Scotland RU

Scotland slideshow

Rugby Union - Lion bite victim Baldwin feared he could lose his hand

Scotland's hooker Fraser Brown tackles Wales' Scott Baldwin during the Six Nations international rugby union match between Scotland and Wales at Murrayfield in Edinburgh, Scotland on Febuary 25, 2017. Scotland won the match 29-13. (AFP Photo/Andy Buchanan)

Saracens hooker Jamie George makes a break during the rugby union European Champions Cup Final match between Saracens and Clermont Auvergne at Murrayfield Stadium in Edinburgh, Scotland on May 13, 2017

Saracens hooker Jamie George makes a break during the rugby union European Champions Cup Final match between Saracens and Clermont Auvergne at Murrayfield Stadium in Edinburgh, Scotland on May 13, 2017

Former Prime Minister of Great Britain David Cameron in the stands before the match

Britain Rugby Union - England v Scotland - Six Nations Championship - Twickenham Stadium, London - 11/3/17 Former Prime Minister of Great Britain David Cameron in the stands before the match Reuters / Stefan Wermuth Livepic

Reece Hodge of Australia scores their first try

Britain Rugby Union - Scotland v Australia - Murrayfield, Edinburgh, Scotland - 12/11/16 Reece Hodge of Australia scores their first try Action Images via Reuters / Lee Smith Livepic

Reece Hodge of Australia scores their first try

FILE PHOTO - Britain Rugby Union - Scotland v Australia - Murrayfield, Edinburgh, Scotland - 12/11/16 Reece Hodge of Australia scores their first try Action Images via Reuters / Lee Smith Livepic EDITORIAL USE ONLY

England's flanker James Haskell (2nd R) congratulates No. 8 Nathan Hughes following their Six Nations rugby union match against Scotland, at Twickenham in London, in March 2017

England's flanker James Haskell (2nd R) congratulates No. 8 Nathan Hughes following their Six Nations rugby union match against Scotland, at Twickenham in London, in March 2017

England's flanker James Haskell (2nd R) congratulates No. 8 Nathan Hughes following their Six Nations rugby union match against Scotland, at Twickenham in London, in March 2017

England's flanker James Haskell (2nd R) congratulates No. 8 Nathan Hughes following their Six Nations rugby union match against Scotland, at Twickenham in London, in March 2017 (AFP Photo/Ben STANSALL)

Rugby Union - Woodward's last gasp try deals Exeter early shock

Gloucester's New Zealand lock Jeremy Thrush (C) is tackled by Stade Francais' French prop Rabah Slimani (L) during the rugby union European Challenge Cup Final match between Gloucester Rugby and Stade Francais Paris at Murrayfield Stadium in Edinburgh, Scotland on May 12, 2017. (AFP Photo/Odd ANDERSEN)

Rugby Union - Scotland lock Gray undergoes back operation

Castres' Loic Jacquet vies with Toulouse's lock Richie Gray in a line out during the French Top 14 rugby union match between Castres and Stade Toulousain, in Castres, on April 29, 2017, at the Pierre Antoine stadium, in Castres, southern France. (AFP Photo/REMY GABALDA)

Paddy Jackson of Ireland scores try as he is tackled by Josh Strauss of Scotland

Britain Rugby Union - Scotland v Ireland - Six Nations Championship - BT Murrayfield Stadium, Edinburgh - 4/2/17 Paddy Jackson of Ireland scores try as he is tackled by Josh Strauss of Scotland Reuters / Russell Cheyne Livepic EDITORIAL USE ONLY.

Rugby Union - Scotland hand call-ups to seven uncapped players

Scotland rugby coach Gregor Townsend (L) passes the ball during their Captain's Run in Sydney on June 16, 2017.Scotland plays Australia in a Test match in Sydney on June 17. (AFP Photo/WILLIAM WEST)

Scotland v Australia - viagogo Autumn Test Series

Rugby Union - Scotland v Australia - viagogo Autumn Test Series - Murrayfield, Edinburgh, Scotland - 23/11/13 Christian Lealiifano of Australia lines up a kick at goal Mandatory Credit: Action Images / Graham Stuart

In this photo from June 17, 2017, Australia's Will Genia, left, sidesteps Scotland's Finn Russell during their rugby union test match in Sydney. Wallabies scrumhalf Genia has signed a two-year deal to join the Melbourne Rebels in the Super Rugby competition. (AP Photo/Rick Rycroft)

Rugby Union - RugbyU: Scotland's Jackson rejoins Glasgow

Scotland's Ruaridh Jackson lines up ahead of the 2015 Rugby World Cup warm up match between and Ireland and Scotland at Aviva Stadium in Dublin, Ireland on August 15, 2015. AFP PHOTO / PAUL FAITH (AFP Photo/PAUL FAITH)

Rugby Union - RugbyU: England wing May swaps Gloucester for Leicester

Gloucester's English wing Jonny May runs in the opening try for Gloucester during the rugby union European Challenge Cup Final match between Gloucester Rugby and Stade Francais Paris at Murrayfield Stadium in Edinburgh, Scotland on May 12, 2017. (AFP Photo/Odd ANDERSEN)

