battrick) face tragedy. Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm The sharp-as-ever sitcom veers into sentimentality with the death of Rosario, the maid that Karen (Megan Mullally) loved to torment. But it’s nicely counterbalanced by Jack’s (Sean Hayes) hilarious funeral speech and a punchy cameo from Minnie Driver. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm There are performers on a well-deserved victory lap feature here. Debra Messing and Eric McCormack soak up praise for the Will & Grace revival (see preview, left), actress Saoirse Ronan basks in the glow of her third Oscar nod, and Keala Settle performs the Oscar-nominated This Is Me from The Greatest Showman. The Bold Type Amazon Prime, from today This fun comedy drama follows friends Jane (Katie Stevens), Kat (Aisha Dee) and Sutton (Meghann Fahy) working at a glossy magazine in New York. In the first episode, Jane is asked to write about her ex, while Kat attempts to convince an artist to be featured. Grand Prix Driver Amazon Prime, from today Michael Douglas narrates this behind-the-scenes look at McLaren’s F1 team during their difficult 2017 season. The four half-hour episodes take us inside McLaren’s mission control during troublesome test drives. Baywatch (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm Baywatch the TV show became a phenomenon, but everything about Baywatch the movie is big, brash and bombastic. Dwayne Johnson is preposterously buff in the role of chief lifeguard Mitch Buchannon, while Zac Efron as new recruit Matt Brody is in full-on idiot mode. A cameo by David Hasselhoff, however, appearing to the strains of Jimi Jamison’s theme I’ll Be Ready, will raise a smile. Looper (2012) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm It’s impossible not to be tickled by the playful logic of this sleek sci-fi film that ticks along with pocket-watch precision. Joseph Gordon-Levitt is a “looper” – an assassin whose targets are zapped back to him from 30 years in the future, before his contract expires and his final target is his future self. It sounds confusing, but works, and has a great cast that includes Emily Blunt, Bruce Willis and Piper Perabo. The Cabin in the Woods (2012) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.20pm Don’t be fooled by its young cast (including a pre-Thor Chris Hemsworth) and stereotypical teenage-horror appeal: Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard’s clever detonation of the scary movie is very good, with the genre’s most original plot twist in years. The story, however, is a classic one: five friends visit a cabin in the woods, where they encounter more than they bargained for. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
What's on TV tonight: Hard Sun, The Voice UK and more
Saturday 3 February Hard Sun BBC One, 9.30pm Five weeks in, and the BBC’s relentlessly dark, eye-wateringly violent thriller is not making much more sense than it did at the outset. All we really know is that those unlikely cops Hicks (Jim Sturgess) and Renko (Agyness Deyn) are still racing around London trying to outsmart MI5, using their belief that the world will end in a little under five years to justify doing indescribably horrible things to some indescribably horrible people. The bloody opening to this episode (suffice to say it involves an ice axe) follows on from last week’s ending in which uber-spook Grace Morrigan (Nikki Amuka-Bird) helpfully gave Renko’s psychopath son Daniel (Jojo Macari) details of who it was that raped his mother at the age 14, with predictable consequences. And guess who’s given the job of investigating the case? That’s the sort of circular plotting that gives Neil Cross’s drama its pace, intensity and throbbing sense of paranoia. But the only thing that’s truly mysterious here is how Hicks and Renko, with the security forces still breathing down their necks in pursuit of the flashdrive containing “proof” of the impending apocalypse, have any time left for the day job. Gerard O’Donovan Hugh’s Wild West BBC Two, 6.00pm; NI, 6.30pm; Wales, 5.30pm Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall heads for the Somerset Levels to witness a spectacular “murmuration” of starlings. He also discovers how one native species of butterfly was rescued from the brink of extinction. The Voice UK ITV, 8.00pm The singing contest’s second series on ITV continues to plod along, with singer Olly Murs making no great impact on the show, as yet. The blind auditions enter their fifth week with more contestants hoping that their performances will be enough to make the coaches spin their chairs. Casualty BBC One, 8.20pm Jeremy Hunt may not have predicted this year’s winter NHS crisis, but the writers of Casualty did. Here, the emergency department is in gridlock, with trolleys blocking corridors and ambulances queuing outside to admit patients. It’s just as well then that new junior doctor Bea Kinsella (Michelle Fox) is keen to get stuck in. Or is it? Grand Tours of Scotland’s Lochs BBC Two, 8.30pm In an unexpectedly explosive edition, Paul Murton visits Loch Shin, where a meteor hit the Highlands 1.2 billion years ago. Then, at Kylesku, he recalls how Britain’s “X Men” helped to destroy one of Germany’s greatest battleships during the Second World War. Johnny Cash’s Bitter Tears Sky Arts, 9.00pm This documentary celebrates one of the Man in Black’s lesser-known works, his 1964 album Bitter Tears: Ballads of the American Indian. It was a pioneering – and at the time controversial – album, which he used to draw attention to the long-running oppression of America’s native peoples. The film also covers the making of a commemorative tribute album by Emmylou Harris, Steve Earle, Kris Kristofferson and other country music stars. Spiral BBC Four, 9.00pm & 10.00pm The sixth series of this wonderfully gritty French policier, that’s been fraught even by its own standards, comes to a nail-biting climax. As gangster Drissa Camara (Narcisse Mame-Zollo) is betrayed over a gold deal, Captain Laure (Caroline Proust) and her detective team get the break they need in the Mercier case and lawyer Joséphine (Audrey Fleurot) realises that sticking to her story could place her in real jeopardy. Hamlet (1948, b/w) ★★★★★ London Live, 3.00pm This version of Shakespeare’s Hamlet was adapted and directed by Laurence Olivier, who also starred as the troubled Prince of Denmark. Despite winning the Academy Award for Best Picture, purists felt that Olivier had taken liberties with the text, condensing four hours into two and removing the characters of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. But the action remains tight and Olivier is magnificent. Suffragette (2015) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Never mind the respectable cast and period costumes – Sarah Gavron’s fiery film about the fight for women’s suffrage is far from genteel. Carey Mulligan is on form showing the transformation of Maud from bystander to activist with riveting emotional precision. As Abi Morgan’s script strips away the reasons for her to fall back into line, her nerve soars through the roof. The Talented Mr Ripley (1999) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.30pm Anthony Minghella’s glossy take on Patricia Highsmith’s novel is an engaging noir thriller with a pitch-perfect ending. New York wannabe Tom Ripley’s life changes when he begins lusting after the lifestyle of an errant playboy (Jude Law) in Italy. Matt Damon is suitably sinister in the lead role, with Philip Seymour Hoffman equally as magnificent as a bulldozer who ruptures Tom’s cosy idyll. Sunday 4 February Endeavour: Shaun Evans and Roger Allam Endeavour ITV, 8.00pm With the likes of Black Mirror, we live in an age of increasingly inventive television, but sometimes what we all need is a nice straightforward period procedural to relax in front of on a Sunday night. Russell Lewis’s Endeavour, now returning for a fifth series, ticks all the boxes. There’s a solid cast, anchored by Shaun Evans, as the young, less grumpy, more awkward Endeavour Morse; some nice if occasionally a little precise period detail (although I did like the throwaway reference to boxer Freddie Mills); and a plot that’s just twisty enough to allow viewers to play “guess the killer”. This opening episode is a pretty bleak affair, centring around a missing Fabergé egg and a series of seemingly unlinked deaths which (topically) turn out to have their origins in a riotous stag party. Along the way, Endeavour deals with an eager but unwanted new underling (Poldark’s Lewis Peek) and crosses swords with a sharp-witted “good-time girl” (Charlotte Hope), who delivers some home truths about his tendency to put women on pedestals. Meanwhile, the wonderful Roger Allam continues to steal every scene as Detective Chief Inspector Fred Thursday. Really someone should just give him his own show. Sarah Hughes Six Nations Rugby Union: Italy v England ITV, 2.15pm Kicking off their defence of their title, England are at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome, where they face Italy. Eddie Jones’s prospects for winning an unprecedented three championships in a row have been given a major boost: Jack Nowell, Chris Robshaw, Maro Itoje and Mike Brown, who were all doubts, have all been miraculously passed fit. Italy gave the champions a scare at Twickenham last term by taking a 10-5 half-time lead, but England eventually prevailed 36-15, with Nowell and Danny Care among the scorers. Premier League Football: Liverpool v Tottenham Hotspur Sky Sports Main Event, 4.15pm Having bounced back from their defeat at Swansea with a 3-0 victory against Huddersfield – thanks to goals from Emre Can, Roberto Firmino and Mohamed Salah – Liverpool host Spurs, who are one place beneath them in fifth. When these sides met in October, two goals from Harry Kane (who else?) helped Spurs to a comprehensive 4-1 victory. Call the Midwife BBC One, 8.00pm Prepare for a real weepy as Nurse Crane (Linda Bassett) and Trixie (Helen George) try to find out what secret a pregnant mother and her family are hiding. Elsewhere, Shelagh (Laura Main) worries that her new au pair isn’t making friends. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm The eccentric yet compelling journey comes to an end as Silver Lady heads towards Inverness. Will bad weather and issues with batteries bring this great experiment to a halt? Inside Number 10 BBC Parliament, 8.00pm We know all about the pressures of being Prime Minister but what about those real-life Sir Humphrey Applebys, the Cabinet Secretaries, aka the powers behind the throne? This interesting new series sees Sue Cameron interview all five living former Cabinet Secretaries about the premierships of Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and David Cameron. McMafia BBC One, 9.00pm The action hots up considerably in this penultimate episode as Alex’s (James Norton) lies unravel. But it’s the Aleksei Serebryakov (as Alex’s father Dimitri) who continues to steal the show. Meanwhile, there’s an excellent vignette featuring nemesis Vadim (Merab Ninidze) chopping wood semi-clothed, presumably in homage to Vladimir Putin. Maltese: The Mafia Detective Channel 4, 10.00pm It might not be the most original series but this Italian import is among the most stylish. The setting is the Seventies and we open with a bang as maverick but honest cop Dario Maltese (Kim Rossi Stuart) finds himself dragged back to the corrupt Sicilian society he left years before. Arena: Stanley and his Daughters BBC Four, 10.00pm What is it really like to be the child of a genius? That question haunts the subjects of this fascinating film about the artist Stanley Spencer and his two daughters, Shirin and Unity. Now 91 and 87, Shirin and Unity were estranged for most of their lives after being separated as children. “I do feel that you were jealous of me for a time,” says Unity while Shirin looks askance. What follows is a complex and complicated story of art, betrayal, love and loss which also allows us to view Spencer’s work anew. American Football: Super Bowl LII Sky Sports Main Event, 11.00pm & BBC One, 11.15pm Hot dogs and Buffalo wings at the ready, as the New England Patriots, looking to win back-to-back Super Bowls, take on Philadelphia Eagles in Minneapolis at the US Bank Stadium. The New England Patriots overcame the Jackonsville Jaguars to set up a finale against the Eagles, who are playing in the showpiece for the first time since 2005, when they lost to the Pats. Much of the attention will be on the Patriots’ 40-year-old quarterback Tom Brady, who is attempting to become the first player to win six Super Bowl rings. Jane Eyre (1943, b/w) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 2.10pm Deep focus and shadows give Robert Stevenson’s version of Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel an extra tinge of Gothic atmosphere. Orson Welles, who provides his Mr Rochester with a hammy melancholy, is an omniscient presence but Joan Fontaine, who had a tendency to be outshone by more dynamic leading men (Cary Grant, Laurence Olivier), is formidable as Jane. Look out for Elizabeth Taylor as the ill-fated Helen Burns. Shark Tale (2004) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 4.40pm Some of Hollywood’s most famous actors, including Will Smith, Robert De Niro, Renée Zellweger, Jack Black and Angelina Jolie (as well as director Martin Scorsese) provide the voices in this comedy animation about a mafia shark family and a little wrasse (Smith) who becomes a hero after surviving a shark encounter. It’s not as good as Finding Nemo but much better than Ice Age. Plenty of gags for grown-ups, too. Yves Saint Laurent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.25am This window into the world of French fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent tells a compelling if not especially potent story. It was made with the blessing of his partner, Pierre Bergé, and charts almost the entire trip, from Saint Laurent’s upbringing in French Algeria to his rise to stardom at Christian Dior and the sexy, druggy, lucrative whirl that followed. Pierre Niney gives good doe-eyed fragility in the title role. Monday 5 February Moving On: Sue Johnston and Paula Wilcox star in Tuesday's episode Moving On BBC One, 2.15pm Jimmy McGovern’s long-running anthology series, beginning its ninth run with another five stories spread across a week, is an exemplar of daytime drama, unafraid to tackle difficult issues and frequently promoting the work of novice writers or directors. That it occasionally settles said issues a little too neatly is understandable – no one wants gale-force McGovern over tea and biscuits – but they reliably make a virtue of the short running-time to deliver intensity and coiled emotion. Stories later in the week (at 2.15pm every afternoon and 2.45pm on Friday) include Sue Johnston’s grieving widow seeking comfort in an unlikely place and Samantha Bond’s registrar forced to re-evaluate her own marriage after an unwelcome discovery. The gripping opener, however, is written by and stars Jodhi May as Rachel, a woman wrestling with the news that the teacher who abused her as a child is back working in the area. Sinead Cusack supplies doughty support as Rachel’s guilt-stricken mother, but May is hauntingly good as a woman torn between exposing her abuser and the potential impact that reopening old wounds may have on her marriage and children. Gabriel Tate My Life: Locked In Boy CBBC, 5.30pm This is a moving account of a 10-year-old whose cerebral palsy left him unable to communicate for eight years. Beginning with an alphabet board and his mother’s help, Jonathan now has a reading age beyond his years, writes poetry and is petitioning MPs to improve education for children with his condition. Horizon: My Amazing Brain: Richard’s War BBC Two, 9.00pm An extraordinary document of both personal fortitude and scientific endeavour, Fiona Lloyd-Davies’s film follows the recovery of her husband, former UN peacekeeper Richard Gray, from a stroke. Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Danny (Viveik Kalra) tries to thwart the plans of the terror cell, Omar (Mawaan Rizwan) takes matters into his own hands and Guy (Jack Davenport) faces powerful enemies. Once again packing its excitements into the closing minutes after a lengthy, patient build-up, this decent thriller concludes tomorrow. The Bulger Killers: Was Justice Done? Channel 4, 9.00pm Rather than reliving the terrible event itself, Matt Smith’s thoughtful film gathers together legal experts and those involved in the case to debate the sufficiency of the eight years served by John Venables and Robert Thompson for the murder of James Bulger in 1993. The X-Files Channel 5, 9.00pm After a patchy revival last year, The X Files rediscovers its mojo with an 11th series opener high on fun and intrigue. Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) lies hospitalised after a seizure, so Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) goes in search of their son as war looms between humans and aliens. Hull’s Headscarf Heroes BBC Four, 9.00pm Steve Humphries’s documentary meets the redoubtable Yvonne Blenkinsop, leader of the “headscarf” campaign against Hull’s trawler companies whose questionable attitude towards crew safety cost 58 lives in a series of tragedies in 1968. Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm In 2013, a gunman killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard. This documentary features an interview with the killer’s sister, still wrestling with his descent into violence. Rear Window (1954) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.40pm Wonderful in its simplicity and compelling in its execution, this belongs in the first rank of Hitchcock’s canon. The director presents a vignette of life through the lens of photographer L B “Jeff” Jeffries (James Stewart), immobilised by a broken leg during a blistering heatwave. Events take an interesting turn when he suspects one of his neighbours across the courtyard may have murdered his wife. Lincoln (2012) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Daniel Day-Lewis is on marvellous, and Oscar-winning, form as Abraham Lincoln, in Steven Spielberg’s intelligent, focused and robust film about the battle to abolish slavery. The film makes no attempt to cover the entire, unwieldy life of its subject. Instead, it dwells solely on the final months of Lincoln’s presidency, during which the political and personal stakes were never higher. Tommy Lee Jones co-stars. The Silence of the Lambs (1991) ★★★★★ Channel 5, 10.00pm Anthony Hopkins triumphs in this creepy thriller as the psychotic Dr Hannibal Lecter who is recruited by trainee FBI agent Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) to track down a serial killer nicknamed Buffalo Bill. No matter how many times you watch this film, Hopkins’s menacing performance – and his lip-smacking relish for human body parts – will always have you on the edge of your seat. Tuesday 6 February Flatpack Empire: James Futcher at SAPA aluminium factory Flatpack Empire BBC Two, 9.00pm There can’t be many urbanites in the UK who haven’t puzzled over the assembly instructions for a piece of Ikea furniture, let alone had the odd experience of being funnelled like a mouse in a maze through one of the firm’s vast depot-like stores. For this series, the Swedish company has granted a camera crew “worldwide access” – from their design headquarters in Sweden to Indian furniture factories and Polish sawmills – to film the £33 billion corporate Goliath’s global operations over the course of a year. Perhaps the biggest surprise (and certainly the thing that Ikea wants us most to know about) is their current move – unthinkable previously – into collaborations with prestige independent designers and other brands, such as audio giants Sonos and fashion designer Virgil Abloh. Among the more interesting is a project with British furniture designer Tom Dixon. “It’s not a sofa-bed, it’s a bed-sofa, but it’s really it’s a platform for living,” says Dixon, a mite grumpily, likening his role to that of a “benign parasite, where I can make a living out of this huge beast”. Maybe they’ll call the finished product “the bed bug” instead of the Swedish names that us Brits struggle to pronounce. Gerard O’Donovan Back in Time for Tea BBC Two, 8.00pm Sara Cox heads up this northern edition of the food-oriented time travel show. Tonight, the conditions that working class Yorkshire folk had to endure 100 years ago come as a shock for the Ellis family from Bradford, especially when one of them mistakes a mangle for a pasta maker. What Would Your Kid Do? ITV, 8.00pm Jason Manford puts parents’ knowledge of their offspring to the test, as children are filmed performing tasks exploring creativity, risk-taking and rule breaking while Mum and Dad have to predict what happens next. Simple and dependably entertaining. Elizabeth: Our Queen Channel 5, 9.00pm Documentaries about the Royal family seem to be appearing at an ever-increasing rate. And now here’s Channel 5’s sprawling eight-part entry, covering her life and reign and hearing from former prime ministers, friends, royal household members and special advisors. Portrait Artist of the Year 2018 Sky Arts, 8.00pm This week’s celebrity sitters are Game of Thrones star Conleth Hill, model Rachel Hunter and actor Stefanie Martini. But, as ever, it’s not so much the well-known faces as the gentle competitiveness and warm interaction between the contestants that makes this portrait painting competition so very engaging. Art, Passion & Power: The Story of the Royal Collection BBC Four, 9.00pm In the final episode of his series on the breathtaking treasures of the Royal Collection, Andrew Graham-Dixon meets the Prince of Wales and explores the last 150 years – when, as he puts it, “women took charge” and used art to help steer the monarchy through times of turbulent change. It’s also a period in which the Royal family’s changing tastes, from Fabergé eggs to the Queen Mother’s more “daring” art acquisitions, neatly demonstrate “the determined emergence of a modern monarchy”. Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm The fourth series of Reece Shearsmith and Steve Pemberton’s darkly comic anthology has been a creepy delight. In Tempting Fate they’ve kept one of the best for last, as a team of contractors clearing out a reclusive hoarder’s council flat unleash a terrible curse. 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Everything you’d expect from Michael Bay is here with bells on – the macho provocation, the sound and fury, and the diabolical pleasure in reducing everything to rubble and bloody mush. However, as a gruelling epitaph to lives wasted, this true-life Libyan shoot-’em-up starring John Krasinski is maddeningly effective and there’s a strange purity to it. Slumdog Millionaire (2008) ★★★★★ More4, 9.00pm Eight Oscars, seven Baftas and four Golden Globes cemented Danny Boyle’s energetic adaptation of Vikas Swarup’s novel Q & A as a triumph. The chaotic beauty of Mumbai is exuberantly brought to life to tell the story of an uneducated orphan (an endearing performance from Dev Patel) from the slums who is on the verge of winning a fortune on the Hindi version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. ’71 (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.50pm Jack O’Connell excels in a near-wordless role as a naive squaddie who gets stranded on the streets of Belfast in 1971 and must throw himself on the mercy of loyalist allies, who are no certain guarantees of sanctuary. It’s a tense, at times almost unbearable watch as we’re wrong-footed all the time by the combinations of terror, guilt, manoeuvring, expediency and revenge that motivate even the most minor of characters. Wednesday 7 February My Millionaire Migrant Boss My Millionaire Migrant Boss Channel 4, 9.00pm Initially, this one-off documentary – following Pakistani multi-millionaire Marwan Koukash as he puts four unemployed Brits through their paces for two weeks, before deciding whether or not to give them a job at his swanky Liverpool hotel – seems like an odd attempt to make The Apprentice on the Dole. But park that knee-jerk criticism right there because what actually unfolds is a thoughtful film in which the tough-but-likeable Koukash refuses to either play to the camera or write off his four eager contenders. That’s not to say that it’s all plain sailing: bubbly Georgia’s chronic unpunctuality soon causes issues, while Koukash, who grew up in a war zone, seems unsure of how to deal with 25-year-old Joe’s lack of confidence. The most entertaining moments, however, come in the hotelier’s relationship with the apparently lazy Heidi, who admits early on that she isn’t really sure why she has to have a job before adding: “I can’t really find out what I want to do.” A less interesting programme would have ensured that Heidi’s role was to infuriate both Koukash and the viewers at home – instead what emerges is surprisingly touching. Sarah Hughes Stacey Dooley: Face to Face with ISIS BBC Three, from 10.00am This harrowing film follows Shireen, a Yazidi woman, as she returns to Iraq with reporter Stacey Dooley for a reckoning with her past. The pair face down soldiers and officials, many of whom seem intent on ensuring that those past atrocities are never mentioned. The final confrontation between Shireen and Anmar, an Islamic State commander, sees the latter squirm blankly as the former finally and movingly gives voice to her pain. Eurovision: You Decide BBC Two, 7.30pm Six lucky contestants battle it out for the dubious honour of becoming Britain’s entrant to the 2018 Eurovision Song Contest. Among the hopefuls are a 16-year-old former Britain’s Got Talent finalist, two former The Voice UK contestants and a Eurovision backing singer. Kirstie and Phil’s Love It or List It Channel 4, 8.00pm The dynamic duo are in Windsor this week, where they meet the Farhall family who can’t decide whether they should sell their four-bedroom detached home. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This series about the history of fashion comes to an end with a look at the story behind Marie Antoinette’s famously risqué portrait in her chemise. Butchart unpicks the meaning behind the painting, looking at what the unhappy French queen was trying to convey while also considering how and why her intended message backfired. It’s a lovely conclusion to a hugely enjoyable series – here’s hoping for a swift return. The New Builds Are Coming: Battle in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Richard Macer’s topical documentary concludes with the focus shifting towards those responsible for the Cullham new builds. “Nobody has a right to a view,” states one architect. Maybe not, but as Macer talks to all involved, so it becomes increasingly clear that this is not an issue that can be easily solved. Girlfriends ITV, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama reaches its conclusion as Sue (Miranda Richardson) and Gail (Zoë Wanamaker) discover that Linda (Phyllis Logan) hasn’t exactly been honest with them about her relationship with her late husband. Harvey (1950, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am James Stewart stars as Elwood Dowd, a middle-aged, wide-eyed dreamer who spends his days getting tipsy with his best friend, a six-foot-three invisible white rabbit called Harvey. His sister Veta (an Oscar-winning Josephine Hull) tries to reform him and a comedy of errors ensues. Henry Koster’s adaptation of Mary Chase’s play is breezy, but has a lot to say about the importance of tolerance. Tango & Cash (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Bringing together two of Hollywood’s biggest action heroes, this silly shoot-’em-up is strangely appealing. Sylvester Stallone is Tango, a slick, sophisticated drug squad cop. Cash (Kurt Russell) is his uncultured rival on the force. And they don’t get on. But when they are framed and sent to prison, they’re forced to work together. It’s pure Eighties bombast, with Yazoo and Alice Cooper on the soundtrack. Harmonium (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.10pm Koji Fukada’s subtle, slow-burning thriller tells of how a family’s fragile domestic bliss is forever altered when an old friend comes to stay and teaches the daughter (Momone Shinokawa) to play the titular instrument. It’s an elegant and gripping film, with a tragic twist halfway through, and rightly won the prize in the Un Certain Regard section at the Cannes Film Festival. Thursday 8 February James Bulger: A Mother's Story James Bulger: a Mother’s Story ITV, 9.00pm Opening with the sound of Jon Venables describing in a matter-of-fact manner how he and fellow 10-year-old Robert Thompson beat and stoned toddler James Bulger to death on a railway track, this documentary relives one of the most horrifying murders of the last century in often very difficult detail. Structured around an interview between Trevor McDonald and Bulger’s mother, Denise Fergus, it exerts an awful grip while never quite deciphering the murder itself. Fergus recounts her unimaginable trauma, police and social workers describe their parts in the events and McDonald describes the trajectory of the case, from abduction to sentencing and an aftermath that has seen Fergus surround her house with CCTV cameras and Venables convicted of child pornography offences. The statements of the two killers – both, we are reminded, with troubled backgrounds – in particular are chilling: manipulative, jokey and fearful. The resilience and courage of Fergus, meanwhile, is admirable and unflinching some 25 years on: “The day I stop speaking about James,” she explains, “is the day I join him.” Gabriel Tate Death in Paradise BBC One, 9.00pm Another surreally absurd case for Jack Mooney (Ardal O’Hanlon), as the leader of a spiritual retreat is strangled while his fellow members are deep in group meditation. Trouble at the Zoo BBC Two, 9.00pm The images and stories that came out of Cumbria’s South Lakes Safari Zoo last year were deeply troubling, forcing management to step down in the face of evidence that almost 500 animals had died there in under four years. Jack Rampling’s challenging observational documentary follows staff trying to keep the institution open in the face of widespread scepticism and queries whether zoos have a place in modern society. Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 9.00pm Scraping the barrel scarcely covers this new series in which the erstwhile Supermarket Sweep host traverses the Sunshine State to check out Walt Disney World, shopping centres and spiritualists. Derry Girls Channel 4, 10.00pm One of the big comedy hits of the year so far, Lisa McGee’s evocative, ribald sitcom set during the Troubles ends with Erin (Saoirse-Monica Jackson) getting her big break as editor of the school magazine. But with great power comes great and largely unwanted responsibility. Nazi Victory: the Postwar Plan UKTV Play, from today Starting (confusingly enough) on the Yesterday channel next week, this engaging new series explores what might have happened in the event of a Nazi victory in the Second World War, from the fifth columnists planted in the United States through to his plans for concentration camps and national monuments in Britain. The latter forms the basis of this opening episode. Britannia Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Jez Butterworth’s compellingly berserk drama rampages through its fourth episode as Kerra (Kelly Reilly) is cast out by her father, King Pellenor, for parlaying with the Romans. How dare she betray the Cantii clan? He throws her to the mercy of the Druids – let’s just hope that she doesn’t meet the same fate as her mother. Meanwhile, former Druid Divis (Nikolaj Lie Kaas) suspects that there is more to General Aulus (David Morrissey) than meets the eye. Lucy (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm In this brilliant, bombastic sci-fi romp from Luc Besson, Scarlett Johansson (always worth watching) plays a drug mule who is dosed with an experimental substance that increases her brainpower by an untold degree. Space-time becomes a flick book, and Lucy’s the girl to rifle through its pages. Besson described it as La Femme Nikita plus Inception plus 2001: A Space Odyssey: that’s ambitious, egotistical, and mostly right. The Hurt Locker (2008) ★★★★☆ TCM, 9.00pm Kathryn Bigelow (Point Break) won the Best Director Oscar (the first woman to do so) for her blistering drama about a bomb disposal unit leading a perilous existence in Iraq. Jeremy Renner is outstanding as a reckless maverick who delights in putting himself in harm’s way, while the jittery cinematography stokes up the suspense to almost unbearable levels. Ralph Fiennes puts in a nice cameo as a military contractor. The Diary of a Teenage Girl (2015) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm This startling debut by Marielle Heller shows the funny side of a teenager’s explorations into her sexuality as a 15-year-old wannabe cartoonist Minnie (Bel Powley) seduces her mother’s 35-year-old boyfriend Monroe (Alexander Skarsgard). Heller’s nimble direction and clever script ensure that the film never paints either Minnie or Monroe entirely as victim or predator. Friday 9 February Winter Olympics 2018: the BBC presenting team Live Winter Olympics 2018 Opening Ceremony BBC One, 10.30am These are interesting times on the Korean peninsula, which will no doubt bring an added frisson to the Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony in Pyeongchang, South Korea. More than 3,000 athletes from 90 countries are expected to march in the ceremony, which will feature a historic moment when the North and South Korean teams march together under a unified flag. History is also being made with the disqualification of Russia from the contest due to its state-sponsored doping scandal, although, controversially, 169 Russian athletes will still compete under a designated Olympic flag. The setting for the occasion is the 35,000- seater Pyeongchang Olympic Stadium, and the following three hours of coverage comes from sure-footed BBC favourite Clare Balding, who’ll also present highlights on BBC Two at 7.00pm on BBC Two. Team GB has set its sights on a record five medals, including perhaps its first in skiing. It’s expected that North Korean artistes will perform at the ceremony in a spirit of cooperation, and while we can’t expect anything as glorious as Danny Boyle’s madcap mega-party for London 2012, we hope for a memorable kick-off to these historic Games. Vicki Power Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Actor Josh Hartnett joins his co-hosts to whip up a beloved ramen dish as the cookery show concludes its fifth series. Jamie Oliver prepares a game curry before trotting off with pal Jimmy Doherty to investigate a new method of farming. Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm Creepy noises and unexplained presences continue to unsettle incomer Matilda (Lydia Wilson) in this thriller. Determined to find out if she’s the child who disappeared from a Welsh backwater 24 years ago, Matilda begins to anger reluctant locals with her questions. Jamestown Sky One, 9.00pm A dramatic series of events in this episode provides an inkling of the high-stakes in store for season two of this glossy period piece based on the shipments of English brides to the American colonies in 1619. The opener sees Alice (Sophie Rundle) give birth and Jocelyn (Naomi Battrick) face tragedy. Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm The sharp-as-ever sitcom veers into sentimentality with the death of Rosario, the maid that Karen (Megan Mullally) loved to torment. But it’s nicely counterbalanced by Jack’s (Sean Hayes) hilarious funeral speech and a punchy cameo from Minnie Driver. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm There are performers on a well-deserved victory lap feature here. Debra Messing and Eric McCormack soak up praise for the Will & Grace revival (see preview, left), actress Saoirse Ronan basks in the glow of her third Oscar nod, and Keala Settle performs the Oscar-nominated This Is Me from The Greatest Showman. The Bold Type Amazon Prime, from today This fun comedy drama follows friends Jane (Katie Stevens), Kat (Aisha Dee) and Sutton (Meghann Fahy) working at a glossy magazine in New York. In the first episode, Jane is asked to write about her ex, while Kat attempts to convince an artist to be featured. Grand Prix Driver Amazon Prime, from today Michael Douglas narrates this behind-the-scenes look at McLaren’s F1 team during their difficult 2017 season. The four half-hour episodes take us inside McLaren’s mission control during troublesome test drives. Baywatch (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm Baywatch the TV show became a phenomenon, but everything about Baywatch the movie is big, brash and bombastic. Dwayne Johnson is preposterously buff in the role of chief lifeguard Mitch Buchannon, while Zac Efron as new recruit Matt Brody is in full-on idiot mode. A cameo by David Hasselhoff, however, appearing to the strains of Jimi Jamison’s theme I’ll Be Ready, will raise a smile. Looper (2012) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm It’s impossible not to be tickled by the playful logic of this sleek sci-fi film that ticks along with pocket-watch precision. Joseph Gordon-Levitt is a “looper” – an assassin whose targets are zapped back to him from 30 years in the future, before his contract expires and his final target is his future self. It sounds confusing, but works, and has a great cast that includes Emily Blunt, Bruce Willis and Piper Perabo. The Cabin in the Woods (2012) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.20pm Don’t be fooled by its young cast (including a pre-Thor Chris Hemsworth) and stereotypical teenage-horror appeal: Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard’s clever detonation of the scary movie is very good, with the genre’s most original plot twist in years. The story, however, is a classic one: five friends visit a cabin in the woods, where they encounter more than they bargained for. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
Saturday 3 February Hard Sun BBC One, 9.30pm Five weeks in, and the BBC’s relentlessly dark, eye-wateringly violent thriller is not making much more sense than it did at the outset. All we really know is that those unlikely cops Hicks (Jim Sturgess) and Renko (Agyness Deyn) are still racing around London trying to outsmart MI5, using their belief that the world will end in a little under five years to justify doing indescribably horrible things to some indescribably horrible people. The bloody opening to this episode (suffice to say it involves an ice axe) follows on from last week’s ending in which uber-spook Grace Morrigan (Nikki Amuka-Bird) helpfully gave Renko’s psychopath son Daniel (Jojo Macari) details of who it was that raped his mother at the age 14, with predictable consequences. And guess who’s given the job of investigating the case? That’s the sort of circular plotting that gives Neil Cross’s drama its pace, intensity and throbbing sense of paranoia. But the only thing that’s truly mysterious here is how Hicks and Renko, with the security forces still breathing down their necks in pursuit of the flashdrive containing “proof” of the impending apocalypse, have any time left for the day job. Gerard O’Donovan Hugh’s Wild West BBC Two, 6.00pm; NI, 6.30pm; Wales, 5.30pm Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall heads for the Somerset Levels to witness a spectacular “murmuration” of starlings. He also discovers how one native species of butterfly was rescued from the brink of extinction. The Voice UK ITV, 8.00pm The singing contest’s second series on ITV continues to plod along, with singer Olly Murs making no great impact on the show, as yet. The blind auditions enter their fifth week with more contestants hoping that their performances will be enough to make the coaches spin their chairs. Casualty BBC One, 8.20pm Jeremy Hunt may not have predicted this year’s winter NHS crisis, but the writers of Casualty did. Here, the emergency department is in gridlock, with trolleys blocking corridors and ambulances queuing outside to admit patients. It’s just as well then that new junior doctor Bea Kinsella (Michelle Fox) is keen to get stuck in. Or is it? Grand Tours of Scotland’s Lochs BBC Two, 8.30pm In an unexpectedly explosive edition, Paul Murton visits Loch Shin, where a meteor hit the Highlands 1.2 billion years ago. Then, at Kylesku, he recalls how Britain’s “X Men” helped to destroy one of Germany’s greatest battleships during the Second World War. Johnny Cash’s Bitter Tears Sky Arts, 9.00pm This documentary celebrates one of the Man in Black’s lesser-known works, his 1964 album Bitter Tears: Ballads of the American Indian. It was a pioneering – and at the time controversial – album, which he used to draw attention to the long-running oppression of America’s native peoples. The film also covers the making of a commemorative tribute album by Emmylou Harris, Steve Earle, Kris Kristofferson and other country music stars. Spiral BBC Four, 9.00pm & 10.00pm The sixth series of this wonderfully gritty French policier, that’s been fraught even by its own standards, comes to a nail-biting climax. As gangster Drissa Camara (Narcisse Mame-Zollo) is betrayed over a gold deal, Captain Laure (Caroline Proust) and her detective team get the break they need in the Mercier case and lawyer Joséphine (Audrey Fleurot) realises that sticking to her story could place her in real jeopardy. Hamlet (1948, b/w) ★★★★★ London Live, 3.00pm This version of Shakespeare’s Hamlet was adapted and directed by Laurence Olivier, who also starred as the troubled Prince of Denmark. Despite winning the Academy Award for Best Picture, purists felt that Olivier had taken liberties with the text, condensing four hours into two and removing the characters of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. But the action remains tight and Olivier is magnificent. Suffragette (2015) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Never mind the respectable cast and period costumes – Sarah Gavron’s fiery film about the fight for women’s suffrage is far from genteel. Carey Mulligan is on form showing the transformation of Maud from bystander to activist with riveting emotional precision. As Abi Morgan’s script strips away the reasons for her to fall back into line, her nerve soars through the roof. The Talented Mr Ripley (1999) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.30pm Anthony Minghella’s glossy take on Patricia Highsmith’s novel is an engaging noir thriller with a pitch-perfect ending. New York wannabe Tom Ripley’s life changes when he begins lusting after the lifestyle of an errant playboy (Jude Law) in Italy. Matt Damon is suitably sinister in the lead role, with Philip Seymour Hoffman equally as magnificent as a bulldozer who ruptures Tom’s cosy idyll. Sunday 4 February Endeavour: Shaun Evans and Roger Allam Endeavour ITV, 8.00pm With the likes of Black Mirror, we live in an age of increasingly inventive television, but sometimes what we all need is a nice straightforward period procedural to relax in front of on a Sunday night. Russell Lewis’s Endeavour, now returning for a fifth series, ticks all the boxes. There’s a solid cast, anchored by Shaun Evans, as the young, less grumpy, more awkward Endeavour Morse; some nice if occasionally a little precise period detail (although I did like the throwaway reference to boxer Freddie Mills); and a plot that’s just twisty enough to allow viewers to play “guess the killer”. This opening episode is a pretty bleak affair, centring around a missing Fabergé egg and a series of seemingly unlinked deaths which (topically) turn out to have their origins in a riotous stag party. Along the way, Endeavour deals with an eager but unwanted new underling (Poldark’s Lewis Peek) and crosses swords with a sharp-witted “good-time girl” (Charlotte Hope), who delivers some home truths about his tendency to put women on pedestals. Meanwhile, the wonderful Roger Allam continues to steal every scene as Detective Chief Inspector Fred Thursday. Really someone should just give him his own show. Sarah Hughes Six Nations Rugby Union: Italy v England ITV, 2.15pm Kicking off their defence of their title, England are at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome, where they face Italy. Eddie Jones’s prospects for winning an unprecedented three championships in a row have been given a major boost: Jack Nowell, Chris Robshaw, Maro Itoje and Mike Brown, who were all doubts, have all been miraculously passed fit. Italy gave the champions a scare at Twickenham last term by taking a 10-5 half-time lead, but England eventually prevailed 36-15, with Nowell and Danny Care among the scorers. Premier League Football: Liverpool v Tottenham Hotspur Sky Sports Main Event, 4.15pm Having bounced back from their defeat at Swansea with a 3-0 victory against Huddersfield – thanks to goals from Emre Can, Roberto Firmino and Mohamed Salah – Liverpool host Spurs, who are one place beneath them in fifth. When these sides met in October, two goals from Harry Kane (who else?) helped Spurs to a comprehensive 4-1 victory. Call the Midwife BBC One, 8.00pm Prepare for a real weepy as Nurse Crane (Linda Bassett) and Trixie (Helen George) try to find out what secret a pregnant mother and her family are hiding. Elsewhere, Shelagh (Laura Main) worries that her new au pair isn’t making friends. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm The eccentric yet compelling journey comes to an end as Silver Lady heads towards Inverness. Will bad weather and issues with batteries bring this great experiment to a halt? Inside Number 10 BBC Parliament, 8.00pm We know all about the pressures of being Prime Minister but what about those real-life Sir Humphrey Applebys, the Cabinet Secretaries, aka the powers behind the throne? This interesting new series sees Sue Cameron interview all five living former Cabinet Secretaries about the premierships of Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and David Cameron. McMafia BBC One, 9.00pm The action hots up considerably in this penultimate episode as Alex’s (James Norton) lies unravel. But it’s the Aleksei Serebryakov (as Alex’s father Dimitri) who continues to steal the show. Meanwhile, there’s an excellent vignette featuring nemesis Vadim (Merab Ninidze) chopping wood semi-clothed, presumably in homage to Vladimir Putin. Maltese: The Mafia Detective Channel 4, 10.00pm It might not be the most original series but this Italian import is among the most stylish. The setting is the Seventies and we open with a bang as maverick but honest cop Dario Maltese (Kim Rossi Stuart) finds himself dragged back to the corrupt Sicilian society he left years before. Arena: Stanley and his Daughters BBC Four, 10.00pm What is it really like to be the child of a genius? That question haunts the subjects of this fascinating film about the artist Stanley Spencer and his two daughters, Shirin and Unity. Now 91 and 87, Shirin and Unity were estranged for most of their lives after being separated as children. “I do feel that you were jealous of me for a time,” says Unity while Shirin looks askance. What follows is a complex and complicated story of art, betrayal, love and loss which also allows us to view Spencer’s work anew. American Football: Super Bowl LII Sky Sports Main Event, 11.00pm & BBC One, 11.15pm Hot dogs and Buffalo wings at the ready, as the New England Patriots, looking to win back-to-back Super Bowls, take on Philadelphia Eagles in Minneapolis at the US Bank Stadium. The New England Patriots overcame the Jackonsville Jaguars to set up a finale against the Eagles, who are playing in the showpiece for the first time since 2005, when they lost to the Pats. Much of the attention will be on the Patriots’ 40-year-old quarterback Tom Brady, who is attempting to become the first player to win six Super Bowl rings. Jane Eyre (1943, b/w) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 2.10pm Deep focus and shadows give Robert Stevenson’s version of Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel an extra tinge of Gothic atmosphere. Orson Welles, who provides his Mr Rochester with a hammy melancholy, is an omniscient presence but Joan Fontaine, who had a tendency to be outshone by more dynamic leading men (Cary Grant, Laurence Olivier), is formidable as Jane. Look out for Elizabeth Taylor as the ill-fated Helen Burns. Shark Tale (2004) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 4.40pm Some of Hollywood’s most famous actors, including Will Smith, Robert De Niro, Renée Zellweger, Jack Black and Angelina Jolie (as well as director Martin Scorsese) provide the voices in this comedy animation about a mafia shark family and a little wrasse (Smith) who becomes a hero after surviving a shark encounter. It’s not as good as Finding Nemo but much better than Ice Age. Plenty of gags for grown-ups, too. Yves Saint Laurent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.25am This window into the world of French fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent tells a compelling if not especially potent story. It was made with the blessing of his partner, Pierre Bergé, and charts almost the entire trip, from Saint Laurent’s upbringing in French Algeria to his rise to stardom at Christian Dior and the sexy, druggy, lucrative whirl that followed. Pierre Niney gives good doe-eyed fragility in the title role. Monday 5 February Moving On: Sue Johnston and Paula Wilcox star in Tuesday's episode Moving On BBC One, 2.15pm Jimmy McGovern’s long-running anthology series, beginning its ninth run with another five stories spread across a week, is an exemplar of daytime drama, unafraid to tackle difficult issues and frequently promoting the work of novice writers or directors. That it occasionally settles said issues a little too neatly is understandable – no one wants gale-force McGovern over tea and biscuits – but they reliably make a virtue of the short running-time to deliver intensity and coiled emotion. Stories later in the week (at 2.15pm every afternoon and 2.45pm on Friday) include Sue Johnston’s grieving widow seeking comfort in an unlikely place and Samantha Bond’s registrar forced to re-evaluate her own marriage after an unwelcome discovery. The gripping opener, however, is written by and stars Jodhi May as Rachel, a woman wrestling with the news that the teacher who abused her as a child is back working in the area. Sinead Cusack supplies doughty support as Rachel’s guilt-stricken mother, but May is hauntingly good as a woman torn between exposing her abuser and the potential impact that reopening old wounds may have on her marriage and children. Gabriel Tate My Life: Locked In Boy CBBC, 5.30pm This is a moving account of a 10-year-old whose cerebral palsy left him unable to communicate for eight years. Beginning with an alphabet board and his mother’s help, Jonathan now has a reading age beyond his years, writes poetry and is petitioning MPs to improve education for children with his condition. Horizon: My Amazing Brain: Richard’s War BBC Two, 9.00pm An extraordinary document of both personal fortitude and scientific endeavour, Fiona Lloyd-Davies’s film follows the recovery of her husband, former UN peacekeeper Richard Gray, from a stroke. Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Danny (Viveik Kalra) tries to thwart the plans of the terror cell, Omar (Mawaan Rizwan) takes matters into his own hands and Guy (Jack Davenport) faces powerful enemies. Once again packing its excitements into the closing minutes after a lengthy, patient build-up, this decent thriller concludes tomorrow. The Bulger Killers: Was Justice Done? Channel 4, 9.00pm Rather than reliving the terrible event itself, Matt Smith’s thoughtful film gathers together legal experts and those involved in the case to debate the sufficiency of the eight years served by John Venables and Robert Thompson for the murder of James Bulger in 1993. The X-Files Channel 5, 9.00pm After a patchy revival last year, The X Files rediscovers its mojo with an 11th series opener high on fun and intrigue. Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) lies hospitalised after a seizure, so Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) goes in search of their son as war looms between humans and aliens. Hull’s Headscarf Heroes BBC Four, 9.00pm Steve Humphries’s documentary meets the redoubtable Yvonne Blenkinsop, leader of the “headscarf” campaign against Hull’s trawler companies whose questionable attitude towards crew safety cost 58 lives in a series of tragedies in 1968. Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm In 2013, a gunman killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard. This documentary features an interview with the killer’s sister, still wrestling with his descent into violence. Rear Window (1954) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.40pm Wonderful in its simplicity and compelling in its execution, this belongs in the first rank of Hitchcock’s canon. The director presents a vignette of life through the lens of photographer L B “Jeff” Jeffries (James Stewart), immobilised by a broken leg during a blistering heatwave. Events take an interesting turn when he suspects one of his neighbours across the courtyard may have murdered his wife. Lincoln (2012) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Daniel Day-Lewis is on marvellous, and Oscar-winning, form as Abraham Lincoln, in Steven Spielberg’s intelligent, focused and robust film about the battle to abolish slavery. The film makes no attempt to cover the entire, unwieldy life of its subject. Instead, it dwells solely on the final months of Lincoln’s presidency, during which the political and personal stakes were never higher. Tommy Lee Jones co-stars. The Silence of the Lambs (1991) ★★★★★ Channel 5, 10.00pm Anthony Hopkins triumphs in this creepy thriller as the psychotic Dr Hannibal Lecter who is recruited by trainee FBI agent Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) to track down a serial killer nicknamed Buffalo Bill. No matter how many times you watch this film, Hopkins’s menacing performance – and his lip-smacking relish for human body parts – will always have you on the edge of your seat. Tuesday 6 February Flatpack Empire: James Futcher at SAPA aluminium factory Flatpack Empire BBC Two, 9.00pm There can’t be many urbanites in the UK who haven’t puzzled over the assembly instructions for a piece of Ikea furniture, let alone had the odd experience of being funnelled like a mouse in a maze through one of the firm’s vast depot-like stores. For this series, the Swedish company has granted a camera crew “worldwide access” – from their design headquarters in Sweden to Indian furniture factories and Polish sawmills – to film the £33 billion corporate Goliath’s global operations over the course of a year. Perhaps the biggest surprise (and certainly the thing that Ikea wants us most to know about) is their current move – unthinkable previously – into collaborations with prestige independent designers and other brands, such as audio giants Sonos and fashion designer Virgil Abloh. Among the more interesting is a project with British furniture designer Tom Dixon. “It’s not a sofa-bed, it’s a bed-sofa, but it’s really it’s a platform for living,” says Dixon, a mite grumpily, likening his role to that of a “benign parasite, where I can make a living out of this huge beast”. Maybe they’ll call the finished product “the bed bug” instead of the Swedish names that us Brits struggle to pronounce. Gerard O’Donovan Back in Time for Tea BBC Two, 8.00pm Sara Cox heads up this northern edition of the food-oriented time travel show. Tonight, the conditions that working class Yorkshire folk had to endure 100 years ago come as a shock for the Ellis family from Bradford, especially when one of them mistakes a mangle for a pasta maker. What Would Your Kid Do? ITV, 8.00pm Jason Manford puts parents’ knowledge of their offspring to the test, as children are filmed performing tasks exploring creativity, risk-taking and rule breaking while Mum and Dad have to predict what happens next. Simple and dependably entertaining. Elizabeth: Our Queen Channel 5, 9.00pm Documentaries about the Royal family seem to be appearing at an ever-increasing rate. And now here’s Channel 5’s sprawling eight-part entry, covering her life and reign and hearing from former prime ministers, friends, royal household members and special advisors. Portrait Artist of the Year 2018 Sky Arts, 8.00pm This week’s celebrity sitters are Game of Thrones star Conleth Hill, model Rachel Hunter and actor Stefanie Martini. But, as ever, it’s not so much the well-known faces as the gentle competitiveness and warm interaction between the contestants that makes this portrait painting competition so very engaging. Art, Passion & Power: The Story of the Royal Collection BBC Four, 9.00pm In the final episode of his series on the breathtaking treasures of the Royal Collection, Andrew Graham-Dixon meets the Prince of Wales and explores the last 150 years – when, as he puts it, “women took charge” and used art to help steer the monarchy through times of turbulent change. It’s also a period in which the Royal family’s changing tastes, from Fabergé eggs to the Queen Mother’s more “daring” art acquisitions, neatly demonstrate “the determined emergence of a modern monarchy”. Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm The fourth series of Reece Shearsmith and Steve Pemberton’s darkly comic anthology has been a creepy delight. In Tempting Fate they’ve kept one of the best for last, as a team of contractors clearing out a reclusive hoarder’s council flat unleash a terrible curse. 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Everything you’d expect from Michael Bay is here with bells on – the macho provocation, the sound and fury, and the diabolical pleasure in reducing everything to rubble and bloody mush. However, as a gruelling epitaph to lives wasted, this true-life Libyan shoot-’em-up starring John Krasinski is maddeningly effective and there’s a strange purity to it. Slumdog Millionaire (2008) ★★★★★ More4, 9.00pm Eight Oscars, seven Baftas and four Golden Globes cemented Danny Boyle’s energetic adaptation of Vikas Swarup’s novel Q & A as a triumph. The chaotic beauty of Mumbai is exuberantly brought to life to tell the story of an uneducated orphan (an endearing performance from Dev Patel) from the slums who is on the verge of winning a fortune on the Hindi version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. ’71 (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.50pm Jack O’Connell excels in a near-wordless role as a naive squaddie who gets stranded on the streets of Belfast in 1971 and must throw himself on the mercy of loyalist allies, who are no certain guarantees of sanctuary. It’s a tense, at times almost unbearable watch as we’re wrong-footed all the time by the combinations of terror, guilt, manoeuvring, expediency and revenge that motivate even the most minor of characters. Wednesday 7 February My Millionaire Migrant Boss My Millionaire Migrant Boss Channel 4, 9.00pm Initially, this one-off documentary – following Pakistani multi-millionaire Marwan Koukash as he puts four unemployed Brits through their paces for two weeks, before deciding whether or not to give them a job at his swanky Liverpool hotel – seems like an odd attempt to make The Apprentice on the Dole. But park that knee-jerk criticism right there because what actually unfolds is a thoughtful film in which the tough-but-likeable Koukash refuses to either play to the camera or write off his four eager contenders. That’s not to say that it’s all plain sailing: bubbly Georgia’s chronic unpunctuality soon causes issues, while Koukash, who grew up in a war zone, seems unsure of how to deal with 25-year-old Joe’s lack of confidence. The most entertaining moments, however, come in the hotelier’s relationship with the apparently lazy Heidi, who admits early on that she isn’t really sure why she has to have a job before adding: “I can’t really find out what I want to do.” A less interesting programme would have ensured that Heidi’s role was to infuriate both Koukash and the viewers at home – instead what emerges is surprisingly touching. Sarah Hughes Stacey Dooley: Face to Face with ISIS BBC Three, from 10.00am This harrowing film follows Shireen, a Yazidi woman, as she returns to Iraq with reporter Stacey Dooley for a reckoning with her past. The pair face down soldiers and officials, many of whom seem intent on ensuring that those past atrocities are never mentioned. The final confrontation between Shireen and Anmar, an Islamic State commander, sees the latter squirm blankly as the former finally and movingly gives voice to her pain. Eurovision: You Decide BBC Two, 7.30pm Six lucky contestants battle it out for the dubious honour of becoming Britain’s entrant to the 2018 Eurovision Song Contest. Among the hopefuls are a 16-year-old former Britain’s Got Talent finalist, two former The Voice UK contestants and a Eurovision backing singer. Kirstie and Phil’s Love It or List It Channel 4, 8.00pm The dynamic duo are in Windsor this week, where they meet the Farhall family who can’t decide whether they should sell their four-bedroom detached home. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This series about the history of fashion comes to an end with a look at the story behind Marie Antoinette’s famously risqué portrait in her chemise. Butchart unpicks the meaning behind the painting, looking at what the unhappy French queen was trying to convey while also considering how and why her intended message backfired. It’s a lovely conclusion to a hugely enjoyable series – here’s hoping for a swift return. The New Builds Are Coming: Battle in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Richard Macer’s topical documentary concludes with the focus shifting towards those responsible for the Cullham new builds. “Nobody has a right to a view,” states one architect. Maybe not, but as Macer talks to all involved, so it becomes increasingly clear that this is not an issue that can be easily solved. Girlfriends ITV, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama reaches its conclusion as Sue (Miranda Richardson) and Gail (Zoë Wanamaker) discover that Linda (Phyllis Logan) hasn’t exactly been honest with them about her relationship with her late husband. Harvey (1950, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am James Stewart stars as Elwood Dowd, a middle-aged, wide-eyed dreamer who spends his days getting tipsy with his best friend, a six-foot-three invisible white rabbit called Harvey. His sister Veta (an Oscar-winning Josephine Hull) tries to reform him and a comedy of errors ensues. Henry Koster’s adaptation of Mary Chase’s play is breezy, but has a lot to say about the importance of tolerance. Tango & Cash (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Bringing together two of Hollywood’s biggest action heroes, this silly shoot-’em-up is strangely appealing. Sylvester Stallone is Tango, a slick, sophisticated drug squad cop. Cash (Kurt Russell) is his uncultured rival on the force. And they don’t get on. But when they are framed and sent to prison, they’re forced to work together. It’s pure Eighties bombast, with Yazoo and Alice Cooper on the soundtrack. Harmonium (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.10pm Koji Fukada’s subtle, slow-burning thriller tells of how a family’s fragile domestic bliss is forever altered when an old friend comes to stay and teaches the daughter (Momone Shinokawa) to play the titular instrument. It’s an elegant and gripping film, with a tragic twist halfway through, and rightly won the prize in the Un Certain Regard section at the Cannes Film Festival. Thursday 8 February James Bulger: A Mother's Story James Bulger: a Mother’s Story ITV, 9.00pm Opening with the sound of Jon Venables describing in a matter-of-fact manner how he and fellow 10-year-old Robert Thompson beat and stoned toddler James Bulger to death on a railway track, this documentary relives one of the most horrifying murders of the last century in often very difficult detail. Structured around an interview between Trevor McDonald and Bulger’s mother, Denise Fergus, it exerts an awful grip while never quite deciphering the murder itself. Fergus recounts her unimaginable trauma, police and social workers describe their parts in the events and McDonald describes the trajectory of the case, from abduction to sentencing and an aftermath that has seen Fergus surround her house with CCTV cameras and Venables convicted of child pornography offences. The statements of the two killers – both, we are reminded, with troubled backgrounds – in particular are chilling: manipulative, jokey and fearful. The resilience and courage of Fergus, meanwhile, is admirable and unflinching some 25 years on: “The day I stop speaking about James,” she explains, “is the day I join him.” Gabriel Tate Death in Paradise BBC One, 9.00pm Another surreally absurd case for Jack Mooney (Ardal O’Hanlon), as the leader of a spiritual retreat is strangled while his fellow members are deep in group meditation. Trouble at the Zoo BBC Two, 9.00pm The images and stories that came out of Cumbria’s South Lakes Safari Zoo last year were deeply troubling, forcing management to step down in the face of evidence that almost 500 animals had died there in under four years. Jack Rampling’s challenging observational documentary follows staff trying to keep the institution open in the face of widespread scepticism and queries whether zoos have a place in modern society. Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 9.00pm Scraping the barrel scarcely covers this new series in which the erstwhile Supermarket Sweep host traverses the Sunshine State to check out Walt Disney World, shopping centres and spiritualists. Derry Girls Channel 4, 10.00pm One of the big comedy hits of the year so far, Lisa McGee’s evocative, ribald sitcom set during the Troubles ends with Erin (Saoirse-Monica Jackson) getting her big break as editor of the school magazine. But with great power comes great and largely unwanted responsibility. Nazi Victory: the Postwar Plan UKTV Play, from today Starting (confusingly enough) on the Yesterday channel next week, this engaging new series explores what might have happened in the event of a Nazi victory in the Second World War, from the fifth columnists planted in the United States through to his plans for concentration camps and national monuments in Britain. The latter forms the basis of this opening episode. Britannia Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Jez Butterworth’s compellingly berserk drama rampages through its fourth episode as Kerra (Kelly Reilly) is cast out by her father, King Pellenor, for parlaying with the Romans. How dare she betray the Cantii clan? He throws her to the mercy of the Druids – let’s just hope that she doesn’t meet the same fate as her mother. Meanwhile, former Druid Divis (Nikolaj Lie Kaas) suspects that there is more to General Aulus (David Morrissey) than meets the eye. Lucy (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm In this brilliant, bombastic sci-fi romp from Luc Besson, Scarlett Johansson (always worth watching) plays a drug mule who is dosed with an experimental substance that increases her brainpower by an untold degree. Space-time becomes a flick book, and Lucy’s the girl to rifle through its pages. Besson described it as La Femme Nikita plus Inception plus 2001: A Space Odyssey: that’s ambitious, egotistical, and mostly right. The Hurt Locker (2008) ★★★★☆ TCM, 9.00pm Kathryn Bigelow (Point Break) won the Best Director Oscar (the first woman to do so) for her blistering drama about a bomb disposal unit leading a perilous existence in Iraq. Jeremy Renner is outstanding as a reckless maverick who delights in putting himself in harm’s way, while the jittery cinematography stokes up the suspense to almost unbearable levels. Ralph Fiennes puts in a nice cameo as a military contractor. The Diary of a Teenage Girl (2015) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm This startling debut by Marielle Heller shows the funny side of a teenager’s explorations into her sexuality as a 15-year-old wannabe cartoonist Minnie (Bel Powley) seduces her mother’s 35-year-old boyfriend Monroe (Alexander Skarsgard). Heller’s nimble direction and clever script ensure that the film never paints either Minnie or Monroe entirely as victim or predator. Friday 9 February Winter Olympics 2018: the BBC presenting team Live Winter Olympics 2018 Opening Ceremony BBC One, 10.30am These are interesting times on the Korean peninsula, which will no doubt bring an added frisson to the Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony in Pyeongchang, South Korea. More than 3,000 athletes from 90 countries are expected to march in the ceremony, which will feature a historic moment when the North and South Korean teams march together under a unified flag. History is also being made with the disqualification of Russia from the contest due to its state-sponsored doping scandal, although, controversially, 169 Russian athletes will still compete under a designated Olympic flag. The setting for the occasion is the 35,000- seater Pyeongchang Olympic Stadium, and the following three hours of coverage comes from sure-footed BBC favourite Clare Balding, who’ll also present highlights on BBC Two at 7.00pm on BBC Two. Team GB has set its sights on a record five medals, including perhaps its first in skiing. It’s expected that North Korean artistes will perform at the ceremony in a spirit of cooperation, and while we can’t expect anything as glorious as Danny Boyle’s madcap mega-party for London 2012, we hope for a memorable kick-off to these historic Games. Vicki Power Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Actor Josh Hartnett joins his co-hosts to whip up a beloved ramen dish as the cookery show concludes its fifth series. Jamie Oliver prepares a game curry before trotting off with pal Jimmy Doherty to investigate a new method of farming. Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm Creepy noises and unexplained presences continue to unsettle incomer Matilda (Lydia Wilson) in this thriller. Determined to find out if she’s the child who disappeared from a Welsh backwater 24 years ago, Matilda begins to anger reluctant locals with her questions. Jamestown Sky One, 9.00pm A dramatic series of events in this episode provides an inkling of the high-stakes in store for season two of this glossy period piece based on the shipments of English brides to the American colonies in 1619. The opener sees Alice (Sophie Rundle) give birth and Jocelyn (Naomi Battrick) face tragedy. Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm The sharp-as-ever sitcom veers into sentimentality with the death of Rosario, the maid that Karen (Megan Mullally) loved to torment. But it’s nicely counterbalanced by Jack’s (Sean Hayes) hilarious funeral speech and a punchy cameo from Minnie Driver. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm There are performers on a well-deserved victory lap feature here. Debra Messing and Eric McCormack soak up praise for the Will & Grace revival (see preview, left), actress Saoirse Ronan basks in the glow of her third Oscar nod, and Keala Settle performs the Oscar-nominated This Is Me from The Greatest Showman. The Bold Type Amazon Prime, from today This fun comedy drama follows friends Jane (Katie Stevens), Kat (Aisha Dee) and Sutton (Meghann Fahy) working at a glossy magazine in New York. In the first episode, Jane is asked to write about her ex, while Kat attempts to convince an artist to be featured. Grand Prix Driver Amazon Prime, from today Michael Douglas narrates this behind-the-scenes look at McLaren’s F1 team during their difficult 2017 season. The four half-hour episodes take us inside McLaren’s mission control during troublesome test drives. Baywatch (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm Baywatch the TV show became a phenomenon, but everything about Baywatch the movie is big, brash and bombastic. Dwayne Johnson is preposterously buff in the role of chief lifeguard Mitch Buchannon, while Zac Efron as new recruit Matt Brody is in full-on idiot mode. A cameo by David Hasselhoff, however, appearing to the strains of Jimi Jamison’s theme I’ll Be Ready, will raise a smile. Looper (2012) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm It’s impossible not to be tickled by the playful logic of this sleek sci-fi film that ticks along with pocket-watch precision. Joseph Gordon-Levitt is a “looper” – an assassin whose targets are zapped back to him from 30 years in the future, before his contract expires and his final target is his future self. It sounds confusing, but works, and has a great cast that includes Emily Blunt, Bruce Willis and Piper Perabo. The Cabin in the Woods (2012) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.20pm Don’t be fooled by its young cast (including a pre-Thor Chris Hemsworth) and stereotypical teenage-horror appeal: Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard’s clever detonation of the scary movie is very good, with the genre’s most original plot twist in years. The story, however, is a classic one: five friends visit a cabin in the woods, where they encounter more than they bargained for. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