What's on TV tonight: Diana: In Her Own Words, plus Women’s Football

Sunday 6 August Diana: In Her Own Words Channel 4, 8.00pm Much controversy has surrounded this documentary, which broadcasts – for the first time in the UK – video footage recorded in 1992 and 1993 by Diana, Princess of Wales’s voice coach, Peter Settelen. Hired to help Diana reframe her public image and put forward her own side of the story regarding her marriage, Settelen saw his work bear fruit in his client’s Panorama interview. Now there is undoubted interest in watching Diana recount key events in her life unmediated, with candour and a seductive mix of charm and steel. “He chatted me up like a bad rash,” she recalls of her future husband at one point; at another, she remembers being “completely thrown” by the Prince of Wales’s peculiar response to a question about them being in love. Diana: The Secret Rebel 01:24 In truth, director Kevin Sim rather crams the at-times uncomfortably intimate footage into the first and final thirds of the documentary, leaving assorted friends and confidants to tell the rest of the very familiar story, and the melodrama is laid on a little thick at times. Exploitative? Perhaps. Fascinating? In patches, although it probably won’t entirely satisfy either those looking for genuinely fresh insights or an opportunity to be outraged. Gabriel Tate Community Shield Football: Arsenal v Chelsea BT Sport 1, 1.00pm Arsenal and Chelsea meet for the second time in as many weeks, with Antonio Conte’s Blues favourites to lift the Community Shield today having won 3-0 in Beijing thanks to a brace from Michy Batshuayi.  Women’s Football: Euro 2017 Channel 4, 3.00pm After a thrilling tournament – during which a record 3.3 million people tuned in to watch England’s Lionesses beat France 1-0 – we’re at the FC Twente Stadion in Enschede, Holland, as the successors to Germany are crowned.   LSO Sky Arts, 6.00pm Originally, and rather impishly, hinting at a “greatest hits” of Haydn, Simon Rattle and his Imaginary Orchestral Journey instead took movements from 11 of the Austrian composer’s works, many of them rarely performed, and realigned them joyfully and perceptively in this concert with the London Symphony Orchestra. Works from Bartók and an extract from Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde provide the hors d’oeuvre for this enticing programme.   BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 7.00pm One of the most anticipated events of every Prom season, the National Youth Orchestra of Great Britain brings its energy and drive to the Royal Albert Hall. First comes the London premiere of Francisco Coll’s “grotesque symphony” Mural and Thomas Adès conducting his own work, Polaris, for the first time in the capital. The climax comes courtesy of Igor Stravinsky and his agelessly thrilling Rite of Spring. It is introduced by Suzy Klein and Lloyd Coleman. GT Secrets of Silicon Valley BBC Two, 8.00pm Blogger Jamie Bartlett investigates whether technological progress should be made at any cost. On the one side, he meets those tackling climate change; on the other, those paying the price for the success of Uber and, somewhere in the middle, the pioneers of self-driving cars.    Poldark BBC One, 9.00pm Having barrelled along entertainingly, with the undercurrent of hardscrabble misery intact, this third series concludes with sightings of French sails spotted on the horizon and Cornwall put on high alert. Meanwhile, Cap’n Ross (Aidan Turner) contends with a broadside from George Warleggan  (Jack Farthing).   The Last Days of Patrick Swayze Channel 5, 10.00pm Given the fact that he died from pancreatic cancer aged 57, we can reasonably surmise that the Dirty Dancing star’s final hours were not wholly pleasant. So, what can forensic pathologist Jason Payne-James, perusing Swayze’s medical records, add to the story?   Gareth Thomas: Hate in the Beautiful Game BBC Two, 10.30pm; not NI Former Welsh rugby union captain Gareth Thomas, who came out in 2009 while still playing, asks why football has shamefully remained a bastion of open homophobia – perhaps the last in sport. GT Frozen (2013) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 1.40pm  Disney’s 53rd feature is an enchanting combination of fairytale derring-do and heart-popping musical numbers that has left children and adults powerless to its charms (even if some parents may have grown rather tired of it). Elsa (Idina Menzel) is a shy princess driven into exile when her magical powers are discovered. Her sister Anna (Kristen Bell) gallops off to fetch her from her beautiful ice palace. The King’s Speech (2010) ★★★★★ Channel 4, 9.50pm  Tom Hooper’s film about the future George VI’s struggle to overcome his stammer in the nation’s hour of need won multiple Academy Awards, including a deserved Best Actor gong for Colin Firth. But it’s his double-act with Geoffrey Rush as his speech therapist Lionel Logue that gives the film its heart, and the doublehanders between them are fraught and fascinating. Point Break (1991) ★★★☆☆ Channel 5, 11.05pm Kathryn Bigelow’s cult surfing/crime film elevated Patrick Swayze’s actor status to true action hero. Keanu Reeves plays Johnny Utah, an FBI agent who goes undercover to infiltrate the Ex-Presidents, a gang of bankrobbing surfers led by the charismatic Bodhi (Swayze). The action heats up when Bodhi and Utah find they share a similar attitude towards danger. Lori Petty is the surfer who catches Johnny’s eye. Monday 7 August Eden: Paradise Lost - the participants Credit: Channel 4 Eden: Paradise Lost Channel 4, 10.00pm In March 2016, 23 idealists set out to take part in Channel 4’s Eden experiment, which, a touch grandiosely, sought to establish “a new society” from scratch, cut off from the modern world on a remote Scottish peninsula for an entire year. “What if we could start again?” was the much-hyped tag line. And the answer was… well, we never got to find out the answer because the series was pulled last summer, after just four episodes, when viewing figures took a dive from 1.7 million to less than 800,000.  Not that Channel 4 or production company Keo Films thought to tell the participants that. Instead they were left to get on with it. Rumours swirled of Lord of the Flies levels of acrimony, mass defections, starvation, health problems, people eating chicken feed to survive. So it could make for absorbing viewing in this five-part update, which airs every night this week. Although probably the greatest fascination will be in seeing the reactions of the 10 participants who suffered through to the end as they emerged from the nightmare in March this year only to discover that their efforts have mostly been in vain – and that the political landscape has drastically altered while they were gone. Gerard O’Donovan Stacey Dooley Investigates: Divide and National Pride in Northern Ireland  BBC Three, from 10.00am The intrepid reporter discovers that bitter political divisions persist in Northern Ireland as she seeks to discover more about Prime Minister Theresa May’s new allies in the Democratic Unionist Party. The Bug Grub Couple BBC One, 7.30pm Bug burger or beef burger? That’s the choice at the Grub restaurant in Pembrokeshire, part of entomologist Dr Sarah Beynon and chef Andy Holcroft’s Bug Farm – an insect zoo, research centre and insect eaterie. Here they struggle to convince us why we all should learn to love eating insect protein.   Masters Tennis: The Rogers Cup Sky Sports Main Event, 7.00pm The Uniprix Stadium in Montreal is the setting, as the Rogers Cup gets under way. Novak Djokovic lifted the trophy in 2016 for the fourth time, defeating Kei Nishikori in the final. The Serbian misses out this time around, though, due to injury.  Tornado: The 100mph Steam Engine BBC Four, 8.00pm If phrases like “it’s a Peppercorn class A1 Pacific” get you all steamed up you’ll be in heaven with this account of how a bunch of engineering enthusiasts got the massive locomotive they took 18 years to build from scratch to take on the ultimate test: hitting 100 miles per hour, a speed no British steam train has achieved since 1967.    Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm This new, live, animal rescue show with Steve Jones, Kate Quilton and Noel Fitzpatrick attempts to rehome a whole shelter’s worth of dogs, cats and assorted other species. Among the celebs espousing the joy of pets in this opener is pop singer Leona Lewis. Continues until Friday.   Man in an Orange Shirt BBC Two, 9.00pm In part two of novelist Patrick Gale’s drama for the Gay Britannia season, more than half a century on, Flora (Vanessa Redgrave) gives her late husband’s cottage to their grandson Adam (Julian Morris), who finds himself drawn to his architect, Steve (David Gyasi).   Inside Heston’s World Good Food, 9.00pm This four-part series chronicles chef Heston Blumenthal’s attempt to bring a flavour of his Fat Duck restaurant to Australia, in a multi-million pound move to Melbourne last year. GO Make or Break? Channel 5, 10.00pm A new reality series, stripped across the week, in which eight troubled couples test the strength of their relationships at a Mexican holiday resort, where alongside counselling and therapy sessions, they have to swap partners every two days. GO Doctor Dolittle (1967) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 5.05pm  This is not the Eddie Murphy comedy version from 1998 but the charming Sixties musical directed by Richard Fleischer. Rex Harrison stars as the terse, eponymous doctor who has the uncanny ability to speak to animals and so embarks on a voyage to find an elusive pink sea snail and a giant lunar moth. Samantha Egger, 20 years Harrison’s junior, co-stars as the adventurous stowaway who falls in love with the doctor.  Storks (2016) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 6.20pm  Warner Animation Group’s first film since 2014’s The Lego Movie is spectacularly daft but manages to be both moving and very fun. Here the storks of the title have moved on from delivering babies to big business and now transport products for an Amazon-style website. But then the old baby-making machine, gathering dust in the corner, is accidentally reactivated and suddenly they have a baby to get home.  American History X (1998) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm  Tony Kaye directs this compellingly violent and brutal examination of white supremacism in America. Edward Norton is both mesmerising and terrifying as Derek, a student drawn into the Neo-Nazi movement who mercilessly kills two black youths. After a stint in prison he’s reformed but returns  home to find his younger brother Danny (Edward Furlong) on the same track he was. Tuesday 8 August Jodie Whittaker and Emun Elliott Credit: BBC Trust Me BBC One, 9.00pm Before she becomes the Doctor in Doctor Who, Jodie Whittaker stars in a drama about… pretending to be a doctor. No doubt there will soon be many jokes about that floating around. In this new four-part drama, written by real-life doctor Dan Sefton, Whittaker stars as Cath, a downtrodden ward sister who is fired when she takes her concerns about the conditions in her Sheffield hospital to the trust. Then, when at the leaving party for her best friend Alison – who’s about to begin a new life in New Zealand – she spots Alison’s CV and medical degree certificate in a bin.  So Cath decides to adopt Alison’s identity and, hoping that her nursing skills will be enough to get by, find a job as a doctor far away in Edinburgh. Though the premise may sound a little daft, it’s actually surprisingly – and worryingly – common. Sefton uses his hospital know-how to bring a sense of authenticity to what is a really quite gripping drama.  Whittaker, rather than channelling a cocky Leonardo DiCaprio in Catch Me if You Can, is every inch the terrified woman flying by the seat of her pants. Excellent, too, is Emun Elliot as the colleague who catches her eye. Catherine Gee EastEnders BBC One, 7.30pm Mick’s (Danny Dyer) dastardly behaviour comes to a head in this special three-hander episode. He decides to tell wife Linda (Kellie Bright) the truth about what he’s been up to while she was away: namely cheating on her with their daughter-in-law Whitney (Shona McGarty).    Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm It’s the second nightly visit to this admirable project, which seeks to rehouse all the animals  in a Newcastle shelter in just a week. While we meet the wide range of animals and see how many still remain, Dom Joly also learns what happens to micropigs when they grow up.     The Dog Rescuers with Alan Davies Channel 5, 8.00pm Among the five unlucky pups needing some loving care from the team this week are an abandoned staffie who’s given a second chance and a young spaniel with a nasty neck wound.     Get a House for Free Channel 4, 9.00pm Marco Robinson is a very rich man – £25 million rich, in fact. He made his fortune through a business and property empire and now he wants to give back. So he’s decided to give away a three-bed flat in Preston to the person who he thinks will benefit the most. This film follows him as he attempts to sift through 8,000 applications. CG Utopia: In Search of the Dream BBC Four, 9.00pm It’s 500 years since the term “utopia” was coined by Sir Thomas More in 1516. In this documentary, art historian Professor Richard Clay examines five centuries of the concept of utopia and the impact it has had on our way of thinking. Often used as a method of criticism of the current system, it is a powerful vision. Clay considers some of our “greatest utopian dreamers”, including Jonathan Swift, author of Gulliver’s Travels, and Gene Roddenberry, creator of Star Trek, and the common themes that run through the ideal.     The Yorkshire Dales and the Lakes More4, 9.00pm The cosy documentary series continues with a farmer finding an unusual method to keep track of his sheep: day-glo paint. Elsewhere in the Dales, we follow the Dent Brewery boys as they create their own craft ales and in the Lake District we see Jon Bennett make his daily ascent to the summit of Helvellyn. CG The Parent Trap (1961) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am   In a film that helped pioneer the split-screen technique, Hayley Mills plays both Susan Evers and Sharon McKendrick, twins unaware of each other’s existence and separated as babies following their parents’ divorce. When they meet, years later, at summer camp, the pair scheme to reunite their parents. This classic Disney comedy spawned three sequels and a 1998 remake starring a young Lindsay Lohan. Tootsie (1982) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.30pm  When actor Michael Dorsey transforms himself into Dorothy Michaels in a desperate attempt to get work, complications arise as he falls for a female friend (Jessica Lange) and her father (Charles Durning)  falls for him. Although you never quite believe that Dustin Hoffman in drag would convince everyone that he’s a woman, it doesn’t matter: Tootsie is lots of fun – and it’s a sharply observed social satire, too. Groundhog Day (1993) ★★★★☆ Sky1, 9.00pm  In this wonderful comedy drama, a surly, sardonic weatherman (Bill Murray) is sent to the small US town of Punxsutawney to cover the annual groundhog festival, but finds himself experiencing precisely the same events over and over – then realises that he can free himself from the loop only by being a nicer person. One criticism: as always, Murray is so much more likeable as the malevolent grouch… Wednesday 9 August My Family, Partition and Me: India 1947 - Anita Rani  Credit: BBC My Family, Partition and Me: India 1947 BBC One, 9.00pm Two years ago, Anita Rani learnt how her family history was forever marked by the 1947 Partition of India in a memorable episode of Who Do You Think You Are? Now, she has wrangled three members of the public – one Hindu, one Christian and one Muslim – to explore how their own lives, and those of their ancestors, were affected by the appalling and widespread outbreaks of religious violence in the wake of Britain’s messy, compromised withdrawal, and the troubled legacy left by the Empire. In addition to eyewitness testimonies, the descendants of the survivors travel back to India, Pakistan and Bangladesh to retrace the journeys their relatives were forced to make. Their discoveries are in equal parts shocking, distressing and uplifting, and its treatment is rightly sensitive for events still in living memory: tears flow freely, yet it’s never sentimental. If there isn’t much space to dig into the wider political situation, the complex reasons behind the violence and longer-term implications, the detail of the personal recollections and anecdotes tells its own powerful tale. Rani returns to her own ancestral story in next week’s concluding part. Gabriel Tate Super Small Animals BBC One, 8.00pm Biologist Patrick Aryee demonstrates that size isn’t everything in the natural world, observing the extraordinary feats of strength, endurance and ingenuity of everything from hummingbirds  and seahorses to beetles and armadillos. Love Your Garden ITV, 8.00pm Alan Titchmarsh and his team turn an uninspiring patch of lumpy lawn and uneven paving into a sensory garden for a four-year-old girl with a very rare degenerative eye disease. Long Lost Family ITV, 9.00pm This episode of the always engaging and emotionally gruelling series reuniting long-estranged relatives charts the story of a woman who gave up her son only to adopt two boys herself, and a man whose mother put him up for adoption through an advert in the local press. My Big Gay Jewish Conversion BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.20pm First shown on BBC Three, this smart and sobering documentary follows Simon Atkins – who is Catholic and gay – as he looks at convert to Judaism, a religion that would allow him to marry his boyfriend, Matthew. Atkin’s journey is both spiritual and literal, as he travels to relatively tolerant Tel Aviv and more conservative Jerusalem, hoping to reconcile his sexuality with his religious beliefs. GT The South Bank Show Sky Arts, 8.00pm Singer-songwriter Benjamin Clementine, who won the Mercury Prize in 2015, talks to Melvyn Bragg about his early years on the streets and being hailed perhaps the brightest musical talent of his generation. In Search of Arcadia BBC Four, 9.00pm This contemplative documentary sees Dr Janina Ramirez and John Bailey explore the roots of the Arcadian cultural revolutionaries that sprang up along the Thames in the 17th and 18th centuries. Citizen Jane: Battle for the City BBC Four, 10.00pm When she saw the controversial development projects proposed by Robert Moses in Sixties New York, Jane Jacobs decided to take him on. Matt Tyrnauer’s punchy documentary pulls together an inspiring tale out of unlikely material – the debate of community culture versus “slum clearance”, one which continues to this day in cities across the world. GT Bridge to Terabithia (2007) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.10pm  Talented child stars AnnaSophia Robb and Josh Hutcherson (who went on to star in The Hunger Games) play two young misfits who become friends and create a magical world of the imagination in a remote part of the forest. This quality Disney production, adapted from Katherine Paterson’s classic novel, ventures into unexpectedly dark territory and packs an emotional punch that will have you reaching for your hankie. Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief (2015) ★★★★☆ Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Based on a book by the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Lawrence Wright, director Alex Gibney’s documentary about the Church of Scientology is a gripping, painstakingly researched exposé of one of the world’s most enigmatic organisations. At its core are a series of chilling allegations by former Scientology members, who describe a culture of abuse. The Lost Boys (1987) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 9.00pm Teen flick meets horror in this Eighties hit about two boys (Jason Patric and Corey Haim) who move to a quiet, northern California town where they become involved with a group of bloodthirsty vampires. These days it has to compete with the likes of Twilight and The Vampire Diaries, but there’s still enough action, intrigue, danger and romance to keep you hooked. Kiefer Sutherland and Corey Feldman also star. Thursday 10 July Princess Diana with Raine, Comtesse De Chambrun  Credit: Channel 4 Princess Diana’s “Wicked” Stepmother Channel 4, 9.00pm A gossipy, full-throttle and altogether naughty documentary about Diana, Princess of Wales’s stepmother Raine, Countess Spencer, who died last October. The daughter of romantic novelist Barbara Cartland, Raine was a prodigious social climber described here as “a famous socialite, a feisty politician and all-round force of nature” (“Nobody gets to be a countess three times by accident,” says one contributor). It seems like an accurate fit.  Named “Debutante of the Year” in 1947, Raine went on to bag a future Earl for a husband at the age of 18, became the youngest member of Westminster City Council at 23, before going on to become a noted conservation campaigner. The main focus here, though, is how she went on to marry a second Earl, John Spencer, in circumstances that earned her the entrenched enmity of his children, prime among them being his then 15-year-old daughter, Lady Diana. Yet when Diana’s own marriage ran into trouble it was Raine, so it’s claimed, that she turned to for support; the once “sworn enemy was transformed into her closest confidante”. The contributors include Downton Abbey writer Julian Fellowes and royal biographer Penny Junor. Gerard O’Donovan Natwest T20 Blast Cricket: Hampshire v Glamorgan Sky Sports Cricket, 6.00pm All the action from the Ageas Bowl for this South Division match. The home side are one of the most successful in the history of domestic T20 cricket, having won the competition twice and appeared in another four Finals Days. 10 Puppies and Us BBC Two, 8.00pm Here are more tales of new dog owners and their pups. This week, a mother seeks a canine companion for her son who has Down’s syndrome; the conflict between rival Chihuahuas Rocky and Chloe deepens; and a newlywed couple call in the behaviourist when a pug objects to their connubial bliss.  James Martin’s French Adventure ITV, 8.30pm Chef James Martin heads to the hilly Jura region, where a pear orchard proves to be the source of the perfect chutney for barbecued duck, and a visit to the citadel at Fort des Rousses shows why dungeons make the best cheese cellars. Top of the Lake: China Girl BBC Two, 9.00pm In the wake of last week’s shock revelation, Jane Campion’s off-kilter crime drama continues, with troubled detective Robin Griffin (Elisabeth Moss) pointing the China Girl investigation in a new direction, that of a surrogacy deal gone wrong. Meanwhile, Robin must face demons from her past when her former police chief Al Parker (David Wenham) arrives from New Zealand. Inside London Fire Brigade ITV, 9.00pm As the documentary series concludes, retiring crew manager Al passes the baton on to 25-year-old rookie Joe, who faces a tough test fighting his first big fire. GO A Premier League of Their Own Sky1, 9.00pm Ahead of next weekend’s opening matches in the Premier League, James Corden and pals begin the new season of the panel show with a special edition. Guests Thierry Henry, Jeff Stelling and Kelly Cates will be celebrating all things football alongside the show’s regulars Freddie Flintoff, Jack Whitehall and Jamie Redknapp. Plus McFly’s Danny Jones, singer Kate Nash and R&B star Lemar will be stepping up to the spot for Popstar Penalties. Laurel and Hardy: Their Lives and Magic Sky Arts, 9.00pm Fans of Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy will enjoy this superb assemblage of clips and out-takes. This enthralling documentary follows the life and work of the world’s most beloved comedy duo, and includes rare footage of Laurel in his later years, as well as an even rarer interview with his daughter, Lois. There’s also a tribute to the unusually strong friendship that the two stars enjoyed throughout their working lives. GO Dr Seuss’ The Lorax (2012) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 2.55pm This animated adaptation of Dr Seuss’s quirky story follows a boy (voiced by Zac Efron) who goes in search of a tree to impress a nature-loving girl (Taylor Swift). But he stumbles on the Once-ler (Ed Helms), the man responsible for harvesting all the world’s plant life. Children will enjoy it, even if the film does sacrifice a measure of its literary magic to the god of cinematic entertainment. Wild (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm  The Pacific Crest Trail, which runs up the entire western spine of the United States, is a challenge of fabled arduousness and rugged beauty. In 1995, aged 26, Cheryl Strayed (played by a superb Reese Witherspoon) walked it, to get clearance in her head after a decade of loss and personal meltdown. Wild powerfully reveals Strayed’s terrors and pleasures as she forges ahead on the journey. Wilde (1996) ★★★☆☆ BBC Four, 10.00pm  Many feel that Stephen Fry was born to play the part of the tragic and devastatingly brilliant Oscar Wilde. He’s terrific, but is only one of several superb players in a film which is held together by its performances. There’s Tom Wilkinson as the odious bully Queensberry and Jude Law on wonderfully petulant form as Bosie, the cause of Wilde’s downfall. Wilde’s story The Selfish Giant is woven throughout the film. Friday 11 August The Royal Albert Hall Credit: BBC BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 8.00pm Swapping tuxes for cowboy hats, the Proms continues tonight with a staging of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s beloved 1943 musical Oklahoma!  Expect plenty of whip-cracking, thigh-slapping, wild-west antics at the Royal Albert Hall, as conductor John Wilson and his orchestra add their signature élan to this story of a love affair between dashing cowboy Curly McLain (Nathaniel Hackmann) and farmer’s daughter Laurey Williams (Scarlett Strallen). Playing Jud Fy, the brooding, bestial social misfit with designs on Laurey himself, meanwhile, is David Seadon-Young. Elsewhere, Belinda Lang stars as the clucking Aunt Eller, and comedian Marcus Brigstocke is Ali Hakim, the Persian huckster battling with the cowboy Will Parker (Robert Fairchild) for the affections of fickle Ado Annie (Lizzy Connolly). The dance routines are balletic and fast, the hits frequent: the jaunty Surrey With the Fringe on Top, the romantic People Will Say We’re in Love, the lovely I Cain’t Say No, and, of course, the unmistakable opening song, Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin’. Rachel Kavanaugh, who directed an acclaimed touring production of Oklahoma! in 2015, is at the helm again here. Patrick Smith Premier League Football: Arsenal v Leicester City Sky Sports Premier League/Sky Sports Main Event, 7.00pm After three months of bluster and big-spending in the transfer market, the Premier League returns – and for the first time, the season gets under way on a Friday. All eyes tonight will be on Arsenal’s Alexandre Lacazette, the French striker who joined the Gunners for a club record fee of £52 million. Can he be the man to fire Arsenal back into the top four? Leicester City, meanwhile, will be keen to bounce back from a disappointing season that saw Claudio Ranieri sacked as manager despite having won them the league nine months previously. When these sides last met, at the end of April, a late own goal from Robert Huth handed Arsenal a 1-0 victory. Teach My Pet to Do That ITV, 8.00pm Arriving in the dog days of summer, this fluffy new series is presented by Alexander Amstrong, who asks such questions as: can a cat be trained to ride a labrador? Helping him teach tricks to the pets – among them, a dachshund labrador cross called Eric and a miniature horse called Aslan – are animal trainers Nando Brown and Jo-Rosie Haffenden.  Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm Throughout this week Steve Jones, Kate Quilton and Supervet Noel Fitzpatrick have been trying to find permanent homes for every animal in the Newcastle Dog and Cat Shelter. Tonight, they make one final push.  Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm Green fingers at the ready as Monty Don advises on how to cut and maintain hedges, while Adam Frost reveals the secrets of successful planting combinations. The Street ITV3, 9.00pm Previously shown in 2009, Jimmy McGovern’s gloom-ridden series comprised six stand-alone episodes focusing on the lives of the inhabitants of a single street in Liverpool. In this instalment, Anna Friel, recently seen in McGovern’s latest drama Broken, plays a single mother trying to hold down two jobs, pay the mortgage and get her two sons into a better school. Starring opposite her is Daniel Mays – with whom she also appeared in Tony Marchant’s similarly bleak drama Public Enemies – as the plumber whom she begins dating. What unfolds is expertly crafted and at times gut-wrenching to watch.  The Agony & the Ecstasy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This entertainingly nostalgic four-part series looks at how the UK’s rave scene exploded in the Eighties, fuelled by the party drug ecstasy. With the help of DJs such as Goldie, Paul Oakenfold and Annie Mac, it also explores how the genre evolved over the next three decades. Reach for the lasers. PS Eden: Paradise Lost Channel 4, 10.00pm The off-grid experiment – in which 23 people were stranded on the west coast of Scotland to fend for themselves – arrived on Channel 4 a year ago amid great fanfare but ended up being an unmitigated flop, with only 10 participants making it through to the end. In tonight’s finale, the action takes us from Christmas Day through to March, when those who remained were finally released. PS Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm  This first of a potentially limitless spin-off series of “Star Wars Stories” follows rebel live-wire Jyn Erso (Felicity Jones), who leads a band of self-styled “spies, saboteurs and assassins” on a death-or-glory mission to steal the Death Star plans from an Imperial stronghold, via some genuinely breathtaking planetary vistas and earth-ripping set-pieces.  The Firm (1993) ★★★☆☆ W, 9.00pm  Sydney Pollack directed this accomplished yet curiously uninvolving adaptation of John Grisham’s legal potboiler. Tom Cruise plays Mitch McDeere, an ambitious young lawyer who takes a well-paid job at a Memphis law firm that sounds too good to be true. And it is: the firm launders money for the Mob. Can Mitch escape with his morals and marriage intact? Gene Hackman co-stars as Cruise’s father figure. Strictly Ballroom (1992) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 11.05pm  Paul Mercurio plays a rebellious ballroom dancer who breaks all the rules and paso dobles his way to victory in this crowd-pleasing Australian comedy. Baz Luhrmann’s writing and directing debut is just as brash as Moulin Rouge! but a lot less pleased with itself. There’s romance between our hero and his ugly duckling partner, and it’s set against an enjoyable parade of sequin-decked caricatures and high camp. Watch here on TVPlayer Television previewers Catherine Gee, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: Diana: In Her Own Words, plus Women’s Football