What's on TV tonight: Hard Sun, The Voice UK and more
Saturday 3 February Hard Sun BBC One, 9.30pm Five weeks in, and the BBC’s relentlessly dark, eye-wateringly violent thriller is not making much more sense than it did at the outset. All we really know is that those unlikely cops Hicks (Jim Sturgess) and Renko (Agyness Deyn) are still racing around London trying to outsmart MI5, using their belief that the world will end in a little under five years to justify doing indescribably horrible things to some indescribably horrible people. The bloody opening to this episode (suffice to say it involves an ice axe) follows on from last week’s ending in which uber-spook Grace Morrigan (Nikki Amuka-Bird) helpfully gave Renko’s psychopath son Daniel (Jojo Macari) details of who it was that raped his mother at the age 14, with predictable consequences. And guess who’s given the job of investigating the case? That’s the sort of circular plotting that gives Neil Cross’s drama its pace, intensity and throbbing sense of paranoia. But the only thing that’s truly mysterious here is how Hicks and Renko, with the security forces still breathing down their necks in pursuit of the flashdrive containing “proof” of the impending apocalypse, have any time left for the day job. Gerard O’Donovan Hugh’s Wild West BBC Two, 6.00pm; NI, 6.30pm; Wales, 5.30pm Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall heads for the Somerset Levels to witness a spectacular “murmuration” of starlings. He also discovers how one native species of butterfly was rescued from the brink of extinction. The Voice UK ITV, 8.00pm The singing contest’s second series on ITV continues to plod along, with singer Olly Murs making no great impact on the show, as yet. The blind auditions enter their fifth week with more contestants hoping that their performances will be enough to make the coaches spin their chairs. Casualty BBC One, 8.20pm Jeremy Hunt may not have predicted this year’s winter NHS crisis, but the writers of Casualty did. Here, the emergency department is in gridlock, with trolleys blocking corridors and ambulances queuing outside to admit patients. It’s just as well then that new junior doctor Bea Kinsella (Michelle Fox) is keen to get stuck in. Or is it? Grand Tours of Scotland’s Lochs BBC Two, 8.30pm In an unexpectedly explosive edition, Paul Murton visits Loch Shin, where a meteor hit the Highlands 1.2 billion years ago. Then, at Kylesku, he recalls how Britain’s “X Men” helped to destroy one of Germany’s greatest battleships during the Second World War. Johnny Cash’s Bitter Tears Sky Arts, 9.00pm This documentary celebrates one of the Man in Black’s lesser-known works, his 1964 album Bitter Tears: Ballads of the American Indian. It was a pioneering – and at the time controversial – album, which he used to draw attention to the long-running oppression of America’s native peoples. The film also covers the making of a commemorative tribute album by Emmylou Harris, Steve Earle, Kris Kristofferson and other country music stars. Spiral BBC Four, 9.00pm & 10.00pm The sixth series of this wonderfully gritty French policier, that’s been fraught even by its own standards, comes to a nail-biting climax. As gangster Drissa Camara (Narcisse Mame-Zollo) is betrayed over a gold deal, Captain Laure (Caroline Proust) and her detective team get the break they need in the Mercier case and lawyer Joséphine (Audrey Fleurot) realises that sticking to her story could place her in real jeopardy. Hamlet (1948, b/w) ★★★★★ London Live, 3.00pm This version of Shakespeare’s Hamlet was adapted and directed by Laurence Olivier, who also starred as the troubled Prince of Denmark. Despite winning the Academy Award for Best Picture, purists felt that Olivier had taken liberties with the text, condensing four hours into two and removing the characters of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. But the action remains tight and Olivier is magnificent. Suffragette (2015) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Never mind the respectable cast and period costumes – Sarah Gavron’s fiery film about the fight for women’s suffrage is far from genteel. Carey Mulligan is on form showing the transformation of Maud from bystander to activist with riveting emotional precision. As Abi Morgan’s script strips away the reasons for her to fall back into line, her nerve soars through the roof. The Talented Mr Ripley (1999) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.30pm Anthony Minghella’s glossy take on Patricia Highsmith’s novel is an engaging noir thriller with a pitch-perfect ending. New York wannabe Tom Ripley’s life changes when he begins lusting after the lifestyle of an errant playboy (Jude Law) in Italy. Matt Damon is suitably sinister in the lead role, with Philip Seymour Hoffman equally as magnificent as a bulldozer who ruptures Tom’s cosy idyll. Sunday 4 February Endeavour: Shaun Evans and Roger Allam Endeavour ITV, 8.00pm With the likes of Black Mirror, we live in an age of increasingly inventive television, but sometimes what we all need is a nice straightforward period procedural to relax in front of on a Sunday night. Russell Lewis’s Endeavour, now returning for a fifth series, ticks all the boxes. There’s a solid cast, anchored by Shaun Evans, as the young, less grumpy, more awkward Endeavour Morse; some nice if occasionally a little precise period detail (although I did like the throwaway reference to boxer Freddie Mills); and a plot that’s just twisty enough to allow viewers to play “guess the killer”. This opening episode is a pretty bleak affair, centring around a missing Fabergé egg and a series of seemingly unlinked deaths which (topically) turn out to have their origins in a riotous stag party. Along the way, Endeavour deals with an eager but unwanted new underling (Poldark’s Lewis Peek) and crosses swords with a sharp-witted “good-time girl” (Charlotte Hope), who delivers some home truths about his tendency to put women on pedestals. Meanwhile, the wonderful Roger Allam continues to steal every scene as Detective Chief Inspector Fred Thursday. Really someone should just give him his own show. Sarah Hughes Six Nations Rugby Union: Italy v England ITV, 2.15pm Kicking off their defence of their title, England are at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome, where they face Italy. Eddie Jones’s prospects for winning an unprecedented three championships in a row have been given a major boost: Jack Nowell, Chris Robshaw, Maro Itoje and Mike Brown, who were all doubts, have all been miraculously passed fit. Italy gave the champions a scare at Twickenham last term by taking a 10-5 half-time lead, but England eventually prevailed 36-15, with Nowell and Danny Care among the scorers. Premier League Football: Liverpool v Tottenham Hotspur Sky Sports Main Event, 4.15pm Having bounced back from their defeat at Swansea with a 3-0 victory against Huddersfield – thanks to goals from Emre Can, Roberto Firmino and Mohamed Salah – Liverpool host Spurs, who are one place beneath them in fifth. When these sides met in October, two goals from Harry Kane (who else?) helped Spurs to a comprehensive 4-1 victory. Call the Midwife BBC One, 8.00pm Prepare for a real weepy as Nurse Crane (Linda Bassett) and Trixie (Helen George) try to find out what secret a pregnant mother and her family are hiding. Elsewhere, Shelagh (Laura Main) worries that her new au pair isn’t making friends. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm The eccentric yet compelling journey comes to an end as Silver Lady heads towards Inverness. Will bad weather and issues with batteries bring this great experiment to a halt? Inside Number 10 BBC Parliament, 8.00pm We know all about the pressures of being Prime Minister but what about those real-life Sir Humphrey Applebys, the Cabinet Secretaries, aka the powers behind the throne? This interesting new series sees Sue Cameron interview all five living former Cabinet Secretaries about the premierships of Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and David Cameron. McMafia BBC One, 9.00pm The action hots up considerably in this penultimate episode as Alex’s (James Norton) lies unravel. But it’s the Aleksei Serebryakov (as Alex’s father Dimitri) who continues to steal the show. Meanwhile, there’s an excellent vignette featuring nemesis Vadim (Merab Ninidze) chopping wood semi-clothed, presumably in homage to Vladimir Putin. Maltese: The Mafia Detective Channel 4, 10.00pm It might not be the most original series but this Italian import is among the most stylish. The setting is the Seventies and we open with a bang as maverick but honest cop Dario Maltese (Kim Rossi Stuart) finds himself dragged back to the corrupt Sicilian society he left years before. Arena: Stanley and his Daughters BBC Four, 10.00pm What is it really like to be the child of a genius? That question haunts the subjects of this fascinating film about the artist Stanley Spencer and his two daughters, Shirin and Unity. Now 91 and 87, Shirin and Unity were estranged for most of their lives after being separated as children. “I do feel that you were jealous of me for a time,” says Unity while Shirin looks askance. What follows is a complex and complicated story of art, betrayal, love and loss which also allows us to view Spencer’s work anew. American Football: Super Bowl LII Sky Sports Main Event, 11.00pm & BBC One, 11.15pm Hot dogs and Buffalo wings at the ready, as the New England Patriots, looking to win back-to-back Super Bowls, take on Philadelphia Eagles in Minneapolis at the US Bank Stadium. The New England Patriots overcame the Jackonsville Jaguars to set up a finale against the Eagles, who are playing in the showpiece for the first time since 2005, when they lost to the Pats. Much of the attention will be on the Patriots’ 40-year-old quarterback Tom Brady, who is attempting to become the first player to win six Super Bowl rings. Jane Eyre (1943, b/w) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 2.10pm Deep focus and shadows give Robert Stevenson’s version of Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel an extra tinge of Gothic atmosphere. Orson Welles, who provides his Mr Rochester with a hammy melancholy, is an omniscient presence but Joan Fontaine, who had a tendency to be outshone by more dynamic leading men (Cary Grant, Laurence Olivier), is formidable as Jane. Look out for Elizabeth Taylor as the ill-fated Helen Burns. Shark Tale (2004) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 4.40pm Some of Hollywood’s most famous actors, including Will Smith, Robert De Niro, Renée Zellweger, Jack Black and Angelina Jolie (as well as director Martin Scorsese) provide the voices in this comedy animation about a mafia shark family and a little wrasse (Smith) who becomes a hero after surviving a shark encounter. It’s not as good as Finding Nemo but much better than Ice Age. Plenty of gags for grown-ups, too. Yves Saint Laurent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.25am This window into the world of French fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent tells a compelling if not especially potent story. It was made with the blessing of his partner, Pierre Bergé, and charts almost the entire trip, from Saint Laurent’s upbringing in French Algeria to his rise to stardom at Christian Dior and the sexy, druggy, lucrative whirl that followed. Pierre Niney gives good doe-eyed fragility in the title role. Monday 5 February Moving On: Sue Johnston and Paula Wilcox star in Tuesday's episode Moving On BBC One, 2.15pm Jimmy McGovern’s long-running anthology series, beginning its ninth run with another five stories spread across a week, is an exemplar of daytime drama, unafraid to tackle difficult issues and frequently promoting the work of novice writers or directors. That it occasionally settles said issues a little too neatly is understandable – no one wants gale-force McGovern over tea and biscuits – but they reliably make a virtue of the short running-time to deliver intensity and coiled emotion. Stories later in the week (at 2.15pm every afternoon and 2.45pm on Friday) include Sue Johnston’s grieving widow seeking comfort in an unlikely place and Samantha Bond’s registrar forced to re-evaluate her own marriage after an unwelcome discovery. The gripping opener, however, is written by and stars Jodhi May as Rachel, a woman wrestling with the news that the teacher who abused her as a child is back working in the area. Sinead Cusack supplies doughty support as Rachel’s guilt-stricken mother, but May is hauntingly good as a woman torn between exposing her abuser and the potential impact that reopening old wounds may have on her marriage and children. Gabriel Tate My Life: Locked In Boy CBBC, 5.30pm This is a moving account of a 10-year-old whose cerebral palsy left him unable to communicate for eight years. Beginning with an alphabet board and his mother’s help, Jonathan now has a reading age beyond his years, writes poetry and is petitioning MPs to improve education for children with his condition. Horizon: My Amazing Brain: Richard’s War BBC Two, 9.00pm An extraordinary document of both personal fortitude and scientific endeavour, Fiona Lloyd-Davies’s film follows the recovery of her husband, former UN peacekeeper Richard Gray, from a stroke. Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Danny (Viveik Kalra) tries to thwart the plans of the terror cell, Omar (Mawaan Rizwan) takes matters into his own hands and Guy (Jack Davenport) faces powerful enemies. Once again packing its excitements into the closing minutes after a lengthy, patient build-up, this decent thriller concludes tomorrow. The Bulger Killers: Was Justice Done? Channel 4, 9.00pm Rather than reliving the terrible event itself, Matt Smith’s thoughtful film gathers together legal experts and those involved in the case to debate the sufficiency of the eight years served by John Venables and Robert Thompson for the murder of James Bulger in 1993. The X-Files Channel 5, 9.00pm After a patchy revival last year, The X Files rediscovers its mojo with an 11th series opener high on fun and intrigue. Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) lies hospitalised after a seizure, so Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) goes in search of their son as war looms between humans and aliens. Hull’s Headscarf Heroes BBC Four, 9.00pm Steve Humphries’s documentary meets the redoubtable Yvonne Blenkinsop, leader of the “headscarf” campaign against Hull’s trawler companies whose questionable attitude towards crew safety cost 58 lives in a series of tragedies in 1968. Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm In 2013, a gunman killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard. This documentary features an interview with the killer’s sister, still wrestling with his descent into violence. Rear Window (1954) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.40pm Wonderful in its simplicity and compelling in its execution, this belongs in the first rank of Hitchcock’s canon. The director presents a vignette of life through the lens of photographer L B “Jeff” Jeffries (James Stewart), immobilised by a broken leg during a blistering heatwave. Events take an interesting turn when he suspects one of his neighbours across the courtyard may have murdered his wife. Lincoln (2012) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Daniel Day-Lewis is on marvellous, and Oscar-winning, form as Abraham Lincoln, in Steven Spielberg’s intelligent, focused and robust film about the battle to abolish slavery. The film makes no attempt to cover the entire, unwieldy life of its subject. Instead, it dwells solely on the final months of Lincoln’s presidency, during which the political and personal stakes were never higher. Tommy Lee Jones co-stars. The Silence of the Lambs (1991) ★★★★★ Channel 5, 10.00pm Anthony Hopkins triumphs in this creepy thriller as the psychotic Dr Hannibal Lecter who is recruited by trainee FBI agent Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) to track down a serial killer nicknamed Buffalo Bill. No matter how many times you watch this film, Hopkins’s menacing performance – and his lip-smacking relish for human body parts – will always have you on the edge of your seat. Tuesday 6 February Flatpack Empire: James Futcher at SAPA aluminium factory Flatpack Empire BBC Two, 9.00pm There can’t be many urbanites in the UK who haven’t puzzled over the assembly instructions for a piece of Ikea furniture, let alone had the odd experience of being funnelled like a mouse in a maze through one of the firm’s vast depot-like stores. For this series, the Swedish company has granted a camera crew “worldwide access” – from their design headquarters in Sweden to Indian furniture factories and Polish sawmills – to film the £33 billion corporate Goliath’s global operations over the course of a year. Perhaps the biggest surprise (and certainly the thing that Ikea wants us most to know about) is their current move – unthinkable previously – into collaborations with prestige independent designers and other brands, such as audio giants Sonos and fashion designer Virgil Abloh. Among the more interesting is a project with British furniture designer Tom Dixon. “It’s not a sofa-bed, it’s a bed-sofa, but it’s really it’s a platform for living,” says Dixon, a mite grumpily, likening his role to that of a “benign parasite, where I can make a living out of this huge beast”. Maybe they’ll call the finished product “the bed bug” instead of the Swedish names that us Brits struggle to pronounce. Gerard O’Donovan Back in Time for Tea BBC Two, 8.00pm Sara Cox heads up this northern edition of the food-oriented time travel show. Tonight, the conditions that working class Yorkshire folk had to endure 100 years ago come as a shock for the Ellis family from Bradford, especially when one of them mistakes a mangle for a pasta maker. What Would Your Kid Do? ITV, 8.00pm Jason Manford puts parents’ knowledge of their offspring to the test, as children are filmed performing tasks exploring creativity, risk-taking and rule breaking while Mum and Dad have to predict what happens next. Simple and dependably entertaining. Elizabeth: Our Queen Channel 5, 9.00pm Documentaries about the Royal family seem to be appearing at an ever-increasing rate. And now here’s Channel 5’s sprawling eight-part entry, covering her life and reign and hearing from former prime ministers, friends, royal household members and special advisors. Portrait Artist of the Year 2018 Sky Arts, 8.00pm This week’s celebrity sitters are Game of Thrones star Conleth Hill, model Rachel Hunter and actor Stefanie Martini. But, as ever, it’s not so much the well-known faces as the gentle competitiveness and warm interaction between the contestants that makes this portrait painting competition so very engaging. Art, Passion & Power: The Story of the Royal Collection BBC Four, 9.00pm In the final episode of his series on the breathtaking treasures of the Royal Collection, Andrew Graham-Dixon meets the Prince of Wales and explores the last 150 years – when, as he puts it, “women took charge” and used art to help steer the monarchy through times of turbulent change. It’s also a period in which the Royal family’s changing tastes, from Fabergé eggs to the Queen Mother’s more “daring” art acquisitions, neatly demonstrate “the determined emergence of a modern monarchy”. Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm The fourth series of Reece Shearsmith and Steve Pemberton’s darkly comic anthology has been a creepy delight. In Tempting Fate they’ve kept one of the best for last, as a team of contractors clearing out a reclusive hoarder’s council flat unleash a terrible curse. 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Everything you’d expect from Michael Bay is here with bells on – the macho provocation, the sound and fury, and the diabolical pleasure in reducing everything to rubble and bloody mush. However, as a gruelling epitaph to lives wasted, this true-life Libyan shoot-’em-up starring John Krasinski is maddeningly effective and there’s a strange purity to it. Slumdog Millionaire (2008) ★★★★★ More4, 9.00pm Eight Oscars, seven Baftas and four Golden Globes cemented Danny Boyle’s energetic adaptation of Vikas Swarup’s novel Q & A as a triumph. The chaotic beauty of Mumbai is exuberantly brought to life to tell the story of an uneducated orphan (an endearing performance from Dev Patel) from the slums who is on the verge of winning a fortune on the Hindi version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. ’71 (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.50pm Jack O’Connell excels in a near-wordless role as a naive squaddie who gets stranded on the streets of Belfast in 1971 and must throw himself on the mercy of loyalist allies, who are no certain guarantees of sanctuary. It’s a tense, at times almost unbearable watch as we’re wrong-footed all the time by the combinations of terror, guilt, manoeuvring, expediency and revenge that motivate even the most minor of characters. Wednesday 7 February My Millionaire Migrant Boss My Millionaire Migrant Boss Channel 4, 9.00pm Initially, this one-off documentary – following Pakistani multi-millionaire Marwan Koukash as he puts four unemployed Brits through their paces for two weeks, before deciding whether or not to give them a job at his swanky Liverpool hotel – seems like an odd attempt to make The Apprentice on the Dole. But park that knee-jerk criticism right there because what actually unfolds is a thoughtful film in which the tough-but-likeable Koukash refuses to either play to the camera or write off his four eager contenders. That’s not to say that it’s all plain sailing: bubbly Georgia’s chronic unpunctuality soon causes issues, while Koukash, who grew up in a war zone, seems unsure of how to deal with 25-year-old Joe’s lack of confidence. The most entertaining moments, however, come in the hotelier’s relationship with the apparently lazy Heidi, who admits early on that she isn’t really sure why she has to have a job before adding: “I can’t really find out what I want to do.” A less interesting programme would have ensured that Heidi’s role was to infuriate both Koukash and the viewers at home – instead what emerges is surprisingly touching. Sarah Hughes Stacey Dooley: Face to Face with ISIS BBC Three, from 10.00am This harrowing film follows Shireen, a Yazidi woman, as she returns to Iraq with reporter Stacey Dooley for a reckoning with her past. The pair face down soldiers and officials, many of whom seem intent on ensuring that those past atrocities are never mentioned. The final confrontation between Shireen and Anmar, an Islamic State commander, sees the latter squirm blankly as the former finally and movingly gives voice to her pain. Eurovision: You Decide BBC Two, 7.30pm Six lucky contestants battle it out for the dubious honour of becoming Britain’s entrant to the 2018 Eurovision Song Contest. Among the hopefuls are a 16-year-old former Britain’s Got Talent finalist, two former The Voice UK contestants and a Eurovision backing singer. Kirstie and Phil’s Love It or List It Channel 4, 8.00pm The dynamic duo are in Windsor this week, where they meet the Farhall family who can’t decide whether they should sell their four-bedroom detached home. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This series about the history of fashion comes to an end with a look at the story behind Marie Antoinette’s famously risqué portrait in her chemise. Butchart unpicks the meaning behind the painting, looking at what the unhappy French queen was trying to convey while also considering how and why her intended message backfired. It’s a lovely conclusion to a hugely enjoyable series – here’s hoping for a swift return. The New Builds Are Coming: Battle in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Richard Macer’s topical documentary concludes with the focus shifting towards those responsible for the Cullham new builds. “Nobody has a right to a view,” states one architect. Maybe not, but as Macer talks to all involved, so it becomes increasingly clear that this is not an issue that can be easily solved. Girlfriends ITV, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama reaches its conclusion as Sue (Miranda Richardson) and Gail (Zoë Wanamaker) discover that Linda (Phyllis Logan) hasn’t exactly been honest with them about her relationship with her late husband. Harvey (1950, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am James Stewart stars as Elwood Dowd, a middle-aged, wide-eyed dreamer who spends his days getting tipsy with his best friend, a six-foot-three invisible white rabbit called Harvey. His sister Veta (an Oscar-winning Josephine Hull) tries to reform him and a comedy of errors ensues. Henry Koster’s adaptation of Mary Chase’s play is breezy, but has a lot to say about the importance of tolerance. Tango & Cash (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Bringing together two of Hollywood’s biggest action heroes, this silly shoot-’em-up is strangely appealing. Sylvester Stallone is Tango, a slick, sophisticated drug squad cop. Cash (Kurt Russell) is his uncultured rival on the force. And they don’t get on. But when they are framed and sent to prison, they’re forced to work together. It’s pure Eighties bombast, with Yazoo and Alice Cooper on the soundtrack. Harmonium (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.10pm Koji Fukada’s subtle, slow-burning thriller tells of how a family’s fragile domestic bliss is forever altered when an old friend comes to stay and teaches the daughter (Momone Shinokawa) to play the titular instrument. It’s an elegant and gripping film, with a tragic twist halfway through, and rightly won the prize in the Un Certain Regard section at the Cannes Film Festival. Thursday 8 February James Bulger: A Mother's Story James Bulger: a Mother’s Story ITV, 9.00pm Opening with the sound of Jon Venables describing in a matter-of-fact manner how he and fellow 10-year-old Robert Thompson beat and stoned toddler James Bulger to death on a railway track, this documentary relives one of the most horrifying murders of the last century in often very difficult detail. Structured around an interview between Trevor McDonald and Bulger’s mother, Denise Fergus, it exerts an awful grip while never quite deciphering the murder itself. Fergus recounts her unimaginable trauma, police and social workers describe their parts in the events and McDonald describes the trajectory of the case, from abduction to sentencing and an aftermath that has seen Fergus surround her house with CCTV cameras and Venables convicted of child pornography offences. The statements of the two killers – both, we are reminded, with troubled backgrounds – in particular are chilling: manipulative, jokey and fearful. The resilience and courage of Fergus, meanwhile, is admirable and unflinching some 25 years on: “The day I stop speaking about James,” she explains, “is the day I join him.” Gabriel Tate Death in Paradise BBC One, 9.00pm Another surreally absurd case for Jack Mooney (Ardal O’Hanlon), as the leader of a spiritual retreat is strangled while his fellow members are deep in group meditation. Trouble at the Zoo BBC Two, 9.00pm The images and stories that came out of Cumbria’s South Lakes Safari Zoo last year were deeply troubling, forcing management to step down in the face of evidence that almost 500 animals had died there in under four years. Jack Rampling’s challenging observational documentary follows staff trying to keep the institution open in the face of widespread scepticism and queries whether zoos have a place in modern society. Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 9.00pm Scraping the barrel scarcely covers this new series in which the erstwhile Supermarket Sweep host traverses the Sunshine State to check out Walt Disney World, shopping centres and spiritualists. Derry Girls Channel 4, 10.00pm One of the big comedy hits of the year so far, Lisa McGee’s evocative, ribald sitcom set during the Troubles ends with Erin (Saoirse-Monica Jackson) getting her big break as editor of the school magazine. But with great power comes great and largely unwanted responsibility. Nazi Victory: the Postwar Plan UKTV Play, from today Starting (confusingly enough) on the Yesterday channel next week, this engaging new series explores what might have happened in the event of a Nazi victory in the Second World War, from the fifth columnists planted in the United States through to his plans for concentration camps and national monuments in Britain. The latter forms the basis of this opening episode. Britannia Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Jez Butterworth’s compellingly berserk drama rampages through its fourth episode as Kerra (Kelly Reilly) is cast out by her father, King Pellenor, for parlaying with the Romans. How dare she betray the Cantii clan? He throws her to the mercy of the Druids – let’s just hope that she doesn’t meet the same fate as her mother. Meanwhile, former Druid Divis (Nikolaj Lie Kaas) suspects that there is more to General Aulus (David Morrissey) than meets the eye. Lucy (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm In this brilliant, bombastic sci-fi romp from Luc Besson, Scarlett Johansson (always worth watching) plays a drug mule who is dosed with an experimental substance that increases her brainpower by an untold degree. Space-time becomes a flick book, and Lucy’s the girl to rifle through its pages. Besson described it as La Femme Nikita plus Inception plus 2001: A Space Odyssey: that’s ambitious, egotistical, and mostly right. The Hurt Locker (2008) ★★★★☆ TCM, 9.00pm Kathryn Bigelow (Point Break) won the Best Director Oscar (the first woman to do so) for her blistering drama about a bomb disposal unit leading a perilous existence in Iraq. Jeremy Renner is outstanding as a reckless maverick who delights in putting himself in harm’s way, while the jittery cinematography stokes up the suspense to almost unbearable levels. Ralph Fiennes puts in a nice cameo as a military contractor. The Diary of a Teenage Girl (2015) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm This startling debut by Marielle Heller shows the funny side of a teenager’s explorations into her sexuality as a 15-year-old wannabe cartoonist Minnie (Bel Powley) seduces her mother’s 35-year-old boyfriend Monroe (Alexander Skarsgard). Heller’s nimble direction and clever script ensure that the film never paints either Minnie or Monroe entirely as victim or predator. Friday 9 February Winter Olympics 2018: the BBC presenting team Live Winter Olympics 2018 Opening Ceremony BBC One, 10.30am These are interesting times on the Korean peninsula, which will no doubt bring an added frisson to the Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony in Pyeongchang, South Korea. More than 3,000 athletes from 90 countries are expected to march in the ceremony, which will feature a historic moment when the North and South Korean teams march together under a unified flag. History is also being made with the disqualification of Russia from the contest due to its state-sponsored doping scandal, although, controversially, 169 Russian athletes will still compete under a designated Olympic flag. The setting for the occasion is the 35,000- seater Pyeongchang Olympic Stadium, and the following three hours of coverage comes from sure-footed BBC favourite Clare Balding, who’ll also present highlights on BBC Two at 7.00pm on BBC Two. Team GB has set its sights on a record five medals, including perhaps its first in skiing. It’s expected that North Korean artistes will perform at the ceremony in a spirit of cooperation, and while we can’t expect anything as glorious as Danny Boyle’s madcap mega-party for London 2012, we hope for a memorable kick-off to these historic Games. Vicki Power Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Actor Josh Hartnett joins his co-hosts to whip up a beloved ramen dish as the cookery show concludes its fifth series. Jamie Oliver prepares a game curry before trotting off with pal Jimmy Doherty to investigate a new method of farming. Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm Creepy noises and unexplained presences continue to unsettle incomer Matilda (Lydia Wilson) in this thriller. Determined to find out if she’s the child who disappeared from a Welsh backwater 24 years ago, Matilda begins to anger reluctant locals with her questions. Jamestown Sky One, 9.00pm A dramatic series of events in this episode provides an inkling of the high-stakes in store for season two of this glossy period piece based on the shipments of English brides to the American colonies in 1619. The opener sees Alice (Sophie Rundle) give birth and Jocelyn (Naomi Battrick) face tragedy. Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm The sharp-as-ever sitcom veers into sentimentality with the death of Rosario, the maid that Karen (Megan Mullally) loved to torment. But it’s nicely counterbalanced by Jack’s (Sean Hayes) hilarious funeral speech and a punchy cameo from Minnie Driver. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm There are performers on a well-deserved victory lap feature here. Debra Messing and Eric McCormack soak up praise for the Will & Grace revival (see preview, left), actress Saoirse Ronan basks in the glow of her third Oscar nod, and Keala Settle performs the Oscar-nominated This Is Me from The Greatest Showman. The Bold Type Amazon Prime, from today This fun comedy drama follows friends Jane (Katie Stevens), Kat (Aisha Dee) and Sutton (Meghann Fahy) working at a glossy magazine in New York. In the first episode, Jane is asked to write about her ex, while Kat attempts to convince an artist to be featured. Grand Prix Driver Amazon Prime, from today Michael Douglas narrates this behind-the-scenes look at McLaren’s F1 team during their difficult 2017 season. The four half-hour episodes take us inside McLaren’s mission control during troublesome test drives. Baywatch (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm Baywatch the TV show became a phenomenon, but everything about Baywatch the movie is big, brash and bombastic. Dwayne Johnson is preposterously buff in the role of chief lifeguard Mitch Buchannon, while Zac Efron as new recruit Matt Brody is in full-on idiot mode. A cameo by David Hasselhoff, however, appearing to the strains of Jimi Jamison’s theme I’ll Be Ready, will raise a smile. Looper (2012) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm It’s impossible not to be tickled by the playful logic of this sleek sci-fi film that ticks along with pocket-watch precision. Joseph Gordon-Levitt is a “looper” – an assassin whose targets are zapped back to him from 30 years in the future, before his contract expires and his final target is his future self. It sounds confusing, but works, and has a great cast that includes Emily Blunt, Bruce Willis and Piper Perabo. The Cabin in the Woods (2012) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.20pm Don’t be fooled by its young cast (including a pre-Thor Chris Hemsworth) and stereotypical teenage-horror appeal: Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard’s clever detonation of the scary movie is very good, with the genre’s most original plot twist in years. The story, however, is a classic one: five friends visit a cabin in the woods, where they encounter more than they bargained for. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
Friday 2 February Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm The glut of psychological suspense dramas on our screens makes it hard for new thrillers to stand out but do make time for the BBC’s haunting and unusual Requiem. Smartly directed by rising star Mahalia Belo, who knows exactly what to do and when to raise the hairs on the back of your neck, this new six-part series melds horror with crime to tell the story of the highly strung Matilda (Lydia Wilson), a promising young cellist whose self-contained world is thrown into disarray by an unexpected and violent death. After walking out on her long-dreamt-of US tour, Matilda and her faithful accompanist Hal (Joel Fry, excellent in a rare serious role) head to Wales, where grief and past secrets threaten to engulf both her and everyone she comes into contact with. To say any more would be unfair but Australian writer Kris Mrksa (best known for crime drama Underbelly) plays a very clever game with the genre, referencing everything from Don’t Look Now to Rosemary’s Baby and ensuring that the audience is both on the back foot and desperate to find out more. Beautifully paced and intelligently told, the resulting story is worth staying in on a Friday night for. Sarah Hughes Altered Carbon Netflix, from today “The first thing you’ll learn is that nothing is as it seems,” intones the solemn voice-over in this adaptation of Richard Morgan’s excellent novel from 2002. Netflix’s latest foray into hardcore science fiction follows a prisoner who, after 250 years in suspended animation, returns to life in a new body with one chance to win his freedom: solving a mind-bending murder. It’s stylishly shot, and features a strong cast, including James Purefoy, Joel Kinnaman, and Hamilton star Renée Elise Goldsberry. Anglo-Welsh Cup: Northampton Saints v Harlequins BT Sport 1, 7.15pm Out-of-sorts Northampton, who’ve won just one of their last eight Premiership games, face Harlequins in the Anglo-Welsh Cup at Franklin’s Gardens. The last time these teams met, in December, Quins ran in seven tries, with Dave Ward, Danny Care and Tim Visser among the scorers, as Saints slumped to an embarrassing 50-21 defeat at Twickenham. Super League: St Helens v Castleford Tigers Sky Sports Main Event, 7.30pm The Totally Wicked Stadium host the action as St Helens and Castleford Tigers get their seasons under way. These sides last met in the semi-finals of last year’s competition in September, with the Tigers winning a dramatic match at the Mend-a-Hose Jungle 23-22 after extra-time, setting up a Grand Final meeting with Leeds Rhinos. Celebrity 5 Go Barging Channel 5, 8.00pm Last year, four celebrities gave us laughs as they took to the canals of England and Wales for the first run of this series. Now it returns with a new motley crew – Tom Conti, Diarmuid Gavin, Tessa Sanderson, Tony Christie and Penny Smith – and this time they are heading to France. So expect some crashes and fireworks. A Vicar’s Life BBC Two, 8.30pm; not Wales The likeable series about vicars in Herefordshire continues with assistant curate Father Matthew Cashmore joining a relief effort taking aid to refugees in Calais, while his boss, the Reverend Ruth Hulse comes up with a novel way of boosting church attendance. Nigel Slater’s Middle East BBC Two, 9.00pm; not Wales Nigel Slater is the sort of company you want on a food journey: enthusiastic, interesting and curious about the places he visits. This new series sees him heading throughout the Middle East, starting off in the food paradise of Beirut before moving on to the Beqaa Valley. Hits, Hype & Hustle: An Insider’s Guide to the Music Business BBC Four, 9.00pm The music industry guide concludes with a focus on reunions, presented by PR man Alan Edwards. “It was supposed to be edge of the seat stuff but, in reality, it was end of the pier,” he says, with a wicked grin, of the Sex Pistols reunion he engineered. Elsewhere, we’re treated to footage of Debbie Harry performing with a giant pair of horns on her head. SH Celebrity Big Brother: Live Final Channel 5, from 9.00pm This series of the reality show, which is celebrating the year of the woman, apparently, reaches its finale. Sadly, the all-female house was short lived and the series has been reduced to the usual mix of crude comments and bed-hopping. SH King Arthur: Legend of the Sword (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Guy Ritchie’s combat-heavy Camelot is a very silly place. It sets up Arthur (Charlie Hunnam) as a Moses figure who’s sent to Londinium when Vortigern (Jude Law) overthrows Camelot. What follows is a quick-witted caper, but the sword-pulling scene is sabotaged by a David Beckham cameo that saps the moment of its mythic excitement. Sorcerer (1977) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm Given the wild success that William Friedkin had achieved with The French Connection (1971) and The Exorcist (1973), the catastrophic failure of Sorcerer, a thrillingly downbeat action film about truck drivers, counted as the bitterest blow of his career: he’s always talked about it as his favourite film. Indeed, it’s far too technically accomplished and conceptually bold to have deserved such short shrift. This Is 40 (2012) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 12.10am Judd Apatow revisits two characters from his 2007 hit Knocked Up. Leslie Mann, Apatow’s wife, and Paul Rudd play a stressed-out Los Angeles couple whose 40th birthdays bookend the film. Apatow and Mann’s real-life daughters also play their children. It’s a perceptive comedy on middle-age and one that guarantees big laughs alongside some of Apatow’s most pertinent observations on love. Saturday 3 February Hard Sun: Agyness Deyn Hard Sun BBC One, 9.30pm Five weeks in, and the BBC’s relentlessly dark, eye-wateringly violent thriller is not making much more sense than it did at the outset. All we really know is that those unlikely cops Hicks (Jim Sturgess) and Renko (Agyness Deyn) are still racing around London trying to outsmart MI5, using their belief that the world will end in a little under five years to justify doing indescribably horrible things to some indescribably horrible people. The bloody opening to this episode (suffice to say it involves an ice axe) follows on from last week’s ending in which uber-spook Grace Morrigan (Nikki Amuka-Bird) helpfully gave Renko’s psychopath son Daniel (Jojo Macari) details of who it was that raped his mother at the age 14, with predictable consequences. And guess who’s given the job of investigating the case? That’s the sort of circular plotting that gives Neil Cross’s drama its pace, intensity and throbbing sense of paranoia. But the only thing that’s truly mysterious here is how Hicks and Renko, with the security forces still breathing down their necks in pursuit of the flashdrive containing “proof” of the impending apocalypse, have any time left for the day job. Gerard O’Donovan Hugh’s Wild West BBC Two, 6.00pm; NI, 6.30pm; Wales, 5.30pm Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall heads for the Somerset Levels to witness a spectacular “murmuration” of starlings. He also discovers how one native species of butterfly was rescued from the brink of extinction. The Voice UK ITV, 8.00pm The singing contest’s second series on ITV continues to plod along, with singer Olly Murs making no great impact on the show, as yet. The blind auditions enter their fifth week with more contestants hoping that their performances will be enough to make the coaches spin their chairs. Casualty BBC One, 8.20pm Jeremy Hunt may not have predicted this year’s winter NHS crisis, but the writers of Casualty did. Here, the emergency department is in gridlock, with trolleys blocking corridors and ambulances queuing outside to admit patients. It’s just as well then that new junior doctor Bea Kinsella (Michelle Fox) is keen to get stuck in. Or is it? Grand Tours of Scotland’s Lochs BBC Two, 8.30pm In an unexpectedly explosive edition, Paul Murton visits Loch Shin, where a meteor hit the Highlands 1.2 billion years ago. Then, at Kylesku, he recalls how Britain’s “X Men” helped to destroy one of Germany’s greatest battleships during the Second World War. Johnny Cash’s Bitter Tears Sky Arts, 9.00pm This documentary celebrates one of the Man in Black’s lesser-known works, his 1964 album Bitter Tears: Ballads of the American Indian. It was a pioneering – and at the time controversial – album, which he used to draw attention to the long-running oppression of America’s native peoples. The film also covers the making of a commemorative tribute album by Emmylou Harris, Steve Earle, Kris Kristofferson and other country music stars. Spiral BBC Four, 9.00pm & 10.00pm The sixth series of this wonderfully gritty French policier, that’s been fraught even by its own standards, comes to a nail-biting climax. As gangster Drissa Camara (Narcisse Mame-Zollo) is betrayed over a gold deal, Captain Laure (Caroline Proust) and her detective team get the break they need in the Mercier case and lawyer Joséphine (Audrey Fleurot) realises that sticking to her story could place her in real jeopardy. Hamlet (1948, b/w) ★★★★★ London Live, 3.00pm This version of Shakespeare’s Hamlet was adapted and directed by Laurence Olivier, who also starred as the troubled Prince of Denmark. Despite winning the Academy Award for Best Picture, purists felt that Olivier had taken liberties with the text, condensing four hours into two and removing the characters of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. But the action remains tight and Olivier is magnificent. Suffragette (2015) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Never mind the respectable cast and period costumes – Sarah Gavron’s fiery film about the fight for women’s suffrage is far from genteel. Carey Mulligan is on form showing the transformation of Maud from bystander to activist with riveting emotional precision. As Abi Morgan’s script strips away the reasons for her to fall back into line, her nerve soars through the roof. The Talented Mr Ripley (1999) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.30pm Anthony Minghella’s glossy take on Patricia Highsmith’s novel is an engaging noir thriller with a pitch-perfect ending. New York wannabe Tom Ripley’s life changes when he begins lusting after the lifestyle of an errant playboy (Jude Law) in Italy. Matt Damon is suitably sinister in the lead role, with Philip Seymour Hoffman equally as magnificent as a bulldozer who ruptures Tom’s cosy idyll. Sunday 4 February Endeavour: Shaun Evans and Roger Allam Endeavour ITV, 8.00pm With the likes of Black Mirror, we live in an age of increasingly inventive television, but sometimes what we all need is a nice straightforward period procedural to relax in front of on a Sunday night. Russell Lewis’s Endeavour, now returning for a fifth series, ticks all the boxes. There’s a solid cast, anchored by Shaun Evans, as the young, less grumpy, more awkward Endeavour Morse; some nice if occasionally a little precise period detail (although I did like the throwaway reference to boxer Freddie Mills); and a plot that’s just twisty enough to allow viewers to play “guess the killer”. This opening episode is a pretty bleak affair, centring around a missing Fabergé egg and a series of seemingly unlinked deaths which (topically) turn out to have their origins in a riotous stag party. Along the way, Endeavour deals with an eager but unwanted new underling (Poldark’s Lewis Peek) and crosses swords with a sharp-witted “good-time girl” (Charlotte Hope), who delivers some home truths about his tendency to put women on pedestals. Meanwhile, the wonderful Roger Allam continues to steal every scene as Detective Chief Inspector Fred Thursday. Really someone should just give him his own show. Sarah Hughes Six Nations Rugby Union: Italy v England ITV, 2.15pm Kicking off their defence of their title, England are at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome, where they face Italy. Eddie Jones’s prospects for winning an unprecedented three championships in a row have been given a major boost: Jack Nowell, Chris Robshaw, Maro Itoje and Mike Brown, who were all doubts, have all been miraculously passed fit. Italy gave the champions a scare at Twickenham last term by taking a 10-5 half-time lead, but England eventually prevailed 36-15, with Nowell and Danny Care among the scorers. Premier League Football: Liverpool v Tottenham Hotspur Sky Sports Main Event, 4.15pm Having bounced back from their defeat at Swansea with a 3-0 victory against Huddersfield – thanks to goals from Emre Can, Roberto Firmino and Mohamed Salah – Liverpool host Spurs, who are one place beneath them in fifth. When these sides met in October, two goals from Harry Kane (who else?) helped Spurs to a comprehensive 4-1 victory. Call the Midwife BBC One, 8.00pm Prepare for a real weepy as Nurse Crane (Linda Bassett) and Trixie (Helen George) try to find out what secret a pregnant mother and her family are hiding. Elsewhere, Shelagh (Laura Main) worries that her new au pair isn’t making friends. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm The eccentric yet compelling journey comes to an end as Silver Lady heads towards Inverness. Will bad weather and issues with batteries bring this great experiment to a halt? Inside Number 10 BBC Parliament, 8.00pm We know all about the pressures of being Prime Minister but what about those real-life Sir Humphrey Applebys, the Cabinet Secretaries, aka the powers behind the throne? This interesting new series sees Sue Cameron interview all five living former Cabinet Secretaries about the premierships of Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and David Cameron. McMafia BBC One, 9.00pm The action hots up considerably in this penultimate episode as Alex’s (James Norton) lies unravel. But it’s the Aleksei Serebryakov (as Alex’s father Dimitri) who continues to steal the show. Meanwhile, there’s an excellent vignette featuring nemesis Vadim (Merab Ninidze) chopping wood semi-clothed, presumably in homage to Vladimir Putin. Maltese: The Mafia Detective Channel 4, 10.00pm It might not be the most original series but this Italian import is among the most stylish. The setting is the Seventies and we open with a bang as maverick but honest cop Dario Maltese (Kim Rossi Stuart) finds himself dragged back to the corrupt Sicilian society he left years before. Arena: Stanley and his Daughters BBC Four, 10.00pm What is it really like to be the child of a genius? That question haunts the subjects of this fascinating film about the artist Stanley Spencer and his two daughters, Shirin and Unity. Now 91 and 87, Shirin and Unity were estranged for most of their lives after being separated as children. “I do feel that you were jealous of me for a time,” says Unity while Shirin looks askance. What follows is a complex and complicated story of art, betrayal, love and loss which also allows us to view Spencer’s work anew. American Football: Super Bowl LII Sky Sports Main Event, 11.00pm & BBC One, 11.15pm Hot dogs and Buffalo wings at the ready, as the New England Patriots, looking to win back-to-back Super Bowls, take on Philadelphia Eagles in Minneapolis at the US Bank Stadium. The New England Patriots overcame the Jackonsville Jaguars to set up a finale against the Eagles, who are playing in the showpiece for the first time since 2005, when they lost to the Pats. Much of the attention will be on the Patriots’ 40-year-old quarterback Tom Brady, who is attempting to become the first player to win six Super Bowl rings. Jane Eyre (1943, b/w) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 2.10pm Deep focus and shadows give Robert Stevenson’s version of Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel an extra tinge of Gothic atmosphere. Orson Welles, who provides his Mr Rochester with a hammy melancholy, is an omniscient presence but Joan Fontaine, who had a tendency to be outshone by more dynamic leading men (Cary Grant, Laurence Olivier), is formidable as Jane. Look out for Elizabeth Taylor as the ill-fated Helen Burns. Shark Tale (2004) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 4.40pm Some of Hollywood’s most famous actors, including Will Smith, Robert De Niro, Renée Zellweger, Jack Black and Angelina Jolie (as well as director Martin Scorsese) provide the voices in this comedy animation about a mafia shark family and a little wrasse (Smith) who becomes a hero after surviving a shark encounter. It’s not as good as Finding Nemo but much better than Ice Age. Plenty of gags for grown-ups, too. Yves Saint Laurent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.25am This window into the world of French fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent tells a compelling if not especially potent story. It was made with the blessing of his partner, Pierre Bergé, and charts almost the entire trip, from Saint Laurent’s upbringing in French Algeria to his rise to stardom at Christian Dior and the sexy, druggy, lucrative whirl that followed. Pierre Niney gives good doe-eyed fragility in the title role. Monday 5 February Moving On: Sue Johnston and Paula Wilcox star in Tuesday's episode Moving On BBC One, 2.15pm Jimmy McGovern’s long-running anthology series, beginning its ninth run with another five stories spread across a week, is an exemplar of daytime drama, unafraid to tackle difficult issues and frequently promoting the work of novice writers or directors. That it occasionally settles said issues a little too neatly is understandable – no one wants gale-force McGovern over tea and biscuits – but they reliably make a virtue of the short running-time to deliver intensity and coiled emotion. Stories later in the week (at 2.15pm every afternoon and 2.45pm on Friday) include Sue Johnston’s grieving widow seeking comfort in an unlikely place and Samantha Bond’s registrar forced to re-evaluate her own marriage after an unwelcome discovery. The gripping opener, however, is written by and stars Jodhi May as Rachel, a woman wrestling with the news that the teacher who abused her as a child is back working in the area. Sinead Cusack supplies doughty support as Rachel’s guilt-stricken mother, but May is hauntingly good as a woman torn between exposing her abuser and the potential impact that reopening old wounds may have on her marriage and children. Gabriel Tate My Life: Locked In Boy CBBC, 5.30pm This is a moving account of a 10-year-old whose cerebral palsy left him unable to communicate for eight years. Beginning with an alphabet board and his mother’s help, Jonathan now has a reading age beyond his years, writes poetry and is petitioning MPs to improve education for children with his condition. Horizon: My Amazing Brain: Richard’s War BBC Two, 9.00pm An extraordinary document of both personal fortitude and scientific endeavour, Fiona Lloyd-Davies’s film follows the recovery of her husband, former UN peacekeeper Richard Gray, from a stroke. Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Danny (Viveik Kalra) tries to thwart the plans of the terror cell, Omar (Mawaan Rizwan) takes matters into his own hands and Guy (Jack Davenport) faces powerful enemies. Once again packing its excitements into the closing minutes after a lengthy, patient build-up, this decent thriller concludes tomorrow. The Bulger Killers: Was Justice Done? Channel 4, 9.00pm Rather than reliving the terrible event itself, Matt Smith’s thoughtful film gathers together legal experts and those involved in the case to debate the sufficiency of the eight years served by John Venables and Robert Thompson for the murder of James Bulger in 1993. The X-Files Channel 5, 9.00pm After a patchy revival last year, The X Files rediscovers its mojo with an 11th series opener high on fun and intrigue. Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) lies hospitalised after a seizure, so Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) goes in search of their son as war looms between humans and aliens. Hull’s Headscarf Heroes BBC Four, 9.00pm Steve Humphries’s documentary meets the redoubtable Yvonne Blenkinsop, leader of the “headscarf” campaign against Hull’s trawler companies whose questionable attitude towards crew safety cost 58 lives in a series of tragedies in 1968. Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm In 2013, a gunman killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard. This documentary features an interview with the killer’s sister, still wrestling with his descent into violence. Rear Window (1954) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.40pm Wonderful in its simplicity and compelling in its execution, this belongs in the first rank of Hitchcock’s canon. The director presents a vignette of life through the lens of photographer L B “Jeff” Jeffries (James Stewart), immobilised by a broken leg during a blistering heatwave. Events take an interesting turn when he suspects one of his neighbours across the courtyard may have murdered his wife. Lincoln (2012) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Daniel Day-Lewis is on marvellous, and Oscar-winning, form as Abraham Lincoln, in Steven Spielberg’s intelligent, focused and robust film about the battle to abolish slavery. The film makes no attempt to cover the entire, unwieldy life of its subject. Instead, it dwells solely on the final months of Lincoln’s presidency, during which the political and personal stakes were never higher. Tommy Lee Jones co-stars. The Silence of the Lambs (1991) ★★★★★ Channel 5, 10.00pm Anthony Hopkins triumphs in this creepy thriller as the psychotic Dr Hannibal Lecter who is recruited by trainee FBI agent Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) to track down a serial killer nicknamed Buffalo Bill. No matter how many times you watch this film, Hopkins’s menacing performance – and his lip-smacking relish for human body parts – will always have you on the edge of your seat. Tuesday 6 February Flatpack Empire: James Futcher at SAPA aluminium factory Flatpack Empire BBC Two, 9.00pm There can’t be many urbanites in the UK who haven’t puzzled over the assembly instructions for a piece of Ikea furniture, let alone had the odd experience of being funnelled like a mouse in a maze through one of the firm’s vast depot-like stores. For this series, the Swedish company has granted a camera crew “worldwide access” – from their design headquarters in Sweden to Indian furniture factories and Polish sawmills – to film the £33 billion corporate Goliath’s global operations over the course of a year. Perhaps the biggest surprise (and certainly the thing that Ikea wants us most to know about) is their current move – unthinkable previously – into collaborations with prestige independent designers and other brands, such as audio giants Sonos and fashion designer Virgil Abloh. Among the more interesting is a project with British furniture designer Tom Dixon. “It’s not a sofa-bed, it’s a bed-sofa, but it’s really it’s a platform for living,” says Dixon, a mite grumpily, likening his role to that of a “benign parasite, where I can make a living out of this huge beast”. Maybe they’ll call the finished product “the bed bug” instead of the Swedish names that us Brits struggle to pronounce. Gerard O’Donovan Back in Time for Tea BBC Two, 8.00pm Sara Cox heads up this northern edition of the food-oriented time travel show. Tonight, the conditions that working class Yorkshire folk had to endure 100 years ago come as a shock for the Ellis family from Bradford, especially when one of them mistakes a mangle for a pasta maker. What Would Your Kid Do? ITV, 8.00pm Jason Manford puts parents’ knowledge of their offspring to the test, as children are filmed performing tasks exploring creativity, risk-taking and rule breaking while Mum and Dad have to predict what happens next. Simple and dependably entertaining. Elizabeth: Our Queen Channel 5, 9.00pm Documentaries about the Royal family seem to be appearing at an ever-increasing rate. And now here’s Channel 5’s sprawling eight-part entry, covering her life and reign and hearing from former prime ministers, friends, royal household members and special advisors. Portrait Artist of the Year 2018 Sky Arts, 8.00pm This week’s celebrity sitters are Game of Thrones star Conleth Hill, model Rachel Hunter and actor Stefanie Martini. But, as ever, it’s not so much the well-known faces as the gentle competitiveness and warm interaction between the contestants that makes this portrait painting competition so very engaging. Art, Passion & Power: The Story of the Royal Collection BBC Four, 9.00pm In the final episode of his series on the breathtaking treasures of the Royal Collection, Andrew Graham-Dixon meets the Prince of Wales and explores the last 150 years – when, as he puts it, “women took charge” and used art to help steer the monarchy through times of turbulent change. It’s also a period in which the Royal family’s changing tastes, from Fabergé eggs to the Queen Mother’s more “daring” art acquisitions, neatly demonstrate “the determined emergence of a modern monarchy”. Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm The fourth series of Reece Shearsmith and Steve Pemberton’s darkly comic anthology has been a creepy delight. In Tempting Fate they’ve kept one of the best for last, as a team of contractors clearing out a reclusive hoarder’s council flat unleash a terrible curse. 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Everything you’d expect from Michael Bay is here with bells on – the macho provocation, the sound and fury, and the diabolical pleasure in reducing everything to rubble and bloody mush. However, as a gruelling epitaph to lives wasted, this true-life Libyan shoot-’em-up starring John Krasinski is maddeningly effective and there’s a strange purity to it. Slumdog Millionaire (2008) ★★★★★ More4, 9.00pm Eight Oscars, seven Baftas and four Golden Globes cemented Danny Boyle’s energetic adaptation of Vikas Swarup’s novel Q & A as a triumph. The chaotic beauty of Mumbai is exuberantly brought to life to tell the story of an uneducated orphan (an endearing performance from Dev Patel) from the slums who is on the verge of winning a fortune on the Hindi version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. ’71 (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.50pm Jack O’Connell excels in a near-wordless role as a naive squaddie who gets stranded on the streets of Belfast in 1971 and must throw himself on the mercy of loyalist allies, who are no certain guarantees of sanctuary. It’s a tense, at times almost unbearable watch as we’re wrong-footed all the time by the combinations of terror, guilt, manoeuvring, expediency and revenge that motivate even the most minor of characters. Wednesday 7 February My Millionaire Migrant Boss My Millionaire Migrant Boss Channel 4, 9.00pm Initially, this one-off documentary – following Pakistani multi-millionaire Marwan Koukash as he puts four unemployed Brits through their paces for two weeks, before deciding whether or not to give them a job at his swanky Liverpool hotel – seems like an odd attempt to make The Apprentice on the Dole. But park that knee-jerk criticism right there because what actually unfolds is a thoughtful film in which the tough-but-likeable Koukash refuses to either play to the camera or write off his four eager contenders. That’s not to say that it’s all plain sailing: bubbly Georgia’s chronic unpunctuality soon causes issues, while Koukash, who grew up in a war zone, seems unsure of how to deal with 25-year-old Joe’s lack of confidence. The most entertaining moments, however, come in the hotelier’s relationship with the apparently lazy Heidi, who admits early on that she isn’t really sure why she has to have a job before adding: “I can’t really find out what I want to do.” A less interesting programme would have ensured that Heidi’s role was to infuriate both Koukash and the viewers at home – instead what emerges is surprisingly touching. Sarah Hughes Stacey Dooley: Face to Face with ISIS BBC Three, from 10.00am This harrowing film follows Shireen, a Yazidi woman, as she returns to Iraq with reporter Stacey Dooley for a reckoning with her past. The pair face down soldiers and officials, many of whom seem intent on ensuring that those past atrocities are never mentioned. The final confrontation between Shireen and Anmar, an Islamic State commander, sees the latter squirm blankly as the former finally and movingly gives voice to her pain. Eurovision: You Decide BBC Two, 7.30pm Six lucky contestants battle it out for the dubious honour of becoming Britain’s entrant to the 2018 Eurovision Song Contest. Among the hopefuls are a 16-year-old former Britain’s Got Talent finalist, two former The Voice UK contestants and a Eurovision backing singer. Kirstie and Phil’s Love It or List It Channel 4, 8.00pm The dynamic duo are in Windsor this week, where they meet the Farhall family who can’t decide whether they should sell their four-bedroom detached home. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This series about the history of fashion comes to an end with a look at the story behind Marie Antoinette’s famously risqué portrait in her chemise. Butchart unpicks the meaning behind the painting, looking at what the unhappy French queen was trying to convey while also considering how and why her intended message backfired. It’s a lovely conclusion to a hugely enjoyable series – here’s hoping for a swift return. The New Builds Are Coming: Battle in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Richard Macer’s topical documentary concludes with the focus shifting towards those responsible for the Cullham new builds. “Nobody has a right to a view,” states one architect. Maybe not, but as Macer talks to all involved, so it becomes increasingly clear that this is not an issue that can be easily solved. Girlfriends ITV, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama reaches its conclusion as Sue (Miranda Richardson) and Gail (Zoë Wanamaker) discover that Linda (Phyllis Logan) hasn’t exactly been honest with them about her relationship with her late husband. Harvey (1950, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am James Stewart stars as Elwood Dowd, a middle-aged, wide-eyed dreamer who spends his days getting tipsy with his best friend, a six-foot-three invisible white rabbit called Harvey. His sister Veta (an Oscar-winning Josephine Hull) tries to reform him and a comedy of errors ensues. Henry Koster’s adaptation of Mary Chase’s play is breezy, but has a lot to say about the importance of tolerance. Tango & Cash (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Bringing together two of Hollywood’s biggest action heroes, this silly shoot-’em-up is strangely appealing. Sylvester Stallone is Tango, a slick, sophisticated drug squad cop. Cash (Kurt Russell) is his uncultured rival on the force. And they don’t get on. But when they are framed and sent to prison, they’re forced to work together. It’s pure Eighties bombast, with Yazoo and Alice Cooper on the soundtrack. Harmonium (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.10pm Koji Fukada’s subtle, slow-burning thriller tells of how a family’s fragile domestic bliss is forever altered when an old friend comes to stay and teaches the daughter (Momone Shinokawa) to play the titular instrument. It’s an elegant and gripping film, with a tragic twist halfway through, and rightly won the prize in the Un Certain Regard section at the Cannes Film Festival. Thursday 8 February James Bulger: A Mother's Story James Bulger: a Mother’s Story ITV, 9.00pm Opening with the sound of Jon Venables describing in a matter-of-fact manner how he and fellow 10-year-old Robert Thompson beat and stoned toddler James Bulger to death on a railway track, this documentary relives one of the most horrifying murders of the last century in often very difficult detail. Structured around an interview between Trevor McDonald and Bulger’s mother, Denise Fergus, it exerts an awful grip while never quite deciphering the murder itself. Fergus recounts her unimaginable trauma, police and social workers describe their parts in the events and McDonald describes the trajectory of the case, from abduction to sentencing and an aftermath that has seen Fergus surround her house with CCTV cameras and Venables convicted of child pornography offences. The statements of the two killers – both, we are reminded, with troubled backgrounds – in particular are chilling: manipulative, jokey and fearful. The resilience and courage of Fergus, meanwhile, is admirable and unflinching some 25 years on: “The day I stop speaking about James,” she explains, “is the day I join him.” Gabriel Tate Death in Paradise BBC One, 9.00pm Another surreally absurd case for Jack Mooney (Ardal O’Hanlon), as the leader of a spiritual retreat is strangled while his fellow members are deep in group meditation. Trouble at the Zoo BBC Two, 9.00pm The images and stories that came out of Cumbria’s South Lakes Safari Zoo last year were deeply troubling, forcing management to step down in the face of evidence that almost 500 animals had died there in under four years. Jack Rampling’s challenging observational documentary follows staff trying to keep the institution open in the face of widespread scepticism and queries whether zoos have a place in modern society. Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 9.00pm Scraping the barrel scarcely covers this new series in which the erstwhile Supermarket Sweep host traverses the Sunshine State to check out Walt Disney World, shopping centres and spiritualists. Derry Girls Channel 4, 10.00pm One of the big comedy hits of the year so far, Lisa McGee’s evocative, ribald sitcom set during the Troubles ends with Erin (Saoirse-Monica Jackson) getting her big break as editor of the school magazine. But with great power comes great and largely unwanted responsibility. Nazi Victory: the Postwar Plan UKTV Play, from today Starting (confusingly enough) on the Yesterday channel next week, this engaging new series explores what might have happened in the event of a Nazi victory in the Second World War, from the fifth columnists planted in the United States through to his plans for concentration camps and national monuments in Britain. The latter forms the basis of this opening episode. Britannia Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Jez Butterworth’s compellingly berserk drama rampages through its fourth episode as Kerra (Kelly Reilly) is cast out by her father, King Pellenor, for parlaying with the Romans. How dare she betray the Cantii clan? He throws her to the mercy of the Druids – let’s just hope that she doesn’t meet the same fate as her mother. Meanwhile, former Druid Divis (Nikolaj Lie Kaas) suspects that there is more to General Aulus (David Morrissey) than meets the eye. Lucy (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm In this brilliant, bombastic sci-fi romp from Luc Besson, Scarlett Johansson (always worth watching) plays a drug mule who is dosed with an experimental substance that increases her brainpower by an untold degree. Space-time becomes a flick book, and Lucy’s the girl to rifle through its pages. Besson described it as La Femme Nikita plus Inception plus 2001: A Space Odyssey: that’s ambitious, egotistical, and mostly right. The Hurt Locker (2008) ★★★★☆ TCM, 9.00pm Kathryn Bigelow (Point Break) won the Best Director Oscar (the first woman to do so) for her blistering drama about a bomb disposal unit leading a perilous existence in Iraq. Jeremy Renner is outstanding as a reckless maverick who delights in putting himself in harm’s way, while the jittery cinematography stokes up the suspense to almost unbearable levels. Ralph Fiennes puts in a nice cameo as a military contractor. The Diary of a Teenage Girl (2015) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm This startling debut by Marielle Heller shows the funny side of a teenager’s explorations into her sexuality as a 15-year-old wannabe cartoonist Minnie (Bel Powley) seduces her mother’s 35-year-old boyfriend Monroe (Alexander Skarsgard). Heller’s nimble direction and clever script ensure that the film never paints either Minnie or Monroe entirely as victim or predator. Friday 9 February Winter Olympics 2018: the BBC presenting team Live Winter Olympics 2018 Opening Ceremony BBC One, 10.30am These are interesting times on the Korean peninsula, which will no doubt bring an added frisson to the Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony in Pyeongchang, South Korea. More than 3,000 athletes from 90 countries are expected to march in the ceremony, which will feature a historic moment when the North and South Korean teams march together under a unified flag. History is also being made with the disqualification of Russia from the contest due to its state-sponsored doping scandal, although, controversially, 169 Russian athletes will still compete under a designated Olympic flag. The setting for the occasion is the 35,000- seater Pyeongchang Olympic Stadium, and the following three hours of coverage comes from sure-footed BBC favourite Clare Balding, who’ll also present highlights on BBC Two at 7.00pm on BBC Two. Team GB has set its sights on a record five medals, including perhaps its first in skiing. It’s expected that North Korean artistes will perform at the ceremony in a spirit of cooperation, and while we can’t expect anything as glorious as Danny Boyle’s madcap mega-party for London 2012, we hope for a memorable kick-off to these historic Games. Vicki Power Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Actor Josh Hartnett joins his co-hosts to whip up a beloved ramen dish as the cookery show concludes its fifth series. Jamie Oliver prepares a game curry before trotting off with pal Jimmy Doherty to investigate a new method of farming. Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm Creepy noises and unexplained presences continue to unsettle incomer Matilda (Lydia Wilson) in this thriller. Determined to find out if she’s the child who disappeared from a Welsh backwater 24 years ago, Matilda begins to anger reluctant locals with her questions. Jamestown Sky One, 9.00pm A dramatic series of events in this episode provides an inkling of the high-stakes in store for season two of this glossy period piece based on the shipments of English brides to the American colonies in 1619. The opener sees Alice (Sophie Rundle) give birth and Jocelyn (Naomi Battrick) face tragedy. Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm The sharp-as-ever sitcom veers into sentimentality with the death of Rosario, the maid that Karen (Megan Mullally) loved to torment. But it’s nicely counterbalanced by Jack’s (Sean Hayes) hilarious funeral speech and a punchy cameo from Minnie Driver. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm There are performers on a well-deserved victory lap feature here. Debra Messing and Eric McCormack soak up praise for the Will & Grace revival (see preview, left), actress Saoirse Ronan basks in the glow of her third Oscar nod, and Keala Settle performs the Oscar-nominated This Is Me from The Greatest Showman. The Bold Type Amazon Prime, from today This fun comedy drama follows friends Jane (Katie Stevens), Kat (Aisha Dee) and Sutton (Meghann Fahy) working at a glossy magazine in New York. In the first episode, Jane is asked to write about her ex, while Kat attempts to convince an artist to be featured. Grand Prix Driver Amazon Prime, from today Michael Douglas narrates this behind-the-scenes look at McLaren’s F1 team during their difficult 2017 season. The four half-hour episodes take us inside McLaren’s mission control during troublesome test drives. Baywatch (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm Baywatch the TV show became a phenomenon, but everything about Baywatch the movie is big, brash and bombastic. Dwayne Johnson is preposterously buff in the role of chief lifeguard Mitch Buchannon, while Zac Efron as new recruit Matt Brody is in full-on idiot mode. A cameo by David Hasselhoff, however, appearing to the strains of Jimi Jamison’s theme I’ll Be Ready, will raise a smile. Looper (2012) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm It’s impossible not to be tickled by the playful logic of this sleek sci-fi film that ticks along with pocket-watch precision. Joseph Gordon-Levitt is a “looper” – an assassin whose targets are zapped back to him from 30 years in the future, before his contract expires and his final target is his future self. It sounds confusing, but works, and has a great cast that includes Emily Blunt, Bruce Willis and Piper Perabo. The Cabin in the Woods (2012) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.20pm Don’t be fooled by its young cast (including a pre-Thor Chris Hemsworth) and stereotypical teenage-horror appeal: Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard’s clever detonation of the scary movie is very good, with the genre’s most original plot twist in years. The story, however, is a classic one: five friends visit a cabin in the woods, where they encounter more than they bargained for. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
What's on TV tonight: Requiem, Altered Carbon and more
Friday 2 February Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm The glut of psychological suspense dramas on our screens makes it hard for new thrillers to stand out but do make time for the BBC’s haunting and unusual Requiem. Smartly directed by rising star Mahalia Belo, who knows exactly what to do and when to raise the hairs on the back of your neck, this new six-part series melds horror with crime to tell the story of the highly strung Matilda (Lydia Wilson), a promising young cellist whose self-contained world is thrown into disarray by an unexpected and violent death. After walking out on her long-dreamt-of US tour, Matilda and her faithful accompanist Hal (Joel Fry, excellent in a rare serious role) head to Wales, where grief and past secrets threaten to engulf both her and everyone she comes into contact with. To say any more would be unfair but Australian writer Kris Mrksa (best known for crime drama Underbelly) plays a very clever game with the genre, referencing everything from Don’t Look Now to Rosemary’s Baby and ensuring that the audience is both on the back foot and desperate to find out more. Beautifully paced and intelligently told, the resulting story is worth staying in on a Friday night for. Sarah Hughes Altered Carbon Netflix, from today “The first thing you’ll learn is that nothing is as it seems,” intones the solemn voice-over in this adaptation of Richard Morgan’s excellent novel from 2002. Netflix’s latest foray into hardcore science fiction follows a prisoner who, after 250 years in suspended animation, returns to life in a new body with one chance to win his freedom: solving a mind-bending murder. It’s stylishly shot, and features a strong cast, including James Purefoy, Joel Kinnaman, and Hamilton star Renée Elise Goldsberry. Anglo-Welsh Cup: Northampton Saints v Harlequins BT Sport 1, 7.15pm Out-of-sorts Northampton, who’ve won just one of their last eight Premiership games, face Harlequins in the Anglo-Welsh Cup at Franklin’s Gardens. The last time these teams met, in December, Quins ran in seven tries, with Dave Ward, Danny Care and Tim Visser among the scorers, as Saints slumped to an embarrassing 50-21 defeat at Twickenham. Super League: St Helens v Castleford Tigers Sky Sports Main Event, 7.30pm The Totally Wicked Stadium host the action as St Helens and Castleford Tigers get their seasons under way. These sides last met in the semi-finals of last year’s competition in September, with the Tigers winning a dramatic match at the Mend-a-Hose Jungle 23-22 after extra-time, setting up a Grand Final meeting with Leeds Rhinos. Celebrity 5 Go Barging Channel 5, 8.00pm Last year, four celebrities gave us laughs as they took to the canals of England and Wales for the first run of this series. Now it returns with a new motley crew – Tom Conti, Diarmuid Gavin, Tessa Sanderson, Tony Christie and Penny Smith – and this time they are heading to France. So expect some crashes and fireworks. A Vicar’s Life BBC Two, 8.30pm; not Wales The likeable series about vicars in Herefordshire continues with assistant curate Father Matthew Cashmore joining a relief effort taking aid to refugees in Calais, while his boss, the Reverend Ruth Hulse comes up with a novel way of boosting church attendance. Nigel Slater’s Middle East BBC Two, 9.00pm; not Wales Nigel Slater is the sort of company you want on a food journey: enthusiastic, interesting and curious about the places he visits. This new series sees him heading throughout the Middle East, starting off in the food paradise of Beirut before moving on to the Beqaa Valley. Hits, Hype & Hustle: An Insider’s Guide to the Music Business BBC Four, 9.00pm The music industry guide concludes with a focus on reunions, presented by PR man Alan Edwards. “It was supposed to be edge of the seat stuff but, in reality, it was end of the pier,” he says, with a wicked grin, of the Sex Pistols reunion he engineered. Elsewhere, we’re treated to footage of Debbie Harry performing with a giant pair of horns on her head. SH Celebrity Big Brother: Live Final Channel 5, from 9.00pm This series of the reality show, which is celebrating the year of the woman, apparently, reaches its finale. Sadly, the all-female house was short lived and the series has been reduced to the usual mix of crude comments and bed-hopping. SH King Arthur: Legend of the Sword (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Guy Ritchie’s combat-heavy Camelot is a very silly place. It sets up Arthur (Charlie Hunnam) as a Moses figure who’s sent to Londinium when Vortigern (Jude Law) overthrows Camelot. What follows is a quick-witted caper, but the sword-pulling scene is sabotaged by a David Beckham cameo that saps the moment of its mythic excitement. Sorcerer (1977) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm Given the wild success that William Friedkin had achieved with The French Connection (1971) and The Exorcist (1973), the catastrophic failure of Sorcerer, a thrillingly downbeat action film about truck drivers, counted as the bitterest blow of his career: he’s always talked about it as his favourite film. Indeed, it’s far too technically accomplished and conceptually bold to have deserved such short shrift. This Is 40 (2012) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 12.10am Judd Apatow revisits two characters from his 2007 hit Knocked Up. Leslie Mann, Apatow’s wife, and Paul Rudd play a stressed-out Los Angeles couple whose 40th birthdays bookend the film. Apatow and Mann’s real-life daughters also play their children. It’s a perceptive comedy on middle-age and one that guarantees big laughs alongside some of Apatow’s most pertinent observations on love. Saturday 3 February Hard Sun: Agyness Deyn Hard Sun BBC One, 9.30pm Five weeks in, and the BBC’s relentlessly dark, eye-wateringly violent thriller is not making much more sense than it did at the outset. All we really know is that those unlikely cops Hicks (Jim Sturgess) and Renko (Agyness Deyn) are still racing around London trying to outsmart MI5, using their belief that the world will end in a little under five years to justify doing indescribably horrible things to some indescribably horrible people. The bloody opening to this episode (suffice to say it involves an ice axe) follows on from last week’s ending in which uber-spook Grace Morrigan (Nikki Amuka-Bird) helpfully gave Renko’s psychopath son Daniel (Jojo Macari) details of who it was that raped his mother at the age 14, with predictable consequences. And guess who’s given the job of investigating the case? That’s the sort of circular plotting that gives Neil Cross’s drama its pace, intensity and throbbing sense of paranoia. But the only thing that’s truly mysterious here is how Hicks and Renko, with the security forces still breathing down their necks in pursuit of the flashdrive containing “proof” of the impending apocalypse, have any time left for the day job. Gerard O’Donovan Hugh’s Wild West BBC Two, 6.00pm; NI, 6.30pm; Wales, 5.30pm Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall heads for the Somerset Levels to witness a spectacular “murmuration” of starlings. He also discovers how one native species of butterfly was rescued from the brink of extinction. The Voice UK ITV, 8.00pm The singing contest’s second series on ITV continues to plod along, with singer Olly Murs making no great impact on the show, as yet. The blind auditions enter their fifth week with more contestants hoping that their performances will be enough to make the coaches spin their chairs. Casualty BBC One, 8.20pm Jeremy Hunt may not have predicted this year’s winter NHS crisis, but the writers of Casualty did. Here, the emergency department is in gridlock, with trolleys blocking corridors and ambulances queuing outside to admit patients. It’s just as well then that new junior doctor Bea Kinsella (Michelle Fox) is keen to get stuck in. Or is it? Grand Tours of Scotland’s Lochs BBC Two, 8.30pm In an unexpectedly explosive edition, Paul Murton visits Loch Shin, where a meteor hit the Highlands 1.2 billion years ago. Then, at Kylesku, he recalls how Britain’s “X Men” helped to destroy one of Germany’s greatest battleships during the Second World War. Johnny Cash’s Bitter Tears Sky Arts, 9.00pm This documentary celebrates one of the Man in Black’s lesser-known works, his 1964 album Bitter Tears: Ballads of the American Indian. It was a pioneering – and at the time controversial – album, which he used to draw attention to the long-running oppression of America’s native peoples. The film also covers the making of a commemorative tribute album by Emmylou Harris, Steve Earle, Kris Kristofferson and other country music stars. Spiral BBC Four, 9.00pm & 10.00pm The sixth series of this wonderfully gritty French policier, that’s been fraught even by its own standards, comes to a nail-biting climax. As gangster Drissa Camara (Narcisse Mame-Zollo) is betrayed over a gold deal, Captain Laure (Caroline Proust) and her detective team get the break they need in the Mercier case and lawyer Joséphine (Audrey Fleurot) realises that sticking to her story could place her in real jeopardy. Hamlet (1948, b/w) ★★★★★ London Live, 3.00pm This version of Shakespeare’s Hamlet was adapted and directed by Laurence Olivier, who also starred as the troubled Prince of Denmark. Despite winning the Academy Award for Best Picture, purists felt that Olivier had taken liberties with the text, condensing four hours into two and removing the characters of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. But the action remains tight and Olivier is magnificent. Suffragette (2015) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Never mind the respectable cast and period costumes – Sarah Gavron’s fiery film about the fight for women’s suffrage is far from genteel. Carey Mulligan is on form showing the transformation of Maud from bystander to activist with riveting emotional precision. As Abi Morgan’s script strips away the reasons for her to fall back into line, her nerve soars through the roof. The Talented Mr Ripley (1999) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.30pm Anthony Minghella’s glossy take on Patricia Highsmith’s novel is an engaging noir thriller with a pitch-perfect ending. New York wannabe Tom Ripley’s life changes when he begins lusting after the lifestyle of an errant playboy (Jude Law) in Italy. Matt Damon is suitably sinister in the lead role, with Philip Seymour Hoffman equally as magnificent as a bulldozer who ruptures Tom’s cosy idyll. Sunday 4 February Endeavour: Shaun Evans and Roger Allam Endeavour ITV, 8.00pm With the likes of Black Mirror, we live in an age of increasingly inventive television, but sometimes what we all need is a nice straightforward period procedural to relax in front of on a Sunday night. Russell Lewis’s Endeavour, now returning for a fifth series, ticks all the boxes. There’s a solid cast, anchored by Shaun Evans, as the young, less grumpy, more awkward Endeavour Morse; some nice if occasionally a little precise period detail (although I did like the throwaway reference to boxer Freddie Mills); and a plot that’s just twisty enough to allow viewers to play “guess the killer”. This opening episode is a pretty bleak affair, centring around a missing Fabergé egg and a series of seemingly unlinked deaths which (topically) turn out to have their origins in a riotous stag party. Along the way, Endeavour deals with an eager but unwanted new underling (Poldark’s Lewis Peek) and crosses swords with a sharp-witted “good-time girl” (Charlotte Hope), who delivers some home truths about his tendency to put women on pedestals. Meanwhile, the wonderful Roger Allam continues to steal every scene as Detective Chief Inspector Fred Thursday. Really someone should just give him his own show. Sarah Hughes Six Nations Rugby Union: Italy v England ITV, 2.15pm Kicking off their defence of their title, England are at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome, where they face Italy. Eddie Jones’s prospects for winning an unprecedented three championships in a row have been given a major boost: Jack Nowell, Chris Robshaw, Maro Itoje and Mike Brown, who were all doubts, have all been miraculously passed fit. Italy gave the champions a scare at Twickenham last term by taking a 10-5 half-time lead, but England eventually prevailed 36-15, with Nowell and Danny Care among the scorers. Premier League Football: Liverpool v Tottenham Hotspur Sky Sports Main Event, 4.15pm Having bounced back from their defeat at Swansea with a 3-0 victory against Huddersfield – thanks to goals from Emre Can, Roberto Firmino and Mohamed Salah – Liverpool host Spurs, who are one place beneath them in fifth. When these sides met in October, two goals from Harry Kane (who else?) helped Spurs to a comprehensive 4-1 victory. Call the Midwife BBC One, 8.00pm Prepare for a real weepy as Nurse Crane (Linda Bassett) and Trixie (Helen George) try to find out what secret a pregnant mother and her family are hiding. Elsewhere, Shelagh (Laura Main) worries that her new au pair isn’t making friends. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm The eccentric yet compelling journey comes to an end as Silver Lady heads towards Inverness. Will bad weather and issues with batteries bring this great experiment to a halt? Inside Number 10 BBC Parliament, 8.00pm We know all about the pressures of being Prime Minister but what about those real-life Sir Humphrey Applebys, the Cabinet Secretaries, aka the powers behind the throne? This interesting new series sees Sue Cameron interview all five living former Cabinet Secretaries about the premierships of Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and David Cameron. McMafia BBC One, 9.00pm The action hots up considerably in this penultimate episode as Alex’s (James Norton) lies unravel. But it’s the Aleksei Serebryakov (as Alex’s father Dimitri) who continues to steal the show. Meanwhile, there’s an excellent vignette featuring nemesis Vadim (Merab Ninidze) chopping wood semi-clothed, presumably in homage to Vladimir Putin. Maltese: The Mafia Detective Channel 4, 10.00pm It might not be the most original series but this Italian import is among the most stylish. The setting is the Seventies and we open with a bang as maverick but honest cop Dario Maltese (Kim Rossi Stuart) finds himself dragged back to the corrupt Sicilian society he left years before. Arena: Stanley and his Daughters BBC Four, 10.00pm What is it really like to be the child of a genius? That question haunts the subjects of this fascinating film about the artist Stanley Spencer and his two daughters, Shirin and Unity. Now 91 and 87, Shirin and Unity were estranged for most of their lives after being separated as children. “I do feel that you were jealous of me for a time,” says Unity while Shirin looks askance. What follows is a complex and complicated story of art, betrayal, love and loss which also allows us to view Spencer’s work anew. American Football: Super Bowl LII Sky Sports Main Event, 11.00pm & BBC One, 11.15pm Hot dogs and Buffalo wings at the ready, as the New England Patriots, looking to win back-to-back Super Bowls, take on Philadelphia Eagles in Minneapolis at the US Bank Stadium. The New England Patriots overcame the Jackonsville Jaguars to set up a finale against the Eagles, who are playing in the showpiece for the first time since 2005, when they lost to the Pats. Much of the attention will be on the Patriots’ 40-year-old quarterback Tom Brady, who is attempting to become the first player to win six Super Bowl rings. Jane Eyre (1943, b/w) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 2.10pm Deep focus and shadows give Robert Stevenson’s version of Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel an extra tinge of Gothic atmosphere. Orson Welles, who provides his Mr Rochester with a hammy melancholy, is an omniscient presence but Joan Fontaine, who had a tendency to be outshone by more dynamic leading men (Cary Grant, Laurence Olivier), is formidable as Jane. Look out for Elizabeth Taylor as the ill-fated Helen Burns. Shark Tale (2004) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 4.40pm Some of Hollywood’s most famous actors, including Will Smith, Robert De Niro, Renée Zellweger, Jack Black and Angelina Jolie (as well as director Martin Scorsese) provide the voices in this comedy animation about a mafia shark family and a little wrasse (Smith) who becomes a hero after surviving a shark encounter. It’s not as good as Finding Nemo but much better than Ice Age. Plenty of gags for grown-ups, too. Yves Saint Laurent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.25am This window into the world of French fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent tells a compelling if not especially potent story. It was made with the blessing of his partner, Pierre Bergé, and charts almost the entire trip, from Saint Laurent’s upbringing in French Algeria to his rise to stardom at Christian Dior and the sexy, druggy, lucrative whirl that followed. Pierre Niney gives good doe-eyed fragility in the title role. Monday 5 February Moving On: Sue Johnston and Paula Wilcox star in Tuesday's episode Moving On BBC One, 2.15pm Jimmy McGovern’s long-running anthology series, beginning its ninth run with another five stories spread across a week, is an exemplar of daytime drama, unafraid to tackle difficult issues and frequently promoting the work of novice writers or directors. That it occasionally settles said issues a little too neatly is understandable – no one wants gale-force McGovern over tea and biscuits – but they reliably make a virtue of the short running-time to deliver intensity and coiled emotion. Stories later in the week (at 2.15pm every afternoon and 2.45pm on Friday) include Sue Johnston’s grieving widow seeking comfort in an unlikely place and Samantha Bond’s registrar forced to re-evaluate her own marriage after an unwelcome discovery. The gripping opener, however, is written by and stars Jodhi May as Rachel, a woman wrestling with the news that the teacher who abused her as a child is back working in the area. Sinead Cusack supplies doughty support as Rachel’s guilt-stricken mother, but May is hauntingly good as a woman torn between exposing her abuser and the potential impact that reopening old wounds may have on her marriage and children. Gabriel Tate My Life: Locked In Boy CBBC, 5.30pm This is a moving account of a 10-year-old whose cerebral palsy left him unable to communicate for eight years. Beginning with an alphabet board and his mother’s help, Jonathan now has a reading age beyond his years, writes poetry and is petitioning MPs to improve education for children with his condition. Horizon: My Amazing Brain: Richard’s War BBC Two, 9.00pm An extraordinary document of both personal fortitude and scientific endeavour, Fiona Lloyd-Davies’s film follows the recovery of her husband, former UN peacekeeper Richard Gray, from a stroke. Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Danny (Viveik Kalra) tries to thwart the plans of the terror cell, Omar (Mawaan Rizwan) takes matters into his own hands and Guy (Jack Davenport) faces powerful enemies. Once again packing its excitements into the closing minutes after a lengthy, patient build-up, this decent thriller concludes tomorrow. The Bulger Killers: Was Justice Done? Channel 4, 9.00pm Rather than reliving the terrible event itself, Matt Smith’s thoughtful film gathers together legal experts and those involved in the case to debate the sufficiency of the eight years served by John Venables and Robert Thompson for the murder of James Bulger in 1993. The X-Files Channel 5, 9.00pm After a patchy revival last year, The X Files rediscovers its mojo with an 11th series opener high on fun and intrigue. Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) lies hospitalised after a seizure, so Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) goes in search of their son as war looms between humans and aliens. Hull’s Headscarf Heroes BBC Four, 9.00pm Steve Humphries’s documentary meets the redoubtable Yvonne Blenkinsop, leader of the “headscarf” campaign against Hull’s trawler companies whose questionable attitude towards crew safety cost 58 lives in a series of tragedies in 1968. Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm In 2013, a gunman killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard. This documentary features an interview with the killer’s sister, still wrestling with his descent into violence. Rear Window (1954) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.40pm Wonderful in its simplicity and compelling in its execution, this belongs in the first rank of Hitchcock’s canon. The director presents a vignette of life through the lens of photographer L B “Jeff” Jeffries (James Stewart), immobilised by a broken leg during a blistering heatwave. Events take an interesting turn when he suspects one of his neighbours across the courtyard may have murdered his wife. Lincoln (2012) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Daniel Day-Lewis is on marvellous, and Oscar-winning, form as Abraham Lincoln, in Steven Spielberg’s intelligent, focused and robust film about the battle to abolish slavery. The film makes no attempt to cover the entire, unwieldy life of its subject. Instead, it dwells solely on the final months of Lincoln’s presidency, during which the political and personal stakes were never higher. Tommy Lee Jones co-stars. The Silence of the Lambs (1991) ★★★★★ Channel 5, 10.00pm Anthony Hopkins triumphs in this creepy thriller as the psychotic Dr Hannibal Lecter who is recruited by trainee FBI agent Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) to track down a serial killer nicknamed Buffalo Bill. No matter how many times you watch this film, Hopkins’s menacing performance – and his lip-smacking relish for human body parts – will always have you on the edge of your seat. Tuesday 6 February Flatpack Empire: James Futcher at SAPA aluminium factory Flatpack Empire BBC Two, 9.00pm There can’t be many urbanites in the UK who haven’t puzzled over the assembly instructions for a piece of Ikea furniture, let alone had the odd experience of being funnelled like a mouse in a maze through one of the firm’s vast depot-like stores. For this series, the Swedish company has granted a camera crew “worldwide access” – from their design headquarters in Sweden to Indian furniture factories and Polish sawmills – to film the £33 billion corporate Goliath’s global operations over the course of a year. Perhaps the biggest surprise (and certainly the thing that Ikea wants us most to know about) is their current move – unthinkable previously – into collaborations with prestige independent designers and other brands, such as audio giants Sonos and fashion designer Virgil Abloh. Among the more interesting is a project with British furniture designer Tom Dixon. “It’s not a sofa-bed, it’s a bed-sofa, but it’s really it’s a platform for living,” says Dixon, a mite grumpily, likening his role to that of a “benign parasite, where I can make a living out of this huge beast”. Maybe they’ll call the finished product “the bed bug” instead of the Swedish names that us Brits struggle to pronounce. Gerard O’Donovan Back in Time for Tea BBC Two, 8.00pm Sara Cox heads up this northern edition of the food-oriented time travel show. Tonight, the conditions that working class Yorkshire folk had to endure 100 years ago come as a shock for the Ellis family from Bradford, especially when one of them mistakes a mangle for a pasta maker. What Would Your Kid Do? ITV, 8.00pm Jason Manford puts parents’ knowledge of their offspring to the test, as children are filmed performing tasks exploring creativity, risk-taking and rule breaking while Mum and Dad have to predict what happens next. Simple and dependably entertaining. Elizabeth: Our Queen Channel 5, 9.00pm Documentaries about the Royal family seem to be appearing at an ever-increasing rate. And now here’s Channel 5’s sprawling eight-part entry, covering her life and reign and hearing from former prime ministers, friends, royal household members and special advisors. Portrait Artist of the Year 2018 Sky Arts, 8.00pm This week’s celebrity sitters are Game of Thrones star Conleth Hill, model Rachel Hunter and actor Stefanie Martini. But, as ever, it’s not so much the well-known faces as the gentle competitiveness and warm interaction between the contestants that makes this portrait painting competition so very engaging. Art, Passion & Power: The Story of the Royal Collection BBC Four, 9.00pm In the final episode of his series on the breathtaking treasures of the Royal Collection, Andrew Graham-Dixon meets the Prince of Wales and explores the last 150 years – when, as he puts it, “women took charge” and used art to help steer the monarchy through times of turbulent change. It’s also a period in which the Royal family’s changing tastes, from Fabergé eggs to the Queen Mother’s more “daring” art acquisitions, neatly demonstrate “the determined emergence of a modern monarchy”. Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm The fourth series of Reece Shearsmith and Steve Pemberton’s darkly comic anthology has been a creepy delight. In Tempting Fate they’ve kept one of the best for last, as a team of contractors clearing out a reclusive hoarder’s council flat unleash a terrible curse. 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Everything you’d expect from Michael Bay is here with bells on – the macho provocation, the sound and fury, and the diabolical pleasure in reducing everything to rubble and bloody mush. However, as a gruelling epitaph to lives wasted, this true-life Libyan shoot-’em-up starring John Krasinski is maddeningly effective and there’s a strange purity to it. Slumdog Millionaire (2008) ★★★★★ More4, 9.00pm Eight Oscars, seven Baftas and four Golden Globes cemented Danny Boyle’s energetic adaptation of Vikas Swarup’s novel Q & A as a triumph. The chaotic beauty of Mumbai is exuberantly brought to life to tell the story of an uneducated orphan (an endearing performance from Dev Patel) from the slums who is on the verge of winning a fortune on the Hindi version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. ’71 (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.50pm Jack O’Connell excels in a near-wordless role as a naive squaddie who gets stranded on the streets of Belfast in 1971 and must throw himself on the mercy of loyalist allies, who are no certain guarantees of sanctuary. It’s a tense, at times almost unbearable watch as we’re wrong-footed all the time by the combinations of terror, guilt, manoeuvring, expediency and revenge that motivate even the most minor of characters. Wednesday 7 February My Millionaire Migrant Boss My Millionaire Migrant Boss Channel 4, 9.00pm Initially, this one-off documentary – following Pakistani multi-millionaire Marwan Koukash as he puts four unemployed Brits through their paces for two weeks, before deciding whether or not to give them a job at his swanky Liverpool hotel – seems like an odd attempt to make The Apprentice on the Dole. But park that knee-jerk criticism right there because what actually unfolds is a thoughtful film in which the tough-but-likeable Koukash refuses to either play to the camera or write off his four eager contenders. That’s not to say that it’s all plain sailing: bubbly Georgia’s chronic unpunctuality soon causes issues, while Koukash, who grew up in a war zone, seems unsure of how to deal with 25-year-old Joe’s lack of confidence. The most entertaining moments, however, come in the hotelier’s relationship with the apparently lazy Heidi, who admits early on that she isn’t really sure why she has to have a job before adding: “I can’t really find out what I want to do.” A less interesting programme would have ensured that Heidi’s role was to infuriate both Koukash and the viewers at home – instead what emerges is surprisingly touching. Sarah Hughes Stacey Dooley: Face to Face with ISIS BBC Three, from 10.00am This harrowing film follows Shireen, a Yazidi woman, as she returns to Iraq with reporter Stacey Dooley for a reckoning with her past. The pair face down soldiers and officials, many of whom seem intent on ensuring that those past atrocities are never mentioned. The final confrontation between Shireen and Anmar, an Islamic State commander, sees the latter squirm blankly as the former finally and movingly gives voice to her pain. Eurovision: You Decide BBC Two, 7.30pm Six lucky contestants battle it out for the dubious honour of becoming Britain’s entrant to the 2018 Eurovision Song Contest. Among the hopefuls are a 16-year-old former Britain’s Got Talent finalist, two former The Voice UK contestants and a Eurovision backing singer. Kirstie and Phil’s Love It or List It Channel 4, 8.00pm The dynamic duo are in Windsor this week, where they meet the Farhall family who can’t decide whether they should sell their four-bedroom detached home. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This series about the history of fashion comes to an end with a look at the story behind Marie Antoinette’s famously risqué portrait in her chemise. Butchart unpicks the meaning behind the painting, looking at what the unhappy French queen was trying to convey while also considering how and why her intended message backfired. It’s a lovely conclusion to a hugely enjoyable series – here’s hoping for a swift return. The New Builds Are Coming: Battle in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Richard Macer’s topical documentary concludes with the focus shifting towards those responsible for the Cullham new builds. “Nobody has a right to a view,” states one architect. Maybe not, but as Macer talks to all involved, so it becomes increasingly clear that this is not an issue that can be easily solved. Girlfriends ITV, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama reaches its conclusion as Sue (Miranda Richardson) and Gail (Zoë Wanamaker) discover that Linda (Phyllis Logan) hasn’t exactly been honest with them about her relationship with her late husband. Harvey (1950, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am James Stewart stars as Elwood Dowd, a middle-aged, wide-eyed dreamer who spends his days getting tipsy with his best friend, a six-foot-three invisible white rabbit called Harvey. His sister Veta (an Oscar-winning Josephine Hull) tries to reform him and a comedy of errors ensues. Henry Koster’s adaptation of Mary Chase’s play is breezy, but has a lot to say about the importance of tolerance. Tango & Cash (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Bringing together two of Hollywood’s biggest action heroes, this silly shoot-’em-up is strangely appealing. Sylvester Stallone is Tango, a slick, sophisticated drug squad cop. Cash (Kurt Russell) is his uncultured rival on the force. And they don’t get on. But when they are framed and sent to prison, they’re forced to work together. It’s pure Eighties bombast, with Yazoo and Alice Cooper on the soundtrack. Harmonium (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.10pm Koji Fukada’s subtle, slow-burning thriller tells of how a family’s fragile domestic bliss is forever altered when an old friend comes to stay and teaches the daughter (Momone Shinokawa) to play the titular instrument. It’s an elegant and gripping film, with a tragic twist halfway through, and rightly won the prize in the Un Certain Regard section at the Cannes Film Festival. Thursday 8 February James Bulger: A Mother's Story James Bulger: a Mother’s Story ITV, 9.00pm Opening with the sound of Jon Venables describing in a matter-of-fact manner how he and fellow 10-year-old Robert Thompson beat and stoned toddler James Bulger to death on a railway track, this documentary relives one of the most horrifying murders of the last century in often very difficult detail. Structured around an interview between Trevor McDonald and Bulger’s mother, Denise Fergus, it exerts an awful grip while never quite deciphering the murder itself. Fergus recounts her unimaginable trauma, police and social workers describe their parts in the events and McDonald describes the trajectory of the case, from abduction to sentencing and an aftermath that has seen Fergus surround her house with CCTV cameras and Venables convicted of child pornography offences. The statements of the two killers – both, we are reminded, with troubled backgrounds – in particular are chilling: manipulative, jokey and fearful. The resilience and courage of Fergus, meanwhile, is admirable and unflinching some 25 years on: “The day I stop speaking about James,” she explains, “is the day I join him.” Gabriel Tate Death in Paradise BBC One, 9.00pm Another surreally absurd case for Jack Mooney (Ardal O’Hanlon), as the leader of a spiritual retreat is strangled while his fellow members are deep in group meditation. Trouble at the Zoo BBC Two, 9.00pm The images and stories that came out of Cumbria’s South Lakes Safari Zoo last year were deeply troubling, forcing management to step down in the face of evidence that almost 500 animals had died there in under four years. Jack Rampling’s challenging observational documentary follows staff trying to keep the institution open in the face of widespread scepticism and queries whether zoos have a place in modern society. Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 9.00pm Scraping the barrel scarcely covers this new series in which the erstwhile Supermarket Sweep host traverses the Sunshine State to check out Walt Disney World, shopping centres and spiritualists. Derry Girls Channel 4, 10.00pm One of the big comedy hits of the year so far, Lisa McGee’s evocative, ribald sitcom set during the Troubles ends with Erin (Saoirse-Monica Jackson) getting her big break as editor of the school magazine. But with great power comes great and largely unwanted responsibility. Nazi Victory: the Postwar Plan UKTV Play, from today Starting (confusingly enough) on the Yesterday channel next week, this engaging new series explores what might have happened in the event of a Nazi victory in the Second World War, from the fifth columnists planted in the United States through to his plans for concentration camps and national monuments in Britain. The latter forms the basis of this opening episode. Britannia Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Jez Butterworth’s compellingly berserk drama rampages through its fourth episode as Kerra (Kelly Reilly) is cast out by her father, King Pellenor, for parlaying with the Romans. How dare she betray the Cantii clan? He throws her to the mercy of the Druids – let’s just hope that she doesn’t meet the same fate as her mother. Meanwhile, former Druid Divis (Nikolaj Lie Kaas) suspects that there is more to General Aulus (David Morrissey) than meets the eye. Lucy (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm In this brilliant, bombastic sci-fi romp from Luc Besson, Scarlett Johansson (always worth watching) plays a drug mule who is dosed with an experimental substance that increases her brainpower by an untold degree. Space-time becomes a flick book, and Lucy’s the girl to rifle through its pages. Besson described it as La Femme Nikita plus Inception plus 2001: A Space Odyssey: that’s ambitious, egotistical, and mostly right. The Hurt Locker (2008) ★★★★☆ TCM, 9.00pm Kathryn Bigelow (Point Break) won the Best Director Oscar (the first woman to do so) for her blistering drama about a bomb disposal unit leading a perilous existence in Iraq. Jeremy Renner is outstanding as a reckless maverick who delights in putting himself in harm’s way, while the jittery cinematography stokes up the suspense to almost unbearable levels. Ralph Fiennes puts in a nice cameo as a military contractor. The Diary of a Teenage Girl (2015) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm This startling debut by Marielle Heller shows the funny side of a teenager’s explorations into her sexuality as a 15-year-old wannabe cartoonist Minnie (Bel Powley) seduces her mother’s 35-year-old boyfriend Monroe (Alexander Skarsgard). Heller’s nimble direction and clever script ensure that the film never paints either Minnie or Monroe entirely as victim or predator. Friday 9 February Winter Olympics 2018: the BBC presenting team Live Winter Olympics 2018 Opening Ceremony BBC One, 10.30am These are interesting times on the Korean peninsula, which will no doubt bring an added frisson to the Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony in Pyeongchang, South Korea. More than 3,000 athletes from 90 countries are expected to march in the ceremony, which will feature a historic moment when the North and South Korean teams march together under a unified flag. History is also being made with the disqualification of Russia from the contest due to its state-sponsored doping scandal, although, controversially, 169 Russian athletes will still compete under a designated Olympic flag. The setting for the occasion is the 35,000- seater Pyeongchang Olympic Stadium, and the following three hours of coverage comes from sure-footed BBC favourite Clare Balding, who’ll also present highlights on BBC Two at 7.00pm on BBC Two. Team GB has set its sights on a record five medals, including perhaps its first in skiing. It’s expected that North Korean artistes will perform at the ceremony in a spirit of cooperation, and while we can’t expect anything as glorious as Danny Boyle’s madcap mega-party for London 2012, we hope for a memorable kick-off to these historic Games. Vicki Power Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Actor Josh Hartnett joins his co-hosts to whip up a beloved ramen dish as the cookery show concludes its fifth series. Jamie Oliver prepares a game curry before trotting off with pal Jimmy Doherty to investigate a new method of farming. Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm Creepy noises and unexplained presences continue to unsettle incomer Matilda (Lydia Wilson) in this thriller. Determined to find out if she’s the child who disappeared from a Welsh backwater 24 years ago, Matilda begins to anger reluctant locals with her questions. Jamestown Sky One, 9.00pm A dramatic series of events in this episode provides an inkling of the high-stakes in store for season two of this glossy period piece based on the shipments of English brides to the American colonies in 1619. The opener sees Alice (Sophie Rundle) give birth and Jocelyn (Naomi Battrick) face tragedy. Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm The sharp-as-ever sitcom veers into sentimentality with the death of Rosario, the maid that Karen (Megan Mullally) loved to torment. But it’s nicely counterbalanced by Jack’s (Sean Hayes) hilarious funeral speech and a punchy cameo from Minnie Driver. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm There are performers on a well-deserved victory lap feature here. Debra Messing and Eric McCormack soak up praise for the Will & Grace revival (see preview, left), actress Saoirse Ronan basks in the glow of her third Oscar nod, and Keala Settle performs the Oscar-nominated This Is Me from The Greatest Showman. The Bold Type Amazon Prime, from today This fun comedy drama follows friends Jane (Katie Stevens), Kat (Aisha Dee) and Sutton (Meghann Fahy) working at a glossy magazine in New York. In the first episode, Jane is asked to write about her ex, while Kat attempts to convince an artist to be featured. Grand Prix Driver Amazon Prime, from today Michael Douglas narrates this behind-the-scenes look at McLaren’s F1 team during their difficult 2017 season. The four half-hour episodes take us inside McLaren’s mission control during troublesome test drives. Baywatch (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm Baywatch the TV show became a phenomenon, but everything about Baywatch the movie is big, brash and bombastic. Dwayne Johnson is preposterously buff in the role of chief lifeguard Mitch Buchannon, while Zac Efron as new recruit Matt Brody is in full-on idiot mode. A cameo by David Hasselhoff, however, appearing to the strains of Jimi Jamison’s theme I’ll Be Ready, will raise a smile. Looper (2012) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm It’s impossible not to be tickled by the playful logic of this sleek sci-fi film that ticks along with pocket-watch precision. Joseph Gordon-Levitt is a “looper” – an assassin whose targets are zapped back to him from 30 years in the future, before his contract expires and his final target is his future self. It sounds confusing, but works, and has a great cast that includes Emily Blunt, Bruce Willis and Piper Perabo. The Cabin in the Woods (2012) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.20pm Don’t be fooled by its young cast (including a pre-Thor Chris Hemsworth) and stereotypical teenage-horror appeal: Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard’s clever detonation of the scary movie is very good, with the genre’s most original plot twist in years. The story, however, is a classic one: five friends visit a cabin in the woods, where they encounter more than they bargained for. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