Sunday 6 August Diana: In Her Own Words Channel 4, 8.00pm Much controversy has surrounded this documentary, which broadcasts – for the first time in the UK – video footage recorded in 1992 and 1993 by Diana, Princess of Wales’s voice coach, Peter Settelen. Hired to help Diana reframe her public image and put forward her own side of the story regarding her marriage, Settelen saw his work bear fruit in his client’s Panorama interview. Now there is undoubted interest in watching Diana recount key events in her life unmediated, with candour and a seductive mix of charm and steel. “He chatted me up like a bad rash,” she recalls of her future husband at one point; at another, she remembers being “completely thrown” by the Prince of Wales’s peculiar response to a question about them being in love. Diana: The Secret Rebel 01:24 In truth, director Kevin Sim rather crams the at-times uncomfortably intimate footage into the first and final thirds of the documentary, leaving assorted friends and confidants to tell the rest of the very familiar story, and the melodrama is laid on a little thick at times. Exploitative? Perhaps. Fascinating? In patches, although it probably won’t entirely satisfy either those looking for genuinely fresh insights or an opportunity to be outraged. Gabriel Tate Community Shield Football: Arsenal v Chelsea BT Sport 1, 1.00pm Arsenal and Chelsea meet for the second time in as many weeks, with Antonio Conte’s Blues favourites to lift the Community Shield today having won 3-0 in Beijing thanks to a brace from Michy Batshuayi.  Women’s Football: Euro 2017 Channel 4, 3.00pm After a thrilling tournament – during which a record 3.3 million people tuned in to watch England’s Lionesses beat France 1-0 – we’re at the FC Twente Stadion in Enschede, Holland, as the successors to Germany are crowned.   LSO Sky Arts, 6.00pm Originally, and rather impishly, hinting at a “greatest hits” of Haydn, Simon Rattle and his Imaginary Orchestral Journey instead took movements from 11 of the Austrian composer’s works, many of them rarely performed, and realigned them joyfully and perceptively in this concert with the London Symphony Orchestra. Works from Bartók and an extract from Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde provide the hors d’oeuvre for this enticing programme.   BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 7.00pm One of the most anticipated events of every Prom season, the National Youth Orchestra of Great Britain brings its energy and drive to the Royal Albert Hall. First comes the London premiere of Francisco Coll’s “grotesque symphony” Mural and Thomas Adès conducting his own work, Polaris, for the first time in the capital. The climax comes courtesy of Igor Stravinsky and his agelessly thrilling Rite of Spring. It is introduced by Suzy Klein and Lloyd Coleman. GT Secrets of Silicon Valley BBC Two, 8.00pm Blogger Jamie Bartlett investigates whether technological progress should be made at any cost. On the one side, he meets those tackling climate change; on the other, those paying the price for the success of Uber and, somewhere in the middle, the pioneers of self-driving cars.    Poldark BBC One, 9.00pm Having barrelled along entertainingly, with the undercurrent of hardscrabble misery intact, this third series concludes with sightings of French sails spotted on the horizon and Cornwall put on high alert. Meanwhile, Cap’n Ross (Aidan Turner) contends with a broadside from George Warleggan  (Jack Farthing).   The Last Days of Patrick Swayze Channel 5, 10.00pm Given the fact that he died from pancreatic cancer aged 57, we can reasonably surmise that the Dirty Dancing star’s final hours were not wholly pleasant. So, what can forensic pathologist Jason Payne-James, perusing Swayze’s medical records, add to the story?   Gareth Thomas: Hate in the Beautiful Game BBC Two, 10.30pm; not NI Former Welsh rugby union captain Gareth Thomas, who came out in 2009 while still playing, asks why football has shamefully remained a bastion of open homophobia – perhaps the last in sport. GT Frozen (2013) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 1.40pm  Disney’s 53rd feature is an enchanting combination of fairytale derring-do and heart-popping musical numbers that has left children and adults powerless to its charms (even if some parents may have grown rather tired of it). Elsa (Idina Menzel) is a shy princess driven into exile when her magical powers are discovered. Her sister Anna (Kristen Bell) gallops off to fetch her from her beautiful ice palace. The King’s Speech (2010) ★★★★★ Channel 4, 9.50pm  Tom Hooper’s film about the future George VI’s struggle to overcome his stammer in the nation’s hour of need won multiple Academy Awards, including a deserved Best Actor gong for Colin Firth. But it’s his double-act with Geoffrey Rush as his speech therapist Lionel Logue that gives the film its heart, and the doublehanders between them are fraught and fascinating. Point Break (1991) ★★★☆☆ Channel 5, 11.05pm Kathryn Bigelow’s cult surfing/crime film elevated Patrick Swayze’s actor status to true action hero. Keanu Reeves plays Johnny Utah, an FBI agent who goes undercover to infiltrate the Ex-Presidents, a gang of bankrobbing surfers led by the charismatic Bodhi (Swayze). The action heats up when Bodhi and Utah find they share a similar attitude towards danger. Lori Petty is the surfer who catches Johnny’s eye. Monday 7 August Eden: Paradise Lost - the participants Credit: Channel 4 Eden: Paradise Lost Channel 4, 10.00pm In March 2016, 23 idealists set out to take part in Channel 4’s Eden experiment, which, a touch grandiosely, sought to establish “a new society” from scratch, cut off from the modern world on a remote Scottish peninsula for an entire year. “What if we could start again?” was the much-hyped tag line. And the answer was… well, we never got to find out the answer because the series was pulled last summer, after just four episodes, when viewing figures took a dive from 1.7 million to less than 800,000.  Not that Channel 4 or production company Keo Films thought to tell the participants that. Instead they were left to get on with it. Rumours swirled of Lord of the Flies levels of acrimony, mass defections, starvation, health problems, people eating chicken feed to survive. So it could make for absorbing viewing in this five-part update, which airs every night this week. Although probably the greatest fascination will be in seeing the reactions of the 10 participants who suffered through to the end as they emerged from the nightmare in March this year only to discover that their efforts have mostly been in vain – and that the political landscape has drastically altered while they were gone. Gerard O’Donovan Stacey Dooley Investigates: Divide and National Pride in Northern Ireland  BBC Three, from 10.00am The intrepid reporter discovers that bitter political divisions persist in Northern Ireland as she seeks to discover more about Prime Minister Theresa May’s new allies in the Democratic Unionist Party. The Bug Grub Couple BBC One, 7.30pm Bug burger or beef burger? That’s the choice at the Grub restaurant in Pembrokeshire, part of entomologist Dr Sarah Beynon and chef Andy Holcroft’s Bug Farm – an insect zoo, research centre and insect eaterie. Here they struggle to convince us why we all should learn to love eating insect protein.   Masters Tennis: The Rogers Cup Sky Sports Main Event, 7.00pm The Uniprix Stadium in Montreal is the setting, as the Rogers Cup gets under way. Novak Djokovic lifted the trophy in 2016 for the fourth time, defeating Kei Nishikori in the final. The Serbian misses out this time around, though, due to injury.  Tornado: The 100mph Steam Engine BBC Four, 8.00pm If phrases like “it’s a Peppercorn class A1 Pacific” get you all steamed up you’ll be in heaven with this account of how a bunch of engineering enthusiasts got the massive locomotive they took 18 years to build from scratch to take on the ultimate test: hitting 100 miles per hour, a speed no British steam train has achieved since 1967.    Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm This new, live, animal rescue show with Steve Jones, Kate Quilton and Noel Fitzpatrick attempts to rehome a whole shelter’s worth of dogs, cats and assorted other species. Among the celebs espousing the joy of pets in this opener is pop singer Leona Lewis. Continues until Friday.   Man in an Orange Shirt BBC Two, 9.00pm In part two of novelist Patrick Gale’s drama for the Gay Britannia season, more than half a century on, Flora (Vanessa Redgrave) gives her late husband’s cottage to their grandson Adam (Julian Morris), who finds himself drawn to his architect, Steve (David Gyasi).   Inside Heston’s World Good Food, 9.00pm This four-part series chronicles chef Heston Blumenthal’s attempt to bring a flavour of his Fat Duck restaurant to Australia, in a multi-million pound move to Melbourne last year. GO Make or Break? Channel 5, 10.00pm A new reality series, stripped across the week, in which eight troubled couples test the strength of their relationships at a Mexican holiday resort, where alongside counselling and therapy sessions, they have to swap partners every two days. GO Doctor Dolittle (1967) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 5.05pm  This is not the Eddie Murphy comedy version from 1998 but the charming Sixties musical directed by Richard Fleischer. Rex Harrison stars as the terse, eponymous doctor who has the uncanny ability to speak to animals and so embarks on a voyage to find an elusive pink sea snail and a giant lunar moth. Samantha Egger, 20 years Harrison’s junior, co-stars as the adventurous stowaway who falls in love with the doctor.  Storks (2016) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 6.20pm  Warner Animation Group’s first film since 2014’s The Lego Movie is spectacularly daft but manages to be both moving and very fun. Here the storks of the title have moved on from delivering babies to big business and now transport products for an Amazon-style website. But then the old baby-making machine, gathering dust in the corner, is accidentally reactivated and suddenly they have a baby to get home.  American History X (1998) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm  Tony Kaye directs this compellingly violent and brutal examination of white supremacism in America. Edward Norton is both mesmerising and terrifying as Derek, a student drawn into the Neo-Nazi movement who mercilessly kills two black youths. After a stint in prison he’s reformed but returns  home to find his younger brother Danny (Edward Furlong) on the same track he was. Tuesday 8 August Jodie Whittaker and Emun Elliott Credit: BBC Trust Me BBC One, 9.00pm Before she becomes the Doctor in Doctor Who, Jodie Whittaker stars in a drama about… pretending to be a doctor. No doubt there will soon be many jokes about that floating around. In this new four-part drama, written by real-life doctor Dan Sefton, Whittaker stars as Cath, a downtrodden ward sister who is fired when she takes her concerns about the conditions in her Sheffield hospital to the trust. Then, when at the leaving party for her best friend Alison – who’s about to begin a new life in New Zealand – she spots Alison’s CV and medical degree certificate in a bin.  So Cath decides to adopt Alison’s identity and, hoping that her nursing skills will be enough to get by, find a job as a doctor far away in Edinburgh. Though the premise may sound a little daft, it’s actually surprisingly – and worryingly – common. Sefton uses his hospital know-how to bring a sense of authenticity to what is a really quite gripping drama.  Whittaker, rather than channelling a cocky Leonardo DiCaprio in Catch Me if You Can, is every inch the terrified woman flying by the seat of her pants. Excellent, too, is Emun Elliot as the colleague who catches her eye. Catherine Gee EastEnders BBC One, 7.30pm Mick’s (Danny Dyer) dastardly behaviour comes to a head in this special three-hander episode. He decides to tell wife Linda (Kellie Bright) the truth about what he’s been up to while she was away: namely cheating on her with their daughter-in-law Whitney (Shona McGarty).    Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm It’s the second nightly visit to this admirable project, which seeks to rehouse all the animals  in a Newcastle shelter in just a week. While we meet the wide range of animals and see how many still remain, Dom Joly also learns what happens to micropigs when they grow up.     The Dog Rescuers with Alan Davies Channel 5, 8.00pm Among the five unlucky pups needing some loving care from the team this week are an abandoned staffie who’s given a second chance and a young spaniel with a nasty neck wound.     Get a House for Free Channel 4, 9.00pm Marco Robinson is a very rich man – £25 million rich, in fact. He made his fortune through a business and property empire and now he wants to give back. So he’s decided to give away a three-bed flat in Preston to the person who he thinks will benefit the most. This film follows him as he attempts to sift through 8,000 applications. CG Utopia: In Search of the Dream BBC Four, 9.00pm It’s 500 years since the term “utopia” was coined by Sir Thomas More in 1516. In this documentary, art historian Professor Richard Clay examines five centuries of the concept of utopia and the impact it has had on our way of thinking. Often used as a method of criticism of the current system, it is a powerful vision. Clay considers some of our “greatest utopian dreamers”, including Jonathan Swift, author of Gulliver’s Travels, and Gene Roddenberry, creator of Star Trek, and the common themes that run through the ideal.     The Yorkshire Dales and the Lakes More4, 9.00pm The cosy documentary series continues with a farmer finding an unusual method to keep track of his sheep: day-glo paint. Elsewhere in the Dales, we follow the Dent Brewery boys as they create their own craft ales and in the Lake District we see Jon Bennett make his daily ascent to the summit of Helvellyn. CG The Parent Trap (1961) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am   In a film that helped pioneer the split-screen technique, Hayley Mills plays both Susan Evers and Sharon McKendrick, twins unaware of each other’s existence and separated as babies following their parents’ divorce. When they meet, years later, at summer camp, the pair scheme to reunite their parents. This classic Disney comedy spawned three sequels and a 1998 remake starring a young Lindsay Lohan. Tootsie (1982) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.30pm  When actor Michael Dorsey transforms himself into Dorothy Michaels in a desperate attempt to get work, complications arise as he falls for a female friend (Jessica Lange) and her father (Charles Durning)  falls for him. Although you never quite believe that Dustin Hoffman in drag would convince everyone that he’s a woman, it doesn’t matter: Tootsie is lots of fun – and it’s a sharply observed social satire, too. Groundhog Day (1993) ★★★★☆ Sky1, 9.00pm  In this wonderful comedy drama, a surly, sardonic weatherman (Bill Murray) is sent to the small US town of Punxsutawney to cover the annual groundhog festival, but finds himself experiencing precisely the same events over and over – then realises that he can free himself from the loop only by being a nicer person. One criticism: as always, Murray is so much more likeable as the malevolent grouch… Wednesday 9 August My Family, Partition and Me: India 1947 - Anita Rani  Credit: BBC My Family, Partition and Me: India 1947 BBC One, 9.00pm Two years ago, Anita Rani learnt how her family history was forever marked by the 1947 Partition of India in a memorable episode of Who Do You Think You Are? Now, she has wrangled three members of the public – one Hindu, one Christian and one Muslim – to explore how their own lives, and those of their ancestors, were affected by the appalling and widespread outbreaks of religious violence in the wake of Britain’s messy, compromised withdrawal, and the troubled legacy left by the Empire. In addition to eyewitness testimonies, the descendants of the survivors travel back to India, Pakistan and Bangladesh to retrace the journeys their relatives were forced to make. Their discoveries are in equal parts shocking, distressing and uplifting, and its treatment is rightly sensitive for events still in living memory: tears flow freely, yet it’s never sentimental. If there isn’t much space to dig into the wider political situation, the complex reasons behind the violence and longer-term implications, the detail of the personal recollections and anecdotes tells its own powerful tale. Rani returns to her own ancestral story in next week’s concluding part. Gabriel Tate Super Small Animals BBC One, 8.00pm Biologist Patrick Aryee demonstrates that size isn’t everything in the natural world, observing the extraordinary feats of strength, endurance and ingenuity of everything from hummingbirds  and seahorses to beetles and armadillos. Love Your Garden ITV, 8.00pm Alan Titchmarsh and his team turn an uninspiring patch of lumpy lawn and uneven paving into a sensory garden for a four-year-old girl with a very rare degenerative eye disease. Long Lost Family ITV, 9.00pm This episode of the always engaging and emotionally gruelling series reuniting long-estranged relatives charts the story of a woman who gave up her son only to adopt two boys herself, and a man whose mother put him up for adoption through an advert in the local press. My Big Gay Jewish Conversion BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.20pm First shown on BBC Three, this smart and sobering documentary follows Simon Atkins – who is Catholic and gay – as he looks at convert to Judaism, a religion that would allow him to marry his boyfriend, Matthew. Atkin’s journey is both spiritual and literal, as he travels to relatively tolerant Tel Aviv and more conservative Jerusalem, hoping to reconcile his sexuality with his religious beliefs. GT The South Bank Show Sky Arts, 8.00pm Singer-songwriter Benjamin Clementine, who won the Mercury Prize in 2015, talks to Melvyn Bragg about his early years on the streets and being hailed perhaps the brightest musical talent of his generation. In Search of Arcadia BBC Four, 9.00pm This contemplative documentary sees Dr Janina Ramirez and John Bailey explore the roots of the Arcadian cultural revolutionaries that sprang up along the Thames in the 17th and 18th centuries. Citizen Jane: Battle for the City BBC Four, 10.00pm When she saw the controversial development projects proposed by Robert Moses in Sixties New York, Jane Jacobs decided to take him on. Matt Tyrnauer’s punchy documentary pulls together an inspiring tale out of unlikely material – the debate of community culture versus “slum clearance”, one which continues to this day in cities across the world. GT Bridge to Terabithia (2007) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.10pm  Talented child stars AnnaSophia Robb and Josh Hutcherson (who went on to star in The Hunger Games) play two young misfits who become friends and create a magical world of the imagination in a remote part of the forest. This quality Disney production, adapted from Katherine Paterson’s classic novel, ventures into unexpectedly dark territory and packs an emotional punch that will have you reaching for your hankie. Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief (2015) ★★★★☆ Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Based on a book by the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Lawrence Wright, director Alex Gibney’s documentary about the Church of Scientology is a gripping, painstakingly researched exposé of one of the world’s most enigmatic organisations. At its core are a series of chilling allegations by former Scientology members, who describe a culture of abuse. The Lost Boys (1987) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 9.00pm Teen flick meets horror in this Eighties hit about two boys (Jason Patric and Corey Haim) who move to a quiet, northern California town where they become involved with a group of bloodthirsty vampires. These days it has to compete with the likes of Twilight and The Vampire Diaries, but there’s still enough action, intrigue, danger and romance to keep you hooked. Kiefer Sutherland and Corey Feldman also star. Thursday 10 July Princess Diana with Raine, Comtesse De Chambrun  Credit: Channel 4 Princess Diana’s “Wicked” Stepmother Channel 4, 9.00pm A gossipy, full-throttle and altogether naughty documentary about Diana, Princess of Wales’s stepmother Raine, Countess Spencer, who died last October. The daughter of romantic novelist Barbara Cartland, Raine was a prodigious social climber described here as “a famous socialite, a feisty politician and all-round force of nature” (“Nobody gets to be a countess three times by accident,” says one contributor). It seems like an accurate fit.  Named “Debutante of the Year” in 1947, Raine went on to bag a future Earl for a husband at the age of 18, became the youngest member of Westminster City Council at 23, before going on to become a noted conservation campaigner. The main focus here, though, is how she went on to marry a second Earl, John Spencer, in circumstances that earned her the entrenched enmity of his children, prime among them being his then 15-year-old daughter, Lady Diana. Yet when Diana’s own marriage ran into trouble it was Raine, so it’s claimed, that she turned to for support; the once “sworn enemy was transformed into her closest confidante”. The contributors include Downton Abbey writer Julian Fellowes and royal biographer Penny Junor. Gerard O’Donovan Natwest T20 Blast Cricket: Hampshire v Glamorgan Sky Sports Cricket, 6.00pm All the action from the Ageas Bowl for this South Division match. The home side are one of the most successful in the history of domestic T20 cricket, having won the competition twice and appeared in another four Finals Days. 10 Puppies and Us BBC Two, 8.00pm Here are more tales of new dog owners and their pups. This week, a mother seeks a canine companion for her son who has Down’s syndrome; the conflict between rival Chihuahuas Rocky and Chloe deepens; and a newlywed couple call in the behaviourist when a pug objects to their connubial bliss.  James Martin’s French Adventure ITV, 8.30pm Chef James Martin heads to the hilly Jura region, where a pear orchard proves to be the source of the perfect chutney for barbecued duck, and a visit to the citadel at Fort des Rousses shows why dungeons make the best cheese cellars. Top of the Lake: China Girl BBC Two, 9.00pm In the wake of last week’s shock revelation, Jane Campion’s off-kilter crime drama continues, with troubled detective Robin Griffin (Elisabeth Moss) pointing the China Girl investigation in a new direction, that of a surrogacy deal gone wrong. Meanwhile, Robin must face demons from her past when her former police chief Al Parker (David Wenham) arrives from New Zealand. Inside London Fire Brigade ITV, 9.00pm As the documentary series concludes, retiring crew manager Al passes the baton on to 25-year-old rookie Joe, who faces a tough test fighting his first big fire. GO A Premier League of Their Own Sky1, 9.00pm Ahead of next weekend’s opening matches in the Premier League, James Corden and pals begin the new season of the panel show with a special edition. Guests Thierry Henry, Jeff Stelling and Kelly Cates will be celebrating all things football alongside the show’s regulars Freddie Flintoff, Jack Whitehall and Jamie Redknapp. Plus McFly’s Danny Jones, singer Kate Nash and R&B star Lemar will be stepping up to the spot for Popstar Penalties. Laurel and Hardy: Their Lives and Magic Sky Arts, 9.00pm Fans of Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy will enjoy this superb assemblage of clips and out-takes. This enthralling documentary follows the life and work of the world’s most beloved comedy duo, and includes rare footage of Laurel in his later years, as well as an even rarer interview with his daughter, Lois. There’s also a tribute to the unusually strong friendship that the two stars enjoyed throughout their working lives. GO Dr Seuss’ The Lorax (2012) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 2.55pm This animated adaptation of Dr Seuss’s quirky story follows a boy (voiced by Zac Efron) who goes in search of a tree to impress a nature-loving girl (Taylor Swift). But he stumbles on the Once-ler (Ed Helms), the man responsible for harvesting all the world’s plant life. Children will enjoy it, even if the film does sacrifice a measure of its literary magic to the god of cinematic entertainment. Wild (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm  The Pacific Crest Trail, which runs up the entire western spine of the United States, is a challenge of fabled arduousness and rugged beauty. In 1995, aged 26, Cheryl Strayed (played by a superb Reese Witherspoon) walked it, to get clearance in her head after a decade of loss and personal meltdown. Wild powerfully reveals Strayed’s terrors and pleasures as she forges ahead on the journey. Wilde (1996) ★★★☆☆ BBC Four, 10.00pm  Many feel that Stephen Fry was born to play the part of the tragic and devastatingly brilliant Oscar Wilde. He’s terrific, but is only one of several superb players in a film which is held together by its performances. There’s Tom Wilkinson as the odious bully Queensberry and Jude Law on wonderfully petulant form as Bosie, the cause of Wilde’s downfall. Wilde’s story The Selfish Giant is woven throughout the film. Friday 11 August The Royal Albert Hall Credit: BBC BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 8.00pm Swapping tuxes for cowboy hats, the Proms continues tonight with a staging of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s beloved 1943 musical Oklahoma!  Expect plenty of whip-cracking, thigh-slapping, wild-west antics at the Royal Albert Hall, as conductor John Wilson and his orchestra add their signature élan to this story of a love affair between dashing cowboy Curly McLain (Nathaniel Hackmann) and farmer’s daughter Laurey Williams (Scarlett Strallen). Playing Jud Fy, the brooding, bestial social misfit with designs on Laurey himself, meanwhile, is David Seadon-Young. Elsewhere, Belinda Lang stars as the clucking Aunt Eller, and comedian Marcus Brigstocke is Ali Hakim, the Persian huckster battling with the cowboy Will Parker (Robert Fairchild) for the affections of fickle Ado Annie (Lizzy Connolly). The dance routines are balletic and fast, the hits frequent: the jaunty Surrey With the Fringe on Top, the romantic People Will Say We’re in Love, the lovely I Cain’t Say No, and, of course, the unmistakable opening song, Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin’. Rachel Kavanaugh, who directed an acclaimed touring production of Oklahoma! in 2015, is at the helm again here. Patrick Smith Premier League Football: Arsenal v Leicester City Sky Sports Premier League/Sky Sports Main Event, 7.00pm After three months of bluster and big-spending in the transfer market, the Premier League returns – and for the first time, the season gets under way on a Friday. All eyes tonight will be on Arsenal’s Alexandre Lacazette, the French striker who joined the Gunners for a club record fee of £52 million. Can he be the man to fire Arsenal back into the top four? Leicester City, meanwhile, will be keen to bounce back from a disappointing season that saw Claudio Ranieri sacked as manager despite having won them the league nine months previously. When these sides last met, at the end of April, a late own goal from Robert Huth handed Arsenal a 1-0 victory. Teach My Pet to Do That ITV, 8.00pm Arriving in the dog days of summer, this fluffy new series is presented by Alexander Amstrong, who asks such questions as: can a cat be trained to ride a labrador? Helping him teach tricks to the pets – among them, a dachshund labrador cross called Eric and a miniature horse called Aslan – are animal trainers Nando Brown and Jo-Rosie Haffenden.  Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm Throughout this week Steve Jones, Kate Quilton and Supervet Noel Fitzpatrick have been trying to find permanent homes for every animal in the Newcastle Dog and Cat Shelter. Tonight, they make one final push.  Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm Green fingers at the ready as Monty Don advises on how to cut and maintain hedges, while Adam Frost reveals the secrets of successful planting combinations. The Street ITV3, 9.00pm Previously shown in 2009, Jimmy McGovern’s gloom-ridden series comprised six stand-alone episodes focusing on the lives of the inhabitants of a single street in Liverpool. In this instalment, Anna Friel, recently seen in McGovern’s latest drama Broken, plays a single mother trying to hold down two jobs, pay the mortgage and get her two sons into a better school. Starring opposite her is Daniel Mays – with whom she also appeared in Tony Marchant’s similarly bleak drama Public Enemies – as the plumber whom she begins dating. What unfolds is expertly crafted and at times gut-wrenching to watch.  The Agony & the Ecstasy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This entertainingly nostalgic four-part series looks at how the UK’s rave scene exploded in the Eighties, fuelled by the party drug ecstasy. With the help of DJs such as Goldie, Paul Oakenfold and Annie Mac, it also explores how the genre evolved over the next three decades. Reach for the lasers. PS Eden: Paradise Lost Channel 4, 10.00pm The off-grid experiment – in which 23 people were stranded on the west coast of Scotland to fend for themselves – arrived on Channel 4 a year ago amid great fanfare but ended up being an unmitigated flop, with only 10 participants making it through to the end. In tonight’s finale, the action takes us from Christmas Day through to March, when those who remained were finally released. PS Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm  This first of a potentially limitless spin-off series of “Star Wars Stories” follows rebel live-wire Jyn Erso (Felicity Jones), who leads a band of self-styled “spies, saboteurs and assassins” on a death-or-glory mission to steal the Death Star plans from an Imperial stronghold, via some genuinely breathtaking planetary vistas and earth-ripping set-pieces.  The Firm (1993) ★★★☆☆ W, 9.00pm  Sydney Pollack directed this accomplished yet curiously uninvolving adaptation of John Grisham’s legal potboiler. Tom Cruise plays Mitch McDeere, an ambitious young lawyer who takes a well-paid job at a Memphis law firm that sounds too good to be true. And it is: the firm launders money for the Mob. Can Mitch escape with his morals and marriage intact? Gene Hackman co-stars as Cruise’s father figure. Strictly Ballroom (1992) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 11.05pm  Paul Mercurio plays a rebellious ballroom dancer who breaks all the rules and paso dobles his way to victory in this crowd-pleasing Australian comedy. Baz Luhrmann’s writing and directing debut is just as brash as Moulin Rouge! but a lot less pleased with itself. There’s romance between our hero and his ugly duckling partner, and it’s set against an enjoyable parade of sequin-decked caricatures and high camp. Watch here on TVPlayer Television previewers Catherine Gee, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: Billy Connolly: Portrait of a Lifetime and Paul O’Grady’s Hollywood