Friday 2 February Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm The glut of psychological suspense dramas on our screens makes it hard for new thrillers to stand out but do make time for the BBC’s haunting and unusual Requiem. Smartly directed by rising star Mahalia Belo, who knows exactly what to do and when to raise the hairs on the back of your neck, this new six-part series melds horror with crime to tell the story of the highly strung Matilda (Lydia Wilson), a promising young cellist whose self-contained world is thrown into disarray by an unexpected and violent death. After walking out on her long-dreamt-of US tour, Matilda and her faithful accompanist Hal (Joel Fry, excellent in a rare serious role) head to Wales, where grief and past secrets threaten to engulf both her and everyone she comes into contact with. To say any more would be unfair but Australian writer Kris Mrksa (best known for crime drama Underbelly) plays a very clever game with the genre, referencing everything from Don’t Look Now to Rosemary’s Baby and ensuring that the audience is both on the back foot and desperate to find out more. Beautifully paced and intelligently told, the resulting story is worth staying in on a Friday night for. Sarah Hughes Altered Carbon Netflix, from today “The first thing you’ll learn is that nothing is as it seems,” intones the solemn voice-over in this adaptation of Richard Morgan’s excellent novel from 2002. Netflix’s latest foray into hardcore science fiction follows a prisoner who, after 250 years in suspended animation, returns to life in a new body with one chance to win his freedom: solving a mind-bending murder. It’s stylishly shot, and features a strong cast, including James Purefoy, Joel Kinnaman, and Hamilton star Renée Elise Goldsberry. Anglo-Welsh Cup: Northampton Saints v Harlequins BT Sport 1, 7.15pm Out-of-sorts Northampton, who’ve won just one of their last eight Premiership games, face Harlequins in the Anglo-Welsh Cup at Franklin’s Gardens. The last time these teams met, in December, Quins ran in seven tries, with Dave Ward, Danny Care and Tim Visser among the scorers, as Saints slumped to an embarrassing 50-21 defeat at Twickenham. Super League: St Helens v Castleford Tigers Sky Sports Main Event, 7.30pm The Totally Wicked Stadium host the action as St Helens and Castleford Tigers get their seasons under way. These sides last met in the semi-finals of last year’s competition in September, with the Tigers winning a dramatic match at the Mend-a-Hose Jungle 23-22 after extra-time, setting up a Grand Final meeting with Leeds Rhinos. Celebrity 5 Go Barging Channel 5, 8.00pm Last year, four celebrities gave us laughs as they took to the canals of England and Wales for the first run of this series. Now it returns with a new motley crew – Tom Conti, Diarmuid Gavin, Tessa Sanderson, Tony Christie and Penny Smith – and this time they are heading to France. So expect some crashes and fireworks. A Vicar’s Life BBC Two, 8.30pm; not Wales The likeable series about vicars in Herefordshire continues with assistant curate Father Matthew Cashmore joining a relief effort taking aid to refugees in Calais, while his boss, the Reverend Ruth Hulse comes up with a novel way of boosting church attendance. Nigel Slater’s Middle East BBC Two, 9.00pm; not Wales Nigel Slater is the sort of company you want on a food journey: enthusiastic, interesting and curious about the places he visits. This new series sees him heading throughout the Middle East, starting off in the food paradise of Beirut before moving on to the Beqaa Valley. Hits, Hype & Hustle: An Insider’s Guide to the Music Business BBC Four, 9.00pm The music industry guide concludes with a focus on reunions, presented by PR man Alan Edwards. “It was supposed to be edge of the seat stuff but, in reality, it was end of the pier,” he says, with a wicked grin, of the Sex Pistols reunion he engineered. Elsewhere, we’re treated to footage of Debbie Harry performing with a giant pair of horns on her head. SH Celebrity Big Brother: Live Final Channel 5, from 9.00pm This series of the reality show, which is celebrating the year of the woman, apparently, reaches its finale. Sadly, the all-female house was short lived and the series has been reduced to the usual mix of crude comments and bed-hopping. SH King Arthur: Legend of the Sword (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Guy Ritchie’s combat-heavy Camelot is a very silly place. It sets up Arthur (Charlie Hunnam) as a Moses figure who’s sent to Londinium when Vortigern (Jude Law) overthrows Camelot. What follows is a quick-witted caper, but the sword-pulling scene is sabotaged by a David Beckham cameo that saps the moment of its mythic excitement. Sorcerer (1977) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm Given the wild success that William Friedkin had achieved with The French Connection (1971) and The Exorcist (1973), the catastrophic failure of Sorcerer, a thrillingly downbeat action film about truck drivers, counted as the bitterest blow of his career: he’s always talked about it as his favourite film. Indeed, it’s far too technically accomplished and conceptually bold to have deserved such short shrift. This Is 40 (2012) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 12.10am Judd Apatow revisits two characters from his 2007 hit Knocked Up. Leslie Mann, Apatow’s wife, and Paul Rudd play a stressed-out Los Angeles couple whose 40th birthdays bookend the film. Apatow and Mann’s real-life daughters also play their children. It’s a perceptive comedy on middle-age and one that guarantees big laughs alongside some of Apatow’s most pertinent observations on love. Saturday 3 February Hard Sun: Agyness Deyn Hard Sun BBC One, 9.30pm Five weeks in, and the BBC’s relentlessly dark, eye-wateringly violent thriller is not making much more sense than it did at the outset. All we really know is that those unlikely cops Hicks (Jim Sturgess) and Renko (Agyness Deyn) are still racing around London trying to outsmart MI5, using their belief that the world will end in a little under five years to justify doing indescribably horrible things to some indescribably horrible people. The bloody opening to this episode (suffice to say it involves an ice axe) follows on from last week’s ending in which uber-spook Grace Morrigan (Nikki Amuka-Bird) helpfully gave Renko’s psychopath son Daniel (Jojo Macari) details of who it was that raped his mother at the age 14, with predictable consequences. And guess who’s given the job of investigating the case? That’s the sort of circular plotting that gives Neil Cross’s drama its pace, intensity and throbbing sense of paranoia. But the only thing that’s truly mysterious here is how Hicks and Renko, with the security forces still breathing down their necks in pursuit of the flashdrive containing “proof” of the impending apocalypse, have any time left for the day job. Gerard O’Donovan Hugh’s Wild West BBC Two, 6.00pm; NI, 6.30pm; Wales, 5.30pm Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall heads for the Somerset Levels to witness a spectacular “murmuration” of starlings. He also discovers how one native species of butterfly was rescued from the brink of extinction. The Voice UK ITV, 8.00pm The singing contest’s second series on ITV continues to plod along, with singer Olly Murs making no great impact on the show, as yet. The blind auditions enter their fifth week with more contestants hoping that their performances will be enough to make the coaches spin their chairs. Casualty BBC One, 8.20pm Jeremy Hunt may not have predicted this year’s winter NHS crisis, but the writers of Casualty did. Here, the emergency department is in gridlock, with trolleys blocking corridors and ambulances queuing outside to admit patients. It’s just as well then that new junior doctor Bea Kinsella (Michelle Fox) is keen to get stuck in. Or is it? Grand Tours of Scotland’s Lochs BBC Two, 8.30pm In an unexpectedly explosive edition, Paul Murton visits Loch Shin, where a meteor hit the Highlands 1.2 billion years ago. Then, at Kylesku, he recalls how Britain’s “X Men” helped to destroy one of Germany’s greatest battleships during the Second World War. Johnny Cash’s Bitter Tears Sky Arts, 9.00pm This documentary celebrates one of the Man in Black’s lesser-known works, his 1964 album Bitter Tears: Ballads of the American Indian. It was a pioneering – and at the time controversial – album, which he used to draw attention to the long-running oppression of America’s native peoples. The film also covers the making of a commemorative tribute album by Emmylou Harris, Steve Earle, Kris Kristofferson and other country music stars. Spiral BBC Four, 9.00pm & 10.00pm The sixth series of this wonderfully gritty French policier, that’s been fraught even by its own standards, comes to a nail-biting climax. As gangster Drissa Camara (Narcisse Mame-Zollo) is betrayed over a gold deal, Captain Laure (Caroline Proust) and her detective team get the break they need in the Mercier case and lawyer Joséphine (Audrey Fleurot) realises that sticking to her story could place her in real jeopardy. Hamlet (1948, b/w) ★★★★★ London Live, 3.00pm This version of Shakespeare’s Hamlet was adapted and directed by Laurence Olivier, who also starred as the troubled Prince of Denmark. Despite winning the Academy Award for Best Picture, purists felt that Olivier had taken liberties with the text, condensing four hours into two and removing the characters of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. But the action remains tight and Olivier is magnificent. Suffragette (2015) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Never mind the respectable cast and period costumes – Sarah Gavron’s fiery film about the fight for women’s suffrage is far from genteel. Carey Mulligan is on form showing the transformation of Maud from bystander to activist with riveting emotional precision. As Abi Morgan’s script strips away the reasons for her to fall back into line, her nerve soars through the roof. The Talented Mr Ripley (1999) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.30pm Anthony Minghella’s glossy take on Patricia Highsmith’s novel is an engaging noir thriller with a pitch-perfect ending. New York wannabe Tom Ripley’s life changes when he begins lusting after the lifestyle of an errant playboy (Jude Law) in Italy. Matt Damon is suitably sinister in the lead role, with Philip Seymour Hoffman equally as magnificent as a bulldozer who ruptures Tom’s cosy idyll. Sunday 4 February Endeavour: Shaun Evans and Roger Allam Endeavour ITV, 8.00pm With the likes of Black Mirror, we live in an age of increasingly inventive television, but sometimes what we all need is a nice straightforward period procedural to relax in front of on a Sunday night. Russell Lewis’s Endeavour, now returning for a fifth series, ticks all the boxes. There’s a solid cast, anchored by Shaun Evans, as the young, less grumpy, more awkward Endeavour Morse; some nice if occasionally a little precise period detail (although I did like the throwaway reference to boxer Freddie Mills); and a plot that’s just twisty enough to allow viewers to play “guess the killer”. This opening episode is a pretty bleak affair, centring around a missing Fabergé egg and a series of seemingly unlinked deaths which (topically) turn out to have their origins in a riotous stag party. Along the way, Endeavour deals with an eager but unwanted new underling (Poldark’s Lewis Peek) and crosses swords with a sharp-witted “good-time girl” (Charlotte Hope), who delivers some home truths about his tendency to put women on pedestals. Meanwhile, the wonderful Roger Allam continues to steal every scene as Detective Chief Inspector Fred Thursday. Really someone should just give him his own show. Sarah Hughes Six Nations Rugby Union: Italy v England ITV, 2.15pm Kicking off their defence of their title, England are at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome, where they face Italy. Eddie Jones’s prospects for winning an unprecedented three championships in a row have been given a major boost: Jack Nowell, Chris Robshaw, Maro Itoje and Mike Brown, who were all doubts, have all been miraculously passed fit. Italy gave the champions a scare at Twickenham last term by taking a 10-5 half-time lead, but England eventually prevailed 36-15, with Nowell and Danny Care among the scorers. Premier League Football: Liverpool v Tottenham Hotspur Sky Sports Main Event, 4.15pm Having bounced back from their defeat at Swansea with a 3-0 victory against Huddersfield – thanks to goals from Emre Can, Roberto Firmino and Mohamed Salah – Liverpool host Spurs, who are one place beneath them in fifth. When these sides met in October, two goals from Harry Kane (who else?) helped Spurs to a comprehensive 4-1 victory. Call the Midwife BBC One, 8.00pm Prepare for a real weepy as Nurse Crane (Linda Bassett) and Trixie (Helen George) try to find out what secret a pregnant mother and her family are hiding. Elsewhere, Shelagh (Laura Main) worries that her new au pair isn’t making friends. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm The eccentric yet compelling journey comes to an end as Silver Lady heads towards Inverness. Will bad weather and issues with batteries bring this great experiment to a halt? Inside Number 10 BBC Parliament, 8.00pm We know all about the pressures of being Prime Minister but what about those real-life Sir Humphrey Applebys, the Cabinet Secretaries, aka the powers behind the throne? This interesting new series sees Sue Cameron interview all five living former Cabinet Secretaries about the premierships of Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and David Cameron. McMafia BBC One, 9.00pm The action hots up considerably in this penultimate episode as Alex’s (James Norton) lies unravel. But it’s the Aleksei Serebryakov (as Alex’s father Dimitri) who continues to steal the show. Meanwhile, there’s an excellent vignette featuring nemesis Vadim (Merab Ninidze) chopping wood semi-clothed, presumably in homage to Vladimir Putin. Maltese: The Mafia Detective Channel 4, 10.00pm It might not be the most original series but this Italian import is among the most stylish. The setting is the Seventies and we open with a bang as maverick but honest cop Dario Maltese (Kim Rossi Stuart) finds himself dragged back to the corrupt Sicilian society he left years before. Arena: Stanley and his Daughters BBC Four, 10.00pm What is it really like to be the child of a genius? That question haunts the subjects of this fascinating film about the artist Stanley Spencer and his two daughters, Shirin and Unity. Now 91 and 87, Shirin and Unity were estranged for most of their lives after being separated as children. “I do feel that you were jealous of me for a time,” says Unity while Shirin looks askance. What follows is a complex and complicated story of art, betrayal, love and loss which also allows us to view Spencer’s work anew. American Football: Super Bowl LII Sky Sports Main Event, 11.00pm & BBC One, 11.15pm Hot dogs and Buffalo wings at the ready, as the New England Patriots, looking to win back-to-back Super Bowls, take on Philadelphia Eagles in Minneapolis at the US Bank Stadium. The New England Patriots overcame the Jackonsville Jaguars to set up a finale against the Eagles, who are playing in the showpiece for the first time since 2005, when they lost to the Pats. Much of the attention will be on the Patriots’ 40-year-old quarterback Tom Brady, who is attempting to become the first player to win six Super Bowl rings. Jane Eyre (1943, b/w) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 2.10pm Deep focus and shadows give Robert Stevenson’s version of Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel an extra tinge of Gothic atmosphere. Orson Welles, who provides his Mr Rochester with a hammy melancholy, is an omniscient presence but Joan Fontaine, who had a tendency to be outshone by more dynamic leading men (Cary Grant, Laurence Olivier), is formidable as Jane. Look out for Elizabeth Taylor as the ill-fated Helen Burns. Shark Tale (2004) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 4.40pm Some of Hollywood’s most famous actors, including Will Smith, Robert De Niro, Renée Zellweger, Jack Black and Angelina Jolie (as well as director Martin Scorsese) provide the voices in this comedy animation about a mafia shark family and a little wrasse (Smith) who becomes a hero after surviving a shark encounter. It’s not as good as Finding Nemo but much better than Ice Age. Plenty of gags for grown-ups, too. Yves Saint Laurent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.25am This window into the world of French fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent tells a compelling if not especially potent story. It was made with the blessing of his partner, Pierre Bergé, and charts almost the entire trip, from Saint Laurent’s upbringing in French Algeria to his rise to stardom at Christian Dior and the sexy, druggy, lucrative whirl that followed. Pierre Niney gives good doe-eyed fragility in the title role. Monday 5 February Moving On: Sue Johnston and Paula Wilcox star in Tuesday's episode Moving On BBC One, 2.15pm Jimmy McGovern’s long-running anthology series, beginning its ninth run with another five stories spread across a week, is an exemplar of daytime drama, unafraid to tackle difficult issues and frequently promoting the work of novice writers or directors. That it occasionally settles said issues a little too neatly is understandable – no one wants gale-force McGovern over tea and biscuits – but they reliably make a virtue of the short running-time to deliver intensity and coiled emotion. Stories later in the week (at 2.15pm every afternoon and 2.45pm on Friday) include Sue Johnston’s grieving widow seeking comfort in an unlikely place and Samantha Bond’s registrar forced to re-evaluate her own marriage after an unwelcome discovery. The gripping opener, however, is written by and stars Jodhi May as Rachel, a woman wrestling with the news that the teacher who abused her as a child is back working in the area. Sinead Cusack supplies doughty support as Rachel’s guilt-stricken mother, but May is hauntingly good as a woman torn between exposing her abuser and the potential impact that reopening old wounds may have on her marriage and children. Gabriel Tate My Life: Locked In Boy CBBC, 5.30pm This is a moving account of a 10-year-old whose cerebral palsy left him unable to communicate for eight years. Beginning with an alphabet board and his mother’s help, Jonathan now has a reading age beyond his years, writes poetry and is petitioning MPs to improve education for children with his condition. Horizon: My Amazing Brain: Richard’s War BBC Two, 9.00pm An extraordinary document of both personal fortitude and scientific endeavour, Fiona Lloyd-Davies’s film follows the recovery of her husband, former UN peacekeeper Richard Gray, from a stroke. Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Danny (Viveik Kalra) tries to thwart the plans of the terror cell, Omar (Mawaan Rizwan) takes matters into his own hands and Guy (Jack Davenport) faces powerful enemies. Once again packing its excitements into the closing minutes after a lengthy, patient build-up, this decent thriller concludes tomorrow. The Bulger Killers: Was Justice Done? Channel 4, 9.00pm Rather than reliving the terrible event itself, Matt Smith’s thoughtful film gathers together legal experts and those involved in the case to debate the sufficiency of the eight years served by John Venables and Robert Thompson for the murder of James Bulger in 1993. The X-Files Channel 5, 9.00pm After a patchy revival last year, The X Files rediscovers its mojo with an 11th series opener high on fun and intrigue. Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) lies hospitalised after a seizure, so Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) goes in search of their son as war looms between humans and aliens. Hull’s Headscarf Heroes BBC Four, 9.00pm Steve Humphries’s documentary meets the redoubtable Yvonne Blenkinsop, leader of the “headscarf” campaign against Hull’s trawler companies whose questionable attitude towards crew safety cost 58 lives in a series of tragedies in 1968. Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm In 2013, a gunman killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard. This documentary features an interview with the killer’s sister, still wrestling with his descent into violence. Rear Window (1954) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.40pm Wonderful in its simplicity and compelling in its execution, this belongs in the first rank of Hitchcock’s canon. The director presents a vignette of life through the lens of photographer L B “Jeff” Jeffries (James Stewart), immobilised by a broken leg during a blistering heatwave. Events take an interesting turn when he suspects one of his neighbours across the courtyard may have murdered his wife. Lincoln (2012) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Daniel Day-Lewis is on marvellous, and Oscar-winning, form as Abraham Lincoln, in Steven Spielberg’s intelligent, focused and robust film about the battle to abolish slavery. The film makes no attempt to cover the entire, unwieldy life of its subject. Instead, it dwells solely on the final months of Lincoln’s presidency, during which the political and personal stakes were never higher. Tommy Lee Jones co-stars. The Silence of the Lambs (1991) ★★★★★ Channel 5, 10.00pm Anthony Hopkins triumphs in this creepy thriller as the psychotic Dr Hannibal Lecter who is recruited by trainee FBI agent Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) to track down a serial killer nicknamed Buffalo Bill. No matter how many times you watch this film, Hopkins’s menacing performance – and his lip-smacking relish for human body parts – will always have you on the edge of your seat. Tuesday 6 February Flatpack Empire: James Futcher at SAPA aluminium factory Flatpack Empire BBC Two, 9.00pm There can’t be many urbanites in the UK who haven’t puzzled over the assembly instructions for a piece of Ikea furniture, let alone had the odd experience of being funnelled like a mouse in a maze through one of the firm’s vast depot-like stores. For this series, the Swedish company has granted a camera crew “worldwide access” – from their design headquarters in Sweden to Indian furniture factories and Polish sawmills – to film the £33 billion corporate Goliath’s global operations over the course of a year. Perhaps the biggest surprise (and certainly the thing that Ikea wants us most to know about) is their current move – unthinkable previously – into collaborations with prestige independent designers and other brands, such as audio giants Sonos and fashion designer Virgil Abloh. Among the more interesting is a project with British furniture designer Tom Dixon. “It’s not a sofa-bed, it’s a bed-sofa, but it’s really it’s a platform for living,” says Dixon, a mite grumpily, likening his role to that of a “benign parasite, where I can make a living out of this huge beast”. Maybe they’ll call the finished product “the bed bug” instead of the Swedish names that us Brits struggle to pronounce. Gerard O’Donovan Back in Time for Tea BBC Two, 8.00pm Sara Cox heads up this northern edition of the food-oriented time travel show. Tonight, the conditions that working class Yorkshire folk had to endure 100 years ago come as a shock for the Ellis family from Bradford, especially when one of them mistakes a mangle for a pasta maker. What Would Your Kid Do? ITV, 8.00pm Jason Manford puts parents’ knowledge of their offspring to the test, as children are filmed performing tasks exploring creativity, risk-taking and rule breaking while Mum and Dad have to predict what happens next. Simple and dependably entertaining. Elizabeth: Our Queen Channel 5, 9.00pm Documentaries about the Royal family seem to be appearing at an ever-increasing rate. And now here’s Channel 5’s sprawling eight-part entry, covering her life and reign and hearing from former prime ministers, friends, royal household members and special advisors. Portrait Artist of the Year 2018 Sky Arts, 8.00pm This week’s celebrity sitters are Game of Thrones star Conleth Hill, model Rachel Hunter and actor Stefanie Martini. But, as ever, it’s not so much the well-known faces as the gentle competitiveness and warm interaction between the contestants that makes this portrait painting competition so very engaging. Art, Passion & Power: The Story of the Royal Collection BBC Four, 9.00pm In the final episode of his series on the breathtaking treasures of the Royal Collection, Andrew Graham-Dixon meets the Prince of Wales and explores the last 150 years – when, as he puts it, “women took charge” and used art to help steer the monarchy through times of turbulent change. It’s also a period in which the Royal family’s changing tastes, from Fabergé eggs to the Queen Mother’s more “daring” art acquisitions, neatly demonstrate “the determined emergence of a modern monarchy”. Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm The fourth series of Reece Shearsmith and Steve Pemberton’s darkly comic anthology has been a creepy delight. In Tempting Fate they’ve kept one of the best for last, as a team of contractors clearing out a reclusive hoarder’s council flat unleash a terrible curse. 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Everything you’d expect from Michael Bay is here with bells on – the macho provocation, the sound and fury, and the diabolical pleasure in reducing everything to rubble and bloody mush. However, as a gruelling epitaph to lives wasted, this true-life Libyan shoot-’em-up starring John Krasinski is maddeningly effective and there’s a strange purity to it. Slumdog Millionaire (2008) ★★★★★ More4, 9.00pm Eight Oscars, seven Baftas and four Golden Globes cemented Danny Boyle’s energetic adaptation of Vikas Swarup’s novel Q & A as a triumph. The chaotic beauty of Mumbai is exuberantly brought to life to tell the story of an uneducated orphan (an endearing performance from Dev Patel) from the slums who is on the verge of winning a fortune on the Hindi version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. ’71 (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.50pm Jack O’Connell excels in a near-wordless role as a naive squaddie who gets stranded on the streets of Belfast in 1971 and must throw himself on the mercy of loyalist allies, who are no certain guarantees of sanctuary. It’s a tense, at times almost unbearable watch as we’re wrong-footed all the time by the combinations of terror, guilt, manoeuvring, expediency and revenge that motivate even the most minor of characters. Wednesday 7 February My Millionaire Migrant Boss My Millionaire Migrant Boss Channel 4, 9.00pm Initially, this one-off documentary – following Pakistani multi-millionaire Marwan Koukash as he puts four unemployed Brits through their paces for two weeks, before deciding whether or not to give them a job at his swanky Liverpool hotel – seems like an odd attempt to make The Apprentice on the Dole. But park that knee-jerk criticism right there because what actually unfolds is a thoughtful film in which the tough-but-likeable Koukash refuses to either play to the camera or write off his four eager contenders. That’s not to say that it’s all plain sailing: bubbly Georgia’s chronic unpunctuality soon causes issues, while Koukash, who grew up in a war zone, seems unsure of how to deal with 25-year-old Joe’s lack of confidence. The most entertaining moments, however, come in the hotelier’s relationship with the apparently lazy Heidi, who admits early on that she isn’t really sure why she has to have a job before adding: “I can’t really find out what I want to do.” A less interesting programme would have ensured that Heidi’s role was to infuriate both Koukash and the viewers at home – instead what emerges is surprisingly touching. Sarah Hughes Stacey Dooley: Face to Face with ISIS BBC Three, from 10.00am This harrowing film follows Shireen, a Yazidi woman, as she returns to Iraq with reporter Stacey Dooley for a reckoning with her past. The pair face down soldiers and officials, many of whom seem intent on ensuring that those past atrocities are never mentioned. The final confrontation between Shireen and Anmar, an Islamic State commander, sees the latter squirm blankly as the former finally and movingly gives voice to her pain. Eurovision: You Decide BBC Two, 7.30pm Six lucky contestants battle it out for the dubious honour of becoming Britain’s entrant to the 2018 Eurovision Song Contest. Among the hopefuls are a 16-year-old former Britain’s Got Talent finalist, two former The Voice UK contestants and a Eurovision backing singer. Kirstie and Phil’s Love It or List It Channel 4, 8.00pm The dynamic duo are in Windsor this week, where they meet the Farhall family who can’t decide whether they should sell their four-bedroom detached home. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This series about the history of fashion comes to an end with a look at the story behind Marie Antoinette’s famously risqué portrait in her chemise. Butchart unpicks the meaning behind the painting, looking at what the unhappy French queen was trying to convey while also considering how and why her intended message backfired. It’s a lovely conclusion to a hugely enjoyable series – here’s hoping for a swift return. The New Builds Are Coming: Battle in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Richard Macer’s topical documentary concludes with the focus shifting towards those responsible for the Cullham new builds. “Nobody has a right to a view,” states one architect. Maybe not, but as Macer talks to all involved, so it becomes increasingly clear that this is not an issue that can be easily solved. Girlfriends ITV, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama reaches its conclusion as Sue (Miranda Richardson) and Gail (Zoë Wanamaker) discover that Linda (Phyllis Logan) hasn’t exactly been honest with them about her relationship with her late husband. Harvey (1950, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am James Stewart stars as Elwood Dowd, a middle-aged, wide-eyed dreamer who spends his days getting tipsy with his best friend, a six-foot-three invisible white rabbit called Harvey. His sister Veta (an Oscar-winning Josephine Hull) tries to reform him and a comedy of errors ensues. Henry Koster’s adaptation of Mary Chase’s play is breezy, but has a lot to say about the importance of tolerance. Tango & Cash (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Bringing together two of Hollywood’s biggest action heroes, this silly shoot-’em-up is strangely appealing. Sylvester Stallone is Tango, a slick, sophisticated drug squad cop. Cash (Kurt Russell) is his uncultured rival on the force. And they don’t get on. But when they are framed and sent to prison, they’re forced to work together. It’s pure Eighties bombast, with Yazoo and Alice Cooper on the soundtrack. Harmonium (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.10pm Koji Fukada’s subtle, slow-burning thriller tells of how a family’s fragile domestic bliss is forever altered when an old friend comes to stay and teaches the daughter (Momone Shinokawa) to play the titular instrument. It’s an elegant and gripping film, with a tragic twist halfway through, and rightly won the prize in the Un Certain Regard section at the Cannes Film Festival. Thursday 8 February James Bulger: A Mother's Story James Bulger: a Mother’s Story ITV, 9.00pm Opening with the sound of Jon Venables describing in a matter-of-fact manner how he and fellow 10-year-old Robert Thompson beat and stoned toddler James Bulger to death on a railway track, this documentary relives one of the most horrifying murders of the last century in often very difficult detail. Structured around an interview between Trevor McDonald and Bulger’s mother, Denise Fergus, it exerts an awful grip while never quite deciphering the murder itself. Fergus recounts her unimaginable trauma, police and social workers describe their parts in the events and McDonald describes the trajectory of the case, from abduction to sentencing and an aftermath that has seen Fergus surround her house with CCTV cameras and Venables convicted of child pornography offences. The statements of the two killers – both, we are reminded, with troubled backgrounds – in particular are chilling: manipulative, jokey and fearful. The resilience and courage of Fergus, meanwhile, is admirable and unflinching some 25 years on: “The day I stop speaking about James,” she explains, “is the day I join him.” Gabriel Tate Death in Paradise BBC One, 9.00pm Another surreally absurd case for Jack Mooney (Ardal O’Hanlon), as the leader of a spiritual retreat is strangled while his fellow members are deep in group meditation. Trouble at the Zoo BBC Two, 9.00pm The images and stories that came out of Cumbria’s South Lakes Safari Zoo last year were deeply troubling, forcing management to step down in the face of evidence that almost 500 animals had died there in under four years. Jack Rampling’s challenging observational documentary follows staff trying to keep the institution open in the face of widespread scepticism and queries whether zoos have a place in modern society. Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 9.00pm Scraping the barrel scarcely covers this new series in which the erstwhile Supermarket Sweep host traverses the Sunshine State to check out Walt Disney World, shopping centres and spiritualists. Derry Girls Channel 4, 10.00pm One of the big comedy hits of the year so far, Lisa McGee’s evocative, ribald sitcom set during the Troubles ends with Erin (Saoirse-Monica Jackson) getting her big break as editor of the school magazine. But with great power comes great and largely unwanted responsibility. Nazi Victory: the Postwar Plan UKTV Play, from today Starting (confusingly enough) on the Yesterday channel next week, this engaging new series explores what might have happened in the event of a Nazi victory in the Second World War, from the fifth columnists planted in the United States through to his plans for concentration camps and national monuments in Britain. The latter forms the basis of this opening episode. Britannia Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Jez Butterworth’s compellingly berserk drama rampages through its fourth episode as Kerra (Kelly Reilly) is cast out by her father, King Pellenor, for parlaying with the Romans. How dare she betray the Cantii clan? He throws her to the mercy of the Druids – let’s just hope that she doesn’t meet the same fate as her mother. Meanwhile, former Druid Divis (Nikolaj Lie Kaas) suspects that there is more to General Aulus (David Morrissey) than meets the eye. Lucy (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm In this brilliant, bombastic sci-fi romp from Luc Besson, Scarlett Johansson (always worth watching) plays a drug mule who is dosed with an experimental substance that increases her brainpower by an untold degree. Space-time becomes a flick book, and Lucy’s the girl to rifle through its pages. Besson described it as La Femme Nikita plus Inception plus 2001: A Space Odyssey: that’s ambitious, egotistical, and mostly right. The Hurt Locker (2008) ★★★★☆ TCM, 9.00pm Kathryn Bigelow (Point Break) won the Best Director Oscar (the first woman to do so) for her blistering drama about a bomb disposal unit leading a perilous existence in Iraq. Jeremy Renner is outstanding as a reckless maverick who delights in putting himself in harm’s way, while the jittery cinematography stokes up the suspense to almost unbearable levels. Ralph Fiennes puts in a nice cameo as a military contractor. The Diary of a Teenage Girl (2015) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm This startling debut by Marielle Heller shows the funny side of a teenager’s explorations into her sexuality as a 15-year-old wannabe cartoonist Minnie (Bel Powley) seduces her mother’s 35-year-old boyfriend Monroe (Alexander Skarsgard). Heller’s nimble direction and clever script ensure that the film never paints either Minnie or Monroe entirely as victim or predator. Friday 9 February Winter Olympics 2018: the BBC presenting team Live Winter Olympics 2018 Opening Ceremony BBC One, 10.30am These are interesting times on the Korean peninsula, which will no doubt bring an added frisson to the Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony in Pyeongchang, South Korea. More than 3,000 athletes from 90 countries are expected to march in the ceremony, which will feature a historic moment when the North and South Korean teams march together under a unified flag. History is also being made with the disqualification of Russia from the contest due to its state-sponsored doping scandal, although, controversially, 169 Russian athletes will still compete under a designated Olympic flag. The setting for the occasion is the 35,000- seater Pyeongchang Olympic Stadium, and the following three hours of coverage comes from sure-footed BBC favourite Clare Balding, who’ll also present highlights on BBC Two at 7.00pm on BBC Two. Team GB has set its sights on a record five medals, including perhaps its first in skiing. It’s expected that North Korean artistes will perform at the ceremony in a spirit of cooperation, and while we can’t expect anything as glorious as Danny Boyle’s madcap mega-party for London 2012, we hope for a memorable kick-off to these historic Games. Vicki Power Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Actor Josh Hartnett joins his co-hosts to whip up a beloved ramen dish as the cookery show concludes its fifth series. Jamie Oliver prepares a game curry before trotting off with pal Jimmy Doherty to investigate a new method of farming. Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm Creepy noises and unexplained presences continue to unsettle incomer Matilda (Lydia Wilson) in this thriller. Determined to find out if she’s the child who disappeared from a Welsh backwater 24 years ago, Matilda begins to anger reluctant locals with her questions. Jamestown Sky One, 9.00pm A dramatic series of events in this episode provides an inkling of the high-stakes in store for season two of this glossy period piece based on the shipments of English brides to the American colonies in 1619. The opener sees Alice (Sophie Rundle) give birth and Jocelyn (Naomi Battrick) face tragedy. Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm The sharp-as-ever sitcom veers into sentimentality with the death of Rosario, the maid that Karen (Megan Mullally) loved to torment. But it’s nicely counterbalanced by Jack’s (Sean Hayes) hilarious funeral speech and a punchy cameo from Minnie Driver. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm There are performers on a well-deserved victory lap feature here. Debra Messing and Eric McCormack soak up praise for the Will & Grace revival (see preview, left), actress Saoirse Ronan basks in the glow of her third Oscar nod, and Keala Settle performs the Oscar-nominated This Is Me from The Greatest Showman. The Bold Type Amazon Prime, from today This fun comedy drama follows friends Jane (Katie Stevens), Kat (Aisha Dee) and Sutton (Meghann Fahy) working at a glossy magazine in New York. In the first episode, Jane is asked to write about her ex, while Kat attempts to convince an artist to be featured. Grand Prix Driver Amazon Prime, from today Michael Douglas narrates this behind-the-scenes look at McLaren’s F1 team during their difficult 2017 season. The four half-hour episodes take us inside McLaren’s mission control during troublesome test drives. Baywatch (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm Baywatch the TV show became a phenomenon, but everything about Baywatch the movie is big, brash and bombastic. Dwayne Johnson is preposterously buff in the role of chief lifeguard Mitch Buchannon, while Zac Efron as new recruit Matt Brody is in full-on idiot mode. A cameo by David Hasselhoff, however, appearing to the strains of Jimi Jamison’s theme I’ll Be Ready, will raise a smile. Looper (2012) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm It’s impossible not to be tickled by the playful logic of this sleek sci-fi film that ticks along with pocket-watch precision. Joseph Gordon-Levitt is a “looper” – an assassin whose targets are zapped back to him from 30 years in the future, before his contract expires and his final target is his future self. It sounds confusing, but works, and has a great cast that includes Emily Blunt, Bruce Willis and Piper Perabo. The Cabin in the Woods (2012) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.20pm Don’t be fooled by its young cast (including a pre-Thor Chris Hemsworth) and stereotypical teenage-horror appeal: Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard’s clever detonation of the scary movie is very good, with the genre’s most original plot twist in years. The story, however, is a classic one: five friends visit a cabin in the woods, where they encounter more than they bargained for. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
What's on TV tonight: Requiem, Altered Carbon and more
Friday 2 February Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm The glut of psychological suspense dramas on our screens makes it hard for new thrillers to stand out but do make time for the BBC’s haunting and unusual Requiem. Smartly directed by rising star Mahalia Belo, who knows exactly what to do and when to raise the hairs on the back of your neck, this new six-part series melds horror with crime to tell the story of the highly strung Matilda (Lydia Wilson), a promising young cellist whose self-contained world is thrown into disarray by an unexpected and violent death. After walking out on her long-dreamt-of US tour, Matilda and her faithful accompanist Hal (Joel Fry, excellent in a rare serious role) head to Wales, where grief and past secrets threaten to engulf both her and everyone she comes into contact with. To say any more would be unfair but Australian writer Kris Mrksa (best known for crime drama Underbelly) plays a very clever game with the genre, referencing everything from Don’t Look Now to Rosemary’s Baby and ensuring that the audience is both on the back foot and desperate to find out more. Beautifully paced and intelligently told, the resulting story is worth staying in on a Friday night for. Sarah Hughes Altered Carbon Netflix, from today “The first thing you’ll learn is that nothing is as it seems,” intones the solemn voice-over in this adaptation of Richard Morgan’s excellent novel from 2002. Netflix’s latest foray into hardcore science fiction follows a prisoner who, after 250 years in suspended animation, returns to life in a new body with one chance to win his freedom: solving a mind-bending murder. It’s stylishly shot, and features a strong cast, including James Purefoy, Joel Kinnaman, and Hamilton star Renée Elise Goldsberry. Anglo-Welsh Cup: Northampton Saints v Harlequins BT Sport 1, 7.15pm Out-of-sorts Northampton, who’ve won just one of their last eight Premiership games, face Harlequins in the Anglo-Welsh Cup at Franklin’s Gardens. The last time these teams met, in December, Quins ran in seven tries, with Dave Ward, Danny Care and Tim Visser among the scorers, as Saints slumped to an embarrassing 50-21 defeat at Twickenham. Super League: St Helens v Castleford Tigers Sky Sports Main Event, 7.30pm The Totally Wicked Stadium host the action as St Helens and Castleford Tigers get their seasons under way. These sides last met in the semi-finals of last year’s competition in September, with the Tigers winning a dramatic match at the Mend-a-Hose Jungle 23-22 after extra-time, setting up a Grand Final meeting with Leeds Rhinos. Celebrity 5 Go Barging Channel 5, 8.00pm Last year, four celebrities gave us laughs as they took to the canals of England and Wales for the first run of this series. Now it returns with a new motley crew – Tom Conti, Diarmuid Gavin, Tessa Sanderson, Tony Christie and Penny Smith – and this time they are heading to France. So expect some crashes and fireworks. A Vicar’s Life BBC Two, 8.30pm; not Wales The likeable series about vicars in Herefordshire continues with assistant curate Father Matthew Cashmore joining a relief effort taking aid to refugees in Calais, while his boss, the Reverend Ruth Hulse comes up with a novel way of boosting church attendance. Nigel Slater’s Middle East BBC Two, 9.00pm; not Wales Nigel Slater is the sort of company you want on a food journey: enthusiastic, interesting and curious about the places he visits. This new series sees him heading throughout the Middle East, starting off in the food paradise of Beirut before moving on to the Beqaa Valley. Hits, Hype & Hustle: An Insider’s Guide to the Music Business BBC Four, 9.00pm The music industry guide concludes with a focus on reunions, presented by PR man Alan Edwards. “It was supposed to be edge of the seat stuff but, in reality, it was end of the pier,” he says, with a wicked grin, of the Sex Pistols reunion he engineered. Elsewhere, we’re treated to footage of Debbie Harry performing with a giant pair of horns on her head. SH Celebrity Big Brother: Live Final Channel 5, from 9.00pm This series of the reality show, which is celebrating the year of the woman, apparently, reaches its finale. Sadly, the all-female house was short lived and the series has been reduced to the usual mix of crude comments and bed-hopping. SH King Arthur: Legend of the Sword (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Guy Ritchie’s combat-heavy Camelot is a very silly place. It sets up Arthur (Charlie Hunnam) as a Moses figure who’s sent to Londinium when Vortigern (Jude Law) overthrows Camelot. What follows is a quick-witted caper, but the sword-pulling scene is sabotaged by a David Beckham cameo that saps the moment of its mythic excitement. Sorcerer (1977) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm Given the wild success that William Friedkin had achieved with The French Connection (1971) and The Exorcist (1973), the catastrophic failure of Sorcerer, a thrillingly downbeat action film about truck drivers, counted as the bitterest blow of his career: he’s always talked about it as his favourite film. Indeed, it’s far too technically accomplished and conceptually bold to have deserved such short shrift. This Is 40 (2012) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 12.10am Judd Apatow revisits two characters from his 2007 hit Knocked Up. Leslie Mann, Apatow’s wife, and Paul Rudd play a stressed-out Los Angeles couple whose 40th birthdays bookend the film. Apatow and Mann’s real-life daughters also play their children. It’s a perceptive comedy on middle-age and one that guarantees big laughs alongside some of Apatow’s most pertinent observations on love. Saturday 3 February Hard Sun: Agyness Deyn Hard Sun BBC One, 9.30pm Five weeks in, and the BBC’s relentlessly dark, eye-wateringly violent thriller is not making much more sense than it did at the outset. All we really know is that those unlikely cops Hicks (Jim Sturgess) and Renko (Agyness Deyn) are still racing around London trying to outsmart MI5, using their belief that the world will end in a little under five years to justify doing indescribably horrible things to some indescribably horrible people. The bloody opening to this episode (suffice to say it involves an ice axe) follows on from last week’s ending in which uber-spook Grace Morrigan (Nikki Amuka-Bird) helpfully gave Renko’s psychopath son Daniel (Jojo Macari) details of who it was that raped his mother at the age 14, with predictable consequences. And guess who’s given the job of investigating the case? That’s the sort of circular plotting that gives Neil Cross’s drama its pace, intensity and throbbing sense of paranoia. But the only thing that’s truly mysterious here is how Hicks and Renko, with the security forces still breathing down their necks in pursuit of the flashdrive containing “proof” of the impending apocalypse, have any time left for the day job. Gerard O’Donovan Hugh’s Wild West BBC Two, 6.00pm; NI, 6.30pm; Wales, 5.30pm Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall heads for the Somerset Levels to witness a spectacular “murmuration” of starlings. He also discovers how one native species of butterfly was rescued from the brink of extinction. The Voice UK ITV, 8.00pm The singing contest’s second series on ITV continues to plod along, with singer Olly Murs making no great impact on the show, as yet. The blind auditions enter their fifth week with more contestants hoping that their performances will be enough to make the coaches spin their chairs. Casualty BBC One, 8.20pm Jeremy Hunt may not have predicted this year’s winter NHS crisis, but the writers of Casualty did. Here, the emergency department is in gridlock, with trolleys blocking corridors and ambulances queuing outside to admit patients. It’s just as well then that new junior doctor Bea Kinsella (Michelle Fox) is keen to get stuck in. Or is it? Grand Tours of Scotland’s Lochs BBC Two, 8.30pm In an unexpectedly explosive edition, Paul Murton visits Loch Shin, where a meteor hit the Highlands 1.2 billion years ago. Then, at Kylesku, he recalls how Britain’s “X Men” helped to destroy one of Germany’s greatest battleships during the Second World War. Johnny Cash’s Bitter Tears Sky Arts, 9.00pm This documentary celebrates one of the Man in Black’s lesser-known works, his 1964 album Bitter Tears: Ballads of the American Indian. It was a pioneering – and at the time controversial – album, which he used to draw attention to the long-running oppression of America’s native peoples. The film also covers the making of a commemorative tribute album by Emmylou Harris, Steve Earle, Kris Kristofferson and other country music stars. Spiral BBC Four, 9.00pm & 10.00pm The sixth series of this wonderfully gritty French policier, that’s been fraught even by its own standards, comes to a nail-biting climax. As gangster Drissa Camara (Narcisse Mame-Zollo) is betrayed over a gold deal, Captain Laure (Caroline Proust) and her detective team get the break they need in the Mercier case and lawyer Joséphine (Audrey Fleurot) realises that sticking to her story could place her in real jeopardy. Hamlet (1948, b/w) ★★★★★ London Live, 3.00pm This version of Shakespeare’s Hamlet was adapted and directed by Laurence Olivier, who also starred as the troubled Prince of Denmark. Despite winning the Academy Award for Best Picture, purists felt that Olivier had taken liberties with the text, condensing four hours into two and removing the characters of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. But the action remains tight and Olivier is magnificent. Suffragette (2015) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Never mind the respectable cast and period costumes – Sarah Gavron’s fiery film about the fight for women’s suffrage is far from genteel. Carey Mulligan is on form showing the transformation of Maud from bystander to activist with riveting emotional precision. As Abi Morgan’s script strips away the reasons for her to fall back into line, her nerve soars through the roof. The Talented Mr Ripley (1999) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.30pm Anthony Minghella’s glossy take on Patricia Highsmith’s novel is an engaging noir thriller with a pitch-perfect ending. New York wannabe Tom Ripley’s life changes when he begins lusting after the lifestyle of an errant playboy (Jude Law) in Italy. Matt Damon is suitably sinister in the lead role, with Philip Seymour Hoffman equally as magnificent as a bulldozer who ruptures Tom’s cosy idyll. Sunday 4 February Endeavour: Shaun Evans and Roger Allam Endeavour ITV, 8.00pm With the likes of Black Mirror, we live in an age of increasingly inventive television, but sometimes what we all need is a nice straightforward period procedural to relax in front of on a Sunday night. Russell Lewis’s Endeavour, now returning for a fifth series, ticks all the boxes. There’s a solid cast, anchored by Shaun Evans, as the young, less grumpy, more awkward Endeavour Morse; some nice if occasionally a little precise period detail (although I did like the throwaway reference to boxer Freddie Mills); and a plot that’s just twisty enough to allow viewers to play “guess the killer”. This opening episode is a pretty bleak affair, centring around a missing Fabergé egg and a series of seemingly unlinked deaths which (topically) turn out to have their origins in a riotous stag party. Along the way, Endeavour deals with an eager but unwanted new underling (Poldark’s Lewis Peek) and crosses swords with a sharp-witted “good-time girl” (Charlotte Hope), who delivers some home truths about his tendency to put women on pedestals. Meanwhile, the wonderful Roger Allam continues to steal every scene as Detective Chief Inspector Fred Thursday. Really someone should just give him his own show. Sarah Hughes Six Nations Rugby Union: Italy v England ITV, 2.15pm Kicking off their defence of their title, England are at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome, where they face Italy. Eddie Jones’s prospects for winning an unprecedented three championships in a row have been given a major boost: Jack Nowell, Chris Robshaw, Maro Itoje and Mike Brown, who were all doubts, have all been miraculously passed fit. Italy gave the champions a scare at Twickenham last term by taking a 10-5 half-time lead, but England eventually prevailed 36-15, with Nowell and Danny Care among the scorers. Premier League Football: Liverpool v Tottenham Hotspur Sky Sports Main Event, 4.15pm Having bounced back from their defeat at Swansea with a 3-0 victory against Huddersfield – thanks to goals from Emre Can, Roberto Firmino and Mohamed Salah – Liverpool host Spurs, who are one place beneath them in fifth. When these sides met in October, two goals from Harry Kane (who else?) helped Spurs to a comprehensive 4-1 victory. Call the Midwife BBC One, 8.00pm Prepare for a real weepy as Nurse Crane (Linda Bassett) and Trixie (Helen George) try to find out what secret a pregnant mother and her family are hiding. Elsewhere, Shelagh (Laura Main) worries that her new au pair isn’t making friends. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm The eccentric yet compelling journey comes to an end as Silver Lady heads towards Inverness. Will bad weather and issues with batteries bring this great experiment to a halt? Inside Number 10 BBC Parliament, 8.00pm We know all about the pressures of being Prime Minister but what about those real-life Sir Humphrey Applebys, the Cabinet Secretaries, aka the powers behind the throne? This interesting new series sees Sue Cameron interview all five living former Cabinet Secretaries about the premierships of Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and David Cameron. McMafia BBC One, 9.00pm The action hots up considerably in this penultimate episode as Alex’s (James Norton) lies unravel. But it’s the Aleksei Serebryakov (as Alex’s father Dimitri) who continues to steal the show. Meanwhile, there’s an excellent vignette featuring nemesis Vadim (Merab Ninidze) chopping wood semi-clothed, presumably in homage to Vladimir Putin. Maltese: The Mafia Detective Channel 4, 10.00pm It might not be the most original series but this Italian import is among the most stylish. The setting is the Seventies and we open with a bang as maverick but honest cop Dario Maltese (Kim Rossi Stuart) finds himself dragged back to the corrupt Sicilian society he left years before. Arena: Stanley and his Daughters BBC Four, 10.00pm What is it really like to be the child of a genius? That question haunts the subjects of this fascinating film about the artist Stanley Spencer and his two daughters, Shirin and Unity. Now 91 and 87, Shirin and Unity were estranged for most of their lives after being separated as children. “I do feel that you were jealous of me for a time,” says Unity while Shirin looks askance. What follows is a complex and complicated story of art, betrayal, love and loss which also allows us to view Spencer’s work anew. American Football: Super Bowl LII Sky Sports Main Event, 11.00pm & BBC One, 11.15pm Hot dogs and Buffalo wings at the ready, as the New England Patriots, looking to win back-to-back Super Bowls, take on Philadelphia Eagles in Minneapolis at the US Bank Stadium. The New England Patriots overcame the Jackonsville Jaguars to set up a finale against the Eagles, who are playing in the showpiece for the first time since 2005, when they lost to the Pats. Much of the attention will be on the Patriots’ 40-year-old quarterback Tom Brady, who is attempting to become the first player to win six Super Bowl rings. Jane Eyre (1943, b/w) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 2.10pm Deep focus and shadows give Robert Stevenson’s version of Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel an extra tinge of Gothic atmosphere. Orson Welles, who provides his Mr Rochester with a hammy melancholy, is an omniscient presence but Joan Fontaine, who had a tendency to be outshone by more dynamic leading men (Cary Grant, Laurence Olivier), is formidable as Jane. Look out for Elizabeth Taylor as the ill-fated Helen Burns. Shark Tale (2004) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 4.40pm Some of Hollywood’s most famous actors, including Will Smith, Robert De Niro, Renée Zellweger, Jack Black and Angelina Jolie (as well as director Martin Scorsese) provide the voices in this comedy animation about a mafia shark family and a little wrasse (Smith) who becomes a hero after surviving a shark encounter. It’s not as good as Finding Nemo but much better than Ice Age. Plenty of gags for grown-ups, too. Yves Saint Laurent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.25am This window into the world of French fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent tells a compelling if not especially potent story. It was made with the blessing of his partner, Pierre Bergé, and charts almost the entire trip, from Saint Laurent’s upbringing in French Algeria to his rise to stardom at Christian Dior and the sexy, druggy, lucrative whirl that followed. Pierre Niney gives good doe-eyed fragility in the title role. Monday 5 February Moving On: Sue Johnston and Paula Wilcox star in Tuesday's episode Moving On BBC One, 2.15pm Jimmy McGovern’s long-running anthology series, beginning its ninth run with another five stories spread across a week, is an exemplar of daytime drama, unafraid to tackle difficult issues and frequently promoting the work of novice writers or directors. That it occasionally settles said issues a little too neatly is understandable – no one wants gale-force McGovern over tea and biscuits – but they reliably make a virtue of the short running-time to deliver intensity and coiled emotion. Stories later in the week (at 2.15pm every afternoon and 2.45pm on Friday) include Sue Johnston’s grieving widow seeking comfort in an unlikely place and Samantha Bond’s registrar forced to re-evaluate her own marriage after an unwelcome discovery. The gripping opener, however, is written by and stars Jodhi May as Rachel, a woman wrestling with the news that the teacher who abused her as a child is back working in the area. Sinead Cusack supplies doughty support as Rachel’s guilt-stricken mother, but May is hauntingly good as a woman torn between exposing her abuser and the potential impact that reopening old wounds may have on her marriage and children. Gabriel Tate My Life: Locked In Boy CBBC, 5.30pm This is a moving account of a 10-year-old whose cerebral palsy left him unable to communicate for eight years. Beginning with an alphabet board and his mother’s help, Jonathan now has a reading age beyond his years, writes poetry and is petitioning MPs to improve education for children with his condition. Horizon: My Amazing Brain: Richard’s War BBC Two, 9.00pm An extraordinary document of both personal fortitude and scientific endeavour, Fiona Lloyd-Davies’s film follows the recovery of her husband, former UN peacekeeper Richard Gray, from a stroke. Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Danny (Viveik Kalra) tries to thwart the plans of the terror cell, Omar (Mawaan Rizwan) takes matters into his own hands and Guy (Jack Davenport) faces powerful enemies. Once again packing its excitements into the closing minutes after a lengthy, patient build-up, this decent thriller concludes tomorrow. The Bulger Killers: Was Justice Done? Channel 4, 9.00pm Rather than reliving the terrible event itself, Matt Smith’s thoughtful film gathers together legal experts and those involved in the case to debate the sufficiency of the eight years served by John Venables and Robert Thompson for the murder of James Bulger in 1993. The X-Files Channel 5, 9.00pm After a patchy revival last year, The X Files rediscovers its mojo with an 11th series opener high on fun and intrigue. Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) lies hospitalised after a seizure, so Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) goes in search of their son as war looms between humans and aliens. Hull’s Headscarf Heroes BBC Four, 9.00pm Steve Humphries’s documentary meets the redoubtable Yvonne Blenkinsop, leader of the “headscarf” campaign against Hull’s trawler companies whose questionable attitude towards crew safety cost 58 lives in a series of tragedies in 1968. Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm In 2013, a gunman killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard. This documentary features an interview with the killer’s sister, still wrestling with his descent into violence. Rear Window (1954) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.40pm Wonderful in its simplicity and compelling in its execution, this belongs in the first rank of Hitchcock’s canon. The director presents a vignette of life through the lens of photographer L B “Jeff” Jeffries (James Stewart), immobilised by a broken leg during a blistering heatwave. Events take an interesting turn when he suspects one of his neighbours across the courtyard may have murdered his wife. Lincoln (2012) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Daniel Day-Lewis is on marvellous, and Oscar-winning, form as Abraham Lincoln, in Steven Spielberg’s intelligent, focused and robust film about the battle to abolish slavery. The film makes no attempt to cover the entire, unwieldy life of its subject. Instead, it dwells solely on the final months of Lincoln’s presidency, during which the political and personal stakes were never higher. Tommy Lee Jones co-stars. The Silence of the Lambs (1991) ★★★★★ Channel 5, 10.00pm Anthony Hopkins triumphs in this creepy thriller as the psychotic Dr Hannibal Lecter who is recruited by trainee FBI agent Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) to track down a serial killer nicknamed Buffalo Bill. No matter how many times you watch this film, Hopkins’s menacing performance – and his lip-smacking relish for human body parts – will always have you on the edge of your seat. Tuesday 6 February Flatpack Empire: James Futcher at SAPA aluminium factory Flatpack Empire BBC Two, 9.00pm There can’t be many urbanites in the UK who haven’t puzzled over the assembly instructions for a piece of Ikea furniture, let alone had the odd experience of being funnelled like a mouse in a maze through one of the firm’s vast depot-like stores. For this series, the Swedish company has granted a camera crew “worldwide access” – from their design headquarters in Sweden to Indian furniture factories and Polish sawmills – to film the £33 billion corporate Goliath’s global operations over the course of a year. Perhaps the biggest surprise (and certainly the thing that Ikea wants us most to know about) is their current move – unthinkable previously – into collaborations with prestige independent designers and other brands, such as audio giants Sonos and fashion designer Virgil Abloh. Among the more interesting is a project with British furniture designer Tom Dixon. “It’s not a sofa-bed, it’s a bed-sofa, but it’s really it’s a platform for living,” says Dixon, a mite grumpily, likening his role to that of a “benign parasite, where I can make a living out of this huge beast”. Maybe they’ll call the finished product “the bed bug” instead of the Swedish names that us Brits struggle to pronounce. Gerard O’Donovan Back in Time for Tea BBC Two, 8.00pm Sara Cox heads up this northern edition of the food-oriented time travel show. Tonight, the conditions that working class Yorkshire folk had to endure 100 years ago come as a shock for the Ellis family from Bradford, especially when one of them mistakes a mangle for a pasta maker. What Would Your Kid Do? ITV, 8.00pm Jason Manford puts parents’ knowledge of their offspring to the test, as children are filmed performing tasks exploring creativity, risk-taking and rule breaking while Mum and Dad have to predict what happens next. Simple and dependably entertaining. Elizabeth: Our Queen Channel 5, 9.00pm Documentaries about the Royal family seem to be appearing at an ever-increasing rate. And now here’s Channel 5’s sprawling eight-part entry, covering her life and reign and hearing from former prime ministers, friends, royal household members and special advisors. Portrait Artist of the Year 2018 Sky Arts, 8.00pm This week’s celebrity sitters are Game of Thrones star Conleth Hill, model Rachel Hunter and actor Stefanie Martini. But, as ever, it’s not so much the well-known faces as the gentle competitiveness and warm interaction between the contestants that makes this portrait painting competition so very engaging. Art, Passion & Power: The Story of the Royal Collection BBC Four, 9.00pm In the final episode of his series on the breathtaking treasures of the Royal Collection, Andrew Graham-Dixon meets the Prince of Wales and explores the last 150 years – when, as he puts it, “women took charge” and used art to help steer the monarchy through times of turbulent change. It’s also a period in which the Royal family’s changing tastes, from Fabergé eggs to the Queen Mother’s more “daring” art acquisitions, neatly demonstrate “the determined emergence of a modern monarchy”. Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm The fourth series of Reece Shearsmith and Steve Pemberton’s darkly comic anthology has been a creepy delight. In Tempting Fate they’ve kept one of the best for last, as a team of contractors clearing out a reclusive hoarder’s council flat unleash a terrible curse. 