Saturday 5 August Billy Connolly: Portrait of a Lifetime BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 10.30pm “Glasgow belongs to me,” says Billy Connolly of his hometown in this heart-warming documentary to mark the comedian’s 75th birthday in November. And he’s not wrong as three imposing 50ft tribute portraits have recently been unveiled on wallends in the city. They were created by Scottish artists John Byrne, Jack Vettriano and Rachel MacLean, and this accompanying film not only gives a neat history of the area, but serves as a celebration of the Big Yin’s career.  Interspersed with clips of his stand-up routines, including his cheeky first appearance on Parkinson in 1975 when he told the bum joke that turned him into a star, the programme see Connolly sit quietly for the artists – not one of his strong points as he admits: “I’ve been very patient. I think I’m due an episode.” Watching them at work in their studios is inspiring and Connolly is taken aback by the results. “It’s like looking into a mirror. You know my soul,” he says to Byrne, who used to design album covers for Connolly’s band The Humblebums. “I’m amazed at the effect these have had on me, they’ve stunned me.” From tomorrow, the original portraits will be hung in the People’s Palace. Rachel Ward Athletics: World Championships BBC Two, 9.30am & BBC One, 6.30pm Day two at the London Stadium in Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park sees Usain Bolt – in all likeliness – going for gold in the men’s 100 m final (9.45pm) as he makes his final individual appearance at a major championships. His main threats are expected to come from former champions Justin Gatlin and Yohan Blake, as well as emerging star Christian Coleman. Earlier in the day, British medal hope Katarina Johnson-Thompson gets her heptathlon bid under way with the 100 m hurdles at 10.05am. Sadly not in action today is Greg Rutherford, who, because of an ankle injury, won’t be competing in the men’s long jump final (8.05pm).  Little Big Shots USA ITV, 5.00pm Steve Harvey showcases more talented youngsters while mocking his own stupidity in this family friendly show exec-produced by Ellen DeGeneres. Tonight, there’s a maths genius and a Motown singer. Royal Cousins at War BBC Two, 7.30pm; NI, 8.00pm A welcome repeat for this riveting analysis of the relationship between Kaiser Bill, Tsar Nicholas II of Russia and our own King George V, and the disastrous effect that their rivalry had on the First World War.  Paul O’Grady’s Hollywood Channel 4, 8.00pm This new series sees Paul O’Grady delve into cinematic history to find out what it takes to make a masterpiece. He begins with “weepies”, where the host’s caustic wit serves as the perfect antidote as talking heads, including Sigourney Weaver and Celine Dion, reach for the tissues as they relate films such as Brief Encounter, Titanic and, quite possibly the saddest in movie history, The Champ.    Dad’s Army BBC Two, 8.30pm; not NI This is a gem of an episode loaded with slapstick fun from 1970. It’s the one where Corporal Jones (Clive Dunn) dresses as a tree trunk during an exercise pitting Mainwaring (Arthur Lowe) and his crew against their pompous arch-rival Captain Square. RW The L.A. Riots: 25 Years Later History, 9.00pm Twenty-five years after Los Angeles erupted into one of the most destructive civil disturbances in US history (11,000 people were arrested and an estimated 63 people were killed), this documentary looks back at the decades of racial injustice that led to the incident and the history of police relations with LA’s black community. Citizens, council members and even those who committed crimes talk about how South Central was beset by mass riots, looting, and fires.  Cambridge Folk Festival 2017 Sky Arts, 9.00pm Broadcaster Mark Radcliffe and musician Julie Fowlis present highlights from this year’s festival, an event that attracts 10,000 visitors. These include Jon Boden, formerly of Bellowhead, performing new material with his band The Remnant Kings. There’s also music from Jake Bugg, electric punk stars Oysterband and Lisa Hannigan, once as a member of Damien Rice’s band. RW The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies (2014) ★★☆☆☆ ITV, 8.00pm  The battle of the title was barely mentioned by JRR Tolkein in The Hobbit, but it was seemingly enough for Peter Jackson to pad out his franchise even further. Picking up where the last film left off, our heroes had just unleashed the wrath of dragon Smaug (Benedict Cumberbatch). But there’s another battle looming, one between themselves which is fuelled by greed. Red (2010) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm  A starry line-up of actors of pensionable age is the attraction of this light-hearted adaptation of Warren Ellis’s graphic novel, and it’s hard to resist Helen Mirren with a submachine gun. RED stands for “Retired Extremely Dangerous”, which is what the CIA has labelled former agents Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich and Mirren, who team up to find out who has marked them for assassination, and why. I Know What You Did Last Summer (1997) ★★☆☆☆ BBC One, 11.55pm  This routine slasher flick, written by Kevin Williamson of Scream fame, will certainly make you jump but it’s unlikely to give you many sleepless nights. When a carful of American teenagers hits and kills a man, they panic and dump the body. Months later, the inevitable slaughter begins. A hapless cast, featuring Sarah Michelle Gellar, brings unintentional levity to proceedings. Sunday 6 August Diana, Princess of Wales Credit: Rex Diana: In Her Own Words Channel 4, 8.00pm Much controversy has surrounded this documentary, which broadcasts – for the first time in the UK – video footage recorded in 1992 and 1993 by Diana, Princess of Wales’s voice coach, Peter Settelen. Hired to help Diana reframe her public image and put forward her own side of the story regarding her marriage, Settelen saw his work bear fruit in his client’s Panorama interview. Now there is undoubted interest in watching Diana recount key events in her life unmediated, with candour and a seductive mix of charm and steel. “He chatted me up like a bad rash,” she recalls of her future husband at one point; at another, she remembers being “completely thrown” by the Prince of Wales’s peculiar response to a question about them being in love. In truth, director Kevin Sim rather crams the at-times uncomfortably intimate footage into the first and final thirds of the documentary, leaving assorted friends and confidants to tell the rest of the very familiar story, and the melodrama is laid on a little thick at times. Exploitative? Perhaps. Fascinating? In patches, although it probably won’t entirely satisfy either those looking for genuinely fresh insights or an opportunity to be outraged. Gabriel Tate Community Shield Football: Arsenal v Chelsea BT Sport 1, 1.00pm Arsenal and Chelsea meet for the second time in as many weeks, with Antonio Conte’s Blues favourites to lift the Community Shield today having won 3-0 in Beijing thanks to a brace from Michy Batshuayi.  Women’s Football: Euro 2017 Channel 4, 3.00pm After a thrilling tournament – during which a record 3.3 million people tuned in to watch England’s Lionesses beat France 1-0 – we’re at the FC Twente Stadion in Enschede, Holland, as the successors to Germany are crowned.   LSO Sky Arts, 6.00pm Originally, and rather impishly, hinting at a “greatest hits” of Haydn, Simon Rattle and his Imaginary Orchestral Journey instead took movements from 11 of the Austrian composer’s works, many of them rarely performed, and realigned them joyfully and perceptively in this concert with the London Symphony Orchestra. Works from Bartók and an extract from Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde provide the hors d’oeuvre for this enticing programme.   BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 7.00pm One of the most anticipated events of every Prom season, the National Youth Orchestra of Great Britain brings its energy and drive to the Royal Albert Hall. First comes the London premiere of Francisco Coll’s “grotesque symphony” Mural and Thomas Adès conducting his own work, Polaris, for the first time in the capital. The climax comes courtesy of Igor Stravinsky and his agelessly thrilling Rite of Spring. It is introduced by Suzy Klein and Lloyd Coleman. GT Secrets of Silicon Valley BBC Two, 8.00pm Blogger Jamie Bartlett investigates whether technological progress should be made at any cost. On the one side, he meets those tackling climate change; on the other, those paying the price for the success of Uber and, somewhere in the middle, the pioneers of self-driving cars.    Poldark BBC One, 9.00pm Having barrelled along entertainingly, with the undercurrent of hardscrabble misery intact, this third series concludes with sightings of French sails spotted on the horizon and Cornwall put on high alert. Meanwhile, Cap’n Ross (Aidan Turner) contends with a broadside from George Warleggan  (Jack Farthing).   The Last Days of Patrick Swayze Channel 5, 10.00pm Given the fact that he died from pancreatic cancer aged 57, we can reasonably surmise that the Dirty Dancing star’s final hours were not wholly pleasant. So, what can forensic pathologist Jason Payne-James, perusing Swayze’s medical records, add to the story?   Gareth Thomas: Hate in the Beautiful Game BBC Two, 10.30pm; not NI Former Welsh rugby union captain Gareth Thomas, who came out in 2009 while still playing, asks why football has shamefully remained a bastion of open homophobia – perhaps the last in sport. GT Frozen (2013) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 1.40pm  Disney’s 53rd feature is an enchanting combination of fairytale derring-do and heart-popping musical numbers that has left children and adults powerless to its charms (even if some parents may have grown rather tired of it). Elsa (Idina Menzel) is a shy princess driven into exile when her magical powers are discovered. Her sister Anna (Kristen Bell) gallops off to fetch her from her beautiful ice palace. The King’s Speech (2010) ★★★★★ Channel 4, 9.50pm  Tom Hooper’s film about the future George VI’s struggle to overcome his stammer in the nation’s hour of need won multiple Academy Awards, including a deserved Best Actor gong for Colin Firth. But it’s his double-act with Geoffrey Rush as his speech therapist Lionel Logue that gives the film its heart, and the doublehanders between them are fraught and fascinating. Point Break (1991) ★★★☆☆ Channel 5, 11.05pm Kathryn Bigelow’s cult surfing/crime film elevated Patrick Swayze’s actor status to true action hero. Keanu Reeves plays Johnny Utah, an FBI agent who goes undercover to infiltrate the Ex-Presidents, a gang of bankrobbing surfers led by the charismatic Bodhi (Swayze). The action heats up when Bodhi and Utah find they share a similar attitude towards danger. Lori Petty is the surfer who catches Johnny’s eye. Monday 7 August Eden: Paradise Lost - the participants Credit: Channel 4 Eden: Paradise Lost Channel 4, 10.00pm In March 2016, 23 idealists set out to take part in Channel 4’s Eden experiment, which, a touch grandiosely, sought to establish “a new society” from scratch, cut off from the modern world on a remote Scottish peninsula for an entire year. “What if we could start again?” was the much-hyped tag line. And the answer was… well, we never got to find out the answer because the series was pulled last summer, after just four episodes, when viewing figures took a dive from 1.7 million to less than 800,000.  Not that Channel 4 or production company Keo Films thought to tell the participants that. Instead they were left to get on with it. Rumours swirled of Lord of the Flies levels of acrimony, mass defections, starvation, health problems, people eating chicken feed to survive. So it could make for absorbing viewing in this five-part update, which airs every night this week. Although probably the greatest fascination will be in seeing the reactions of the 10 participants who suffered through to the end as they emerged from the nightmare in March this year only to discover that their efforts have mostly been in vain – and that the political landscape has drastically altered while they were gone. Gerard O’Donovan Stacey Dooley Investigates: Divide and National Pride in Northern Ireland  BBC Three, from 10.00am The intrepid reporter discovers that bitter political divisions persist in Northern Ireland as she seeks to discover more about Prime Minister Theresa May’s new allies in the Democratic Unionist Party. The Bug Grub Couple BBC One, 7.30pm Bug burger or beef burger? That’s the choice at the Grub restaurant in Pembrokeshire, part of entomologist Dr Sarah Beynon and chef Andy Holcroft’s Bug Farm – an insect zoo, research centre and insect eaterie. Here they struggle to convince us why we all should learn to love eating insect protein.   Masters Tennis: The Rogers Cup Sky Sports Main Event, 7.00pm The Uniprix Stadium in Montreal is the setting, as the Rogers Cup gets under way. Novak Djokovic lifted the trophy in 2016 for the fourth time, defeating Kei Nishikori in the final. The Serbian misses out this time around, though, due to injury.  Tornado: The 100mph Steam Engine BBC Four, 8.00pm If phrases like “it’s a Peppercorn class A1 Pacific” get you all steamed up you’ll be in heaven with this account of how a bunch of engineering enthusiasts got the massive locomotive they took 18 years to build from scratch to take on the ultimate test: hitting 100 miles per hour, a speed no British steam train has achieved since 1967.    Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm This new, live, animal rescue show with Steve Jones, Kate Quilton and Noel Fitzpatrick attempts to rehome a whole shelter’s worth of dogs, cats and assorted other species. Among the celebs espousing the joy of pets in this opener is pop singer Leona Lewis. Continues until Friday.   Man in an Orange Shirt BBC Two, 9.00pm In part two of novelist Patrick Gale’s drama for the Gay Britannia season, more than half a century on, Flora (Vanessa Redgrave) gives her late husband’s cottage to their grandson Adam (Julian Morris), who finds himself drawn to his architect, Steve (David Gyasi).   Inside Heston’s World Good Food, 9.00pm This four-part series chronicles chef Heston Blumenthal’s attempt to bring a flavour of his Fat Duck restaurant to Australia, in a multi-million pound move to Melbourne last year. GO Make or Break? Channel 5, 10.00pm A new reality series, stripped across the week, in which eight troubled couples test the strength of their relationships at a Mexican holiday resort, where alongside counselling and therapy sessions, they have to swap partners every two days. GO Doctor Dolittle (1967) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 5.05pm  This is not the Eddie Murphy comedy version from 1998 but the charming Sixties musical directed by Richard Fleischer. Rex Harrison stars as the terse, eponymous doctor who has the uncanny ability to speak to animals and so embarks on a voyage to find an elusive pink sea snail and a giant lunar moth. Samantha Egger, 20 years Harrison’s junior, co-stars as the adventurous stowaway who falls in love with the doctor.  Storks (2016) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 6.20pm  Warner Animation Group’s first film since 2014’s The Lego Movie is spectacularly daft but manages to be both moving and very fun. Here the storks of the title have moved on from delivering babies to big business and now transport products for an Amazon-style website. But then the old baby-making machine, gathering dust in the corner, is accidentally reactivated and suddenly they have a baby to get home.  American History X (1998) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm  Tony Kaye directs this compellingly violent and brutal examination of white supremacism in America. Edward Norton is both mesmerising and terrifying as Derek, a student drawn into the Neo-Nazi movement who mercilessly kills two black youths. After a stint in prison he’s reformed but returns  home to find his younger brother Danny (Edward Furlong) on the same track he was. Tuesday 8 August Jodie Whittaker and Emun Elliott Credit: BBC Trust Me BBC One, 9.00pm Before she becomes the Doctor in Doctor Who, Jodie Whittaker stars in a drama about… pretending to be a doctor. No doubt there will soon be many jokes about that floating around. In this new four-part drama, written by real-life doctor Dan Sefton, Whittaker stars as Cath, a downtrodden ward sister who is fired when she takes her concerns about the conditions in her Sheffield hospital to the trust. Then, when at the leaving party for her best friend Alison – who’s about to begin a new life in New Zealand – she spots Alison’s CV and medical degree certificate in a bin.  So Cath decides to adopt Alison’s identity and, hoping that her nursing skills will be enough to get by, find a job as a doctor far away in Edinburgh. Though the premise may sound a little daft, it’s actually surprisingly – and worryingly – common. Sefton uses his hospital know-how to bring a sense of authenticity to what is a really quite gripping drama.  Whittaker, rather than channelling a cocky Leonardo DiCaprio in Catch Me if You Can, is every inch the terrified woman flying by the seat of her pants. Excellent, too, is Emun Elliot as the colleague who catches her eye. Catherine Gee EastEnders BBC One, 7.30pm Mick’s (Danny Dyer) dastardly behaviour comes to a head in this special three-hander episode. He decides to tell wife Linda (Kellie Bright) the truth about what he’s been up to while she was away: namely cheating on her with their daughter-in-law Whitney (Shona McGarty).    Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm It’s the second nightly visit to this admirable project, which seeks to rehouse all the animals  in a Newcastle shelter in just a week. While we meet the wide range of animals and see how many still remain, Dom Joly also learns what happens to micropigs when they grow up.     The Dog Rescuers with Alan Davies Channel 5, 8.00pm Among the five unlucky pups needing some loving care from the team this week are an abandoned staffie who’s given a second chance and a young spaniel with a nasty neck wound.     Get a House for Free Channel 4, 9.00pm Marco Robinson is a very rich man – £25 million rich, in fact. He made his fortune through a business and property empire and now he wants to give back. So he’s decided to give away a three-bed flat in Preston to the person who he thinks will benefit the most. This film follows him as he attempts to sift through 8,000 applications. CG Utopia: In Search of the Dream BBC Four, 9.00pm It’s 500 years since the term “utopia” was coined by Sir Thomas More in 1516. In this documentary, art historian Professor Richard Clay examines five centuries of the concept of utopia and the impact it has had on our way of thinking. Often used as a method of criticism of the current system, it is a powerful vision. Clay considers some of our “greatest utopian dreamers”, including Jonathan Swift, author of Gulliver’s Travels, and Gene Roddenberry, creator of Star Trek, and the common themes that run through the ideal.     The Yorkshire Dales and the Lakes More4, 9.00pm The cosy documentary series continues with a farmer finding an unusual method to keep track of his sheep: day-glo paint. Elsewhere in the Dales, we follow the Dent Brewery boys as they create their own craft ales and in the Lake District we see Jon Bennett make his daily ascent to the summit of Helvellyn. CG The Parent Trap (1961) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am   In a film that helped pioneer the split-screen technique, Hayley Mills plays both Susan Evers and Sharon McKendrick, twins unaware of each other’s existence and separated as babies following their parents’ divorce. When they meet, years later, at summer camp, the pair scheme to reunite their parents. This classic Disney comedy spawned three sequels and a 1998 remake starring a young Lindsay Lohan. Tootsie (1982) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.30pm  When actor Michael Dorsey transforms himself into Dorothy Michaels in a desperate attempt to get work, complications arise as he falls for a female friend (Jessica Lange) and her father (Charles Durning)  falls for him. Although you never quite believe that Dustin Hoffman in drag would convince everyone that he’s a woman, it doesn’t matter: Tootsie is lots of fun – and it’s a sharply observed social satire, too. Groundhog Day (1993) ★★★★☆ Sky1, 9.00pm  In this wonderful comedy drama, a surly, sardonic weatherman (Bill Murray) is sent to the small US town of Punxsutawney to cover the annual groundhog festival, but finds himself experiencing precisely the same events over and over – then realises that he can free himself from the loop only by being a nicer person. One criticism: as always, Murray is so much more likeable as the malevolent grouch… Wednesday 9 August My Family, Partition and Me: India 1947 - Anita Rani  Credit: BBC My Family, Partition and Me: India 1947 BBC One, 9.00pm Two years ago, Anita Rani learnt how her family history was forever marked by the 1947 Partition of India in a memorable episode of Who Do You Think You Are? Now, she has wrangled three members of the public – one Hindu, one Christian and one Muslim – to explore how their own lives, and those of their ancestors, were affected by the appalling and widespread outbreaks of religious violence in the wake of Britain’s messy, compromised withdrawal, and the troubled legacy left by the Empire. In addition to eyewitness testimonies, the descendants of the survivors travel back to India, Pakistan and Bangladesh to retrace the journeys their relatives were forced to make. Their discoveries are in equal parts shocking, distressing and uplifting, and its treatment is rightly sensitive for events still in living memory: tears flow freely, yet it’s never sentimental. If there isn’t much space to dig into the wider political situation, the complex reasons behind the violence and longer-term implications, the detail of the personal recollections and anecdotes tells its own powerful tale. Rani returns to her own ancestral story in next week’s concluding part. Gabriel Tate Super Small Animals BBC One, 8.00pm Biologist Patrick Aryee demonstrates that size isn’t everything in the natural world, observing the extraordinary feats of strength, endurance and ingenuity of everything from hummingbirds  and seahorses to beetles and armadillos. Love Your Garden ITV, 8.00pm Alan Titchmarsh and his team turn an uninspiring patch of lumpy lawn and uneven paving into a sensory garden for a four-year-old girl with a very rare degenerative eye disease. Long Lost Family ITV, 9.00pm This episode of the always engaging and emotionally gruelling series reuniting long-estranged relatives charts the story of a woman who gave up her son only to adopt two boys herself, and a man whose mother put him up for adoption through an advert in the local press. My Big Gay Jewish Conversion BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.20pm First shown on BBC Three, this smart and sobering documentary follows Simon Atkins – who is Catholic and gay – as he looks at convert to Judaism, a religion that would allow him to marry his boyfriend, Matthew. Atkin’s journey is both spiritual and literal, as he travels to relatively tolerant Tel Aviv and more conservative Jerusalem, hoping to reconcile his sexuality with his religious beliefs. GT The South Bank Show Sky Arts, 8.00pm Singer-songwriter Benjamin Clementine, who won the Mercury Prize in 2015, talks to Melvyn Bragg about his early years on the streets and being hailed perhaps the brightest musical talent of his generation. In Search of Arcadia BBC Four, 9.00pm This contemplative documentary sees Dr Janina Ramirez and John Bailey explore the roots of the Arcadian cultural revolutionaries that sprang up along the Thames in the 17th and 18th centuries. Citizen Jane: Battle for the City BBC Four, 10.00pm When she saw the controversial development projects proposed by Robert Moses in Sixties New York, Jane Jacobs decided to take him on. Matt Tyrnauer’s punchy documentary pulls together an inspiring tale out of unlikely material – the debate of community culture versus “slum clearance”, one which continues to this day in cities across the world. GT Bridge to Terabithia (2007) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.10pm  Talented child stars AnnaSophia Robb and Josh Hutcherson (who went on to star in The Hunger Games) play two young misfits who become friends and create a magical world of the imagination in a remote part of the forest. This quality Disney production, adapted from Katherine Paterson’s classic novel, ventures into unexpectedly dark territory and packs an emotional punch that will have you reaching for your hankie. Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief (2015) ★★★★☆ Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Based on a book by the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Lawrence Wright, director Alex Gibney’s documentary about the Church of Scientology is a gripping, painstakingly researched exposé of one of the world’s most enigmatic organisations. At its core are a series of chilling allegations by former Scientology members, who describe a culture of abuse. The Lost Boys (1987) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 9.00pm Teen flick meets horror in this Eighties hit about two boys (Jason Patric and Corey Haim) who move to a quiet, northern California town where they become involved with a group of bloodthirsty vampires. These days it has to compete with the likes of Twilight and The Vampire Diaries, but there’s still enough action, intrigue, danger and romance to keep you hooked. Kiefer Sutherland and Corey Feldman also star. Thursday 10 July Princess Diana with Raine, Comtesse De Chambrun  Credit: Channel 4 Princess Diana’s “Wicked” Stepmother Channel 4, 9.00pm A gossipy, full-throttle and altogether naughty documentary about Diana, Princess of Wales’s stepmother Raine, Countess Spencer, who died last October. The daughter of romantic novelist Barbara Cartland, Raine was a prodigious social climber described here as “a famous socialite, a feisty politician and all-round force of nature” (“Nobody gets to be a countess three times by accident,” says one contributor). It seems like an accurate fit.  Named “Debutante of the Year” in 1947, Raine went on to bag a future Earl for a husband at the age of 18, became the youngest member of Westminster City Council at 23, before going on to become a noted conservation campaigner. The main focus here, though, is how she went on to marry a second Earl, John Spencer, in circumstances that earned her the entrenched enmity of his children, prime among them being his then 15-year-old daughter, Lady Diana. Yet when Diana’s own marriage ran into trouble it was Raine, so it’s claimed, that she turned to for support; the once “sworn enemy was transformed into her closest confidante”. The contributors include Downton Abbey writer Julian Fellowes and royal biographer Penny Junor. Gerard O’Donovan Natwest T20 Blast Cricket: Hampshire v Glamorgan Sky Sports Cricket, 6.00pm All the action from the Ageas Bowl for this South Division match. The home side are one of the most successful in the history of domestic T20 cricket, having won the competition twice and appeared in another four Finals Days. 10 Puppies and Us BBC Two, 8.00pm Here are more tales of new dog owners and their pups. This week, a mother seeks a canine companion for her son who has Down’s syndrome; the conflict between rival Chihuahuas Rocky and Chloe deepens; and a newlywed couple call in the behaviourist when a pug objects to their connubial bliss.  James Martin’s French Adventure ITV, 8.30pm Chef James Martin heads to the hilly Jura region, where a pear orchard proves to be the source of the perfect chutney for barbecued duck, and a visit to the citadel at Fort des Rousses shows why dungeons make the best cheese cellars. Top of the Lake: China Girl BBC Two, 9.00pm In the wake of last week’s shock revelation, Jane Campion’s off-kilter crime drama continues, with troubled detective Robin Griffin (Elisabeth Moss) pointing the China Girl investigation in a new direction, that of a surrogacy deal gone wrong. Meanwhile, Robin must face demons from her past when her former police chief Al Parker (David Wenham) arrives from New Zealand. Inside London Fire Brigade ITV, 9.00pm As the documentary series concludes, retiring crew manager Al passes the baton on to 25-year-old rookie Joe, who faces a tough test fighting his first big fire. GO A Premier League of Their Own Sky1, 9.00pm Ahead of next weekend’s opening matches in the Premier League, James Corden and pals begin the new season of the panel show with a special edition. Guests Thierry Henry, Jeff Stelling and Kelly Cates will be celebrating all things football alongside the show’s regulars Freddie Flintoff, Jack Whitehall and Jamie Redknapp. Plus McFly’s Danny Jones, singer Kate Nash and R&B star Lemar will be stepping up to the spot for Popstar Penalties. Laurel and Hardy: Their Lives and Magic Sky Arts, 9.00pm Fans of Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy will enjoy this superb assemblage of clips and out-takes. This enthralling documentary follows the life and work of the world’s most beloved comedy duo, and includes rare footage of Laurel in his later years, as well as an even rarer interview with his daughter, Lois. There’s also a tribute to the unusually strong friendship that the two stars enjoyed throughout their working lives. GO Dr Seuss’ The Lorax (2012) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 2.55pm This animated adaptation of Dr Seuss’s quirky story follows a boy (voiced by Zac Efron) who goes in search of a tree to impress a nature-loving girl (Taylor Swift). But he stumbles on the Once-ler (Ed Helms), the man responsible for harvesting all the world’s plant life. Children will enjoy it, even if the film does sacrifice a measure of its literary magic to the god of cinematic entertainment. Wild (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm  The Pacific Crest Trail, which runs up the entire western spine of the United States, is a challenge of fabled arduousness and rugged beauty. In 1995, aged 26, Cheryl Strayed (played by a superb Reese Witherspoon) walked it, to get clearance in her head after a decade of loss and personal meltdown. Wild powerfully reveals Strayed’s terrors and pleasures as she forges ahead on the journey. Wilde (1996) ★★★☆☆ BBC Four, 10.00pm  Many feel that Stephen Fry was born to play the part of the tragic and devastatingly brilliant Oscar Wilde. He’s terrific, but is only one of several superb players in a film which is held together by its performances. There’s Tom Wilkinson as the odious bully Queensberry and Jude Law on wonderfully petulant form as Bosie, the cause of Wilde’s downfall. Wilde’s story The Selfish Giant is woven throughout the film. Friday 11 August The Royal Albert Hall Credit: BBC BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 8.00pm Swapping tuxes for cowboy hats, the Proms continues tonight with a staging of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s beloved 1943 musical Oklahoma!  Expect plenty of whip-cracking, thigh-slapping, wild-west antics at the Royal Albert Hall, as conductor John Wilson and his orchestra add their signature élan to this story of a love affair between dashing cowboy Curly McLain (Nathaniel Hackmann) and farmer’s daughter Laurey Williams (Scarlett Strallen). Playing Jud Fy, the brooding, bestial social misfit with designs on Laurey himself, meanwhile, is David Seadon-Young. Elsewhere, Belinda Lang stars as the clucking Aunt Eller, and comedian Marcus Brigstocke is Ali Hakim, the Persian huckster battling with the cowboy Will Parker (Robert Fairchild) for the affections of fickle Ado Annie (Lizzy Connolly). The dance routines are balletic and fast, the hits frequent: the jaunty Surrey With the Fringe on Top, the romantic People Will Say We’re in Love, the lovely I Cain’t Say No, and, of course, the unmistakable opening song, Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin’. Rachel Kavanaugh, who directed an acclaimed touring production of Oklahoma! in 2015, is at the helm again here. Patrick Smith Premier League Football: Arsenal v Leicester City Sky Sports Premier League/Sky Sports Main Event, 7.00pm After three months of bluster and big-spending in the transfer market, the Premier League returns – and for the first time, the season gets under way on a Friday. All eyes tonight will be on Arsenal’s Alexandre Lacazette, the French striker who joined the Gunners for a club record fee of £52 million. Can he be the man to fire Arsenal back into the top four? Leicester City, meanwhile, will be keen to bounce back from a disappointing season that saw Claudio Ranieri sacked as manager despite having won them the league nine months previously. When these sides last met, at the end of April, a late own goal from Robert Huth handed Arsenal a 1-0 victory. Teach My Pet to Do That ITV, 8.00pm Arriving in the dog days of summer, this fluffy new series is presented by Alexander Amstrong, who asks such questions as: can a cat be trained to ride a labrador? Helping him teach tricks to the pets – among them, a dachshund labrador cross called Eric and a miniature horse called Aslan – are animal trainers Nando Brown and Jo-Rosie Haffenden.  Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm Throughout this week Steve Jones, Kate Quilton and Supervet Noel Fitzpatrick have been trying to find permanent homes for every animal in the Newcastle Dog and Cat Shelter. Tonight, they make one final push.  Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm Green fingers at the ready as Monty Don advises on how to cut and maintain hedges, while Adam Frost reveals the secrets of successful planting combinations. The Street ITV3, 9.00pm Previously shown in 2009, Jimmy McGovern’s gloom-ridden series comprised six stand-alone episodes focusing on the lives of the inhabitants of a single street in Liverpool. In this instalment, Anna Friel, recently seen in McGovern’s latest drama Broken, plays a single mother trying to hold down two jobs, pay the mortgage and get her two sons into a better school. Starring opposite her is Daniel Mays – with whom she also appeared in Tony Marchant’s similarly bleak drama Public Enemies – as the plumber whom she begins dating. What unfolds is expertly crafted and at times gut-wrenching to watch.  The Agony & the Ecstasy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This entertainingly nostalgic four-part series looks at how the UK’s rave scene exploded in the Eighties, fuelled by the party drug ecstasy. With the help of DJs such as Goldie, Paul Oakenfold and Annie Mac, it also explores how the genre evolved over the next three decades. Reach for the lasers. PS Eden: Paradise Lost Channel 4, 10.00pm The off-grid experiment – in which 23 people were stranded on the west coast of Scotland to fend for themselves – arrived on Channel 4 a year ago amid great fanfare but ended up being an unmitigated flop, with only 10 participants making it through to the end. In tonight’s finale, the action takes us from Christmas Day through to March, when those who remained were finally released. PS Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm  This first of a potentially limitless spin-off series of “Star Wars Stories” follows rebel live-wire Jyn Erso (Felicity Jones), who leads a band of self-styled “spies, saboteurs and assassins” on a death-or-glory mission to steal the Death Star plans from an Imperial stronghold, via some genuinely breathtaking planetary vistas and earth-ripping set-pieces.  The Firm (1993) ★★★☆☆ W, 9.00pm  Sydney Pollack directed this accomplished yet curiously uninvolving adaptation of John Grisham’s legal potboiler. Tom Cruise plays Mitch McDeere, an ambitious young lawyer who takes a well-paid job at a Memphis law firm that sounds too good to be true. And it is: the firm launders money for the Mob. Can Mitch escape with his morals and marriage intact? Gene Hackman co-stars as Cruise’s father figure. Strictly Ballroom (1992) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 11.05pm  Paul Mercurio plays a rebellious ballroom dancer who breaks all the rules and paso dobles his way to victory in this crowd-pleasing Australian comedy. Baz Luhrmann’s writing and directing debut is just as brash as Moulin Rouge! but a lot less pleased with itself. There’s romance between our hero and his ugly duckling partner, and it’s set against an enjoyable parade of sequin-decked caricatures and high camp. Watch here on TVPlayer Television previewers Catherine Gee, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: Billy Connolly: Portrait of a Lifetime and Paul O’Grady’s Hollywood