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Everything you’d expect from Michael Bay is here with bells on – the macho provocation, the sound and fury, and the diabolical pleasure in reducing everything to rubble and bloody mush. However, as a gruelling epitaph to lives wasted, this true-life Libyan shoot-’em-up starring John Krasinski is maddeningly effective and there’s a strange purity to it. Slumdog Millionaire (2008) ★★★★★ More4, 9.00pm Eight Oscars, seven Baftas and four Golden Globes cemented Danny Boyle’s energetic adaptation of Vikas Swarup’s novel Q & A as a triumph. The chaotic beauty of Mumbai is exuberantly brought to life to tell the story of an uneducated orphan (an endearing performance from Dev Patel) from the slums who is on the verge of winning a fortune on the Hindi version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. ’71 (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.50pm Jack O’Connell excels in a near-wordless role as a naive squaddie who gets stranded on the streets of Belfast in 1971 and must throw himself on the mercy of loyalist allies, who are no certain guarantees of sanctuary. It’s a tense, at times almost unbearable watch as we’re wrong-footed all the time by the combinations of terror, guilt, manoeuvring, expediency and revenge that motivate even the most minor of characters. Wednesday 7 February My Millionaire Migrant Boss My Millionaire Migrant Boss Channel 4, 9.00pm Initially, this one-off documentary – following Pakistani multi-millionaire Marwan Koukash as he puts four unemployed Brits through their paces for two weeks, before deciding whether or not to give them a job at his swanky Liverpool hotel – seems like an odd attempt to make The Apprentice on the Dole. But park that knee-jerk criticism right there because what actually unfolds is a thoughtful film in which the tough-but-likeable Koukash refuses to either play to the camera or write off his four eager contenders. That’s not to say that it’s all plain sailing: bubbly Georgia’s chronic unpunctuality soon causes issues, while Koukash, who grew up in a war zone, seems unsure of how to deal with 25-year-old Joe’s lack of confidence. The most entertaining moments, however, come in the hotelier’s relationship with the apparently lazy Heidi, who admits early on that she isn’t really sure why she has to have a job before adding: “I can’t really find out what I want to do.” A less interesting programme would have ensured that Heidi’s role was to infuriate both Koukash and the viewers at home – instead what emerges is surprisingly touching. Sarah Hughes Stacey Dooley: Face to Face with ISIS BBC Three, from 10.00am This harrowing film follows Shireen, a Yazidi woman, as she returns to Iraq with reporter Stacey Dooley for a reckoning with her past. The pair face down soldiers and officials, many of whom seem intent on ensuring that those past atrocities are never mentioned. The final confrontation between Shireen and Anmar, an Islamic State commander, sees the latter squirm blankly as the former finally and movingly gives voice to her pain. Eurovision: You Decide BBC Two, 7.30pm Six lucky contestants battle it out for the dubious honour of becoming Britain’s entrant to the 2018 Eurovision Song Contest. Among the hopefuls are a 16-year-old former Britain’s Got Talent finalist, two former The Voice UK contestants and a Eurovision backing singer. Kirstie and Phil’s Love It or List It Channel 4, 8.00pm The dynamic duo are in Windsor this week, where they meet the Farhall family who can’t decide whether they should sell their four-bedroom detached home. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This series about the history of fashion comes to an end with a look at the story behind Marie Antoinette’s famously risqué portrait in her chemise. Butchart unpicks the meaning behind the painting, looking at what the unhappy French queen was trying to convey while also considering how and why her intended message backfired. It’s a lovely conclusion to a hugely enjoyable series – here’s hoping for a swift return. The New Builds Are Coming: Battle in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Richard Macer’s topical documentary concludes with the focus shifting towards those responsible for the Cullham new builds. “Nobody has a right to a view,” states one architect. Maybe not, but as Macer talks to all involved, so it becomes increasingly clear that this is not an issue that can be easily solved. Girlfriends ITV, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama reaches its conclusion as Sue (Miranda Richardson) and Gail (Zoë Wanamaker) discover that Linda (Phyllis Logan) hasn’t exactly been honest with them about her relationship with her late husband. Harvey (1950, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am James Stewart stars as Elwood Dowd, a middle-aged, wide-eyed dreamer who spends his days getting tipsy with his best friend, a six-foot-three invisible white rabbit called Harvey. His sister Veta (an Oscar-winning Josephine Hull) tries to reform him and a comedy of errors ensues. Henry Koster’s adaptation of Mary Chase’s play is breezy, but has a lot to say about the importance of tolerance. Tango & Cash (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Bringing together two of Hollywood’s biggest action heroes, this silly shoot-’em-up is strangely appealing. Sylvester Stallone is Tango, a slick, sophisticated drug squad cop. Cash (Kurt Russell) is his uncultured rival on the force. And they don’t get on. But when they are framed and sent to prison, they’re forced to work together. It’s pure Eighties bombast, with Yazoo and Alice Cooper on the soundtrack. Harmonium (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.10pm Koji Fukada’s subtle, slow-burning thriller tells of how a family’s fragile domestic bliss is forever altered when an old friend comes to stay and teaches the daughter (Momone Shinokawa) to play the titular instrument. It’s an elegant and gripping film, with a tragic twist halfway through, and rightly won the prize in the Un Certain Regard section at the Cannes Film Festival. Thursday 8 February James Bulger: A Mother's Story James Bulger: a Mother’s Story ITV, 9.00pm Opening with the sound of Jon Venables describing in a matter-of-fact manner how he and fellow 10-year-old Robert Thompson beat and stoned toddler James Bulger to death on a railway track, this documentary relives one of the most horrifying murders of the last century in often very difficult detail. Structured around an interview between Trevor McDonald and Bulger’s mother, Denise Fergus, it exerts an awful grip while never quite deciphering the murder itself. Fergus recounts her unimaginable trauma, police and social workers describe their parts in the events and McDonald describes the trajectory of the case, from abduction to sentencing and an aftermath that has seen Fergus surround her house with CCTV cameras and Venables convicted of child pornography offences. The statements of the two killers – both, we are reminded, with troubled backgrounds – in particular are chilling: manipulative, jokey and fearful. The resilience and courage of Fergus, meanwhile, is admirable and unflinching some 25 years on: “The day I stop speaking about James,” she explains, “is the day I join him.” Gabriel Tate Death in Paradise BBC One, 9.00pm Another surreally absurd case for Jack Mooney (Ardal O’Hanlon), as the leader of a spiritual retreat is strangled while his fellow members are deep in group meditation. Trouble at the Zoo BBC Two, 9.00pm The images and stories that came out of Cumbria’s South Lakes Safari Zoo last year were deeply troubling, forcing management to step down in the face of evidence that almost 500 animals had died there in under four years. Jack Rampling’s challenging observational documentary follows staff trying to keep the institution open in the face of widespread scepticism and queries whether zoos have a place in modern society. Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 9.00pm Scraping the barrel scarcely covers this new series in which the erstwhile Supermarket Sweep host traverses the Sunshine State to check out Walt Disney World, shopping centres and spiritualists. Derry Girls Channel 4, 10.00pm One of the big comedy hits of the year so far, Lisa McGee’s evocative, ribald sitcom set during the Troubles ends with Erin (Saoirse-Monica Jackson) getting her big break as editor of the school magazine. But with great power comes great and largely unwanted responsibility. Nazi Victory: the Postwar Plan UKTV Play, from today Starting (confusingly enough) on the Yesterday channel next week, this engaging new series explores what might have happened in the event of a Nazi victory in the Second World War, from the fifth columnists planted in the United States through to his plans for concentration camps and national monuments in Britain. The latter forms the basis of this opening episode. Britannia Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Jez Butterworth’s compellingly berserk drama rampages through its fourth episode as Kerra (Kelly Reilly) is cast out by her father, King Pellenor, for parlaying with the Romans. How dare she betray the Cantii clan? He throws her to the mercy of the Druids – let’s just hope that she doesn’t meet the same fate as her mother. Meanwhile, former Druid Divis (Nikolaj Lie Kaas) suspects that there is more to General Aulus (David Morrissey) than meets the eye. Lucy (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm In this brilliant, bombastic sci-fi romp from Luc Besson, Scarlett Johansson (always worth watching) plays a drug mule who is dosed with an experimental substance that increases her brainpower by an untold degree. Space-time becomes a flick book, and Lucy’s the girl to rifle through its pages. Besson described it as La Femme Nikita plus Inception plus 2001: A Space Odyssey: that’s ambitious, egotistical, and mostly right. The Hurt Locker (2008) ★★★★☆ TCM, 9.00pm Kathryn Bigelow (Point Break) won the Best Director Oscar (the first woman to do so) for her blistering drama about a bomb disposal unit leading a perilous existence in Iraq. Jeremy Renner is outstanding as a reckless maverick who delights in putting himself in harm’s way, while the jittery cinematography stokes up the suspense to almost unbearable levels. Ralph Fiennes puts in a nice cameo as a military contractor. The Diary of a Teenage Girl (2015) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm This startling debut by Marielle Heller shows the funny side of a teenager’s explorations into her sexuality as a 15-year-old wannabe cartoonist Minnie (Bel Powley) seduces her mother’s 35-year-old boyfriend Monroe (Alexander Skarsgard). Heller’s nimble direction and clever script ensure that the film never paints either Minnie or Monroe entirely as victim or predator. Friday 9 February Winter Olympics 2018: the BBC presenting team Live Winter Olympics 2018 Opening Ceremony BBC One, 10.30am These are interesting times on the Korean peninsula, which will no doubt bring an added frisson to the Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony in Pyeongchang, South Korea. More than 3,000 athletes from 90 countries are expected to march in the ceremony, which will feature a historic moment when the North and South Korean teams march together under a unified flag. History is also being made with the disqualification of Russia from the contest due to its state-sponsored doping scandal, although, controversially, 169 Russian athletes will still compete under a designated Olympic flag. The setting for the occasion is the 35,000- seater Pyeongchang Olympic Stadium, and the following three hours of coverage comes from sure-footed BBC favourite Clare Balding, who’ll also present highlights on BBC Two at 7.00pm on BBC Two. Team GB has set its sights on a record five medals, including perhaps its first in skiing. It’s expected that North Korean artistes will perform at the ceremony in a spirit of cooperation, and while we can’t expect anything as glorious as Danny Boyle’s madcap mega-party for London 2012, we hope for a memorable kick-off to these historic Games. Vicki Power Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Actor Josh Hartnett joins his co-hosts to whip up a beloved ramen dish as the cookery show concludes its fifth series. Jamie Oliver prepares a game curry before trotting off with pal Jimmy Doherty to investigate a new method of farming. Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm Creepy noises and unexplained presences continue to unsettle incomer Matilda (Lydia Wilson) in this thriller. Determined to find out if she’s the child who disappeared from a Welsh backwater 24 years ago, Matilda begins to anger reluctant locals with her questions. Jamestown Sky One, 9.00pm A dramatic series of events in this episode provides an inkling of the high-stakes in store for season two of this glossy period piece based on the shipments of English brides to the American colonies in 1619. The opener sees Alice (Sophie Rundle) give birth and Jocelyn (Naomi Battrick) face tragedy. Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm The sharp-as-ever sitcom veers into sentimentality with the death of Rosario, the maid that Karen (Megan Mullally) loved to torment. But it’s nicely counterbalanced by Jack’s (Sean Hayes) hilarious funeral speech and a punchy cameo from Minnie Driver. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm There are performers on a well-deserved victory lap feature here. Debra Messing and Eric McCormack soak up praise for the Will & Grace revival (see preview, left), actress Saoirse Ronan basks in the glow of her third Oscar nod, and Keala Settle performs the Oscar-nominated This Is Me from The Greatest Showman. The Bold Type Amazon Prime, from today This fun comedy drama follows friends Jane (Katie Stevens), Kat (Aisha Dee) and Sutton (Meghann Fahy) working at a glossy magazine in New York. In the first episode, Jane is asked to write about her ex, while Kat attempts to convince an artist to be featured. Grand Prix Driver Amazon Prime, from today Michael Douglas narrates this behind-the-scenes look at McLaren’s F1 team during their difficult 2017 season. The four half-hour episodes take us inside McLaren’s mission control during troublesome test drives. Baywatch (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm Baywatch the TV show became a phenomenon, but everything about Baywatch the movie is big, brash and bombastic. Dwayne Johnson is preposterously buff in the role of chief lifeguard Mitch Buchannon, while Zac Efron as new recruit Matt Brody is in full-on idiot mode. A cameo by David Hasselhoff, however, appearing to the strains of Jimi Jamison’s theme I’ll Be Ready, will raise a smile. Looper (2012) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm It’s impossible not to be tickled by the playful logic of this sleek sci-fi film that ticks along with pocket-watch precision. Joseph Gordon-Levitt is a “looper” – an assassin whose targets are zapped back to him from 30 years in the future, before his contract expires and his final target is his future self. It sounds confusing, but works, and has a great cast that includes Emily Blunt, Bruce Willis and Piper Perabo. The Cabin in the Woods (2012) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.20pm Don’t be fooled by its young cast (including a pre-Thor Chris Hemsworth) and stereotypical teenage-horror appeal: Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard’s clever detonation of the scary movie is very good, with the genre’s most original plot twist in years. The story, however, is a classic one: five friends visit a cabin in the woods, where they encounter more than they bargained for. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
Sunday 7 January Michael Palin: a Life on Screen BBC Two, 9.00pm Telling Michael Palin’s story from his birth to the film Death of Stalin (in which he played Minister Molotov), this profile of the “Nicest Man in Showbiz” is a pleasure from start to finish. First realising his talents in improvised shows for his school friends, Palin found kindred spirits and his comic mojo as part of the Oxford Revue at the Edinburgh Festival, eventually parlaying his skills as a jobbing writer and performer into a series that changed the comedy landscape forever: Monty Python’s Flying Circus was born after an apparently disastrous meeting ended with a BBC commissioner pronouncing sternly, “all right, I’ll give you 13 episodes. But that’s all!” While John Cleese provides the tongue-in-cheek venom (describing Palin as “a sociopath”), Connie Booth, David Jason and Armando Iannucci pay tribute to a versatile talent. An abundance of clips confirm that alongside the comic genius of Python and Ripping Yarns lay a serious actor of genuine heft (as seen in GBH and Brazil), the gifted travel journalist of Around the World in 80 Days and a successful and engaging diarist. Palin, too, chips in with observations and memories, all delivered with charismatic humility and self-deprecation. Gabriel Tate Into the Forest BBC Three, from 10.00am This uneven but intriguing Canadian indie film didn’t find much of an audience when it was released in 2015 but will be now shown online via BBC Three. Evan Rachel Wood (Westworld) and Ellen Page (Juno) star in this dystopian drama as Nell and Eva, two sisters living in a forest with their father in the near future. They find their isolated existence under threat when a district-wide power cut sparks anarchy and increasing desperation in the nearby town. FA Cup Football: Shrewsbury Town v West Ham United BBC One, 1.40pm More potential giant-killing in the FA Cup, as League One side Shrewsbury Town try to cut down West Ham at Montgomery Waters Meadow. The visitors have won the FA Cup three times but haven’t lifted the trophy since 1980, when they beat Arsenal 1-0, thanks to a goal by Trevor Brooking. Shrewsbury made it through to the third round by beating against Aldershot Town and Morecambe. Premiership Rugby Union: Wasps v Saracens BT Sport 1, 2.30pm Having beaten Bath 31-26 at the Rec last weekend, Wasps look to continue their fine form in the new year at home to second-placed Saracens. The away side will be full of confidence, though: they capped off an impressive 2017 with a 46-31 victory over Worcester Warriors, with Jackson Wray and Nathan Earle both scoring try doubles as Saracens ran in six tries at Allianz Park. When these sides last met here, a hat-trick from Thomas Young helped Wasps to a 35-15 victory. A repeat performance here will see them leapfrog Saracens in the table. Dancing on Ice ITV, 6.00pm Back after a four-year absence, Jayne Torvill and Christopher Dean return with Dancing on Ice, but they are no longer coaches. They are now be assessing the ice-skating abilities of a dozen celebrities, including Bucks Fizz alumna Cheryl Baker and Great British Bake Off 2016 champion Candice Brown. Joe Cocker Night Sky Arts, from 6.45pm One of the finest of all the white blues and soul shouters, Joe Cocker’s gargling, howling delivery was most famously captured in his performance of With a Little Help from My Friends at Woodstock. This double bill begins with the concert film Fire It Up: Live, and Cocker performing in Cologne on his final tour before his death in 2014. John Edginton’s biographical documentary, Mad Dog with Soul, follows at 9.00pm. GT Attenborough and the Sea Dragon BBC One, 8.00pm David Attenborough pursues his lifelong passion of fossilology on Britain’s Jurassic Coast. The 200-million-year-old bones of an Ichthyosaur must be dug out of the Dorset cliffs, analysed and finally recreated using computer technology. Vera ITV, 8.00pm The eighth series of the murder mystery begins with DCI Vera Stanhope (the excellent Brenda Blethyn) investigating how a respected fraud officer came to be incinerated in an abbatoir. Her enquiries lead her into a close-knit fishing community and clashes with her fellow coppers. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm In this extraordinary venture, Dick Strawbridge and a team of fellow enthusiasts attempt to build a model railway to stretch 71 miles from Fort William to Inverness. The project will require viaducts, bridges and even a miniature ferry, all documented over the next five weeks. GT And Now for Something Completely Different (1971) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.00pm; N Ireland, 11.30pm Fans of Monty Python’s Flying Circus rejoice – this compilation film is a feast of the comedians’ favourite sketches from the first two TV series. With John Cleese introducing a number of scenes with: “And now, for something completely different”, it’s a fun trip into the archives, including as the “dead parrot” sketch. Captain Phillips (2013) ★★★★☆ ITV, 10.10pm Paul Greengrass (United 93 and three Bourne films) has a rare gift for working with action-thriller material and making something cohesive, layered and complex from it. With this account of Somali pirates boarding an American cargo ship and kidnapping its captain (Tom Hanks), he remains at the top of his game. Hanks may be the big draw, but it’s the pirates who impress, especially Bafta-winning Barkhad Abdi. Stations of the Cross (2015) ★★★☆☆ BBC Four, 11.00pm This cold, preachy German film from director Dietrich Brüggemann plays out over 14 single-shot scenes, each titled after a station of the cross on Christ’s walk to Calvary and to mirror the restrictions of religious fundamentalism. Its story, about a 14-year-old girl who pursues the ideals of Christian self-sacrifice to terrifying extremes, won the best script gong at the Berlin International Film Festival. Monday 8 January Archie Panjabi Credit: ITV Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Written by Indian Summers creator Paul Rutman and partner Natasha Narayan, this atmospheric six-part thriller has a fine cast and gets off to an instantly intriguing start. Emmy-winner Archie Panjabi is a smart and sympathetic presence as British-Pakistani doctor Mona Harcourt, who, together with her well-connected political lobbyist husband Guy (Jack Davenport) and wider family, is preparing to celebrate the return from Lahore of her beloved brother Kareem (Navin Chowdhry). His failure to arrive as expected on the day a terrorist incident in London results in four deaths, and brings the city to a standstill. It sets in motion a series of terrifying consequences – the most disturbing of which is the sudden intense interest in the family of the anti-terrorism unit of the Metropolitan Police. It is a credible, and in parts distressing, depiction of what it is like to be an ordinary British Muslim in the wake of such an attack, especially when it emerges that the real focus of the police investigation is not Kareem, but his 18-year-old student son Danny (Viveik Kalra) who had been becoming increasingly isolated from the family in the weeks before the attack. Gerard O’Donovan Star Trek: Discovery Netflix, from today Following an eight-week break, the latest incarnation of the Star Trek franchise returns to complete its debut run. The previous episode ended on a twist that saw the USS Discovery cast out into unchartered space. Unsurprisingly, this 10th episode picks up with Captain Lorca (Jason Isaacs) and crew facing a raft of previously unimagined threats in their eventful efforts to find a way home. How to Lose Weight Well Channel 4, 8.00pm Dr Xand van Tulleken and dietician Hala El-Shafie take a new approach to diet testing, dividing a group of volunteers into three categories: crashers (short-term diets), shape shifters (six-week programmes) and life changers (four-month plans) to see which of the current popular diets are most effective. Silent Witness BBC One, 9.00pm The enduringly popular pathologists-playing-cops drama kicks off its 21st series with a typically slow burn two-parter. As Nikki Alexander (Emilia Fox) struggles to get over her Mexican ordeal, a close friend (Emma Fielding) goes missing. Surgeons: At the Edge of Life BBC Two, 9.00pm Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham’s busy surgical unit is the focus of this new series following surgeons, theatre staff and patients through operations at the cutting edge of medicine. In the first edition, maxillofacial surgeons tackle a marathon operation on a 53-year-old diagnosed with a major facial tumour. My Astonishing Self: Gabriel Byrne on George Bernard Shaw BBC Four, 9.00pm An actor’s homage to a playwright becomes a fascinating exploration of the life and work of a literary Titan of the early 20th century.George Bernard Shaw was a pioneering socialist, feminist and philosopher as well as the writer of hugely popular plays such as Pygmalion. Here, Gabriel Byrne assesses the character and legacy of a man whose intelligence, charm and social conscience, and ingenuity for self-promotion, propelled him to global renown. GO The Undateables Channel 4, 9.00pm A fresh crop of singletons looking for love includes a rugby-playing chef from Hull with Tourette’s, a bookseller from Cambridgeshire with Asperger’s, and a photography graduate from London with scoliosis. GO Gallipoli (1981) ★★★★★ Film4, 6.35pm Director Peter Weir’s tale of war and friendship in 1915 – one of his very finest films – reaches a devastating finale in the clash between Australians and Turks on the shore of the Dardanelles. Mel Gibson’s race through the trenches with a crucial message – ignore the last order! – is more pulse-quickening than a dozen Bravehearts. You pray for him to beat that whistle every time. Harold Hopkins also stars. Life of Pi (2012) ★★★★★ E4, 8.00pm Ang Lee’s warm, wise and wondrous adventure story, adapted from Yann Martel’s 2002 Booker Prize-winning novel, follows Pi (Suraj Sharma), shipwrecked in the South Pacific with Richard Parker, a Bengal tiger named after the hunter who captured him. Its kaleidoscopic imagery is some of the most advanced ever, but the story unfolds with such simplicity and clarity that it could almost be a silent movie. Logan (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Hugh Jackman’s third – and best – lone outing for his whiskery mutant Wolverine. You might assume James Mangold’s film, set in the near future, where a weary Logan meets a young mutant much like himself, is meant as a sequel to the two other Wolverine movies, but watching it, you’re struck by the thought that this paranoid, violent noir western is the real, shotgun-toting deal. Tuesday 9 January Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman Credit: AFP House of Saud: A Family at War BBC Two, 9.00pm This detailed three-part series on the ruling family of Saudi Arabia makes for unmissable if terrifying television. Dispensing with any sort of Adam Curtis-style frills, the opening film simply talks us through the House of Saud’s involvement in recent history, from Sarajevo to Syria. Hearing from intelligence analysts and long-time Saudi observers, it builds a complicated picture of the uneasy relationship between the Saudi royal family and Wahhabism, the particular strain of Islam they promote. It’s a story that encompasses a small hamlet in Bosnia, a family home in India, weapons dealt from Bulgaria to Afghanistan and online films watched all over the world. Much is made of the new Crown Prince, Mohammed bin Salman, and his desire for reform (“It’s not a question of how important he is to this – he is this,” announces one observer) but it remains hard to judge just how much of his actions are driven by genuine belief and how much constitute a power grab. Ultimately what lingers is not the political revelations, interesting though they are, but the interviews with the blinded of Syria, the wounded of Iraq, the devastated of Bosnia: the countless casualties of the geopolitical game. Sarah Hughes England’s Forgotten Queen: The Life and Death of Lady Jane Grey BBC Four, 9.00pm Tudor England might seem like a subject that has been covered so much that there is nothing new to be said about it. But hold on to those gripes because Helen Castor’s detailed look at the nine-day reign of Lady Jane Grey is an invigorating, intelligent take on the period. Using a wide range of old documents and interesting voices, Castor guides us through Jane’s brief, unlucky life, examining how she ended up as a pawn between two powerful factions and why it was that she found herself raised from relative obscurity to the dizzying heights of the English throne. School for Stammerers ITV, 9.00pm Speech impediments can be devastating to live with, as this thoughtful film, which follows six people living with a stammer, demonstrates. One solution on offer is the intensive McGuire Programme, a residential course that promises life-changing results albeit under tough conditions. 24 Hours in A&E Channel 4, 9.00pm The fly-on-the-wall medical series continues with this week’s patients including Marie, who arrives by ambulance at St George’s Hospital having collapsed at home with an unexplained headache. The Blacklist Sky One, 9.00pm The ludicrous and yet strangely enjoyable US spy series continues with James Spader’s slick Red this week setting his sights on wealthy art thief Greyson Blaise (Owain Yeoman). While Red gallivants abroad Tom (Ryan Eggold) seeks help to identify the bones in the suitcase. SH Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm This melancholy tale in the excellent comedy anthology is of rivalry and friendship lost. Reece Shearsmith is Tommy, who grumpily agrees to perform with former stand-up partner Len (Steve Pemberton), 30 years after they split in mysterious circumstances. Working Class White Men Channel 4, 10.00pm Rapper Professor Green has been quietly making a name for himself as a film-maker and this fascinating film about white working-class men is one of the week’s highlights. Green’s tense meeting with Britain First will garner the headlines but there is hope here too, with Lewis, the teenage would-be mathematician, the show’s highlight. SH The Fault in Our Stars (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Josh Boone’s film, adapted from the phenomenally successful young-adult novel, about two American teenagers both diagnosed with cancer is wisely observed and tenderly performed, most notably by Shailene Woodley. The basic storyline is so worn it’s close to threadbare – Love Story told it more than 40 years ago – but it comes with enough quirks to give it the appearance of freshness. The Lincoln Lawyer (2011) ★★★☆☆ More4, 9.00pm He won acclaim for his role as enigmatic detective Rust Cohle in the TV series True Detective, but Oscar winner Matthew McConaughey stars here in the sort of courtroom drama for which he made his name. This time he’s Mick Haller, a slick LA defence lawyer who prefers to represent the guilty. However, a wealthy new client (Ryan Phillippe) prompts Haller to address his own past sins. Billy Liar (1963, b/w) ★★★☆☆ London Live, 12.00midnight Best known for Midnight Cowboy, for which he won three Oscars, John Schlesinger ranged from violent thrillers (Marathon Man) to romantic epics (Far from the Madding Crowd) to perceptive human studies (An Englishman Abroad), but he indicated the breadth of his ambitions with this gritty social drama featuring Tom Courtenay as an undertaker’s clerk with extravagant fantasies. Wednesday 10 January Sarah Lancashire Credit: Channel 4 Kiri Channel 4, 9.00pm Screenwriter Jack Thorne follows up the excellent National Treasure with another superbly cast, nimble and dark exploration of contemporary mores. Thorne’s careful research is all over this opening episode of four, yet it never feels didactic or clumsy. Kiri follows the investigation into the abduction of the titular black girl Kiri Akindele (Felicia Mukasa) by her birth family, just days before she is due to be adopted by her white foster family, headed up by Lia Williams and Steven Mackintosh. Sarah Lancashire plays Miriam Grayson, the social worker who allows Kiri’s ill-fated unsupervised visit. Lancashire picks her projects carefully, and this is a performance to rank alongside her Bafta-winning turn in Happy Valley: Miriam is an imperfect Samaritan, trying her best amid funding cuts, weak superiors and a dormant drink problem. From the moment that the girl disappears and director Euros Lyn’s colour palette darkens, the focus seems to be as much on apportioning blame as finding the missing girl. It’s a desperate situation shot through with guilt and human frailty, yet not without humour; another modern tragedy from a writer who specialises in them. Gabriel Tate The Truth About Looking Good BBC One, 8.00pm Cherry Healey and 25 volunteers and experts from the Universities of Sheffield and Sunderland join forces to separate scientific fact from marketing fiction in the £9 billion per annum industry of cosmetics, in particular weighing up the pros and cons of moisturisers and cellulite solutions. Britain’s Brightest Family ITV, 8.00pm Anne Hegerty – familiar as The Chase’s Governess – oversees a new quiz show in which family members must show off their own general knowledge and nominate relatives according to their perceived areas of expertise. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This fascinating series finds fashion historian Amber Butchart displaying a variety of eye-catching headgear to scrutinise Jan van Eyck’s The Arnolfini Portrait for clues about its subjects and the 15th-century world that they inhabited. Couturier Ninya Mikhaila, meanwhile, recreates the green gown worn by the painting’s pregnant woman. Miriam’s Big American Adventure BBC One, 9.00pm; Scotland, 10.45pm Miriam Margolyes hits Middle America, where she encounters young Indiana summer campers pledging their allegiance, slightly older drug casualties in Ohio and survivalists of all ages in Tennessee. Fighting for Air BBC Two, 9.00pm Campaigning doctor and inescapable TV face Xand van Tulleken examines the grim effects of air pollution on the body, before travelling to Birmingham to bring clean air to one high street using a combination of technological expertise and community goodwill. GT England’s Forgotten Queen: The Life and Death of Lady Jane Grey BBC Four, 9.00pm While dedicating three hours to just nine days of British history might seem like overkill, here it almost feels inadequate, such is the wealth of incident and intrigue in Dr Helen Castor’s series. This middle episode follows the five days that determined whether or not Lady Jane would survive on the throne. The reconstructions are decent and the CGI sparingly used; instead, Castor lets the experts do the talking in an engaging piece of narrative history, concluding tomorrow. GT Tunes of Glory (1960) ★★★☆☆ Movies4Men, 4.00pm British director Ronald Neame made some of the best-known films of the 20th century, including The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie and The Poseidon Adventure, but this was his personal favourite. It focuses on personal rivalries within a fictional Highland regiment after the Second World War. John Mills plays a new, authoritarian CO, and Alec Guinness – cast against type – gives an exceptional performance as his lax, hard-drinking predecessor. JFK (1991) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.55pm Oliver Stone is in conspiracy-theorist mode for this film about the murder of President John F Kennedy. Whatever you make of Stone’s theory that the assassination was an FBI plot, lawyer Jim Garrison’s (Kevin Costner) showdown moment when he demonstrates that JFK was killed by multiple bullets is jaw-dropping. Costner, fresh from the Oscars glory of Dances with Wolves, is a magnetic lead. The Social Network (2010) ★★★★★ Channel 4, 1.10am Jesse Eisenberg is superb as the gauche cyber-geek who became a billionaire in his twenties in this dazzling dramatisation of the story of Facebook. It may necessarily be speculative in parts about Mark Zuckerberg and his invention, but this is a brilliantly scripted and absolutely gripping tale of clashing egos, precocious talent and betrayal. Justin Timberlake and Andrew Garfield also star. Thursday 11 January Cheetahs in Namibia Credit: BBC Big Cats BBC One, 8.00pm One family, 40 different faces. That’s how this beautifully shot three-part series about the planet’s top wild predator, the cat, begins – with a kaleidoscope of feline faces that perfectly illustrates the huge variety and essential similarity between the many different branches of the family. Not all of them are big. One, the rusty-spotted cat – a kittenish, ultra-rare inhabitant of Sri Lanka’s jungles – is so tiny when fully grown that it can fit in the palm of your hand. Although it makes up for its small stature with surprising ferocity. The series took two years and 30 separate filming expeditions to make, travelling to all four corners of the globe to show just how adaptable wild cats have evolved to be. In this opening edition we see not only relatively familiar sights such as cheetahs and lions chasing down water buffalo and giraffe in Africa, but also some rarities, such as a snow leopard searching the Himalayas for a mate. Plus, Siberian tigers and the elusive Canada lynx make appearances. There are surprises, too, in footage of jaguars taking on caiman in the waters of the Pantanal, and pumas hunting penguin on the freezing southern shores of Patagonia. Gerard O’Donovan European Tour Golf: The BMW SA Open Sky Sports Main Event, 8.00am Action from the opening day’s play at the City of Ekurhuleni in Gauteng, South Africa, where Graeme Storm was the winner last year. Having very nearly lost his tour card in 2016, the Englishman defeated Northern Irish star Rory McIlroy in a play-off to win his second title on the tour and his first since the 2007 Open de France. EastEnders BBC One, 7.30pm Mel Owen (Tamzin Outhwaite) returns to Albert Square after a 16-year absence. Last time around she married twice, burnt down a nightclub, was kidnapped and slept with her best friend’s husband. So the producers’ promise of an “incredible” storyline for her comeback is probably, uh, credible. The Cruise: Return to the Mediterranean ITV, 8.30pm More stories of life on the cruise ship Royal Princess. Tonight, with 5,000 passengers and crew aboard, bad weather prevents the cruise ship from docking. England’s Forgotten Queen: The Life and Death of Lady Jane Grey BBC Four, 9.00pm The concluding part of Helen Castor’s fascinating account of England’s “nine-day queen” opens on the eighth day of her reign, with armies heading for Framlingham Castle where her Catholic rival for the throne, Mary Tudor, had assembled a powerful force. Within a day, 16-year-old Jane would be betrayed, abandoned and consigned to the Tower of London. But her legacy, according to Castor, was far greater than her brief time on the throne suggests. Transformation Street ITV, 9.00pm Wimpole Street, Marylebone, is home to the London Transgender Surgery, a private clinic catering for some of the estimated 130,000 Britons currently wishing to change gender. This revealing three-parter follows patients from initial consultations through to gender confirmation surgery. Walks with My Dog More4, 9.00pm The simple but engaging series in which celebrities take their four-legged friends for a trek through the UK’s more scenic parts makes a welcome return. This time Hadrian’s Wall, Norfolk and the Welsh mountains are among the destinations. Actress Caroline Quentin leads off tonight, taking her pooch for a stroll around the Helford estuary in Cornwall. GO Great Art ITV, 10.45pm In this second episode of the art series, Tim Marlow moves on to the 19th-century Parisian art collector Paul Durand-Ruel, whose financially risky landmark 1886 exhibition in New York thrust impressionism into the mainstream. Marlow examines his impact, and the lasting influence of Monet, Cézanne, Degas and Renoir. GO From Russia with Love (1963) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Ah, those were the days: the certainties of the Cold War, a beautiful Soviet defector and a chase across the Balkans. Will Spectre avenge the death of Dr No? No chance. Sean Connery was in the swing of things in his second outing as James Bond, pursued by two of 007’s best adversaries, in “Red” Grant (Robert Shaw) and Rosa Klebb (Lotte Lenya). Terence Young directs. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.15pm This superb adaptation of John le Carré’s brilliant, intricate Cold War spy novel is a triumph. The espionage drama follows the hunt for a Soviet double agent at the top of the British secret service, with Gary Oldman spearheading the excellent ensemble cast, which includes Colin Firth, Tom Hardy, John Hurt and Benedict Cumberbatch. It’s funny, seductive and suspenseful. GoodFellas (1990) ★★★★★ ITV4, 11.25pm Martin Scorsese’s Mafia masterpiece, adapted from a non-fiction book, has all the qualities of great cinema: it’s thrilling, it’s provocative, it’s stylish, and it’s got a young Robert De Niro in it. Ray Liotta plays the youngster who longs to be a gangster; De Niro and Joe Pesci are in the Mob. Pesci’s mother, meanwhile, reportedly asked him if he had to swear quite so much – the f-word is used 300 times. Friday 12 January Revd Matthew Stafford, Revd Nicholas Lowton, Fr Matthew Cashmore and Revd Ruth Hulse Credit: BBC A Vicar’s Life BBC Two, 8.30pm This amiable new series follows several vicars in their parishes in the Diocese of Hereford, the most rural in the Church of England. It’s the standard heart-warming mixture of births, marriages and deaths – or as likeable Reverend Matthew Stafford, vicar at the village of Much Wenlock, says: “hatched, matched and dispatched” – but, for all that sense of familiarity, it’s well-made and very engaging. This opening episode sees Matthew officiate at a lovely local wedding, and Reverend Nicholas Lowton, the Rural Dean of Abbeydore and Vicar of the Black Mountains Group, deal with the theft of the parish registry books (“whoever did this has got lessons that they need to learn”). Elsewhere, Reverend Ruth Hulse, Team Vicar for West Hereford, organises a funeral for much-loved former churchwarden Barbara. “It’s a huge loss, like losing a member of your own family,” she says. Everyone involved comes out of it well, and Matthew manages to sneak a message in amid the jokes: “I don’t take myself seriously, but I do take God and what I do very seriously,” he notes. So do his parishioners, many of whom admit that he’s helped them see the church in a more favourable light. Sarah Hughes PGA Tour Golf: The Sony Open Sky Sports Main Event, 12.01am The opening day of the tournament at the Waialae CC in Honolulu, Hawaii, where Justin Thomas won the title last year. Room 101 BBC One, 8.30pm Frank Skinner returns with a new series of the long-running show. This opener promises to be a lot of fun given that his guests, Charlie Brooker, Scarlett Moffatt and Pearl Mackie, are not short of opinion. Among the objects up for inclusion in Room 101 are crocodiles, mosquitos and haircuts. Rome Unpacked BBC Two, 9.00pm The second part of this food and art travelogue sees chef Giorgio Locatelli and art critic Andrew Graham-Dixon visit the Basilica di San Clemente, the Testaccio Slaughterhouse and the Palazzo Colonna. As before, a great deal of the fun comes from the way that each man learns from the other. David Bowie Evening BBC Four, from 9.00pm Two years after David Bowie’s death, BBC Four dedicates an evening to the rock great. First up is Francis Whately’s 2013 film David Bowie: Five Years in the Making of an Icon, which looks at key moments in his career. These include his time as Ziggy Stardust, his reinvention as the Thin White Duke, the making of 1977’s Heroes, and the global success of Let’s Dance. It’s followed by David Bowie and the Story of Ziggy Stardust, which looks at how Bowie created his most (in)famous alter ego. Lethal Weapon ITV, 9.00pm The rambunctious remake of the Danny Glover-Mel Gibson films roars back for a second series. It begins with an action-packed episode that sees Murtaugh (Damon Wayans) heading to Mexico to try to reign in partner Riggs (Clayne Crawford) who is still seeking vengeance for his wife’s death. Delicious Sky One, 9.00pm The second series of the foodie drama reaches its penultimate episode, and it’s the anniversary of philanderer Leo’s death, which the families plan to mark with a feast. Naturally, nothing goes smoothly – chef Gina (Dawn French) is pushed to the limits by her daughter Theresa’s (Tanya Reynolds) behaviour, while Gina’s love rival turned business partner Sam (Emilia Fox) takes out her anger on chef Adam (Aaron Anthony). SH The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm Expect a super-smooth evening as Graham Norton is joined by A-listers Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks, who discuss Steven Spielberg’s political drama The Post, but also share some good anecdotes amid all the mild ribbing. SH The Polka King (2017) Netflix, from today Exuberant Jack Black plays to his strengths in this biopic, based on the documentary The Man Who Would Be Polka King, about a flamboyant Polish émigré-turned-Polka King-turned-convicted Ponzi-scheme criminal. Despite being a film about a scoundrel who swindled senior citizens out of millions of dollars in order to achieve the American dream, it’s surprisingly entertaining, though a more serious consideration of con artists wouldn’t have gone amiss. The Frogmen (1951, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 4.35pm A pleasingly understated yet atmospheric war drama in which Richard Widmark stars as a tough Navy commander put in charge of a team of demolition divers on a South Pacific island. At first, the arrival of their superior goes down like a lead diving suit, but he soon wins them over by neutralising an undetonated torpedo. Due to the conditions being deemed too “riotous”, the female roles were written out. Get Out (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Get Out is one of the first films expressly to be set in a post-Obama era and is a breathlessly suspenseful exposé of the horror of liberal racism. Perfect, white Rose Armitage (Allison Williams) wants to allay the concerns of her boyfriend, black photographer Chris (Daniel Kaluuya), and invites him to meet her parents. They don’t bat an eyelid over his skin colour, but the film rattles with provocations. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
What's on TV tonight: Michael Palin: a Life on Screen and Dancing on Ice
Sunday 7 January Michael Palin: a Life on Screen BBC Two, 9.00pm Telling Michael Palin’s story from his birth to the film Death of Stalin (in which he played Minister Molotov), this profile of the “Nicest Man in Showbiz” is a pleasure from start to finish. First realising his talents in improvised shows for his school friends, Palin found kindred spirits and his comic mojo as part of the Oxford Revue at the Edinburgh Festival, eventually parlaying his skills as a jobbing writer and performer into a series that changed the comedy landscape forever: Monty Python’s Flying Circus was born after an apparently disastrous meeting ended with a BBC commissioner pronouncing sternly, “all right, I’ll give you 13 episodes. But that’s all!” While John Cleese provides the tongue-in-cheek venom (describing Palin as “a sociopath”), Connie Booth, David Jason and Armando Iannucci pay tribute to a versatile talent. An abundance of clips confirm that alongside the comic genius of Python and Ripping Yarns lay a serious actor of genuine heft (as seen in GBH and Brazil), the gifted travel journalist of Around the World in 80 Days and a successful and engaging diarist. Palin, too, chips in with observations and memories, all delivered with charismatic humility and self-deprecation. Gabriel Tate Into the Forest BBC Three, from 10.00am This uneven but intriguing Canadian indie film didn’t find much of an audience when it was released in 2015 but will be now shown online via BBC Three. Evan Rachel Wood (Westworld) and Ellen Page (Juno) star in this dystopian drama as Nell and Eva, two sisters living in a forest with their father in the near future. They find their isolated existence under threat when a district-wide power cut sparks anarchy and increasing desperation in the nearby town. FA Cup Football: Shrewsbury Town v West Ham United BBC One, 1.40pm More potential giant-killing in the FA Cup, as League One side Shrewsbury Town try to cut down West Ham at Montgomery Waters Meadow. The visitors have won the FA Cup three times but haven’t lifted the trophy since 1980, when they beat Arsenal 1-0, thanks to a goal by Trevor Brooking. Shrewsbury made it through to the third round by beating against Aldershot Town and Morecambe. Premiership Rugby Union: Wasps v Saracens BT Sport 1, 2.30pm Having beaten Bath 31-26 at the Rec last weekend, Wasps look to continue their fine form in the new year at home to second-placed Saracens. The away side will be full of confidence, though: they capped off an impressive 2017 with a 46-31 victory over Worcester Warriors, with Jackson Wray and Nathan Earle both scoring try doubles as Saracens ran in six tries at Allianz Park. When these sides last met here, a hat-trick from Thomas Young helped Wasps to a 35-15 victory. A repeat performance here will see them leapfrog Saracens in the table. Dancing on Ice ITV, 6.00pm Back after a four-year absence, Jayne Torvill and Christopher Dean return with Dancing on Ice, but they are no longer coaches. They are now be assessing the ice-skating abilities of a dozen celebrities, including Bucks Fizz alumna Cheryl Baker and Great British Bake Off 2016 champion Candice Brown. Joe Cocker Night Sky Arts, from 6.45pm One of the finest of all the white blues and soul shouters, Joe Cocker’s gargling, howling delivery was most famously captured in his performance of With a Little Help from My Friends at Woodstock. This double bill begins with the concert film Fire It Up: Live, and Cocker performing in Cologne on his final tour before his death in 2014. John Edginton’s biographical documentary, Mad Dog with Soul, follows at 9.00pm. GT Attenborough and the Sea Dragon BBC One, 8.00pm David Attenborough pursues his lifelong passion of fossilology on Britain’s Jurassic Coast. The 200-million-year-old bones of an Ichthyosaur must be dug out of the Dorset cliffs, analysed and finally recreated using computer technology. Vera ITV, 8.00pm The eighth series of the murder mystery begins with DCI Vera Stanhope (the excellent Brenda Blethyn) investigating how a respected fraud officer came to be incinerated in an abbatoir. Her enquiries lead her into a close-knit fishing community and clashes with her fellow coppers. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm In this extraordinary venture, Dick Strawbridge and a team of fellow enthusiasts attempt to build a model railway to stretch 71 miles from Fort William to Inverness. The project will require viaducts, bridges and even a miniature ferry, all documented over the next five weeks. GT And Now for Something Completely Different (1971) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.00pm; N Ireland, 11.30pm Fans of Monty Python’s Flying Circus rejoice – this compilation film is a feast of the comedians’ favourite sketches from the first two TV series. With John Cleese introducing a number of scenes with: “And now, for something completely different”, it’s a fun trip into the archives, including as the “dead parrot” sketch. Captain Phillips (2013) ★★★★☆ ITV, 10.10pm Paul Greengrass (United 93 and three Bourne films) has a rare gift for working with action-thriller material and making something cohesive, layered and complex from it. With this account of Somali pirates boarding an American cargo ship and kidnapping its captain (Tom Hanks), he remains at the top of his game. Hanks may be the big draw, but it’s the pirates who impress, especially Bafta-winning Barkhad Abdi. Stations of the Cross (2015) ★★★☆☆ BBC Four, 11.00pm This cold, preachy German film from director Dietrich Brüggemann plays out over 14 single-shot scenes, each titled after a station of the cross on Christ’s walk to Calvary and to mirror the restrictions of religious fundamentalism. Its story, about a 14-year-old girl who pursues the ideals of Christian self-sacrifice to terrifying extremes, won the best script gong at the Berlin International Film Festival. Monday 8 January Archie Panjabi Credit: ITV Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Written by Indian Summers creator Paul Rutman and partner Natasha Narayan, this atmospheric six-part thriller has a fine cast and gets off to an instantly intriguing start. Emmy-winner Archie Panjabi is a smart and sympathetic presence as British-Pakistani doctor Mona Harcourt, who, together with her well-connected political lobbyist husband Guy (Jack Davenport) and wider family, is preparing to celebrate the return from Lahore of her beloved brother Kareem (Navin Chowdhry). His failure to arrive as expected on the day a terrorist incident in London results in four deaths, and brings the city to a standstill. It sets in motion a series of terrifying consequences – the most disturbing of which is the sudden intense interest in the family of the anti-terrorism unit of the Metropolitan Police. It is a credible, and in parts distressing, depiction of what it is like to be an ordinary British Muslim in the wake of such an attack, especially when it emerges that the real focus of the police investigation is not Kareem, but his 18-year-old student son Danny (Viveik Kalra) who had been becoming increasingly isolated from the family in the weeks before the attack. Gerard O’Donovan Star Trek: Discovery Netflix, from today Following an eight-week break, the latest incarnation of the Star Trek franchise returns to complete its debut run. The previous episode ended on a twist that saw the USS Discovery cast out into unchartered space. Unsurprisingly, this 10th episode picks up with Captain Lorca (Jason Isaacs) and crew facing a raft of previously unimagined threats in their eventful efforts to find a way home. How to Lose Weight Well Channel 4, 8.00pm Dr Xand van Tulleken and dietician Hala El-Shafie take a new approach to diet testing, dividing a group of volunteers into three categories: crashers (short-term diets), shape shifters (six-week programmes) and life changers (four-month plans) to see which of the current popular diets are most effective. Silent Witness BBC One, 9.00pm The enduringly popular pathologists-playing-cops drama kicks off its 21st series with a typically slow burn two-parter. As Nikki Alexander (Emilia Fox) struggles to get over her Mexican ordeal, a close friend (Emma Fielding) goes missing. Surgeons: At the Edge of Life BBC Two, 9.00pm Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham’s busy surgical unit is the focus of this new series following surgeons, theatre staff and patients through operations at the cutting edge of medicine. In the first edition, maxillofacial surgeons tackle a marathon operation on a 53-year-old diagnosed with a major facial tumour. My Astonishing Self: Gabriel Byrne on George Bernard Shaw BBC Four, 9.00pm An actor’s homage to a playwright becomes a fascinating exploration of the life and work of a literary Titan of the early 20th century.George Bernard Shaw was a pioneering socialist, feminist and philosopher as well as the writer of hugely popular plays such as Pygmalion. Here, Gabriel Byrne assesses the character and legacy of a man whose intelligence, charm and social conscience, and ingenuity for self-promotion, propelled him to global renown. GO The Undateables Channel 4, 9.00pm A fresh crop of singletons looking for love includes a rugby-playing chef from Hull with Tourette’s, a bookseller from Cambridgeshire with Asperger’s, and a photography graduate from London with scoliosis. GO Gallipoli (1981) ★★★★★ Film4, 6.35pm Director Peter Weir’s tale of war and friendship in 1915 – one of his very finest films – reaches a devastating finale in the clash between Australians and Turks on the shore of the Dardanelles. Mel Gibson’s race through the trenches with a crucial message – ignore the last order! – is more pulse-quickening than a dozen Bravehearts. You pray for him to beat that whistle every time. Harold Hopkins also stars. Life of Pi (2012) ★★★★★ E4, 8.00pm Ang Lee’s warm, wise and wondrous adventure story, adapted from Yann Martel’s 2002 Booker Prize-winning novel, follows Pi (Suraj Sharma), shipwrecked in the South Pacific with Richard Parker, a Bengal tiger named after the hunter who captured him. Its kaleidoscopic imagery is some of the most advanced ever, but the story unfolds with such simplicity and clarity that it could almost be a silent movie. Logan (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Hugh Jackman’s third – and best – lone outing for his whiskery mutant Wolverine. You might assume James Mangold’s film, set in the near future, where a weary Logan meets a young mutant much like himself, is meant as a sequel to the two other Wolverine movies, but watching it, you’re struck by the thought that this paranoid, violent noir western is the real, shotgun-toting deal. Tuesday 9 January Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman Credit: AFP House of Saud: A Family at War BBC Two, 9.00pm This detailed three-part series on the ruling family of Saudi Arabia makes for unmissable if terrifying television. Dispensing with any sort of Adam Curtis-style frills, the opening film simply talks us through the House of Saud’s involvement in recent history, from Sarajevo to Syria. Hearing from intelligence analysts and long-time Saudi observers, it builds a complicated picture of the uneasy relationship between the Saudi royal family and Wahhabism, the particular strain of Islam they promote. It’s a story that encompasses a small hamlet in Bosnia, a family home in India, weapons dealt from Bulgaria to Afghanistan and online films watched all over the world. Much is made of the new Crown Prince, Mohammed bin Salman, and his desire for reform (“It’s not a question of how important he is to this – he is this,” announces one observer) but it remains hard to judge just how much of his actions are driven by genuine belief and how much constitute a power grab. Ultimately what lingers is not the political revelations, interesting though they are, but the interviews with the blinded of Syria, the wounded of Iraq, the devastated of Bosnia: the countless casualties of the geopolitical game. Sarah Hughes England’s Forgotten Queen: The Life and Death of Lady Jane Grey BBC Four, 9.00pm Tudor England might seem like a subject that has been covered so much that there is nothing new to be said about it. But hold on to those gripes because Helen Castor’s detailed look at the nine-day reign of Lady Jane Grey is an invigorating, intelligent take on the period. Using a wide range of old documents and interesting voices, Castor guides us through Jane’s brief, unlucky life, examining how she ended up as a pawn between two powerful factions and why it was that she found herself raised from relative obscurity to the dizzying heights of the English throne. School for Stammerers ITV, 9.00pm Speech impediments can be devastating to live with, as this thoughtful film, which follows six people living with a stammer, demonstrates. One solution on offer is the intensive McGuire Programme, a residential course that promises life-changing results albeit under tough conditions. 24 Hours in A&E Channel 4, 9.00pm The fly-on-the-wall medical series continues with this week’s patients including Marie, who arrives by ambulance at St George’s Hospital having collapsed at home with an unexplained headache. The Blacklist Sky One, 9.00pm The ludicrous and yet strangely enjoyable US spy series continues with James Spader’s slick Red this week setting his sights on wealthy art thief Greyson Blaise (Owain Yeoman). While Red gallivants abroad Tom (Ryan Eggold) seeks help to identify the bones in the suitcase. SH Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm This melancholy tale in the excellent comedy anthology is of rivalry and friendship lost. Reece Shearsmith is Tommy, who grumpily agrees to perform with former stand-up partner Len (Steve Pemberton), 30 years after they split in mysterious circumstances. Working Class White Men Channel 4, 10.00pm Rapper Professor Green has been quietly making a name for himself as a film-maker and this fascinating film about white working-class men is one of the week’s highlights. Green’s tense meeting with Britain First will garner the headlines but there is hope here too, with Lewis, the teenage would-be mathematician, the show’s highlight. SH The Fault in Our Stars (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Josh Boone’s film, adapted from the phenomenally successful young-adult novel, about two American teenagers both diagnosed with cancer is wisely observed and tenderly performed, most notably by Shailene Woodley. The basic storyline is so worn it’s close to threadbare – Love Story told it more than 40 years ago – but it comes with enough quirks to give it the appearance of freshness. The Lincoln Lawyer (2011) ★★★☆☆ More4, 9.00pm He won acclaim for his role as enigmatic detective Rust Cohle in the TV series True Detective, but Oscar winner Matthew McConaughey stars here in the sort of courtroom drama for which he made his name. This time he’s Mick Haller, a slick LA defence lawyer who prefers to represent the guilty. However, a wealthy new client (Ryan Phillippe) prompts Haller to address his own past sins. Billy Liar (1963, b/w) ★★★☆☆ London Live, 12.00midnight Best known for Midnight Cowboy, for which he won three Oscars, John Schlesinger ranged from violent thrillers (Marathon Man) to romantic epics (Far from the Madding Crowd) to perceptive human studies (An Englishman Abroad), but he indicated the breadth of his ambitions with this gritty social drama featuring Tom Courtenay as an undertaker’s clerk with extravagant fantasies. Wednesday 10 January Sarah Lancashire Credit: Channel 4 Kiri Channel 4, 9.00pm Screenwriter Jack Thorne follows up the excellent National Treasure with another superbly cast, nimble and dark exploration of contemporary mores. Thorne’s careful research is all over this opening episode of four, yet it never feels didactic or clumsy. Kiri follows the investigation into the abduction of the titular black girl Kiri Akindele (Felicia Mukasa) by her birth family, just days before she is due to be adopted by her white foster family, headed up by Lia Williams and Steven Mackintosh. Sarah Lancashire plays Miriam Grayson, the social worker who allows Kiri’s ill-fated unsupervised visit. Lancashire picks her projects carefully, and this is a performance to rank alongside her Bafta-winning turn in Happy Valley: Miriam is an imperfect Samaritan, trying her best amid funding cuts, weak superiors and a dormant drink problem. From the moment that the girl disappears and director Euros Lyn’s colour palette darkens, the focus seems to be as much on apportioning blame as finding the missing girl. It’s a desperate situation shot through with guilt and human frailty, yet not without humour; another modern tragedy from a writer who specialises in them. Gabriel Tate The Truth About Looking Good BBC One, 8.00pm Cherry Healey and 25 volunteers and experts from the Universities of Sheffield and Sunderland join forces to separate scientific fact from marketing fiction in the £9 billion per annum industry of cosmetics, in particular weighing up the pros and cons of moisturisers and cellulite solutions. Britain’s Brightest Family ITV, 8.00pm Anne Hegerty – familiar as The Chase’s Governess – oversees a new quiz show in which family members must show off their own general knowledge and nominate relatives according to their perceived areas of expertise. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This fascinating series finds fashion historian Amber Butchart displaying a variety of eye-catching headgear to scrutinise Jan van Eyck’s The Arnolfini Portrait for clues about its subjects and the 15th-century world that they inhabited. Couturier Ninya Mikhaila, meanwhile, recreates the green gown worn by the painting’s pregnant woman. Miriam’s Big American Adventure BBC One, 9.00pm; Scotland, 10.45pm Miriam Margolyes hits Middle America, where she encounters young Indiana summer campers pledging their allegiance, slightly older drug casualties in Ohio and survivalists of all ages in Tennessee. Fighting for Air BBC Two, 9.00pm Campaigning doctor and inescapable TV face Xand van Tulleken examines the grim effects of air pollution on the body, before travelling to Birmingham to bring clean air to one high street using a combination of technological expertise and community goodwill. GT England’s Forgotten Queen: The Life and Death of Lady Jane Grey BBC Four, 9.00pm While dedicating three hours to just nine days of British history might seem like overkill, here it almost feels inadequate, such is the wealth of incident and intrigue in Dr Helen Castor’s series. This middle episode follows the five days that determined whether or not Lady Jane would survive on the throne. The reconstructions are decent and the CGI sparingly used; instead, Castor lets the experts do the talking in an engaging piece of narrative history, concluding tomorrow. GT Tunes of Glory (1960) ★★★☆☆ Movies4Men, 4.00pm British director Ronald Neame made some of the best-known films of the 20th century, including The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie and The Poseidon Adventure, but this was his personal favourite. It focuses on personal rivalries within a fictional Highland regiment after the Second World War. John Mills plays a new, authoritarian CO, and Alec Guinness – cast against type – gives an exceptional performance as his lax, hard-drinking predecessor. JFK (1991) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.55pm Oliver Stone is in conspiracy-theorist mode for this film about the murder of President John F Kennedy. Whatever you make of Stone’s theory that the assassination was an FBI plot, lawyer Jim Garrison’s (Kevin Costner) showdown moment when he demonstrates that JFK was killed by multiple bullets is jaw-dropping. Costner, fresh from the Oscars glory of Dances with Wolves, is a magnetic lead. The Social Network (2010) ★★★★★ Channel 4, 1.10am Jesse Eisenberg is superb as the gauche cyber-geek who became a billionaire in his twenties in this dazzling dramatisation of the story of Facebook. It may necessarily be speculative in parts about Mark Zuckerberg and his invention, but this is a brilliantly scripted and absolutely gripping tale of clashing egos, precocious talent and betrayal. Justin Timberlake and Andrew Garfield also star. Thursday 11 January Cheetahs in Namibia Credit: BBC Big Cats BBC One, 8.00pm One family, 40 different faces. That’s how this beautifully shot three-part series about the planet’s top wild predator, the cat, begins – with a kaleidoscope of feline faces that perfectly illustrates the huge variety and essential similarity between the many different branches of the family. Not all of them are big. One, the rusty-spotted cat – a kittenish, ultra-rare inhabitant of Sri Lanka’s jungles – is so tiny when fully grown that it can fit in the palm of your hand. Although it makes up for its small stature with surprising ferocity. The series took two years and 30 separate filming expeditions to make, travelling to all four corners of the globe to show just how adaptable wild cats have evolved to be. In this opening edition we see not only relatively familiar sights such as cheetahs and lions chasing down water buffalo and giraffe in Africa, but also some rarities, such as a snow leopard searching the Himalayas for a mate. Plus, Siberian tigers and the elusive Canada lynx make appearances. There are surprises, too, in footage of jaguars taking on caiman in the waters of the Pantanal, and pumas hunting penguin on the freezing southern shores of Patagonia. Gerard O’Donovan European Tour Golf: The BMW SA Open Sky Sports Main Event, 8.00am Action from the opening day’s play at the City of Ekurhuleni in Gauteng, South Africa, where Graeme Storm was the winner last year. Having very nearly lost his tour card in 2016, the Englishman defeated Northern Irish star Rory McIlroy in a play-off to win his second title on the tour and his first since the 2007 Open de France. EastEnders BBC One, 7.30pm Mel Owen (Tamzin Outhwaite) returns to Albert Square after a 16-year absence. Last time around she married twice, burnt down a nightclub, was kidnapped and slept with her best friend’s husband. So the producers’ promise of an “incredible” storyline for her comeback is probably, uh, credible. The Cruise: Return to the Mediterranean ITV, 8.30pm More stories of life on the cruise ship Royal Princess. Tonight, with 5,000 passengers and crew aboard, bad weather prevents the cruise ship from docking. England’s Forgotten Queen: The Life and Death of Lady Jane Grey BBC Four, 9.00pm The concluding part of Helen Castor’s fascinating account of England’s “nine-day queen” opens on the eighth day of her reign, with armies heading for Framlingham Castle where her Catholic rival for the throne, Mary Tudor, had assembled a powerful force. Within a day, 16-year-old Jane would be betrayed, abandoned and consigned to the Tower of London. But her legacy, according to Castor, was far greater than her brief time on the throne suggests. Transformation Street ITV, 9.00pm Wimpole Street, Marylebone, is home to the London Transgender Surgery, a private clinic catering for some of the estimated 130,000 Britons currently wishing to change gender. This revealing three-parter follows patients from initial consultations through to gender confirmation surgery. Walks with My Dog More4, 9.00pm The simple but engaging series in which celebrities take their four-legged friends for a trek through the UK’s more scenic parts makes a welcome return. This time Hadrian’s Wall, Norfolk and the Welsh mountains are among the destinations. Actress Caroline Quentin leads off tonight, taking her pooch for a stroll around the Helford estuary in Cornwall. GO Great Art ITV, 10.45pm In this second episode of the art series, Tim Marlow moves on to the 19th-century Parisian art collector Paul Durand-Ruel, whose financially risky landmark 1886 exhibition in New York thrust impressionism into the mainstream. Marlow examines his impact, and the lasting influence of Monet, Cézanne, Degas and Renoir. GO From Russia with Love (1963) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Ah, those were the days: the certainties of the Cold War, a beautiful Soviet defector and a chase across the Balkans. Will Spectre avenge the death of Dr No? No chance. Sean Connery was in the swing of things in his second outing as James Bond, pursued by two of 007’s best adversaries, in “Red” Grant (Robert Shaw) and Rosa Klebb (Lotte Lenya). Terence Young directs. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.15pm This superb adaptation of John le Carré’s brilliant, intricate Cold War spy novel is a triumph. The espionage drama follows the hunt for a Soviet double agent at the top of the British secret service, with Gary Oldman spearheading the excellent ensemble cast, which includes Colin Firth, Tom Hardy, John Hurt and Benedict Cumberbatch. It’s funny, seductive and suspenseful. GoodFellas (1990) ★★★★★ ITV4, 11.25pm Martin Scorsese’s Mafia masterpiece, adapted from a non-fiction book, has all the qualities of great cinema: it’s thrilling, it’s provocative, it’s stylish, and it’s got a young Robert De Niro in it. Ray Liotta plays the youngster who longs to be a gangster; De Niro and Joe Pesci are in the Mob. Pesci’s mother, meanwhile, reportedly asked him if he had to swear quite so much – the f-word is used 300 times. Friday 12 January Revd Matthew Stafford, Revd Nicholas Lowton, Fr Matthew Cashmore and Revd Ruth Hulse Credit: BBC A Vicar’s Life BBC Two, 8.30pm This amiable new series follows several vicars in their parishes in the Diocese of Hereford, the most rural in the Church of England. It’s the standard heart-warming mixture of births, marriages and deaths – or as likeable Reverend Matthew Stafford, vicar at the village of Much Wenlock, says: “hatched, matched and dispatched” – but, for all that sense of familiarity, it’s well-made and very engaging. This opening episode sees Matthew officiate at a lovely local wedding, and Reverend Nicholas Lowton, the Rural Dean of Abbeydore and Vicar of the Black Mountains Group, deal with the theft of the parish registry books (“whoever did this has got lessons that they need to learn”). Elsewhere, Reverend Ruth Hulse, Team Vicar for West Hereford, organises a funeral for much-loved former churchwarden Barbara. “It’s a huge loss, like losing a member of your own family,” she says. Everyone involved comes out of it well, and Matthew manages to sneak a message in amid the jokes: “I don’t take myself seriously, but I do take God and what I do very seriously,” he notes. So do his parishioners, many of whom admit that he’s helped them see the church in a more favourable light. Sarah Hughes PGA Tour Golf: The Sony Open Sky Sports Main Event, 12.01am The opening day of the tournament at the Waialae CC in Honolulu, Hawaii, where Justin Thomas won the title last year. Room 101 BBC One, 8.30pm Frank Skinner returns with a new series of the long-running show. This opener promises to be a lot of fun given that his guests, Charlie Brooker, Scarlett Moffatt and Pearl Mackie, are not short of opinion. Among the objects up for inclusion in Room 101 are crocodiles, mosquitos and haircuts. Rome Unpacked BBC Two, 9.00pm The second part of this food and art travelogue sees chef Giorgio Locatelli and art critic Andrew Graham-Dixon visit the Basilica di San Clemente, the Testaccio Slaughterhouse and the Palazzo Colonna. As before, a great deal of the fun comes from the way that each man learns from the other. David Bowie Evening BBC Four, from 9.00pm Two years after David Bowie’s death, BBC Four dedicates an evening to the rock great. First up is Francis Whately’s 2013 film David Bowie: Five Years in the Making of an Icon, which looks at key moments in his career. These include his time as Ziggy Stardust, his reinvention as the Thin White Duke, the making of 1977’s Heroes, and the global success of Let’s Dance. It’s followed by David Bowie and the Story of Ziggy Stardust, which looks at how Bowie created his most (in)famous alter ego. Lethal Weapon ITV, 9.00pm The rambunctious remake of the Danny Glover-Mel Gibson films roars back for a second series. It begins with an action-packed episode that sees Murtaugh (Damon Wayans) heading to Mexico to try to reign in partner Riggs (Clayne Crawford) who is still seeking vengeance for his wife’s death. Delicious Sky One, 9.00pm The second series of the foodie drama reaches its penultimate episode, and it’s the anniversary of philanderer Leo’s death, which the families plan to mark with a feast. Naturally, nothing goes smoothly – chef Gina (Dawn French) is pushed to the limits by her daughter Theresa’s (Tanya Reynolds) behaviour, while Gina’s love rival turned business partner Sam (Emilia Fox) takes out her anger on chef Adam (Aaron Anthony). SH The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm Expect a super-smooth evening as Graham Norton is joined by A-listers Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks, who discuss Steven Spielberg’s political drama The Post, but also share some good anecdotes amid all the mild ribbing. SH The Polka King (2017) Netflix, from today Exuberant Jack Black plays to his strengths in this biopic, based on the documentary The Man Who Would Be Polka King, about a flamboyant Polish émigré-turned-Polka King-turned-convicted Ponzi-scheme criminal. Despite being a film about a scoundrel who swindled senior citizens out of millions of dollars in order to achieve the American dream, it’s surprisingly entertaining, though a more serious consideration of con artists wouldn’t have gone amiss. The Frogmen (1951, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 4.35pm A pleasingly understated yet atmospheric war drama in which Richard Widmark stars as a tough Navy commander put in charge of a team of demolition divers on a South Pacific island. At first, the arrival of their superior goes down like a lead diving suit, but he soon wins them over by neutralising an undetonated torpedo. Due to the conditions being deemed too “riotous”, the female roles were written out. Get Out (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Get Out is one of the first films expressly to be set in a post-Obama era and is a breathlessly suspenseful exposé of the horror of liberal racism. Perfect, white Rose Armitage (Allison Williams) wants to allay the concerns of her boyfriend, black photographer Chris (Daniel Kaluuya), and invites him to meet her parents. They don’t bat an eyelid over his skin colour, but the film rattles with provocations. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
Sunday 7 January Michael Palin: a Life on Screen BBC Two, 9.00pm Telling Michael Palin’s story from his birth to the film Death of Stalin (in which he played Minister Molotov), this profile of the “Nicest Man in Showbiz” is a pleasure from start to finish. First realising his talents in improvised shows for his school friends, Palin found kindred spirits and his comic mojo as part of the Oxford Revue at the Edinburgh Festival, eventually parlaying his skills as a jobbing writer and performer into a series that changed the comedy landscape forever: Monty Python’s Flying Circus was born after an apparently disastrous meeting ended with a BBC commissioner pronouncing sternly, “all right, I’ll give you 13 episodes. But that’s all!” While John Cleese provides the tongue-in-cheek venom (describing Palin as “a sociopath”), Connie Booth, David Jason and Armando Iannucci pay tribute to a versatile talent. An abundance of clips confirm that alongside the comic genius of Python and Ripping Yarns lay a serious actor of genuine heft (as seen in GBH and Brazil), the gifted travel journalist of Around the World in 80 Days and a successful and engaging diarist. Palin, too, chips in with observations and memories, all delivered with charismatic humility and self-deprecation. Gabriel Tate Into the Forest BBC Three, from 10.00am This uneven but intriguing Canadian indie film didn’t find much of an audience when it was released in 2015 but will be now shown online via BBC Three. Evan Rachel Wood (Westworld) and Ellen Page (Juno) star in this dystopian drama as Nell and Eva, two sisters living in a forest with their father in the near future. They find their isolated existence under threat when a district-wide power cut sparks anarchy and increasing desperation in the nearby town. FA Cup Football: Shrewsbury Town v West Ham United BBC One, 1.40pm More potential giant-killing in the FA Cup, as League One side Shrewsbury Town try to cut down West Ham at Montgomery Waters Meadow. The visitors have won the FA Cup three times but haven’t lifted the trophy since 1980, when they beat Arsenal 1-0, thanks to a goal by Trevor Brooking. Shrewsbury made it through to the third round by beating against Aldershot Town and Morecambe. Premiership Rugby Union: Wasps v Saracens BT Sport 1, 2.30pm Having beaten Bath 31-26 at the Rec last weekend, Wasps look to continue their fine form in the new year at home to second-placed Saracens. The away side will be full of confidence, though: they capped off an impressive 2017 with a 46-31 victory over Worcester Warriors, with Jackson Wray and Nathan Earle both scoring try doubles as Saracens ran in six tries at Allianz Park. When these sides last met here, a hat-trick from Thomas Young helped Wasps to a 35-15 victory. A repeat performance here will see them leapfrog Saracens in the table. Dancing on Ice ITV, 6.00pm Back after a four-year absence, Jayne Torvill and Christopher Dean return with Dancing on Ice, but they are no longer coaches. They are now be assessing the ice-skating abilities of a dozen celebrities, including Bucks Fizz alumna Cheryl Baker and Great British Bake Off 2016 champion Candice Brown. Joe Cocker Night Sky Arts, from 6.45pm One of the finest of all the white blues and soul shouters, Joe Cocker’s gargling, howling delivery was most famously captured in his performance of With a Little Help from My Friends at Woodstock. This double bill begins with the concert film Fire It Up: Live, and Cocker performing in Cologne on his final tour before his death in 2014. John Edginton’s biographical documentary, Mad Dog with Soul, follows at 9.00pm. GT Attenborough and the Sea Dragon BBC One, 8.00pm David Attenborough pursues his lifelong passion of fossilology on Britain’s Jurassic Coast. The 200-million-year-old bones of an Ichthyosaur must be dug out of the Dorset cliffs, analysed and finally recreated using computer technology. Vera ITV, 8.00pm The eighth series of the murder mystery begins with DCI Vera Stanhope (the excellent Brenda Blethyn) investigating how a respected fraud officer came to be incinerated in an abbatoir. Her enquiries lead her into a close-knit fishing community and clashes with her fellow coppers. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm In this extraordinary venture, Dick Strawbridge and a team of fellow enthusiasts attempt to build a model railway to stretch 71 miles from Fort William to Inverness. The project will require viaducts, bridges and even a miniature ferry, all documented over the next five weeks. GT And Now for Something Completely Different (1971) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.00pm; N Ireland, 11.30pm Fans of Monty Python’s Flying Circus rejoice – this compilation film is a feast of the comedians’ favourite sketches from the first two TV series. With John Cleese introducing a number of scenes with: “And now, for something completely different”, it’s a fun trip into the archives, including as the “dead parrot” sketch. Captain Phillips (2013) ★★★★☆ ITV, 10.10pm Paul Greengrass (United 93 and three Bourne films) has a rare gift for working with action-thriller material and making something cohesive, layered and complex from it. With this account of Somali pirates boarding an American cargo ship and kidnapping its captain (Tom Hanks), he remains at the top of his game. Hanks may be the big draw, but it’s the pirates who impress, especially Bafta-winning Barkhad Abdi. Stations of the Cross (2015) ★★★☆☆ BBC Four, 11.00pm This cold, preachy German film from director Dietrich Brüggemann plays out over 14 single-shot scenes, each titled after a station of the cross on Christ’s walk to Calvary and to mirror the restrictions of religious fundamentalism. Its story, about a 14-year-old girl who pursues the ideals of Christian self-sacrifice to terrifying extremes, won the best script gong at the Berlin International Film Festival. Monday 8 January Archie Panjabi Credit: ITV Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Written by Indian Summers creator Paul Rutman and partner Natasha Narayan, this atmospheric six-part thriller has a fine cast and gets off to an instantly intriguing start. Emmy-winner Archie Panjabi is a smart and sympathetic presence as British-Pakistani doctor Mona Harcourt, who, together with her well-connected political lobbyist husband Guy (Jack Davenport) and wider family, is preparing to celebrate the return from Lahore of her beloved brother Kareem (Navin Chowdhry). His failure to arrive as expected on the day a terrorist incident in London results in four deaths, and brings the city to a standstill. It sets in motion a series of terrifying consequences – the most disturbing of which is the sudden intense interest in the family of the anti-terrorism unit of the Metropolitan Police. It is a credible, and in parts distressing, depiction of what it is like to be an ordinary British Muslim in the wake of such an attack, especially when it emerges that the real focus of the police investigation is not Kareem, but his 18-year-old student son Danny (Viveik Kalra) who had been becoming increasingly isolated from the family in the weeks before the attack. Gerard O’Donovan Star Trek: Discovery Netflix, from today Following an eight-week break, the latest incarnation of the Star Trek franchise returns to complete its debut run. The previous episode ended on a twist that saw the USS Discovery cast out into unchartered space. Unsurprisingly, this 10th episode picks up with Captain Lorca (Jason Isaacs) and crew facing a raft of previously unimagined threats in their eventful efforts to find a way home. How to Lose Weight Well Channel 4, 8.00pm Dr Xand van Tulleken and dietician Hala El-Shafie take a new approach to diet testing, dividing a group of volunteers into three categories: crashers (short-term diets), shape shifters (six-week programmes) and life changers (four-month plans) to see which of the current popular diets are most effective. Silent Witness BBC One, 9.00pm The enduringly popular pathologists-playing-cops drama kicks off its 21st series with a typically slow burn two-parter. As Nikki Alexander (Emilia Fox) struggles to get over her Mexican ordeal, a close friend (Emma Fielding) goes missing. Surgeons: At the Edge of Life BBC Two, 9.00pm Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham’s busy surgical unit is the focus of this new series following surgeons, theatre staff and patients through operations at the cutting edge of medicine. In the first edition, maxillofacial surgeons tackle a marathon operation on a 53-year-old diagnosed with a major facial tumour. My Astonishing Self: Gabriel Byrne on George Bernard Shaw BBC Four, 9.00pm An actor’s homage to a playwright becomes a fascinating exploration of the life and work of a literary Titan of the early 20th century.George Bernard Shaw was a pioneering socialist, feminist and philosopher as well as the writer of hugely popular plays such as Pygmalion. Here, Gabriel Byrne assesses the character and legacy of a man whose intelligence, charm and social conscience, and ingenuity for self-promotion, propelled him to global renown. GO The Undateables Channel 4, 9.00pm A fresh crop of singletons looking for love includes a rugby-playing chef from Hull with Tourette’s, a bookseller from Cambridgeshire with Asperger’s, and a photography graduate from London with scoliosis. GO Gallipoli (1981) ★★★★★ Film4, 6.35pm Director Peter Weir’s tale of war and friendship in 1915 – one of his very finest films – reaches a devastating finale in the clash between Australians and Turks on the shore of the Dardanelles. Mel Gibson’s race through the trenches with a crucial message – ignore the last order! – is more pulse-quickening than a dozen Bravehearts. You pray for him to beat that whistle every time. Harold Hopkins also stars. Life of Pi (2012) ★★★★★ E4, 8.00pm Ang Lee’s warm, wise and wondrous adventure story, adapted from Yann Martel’s 2002 Booker Prize-winning novel, follows Pi (Suraj Sharma), shipwrecked in the South Pacific with Richard Parker, a Bengal tiger named after the hunter who captured him. Its kaleidoscopic imagery is some of the most advanced ever, but the story unfolds with such simplicity and clarity that it could almost be a silent movie. Logan (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Hugh Jackman’s third – and best – lone outing for his whiskery mutant Wolverine. You might assume James Mangold’s film, set in the near future, where a weary Logan meets a young mutant much like himself, is meant as a sequel to the two other Wolverine movies, but watching it, you’re struck by the thought that this paranoid, violent noir western is the real, shotgun-toting deal. Tuesday 9 January Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman Credit: AFP House of Saud: A Family at War BBC Two, 9.00pm This detailed three-part series on the ruling family of Saudi Arabia makes for unmissable if terrifying television. Dispensing with any sort of Adam Curtis-style frills, the opening film simply talks us through the House of Saud’s involvement in recent history, from Sarajevo to Syria. Hearing from intelligence analysts and long-time Saudi observers, it builds a complicated picture of the uneasy relationship between the Saudi royal family and Wahhabism, the particular strain of Islam they promote. It’s a story that encompasses a small hamlet in Bosnia, a family home in India, weapons dealt from Bulgaria to Afghanistan and online films watched all over the world. Much is made of the new Crown Prince, Mohammed bin Salman, and his desire for reform (“It’s not a question of how important he is to this – he is this,” announces one observer) but it remains hard to judge just how much of his actions are driven by genuine belief and how much constitute a power grab. Ultimately what lingers is not the political revelations, interesting though they are, but the interviews with the blinded of Syria, the wounded of Iraq, the devastated of Bosnia: the countless casualties of the geopolitical game. Sarah Hughes England’s Forgotten Queen: The Life and Death of Lady Jane Grey BBC Four, 9.00pm Tudor England might seem like a subject that has been covered so much that there is nothing new to be said about it. But hold on to those gripes because Helen Castor’s detailed look at the nine-day reign of Lady Jane Grey is an invigorating, intelligent take on the period. Using a wide range of old documents and interesting voices, Castor guides us through Jane’s brief, unlucky life, examining how she ended up as a pawn between two powerful factions and why it was that she found herself raised from relative obscurity to the dizzying heights of the English throne. School for Stammerers ITV, 9.00pm Speech impediments can be devastating to live with, as this thoughtful film, which follows six people living with a stammer, demonstrates. One solution on offer is the intensive McGuire Programme, a residential course that promises life-changing results albeit under tough conditions. 24 Hours in A&E Channel 4, 9.00pm The fly-on-the-wall medical series continues with this week’s patients including Marie, who arrives by ambulance at St George’s Hospital having collapsed at home with an unexplained headache. The Blacklist Sky One, 9.00pm The ludicrous and yet strangely enjoyable US spy series continues with James Spader’s slick Red this week setting his sights on wealthy art thief Greyson Blaise (Owain Yeoman). While Red gallivants abroad Tom (Ryan Eggold) seeks help to identify the bones in the suitcase. SH Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm This melancholy tale in the excellent comedy anthology is of rivalry and friendship lost. Reece Shearsmith is Tommy, who grumpily agrees to perform with former stand-up partner Len (Steve Pemberton), 30 years after they split in mysterious circumstances. Working Class White Men Channel 4, 10.00pm Rapper Professor Green has been quietly making a name for himself as a film-maker and this fascinating film about white working-class men is one of the week’s highlights. Green’s tense meeting with Britain First will garner the headlines but there is hope here too, with Lewis, the teenage would-be mathematician, the show’s highlight. SH The Fault in Our Stars (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Josh Boone’s film, adapted from the phenomenally successful young-adult novel, about two American teenagers both diagnosed with cancer is wisely observed and tenderly performed, most notably by Shailene Woodley. The basic storyline is so worn it’s close to threadbare – Love Story told it more than 40 years ago – but it comes with enough quirks to give it the appearance of freshness. The Lincoln Lawyer (2011) ★★★☆☆ More4, 9.00pm He won acclaim for his role as enigmatic detective Rust Cohle in the TV series True Detective, but Oscar winner Matthew McConaughey stars here in the sort of courtroom drama for which he made his name. This time he’s Mick Haller, a slick LA defence lawyer who prefers to represent the guilty. However, a wealthy new client (Ryan Phillippe) prompts Haller to address his own past sins. Billy Liar (1963, b/w) ★★★☆☆ London Live, 12.00midnight Best known for Midnight Cowboy, for which he won three Oscars, John Schlesinger ranged from violent thrillers (Marathon Man) to romantic epics (Far from the Madding Crowd) to perceptive human studies (An Englishman Abroad), but he indicated the breadth of his ambitions with this gritty social drama featuring Tom Courtenay as an undertaker’s clerk with extravagant fantasies. Wednesday 10 January Sarah Lancashire Credit: Channel 4 Kiri Channel 4, 9.00pm Screenwriter Jack Thorne follows up the excellent National Treasure with another superbly cast, nimble and dark exploration of contemporary mores. Thorne’s careful research is all over this opening episode of four, yet it never feels didactic or clumsy. Kiri follows the investigation into the abduction of the titular black girl Kiri Akindele (Felicia Mukasa) by her birth family, just days before she is due to be adopted by her white foster family, headed up by Lia Williams and Steven Mackintosh. Sarah Lancashire plays Miriam Grayson, the social worker who allows Kiri’s ill-fated unsupervised visit. Lancashire picks her projects carefully, and this is a performance to rank alongside her Bafta-winning turn in Happy Valley: Miriam is an imperfect Samaritan, trying her best amid funding cuts, weak superiors and a dormant drink problem. From the moment that the girl disappears and director Euros Lyn’s colour palette darkens, the focus seems to be as much on apportioning blame as finding the missing girl. It’s a desperate situation shot through with guilt and human frailty, yet not without humour; another modern tragedy from a writer who specialises in them. Gabriel Tate The Truth About Looking Good BBC One, 8.00pm Cherry Healey and 25 volunteers and experts from the Universities of Sheffield and Sunderland join forces to separate scientific fact from marketing fiction in the £9 billion per annum industry of cosmetics, in particular weighing up the pros and cons of moisturisers and cellulite solutions. Britain’s Brightest Family ITV, 8.00pm Anne Hegerty – familiar as The Chase’s Governess – oversees a new quiz show in which family members must show off their own general knowledge and nominate relatives according to their perceived areas of expertise. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This fascinating series finds fashion historian Amber Butchart displaying a variety of eye-catching headgear to scrutinise Jan van Eyck’s The Arnolfini Portrait for clues about its subjects and the 15th-century world that they inhabited. Couturier Ninya Mikhaila, meanwhile, recreates the green gown worn by the painting’s pregnant woman. Miriam’s Big American Adventure BBC One, 9.00pm; Scotland, 10.45pm Miriam Margolyes hits Middle America, where she encounters young Indiana summer campers pledging their allegiance, slightly older drug casualties in Ohio and survivalists of all ages in Tennessee. Fighting for Air BBC Two, 9.00pm Campaigning doctor and inescapable TV face Xand van Tulleken examines the grim effects of air pollution on the body, before travelling to Birmingham to bring clean air to one high street using a combination of technological expertise and community goodwill. GT England’s Forgotten Queen: The Life and Death of Lady Jane Grey BBC Four, 9.00pm While dedicating three hours to just nine days of British history might seem like overkill, here it almost feels inadequate, such is the wealth of incident and intrigue in Dr Helen Castor’s series. This middle episode follows the five days that determined whether or not Lady Jane would survive on the throne. The reconstructions are decent and the CGI sparingly used; instead, Castor lets the experts do the talking in an engaging piece of narrative history, concluding tomorrow. GT Tunes of Glory (1960) ★★★☆☆ Movies4Men, 4.00pm British director Ronald Neame made some of the best-known films of the 20th century, including The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie and The Poseidon Adventure, but this was his personal favourite. It focuses on personal rivalries within a fictional Highland regiment after the Second World War. John Mills plays a new, authoritarian CO, and Alec Guinness – cast against type – gives an exceptional performance as his lax, hard-drinking predecessor. JFK (1991) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.55pm Oliver Stone is in conspiracy-theorist mode for this film about the murder of President John F Kennedy. Whatever you make of Stone’s theory that the assassination was an FBI plot, lawyer Jim Garrison’s (Kevin Costner) showdown moment when he demonstrates that JFK was killed by multiple bullets is jaw-dropping. Costner, fresh from the Oscars glory of Dances with Wolves, is a magnetic lead. The Social Network (2010) ★★★★★ Channel 4, 1.10am Jesse Eisenberg is superb as the gauche cyber-geek who became a billionaire in his twenties in this dazzling dramatisation of the story of Facebook. It may necessarily be speculative in parts about Mark Zuckerberg and his invention, but this is a brilliantly scripted and absolutely gripping tale of clashing egos, precocious talent and betrayal. Justin Timberlake and Andrew Garfield also star. Thursday 11 January Cheetahs in Namibia Credit: BBC Big Cats BBC One, 8.00pm One family, 40 different faces. That’s how this beautifully shot three-part series about the planet’s top wild predator, the cat, begins – with a kaleidoscope of feline faces that perfectly illustrates the huge variety and essential similarity between the many different branches of the family. Not all of them are big. One, the rusty-spotted cat – a kittenish, ultra-rare inhabitant of Sri Lanka’s jungles – is so tiny when fully grown that it can fit in the palm of your hand. Although it makes up for its small stature with surprising ferocity. The series took two years and 30 separate filming expeditions to make, travelling to all four corners of the globe to show just how adaptable wild cats have evolved to be. In this opening edition we see not only relatively familiar sights such as cheetahs and lions chasing down water buffalo and giraffe in Africa, but also some rarities, such as a snow leopard searching the Himalayas for a mate. Plus, Siberian tigers and the elusive Canada lynx make appearances. There are surprises, too, in footage of jaguars taking on caiman in the waters of the Pantanal, and pumas hunting penguin on the freezing southern shores of Patagonia. Gerard O’Donovan European Tour Golf: The BMW SA Open Sky Sports Main Event, 8.00am Action from the opening day’s play at the City of Ekurhuleni in Gauteng, South Africa, where Graeme Storm was the winner last year. Having very nearly lost his tour card in 2016, the Englishman defeated Northern Irish star Rory McIlroy in a play-off to win his second title on the tour and his first since the 2007 Open de France. EastEnders BBC One, 7.30pm Mel Owen (Tamzin Outhwaite) returns to Albert Square after a 16-year absence. Last time around she married twice, burnt down a nightclub, was kidnapped and slept with her best friend’s husband. So the producers’ promise of an “incredible” storyline for her comeback is probably, uh, credible. The Cruise: Return to the Mediterranean ITV, 8.30pm More stories of life on the cruise ship Royal Princess. Tonight, with 5,000 passengers and crew aboard, bad weather prevents the cruise ship from docking. England’s Forgotten Queen: The Life and Death of Lady Jane Grey BBC Four, 9.00pm The concluding part of Helen Castor’s fascinating account of England’s “nine-day queen” opens on the eighth day of her reign, with armies heading for Framlingham Castle where her Catholic rival for the throne, Mary Tudor, had assembled a powerful force. Within a day, 16-year-old Jane would be betrayed, abandoned and consigned to the Tower of London. But her legacy, according to Castor, was far greater than her brief time on the throne suggests. Transformation Street ITV, 9.00pm Wimpole Street, Marylebone, is home to the London Transgender Surgery, a private clinic catering for some of the estimated 130,000 Britons currently wishing to change gender. This revealing three-parter follows patients from initial consultations through to gender confirmation surgery. Walks with My Dog More4, 9.00pm The simple but engaging series in which celebrities take their four-legged friends for a trek through the UK’s more scenic parts makes a welcome return. This time Hadrian’s Wall, Norfolk and the Welsh mountains are among the destinations. Actress Caroline Quentin leads off tonight, taking her pooch for a stroll around the Helford estuary in Cornwall. GO Great Art ITV, 10.45pm In this second episode of the art series, Tim Marlow moves on to the 19th-century Parisian art collector Paul Durand-Ruel, whose financially risky landmark 1886 exhibition in New York thrust impressionism into the mainstream. Marlow examines his impact, and the lasting influence of Monet, Cézanne, Degas and Renoir. GO From Russia with Love (1963) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Ah, those were the days: the certainties of the Cold War, a beautiful Soviet defector and a chase across the Balkans. Will Spectre avenge the death of Dr No? No chance. Sean Connery was in the swing of things in his second outing as James Bond, pursued by two of 007’s best adversaries, in “Red” Grant (Robert Shaw) and Rosa Klebb (Lotte Lenya). Terence Young directs. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.15pm This superb adaptation of John le Carré’s brilliant, intricate Cold War spy novel is a triumph. The espionage drama follows the hunt for a Soviet double agent at the top of the British secret service, with Gary Oldman spearheading the excellent ensemble cast, which includes Colin Firth, Tom Hardy, John Hurt and Benedict Cumberbatch. It’s funny, seductive and suspenseful. GoodFellas (1990) ★★★★★ ITV4, 11.25pm Martin Scorsese’s Mafia masterpiece, adapted from a non-fiction book, has all the qualities of great cinema: it’s thrilling, it’s provocative, it’s stylish, and it’s got a young Robert De Niro in it. Ray Liotta plays the youngster who longs to be a gangster; De Niro and Joe Pesci are in the Mob. Pesci’s mother, meanwhile, reportedly asked him if he had to swear quite so much – the f-word is used 300 times. Friday 12 January Revd Matthew Stafford, Revd Nicholas Lowton, Fr Matthew Cashmore and Revd Ruth Hulse Credit: BBC A Vicar’s Life BBC Two, 8.30pm This amiable new series follows several vicars in their parishes in the Diocese of Hereford, the most rural in the Church of England. It’s the standard heart-warming mixture of births, marriages and deaths – or as likeable Reverend Matthew Stafford, vicar at the village of Much Wenlock, says: “hatched, matched and dispatched” – but, for all that sense of familiarity, it’s well-made and very engaging. This opening episode sees Matthew officiate at a lovely local wedding, and Reverend Nicholas Lowton, the Rural Dean of Abbeydore and Vicar of the Black Mountains Group, deal with the theft of the parish registry books (“whoever did this has got lessons that they need to learn”). Elsewhere, Reverend Ruth Hulse, Team Vicar for West Hereford, organises a funeral for much-loved former churchwarden Barbara. “It’s a huge loss, like losing a member of your own family,” she says. Everyone involved comes out of it well, and Matthew manages to sneak a message in amid the jokes: “I don’t take myself seriously, but I do take God and what I do very seriously,” he notes. So do his parishioners, many of whom admit that he’s helped them see the church in a more favourable light. Sarah Hughes PGA Tour Golf: The Sony Open Sky Sports Main Event, 12.01am The opening day of the tournament at the Waialae CC in Honolulu, Hawaii, where Justin Thomas won the title last year. Room 101 BBC One, 8.30pm Frank Skinner returns with a new series of the long-running show. This opener promises to be a lot of fun given that his guests, Charlie Brooker, Scarlett Moffatt and Pearl Mackie, are not short of opinion. Among the objects up for inclusion in Room 101 are crocodiles, mosquitos and haircuts. Rome Unpacked BBC Two, 9.00pm The second part of this food and art travelogue sees chef Giorgio Locatelli and art critic Andrew Graham-Dixon visit the Basilica di San Clemente, the Testaccio Slaughterhouse and the Palazzo Colonna. As before, a great deal of the fun comes from the way that each man learns from the other. David Bowie Evening BBC Four, from 9.00pm Two years after David Bowie’s death, BBC Four dedicates an evening to the rock great. First up is Francis Whately’s 2013 film David Bowie: Five Years in the Making of an Icon, which looks at key moments in his career. These include his time as Ziggy Stardust, his reinvention as the Thin White Duke, the making of 1977’s Heroes, and the global success of Let’s Dance. It’s followed by David Bowie and the Story of Ziggy Stardust, which looks at how Bowie created his most (in)famous alter ego. Lethal Weapon ITV, 9.00pm The rambunctious remake of the Danny Glover-Mel Gibson films roars back for a second series. It begins with an action-packed episode that sees Murtaugh (Damon Wayans) heading to Mexico to try to reign in partner Riggs (Clayne Crawford) who is still seeking vengeance for his wife’s death. Delicious Sky One, 9.00pm The second series of the foodie drama reaches its penultimate episode, and it’s the anniversary of philanderer Leo’s death, which the families plan to mark with a feast. Naturally, nothing goes smoothly – chef Gina (Dawn French) is pushed to the limits by her daughter Theresa’s (Tanya Reynolds) behaviour, while Gina’s love rival turned business partner Sam (Emilia Fox) takes out her anger on chef Adam (Aaron Anthony). SH The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm Expect a super-smooth evening as Graham Norton is joined by A-listers Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks, who discuss Steven Spielberg’s political drama The Post, but also share some good anecdotes amid all the mild ribbing. SH The Polka King (2017) Netflix, from today Exuberant Jack Black plays to his strengths in this biopic, based on the documentary The Man Who Would Be Polka King, about a flamboyant Polish émigré-turned-Polka King-turned-convicted Ponzi-scheme criminal. Despite being a film about a scoundrel who swindled senior citizens out of millions of dollars in order to achieve the American dream, it’s surprisingly entertaining, though a more serious consideration of con artists wouldn’t have gone amiss. The Frogmen (1951, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 4.35pm A pleasingly understated yet atmospheric war drama in which Richard Widmark stars as a tough Navy commander put in charge of a team of demolition divers on a South Pacific island. At first, the arrival of their superior goes down like a lead diving suit, but he soon wins them over by neutralising an undetonated torpedo. Due to the conditions being deemed too “riotous”, the female roles were written out. Get Out (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Get Out is one of the first films expressly to be set in a post-Obama era and is a breathlessly suspenseful exposé of the horror of liberal racism. Perfect, white Rose Armitage (Allison Williams) wants to allay the concerns of her boyfriend, black photographer Chris (Daniel Kaluuya), and invites him to meet her parents. They don’t bat an eyelid over his skin colour, but the film rattles with provocations. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
What's on TV tonight: Michael Palin: a Life on Screen and Dancing on Ice
Sunday 7 January Michael Palin: a Life on Screen BBC Two, 9.00pm Telling Michael Palin’s story from his birth to the film Death of Stalin (in which he played Minister Molotov), this profile of the “Nicest Man in Showbiz” is a pleasure from start to finish. First realising his talents in improvised shows for his school friends, Palin found kindred spirits and his comic mojo as part of the Oxford Revue at the Edinburgh Festival, eventually parlaying his skills as a jobbing writer and performer into a series that changed the comedy landscape forever: Monty Python’s Flying Circus was born after an apparently disastrous meeting ended with a BBC commissioner pronouncing sternly, “all right, I’ll give you 13 episodes. But that’s all!” While John Cleese provides the tongue-in-cheek venom (describing Palin as “a sociopath”), Connie Booth, David Jason and Armando Iannucci pay tribute to a versatile talent. An abundance of clips confirm that alongside the comic genius of Python and Ripping Yarns lay a serious actor of genuine heft (as seen in GBH and Brazil), the gifted travel journalist of Around the World in 80 Days and a successful and engaging diarist. Palin, too, chips in with observations and memories, all delivered with charismatic humility and self-deprecation. Gabriel Tate Into the Forest BBC Three, from 10.00am This uneven but intriguing Canadian indie film didn’t find much of an audience when it was released in 2015 but will be now shown online via BBC Three. Evan Rachel Wood (Westworld) and Ellen Page (Juno) star in this dystopian drama as Nell and Eva, two sisters living in a forest with their father in the near future. They find their isolated existence under threat when a district-wide power cut sparks anarchy and increasing desperation in the nearby town. FA Cup Football: Shrewsbury Town v West Ham United BBC One, 1.40pm More potential giant-killing in the FA Cup, as League One side Shrewsbury Town try to cut down West Ham at Montgomery Waters Meadow. The visitors have won the FA Cup three times but haven’t lifted the trophy since 1980, when they beat Arsenal 1-0, thanks to a goal by Trevor Brooking. Shrewsbury made it through to the third round by beating against Aldershot Town and Morecambe. Premiership Rugby Union: Wasps v Saracens BT Sport 1, 2.30pm Having beaten Bath 31-26 at the Rec last weekend, Wasps look to continue their fine form in the new year at home to second-placed Saracens. The away side will be full of confidence, though: they capped off an impressive 2017 with a 46-31 victory over Worcester Warriors, with Jackson Wray and Nathan Earle both scoring try doubles as Saracens ran in six tries at Allianz Park. When these sides last met here, a hat-trick from Thomas Young helped Wasps to a 35-15 victory. A repeat performance here will see them leapfrog Saracens in the table. Dancing on Ice ITV, 6.00pm Back after a four-year absence, Jayne Torvill and Christopher Dean return with Dancing on Ice, but they are no longer coaches. They are now be assessing the ice-skating abilities of a dozen celebrities, including Bucks Fizz alumna Cheryl Baker and Great British Bake Off 2016 champion Candice Brown. Joe Cocker Night Sky Arts, from 6.45pm One of the finest of all the white blues and soul shouters, Joe Cocker’s gargling, howling delivery was most famously captured in his performance of With a Little Help from My Friends at Woodstock. This double bill begins with the concert film Fire It Up: Live, and Cocker performing in Cologne on his final tour before his death in 2014. John Edginton’s biographical documentary, Mad Dog with Soul, follows at 9.00pm. GT Attenborough and the Sea Dragon BBC One, 8.00pm David Attenborough pursues his lifelong passion of fossilology on Britain’s Jurassic Coast. The 200-million-year-old bones of an Ichthyosaur must be dug out of the Dorset cliffs, analysed and finally recreated using computer technology. Vera ITV, 8.00pm The eighth series of the murder mystery begins with DCI Vera Stanhope (the excellent Brenda Blethyn) investigating how a respected fraud officer came to be incinerated in an abbatoir. Her enquiries lead her into a close-knit fishing community and clashes with her fellow coppers. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm In this extraordinary venture, Dick Strawbridge and a team of fellow enthusiasts attempt to build a model railway to stretch 71 miles from Fort William to Inverness. The project will require viaducts, bridges and even a miniature ferry, all documented over the next five weeks. GT And Now for Something Completely Different (1971) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.00pm; N Ireland, 11.30pm Fans of Monty Python’s Flying Circus rejoice – this compilation film is a feast of the comedians’ favourite sketches from the first two TV series. With John Cleese introducing a number of scenes with: “And now, for something completely different”, it’s a fun trip into the archives, including as the “dead parrot” sketch. Captain Phillips (2013) ★★★★☆ ITV, 10.10pm Paul Greengrass (United 93 and three Bourne films) has a rare gift for working with action-thriller material and making something cohesive, layered and complex from it. With this account of Somali pirates boarding an American cargo ship and kidnapping its captain (Tom Hanks), he remains at the top of his game. Hanks may be the big draw, but it’s the pirates who impress, especially Bafta-winning Barkhad Abdi. Stations of the Cross (2015) ★★★☆☆ BBC Four, 11.00pm This cold, preachy German film from director Dietrich Brüggemann plays out over 14 single-shot scenes, each titled after a station of the cross on Christ’s walk to Calvary and to mirror the restrictions of religious fundamentalism. Its story, about a 14-year-old girl who pursues the ideals of Christian self-sacrifice to terrifying extremes, won the best script gong at the Berlin International Film Festival. Monday 8 January Archie Panjabi Credit: ITV Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Written by Indian Summers creator Paul Rutman and partner Natasha Narayan, this atmospheric six-part thriller has a fine cast and gets off to an instantly intriguing start. Emmy-winner Archie Panjabi is a smart and sympathetic presence as British-Pakistani doctor Mona Harcourt, who, together with her well-connected political lobbyist husband Guy (Jack Davenport) and wider family, is preparing to celebrate the return from Lahore of her beloved brother Kareem (Navin Chowdhry). His failure to arrive as expected on the day a terrorist incident in London results in four deaths, and brings the city to a standstill. It sets in motion a series of terrifying consequences – the most disturbing of which is the sudden intense interest in the family of the anti-terrorism unit of the Metropolitan Police. It is a credible, and in parts distressing, depiction of what it is like to be an ordinary British Muslim in the wake of such an attack, especially when it emerges that the real focus of the police investigation is not Kareem, but his 18-year-old student son Danny (Viveik Kalra) who had been becoming increasingly isolated from the family in the weeks before the attack. Gerard O’Donovan Star Trek: Discovery Netflix, from today Following an eight-week break, the latest incarnation of the Star Trek franchise returns to complete its debut run. The previous episode ended on a twist that saw the USS Discovery cast out into unchartered space. Unsurprisingly, this 10th episode picks up with Captain Lorca (Jason Isaacs) and crew facing a raft of previously unimagined threats in their eventful efforts to find a way home. How to Lose Weight Well Channel 4, 8.00pm Dr Xand van Tulleken and dietician Hala El-Shafie take a new approach to diet testing, dividing a group of volunteers into three categories: crashers (short-term diets), shape shifters (six-week programmes) and life changers (four-month plans) to see which of the current popular diets are most effective. Silent Witness BBC One, 9.00pm The enduringly popular pathologists-playing-cops drama kicks off its 21st series with a typically slow burn two-parter. As Nikki Alexander (Emilia Fox) struggles to get over her Mexican ordeal, a close friend (Emma Fielding) goes missing. Surgeons: At the Edge of Life BBC Two, 9.00pm Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham’s busy surgical unit is the focus of this new series following surgeons, theatre staff and patients through operations at the cutting edge of medicine. In the first edition, maxillofacial surgeons tackle a marathon operation on a 53-year-old diagnosed with a major facial tumour. My Astonishing Self: Gabriel Byrne on George Bernard Shaw BBC Four, 9.00pm An actor’s homage to a playwright becomes a fascinating exploration of the life and work of a literary Titan of the early 20th century.George Bernard Shaw was a pioneering socialist, feminist and philosopher as well as the writer of hugely popular plays such as Pygmalion. Here, Gabriel Byrne assesses the character and legacy of a man whose intelligence, charm and social conscience, and ingenuity for self-promotion, propelled him to global renown. GO The Undateables Channel 4, 9.00pm A fresh crop of singletons looking for love includes a rugby-playing chef from Hull with Tourette’s, a bookseller from Cambridgeshire with Asperger’s, and a photography graduate from London with scoliosis. GO Gallipoli (1981) ★★★★★ Film4, 6.35pm Director Peter Weir’s tale of war and friendship in 1915 – one of his very finest films – reaches a devastating finale in the clash between Australians and Turks on the shore of the Dardanelles. Mel Gibson’s race through the trenches with a crucial message – ignore the last order! – is more pulse-quickening than a dozen Bravehearts. You pray for him to beat that whistle every time. Harold Hopkins also stars. Life of Pi (2012) ★★★★★ E4, 8.00pm Ang Lee’s warm, wise and wondrous adventure story, adapted from Yann Martel’s 2002 Booker Prize-winning novel, follows Pi (Suraj Sharma), shipwrecked in the South Pacific with Richard Parker, a Bengal tiger named after the hunter who captured him. Its kaleidoscopic imagery is some of the most advanced ever, but the story unfolds with such simplicity and clarity that it could almost be a silent movie. Logan (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Hugh Jackman’s third – and best – lone outing for his whiskery mutant Wolverine. You might assume James Mangold’s film, set in the near future, where a weary Logan meets a young mutant much like himself, is meant as a sequel to the two other Wolverine movies, but watching it, you’re struck by the thought that this paranoid, violent noir western is the real, shotgun-toting deal. Tuesday 9 January Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman Credit: AFP House of Saud: A Family at War BBC Two, 9.00pm This detailed three-part series on the ruling family of Saudi Arabia makes for unmissable if terrifying television. Dispensing with any sort of Adam Curtis-style frills, the opening film simply talks us through the House of Saud’s involvement in recent history, from Sarajevo to Syria. Hearing from intelligence analysts and long-time Saudi observers, it builds a complicated picture of the uneasy relationship between the Saudi royal family and Wahhabism, the particular strain of Islam they promote. It’s a story that encompasses a small hamlet in Bosnia, a family home in India, weapons dealt from Bulgaria to Afghanistan and online films watched all over the world. Much is made of the new Crown Prince, Mohammed bin Salman, and his desire for reform (“It’s not a question of how important he is to this – he is this,” announces one observer) but it remains hard to judge just how much of his actions are driven by genuine belief and how much constitute a power grab. Ultimately what lingers is not the political revelations, interesting though they are, but the interviews with the blinded of Syria, the wounded of Iraq, the devastated of Bosnia: the countless casualties of the geopolitical game. Sarah Hughes England’s Forgotten Queen: The Life and Death of Lady Jane Grey BBC Four, 9.00pm Tudor England might seem like a subject that has been covered so much that there is nothing new to be said about it. But hold on to those gripes because Helen Castor’s detailed look at the nine-day reign of Lady Jane Grey is an invigorating, intelligent take on the period. Using a wide range of old documents and interesting voices, Castor guides us through Jane’s brief, unlucky life, examining how she ended up as a pawn between two powerful factions and why it was that she found herself raised from relative obscurity to the dizzying heights of the English throne. School for Stammerers ITV, 9.00pm Speech impediments can be devastating to live with, as this thoughtful film, which follows six people living with a stammer, demonstrates. One solution on offer is the intensive McGuire Programme, a residential course that promises life-changing results albeit under tough conditions. 24 Hours in A&E Channel 4, 9.00pm The fly-on-the-wall medical series continues with this week’s patients including Marie, who arrives by ambulance at St George’s Hospital having collapsed at home with an unexplained headache. The Blacklist Sky One, 9.00pm The ludicrous and yet strangely enjoyable US spy series continues with James Spader’s slick Red this week setting his sights on wealthy art thief Greyson Blaise (Owain Yeoman). While Red gallivants abroad Tom (Ryan Eggold) seeks help to identify the bones in the suitcase. SH Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm This melancholy tale in the excellent comedy anthology is of rivalry and friendship lost. Reece Shearsmith is Tommy, who grumpily agrees to perform with former stand-up partner Len (Steve Pemberton), 30 years after they split in mysterious circumstances. Working Class White Men Channel 4, 10.00pm Rapper Professor Green has been quietly making a name for himself as a film-maker and this fascinating film about white working-class men is one of the week’s highlights. Green’s tense meeting with Britain First will garner the headlines but there is hope here too, with Lewis, the teenage would-be mathematician, the show’s highlight. SH The Fault in Our Stars (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Josh Boone’s film, adapted from the phenomenally successful young-adult novel, about two American teenagers both diagnosed with cancer is wisely observed and tenderly performed, most notably by Shailene Woodley. The basic storyline is so worn it’s close to threadbare – Love Story told it more than 40 years ago – but it comes with enough quirks to give it the appearance of freshness. The Lincoln Lawyer (2011) ★★★☆☆ More4, 9.00pm He won acclaim for his role as enigmatic detective Rust Cohle in the TV series True Detective, but Oscar winner Matthew McConaughey stars here in the sort of courtroom drama for which he made his name. This time he’s Mick Haller, a slick LA defence lawyer who prefers to represent the guilty. However, a wealthy new client (Ryan Phillippe) prompts Haller to address his own past sins. Billy Liar (1963, b/w) ★★★☆☆ London Live, 12.00midnight Best known for Midnight Cowboy, for which he won three Oscars, John Schlesinger ranged from violent thrillers (Marathon Man) to romantic epics (Far from the Madding Crowd) to perceptive human studies (An Englishman Abroad), but he indicated the breadth of his ambitions with this gritty social drama featuring Tom Courtenay as an undertaker’s clerk with extravagant fantasies. Wednesday 10 January Sarah Lancashire Credit: Channel 4 Kiri Channel 4, 9.00pm Screenwriter Jack Thorne follows up the excellent National Treasure with another superbly cast, nimble and dark exploration of contemporary mores. Thorne’s careful research is all over this opening episode of four, yet it never feels didactic or clumsy. Kiri follows the investigation into the abduction of the titular black girl Kiri Akindele (Felicia Mukasa) by her birth family, just days before she is due to be adopted by her white foster family, headed up by Lia Williams and Steven Mackintosh. Sarah Lancashire plays Miriam Grayson, the social worker who allows Kiri’s ill-fated unsupervised visit. Lancashire picks her projects carefully, and this is a performance to rank alongside her Bafta-winning turn in Happy Valley: Miriam is an imperfect Samaritan, trying her best amid funding cuts, weak superiors and a dormant drink problem. From the moment that the girl disappears and director Euros Lyn’s colour palette darkens, the focus seems to be as much on apportioning blame as finding the missing girl. It’s a desperate situation shot through with guilt and human frailty, yet not without humour; another modern tragedy from a writer who specialises in them. Gabriel Tate The Truth About Looking Good BBC One, 8.00pm Cherry Healey and 25 volunteers and experts from the Universities of Sheffield and Sunderland join forces to separate scientific fact from marketing fiction in the £9 billion per annum industry of cosmetics, in particular weighing up the pros and cons of moisturisers and cellulite solutions. Britain’s Brightest Family ITV, 8.00pm Anne Hegerty – familiar as The Chase’s Governess – oversees a new quiz show in which family members must show off their own general knowledge and nominate relatives according to their perceived areas of expertise. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This fascinating series finds fashion historian Amber Butchart displaying a variety of eye-catching headgear to scrutinise Jan van Eyck’s The Arnolfini Portrait for clues about its subjects and the 15th-century world that they inhabited. Couturier Ninya Mikhaila, meanwhile, recreates the green gown worn by the painting’s pregnant woman. Miriam’s Big American Adventure BBC One, 9.00pm; Scotland, 10.45pm Miriam Margolyes hits Middle America, where she encounters young Indiana summer campers pledging their allegiance, slightly older drug casualties in Ohio and survivalists of all ages in Tennessee. Fighting for Air BBC Two, 9.00pm Campaigning doctor and inescapable TV face Xand van Tulleken examines the grim effects of air pollution on the body, before travelling to Birmingham to bring clean air to one high street using a combination of technological expertise and community goodwill. GT England’s Forgotten Queen: The Life and Death of Lady Jane Grey BBC Four, 9.00pm While dedicating three hours to just nine days of British history might seem like overkill, here it almost feels inadequate, such is the wealth of incident and intrigue in Dr Helen Castor’s series. This middle episode follows the five days that determined whether or not Lady Jane would survive on the throne. The reconstructions are decent and the CGI sparingly used; instead, Castor lets the experts do the talking in an engaging piece of narrative history, concluding tomorrow. GT Tunes of Glory (1960) ★★★☆☆ Movies4Men, 4.00pm British director Ronald Neame made some of the best-known films of the 20th century, including The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie and The Poseidon Adventure, but this was his personal favourite. It focuses on personal rivalries within a fictional Highland regiment after the Second World War. John Mills plays a new, authoritarian CO, and Alec Guinness – cast against type – gives an exceptional performance as his lax, hard-drinking predecessor. JFK (1991) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.55pm Oliver Stone is in conspiracy-theorist mode for this film about the murder of President John F Kennedy. Whatever you make of Stone’s theory that the assassination was an FBI plot, lawyer Jim Garrison’s (Kevin Costner) showdown moment when he demonstrates that JFK was killed by multiple bullets is jaw-dropping. Costner, fresh from the Oscars glory of Dances with Wolves, is a magnetic lead. The Social Network (2010) ★★★★★ Channel 4, 1.10am Jesse Eisenberg is superb as the gauche cyber-geek who became a billionaire in his twenties in this dazzling dramatisation of the story of Facebook. It may necessarily be speculative in parts about Mark Zuckerberg and his invention, but this is a brilliantly scripted and absolutely gripping tale of clashing egos, precocious talent and betrayal. Justin Timberlake and Andrew Garfield also star. Thursday 11 January Cheetahs in Namibia Credit: BBC Big Cats BBC One, 8.00pm One family, 40 different faces. That’s how this beautifully shot three-part series about the planet’s top wild predator, the cat, begins – with a kaleidoscope of feline faces that perfectly illustrates the huge variety and essential similarity between the many different branches of the family. Not all of them are big. One, the rusty-spotted cat – a kittenish, ultra-rare inhabitant of Sri Lanka’s jungles – is so tiny when fully grown that it can fit in the palm of your hand. Although it makes up for its small stature with surprising ferocity. The series took two years and 30 separate filming expeditions to make, travelling to all four corners of the globe to show just how adaptable wild cats have evolved to be. In this opening edition we see not only relatively familiar sights such as cheetahs and lions chasing down water buffalo and giraffe in Africa, but also some rarities, such as a snow leopard searching the Himalayas for a mate. Plus, Siberian tigers and the elusive Canada lynx make appearances. There are surprises, too, in footage of jaguars taking on caiman in the waters of the Pantanal, and pumas hunting penguin on the freezing southern shores of Patagonia. Gerard O’Donovan European Tour Golf: The BMW SA Open Sky Sports Main Event, 8.00am Action from the opening day’s play at the City of Ekurhuleni in Gauteng, South Africa, where Graeme Storm was the winner last year. Having very nearly lost his tour card in 2016, the Englishman defeated Northern Irish star Rory McIlroy in a play-off to win his second title on the tour and his first since the 2007 Open de France. EastEnders BBC One, 7.30pm Mel Owen (Tamzin Outhwaite) returns to Albert Square after a 16-year absence. Last time around she married twice, burnt down a nightclub, was kidnapped and slept with her best friend’s husband. So the producers’ promise of an “incredible” storyline for her comeback is probably, uh, credible. The Cruise: Return to the Mediterranean ITV, 8.30pm More stories of life on the cruise ship Royal Princess. Tonight, with 5,000 passengers and crew aboard, bad weather prevents the cruise ship from docking. England’s Forgotten Queen: The Life and Death of Lady Jane Grey BBC Four, 9.00pm The concluding part of Helen Castor’s fascinating account of England’s “nine-day queen” opens on the eighth day of her reign, with armies heading for Framlingham Castle where her Catholic rival for the throne, Mary Tudor, had assembled a powerful force. Within a day, 16-year-old Jane would be betrayed, abandoned and consigned to the Tower of London. But her legacy, according to Castor, was far greater than her brief time on the throne suggests. Transformation Street ITV, 9.00pm Wimpole Street, Marylebone, is home to the London Transgender Surgery, a private clinic catering for some of the estimated 130,000 Britons currently wishing to change gender. This revealing three-parter follows patients from initial consultations through to gender confirmation surgery. Walks with My Dog More4, 9.00pm The simple but engaging series in which celebrities take their four-legged friends for a trek through the UK’s more scenic parts makes a welcome return. This time Hadrian’s Wall, Norfolk and the Welsh mountains are among the destinations. Actress Caroline Quentin leads off tonight, taking her pooch for a stroll around the Helford estuary in Cornwall. GO Great Art ITV, 10.45pm In this second episode of the art series, Tim Marlow moves on to the 19th-century Parisian art collector Paul Durand-Ruel, whose financially risky landmark 1886 exhibition in New York thrust impressionism into the mainstream. Marlow examines his impact, and the lasting influence of Monet, Cézanne, Degas and Renoir. GO From Russia with Love (1963) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Ah, those were the days: the certainties of the Cold War, a beautiful Soviet defector and a chase across the Balkans. Will Spectre avenge the death of Dr No? No chance. Sean Connery was in the swing of things in his second outing as James Bond, pursued by two of 007’s best adversaries, in “Red” Grant (Robert Shaw) and Rosa Klebb (Lotte Lenya). Terence Young directs. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.15pm This superb adaptation of John le Carré’s brilliant, intricate Cold War spy novel is a triumph. The espionage drama follows the hunt for a Soviet double agent at the top of the British secret service, with Gary Oldman spearheading the excellent ensemble cast, which includes Colin Firth, Tom Hardy, John Hurt and Benedict Cumberbatch. It’s funny, seductive and suspenseful. GoodFellas (1990) ★★★★★ ITV4, 11.25pm Martin Scorsese’s Mafia masterpiece, adapted from a non-fiction book, has all the qualities of great cinema: it’s thrilling, it’s provocative, it’s stylish, and it’s got a young Robert De Niro in it. Ray Liotta plays the youngster who longs to be a gangster; De Niro and Joe Pesci are in the Mob. Pesci’s mother, meanwhile, reportedly asked him if he had to swear quite so much – the f-word is used 300 times. Friday 12 January Revd Matthew Stafford, Revd Nicholas Lowton, Fr Matthew Cashmore and Revd Ruth Hulse Credit: BBC A Vicar’s Life BBC Two, 8.30pm This amiable new series follows several vicars in their parishes in the Diocese of Hereford, the most rural in the Church of England. It’s the standard heart-warming mixture of births, marriages and deaths – or as likeable Reverend Matthew Stafford, vicar at the village of Much Wenlock, says: “hatched, matched and dispatched” – but, for all that sense of familiarity, it’s well-made and very engaging. This opening episode sees Matthew officiate at a lovely local wedding, and Reverend Nicholas Lowton, the Rural Dean of Abbeydore and Vicar of the Black Mountains Group, deal with the theft of the parish registry books (“whoever did this has got lessons that they need to learn”). Elsewhere, Reverend Ruth Hulse, Team Vicar for West Hereford, organises a funeral for much-loved former churchwarden Barbara. “It’s a huge loss, like losing a member of your own family,” she says. Everyone involved comes out of it well, and Matthew manages to sneak a message in amid the jokes: “I don’t take myself seriously, but I do take God and what I do very seriously,” he notes. So do his parishioners, many of whom admit that he’s helped them see the church in a more favourable light. Sarah Hughes PGA Tour Golf: The Sony Open Sky Sports Main Event, 12.01am The opening day of the tournament at the Waialae CC in Honolulu, Hawaii, where Justin Thomas won the title last year. Room 101 BBC One, 8.30pm Frank Skinner returns with a new series of the long-running show. This opener promises to be a lot of fun given that his guests, Charlie Brooker, Scarlett Moffatt and Pearl Mackie, are not short of opinion. Among the objects up for inclusion in Room 101 are crocodiles, mosquitos and haircuts. Rome Unpacked BBC Two, 9.00pm The second part of this food and art travelogue sees chef Giorgio Locatelli and art critic Andrew Graham-Dixon visit the Basilica di San Clemente, the Testaccio Slaughterhouse and the Palazzo Colonna. As before, a great deal of the fun comes from the way that each man learns from the other. David Bowie Evening BBC Four, from 9.00pm Two years after David Bowie’s death, BBC Four dedicates an evening to the rock great. First up is Francis Whately’s 2013 film David Bowie: Five Years in the Making of an Icon, which looks at key moments in his career. These include his time as Ziggy Stardust, his reinvention as the Thin White Duke, the making of 1977’s Heroes, and the global success of Let’s Dance. It’s followed by David Bowie and the Story of Ziggy Stardust, which looks at how Bowie created his most (in)famous alter ego. Lethal Weapon ITV, 9.00pm The rambunctious remake of the Danny Glover-Mel Gibson films roars back for a second series. It begins with an action-packed episode that sees Murtaugh (Damon Wayans) heading to Mexico to try to reign in partner Riggs (Clayne Crawford) who is still seeking vengeance for his wife’s death. Delicious Sky One, 9.00pm The second series of the foodie drama reaches its penultimate episode, and it’s the anniversary of philanderer Leo’s death, which the families plan to mark with a feast. Naturally, nothing goes smoothly – chef Gina (Dawn French) is pushed to the limits by her daughter Theresa’s (Tanya Reynolds) behaviour, while Gina’s love rival turned business partner Sam (Emilia Fox) takes out her anger on chef Adam (Aaron Anthony). SH The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm Expect a super-smooth evening as Graham Norton is joined by A-listers Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks, who discuss Steven Spielberg’s political drama The Post, but also share some good anecdotes amid all the mild ribbing. SH The Polka King (2017) Netflix, from today Exuberant Jack Black plays to his strengths in this biopic, based on the documentary The Man Who Would Be Polka King, about a flamboyant Polish émigré-turned-Polka King-turned-convicted Ponzi-scheme criminal. Despite being a film about a scoundrel who swindled senior citizens out of millions of dollars in order to achieve the American dream, it’s surprisingly entertaining, though a more serious consideration of con artists wouldn’t have gone amiss. The Frogmen (1951, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 4.35pm A pleasingly understated yet atmospheric war drama in which Richard Widmark stars as a tough Navy commander put in charge of a team of demolition divers on a South Pacific island. At first, the arrival of their superior goes down like a lead diving suit, but he soon wins them over by neutralising an undetonated torpedo. Due to the conditions being deemed too “riotous”, the female roles were written out. Get Out (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Get Out is one of the first films expressly to be set in a post-Obama era and is a breathlessly suspenseful exposé of the horror of liberal racism. Perfect, white Rose Armitage (Allison Williams) wants to allay the concerns of her boyfriend, black photographer Chris (Daniel Kaluuya), and invites him to meet her parents. They don’t bat an eyelid over his skin colour, but the film rattles with provocations. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
Sunday 7 January Michael Palin: a Life on Screen BBC Two, 9.00pm Telling Michael Palin’s story from his birth to the film Death of Stalin (in which he played Minister Molotov), this profile of the “Nicest Man in Showbiz” is a pleasure from start to finish. First realising his talents in improvised shows for his school friends, Palin found kindred spirits and his comic mojo as part of the Oxford Revue at the Edinburgh Festival, eventually parlaying his skills as a jobbing writer and performer into a series that changed the comedy landscape forever: Monty Python’s Flying Circus was born after an apparently disastrous meeting ended with a BBC commissioner pronouncing sternly, “all right, I’ll give you 13 episodes. But that’s all!” While John Cleese provides the tongue-in-cheek venom (describing Palin as “a sociopath”), Connie Booth, David Jason and Armando Iannucci pay tribute to a versatile talent. An abundance of clips confirm that alongside the comic genius of Python and Ripping Yarns lay a serious actor of genuine heft (as seen in GBH and Brazil), the gifted travel journalist of Around the World in 80 Days and a successful and engaging diarist. Palin, too, chips in with observations and memories, all delivered with charismatic humility and self-deprecation. Gabriel Tate Into the Forest BBC Three, from 10.00am This uneven but intriguing Canadian indie film didn’t find much of an audience when it was released in 2015 but will be now shown online via BBC Three. Evan Rachel Wood (Westworld) and Ellen Page (Juno) star in this dystopian drama as Nell and Eva, two sisters living in a forest with their father in the near future. They find their isolated existence under threat when a district-wide power cut sparks anarchy and increasing desperation in the nearby town. FA Cup Football: Shrewsbury Town v West Ham United BBC One, 1.40pm More potential giant-killing in the FA Cup, as League One side Shrewsbury Town try to cut down West Ham at Montgomery Waters Meadow. The visitors have won the FA Cup three times but haven’t lifted the trophy since 1980, when they beat Arsenal 1-0, thanks to a goal by Trevor Brooking. Shrewsbury made it through to the third round by beating against Aldershot Town and Morecambe. Premiership Rugby Union: Wasps v Saracens BT Sport 1, 2.30pm Having beaten Bath 31-26 at the Rec last weekend, Wasps look to continue their fine form in the new year at home to second-placed Saracens. The away side will be full of confidence, though: they capped off an impressive 2017 with a 46-31 victory over Worcester Warriors, with Jackson Wray and Nathan Earle both scoring try doubles as Saracens ran in six tries at Allianz Park. When these sides last met here, a hat-trick from Thomas Young helped Wasps to a 35-15 victory. A repeat performance here will see them leapfrog Saracens in the table. Dancing on Ice ITV, 6.00pm Back after a four-year absence, Jayne Torvill and Christopher Dean return with Dancing on Ice, but they are no longer coaches. They are now be assessing the ice-skating abilities of a dozen celebrities, including Bucks Fizz alumna Cheryl Baker and Great British Bake Off 2016 champion Candice Brown. Joe Cocker Night Sky Arts, from 6.45pm One of the finest of all the white blues and soul shouters, Joe Cocker’s gargling, howling delivery was most famously captured in his performance of With a Little Help from My Friends at Woodstock. This double bill begins with the concert film Fire It Up: Live, and Cocker performing in Cologne on his final tour before his death in 2014. John Edginton’s biographical documentary, Mad Dog with Soul, follows at 9.00pm. GT Attenborough and the Sea Dragon BBC One, 8.00pm David Attenborough pursues his lifelong passion of fossilology on Britain’s Jurassic Coast. The 200-million-year-old bones of an Ichthyosaur must be dug out of the Dorset cliffs, analysed and finally recreated using computer technology. Vera ITV, 8.00pm The eighth series of the murder mystery begins with DCI Vera Stanhope (the excellent Brenda Blethyn) investigating how a respected fraud officer came to be incinerated in an abbatoir. Her enquiries lead her into a close-knit fishing community and clashes with her fellow coppers. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm In this extraordinary venture, Dick Strawbridge and a team of fellow enthusiasts attempt to build a model railway to stretch 71 miles from Fort William to Inverness. The project will require viaducts, bridges and even a miniature ferry, all documented over the next five weeks. GT And Now for Something Completely Different (1971) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.00pm; N Ireland, 11.30pm Fans of Monty Python’s Flying Circus rejoice – this compilation film is a feast of the comedians’ favourite sketches from the first two TV series. With John Cleese introducing a number of scenes with: “And now, for something completely different”, it’s a fun trip into the archives, including as the “dead parrot” sketch. Captain Phillips (2013) ★★★★☆ ITV, 10.10pm Paul Greengrass (United 93 and three Bourne films) has a rare gift for working with action-thriller material and making something cohesive, layered and complex from it. With this account of Somali pirates boarding an American cargo ship and kidnapping its captain (Tom Hanks), he remains at the top of his game. Hanks may be the big draw, but it’s the pirates who impress, especially Bafta-winning Barkhad Abdi. Stations of the Cross (2015) ★★★☆☆ BBC Four, 11.00pm This cold, preachy German film from director Dietrich Brüggemann plays out over 14 single-shot scenes, each titled after a station of the cross on Christ’s walk to Calvary and to mirror the restrictions of religious fundamentalism. Its story, about a 14-year-old girl who pursues the ideals of Christian self-sacrifice to terrifying extremes, won the best script gong at the Berlin International Film Festival. Monday 8 January Archie Panjabi Credit: ITV Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Written by Indian Summers creator Paul Rutman and partner Natasha Narayan, this atmospheric six-part thriller has a fine cast and gets off to an instantly intriguing start. Emmy-winner Archie Panjabi is a smart and sympathetic presence as British-Pakistani doctor Mona Harcourt, who, together with her well-connected political lobbyist husband Guy (Jack Davenport) and wider family, is preparing to celebrate the return from Lahore of her beloved brother Kareem (Navin Chowdhry). His failure to arrive as expected on the day a terrorist incident in London results in four deaths, and brings the city to a standstill. It sets in motion a series of terrifying consequences – the most disturbing of which is the sudden intense interest in the family of the anti-terrorism unit of the Metropolitan Police. It is a credible, and in parts distressing, depiction of what it is like to be an ordinary British Muslim in the wake of such an attack, especially when it emerges that the real focus of the police investigation is not Kareem, but his 18-year-old student son Danny (Viveik Kalra) who had been becoming increasingly isolated from the family in the weeks before the attack. Gerard O’Donovan Star Trek: Discovery Netflix, from today Following an eight-week break, the latest incarnation of the Star Trek franchise returns to complete its debut run. The previous episode ended on a twist that saw the USS Discovery cast out into unchartered space. Unsurprisingly, this 10th episode picks up with Captain Lorca (Jason Isaacs) and crew facing a raft of previously unimagined threats in their eventful efforts to find a way home. How to Lose Weight Well Channel 4, 8.00pm Dr Xand van Tulleken and dietician Hala El-Shafie take a new approach to diet testing, dividing a group of volunteers into three categories: crashers (short-term diets), shape shifters (six-week programmes) and life changers (four-month plans) to see which of the current popular diets are most effective. Silent Witness BBC One, 9.00pm The enduringly popular pathologists-playing-cops drama kicks off its 21st series with a typically slow burn two-parter. As Nikki Alexander (Emilia Fox) struggles to get over her Mexican ordeal, a close friend (Emma Fielding) goes missing. Surgeons: At the Edge of Life BBC Two, 9.00pm Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham’s busy surgical unit is the focus of this new series following surgeons, theatre staff and patients through operations at the cutting edge of medicine. In the first edition, maxillofacial surgeons tackle a marathon operation on a 53-year-old diagnosed with a major facial tumour. My Astonishing Self: Gabriel Byrne on George Bernard Shaw BBC Four, 9.00pm An actor’s homage to a playwright becomes a fascinating exploration of the life and work of a literary Titan of the early 20th century.George Bernard Shaw was a pioneering socialist, feminist and philosopher as well as the writer of hugely popular plays such as Pygmalion. Here, Gabriel Byrne assesses the character and legacy of a man whose intelligence, charm and social conscience, and ingenuity for self-promotion, propelled him to global renown. GO The Undateables Channel 4, 9.00pm A fresh crop of singletons looking for love includes a rugby-playing chef from Hull with Tourette’s, a bookseller from Cambridgeshire with Asperger’s, and a photography graduate from London with scoliosis. GO Gallipoli (1981) ★★★★★ Film4, 6.35pm Director Peter Weir’s tale of war and friendship in 1915 – one of his very finest films – reaches a devastating finale in the clash between Australians and Turks on the shore of the Dardanelles. Mel Gibson’s race through the trenches with a crucial message – ignore the last order! – is more pulse-quickening than a dozen Bravehearts. You pray for him to beat that whistle every time. Harold Hopkins also stars. Life of Pi (2012) ★★★★★ E4, 8.00pm Ang Lee’s warm, wise and wondrous adventure story, adapted from Yann Martel’s 2002 Booker Prize-winning novel, follows Pi (Suraj Sharma), shipwrecked in the South Pacific with Richard Parker, a Bengal tiger named after the hunter who captured him. Its kaleidoscopic imagery is some of the most advanced ever, but the story unfolds with such simplicity and clarity that it could almost be a silent movie. Logan (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Hugh Jackman’s third – and best – lone outing for his whiskery mutant Wolverine. You might assume James Mangold’s film, set in the near future, where a weary Logan meets a young mutant much like himself, is meant as a sequel to the two other Wolverine movies, but watching it, you’re struck by the thought that this paranoid, violent noir western is the real, shotgun-toting deal. Tuesday 9 January Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman Credit: AFP House of Saud: A Family at War BBC Two, 9.00pm This detailed three-part series on the ruling family of Saudi Arabia makes for unmissable if terrifying television. Dispensing with any sort of Adam Curtis-style frills, the opening film simply talks us through the House of Saud’s involvement in recent history, from Sarajevo to Syria. Hearing from intelligence analysts and long-time Saudi observers, it builds a complicated picture of the uneasy relationship between the Saudi royal family and Wahhabism, the particular strain of Islam they promote. It’s a story that encompasses a small hamlet in Bosnia, a family home in India, weapons dealt from Bulgaria to Afghanistan and online films watched all over the world. Much is made of the new Crown Prince, Mohammed bin Salman, and his desire for reform (“It’s not a question of how important he is to this – he is this,” announces one observer) but it remains hard to judge just how much of his actions are driven by genuine belief and how much constitute a power grab. Ultimately what lingers is not the political revelations, interesting though they are, but the interviews with the blinded of Syria, the wounded of Iraq, the devastated of Bosnia: the countless casualties of the geopolitical game. Sarah Hughes England’s Forgotten Queen: The Life and Death of Lady Jane Grey BBC Four, 9.00pm Tudor England might seem like a subject that has been covered so much that there is nothing new to be said about it. But hold on to those gripes because Helen Castor’s detailed look at the nine-day reign of Lady Jane Grey is an invigorating, intelligent take on the period. Using a wide range of old documents and interesting voices, Castor guides us through Jane’s brief, unlucky life, examining how she ended up as a pawn between two powerful factions and why it was that she found herself raised from relative obscurity to the dizzying heights of the English throne. School for Stammerers ITV, 9.00pm Speech impediments can be devastating to live with, as this thoughtful film, which follows six people living with a stammer, demonstrates. One solution on offer is the intensive McGuire Programme, a residential course that promises life-changing results albeit under tough conditions. 24 Hours in A&E Channel 4, 9.00pm The fly-on-the-wall medical series continues with this week’s patients including Marie, who arrives by ambulance at St George’s Hospital having collapsed at home with an unexplained headache. The Blacklist Sky One, 9.00pm The ludicrous and yet strangely enjoyable US spy series continues with James Spader’s slick Red this week setting his sights on wealthy art thief Greyson Blaise (Owain Yeoman). While Red gallivants abroad Tom (Ryan Eggold) seeks help to identify the bones in the suitcase. SH Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm This melancholy tale in the excellent comedy anthology is of rivalry and friendship lost. Reece Shearsmith is Tommy, who grumpily agrees to perform with former stand-up partner Len (Steve Pemberton), 30 years after they split in mysterious circumstances. Working Class White Men Channel 4, 10.00pm Rapper Professor Green has been quietly making a name for himself as a film-maker and this fascinating film about white working-class men is one of the week’s highlights. Green’s tense meeting with Britain First will garner the headlines but there is hope here too, with Lewis, the teenage would-be mathematician, the show’s highlight. SH The Fault in Our Stars (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Josh Boone’s film, adapted from the phenomenally successful young-adult novel, about two American teenagers both diagnosed with cancer is wisely observed and tenderly performed, most notably by Shailene Woodley. The basic storyline is so worn it’s close to threadbare – Love Story told it more than 40 years ago – but it comes with enough quirks to give it the appearance of freshness. The Lincoln Lawyer (2011) ★★★☆☆ More4, 9.00pm He won acclaim for his role as enigmatic detective Rust Cohle in the TV series True Detective, but Oscar winner Matthew McConaughey stars here in the sort of courtroom drama for which he made his name. This time he’s Mick Haller, a slick LA defence lawyer who prefers to represent the guilty. However, a wealthy new client (Ryan Phillippe) prompts Haller to address his own past sins. Billy Liar (1963, b/w) ★★★☆☆ London Live, 12.00midnight Best known for Midnight Cowboy, for which he won three Oscars, John Schlesinger ranged from violent thrillers (Marathon Man) to romantic epics (Far from the Madding Crowd) to perceptive human studies (An Englishman Abroad), but he indicated the breadth of his ambitions with this gritty social drama featuring Tom Courtenay as an undertaker’s clerk with extravagant fantasies. Wednesday 10 January Sarah Lancashire Credit: Channel 4 Kiri Channel 4, 9.00pm Screenwriter Jack Thorne follows up the excellent National Treasure with another superbly cast, nimble and dark exploration of contemporary mores. Thorne’s careful research is all over this opening episode of four, yet it never feels didactic or clumsy. Kiri follows the investigation into the abduction of the titular black girl Kiri Akindele (Felicia Mukasa) by her birth family, just days before she is due to be adopted by her white foster family, headed up by Lia Williams and Steven Mackintosh. Sarah Lancashire plays Miriam Grayson, the social worker who allows Kiri’s ill-fated unsupervised visit. Lancashire picks her projects carefully, and this is a performance to rank alongside her Bafta-winning turn in Happy Valley: Miriam is an imperfect Samaritan, trying her best amid funding cuts, weak superiors and a dormant drink problem. From the moment that the girl disappears and director Euros Lyn’s colour palette darkens, the focus seems to be as much on apportioning blame as finding the missing girl. It’s a desperate situation shot through with guilt and human frailty, yet not without humour; another modern tragedy from a writer who specialises in them. Gabriel Tate The Truth About Looking Good BBC One, 8.00pm Cherry Healey and 25 volunteers and experts from the Universities of Sheffield and Sunderland join forces to separate scientific fact from marketing fiction in the £9 billion per annum industry of cosmetics, in particular weighing up the pros and cons of moisturisers and cellulite solutions. Britain’s Brightest Family ITV, 8.00pm Anne Hegerty – familiar as The Chase’s Governess – oversees a new quiz show in which family members must show off their own general knowledge and nominate relatives according to their perceived areas of expertise. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This fascinating series finds fashion historian Amber Butchart displaying a variety of eye-catching headgear to scrutinise Jan van Eyck’s The Arnolfini Portrait for clues about its subjects and the 15th-century world that they inhabited. Couturier Ninya Mikhaila, meanwhile, recreates the green gown worn by the painting’s pregnant woman. Miriam’s Big American Adventure BBC One, 9.00pm; Scotland, 10.45pm Miriam Margolyes hits Middle America, where she encounters young Indiana summer campers pledging their allegiance, slightly older drug casualties in Ohio and survivalists of all ages in Tennessee. Fighting for Air BBC Two, 9.00pm Campaigning doctor and inescapable TV face Xand van Tulleken examines the grim effects of air pollution on the body, before travelling to Birmingham to bring clean air to one high street using a combination of technological expertise and community goodwill. GT England’s Forgotten Queen: The Life and Death of Lady Jane Grey BBC Four, 9.00pm While dedicating three hours to just nine days of British history might seem like overkill, here it almost feels inadequate, such is the wealth of incident and intrigue in Dr Helen Castor’s series. This middle episode follows the five days that determined whether or not Lady Jane would survive on the throne. The reconstructions are decent and the CGI sparingly used; instead, Castor lets the experts do the talking in an engaging piece of narrative history, concluding tomorrow. GT Tunes of Glory (1960) ★★★☆☆ Movies4Men, 4.00pm British director Ronald Neame made some of the best-known films of the 20th century, including The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie and The Poseidon Adventure, but this was his personal favourite. It focuses on personal rivalries within a fictional Highland regiment after the Second World War. John Mills plays a new, authoritarian CO, and Alec Guinness – cast against type – gives an exceptional performance as his lax, hard-drinking predecessor. JFK (1991) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.55pm Oliver Stone is in conspiracy-theorist mode for this film about the murder of President John F Kennedy. Whatever you make of Stone’s theory that the assassination was an FBI plot, lawyer Jim Garrison’s (Kevin Costner) showdown moment when he demonstrates that JFK was killed by multiple bullets is jaw-dropping. Costner, fresh from the Oscars glory of Dances with Wolves, is a magnetic lead. The Social Network (2010) ★★★★★ Channel 4, 1.10am Jesse Eisenberg is superb as the gauche cyber-geek who became a billionaire in his twenties in this dazzling dramatisation of the story of Facebook. It may necessarily be speculative in parts about Mark Zuckerberg and his invention, but this is a brilliantly scripted and absolutely gripping tale of clashing egos, precocious talent and betrayal. Justin Timberlake and Andrew Garfield also star. Thursday 11 January Cheetahs in Namibia Credit: BBC Big Cats BBC One, 8.00pm One family, 40 different faces. That’s how this beautifully shot three-part series about the planet’s top wild predator, the cat, begins – with a kaleidoscope of feline faces that perfectly illustrates the huge variety and essential similarity between the many different branches of the family. Not all of them are big. One, the rusty-spotted cat – a kittenish, ultra-rare inhabitant of Sri Lanka’s jungles – is so tiny when fully grown that it can fit in the palm of your hand. Although it makes up for its small stature with surprising ferocity. The series took two years and 30 separate filming expeditions to make, travelling to all four corners of the globe to show just how adaptable wild cats have evolved to be. In this opening edition we see not only relatively familiar sights such as cheetahs and lions chasing down water buffalo and giraffe in Africa, but also some rarities, such as a snow leopard searching the Himalayas for a mate. Plus, Siberian tigers and the elusive Canada lynx make appearances. There are surprises, too, in footage of jaguars taking on caiman in the waters of the Pantanal, and pumas hunting penguin on the freezing southern shores of Patagonia. Gerard O’Donovan European Tour Golf: The BMW SA Open Sky Sports Main Event, 8.00am Action from the opening day’s play at the City of Ekurhuleni in Gauteng, South Africa, where Graeme Storm was the winner last year. Having very nearly lost his tour card in 2016, the Englishman defeated Northern Irish star Rory McIlroy in a play-off to win his second title on the tour and his first since the 2007 Open de France. EastEnders BBC One, 7.30pm Mel Owen (Tamzin Outhwaite) returns to Albert Square after a 16-year absence. Last time around she married twice, burnt down a nightclub, was kidnapped and slept with her best friend’s husband. So the producers’ promise of an “incredible” storyline for her comeback is probably, uh, credible. The Cruise: Return to the Mediterranean ITV, 8.30pm More stories of life on the cruise ship Royal Princess. Tonight, with 5,000 passengers and crew aboard, bad weather prevents the cruise ship from docking. England’s Forgotten Queen: The Life and Death of Lady Jane Grey BBC Four, 9.00pm The concluding part of Helen Castor’s fascinating account of England’s “nine-day queen” opens on the eighth day of her reign, with armies heading for Framlingham Castle where her Catholic rival for the throne, Mary Tudor, had assembled a powerful force. Within a day, 16-year-old Jane would be betrayed, abandoned and consigned to the Tower of London. But her legacy, according to Castor, was far greater than her brief time on the throne suggests. Transformation Street ITV, 9.00pm Wimpole Street, Marylebone, is home to the London Transgender Surgery, a private clinic catering for some of the estimated 130,000 Britons currently wishing to change gender. This revealing three-parter follows patients from initial consultations through to gender confirmation surgery. Walks with My Dog More4, 9.00pm The simple but engaging series in which celebrities take their four-legged friends for a trek through the UK’s more scenic parts makes a welcome return. This time Hadrian’s Wall, Norfolk and the Welsh mountains are among the destinations. Actress Caroline Quentin leads off tonight, taking her pooch for a stroll around the Helford estuary in Cornwall. GO Great Art ITV, 10.45pm In this second episode of the art series, Tim Marlow moves on to the 19th-century Parisian art collector Paul Durand-Ruel, whose financially risky landmark 1886 exhibition in New York thrust impressionism into the mainstream. Marlow examines his impact, and the lasting influence of Monet, Cézanne, Degas and Renoir. GO From Russia with Love (1963) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Ah, those were the days: the certainties of the Cold War, a beautiful Soviet defector and a chase across the Balkans. Will Spectre avenge the death of Dr No? No chance. Sean Connery was in the swing of things in his second outing as James Bond, pursued by two of 007’s best adversaries, in “Red” Grant (Robert Shaw) and Rosa Klebb (Lotte Lenya). Terence Young directs. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.15pm This superb adaptation of John le Carré’s brilliant, intricate Cold War spy novel is a triumph. The espionage drama follows the hunt for a Soviet double agent at the top of the British secret service, with Gary Oldman spearheading the excellent ensemble cast, which includes Colin Firth, Tom Hardy, John Hurt and Benedict Cumberbatch. It’s funny, seductive and suspenseful. GoodFellas (1990) ★★★★★ ITV4, 11.25pm Martin Scorsese’s Mafia masterpiece, adapted from a non-fiction book, has all the qualities of great cinema: it’s thrilling, it’s provocative, it’s stylish, and it’s got a young Robert De Niro in it. Ray Liotta plays the youngster who longs to be a gangster; De Niro and Joe Pesci are in the Mob. Pesci’s mother, meanwhile, reportedly asked him if he had to swear quite so much – the f-word is used 300 times. Friday 12 January Revd Matthew Stafford, Revd Nicholas Lowton, Fr Matthew Cashmore and Revd Ruth Hulse Credit: BBC A Vicar’s Life BBC Two, 8.30pm This amiable new series follows several vicars in their parishes in the Diocese of Hereford, the most rural in the Church of England. It’s the standard heart-warming mixture of births, marriages and deaths – or as likeable Reverend Matthew Stafford, vicar at the village of Much Wenlock, says: “hatched, matched and dispatched” – but, for all that sense of familiarity, it’s well-made and very engaging. This opening episode sees Matthew officiate at a lovely local wedding, and Reverend Nicholas Lowton, the Rural Dean of Abbeydore and Vicar of the Black Mountains Group, deal with the theft of the parish registry books (“whoever did this has got lessons that they need to learn”). Elsewhere, Reverend Ruth Hulse, Team Vicar for West Hereford, organises a funeral for much-loved former churchwarden Barbara. “It’s a huge loss, like losing a member of your own family,” she says. Everyone involved comes out of it well, and Matthew manages to sneak a message in amid the jokes: “I don’t take myself seriously, but I do take God and what I do very seriously,” he notes. So do his parishioners, many of whom admit that he’s helped them see the church in a more favourable light. Sarah Hughes PGA Tour Golf: The Sony Open Sky Sports Main Event, 12.01am The opening day of the tournament at the Waialae CC in Honolulu, Hawaii, where Justin Thomas won the title last year. Room 101 BBC One, 8.30pm Frank Skinner returns with a new series of the long-running show. This opener promises to be a lot of fun given that his guests, Charlie Brooker, Scarlett Moffatt and Pearl Mackie, are not short of opinion. Among the objects up for inclusion in Room 101 are crocodiles, mosquitos and haircuts. Rome Unpacked BBC Two, 9.00pm The second part of this food and art travelogue sees chef Giorgio Locatelli and art critic Andrew Graham-Dixon visit the Basilica di San Clemente, the Testaccio Slaughterhouse and the Palazzo Colonna. As before, a great deal of the fun comes from the way that each man learns from the other. David Bowie Evening BBC Four, from 9.00pm Two years after David Bowie’s death, BBC Four dedicates an evening to the rock great. First up is Francis Whately’s 2013 film David Bowie: Five Years in the Making of an Icon, which looks at key moments in his career. These include his time as Ziggy Stardust, his reinvention as the Thin White Duke, the making of 1977’s Heroes, and the global success of Let’s Dance. It’s followed by David Bowie and the Story of Ziggy Stardust, which looks at how Bowie created his most (in)famous alter ego. Lethal Weapon ITV, 9.00pm The rambunctious remake of the Danny Glover-Mel Gibson films roars back for a second series. It begins with an action-packed episode that sees Murtaugh (Damon Wayans) heading to Mexico to try to reign in partner Riggs (Clayne Crawford) who is still seeking vengeance for his wife’s death. Delicious Sky One, 9.00pm The second series of the foodie drama reaches its penultimate episode, and it’s the anniversary of philanderer Leo’s death, which the families plan to mark with a feast. Naturally, nothing goes smoothly – chef Gina (Dawn French) is pushed to the limits by her daughter Theresa’s (Tanya Reynolds) behaviour, while Gina’s love rival turned business partner Sam (Emilia Fox) takes out her anger on chef Adam (Aaron Anthony). SH The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm Expect a super-smooth evening as Graham Norton is joined by A-listers Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks, who discuss Steven Spielberg’s political drama The Post, but also share some good anecdotes amid all the mild ribbing. SH The Polka King (2017) Netflix, from today Exuberant Jack Black plays to his strengths in this biopic, based on the documentary The Man Who Would Be Polka King, about a flamboyant Polish émigré-turned-Polka King-turned-convicted Ponzi-scheme criminal. Despite being a film about a scoundrel who swindled senior citizens out of millions of dollars in order to achieve the American dream, it’s surprisingly entertaining, though a more serious consideration of con artists wouldn’t have gone amiss. The Frogmen (1951, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 4.35pm A pleasingly understated yet atmospheric war drama in which Richard Widmark stars as a tough Navy commander put in charge of a team of demolition divers on a South Pacific island. At first, the arrival of their superior goes down like a lead diving suit, but he soon wins them over by neutralising an undetonated torpedo. Due to the conditions being deemed too “riotous”, the female roles were written out. Get Out (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Get Out is one of the first films expressly to be set in a post-Obama era and is a breathlessly suspenseful exposé of the horror of liberal racism. Perfect, white Rose Armitage (Allison Williams) wants to allay the concerns of her boyfriend, black photographer Chris (Daniel Kaluuya), and invites him to meet her parents. They don’t bat an eyelid over his skin colour, but the film rattles with provocations. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
What's on TV tonight: Michael Palin: a Life on Screen and Dancing on Ice
Sunday 7 January Michael Palin: a Life on Screen BBC Two, 9.00pm Telling Michael Palin’s story from his birth to the film Death of Stalin (in which he played Minister Molotov), this profile of the “Nicest Man in Showbiz” is a pleasure from start to finish. First realising his talents in improvised shows for his school friends, Palin found kindred spirits and his comic mojo as part of the Oxford Revue at the Edinburgh Festival, eventually parlaying his skills as a jobbing writer and performer into a series that changed the comedy landscape forever: Monty Python’s Flying Circus was born after an apparently disastrous meeting ended with a BBC commissioner pronouncing sternly, “all right, I’ll give you 13 episodes. But that’s all!” While John Cleese provides the tongue-in-cheek venom (describing Palin as “a sociopath”), Connie Booth, David Jason and Armando Iannucci pay tribute to a versatile talent. An abundance of clips confirm that alongside the comic genius of Python and Ripping Yarns lay a serious actor of genuine heft (as seen in GBH and Brazil), the gifted travel journalist of Around the World in 80 Days and a successful and engaging diarist. Palin, too, chips in with observations and memories, all delivered with charismatic humility and self-deprecation. Gabriel Tate Into the Forest BBC Three, from 10.00am This uneven but intriguing Canadian indie film didn’t find much of an audience when it was released in 2015 but will be now shown online via BBC Three. Evan Rachel Wood (Westworld) and Ellen Page (Juno) star in this dystopian drama as Nell and Eva, two sisters living in a forest with their father in the near future. They find their isolated existence under threat when a district-wide power cut sparks anarchy and increasing desperation in the nearby town. FA Cup Football: Shrewsbury Town v West Ham United BBC One, 1.40pm More potential giant-killing in the FA Cup, as League One side Shrewsbury Town try to cut down West Ham at Montgomery Waters Meadow. The visitors have won the FA Cup three times but haven’t lifted the trophy since 1980, when they beat Arsenal 1-0, thanks to a goal by Trevor Brooking. Shrewsbury made it through to the third round by beating against Aldershot Town and Morecambe. Premiership Rugby Union: Wasps v Saracens BT Sport 1, 2.30pm Having beaten Bath 31-26 at the Rec last weekend, Wasps look to continue their fine form in the new year at home to second-placed Saracens. The away side will be full of confidence, though: they capped off an impressive 2017 with a 46-31 victory over Worcester Warriors, with Jackson Wray and Nathan Earle both scoring try doubles as Saracens ran in six tries at Allianz Park. When these sides last met here, a hat-trick from Thomas Young helped Wasps to a 35-15 victory. A repeat performance here will see them leapfrog Saracens in the table. Dancing on Ice ITV, 6.00pm Back after a four-year absence, Jayne Torvill and Christopher Dean return with Dancing on Ice, but they are no longer coaches. They are now be assessing the ice-skating abilities of a dozen celebrities, including Bucks Fizz alumna Cheryl Baker and Great British Bake Off 2016 champion Candice Brown. Joe Cocker Night Sky Arts, from 6.45pm One of the finest of all the white blues and soul shouters, Joe Cocker’s gargling, howling delivery was most famously captured in his performance of With a Little Help from My Friends at Woodstock. This double bill begins with the concert film Fire It Up: Live, and Cocker performing in Cologne on his final tour before his death in 2014. John Edginton’s biographical documentary, Mad Dog with Soul, follows at 9.00pm. GT Attenborough and the Sea Dragon BBC One, 8.00pm David Attenborough pursues his lifelong passion of fossilology on Britain’s Jurassic Coast. The 200-million-year-old bones of an Ichthyosaur must be dug out of the Dorset cliffs, analysed and finally recreated using computer technology. Vera ITV, 8.00pm The eighth series of the murder mystery begins with DCI Vera Stanhope (the excellent Brenda Blethyn) investigating how a respected fraud officer came to be incinerated in an abbatoir. Her enquiries lead her into a close-knit fishing community and clashes with her fellow coppers. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm In this extraordinary venture, Dick Strawbridge and a team of fellow enthusiasts attempt to build a model railway to stretch 71 miles from Fort William to Inverness. The project will require viaducts, bridges and even a miniature ferry, all documented over the next five weeks. GT And Now for Something Completely Different (1971) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.00pm; N Ireland, 11.30pm Fans of Monty Python’s Flying Circus rejoice – this compilation film is a feast of the comedians’ favourite sketches from the first two TV series. With John Cleese introducing a number of scenes with: “And now, for something completely different”, it’s a fun trip into the archives, including as the “dead parrot” sketch. Captain Phillips (2013) ★★★★☆ ITV, 10.10pm Paul Greengrass (United 93 and three Bourne films) has a rare gift for working with action-thriller material and making something cohesive, layered and complex from it. With this account of Somali pirates boarding an American cargo ship and kidnapping its captain (Tom Hanks), he remains at the top of his game. Hanks may be the big draw, but it’s the pirates who impress, especially Bafta-winning Barkhad Abdi. Stations of the Cross (2015) ★★★☆☆ BBC Four, 11.00pm This cold, preachy German film from director Dietrich Brüggemann plays out over 14 single-shot scenes, each titled after a station of the cross on Christ’s walk to Calvary and to mirror the restrictions of religious fundamentalism. Its story, about a 14-year-old girl who pursues the ideals of Christian self-sacrifice to terrifying extremes, won the best script gong at the Berlin International Film Festival. Monday 8 January Archie Panjabi Credit: ITV Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Written by Indian Summers creator Paul Rutman and partner Natasha Narayan, this atmospheric six-part thriller has a fine cast and gets off to an instantly intriguing start. Emmy-winner Archie Panjabi is a smart and sympathetic presence as British-Pakistani doctor Mona Harcourt, who, together with her well-connected political lobbyist husband Guy (Jack Davenport) and wider family, is preparing to celebrate the return from Lahore of her beloved brother Kareem (Navin Chowdhry). His failure to arrive as expected on the day a terrorist incident in London results in four deaths, and brings the city to a standstill. It sets in motion a series of terrifying consequences – the most disturbing of which is the sudden intense interest in the family of the anti-terrorism unit of the Metropolitan Police. It is a credible, and in parts distressing, depiction of what it is like to be an ordinary British Muslim in the wake of such an attack, especially when it emerges that the real focus of the police investigation is not Kareem, but his 18-year-old student son Danny (Viveik Kalra) who had been becoming increasingly isolated from the family in the weeks before the attack. Gerard O’Donovan Star Trek: Discovery Netflix, from today Following an eight-week break, the latest incarnation of the Star Trek franchise returns to complete its debut run. The previous episode ended on a twist that saw the USS Discovery cast out into unchartered space. Unsurprisingly, this 10th episode picks up with Captain Lorca (Jason Isaacs) and crew facing a raft of previously unimagined threats in their eventful efforts to find a way home. How to Lose Weight Well Channel 4, 8.00pm Dr Xand van Tulleken and dietician Hala El-Shafie take a new approach to diet testing, dividing a group of volunteers into three categories: crashers (short-term diets), shape shifters (six-week programmes) and life changers (four-month plans) to see which of the current popular diets are most effective. Silent Witness BBC One, 9.00pm The enduringly popular pathologists-playing-cops drama kicks off its 21st series with a typically slow burn two-parter. As Nikki Alexander (Emilia Fox) struggles to get over her Mexican ordeal, a close friend (Emma Fielding) goes missing. Surgeons: At the Edge of Life BBC Two, 9.00pm Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham’s busy surgical unit is the focus of this new series following surgeons, theatre staff and patients through operations at the cutting edge of medicine. In the first edition, maxillofacial surgeons tackle a marathon operation on a 53-year-old diagnosed with a major facial tumour. My Astonishing Self: Gabriel Byrne on George Bernard Shaw BBC Four, 9.00pm An actor’s homage to a playwright becomes a fascinating exploration of the life and work of a literary Titan of the early 20th century.George Bernard Shaw was a pioneering socialist, feminist and philosopher as well as the writer of hugely popular plays such as Pygmalion. Here, Gabriel Byrne assesses the character and legacy of a man whose intelligence, charm and social conscience, and ingenuity for self-promotion, propelled him to global renown. GO The Undateables Channel 4, 9.00pm A fresh crop of singletons looking for love includes a rugby-playing chef from Hull with Tourette’s, a bookseller from Cambridgeshire with Asperger’s, and a photography graduate from London with scoliosis. GO Gallipoli (1981) ★★★★★ Film4, 6.35pm Director Peter Weir’s tale of war and friendship in 1915 – one of his very finest films – reaches a devastating finale in the clash between Australians and Turks on the shore of the Dardanelles. Mel Gibson’s race through the trenches with a crucial message – ignore the last order! – is more pulse-quickening than a dozen Bravehearts. You pray for him to beat that whistle every time. Harold Hopkins also stars. Life of Pi (2012) ★★★★★ E4, 8.00pm Ang Lee’s warm, wise and wondrous adventure story, adapted from Yann Martel’s 2002 Booker Prize-winning novel, follows Pi (Suraj Sharma), shipwrecked in the South Pacific with Richard Parker, a Bengal tiger named after the hunter who captured him. Its kaleidoscopic imagery is some of the most advanced ever, but the story unfolds with such simplicity and clarity that it could almost be a silent movie. Logan (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Hugh Jackman’s third – and best – lone outing for his whiskery mutant Wolverine. You might assume James Mangold’s film, set in the near future, where a weary Logan meets a young mutant much like himself, is meant as a sequel to the two other Wolverine movies, but watching it, you’re struck by the thought that this paranoid, violent noir western is the real, shotgun-toting deal. Tuesday 9 January Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman Credit: AFP House of Saud: A Family at War BBC Two, 9.00pm This detailed three-part series on the ruling family of Saudi Arabia makes for unmissable if terrifying television. Dispensing with any sort of Adam Curtis-style frills, the opening film simply talks us through the House of Saud’s involvement in recent history, from Sarajevo to Syria. Hearing from intelligence analysts and long-time Saudi observers, it builds a complicated picture of the uneasy relationship between the Saudi royal family and Wahhabism, the particular strain of Islam they promote. It’s a story that encompasses a small hamlet in Bosnia, a family home in India, weapons dealt from Bulgaria to Afghanistan and online films watched all over the world. Much is made of the new Crown Prince, Mohammed bin Salman, and his desire for reform (“It’s not a question of how important he is to this – he is this,” announces one observer) but it remains hard to judge just how much of his actions are driven by genuine belief and how much constitute a power grab. Ultimately what lingers is not the political revelations, interesting though they are, but the interviews with the blinded of Syria, the wounded of Iraq, the devastated of Bosnia: the countless casualties of the geopolitical game. Sarah Hughes England’s Forgotten Queen: The Life and Death of Lady Jane Grey BBC Four, 9.00pm Tudor England might seem like a subject that has been covered so much that there is nothing new to be said about it. But hold on to those gripes because Helen Castor’s detailed look at the nine-day reign of Lady Jane Grey is an invigorating, intelligent take on the period. Using a wide range of old documents and interesting voices, Castor guides us through Jane’s brief, unlucky life, examining how she ended up as a pawn between two powerful factions and why it was that she found herself raised from relative obscurity to the dizzying heights of the English throne. School for Stammerers ITV, 9.00pm Speech impediments can be devastating to live with, as this thoughtful film, which follows six people living with a stammer, demonstrates. One solution on offer is the intensive McGuire Programme, a residential course that promises life-changing results albeit under tough conditions. 24 Hours in A&E Channel 4, 9.00pm The fly-on-the-wall medical series continues with this week’s patients including Marie, who arrives by ambulance at St George’s Hospital having collapsed at home with an unexplained headache. The Blacklist Sky One, 9.00pm The ludicrous and yet strangely enjoyable US spy series continues with James Spader’s slick Red this week setting his sights on wealthy art thief Greyson Blaise (Owain Yeoman). While Red gallivants abroad Tom (Ryan Eggold) seeks help to identify the bones in the suitcase. SH Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm This melancholy tale in the excellent comedy anthology is of rivalry and friendship lost. Reece Shearsmith is Tommy, who grumpily agrees to perform with former stand-up partner Len (Steve Pemberton), 30 years after they split in mysterious circumstances. Working Class White Men Channel 4, 10.00pm Rapper Professor Green has been quietly making a name for himself as a film-maker and this fascinating film about white working-class men is one of the week’s highlights. Green’s tense meeting with Britain First will garner the headlines but there is hope here too, with Lewis, the teenage would-be mathematician, the show’s highlight. SH The Fault in Our Stars (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Josh Boone’s film, adapted from the phenomenally successful young-adult novel, about two American teenagers both diagnosed with cancer is wisely observed and tenderly performed, most notably by Shailene Woodley. The basic storyline is so worn it’s close to threadbare – Love Story told it more than 40 years ago – but it comes with enough quirks to give it the appearance of freshness. The Lincoln Lawyer (2011) ★★★☆☆ More4, 9.00pm He won acclaim for his role as enigmatic detective Rust Cohle in the TV series True Detective, but Oscar winner Matthew McConaughey stars here in the sort of courtroom drama for which he made his name. This time he’s Mick Haller, a slick LA defence lawyer who prefers to represent the guilty. However, a wealthy new client (Ryan Phillippe) prompts Haller to address his own past sins. Billy Liar (1963, b/w) ★★★☆☆ London Live, 12.00midnight Best known for Midnight Cowboy, for which he won three Oscars, John Schlesinger ranged from violent thrillers (Marathon Man) to romantic epics (Far from the Madding Crowd) to perceptive human studies (An Englishman Abroad), but he indicated the breadth of his ambitions with this gritty social drama featuring Tom Courtenay as an undertaker’s clerk with extravagant fantasies. Wednesday 10 January Sarah Lancashire Credit: Channel 4 Kiri Channel 4, 9.00pm Screenwriter Jack Thorne follows up the excellent National Treasure with another superbly cast, nimble and dark exploration of contemporary mores. Thorne’s careful research is all over this opening episode of four, yet it never feels didactic or clumsy. Kiri follows the investigation into the abduction of the titular black girl Kiri Akindele (Felicia Mukasa) by her birth family, just days before she is due to be adopted by her white foster family, headed up by Lia Williams and Steven Mackintosh. Sarah Lancashire plays Miriam Grayson, the social worker who allows Kiri’s ill-fated unsupervised visit. Lancashire picks her projects carefully, and this is a performance to rank alongside her Bafta-winning turn in Happy Valley: Miriam is an imperfect Samaritan, trying her best amid funding cuts, weak superiors and a dormant drink problem. From the moment that the girl disappears and director Euros Lyn’s colour palette darkens, the focus seems to be as much on apportioning blame as finding the missing girl. It’s a desperate situation shot through with guilt and human frailty, yet not without humour; another modern tragedy from a writer who specialises in them. Gabriel Tate The Truth About Looking Good BBC One, 8.00pm Cherry Healey and 25 volunteers and experts from the Universities of Sheffield and Sunderland join forces to separate scientific fact from marketing fiction in the £9 billion per annum industry of cosmetics, in particular weighing up the pros and cons of moisturisers and cellulite solutions. Britain’s Brightest Family ITV, 8.00pm Anne Hegerty – familiar as The Chase’s Governess – oversees a new quiz show in which family members must show off their own general knowledge and nominate relatives according to their perceived areas of expertise. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This fascinating series finds fashion historian Amber Butchart displaying a variety of eye-catching headgear to scrutinise Jan van Eyck’s The Arnolfini Portrait for clues about its subjects and the 15th-century world that they inhabited. Couturier Ninya Mikhaila, meanwhile, recreates the green gown worn by the painting’s pregnant woman. Miriam’s Big American Adventure BBC One, 9.00pm; Scotland, 10.45pm Miriam Margolyes hits Middle America, where she encounters young Indiana summer campers pledging their allegiance, slightly older drug casualties in Ohio and survivalists of all ages in Tennessee. Fighting for Air BBC Two, 9.00pm Campaigning doctor and inescapable TV face Xand van Tulleken examines the grim effects of air pollution on the body, before travelling to Birmingham to bring clean air to one high street using a combination of technological expertise and community goodwill. GT England’s Forgotten Queen: The Life and Death of Lady Jane Grey BBC Four, 9.00pm While dedicating three hours to just nine days of British history might seem like overkill, here it almost feels inadequate, such is the wealth of incident and intrigue in Dr Helen Castor’s series. This middle episode follows the five days that determined whether or not Lady Jane would survive on the throne. The reconstructions are decent and the CGI sparingly used; instead, Castor lets the experts do the talking in an engaging piece of narrative history, concluding tomorrow. GT Tunes of Glory (1960) ★★★☆☆ Movies4Men, 4.00pm British director Ronald Neame made some of the best-known films of the 20th century, including The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie and The Poseidon Adventure, but this was his personal favourite. It focuses on personal rivalries within a fictional Highland regiment after the Second World War. John Mills plays a new, authoritarian CO, and Alec Guinness – cast against type – gives an exceptional performance as his lax, hard-drinking predecessor. JFK (1991) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.55pm Oliver Stone is in conspiracy-theorist mode for this film about the murder of President John F Kennedy. Whatever you make of Stone’s theory that the assassination was an FBI plot, lawyer Jim Garrison’s (Kevin Costner) showdown moment when he demonstrates that JFK was killed by multiple bullets is jaw-dropping. Costner, fresh from the Oscars glory of Dances with Wolves, is a magnetic lead. The Social Network (2010) ★★★★★ Channel 4, 1.10am Jesse Eisenberg is superb as the gauche cyber-geek who became a billionaire in his twenties in this dazzling dramatisation of the story of Facebook. It may necessarily be speculative in parts about Mark Zuckerberg and his invention, but this is a brilliantly scripted and absolutely gripping tale of clashing egos, precocious talent and betrayal. Justin Timberlake and Andrew Garfield also star. Thursday 11 January Cheetahs in Namibia Credit: BBC Big Cats BBC One, 8.00pm One family, 40 different faces. That’s how this beautifully shot three-part series about the planet’s top wild predator, the cat, begins – with a kaleidoscope of feline faces that perfectly illustrates the huge variety and essential similarity between the many different branches of the family. Not all of them are big. One, the rusty-spotted cat – a kittenish, ultra-rare inhabitant of Sri Lanka’s jungles – is so tiny when fully grown that it can fit in the palm of your hand. Although it makes up for its small stature with surprising ferocity. The series took two years and 30 separate filming expeditions to make, travelling to all four corners of the globe to show just how adaptable wild cats have evolved to be. In this opening edition we see not only relatively familiar sights such as cheetahs and lions chasing down water buffalo and giraffe in Africa, but also some rarities, such as a snow leopard searching the Himalayas for a mate. Plus, Siberian tigers and the elusive Canada lynx make appearances. There are surprises, too, in footage of jaguars taking on caiman in the waters of the Pantanal, and pumas hunting penguin on the freezing southern shores of Patagonia. Gerard O’Donovan European Tour Golf: The BMW SA Open Sky Sports Main Event, 8.00am Action from the opening day’s play at the City of Ekurhuleni in Gauteng, South Africa, where Graeme Storm was the winner last year. Having very nearly lost his tour card in 2016, the Englishman defeated Northern Irish star Rory McIlroy in a play-off to win his second title on the tour and his first since the 2007 Open de France. EastEnders BBC One, 7.30pm Mel Owen (Tamzin Outhwaite) returns to Albert Square after a 16-year absence. Last time around she married twice, burnt down a nightclub, was kidnapped and slept with her best friend’s husband. So the producers’ promise of an “incredible” storyline for her comeback is probably, uh, credible. The Cruise: Return to the Mediterranean ITV, 8.30pm More stories of life on the cruise ship Royal Princess. Tonight, with 5,000 passengers and crew aboard, bad weather prevents the cruise ship from docking. England’s Forgotten Queen: The Life and Death of Lady Jane Grey BBC Four, 9.00pm The concluding part of Helen Castor’s fascinating account of England’s “nine-day queen” opens on the eighth day of her reign, with armies heading for Framlingham Castle where her Catholic rival for the throne, Mary Tudor, had assembled a powerful force. Within a day, 16-year-old Jane would be betrayed, abandoned and consigned to the Tower of London. But her legacy, according to Castor, was far greater than her brief time on the throne suggests. Transformation Street ITV, 9.00pm Wimpole Street, Marylebone, is home to the London Transgender Surgery, a private clinic catering for some of the estimated 130,000 Britons currently wishing to change gender. This revealing three-parter follows patients from initial consultations through to gender confirmation surgery. Walks with My Dog More4, 9.00pm The simple but engaging series in which celebrities take their four-legged friends for a trek through the UK’s more scenic parts makes a welcome return. This time Hadrian’s Wall, Norfolk and the Welsh mountains are among the destinations. Actress Caroline Quentin leads off tonight, taking her pooch for a stroll around the Helford estuary in Cornwall. GO Great Art ITV, 10.45pm In this second episode of the art series, Tim Marlow moves on to the 19th-century Parisian art collector Paul Durand-Ruel, whose financially risky landmark 1886 exhibition in New York thrust impressionism into the mainstream. Marlow examines his impact, and the lasting influence of Monet, Cézanne, Degas and Renoir. GO From Russia with Love (1963) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Ah, those were the days: the certainties of the Cold War, a beautiful Soviet defector and a chase across the Balkans. Will Spectre avenge the death of Dr No? No chance. Sean Connery was in the swing of things in his second outing as James Bond, pursued by two of 007’s best adversaries, in “Red” Grant (Robert Shaw) and Rosa Klebb (Lotte Lenya). Terence Young directs. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.15pm This superb adaptation of John le Carré’s brilliant, intricate Cold War spy novel is a triumph. The espionage drama follows the hunt for a Soviet double agent at the top of the British secret service, with Gary Oldman spearheading the excellent ensemble cast, which includes Colin Firth, Tom Hardy, John Hurt and Benedict Cumberbatch. It’s funny, seductive and suspenseful. GoodFellas (1990) ★★★★★ ITV4, 11.25pm Martin Scorsese’s Mafia masterpiece, adapted from a non-fiction book, has all the qualities of great cinema: it’s thrilling, it’s provocative, it’s stylish, and it’s got a young Robert De Niro in it. Ray Liotta plays the youngster who longs to be a gangster; De Niro and Joe Pesci are in the Mob. Pesci’s mother, meanwhile, reportedly asked him if he had to swear quite so much – the f-word is used 300 times. Friday 12 January Revd Matthew Stafford, Revd Nicholas Lowton, Fr Matthew Cashmore and Revd Ruth Hulse Credit: BBC A Vicar’s Life BBC Two, 8.30pm This amiable new series follows several vicars in their parishes in the Diocese of Hereford, the most rural in the Church of England. It’s the standard heart-warming mixture of births, marriages and deaths – or as likeable Reverend Matthew Stafford, vicar at the village of Much Wenlock, says: “hatched, matched and dispatched” – but, for all that sense of familiarity, it’s well-made and very engaging. This opening episode sees Matthew officiate at a lovely local wedding, and Reverend Nicholas Lowton, the Rural Dean of Abbeydore and Vicar of the Black Mountains Group, deal with the theft of the parish registry books (“whoever did this has got lessons that they need to learn”). Elsewhere, Reverend Ruth Hulse, Team Vicar for West Hereford, organises a funeral for much-loved former churchwarden Barbara. “It’s a huge loss, like losing a member of your own family,” she says. Everyone involved comes out of it well, and Matthew manages to sneak a message in amid the jokes: “I don’t take myself seriously, but I do take God and what I do very seriously,” he notes. So do his parishioners, many of whom admit that he’s helped them see the church in a more favourable light. Sarah Hughes PGA Tour Golf: The Sony Open Sky Sports Main Event, 12.01am The opening day of the tournament at the Waialae CC in Honolulu, Hawaii, where Justin Thomas won the title last year. Room 101 BBC One, 8.30pm Frank Skinner returns with a new series of the long-running show. This opener promises to be a lot of fun given that his guests, Charlie Brooker, Scarlett Moffatt and Pearl Mackie, are not short of opinion. Among the objects up for inclusion in Room 101 are crocodiles, mosquitos and haircuts. Rome Unpacked BBC Two, 9.00pm The second part of this food and art travelogue sees chef Giorgio Locatelli and art critic Andrew Graham-Dixon visit the Basilica di San Clemente, the Testaccio Slaughterhouse and the Palazzo Colonna. As before, a great deal of the fun comes from the way that each man learns from the other. David Bowie Evening BBC Four, from 9.00pm Two years after David Bowie’s death, BBC Four dedicates an evening to the rock great. First up is Francis Whately’s 2013 film David Bowie: Five Years in the Making of an Icon, which looks at key moments in his career. These include his time as Ziggy Stardust, his reinvention as the Thin White Duke, the making of 1977’s Heroes, and the global success of Let’s Dance. It’s followed by David Bowie and the Story of Ziggy Stardust, which looks at how Bowie created his most (in)famous alter ego. Lethal Weapon ITV, 9.00pm The rambunctious remake of the Danny Glover-Mel Gibson films roars back for a second series. It begins with an action-packed episode that sees Murtaugh (Damon Wayans) heading to Mexico to try to reign in partner Riggs (Clayne Crawford) who is still seeking vengeance for his wife’s death. Delicious Sky One, 9.00pm The second series of the foodie drama reaches its penultimate episode, and it’s the anniversary of philanderer Leo’s death, which the families plan to mark with a feast. Naturally, nothing goes smoothly – chef Gina (Dawn French) is pushed to the limits by her daughter Theresa’s (Tanya Reynolds) behaviour, while Gina’s love rival turned business partner Sam (Emilia Fox) takes out her anger on chef Adam (Aaron Anthony). SH The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm Expect a super-smooth evening as Graham Norton is joined by A-listers Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks, who discuss Steven Spielberg’s political drama The Post, but also share some good anecdotes amid all the mild ribbing. SH The Polka King (2017) Netflix, from today Exuberant Jack Black plays to his strengths in this biopic, based on the documentary The Man Who Would Be Polka King, about a flamboyant Polish émigré-turned-Polka King-turned-convicted Ponzi-scheme criminal. Despite being a film about a scoundrel who swindled senior citizens out of millions of dollars in order to achieve the American dream, it’s surprisingly entertaining, though a more serious consideration of con artists wouldn’t have gone amiss. The Frogmen (1951, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 4.35pm A pleasingly understated yet atmospheric war drama in which Richard Widmark stars as a tough Navy commander put in charge of a team of demolition divers on a South Pacific island. At first, the arrival of their superior goes down like a lead diving suit, but he soon wins them over by neutralising an undetonated torpedo. Due to the conditions being deemed too “riotous”, the female roles were written out. Get Out (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Get Out is one of the first films expressly to be set in a post-Obama era and is a breathlessly suspenseful exposé of the horror of liberal racism. Perfect, white Rose Armitage (Allison Williams) wants to allay the concerns of her boyfriend, black photographer Chris (Daniel Kaluuya), and invites him to meet her parents. They don’t bat an eyelid over his skin colour, but the film rattles with provocations. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
Saturday 6 January Hard Sun BBC One, 9.35pm The BBC launches into 2018 with this hard-boiled crime drama from Luther creator Neil Cross. It seems like a standard police procedural at first. Slick detective Charlie Hicks (Jim Sturgess) is paired up with an inscrutable new colleague, Elaine Renko (Agyness Deyn), and they head off to investigate an apparent suicide. Quickly, however, both the case and characters gather complexity. For a start, the main players have enticing back stories: Hicks is involved in a sensitive extramarital dalliance, whilst Renko is psychologically bruised from a recent violent break-in at her home. Equally intriguing, however, is the sci-fi-inspired twist that the investigation takes. We learn that behind the suicide lies an exchange of top-secret information confirming the destruction of the world in five years time. Goofy though this sounds, it gives undeniable tension to the episode as shadowy forces close in on our duo, and nicely sets things up for further thrills should news of the apocalypse break out. Sturgess and Deyn have enough chemistry to convince, and London, at its most relentlessly urban here, provides a bleakly atmospheric backdrop. Toby Dantzic FA Cup Football: Fleetwood Town v Leicester City BBC One, 12.45pm How’s this for a David-versus-Goliath affair, as League One’s Fleetwood Town take on the 2016 Premier League winners at Highbury Stadium? The Leicester have made it to the FA Cup final on four occasions but have never won the competition. The last time they appeared in the final, in April 1969, they lost 1-0 to Manchester City. Darts: BDO Lakeside World Professional Championships Channel 4, 12.45pm Coverage of the opening day of the tournament staged at Lakeside Country Club in Frimley Green, featuring matches in the first round of the men’s and ladies’ competitions. Forty men and 16 women from 17 countries do battle for the coveted prizes, won last year by Glen Durrant and Lisa Ashton. This afternoon, three-time Lakeside champion Martin “Wolfie” Adams takes on the number two seed Mark “Gladiator” McGeeney, before Ashton starts the defence of her title against Wales’s Rhian Griffiths. Hugh’s Wild West BBC Two, 6.15pm; Northern Ireland, 7.45pm Eco-friendly chef Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall takes us on a nature trail through his beloved West Country for this new series. He starts in the Wye Valley, “one of nature’s secret gardens”, where he introduces us to the Dipper, Britain’s only aquatic songbird. Wedding Day Winners BBC One, 7.25pm Lorraine Kelly and Rob Beckett host this new nuptial-themed Saturday night entertainment show. Two couples, along with their friends and families, compete in a series of challenges to win a televised wedding and lavish honeymoon. The Voice UK ITV, 8.00pm After just one series, last year’s new coach Gavin Rossdale is out nd in comes X Factor success story Olly Murs, as the singing contest begins its staggering seventh run. Emma Willis returns as the host, as the blind auditions get under way. Spiral BBC Four, 9.00pm and 10.00pm One of the first shows to pique our interest in European crime drama, this much-admired French series returned last week for its sixth outing. The discovery of a torso in a suitcase prompted tough police captain Laure Berthaud (Caroline Proust) to return from her maternity leave. This week, Berthaud and partner Lt Escoffier (Thierry Godard) grill two brothers who they believe have links to the deceased, and lawyer Joséphine Karlsson (Audrey Fleurot) pushes her client to plead guilty. Freddie Mercury: The Great Pretender Sky Arts, 9.00pm Rhys Thomas’s 2012 documentary explores Queen singer Freddie Mercury’s attempt to forge a solo career in the Eighties. The insights from his peers and the concert footage are compelling, but it’s the previously unseen interviews with and snippets of his collaborations with the likes of Michael Jackson that prove revelatory. TD Feud: Bette and Joan BBC Two, 9.15pm and 10.00pm Delightfully camp but moving all the same, Ryan Murphy’s dramatisation of this great Hollywood rivalry concludes with one last double bill. Joan Crawford (Jessica Lange) becomes increasingly riled by Bette Davis (Susan Sarandon), as the latter interferes with her performance on their latest film collaboration, Hush… Hush, Sweet Charlotte. TD West Side Story (1961) ★★★★★ Channel 5, 11.40am The vertiginous energy and heart make this one of the greatest musicals. Jerome Robbins’s inspired choreography needs the biggest screen it can get; when the film’s firing on all cylinders of music, lyrics and motion, there’s little to touch it. Natalie Wood and Richard Beymer are lovers from opposite sides of the tracks, while Leonard Bernstein’s heady score perfectly aids their battle. The Letter (1940, b/w) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 3.00pm By 1940, Bette Davis was the biggest star. She’d just won her second Oscar for Jezebel, giving a performance that typified women of the era – wild, wilful, destructive, bitchy. But in William Wyler’s film noir, based on W Somerset Maugham’s short story, she careened towards tragedy with self-annihilating abandon. Davis plays Leslie, who kills a man in self defence, but an incriminating letter casts doubt on her story. The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 2 (2015) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Jennifer Lawrence and Philip Seymour Hoffman – in his last film – end the Hunger Games series with an electrifying, high-stakes final showdown. In addition to the two leads, Part 2 groans with the collective talents of Donald Sutherland, Julianne Moore and Woody Harrelson as vengeful modern heroine Katniss (Lawrence) prepares to win the war. Sunday 7 January Michael Palin Credit: BBC Michael Palin: a Life on Screen BBC Two, 9.00pm Telling Michael Palin’s story from his birth to the film Death of Stalin (in which he played Minister Molotov), this profile of the “Nicest Man in Showbiz” is a pleasure from start to finish. First realising his talents in improvised shows for his school friends, Palin found kindred spirits and his comic mojo as part of the Oxford Revue at the Edinburgh Festival, eventually parlaying his skills as a jobbing writer and performer into a series that changed the comedy landscape forever: Monty Python’s Flying Circus was born after an apparently disastrous meeting ended with a BBC commissioner pronouncing sternly, “all right, I’ll give you 13 episodes. But that’s all!” While John Cleese provides the tongue-in-cheek venom (describing Palin as “a sociopath”), Connie Booth, David Jason and Armando Iannucci pay tribute to a versatile talent. An abundance of clips confirm that alongside the comic genius of Python and Ripping Yarns lay a serious actor of genuine heft (as seen in GBH and Brazil), the gifted travel journalist of Around the World in 80 Days and a successful and engaging diarist. Palin, too, chips in with observations and memories, all delivered with charismatic humility and self-deprecation. Gabriel Tate Into the Forest BBC Three, from 10.00am This uneven but intriguing Canadian indie film didn’t find much of an audience when it was released in 2015 but will be now shown online via BBC Three. Evan Rachel Wood (Westworld) and Ellen Page (Juno) star in this dystopian drama as Nell and Eva, two sisters living in a forest with their father in the near future. They find their isolated existence under threat when a district-wide power cut sparks anarchy and increasing desperation in the nearby town. FA Cup Football: Shrewsbury Town v West Ham United BBC One, 1.40pm More potential giant-killing in the FA Cup, as League One side Shrewsbury Town try to cut down West Ham at Montgomery Waters Meadow. The visitors have won the FA Cup three times but haven’t lifted the trophy since 1980, when they beat Arsenal 1-0, thanks to a goal by Trevor Brooking. Shrewsbury made it through to the third round by beating against Aldershot Town and Morecambe. Premiership Rugby Union: Wasps v Saracens BT Sport 1, 2.30pm Having beaten Bath 31-26 at the Rec last weekend, Wasps look to continue their fine form in the new year at home to second-placed Saracens. The away side will be full of confidence, though: they capped off an impressive 2017 with a 46-31 victory over Worcester Warriors, with Jackson Wray and Nathan Earle both scoring try doubles as Saracens ran in six tries at Allianz Park. When these sides last met here, a hat-trick from Thomas Young helped Wasps to a 35-15 victory. A repeat performance here will see them leapfrog Saracens in the table. Dancing on Ice ITV, 6.00pm Back after a four-year absence, Jayne Torvill and Christopher Dean return with Dancing on Ice, but they are no longer coaches. They are now be assessing the ice-skating abilities of a dozen celebrities, including Bucks Fizz alumna Cheryl Baker and Great British Bake Off 2016 champion Candice Brown. Joe Cocker Night Sky Arts, from 6.45pm One of the finest of all the white blues and soul shouters, Joe Cocker’s gargling, howling delivery was most famously captured in his performance of With a Little Help from My Friends at Woodstock. This double bill begins with the concert film Fire It Up: Live, and Cocker performing in Cologne on his final tour before his death in 2014. John Edginton’s biographical documentary, Mad Dog with Soul, follows at 9.00pm. GT Attenborough and the Sea Dragon BBC One, 8.00pm David Attenborough pursues his lifelong passion of fossilology on Britain’s Jurassic Coast. The 200-million-year-old bones of an Ichthyosaur must be dug out of the Dorset cliffs, analysed and finally recreated using computer technology. Vera ITV, 8.00pm The eighth series of the murder mystery begins with DCI Vera Stanhope (the excellent Brenda Blethyn) investigating how a respected fraud officer came to be incinerated in an abbatoir. Her enquiries lead her into a close-knit fishing community and clashes with her fellow coppers. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm In this extraordinary venture, Dick Strawbridge and a team of fellow enthusiasts attempt to build a model railway to stretch 71 miles from Fort William to Inverness. The project will require viaducts, bridges and even a miniature ferry, all documented over the next five weeks. GT And Now for Something Completely Different (1971) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.00pm; N Ireland, 11.30pm Fans of Monty Python’s Flying Circus rejoice – this compilation film is a feast of the comedians’ favourite sketches from the first two TV series. With John Cleese introducing a number of scenes with: “And now, for something completely different”, it’s a fun trip into the archives, including as the “dead parrot” sketch. Captain Phillips (2013) ★★★★☆ ITV, 10.10pm Paul Greengrass (United 93 and three Bourne films) has a rare gift for working with action-thriller material and making something cohesive, layered and complex from it. With this account of Somali pirates boarding an American cargo ship and kidnapping its captain (Tom Hanks), he remains at the top of his game. Hanks may be the big draw, but it’s the pirates who impress, especially Bafta-winning Barkhad Abdi. Stations of the Cross (2015) ★★★☆☆ BBC Four, 11.00pm This cold, preachy German film from director Dietrich Brüggemann plays out over 14 single-shot scenes, each titled after a station of the cross on Christ’s walk to Calvary and to mirror the restrictions of religious fundamentalism. Its story, about a 14-year-old girl who pursues the ideals of Christian self-sacrifice to terrifying extremes, won the best script gong at the Berlin International Film Festival. Monday 8 January Archie Panjabi Credit: ITV Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Written by Indian Summers creator Paul Rutman and partner Natasha Narayan, this atmospheric six-part thriller has a fine cast and gets off to an instantly intriguing start. Emmy-winner Archie Panjabi is a smart and sympathetic presence as British-Pakistani doctor Mona Harcourt, who, together with her well-connected political lobbyist husband Guy (Jack Davenport) and wider family, is preparing to celebrate the return from Lahore of her beloved brother Kareem (Navin Chowdhry). His failure to arrive as expected on the day a terrorist incident in London results in four deaths, and brings the city to a standstill. It sets in motion a series of terrifying consequences – the most disturbing of which is the sudden intense interest in the family of the anti-terrorism unit of the Metropolitan Police. It is a credible, and in parts distressing, depiction of what it is like to be an ordinary British Muslim in the wake of such an attack, especially when it emerges that the real focus of the police investigation is not Kareem, but his 18-year-old student son Danny (Viveik Kalra) who had been becoming increasingly isolated from the family in the weeks before the attack. Gerard O’Donovan Star Trek: Discovery Netflix, from today Following an eight-week break, the latest incarnation of the Star Trek franchise returns to complete its debut run. The previous episode ended on a twist that saw the USS Discovery cast out into unchartered space. Unsurprisingly, this 10th episode picks up with Captain Lorca (Jason Isaacs) and crew facing a raft of previously unimagined threats in their eventful efforts to find a way home. How to Lose Weight Well Channel 4, 8.00pm Dr Xand van Tulleken and dietician Hala El-Shafie take a new approach to diet testing, dividing a group of volunteers into three categories: crashers (short-term diets), shape shifters (six-week programmes) and life changers (four-month plans) to see which of the current popular diets are most effective. Silent Witness BBC One, 9.00pm The enduringly popular pathologists-playing-cops drama kicks off its 21st series with a typically slow burn two-parter. As Nikki Alexander (Emilia Fox) struggles to get over her Mexican ordeal, a close friend (Emma Fielding) goes missing. Surgeons: At the Edge of Life BBC Two, 9.00pm Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham’s busy surgical unit is the focus of this new series following surgeons, theatre staff and patients through operations at the cutting edge of medicine. In the first edition, maxillofacial surgeons tackle a marathon operation on a 53-year-old diagnosed with a major facial tumour. My Astonishing Self: Gabriel Byrne on George Bernard Shaw BBC Four, 9.00pm An actor’s homage to a playwright becomes a fascinating exploration of the life and work of a literary Titan of the early 20th century.George Bernard Shaw was a pioneering socialist, feminist and philosopher as well as the writer of hugely popular plays such as Pygmalion. Here, Gabriel Byrne assesses the character and legacy of a man whose intelligence, charm and social conscience, and ingenuity for self-promotion, propelled him to global renown. GO The Undateables Channel 4, 9.00pm A fresh crop of singletons looking for love includes a rugby-playing chef from Hull with Tourette’s, a bookseller from Cambridgeshire with Asperger’s, and a photography graduate from London with scoliosis. GO Gallipoli (1981) ★★★★★ Film4, 6.35pm Director Peter Weir’s tale of war and friendship in 1915 – one of his very finest films – reaches a devastating finale in the clash between Australians and Turks on the shore of the Dardanelles. Mel Gibson’s race through the trenches with a crucial message – ignore the last order! – is more pulse-quickening than a dozen Bravehearts. You pray for him to beat that whistle every time. Harold Hopkins also stars. Life of Pi (2012) ★★★★★ E4, 8.00pm Ang Lee’s warm, wise and wondrous adventure story, adapted from Yann Martel’s 2002 Booker Prize-winning novel, follows Pi (Suraj Sharma), shipwrecked in the South Pacific with Richard Parker, a Bengal tiger named after the hunter who captured him. Its kaleidoscopic imagery is some of the most advanced ever, but the story unfolds with such simplicity and clarity that it could almost be a silent movie. Logan (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Hugh Jackman’s third – and best – lone outing for his whiskery mutant Wolverine. You might assume James Mangold’s film, set in the near future, where a weary Logan meets a young mutant much like himself, is meant as a sequel to the two other Wolverine movies, but watching it, you’re struck by the thought that this paranoid, violent noir western is the real, shotgun-toting deal. Tuesday 9 January Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman Credit: AFP House of Saud: A Family at War BBC Two, 9.00pm This detailed three-part series on the ruling family of Saudi Arabia makes for unmissable if terrifying television. Dispensing with any sort of Adam Curtis-style frills, the opening film simply talks us through the House of Saud’s involvement in recent history, from Sarajevo to Syria. Hearing from intelligence analysts and long-time Saudi observers, it builds a complicated picture of the uneasy relationship between the Saudi royal family and Wahhabism, the particular strain of Islam they promote. It’s a story that encompasses a small hamlet in Bosnia, a family home in India, weapons dealt from Bulgaria to Afghanistan and online films watched all over the world. Much is made of the new Crown Prince, Mohammed bin Salman, and his desire for reform (“It’s not a question of how important he is to this – he is this,” announces one observer) but it remains hard to judge just how much of his actions are driven by genuine belief and how much constitute a power grab. Ultimately what lingers is not the political revelations, interesting though they are, but the interviews with the blinded of Syria, the wounded of Iraq, the devastated of Bosnia: the countless casualties of the geopolitical game. Sarah Hughes England’s Forgotten Queen: The Life and Death of Lady Jane Grey BBC Four, 9.00pm Tudor England might seem like a subject that has been covered so much that there is nothing new to be said about it. But hold on to those gripes because Helen Castor’s detailed look at the nine-day reign of Lady Jane Grey is an invigorating, intelligent take on the period. Using a wide range of old documents and interesting voices, Castor guides us through Jane’s brief, unlucky life, examining how she ended up as a pawn between two powerful factions and why it was that she found herself raised from relative obscurity to the dizzying heights of the English throne. School for Stammerers ITV, 9.00pm Speech impediments can be devastating to live with, as this thoughtful film, which follows six people living with a stammer, demonstrates. One solution on offer is the intensive McGuire Programme, a residential course that promises life-changing results albeit under tough conditions. 24 Hours in A&E Channel 4, 9.00pm The fly-on-the-wall medical series continues with this week’s patients including Marie, who arrives by ambulance at St George’s Hospital having collapsed at home with an unexplained headache. The Blacklist Sky One, 9.00pm The ludicrous and yet strangely enjoyable US spy series continues with James Spader’s slick Red this week setting his sights on wealthy art thief Greyson Blaise (Owain Yeoman). While Red gallivants abroad Tom (Ryan Eggold) seeks help to identify the bones in the suitcase. SH Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm This melancholy tale in the excellent comedy anthology is of rivalry and friendship lost. Reece Shearsmith is Tommy, who grumpily agrees to perform with former stand-up partner Len (Steve Pemberton), 30 years after they split in mysterious circumstances. Working Class White Men Channel 4, 10.00pm Rapper Professor Green has been quietly making a name for himself as a film-maker and this fascinating film about white working-class men is one of the week’s highlights. Green’s tense meeting with Britain First will garner the headlines but there is hope here too, with Lewis, the teenage would-be mathematician, the show’s highlight. SH The Fault in Our Stars (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Josh Boone’s film, adapted from the phenomenally successful young-adult novel, about two American teenagers both diagnosed with cancer is wisely observed and tenderly performed, most notably by Shailene Woodley. The basic storyline is so worn it’s close to threadbare – Love Story told it more than 40 years ago – but it comes with enough quirks to give it the appearance of freshness. The Lincoln Lawyer (2011) ★★★☆☆ More4, 9.00pm He won acclaim for his role as enigmatic detective Rust Cohle in the TV series True Detective, but Oscar winner Matthew McConaughey stars here in the sort of courtroom drama for which he made his name. This time he’s Mick Haller, a slick LA defence lawyer who prefers to represent the guilty. However, a wealthy new client (Ryan Phillippe) prompts Haller to address his own past sins. Billy Liar (1963, b/w) ★★★☆☆ London Live, 12.00midnight Best known for Midnight Cowboy, for which he won three Oscars, John Schlesinger ranged from violent thrillers (Marathon Man) to romantic epics (Far from the Madding Crowd) to perceptive human studies (An Englishman Abroad), but he indicated the breadth of his ambitions with this gritty social drama featuring Tom Courtenay as an undertaker’s clerk with extravagant fantasies. Wednesday 10 January Sarah Lancashire Credit: Channel 4 Kiri Channel 4, 9.00pm Screenwriter Jack Thorne follows up the excellent National Treasure with another superbly cast, nimble and dark exploration of contemporary mores. Thorne’s careful research is all over this opening episode of four, yet it never feels didactic or clumsy. Kiri follows the investigation into the abduction of the titular black girl Kiri Akindele (Felicia Mukasa) by her birth family, just days before she is due to be adopted by her white foster family, headed up by Lia Williams and Steven Mackintosh. Sarah Lancashire plays Miriam Grayson, the social worker who allows Kiri’s ill-fated unsupervised visit. Lancashire picks her projects carefully, and this is a performance to rank alongside her Bafta-winning turn in Happy Valley: Miriam is an imperfect Samaritan, trying her best amid funding cuts, weak superiors and a dormant drink problem. From the moment that the girl disappears and director Euros Lyn’s colour palette darkens, the focus seems to be as much on apportioning blame as finding the missing girl. It’s a desperate situation shot through with guilt and human frailty, yet not without humour; another modern tragedy from a writer who specialises in them. Gabriel Tate The Truth About Looking Good BBC One, 8.00pm Cherry Healey and 25 volunteers and experts from the Universities of Sheffield and Sunderland join forces to separate scientific fact from marketing fiction in the £9 billion per annum industry of cosmetics, in particular weighing up the pros and cons of moisturisers and cellulite solutions. Britain’s Brightest Family ITV, 8.00pm Anne Hegerty – familiar as The Chase’s Governess – oversees a new quiz show in which family members must show off their own general knowledge and nominate relatives according to their perceived areas of expertise. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This fascinating series finds fashion historian Amber Butchart displaying a variety of eye-catching headgear to scrutinise Jan van Eyck’s The Arnolfini Portrait for clues about its subjects and the 15th-century world that they inhabited. Couturier Ninya Mikhaila, meanwhile, recreates the green gown worn by the painting’s pregnant woman. Miriam’s Big American Adventure BBC One, 9.00pm; Scotland, 10.45pm Miriam Margolyes hits Middle America, where she encounters young Indiana summer campers pledging their allegiance, slightly older drug casualties in Ohio and survivalists of all ages in Tennessee. Fighting for Air BBC Two, 9.00pm Campaigning doctor and inescapable TV face Xand van Tulleken examines the grim effects of air pollution on the body, before travelling to Birmingham to bring clean air to one high street using a combination of technological expertise and community goodwill. GT England’s Forgotten Queen: The Life and Death of Lady Jane Grey BBC Four, 9.00pm While dedicating three hours to just nine days of British history might seem like overkill, here it almost feels inadequate, such is the wealth of incident and intrigue in Dr Helen Castor’s series. This middle episode follows the five days that determined whether or not Lady Jane would survive on the throne. The reconstructions are decent and the CGI sparingly used; instead, Castor lets the experts do the talking in an engaging piece of narrative history, concluding tomorrow. GT Tunes of Glory (1960) ★★★☆☆ Movies4Men, 4.00pm British director Ronald Neame made some of the best-known films of the 20th century, including The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie and The Poseidon Adventure, but this was his personal favourite. It focuses on personal rivalries within a fictional Highland regiment after the Second World War. John Mills plays a new, authoritarian CO, and Alec Guinness – cast against type – gives an exceptional performance as his lax, hard-drinking predecessor. JFK (1991) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.55pm Oliver Stone is in conspiracy-theorist mode for this film about the murder of President John F Kennedy. Whatever you make of Stone’s theory that the assassination was an FBI plot, lawyer Jim Garrison’s (Kevin Costner) showdown moment when he demonstrates that JFK was killed by multiple bullets is jaw-dropping. Costner, fresh from the Oscars glory of Dances with Wolves, is a magnetic lead. The Social Network (2010) ★★★★★ Channel 4, 1.10am Jesse Eisenberg is superb as the gauche cyber-geek who became a billionaire in his twenties in this dazzling dramatisation of the story of Facebook. It may necessarily be speculative in parts about Mark Zuckerberg and his invention, but this is a brilliantly scripted and absolutely gripping tale of clashing egos, precocious talent and betrayal. Justin Timberlake and Andrew Garfield also star. Thursday 11 January Cheetahs in Namibia Credit: BBC Big Cats BBC One, 8.00pm One family, 40 different faces. That’s how this beautifully shot three-part series about the planet’s top wild predator, the cat, begins – with a kaleidoscope of feline faces that perfectly illustrates the huge variety and essential similarity between the many different branches of the family. Not all of them are big. One, the rusty-spotted cat – a kittenish, ultra-rare inhabitant of Sri Lanka’s jungles – is so tiny when fully grown that it can fit in the palm of your hand. Although it makes up for its small stature with surprising ferocity. The series took two years and 30 separate filming expeditions to make, travelling to all four corners of the globe to show just how adaptable wild cats have evolved to be. In this opening edition we see not only relatively familiar sights such as cheetahs and lions chasing down water buffalo and giraffe in Africa, but also some rarities, such as a snow leopard searching the Himalayas for a mate. Plus, Siberian tigers and the elusive Canada lynx make appearances. There are surprises, too, in footage of jaguars taking on caiman in the waters of the Pantanal, and pumas hunting penguin on the freezing southern shores of Patagonia. Gerard O’Donovan European Tour Golf: The BMW SA Open Sky Sports Main Event, 8.00am Action from the opening day’s play at the City of Ekurhuleni in Gauteng, South Africa, where Graeme Storm was the winner last year. Having very nearly lost his tour card in 2016, the Englishman defeated Northern Irish star Rory McIlroy in a play-off to win his second title on the tour and his first since the 2007 Open de France. EastEnders BBC One, 7.30pm Mel Owen (Tamzin Outhwaite) returns to Albert Square after a 16-year absence. Last time around she married twice, burnt down a nightclub, was kidnapped and slept with her best friend’s husband. So the producers’ promise of an “incredible” storyline for her comeback is probably, uh, credible. The Cruise: Return to the Mediterranean ITV, 8.30pm More stories of life on the cruise ship Royal Princess. Tonight, with 5,000 passengers and crew aboard, bad weather prevents the cruise ship from docking. England’s Forgotten Queen: The Life and Death of Lady Jane Grey BBC Four, 9.00pm The concluding part of Helen Castor’s fascinating account of England’s “nine-day queen” opens on the eighth day of her reign, with armies heading for Framlingham Castle where her Catholic rival for the throne, Mary Tudor, had assembled a powerful force. Within a day, 16-year-old Jane would be betrayed, abandoned and consigned to the Tower of London. But her legacy, according to Castor, was far greater than her brief time on the throne suggests. Transformation Street ITV, 9.00pm Wimpole Street, Marylebone, is home to the London Transgender Surgery, a private clinic catering for some of the estimated 130,000 Britons currently wishing to change gender. This revealing three-parter follows patients from initial consultations through to gender confirmation surgery. Walks with My Dog More4, 9.00pm The simple but engaging series in which celebrities take their four-legged friends for a trek through the UK’s more scenic parts makes a welcome return. This time Hadrian’s Wall, Norfolk and the Welsh mountains are among the destinations. Actress Caroline Quentin leads off tonight, taking her pooch for a stroll around the Helford estuary in Cornwall. GO Great Art ITV, 10.45pm In this second episode of the art series, Tim Marlow moves on to the 19th-century Parisian art collector Paul Durand-Ruel, whose financially risky landmark 1886 exhibition in New York thrust impressionism into the mainstream. Marlow examines his impact, and the lasting influence of Monet, Cézanne, Degas and Renoir. GO From Russia with Love (1963) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Ah, those were the days: the certainties of the Cold War, a beautiful Soviet defector and a chase across the Balkans. Will Spectre avenge the death of Dr No? No chance. Sean Connery was in the swing of things in his second outing as James Bond, pursued by two of 007’s best adversaries, in “Red” Grant (Robert Shaw) and Rosa Klebb (Lotte Lenya). Terence Young directs. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.15pm This superb adaptation of John le Carré’s brilliant, intricate Cold War spy novel is a triumph. The espionage drama follows the hunt for a Soviet double agent at the top of the British secret service, with Gary Oldman spearheading the excellent ensemble cast, which includes Colin Firth, Tom Hardy, John Hurt and Benedict Cumberbatch. It’s funny, seductive and suspenseful. GoodFellas (1990) ★★★★★ ITV4, 11.25pm Martin Scorsese’s Mafia masterpiece, adapted from a non-fiction book, has all the qualities of great cinema: it’s thrilling, it’s provocative, it’s stylish, and it’s got a young Robert De Niro in it. Ray Liotta plays the youngster who longs to be a gangster; De Niro and Joe Pesci are in the Mob. Pesci’s mother, meanwhile, reportedly asked him if he had to swear quite so much – the f-word is used 300 times. Friday 12 January Revd Matthew Stafford, Revd Nicholas Lowton, Fr Matthew Cashmore and Revd Ruth Hulse Credit: BBC A Vicar’s Life BBC Two, 8.30pm This amiable new series follows several vicars in their parishes in the Diocese of Hereford, the most rural in the Church of England. It’s the standard heart-warming mixture of births, marriages and deaths – or as likeable Reverend Matthew Stafford, vicar at the village of Much Wenlock, says: “hatched, matched and dispatched” – but, for all that sense of familiarity, it’s well-made and very engaging. This opening episode sees Matthew officiate at a lovely local wedding, and Reverend Nicholas Lowton, the Rural Dean of Abbeydore and Vicar of the Black Mountains Group, deal with the theft of the parish registry books (“whoever did this has got lessons that they need to learn”). Elsewhere, Reverend Ruth Hulse, Team Vicar for West Hereford, organises a funeral for much-loved former churchwarden Barbara. “It’s a huge loss, like losing a member of your own family,” she says. Everyone involved comes out of it well, and Matthew manages to sneak a message in amid the jokes: “I don’t take myself seriously, but I do take God and what I do very seriously,” he notes. So do his parishioners, many of whom admit that he’s helped them see the church in a more favourable light. Sarah Hughes PGA Tour Golf: The Sony Open Sky Sports Main Event, 12.01am The opening day of the tournament at the Waialae CC in Honolulu, Hawaii, where Justin Thomas won the title last year. Room 101 BBC One, 8.30pm Frank Skinner returns with a new series of the long-running show. This opener promises to be a lot of fun given that his guests, Charlie Brooker, Scarlett Moffatt and Pearl Mackie, are not short of opinion. Among the objects up for inclusion in Room 101 are crocodiles, mosquitos and haircuts. Rome Unpacked BBC Two, 9.00pm The second part of this food and art travelogue sees chef Giorgio Locatelli and art critic Andrew Graham-Dixon visit the Basilica di San Clemente, the Testaccio Slaughterhouse and the Palazzo Colonna. As before, a great deal of the fun comes from the way that each man learns from the other. David Bowie Evening BBC Four, from 9.00pm Two years after David Bowie’s death, BBC Four dedicates an evening to the rock great. First up is Francis Whately’s 2013 film David Bowie: Five Years in the Making of an Icon, which looks at key moments in his career. These include his time as Ziggy Stardust, his reinvention as the Thin White Duke, the making of 1977’s Heroes, and the global success of Let’s Dance. It’s followed by David Bowie and the Story of Ziggy Stardust, which looks at how Bowie created his most (in)famous alter ego. Lethal Weapon ITV, 9.00pm The rambunctious remake of the Danny Glover-Mel Gibson films roars back for a second series. It begins with an action-packed episode that sees Murtaugh (Damon Wayans) heading to Mexico to try to reign in partner Riggs (Clayne Crawford) who is still seeking vengeance for his wife’s death. Delicious Sky One, 9.00pm The second series of the foodie drama reaches its penultimate episode, and it’s the anniversary of philanderer Leo’s death, which the families plan to mark with a feast. Naturally, nothing goes smoothly – chef Gina (Dawn French) is pushed to the limits by her daughter Theresa’s (Tanya Reynolds) behaviour, while Gina’s love rival turned business partner Sam (Emilia Fox) takes out her anger on chef Adam (Aaron Anthony). SH The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm Expect a super-smooth evening as Graham Norton is joined by A-listers Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks, who discuss Steven Spielberg’s political drama The Post, but also share some good anecdotes amid all the mild ribbing. SH The Polka King (2017) Netflix, from today Exuberant Jack Black plays to his strengths in this biopic, based on the documentary The Man Who Would Be Polka King, about a flamboyant Polish émigré-turned-Polka King-turned-convicted Ponzi-scheme criminal. Despite being a film about a scoundrel who swindled senior citizens out of millions of dollars in order to achieve the American dream, it’s surprisingly entertaining, though a more serious consideration of con artists wouldn’t have gone amiss. The Frogmen (1951, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 4.35pm A pleasingly understated yet atmospheric war drama in which Richard Widmark stars as a tough Navy commander put in charge of a team of demolition divers on a South Pacific island. At first, the arrival of their superior goes down like a lead diving suit, but he soon wins them over by neutralising an undetonated torpedo. Due to the conditions being deemed too “riotous”, the female roles were written out. Get Out (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Get Out is one of the first films expressly to be set in a post-Obama era and is a breathlessly suspenseful exposé of the horror of liberal racism. Perfect, white Rose Armitage (Allison Williams) wants to allay the concerns of her boyfriend, black photographer Chris (Daniel Kaluuya), and invites him to meet her parents. They don’t bat an eyelid over his skin colour, but the film rattles with provocations. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
What's on TV tonight: Hard Sun and Wedding Day Winners
Saturday 6 January Hard Sun BBC One, 9.35pm The BBC launches into 2018 with this hard-boiled crime drama from Luther creator Neil Cross. It seems like a standard police procedural at first. Slick detective Charlie Hicks (Jim Sturgess) is paired up with an inscrutable new colleague, Elaine Renko (Agyness Deyn), and they head off to investigate an apparent suicide. Quickly, however, both the case and characters gather complexity. For a start, the main players have enticing back stories: Hicks is involved in a sensitive extramarital dalliance, whilst Renko is psychologically bruised from a recent violent break-in at her home. Equally intriguing, however, is the sci-fi-inspired twist that the investigation takes. We learn that behind the suicide lies an exchange of top-secret information confirming the destruction of the world in five years time. Goofy though this sounds, it gives undeniable tension to the episode as shadowy forces close in on our duo, and nicely sets things up for further thrills should news of the apocalypse break out. Sturgess and Deyn have enough chemistry to convince, and London, at its most relentlessly urban here, provides a bleakly atmospheric backdrop. Toby Dantzic FA Cup Football: Fleetwood Town v Leicester City BBC One, 12.45pm How’s this for a David-versus-Goliath affair, as League One’s Fleetwood Town take on the 2016 Premier League winners at Highbury Stadium? The Leicester have made it to the FA Cup final on four occasions but have never won the competition. The last time they appeared in the final, in April 1969, they lost 1-0 to Manchester City. Darts: BDO Lakeside World Professional Championships Channel 4, 12.45pm Coverage of the opening day of the tournament staged at Lakeside Country Club in Frimley Green, featuring matches in the first round of the men’s and ladies’ competitions. Forty men and 16 women from 17 countries do battle for the coveted prizes, won last year by Glen Durrant and Lisa Ashton. This afternoon, three-time Lakeside champion Martin “Wolfie” Adams takes on the number two seed Mark “Gladiator” McGeeney, before Ashton starts the defence of her title against Wales’s Rhian Griffiths. Hugh’s Wild West BBC Two, 6.15pm; Northern Ireland, 7.45pm Eco-friendly chef Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall takes us on a nature trail through his beloved West Country for this new series. He starts in the Wye Valley, “one of nature’s secret gardens”, where he introduces us to the Dipper, Britain’s only aquatic songbird. Wedding Day Winners BBC One, 7.25pm Lorraine Kelly and Rob Beckett host this new nuptial-themed Saturday night entertainment show. Two couples, along with their friends and families, compete in a series of challenges to win a televised wedding and lavish honeymoon. The Voice UK ITV, 8.00pm After just one series, last year’s new coach Gavin Rossdale is out nd in comes X Factor success story Olly Murs, as the singing contest begins its staggering seventh run. Emma Willis returns as the host, as the blind auditions get under way. Spiral BBC Four, 9.00pm and 10.00pm One of the first shows to pique our interest in European crime drama, this much-admired French series returned last week for its sixth outing. The discovery of a torso in a suitcase prompted tough police captain Laure Berthaud (Caroline Proust) to return from her maternity leave. This week, Berthaud and partner Lt Escoffier (Thierry Godard) grill two brothers who they believe have links to the deceased, and lawyer Joséphine Karlsson (Audrey Fleurot) pushes her client to plead guilty. Freddie Mercury: The Great Pretender Sky Arts, 9.00pm Rhys Thomas’s 2012 documentary explores Queen singer Freddie Mercury’s attempt to forge a solo career in the Eighties. The insights from his peers and the concert footage are compelling, but it’s the previously unseen interviews with and snippets of his collaborations with the likes of Michael Jackson that prove revelatory. TD Feud: Bette and Joan BBC Two, 9.15pm and 10.00pm Delightfully camp but moving all the same, Ryan Murphy’s dramatisation of this great Hollywood rivalry concludes with one last double bill. Joan Crawford (Jessica Lange) becomes increasingly riled by Bette Davis (Susan Sarandon), as the latter interferes with her performance on their latest film collaboration, Hush… Hush, Sweet Charlotte. TD West Side Story (1961) ★★★★★ Channel 5, 11.40am The vertiginous energy and heart make this one of the greatest musicals. Jerome Robbins’s inspired choreography needs the biggest screen it can get; when the film’s firing on all cylinders of music, lyrics and motion, there’s little to touch it. Natalie Wood and Richard Beymer are lovers from opposite sides of the tracks, while Leonard Bernstein’s heady score perfectly aids their battle. The Letter (1940, b/w) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 3.00pm By 1940, Bette Davis was the biggest star. She’d just won her second Oscar for Jezebel, giving a performance that typified women of the era – wild, wilful, destructive, bitchy. But in William Wyler’s film noir, based on W Somerset Maugham’s short story, she careened towards tragedy with self-annihilating abandon. Davis plays Leslie, who kills a man in self defence, but an incriminating letter casts doubt on her story. The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 2 (2015) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Jennifer Lawrence and Philip Seymour Hoffman – in his last film – end the Hunger Games series with an electrifying, high-stakes final showdown. In addition to the two leads, Part 2 groans with the collective talents of Donald Sutherland, Julianne Moore and Woody Harrelson as vengeful modern heroine Katniss (Lawrence) prepares to win the war. Sunday 7 January Michael Palin Credit: BBC Michael Palin: a Life on Screen BBC Two, 9.00pm Telling Michael Palin’s story from his birth to the film Death of Stalin (in which he played Minister Molotov), this profile of the “Nicest Man in Showbiz” is a pleasure from start to finish. First realising his talents in improvised shows for his school friends, Palin found kindred spirits and his comic mojo as part of the Oxford Revue at the Edinburgh Festival, eventually parlaying his skills as a jobbing writer and performer into a series that changed the comedy landscape forever: Monty Python’s Flying Circus was born after an apparently disastrous meeting ended with a BBC commissioner pronouncing sternly, “all right, I’ll give you 13 episodes. But that’s all!” While John Cleese provides the tongue-in-cheek venom (describing Palin as “a sociopath”), Connie Booth, David Jason and Armando Iannucci pay tribute to a versatile talent. An abundance of clips confirm that alongside the comic genius of Python and Ripping Yarns lay a serious actor of genuine heft (as seen in GBH and Brazil), the gifted travel journalist of Around the World in 80 Days and a successful and engaging diarist. Palin, too, chips in with observations and memories, all delivered with charismatic humility and self-deprecation. Gabriel Tate Into the Forest BBC Three, from 10.00am This uneven but intriguing Canadian indie film didn’t find much of an audience when it was released in 2015 but will be now shown online via BBC Three. Evan Rachel Wood (Westworld) and Ellen Page (Juno) star in this dystopian drama as Nell and Eva, two sisters living in a forest with their father in the near future. They find their isolated existence under threat when a district-wide power cut sparks anarchy and increasing desperation in the nearby town. FA Cup Football: Shrewsbury Town v West Ham United BBC One, 1.40pm More potential giant-killing in the FA Cup, as League One side Shrewsbury Town try to cut down West Ham at Montgomery Waters Meadow. The visitors have won the FA Cup three times but haven’t lifted the trophy since 1980, when they beat Arsenal 1-0, thanks to a goal by Trevor Brooking. Shrewsbury made it through to the third round by beating against Aldershot Town and Morecambe. Premiership Rugby Union: Wasps v Saracens BT Sport 1, 2.30pm Having beaten Bath 31-26 at the Rec last weekend, Wasps look to continue their fine form in the new year at home to second-placed Saracens. The away side will be full of confidence, though: they capped off an impressive 2017 with a 46-31 victory over Worcester Warriors, with Jackson Wray and Nathan Earle both scoring try doubles as Saracens ran in six tries at Allianz Park. When these sides last met here, a hat-trick from Thomas Young helped Wasps to a 35-15 victory. A repeat performance here will see them leapfrog Saracens in the table. Dancing on Ice ITV, 6.00pm Back after a four-year absence, Jayne Torvill and Christopher Dean return with Dancing on Ice, but they are no longer coaches. They are now be assessing the ice-skating abilities of a dozen celebrities, including Bucks Fizz alumna Cheryl Baker and Great British Bake Off 2016 champion Candice Brown. Joe Cocker Night Sky Arts, from 6.45pm One of the finest of all the white blues and soul shouters, Joe Cocker’s gargling, howling delivery was most famously captured in his performance of With a Little Help from My Friends at Woodstock. This double bill begins with the concert film Fire It Up: Live, and Cocker performing in Cologne on his final tour before his death in 2014. John Edginton’s biographical documentary, Mad Dog with Soul, follows at 9.00pm. GT Attenborough and the Sea Dragon BBC One, 8.00pm David Attenborough pursues his lifelong passion of fossilology on Britain’s Jurassic Coast. The 200-million-year-old bones of an Ichthyosaur must be dug out of the Dorset cliffs, analysed and finally recreated using computer technology. Vera ITV, 8.00pm The eighth series of the murder mystery begins with DCI Vera Stanhope (the excellent Brenda Blethyn) investigating how a respected fraud officer came to be incinerated in an abbatoir. Her enquiries lead her into a close-knit fishing community and clashes with her fellow coppers. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm In this extraordinary venture, Dick Strawbridge and a team of fellow enthusiasts attempt to build a model railway to stretch 71 miles from Fort William to Inverness. The project will require viaducts, bridges and even a miniature ferry, all documented over the next five weeks. GT And Now for Something Completely Different (1971) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.00pm; N Ireland, 11.30pm Fans of Monty Python’s Flying Circus rejoice – this compilation film is a feast of the comedians’ favourite sketches from the first two TV series. With John Cleese introducing a number of scenes with: “And now, for something completely different”, it’s a fun trip into the archives, including as the “dead parrot” sketch. Captain Phillips (2013) ★★★★☆ ITV, 10.10pm Paul Greengrass (United 93 and three Bourne films) has a rare gift for working with action-thriller material and making something cohesive, layered and complex from it. With this account of Somali pirates boarding an American cargo ship and kidnapping its captain (Tom Hanks), he remains at the top of his game. Hanks may be the big draw, but it’s the pirates who impress, especially Bafta-winning Barkhad Abdi. Stations of the Cross (2015) ★★★☆☆ BBC Four, 11.00pm This cold, preachy German film from director Dietrich Brüggemann plays out over 14 single-shot scenes, each titled after a station of the cross on Christ’s walk to Calvary and to mirror the restrictions of religious fundamentalism. Its story, about a 14-year-old girl who pursues the ideals of Christian self-sacrifice to terrifying extremes, won the best script gong at the Berlin International Film Festival. Monday 8 January Archie Panjabi Credit: ITV Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Written by Indian Summers creator Paul Rutman and partner Natasha Narayan, this atmospheric six-part thriller has a fine cast and gets off to an instantly intriguing start. Emmy-winner Archie Panjabi is a smart and sympathetic presence as British-Pakistani doctor Mona Harcourt, who, together with her well-connected political lobbyist husband Guy (Jack Davenport) and wider family, is preparing to celebrate the return from Lahore of her beloved brother Kareem (Navin Chowdhry). His failure to arrive as expected on the day a terrorist incident in London results in four deaths, and brings the city to a standstill. It sets in motion a series of terrifying consequences – the most disturbing of which is the sudden intense interest in the family of the anti-terrorism unit of the Metropolitan Police. It is a credible, and in parts distressing, depiction of what it is like to be an ordinary British Muslim in the wake of such an attack, especially when it emerges that the real focus of the police investigation is not Kareem, but his 18-year-old student son Danny (Viveik Kalra) who had been becoming increasingly isolated from the family in the weeks before the attack. Gerard O’Donovan Star Trek: Discovery Netflix, from today Following an eight-week break, the latest incarnation of the Star Trek franchise returns to complete its debut run. The previous episode ended on a twist that saw the USS Discovery cast out into unchartered space. Unsurprisingly, this 10th episode picks up with Captain Lorca (Jason Isaacs) and crew facing a raft of previously unimagined threats in their eventful efforts to find a way home. How to Lose Weight Well Channel 4, 8.00pm Dr Xand van Tulleken and dietician Hala El-Shafie take a new approach to diet testing, dividing a group of volunteers into three categories: crashers (short-term diets), shape shifters (six-week programmes) and life changers (four-month plans) to see which of the current popular diets are most effective. Silent Witness BBC One, 9.00pm The enduringly popular pathologists-playing-cops drama kicks off its 21st series with a typically slow burn two-parter. As Nikki Alexander (Emilia Fox) struggles to get over her Mexican ordeal, a close friend (Emma Fielding) goes missing. Surgeons: At the Edge of Life BBC Two, 9.00pm Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham’s busy surgical unit is the focus of this new series following surgeons, theatre staff and patients through operations at the cutting edge of medicine. In the first edition, maxillofacial surgeons tackle a marathon operation on a 53-year-old diagnosed with a major facial tumour. My Astonishing Self: Gabriel Byrne on George Bernard Shaw BBC Four, 9.00pm An actor’s homage to a playwright becomes a fascinating exploration of the life and work of a literary Titan of the early 20th century.George Bernard Shaw was a pioneering socialist, feminist and philosopher as well as the writer of hugely popular plays such as Pygmalion. Here, Gabriel Byrne assesses the character and legacy of a man whose intelligence, charm and social conscience, and ingenuity for self-promotion, propelled him to global renown. GO The Undateables Channel 4, 9.00pm A fresh crop of singletons looking for love includes a rugby-playing chef from Hull with Tourette’s, a bookseller from Cambridgeshire with Asperger’s, and a photography graduate from London with scoliosis. GO Gallipoli (1981) ★★★★★ Film4, 6.35pm Director Peter Weir’s tale of war and friendship in 1915 – one of his very finest films – reaches a devastating finale in the clash between Australians and Turks on the shore of the Dardanelles. Mel Gibson’s race through the trenches with a crucial message – ignore the last order! – is more pulse-quickening than a dozen Bravehearts. You pray for him to beat that whistle every time. Harold Hopkins also stars. Life of Pi (2012) ★★★★★ E4, 8.00pm Ang Lee’s warm, wise and wondrous adventure story, adapted from Yann Martel’s 2002 Booker Prize-winning novel, follows Pi (Suraj Sharma), shipwrecked in the South Pacific with Richard Parker, a Bengal tiger named after the hunter who captured him. Its kaleidoscopic imagery is some of the most advanced ever, but the story unfolds with such simplicity and clarity that it could almost be a silent movie. Logan (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Hugh Jackman’s third – and best – lone outing for his whiskery mutant Wolverine. You might assume James Mangold’s film, set in the near future, where a weary Logan meets a young mutant much like himself, is meant as a sequel to the two other Wolverine movies, but watching it, you’re struck by the thought that this paranoid, violent noir western is the real, shotgun-toting deal. Tuesday 9 January Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman Credit: AFP House of Saud: A Family at War BBC Two, 9.00pm This detailed three-part series on the ruling family of Saudi Arabia makes for unmissable if terrifying television. Dispensing with any sort of Adam Curtis-style frills, the opening film simply talks us through the House of Saud’s involvement in recent history, from Sarajevo to Syria. Hearing from intelligence analysts and long-time Saudi observers, it builds a complicated picture of the uneasy relationship between the Saudi royal family and Wahhabism, the particular strain of Islam they promote. It’s a story that encompasses a small hamlet in Bosnia, a family home in India, weapons dealt from Bulgaria to Afghanistan and online films watched all over the world. Much is made of the new Crown Prince, Mohammed bin Salman, and his desire for reform (“It’s not a question of how important he is to this – he is this,” announces one observer) but it remains hard to judge just how much of his actions are driven by genuine belief and how much constitute a power grab. Ultimately what lingers is not the political revelations, interesting though they are, but the interviews with the blinded of Syria, the wounded of Iraq, the devastated of Bosnia: the countless casualties of the geopolitical game. Sarah Hughes England’s Forgotten Queen: The Life and Death of Lady Jane Grey BBC Four, 9.00pm Tudor England might seem like a subject that has been covered so much that there is nothing new to be said about it. But hold on to those gripes because Helen Castor’s detailed look at the nine-day reign of Lady Jane Grey is an invigorating, intelligent take on the period. Using a wide range of old documents and interesting voices, Castor guides us through Jane’s brief, unlucky life, examining how she ended up as a pawn between two powerful factions and why it was that she found herself raised from relative obscurity to the dizzying heights of the English throne. School for Stammerers ITV, 9.00pm Speech impediments can be devastating to live with, as this thoughtful film, which follows six people living with a stammer, demonstrates. One solution on offer is the intensive McGuire Programme, a residential course that promises life-changing results albeit under tough conditions. 24 Hours in A&E Channel 4, 9.00pm The fly-on-the-wall medical series continues with this week’s patients including Marie, who arrives by ambulance at St George’s Hospital having collapsed at home with an unexplained headache. The Blacklist Sky One, 9.00pm The ludicrous and yet strangely enjoyable US spy series continues with James Spader’s slick Red this week setting his sights on wealthy art thief Greyson Blaise (Owain Yeoman). While Red gallivants abroad Tom (Ryan Eggold) seeks help to identify the bones in the suitcase. SH Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm This melancholy tale in the excellent comedy anthology is of rivalry and friendship lost. Reece Shearsmith is Tommy, who grumpily agrees to perform with former stand-up partner Len (Steve Pemberton), 30 years after they split in mysterious circumstances. Working Class White Men Channel 4, 10.00pm Rapper Professor Green has been quietly making a name for himself as a film-maker and this fascinating film about white working-class men is one of the week’s highlights. Green’s tense meeting with Britain First will garner the headlines but there is hope here too, with Lewis, the teenage would-be mathematician, the show’s highlight. SH The Fault in Our Stars (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Josh Boone’s film, adapted from the phenomenally successful young-adult novel, about two American teenagers both diagnosed with cancer is wisely observed and tenderly performed, most notably by Shailene Woodley. The basic storyline is so worn it’s close to threadbare – Love Story told it more than 40 years ago – but it comes with enough quirks to give it the appearance of freshness. The Lincoln Lawyer (2011) ★★★☆☆ More4, 9.00pm He won acclaim for his role as enigmatic detective Rust Cohle in the TV series True Detective, but Oscar winner Matthew McConaughey stars here in the sort of courtroom drama for which he made his name. This time he’s Mick Haller, a slick LA defence lawyer who prefers to represent the guilty. However, a wealthy new client (Ryan Phillippe) prompts Haller to address his own past sins. Billy Liar (1963, b/w) ★★★☆☆ London Live, 12.00midnight Best known for Midnight Cowboy, for which he won three Oscars, John Schlesinger ranged from violent thrillers (Marathon Man) to romantic epics (Far from the Madding Crowd) to perceptive human studies (An Englishman Abroad), but he indicated the breadth of his ambitions with this gritty social drama featuring Tom Courtenay as an undertaker’s clerk with extravagant fantasies. Wednesday 10 January Sarah Lancashire Credit: Channel 4 Kiri Channel 4, 9.00pm Screenwriter Jack Thorne follows up the excellent National Treasure with another superbly cast, nimble and dark exploration of contemporary mores. Thorne’s careful research is all over this opening episode of four, yet it never feels didactic or clumsy. Kiri follows the investigation into the abduction of the titular black girl Kiri Akindele (Felicia Mukasa) by her birth family, just days before she is due to be adopted by her white foster family, headed up by Lia Williams and Steven Mackintosh. Sarah Lancashire plays Miriam Grayson, the social worker who allows Kiri’s ill-fated unsupervised visit. Lancashire picks her projects carefully, and this is a performance to rank alongside her Bafta-winning turn in Happy Valley: Miriam is an imperfect Samaritan, trying her best amid funding cuts, weak superiors and a dormant drink problem. From the moment that the girl disappears and director Euros Lyn’s colour palette darkens, the focus seems to be as much on apportioning blame as finding the missing girl. It’s a desperate situation shot through with guilt and human frailty, yet not without humour; another modern tragedy from a writer who specialises in them. Gabriel Tate The Truth About Looking Good BBC One, 8.00pm Cherry Healey and 25 volunteers and experts from the Universities of Sheffield and Sunderland join forces to separate scientific fact from marketing fiction in the £9 billion per annum industry of cosmetics, in particular weighing up the pros and cons of moisturisers and cellulite solutions. Britain’s Brightest Family ITV, 8.00pm Anne Hegerty – familiar as The Chase’s Governess – oversees a new quiz show in which family members must show off their own general knowledge and nominate relatives according to their perceived areas of expertise. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This fascinating series finds fashion historian Amber Butchart displaying a variety of eye-catching headgear to scrutinise Jan van Eyck’s The Arnolfini Portrait for clues about its subjects and