Saturday 5 August Billy Connolly: Portrait of a Lifetime BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 10.30pm “Glasgow belongs to me,” says Billy Connolly of his hometown in this heart-warming documentary to mark the comedian’s 75th birthday in November. And he’s not wrong as three imposing 50ft tribute portraits have recently been unveiled on wallends in the city. They were created by Scottish artists John Byrne, Jack Vettriano and Rachel MacLean, and this accompanying film not only gives a neat history of the area, but serves as a celebration of the Big Yin’s career.  Interspersed with clips of his stand-up routines, including his cheeky first appearance on Parkinson in 1975 when he told the bum joke that turned him into a star, the programme see Connolly sit quietly for the artists – not one of his strong points as he admits: “I’ve been very patient. I think I’m due an episode.” Watching them at work in their studios is inspiring and Connolly is taken aback by the results. “It’s like looking into a mirror. You know my soul,” he says to Byrne, who used to design album covers for Connolly’s band The Humblebums. “I’m amazed at the effect these have had on me, they’ve stunned me.” From tomorrow, the original portraits will be hung in the People’s Palace. Rachel Ward Athletics: World Championships BBC Two, 9.30am & BBC One, 6.30pm Day two at the London Stadium in Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park sees Usain Bolt – in all likeliness – going for gold in the men’s 100 m final (9.45pm) as he makes his final individual appearance at a major championships. His main threats are expected to come from former champions Justin Gatlin and Yohan Blake, as well as emerging star Christian Coleman. Earlier in the day, British medal hope Katarina Johnson-Thompson gets her heptathlon bid under way with the 100 m hurdles at 10.05am. Sadly not in action today is Greg Rutherford, who, because of an ankle injury, won’t be competing in the men’s long jump final (8.05pm).  Little Big Shots USA ITV, 5.00pm Steve Harvey showcases more talented youngsters while mocking his own stupidity in this family friendly show exec-produced by Ellen DeGeneres. Tonight, there’s a maths genius and a Motown singer. Royal Cousins at War BBC Two, 7.30pm; NI, 8.00pm A welcome repeat for this riveting analysis of the relationship between Kaiser Bill, Tsar Nicholas II of Russia and our own King George V, and the disastrous effect that their rivalry had on the First World War.  Paul O’Grady’s Hollywood Channel 4, 8.00pm This new series sees Paul O’Grady delve into cinematic history to find out what it takes to make a masterpiece. He begins with “weepies”, where the host’s caustic wit serves as the perfect antidote as talking heads, including Sigourney Weaver and Celine Dion, reach for the tissues as they relate films such as Brief Encounter, Titanic and, quite possibly the saddest in movie history, The Champ.    Dad’s Army BBC Two, 8.30pm; not NI This is a gem of an episode loaded with slapstick fun from 1970. It’s the one where Corporal Jones (Clive Dunn) dresses as a tree trunk during an exercise pitting Mainwaring (Arthur Lowe) and his crew against their pompous arch-rival Captain Square. RW The L.A. Riots: 25 Years Later History, 9.00pm Twenty-five years after Los Angeles erupted into one of the most destructive civil disturbances in US history (11,000 people were arrested and an estimated 63 people were killed), this documentary looks back at the decades of racial injustice that led to the incident and the history of police relations with LA’s black community. Citizens, council members and even those who committed crimes talk about how South Central was beset by mass riots, looting, and fires.  Cambridge Folk Festival 2017 Sky Arts, 9.00pm Broadcaster Mark Radcliffe and musician Julie Fowlis present highlights from this year’s festival, an event that attracts 10,000 visitors. These include Jon Boden, formerly of Bellowhead, performing new material with his band The Remnant Kings. There’s also music from Jake Bugg, electric punk stars Oysterband and Lisa Hannigan, once as a member of Damien Rice’s band. RW The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies (2014) ★★☆☆☆ ITV, 8.00pm  The battle of the title was barely mentioned by JRR Tolkein in The Hobbit, but it was seemingly enough for Peter Jackson to pad out his franchise even further. Picking up where the last film left off, our heroes had just unleashed the wrath of dragon Smaug (Benedict Cumberbatch). But there’s another battle looming, one between themselves which is fuelled by greed. Red (2010) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm  A starry line-up of actors of pensionable age is the attraction of this light-hearted adaptation of Warren Ellis’s graphic novel, and it’s hard to resist Helen Mirren with a submachine gun. RED stands for “Retired Extremely Dangerous”, which is what the CIA has labelled former agents Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich and Mirren, who team up to find out who has marked them for assassination, and why. I Know What You Did Last Summer (1997) ★★☆☆☆ BBC One, 11.55pm  This routine slasher flick, written by Kevin Williamson of Scream fame, will certainly make you jump but it’s unlikely to give you many sleepless nights. When a carful of American teenagers hits and kills a man, they panic and dump the body. Months later, the inevitable slaughter begins. A hapless cast, featuring Sarah Michelle Gellar, brings unintentional levity to proceedings. Sunday 6 August Diana, Princess of Wales Credit: Rex Diana: In Her Own Words Channel 4, 8.00pm Much controversy has surrounded this documentary, which broadcasts – for the first time in the UK – video footage recorded in 1992 and 1993 by Diana, Princess of Wales’s voice coach, Peter Settelen. Hired to help Diana reframe her public image and put forward her own side of the story regarding her marriage, Settelen saw his work bear fruit in his client’s Panorama interview. Now there is undoubted interest in watching Diana recount key events in her life unmediated, with candour and a seductive mix of charm and steel. “He chatted me up like a bad rash,” she recalls of her future husband at one point; at another, she remembers being “completely thrown” by the Prince of Wales’s peculiar response to a question about them being in love. In truth, director Kevin Sim rather crams the at-times uncomfortably intimate footage into the first and final thirds of the documentary, leaving assorted friends and confidants to tell the rest of the very familiar story, and the melodrama is laid on a little thick at times. Exploitative? Perhaps. Fascinating? In patches, although it probably won’t entirely satisfy either those looking for genuinely fresh insights or an opportunity to be outraged. Gabriel Tate Community Shield Football: Arsenal v Chelsea BT Sport 1, 1.00pm Arsenal and Chelsea meet for the second time in as many weeks, with Antonio Conte’s Blues favourites to lift the Community Shield today having won 3-0 in Beijing thanks to a brace from Michy Batshuayi.  Women’s Football: Euro 2017 Channel 4, 3.00pm After a thrilling tournament – during which a record 3.3 million people tuned in to watch England’s Lionesses beat France 1-0 – we’re at the FC Twente Stadion in Enschede, Holland, as the successors to Germany are crowned.   LSO Sky Arts, 6.00pm Originally, and rather impishly, hinting at a “greatest hits” of Haydn, Simon Rattle and his Imaginary Orchestral Journey instead took movements from 11 of the Austrian composer’s works, many of them rarely performed, and realigned them joyfully and perceptively in this concert with the London Symphony Orchestra. Works from Bartók and an extract from Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde provide the hors d’oeuvre for this enticing programme.   BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 7.00pm One of the most anticipated events of every Prom season, the National Youth Orchestra of Great Britain brings its energy and drive to the Royal Albert Hall. First comes the London premiere of Francisco Coll’s “grotesque symphony” Mural and Thomas Adès conducting his own work, Polaris, for the first time in the capital. The climax comes courtesy of Igor Stravinsky and his agelessly thrilling Rite of Spring. It is introduced by Suzy Klein and Lloyd Coleman. GT Secrets of Silicon Valley BBC Two, 8.00pm Blogger Jamie Bartlett investigates whether technological progress should be made at any cost. On the one side, he meets those tackling climate change; on the other, those paying the price for the success of Uber and, somewhere in the middle, the pioneers of self-driving cars.    Poldark BBC One, 9.00pm Having barrelled along entertainingly, with the undercurrent of hardscrabble misery intact, this third series concludes with sightings of French sails spotted on the horizon and Cornwall put on high alert. Meanwhile, Cap’n Ross (Aidan Turner) contends with a broadside from George Warleggan  (Jack Farthing).   The Last Days of Patrick Swayze Channel 5, 10.00pm Given the fact that he died from pancreatic cancer aged 57, we can reasonably surmise that the Dirty Dancing star’s final hours were not wholly pleasant. So, what can forensic pathologist Jason Payne-James, perusing Swayze’s medical records, add to the story?   Gareth Thomas: Hate in the Beautiful Game BBC Two, 10.30pm; not NI Former Welsh rugby union captain Gareth Thomas, who came out in 2009 while still playing, asks why football has shamefully remained a bastion of open homophobia – perhaps the last in sport. GT Frozen (2013) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 1.40pm  Disney’s 53rd feature is an enchanting combination of fairytale derring-do and heart-popping musical numbers that has left children and adults powerless to its charms (even if some parents may have grown rather tired of it). Elsa (Idina Menzel) is a shy princess driven into exile when her magical powers are discovered. Her sister Anna (Kristen Bell) gallops off to fetch her from her beautiful ice palace. The King’s Speech (2010) ★★★★★ Channel 4, 9.50pm  Tom Hooper’s film about the future George VI’s struggle to overcome his stammer in the nation’s hour of need won multiple Academy Awards, including a deserved Best Actor gong for Colin Firth. But it’s his double-act with Geoffrey Rush as his speech therapist Lionel Logue that gives the film its heart, and the doublehanders between them are fraught and fascinating. Point Break (1991) ★★★☆☆ Channel 5, 11.05pm Kathryn Bigelow’s cult surfing/crime film elevated Patrick Swayze’s actor status to true action hero. Keanu Reeves plays Johnny Utah, an FBI agent who goes undercover to infiltrate the Ex-Presidents, a gang of bankrobbing surfers led by the charismatic Bodhi (Swayze). The action heats up when Bodhi and Utah find they share a similar attitude towards danger. Lori Petty is the surfer who catches Johnny’s eye. Monday 7 August Eden: Paradise Lost - the participants Credit: Channel 4 Eden: Paradise Lost Channel 4, 10.00pm In March 2016, 23 idealists set out to take part in Channel 4’s Eden experiment, which, a touch grandiosely, sought to establish “a new society” from scratch, cut off from the modern world on a remote Scottish peninsula for an entire year. “What if we could start again?” was the much-hyped tag line. And the answer was… well, we never got to find out the answer because the series was pulled last summer, after just four episodes, when viewing figures took a dive from 1.7 million to less than 800,000.  Not that Channel 4 or production company Keo Films thought to tell the participants that. Instead they were left to get on with it. Rumours swirled of Lord of the Flies levels of acrimony, mass defections, starvation, health problems, people eating chicken feed to survive. So it could make for absorbing viewing in this five-part update, which airs every night this week. Although probably the greatest fascination will be in seeing the reactions of the 10 participants who suffered through to the end as they emerged from the nightmare in March this year only to discover that their efforts have mostly been in vain – and that the political landscape has drastically altered while they were gone. Gerard O’Donovan Stacey Dooley Investigates: Divide and National Pride in Northern Ireland  BBC Three, from 10.00am The intrepid reporter discovers that bitter political divisions persist in Northern Ireland as she seeks to discover more about Prime Minister Theresa May’s new allies in the Democratic Unionist Party. The Bug Grub Couple BBC One, 7.30pm Bug burger or beef burger? That’s the choice at the Grub restaurant in Pembrokeshire, part of entomologist Dr Sarah Beynon and chef Andy Holcroft’s Bug Farm – an insect zoo, research centre and insect eaterie. Here they struggle to convince us why we all should learn to love eating insect protein.   Masters Tennis: The Rogers Cup Sky Sports Main Event, 7.00pm The Uniprix Stadium in Montreal is the setting, as the Rogers Cup gets under way. Novak Djokovic lifted the trophy in 2016 for the fourth time, defeating Kei Nishikori in the final. The Serbian misses out this time around, though, due to injury.  Tornado: The 100mph Steam Engine BBC Four, 8.00pm If phrases like “it’s a Peppercorn class A1 Pacific” get you all steamed up you’ll be in heaven with this account of how a bunch of engineering enthusiasts got the massive locomotive they took 18 years to build from scratch to take on the ultimate test: hitting 100 miles per hour, a speed no British steam train has achieved since 1967.    Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm This new, live, animal rescue show with Steve Jones, Kate Quilton and Noel Fitzpatrick attempts to rehome a whole shelter’s worth of dogs, cats and assorted other species. Among the celebs espousing the joy of pets in this opener is pop singer Leona Lewis. Continues until Friday.   Man in an Orange Shirt BBC Two, 9.00pm In part two of novelist Patrick Gale’s drama for the Gay Britannia season, more than half a century on, Flora (Vanessa Redgrave) gives her late husband’s cottage to their grandson Adam (Julian Morris), who finds himself drawn to his architect, Steve (David Gyasi).   Inside Heston’s World Good Food, 9.00pm This four-part series chronicles chef Heston Blumenthal’s attempt to bring a flavour of his Fat Duck restaurant to Australia, in a multi-million pound move to Melbourne last year. GO Make or Break? Channel 5, 10.00pm A new reality series, stripped across the week, in which eight troubled couples test the strength of their relationships at a Mexican holiday resort, where alongside counselling and therapy sessions, they have to swap partners every two days. GO Doctor Dolittle (1967) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 5.05pm  This is not the Eddie Murphy comedy version from 1998 but the charming Sixties musical directed by Richard Fleischer. Rex Harrison stars as the terse, eponymous doctor who has the uncanny ability to speak to animals and so embarks on a voyage to find an elusive pink sea snail and a giant lunar moth. Samantha Egger, 20 years Harrison’s junior, co-stars as the adventurous stowaway who falls in love with the doctor.  Storks (2016) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 6.20pm  Warner Animation Group’s first film since 2014’s The Lego Movie is spectacularly daft but manages to be both moving and very fun. Here the storks of the title have moved on from delivering babies to big business and now transport products for an Amazon-style website. But then the old baby-making machine, gathering dust in the corner, is accidentally reactivated and suddenly they have a baby to get home.  American History X (1998) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm  Tony Kaye directs this compellingly violent and brutal examination of white supremacism in America. Edward Norton is both mesmerising and terrifying as Derek, a student drawn into the Neo-Nazi movement who mercilessly kills two black youths. After a stint in prison he’s reformed but returns  home to find his younger brother Danny (Edward Furlong) on the same track he was. Tuesday 8 August Jodie Whittaker and Emun Elliott Credit: BBC Trust Me BBC One, 9.00pm Before she becomes the Doctor in Doctor Who, Jodie Whittaker stars in a drama about… pretending to be a doctor. No doubt there will soon be many jokes about that floating around. In this new four-part drama, written by real-life doctor Dan Sefton, Whittaker stars as Cath, a downtrodden ward sister who is fired when she takes her concerns about the conditions in her Sheffield hospital to the trust. Then, when at the leaving party for her best friend Alison – who’s about to begin a new life in New Zealand – she spots Alison’s CV and medical degree certificate in a bin.  So Cath decides to adopt Alison’s identity and, hoping that her nursing skills will be enough to get by, find a job as a doctor far away in Edinburgh. Though the premise may sound a little daft, it’s actually surprisingly – and worryingly – common. Sefton uses his hospital know-how to bring a sense of authenticity to what is a really quite gripping drama.  Whittaker, rather than channelling a cocky Leonardo DiCaprio in Catch Me if You Can, is every inch the terrified woman flying by the seat of her pants. Excellent, too, is Emun Elliot as the colleague who catches her eye. Catherine Gee EastEnders BBC One, 7.30pm Mick’s (Danny Dyer) dastardly behaviour comes to a head in this special three-hander episode. He decides to tell wife Linda (Kellie Bright) the truth about what he’s been up to while she was away: namely cheating on her with their daughter-in-law Whitney (Shona McGarty).    Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm It’s the second nightly visit to this admirable project, which seeks to rehouse all the animals  in a Newcastle shelter in just a week. While we meet the wide range of animals and see how many still remain, Dom Joly also learns what happens to micropigs when they grow up.     The Dog Rescuers with Alan Davies Channel 5, 8.00pm Among the five unlucky pups needing some loving care from the team this week are an abandoned staffie who’s given a second chance and a young spaniel with a nasty neck wound.     Get a House for Free Channel 4, 9.00pm Marco Robinson is a very rich man – £25 million rich, in fact. He made his fortune through a business and property empire and now he wants to give back. So he’s decided to give away a three-bed flat in Preston to the person who he thinks will benefit the most. This film follows him as he attempts to sift through 8,000 applications. CG Utopia: In Search of the Dream BBC Four, 9.00pm It’s 500 years since the term “utopia” was coined by Sir Thomas More in 1516. In this documentary, art historian Professor Richard Clay examines five centuries of the concept of utopia and the impact it has had on our way of thinking. Often used as a method of criticism of the current system, it is a powerful vision. Clay considers some of our “greatest utopian dreamers”, including Jonathan Swift, author of Gulliver’s Travels, and Gene Roddenberry, creator of Star Trek, and the common themes that run through the ideal.     The Yorkshire Dales and the Lakes More4, 9.00pm The cosy documentary series continues with a farmer finding an unusual method to keep track of his sheep: day-glo paint. Elsewhere in the Dales, we follow the Dent Brewery boys as they create their own craft ales and in the Lake District we see Jon Bennett make his daily ascent to the summit of Helvellyn. CG The Parent Trap (1961) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am   In a film that helped pioneer the split-screen technique, Hayley Mills plays both Susan Evers and Sharon McKendrick, twins unaware of each other’s existence and separated as babies following their parents’ divorce. When they meet, years later, at summer camp, the pair scheme to reunite their parents. This classic Disney comedy spawned three sequels and a 1998 remake starring a young Lindsay Lohan. Tootsie (1982) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.30pm  When actor Michael Dorsey transforms himself into Dorothy Michaels in a desperate attempt to get work, complications arise as he falls for a female friend (Jessica Lange) and her father (Charles Durning)  falls for him. Although you never quite believe that Dustin Hoffman in drag would convince everyone that he’s a woman, it doesn’t matter: Tootsie is lots of fun – and it’s a sharply observed social satire, too. Groundhog Day (1993) ★★★★☆ Sky1, 9.00pm  In this wonderful comedy drama, a surly, sardonic weatherman (Bill Murray) is sent to the small US town of Punxsutawney to cover the annual groundhog festival, but finds himself experiencing precisely the same events over and over – then realises that he can free himself from the loop only by being a nicer person. One criticism: as always, Murray is so much more likeable as the malevolent grouch… Wednesday 9 August My Family, Partition and Me: India 1947 - Anita Rani  Credit: BBC My Family, Partition and Me: India 1947 BBC One, 9.00pm Two years ago, Anita Rani learnt how her family history was forever marked by the 1947 Partition of India in a memorable episode of Who Do You Think You Are? Now, she has wrangled three members of the public – one Hindu, one Christian and one Muslim – to explore how their own lives, and those of their ancestors, were affected by the appalling and widespread outbreaks of religious violence in the wake of Britain’s messy, compromised withdrawal, and the troubled legacy left by the Empire. In addition to eyewitness testimonies, the descendants of the survivors travel back to India, Pakistan and Bangladesh to retrace the journeys their relatives were forced to make. Their discoveries are in equal parts shocking, distressing and uplifting, and its treatment is rightly sensitive for events still in living memory: tears flow freely, yet it’s never sentimental. If there isn’t much space to dig into the wider political situation, the complex reasons behind the violence and longer-term implications, the detail of the personal recollections and anecdotes tells its own powerful tale. Rani returns to her own ancestral story in next week’s concluding part. Gabriel Tate Super Small Animals BBC One, 8.00pm Biologist Patrick Aryee demonstrates that size isn’t everything in the natural world, observing the extraordinary feats of strength, endurance and ingenuity of everything from hummingbirds  and seahorses to beetles and armadillos. Love Your Garden ITV, 8.00pm Alan Titchmarsh and his team turn an uninspiring patch of lumpy lawn and uneven paving into a sensory garden for a four-year-old girl with a very rare degenerative eye disease. Long Lost Family ITV, 9.00pm This episode of the always engaging and emotionally gruelling series reuniting long-estranged relatives charts the story of a woman who gave up her son only to adopt two boys herself, and a man whose mother put him up for adoption through an advert in the local press. My Big Gay Jewish Conversion BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.20pm First shown on BBC Three, this smart and sobering documentary follows Simon Atkins – who is Catholic and gay – as he looks at convert to Judaism, a religion that would allow him to marry his boyfriend, Matthew. Atkin’s journey is both spiritual and literal, as he travels to relatively tolerant Tel Aviv and more conservative Jerusalem, hoping to reconcile his sexuality with his religious beliefs. GT The South Bank Show Sky Arts, 8.00pm Singer-songwriter Benjamin Clementine, who won the Mercury Prize in 2015, talks to Melvyn Bragg about his early years on the streets and being hailed perhaps the brightest musical talent of his generation. In Search of Arcadia BBC Four, 9.00pm This contemplative documentary sees Dr Janina Ramirez and John Bailey explore the roots of the Arcadian cultural revolutionaries that sprang up along the Thames in the 17th and 18th centuries. Citizen Jane: Battle for the City BBC Four, 10.00pm When she saw the controversial development projects proposed by Robert Moses in Sixties New York, Jane Jacobs decided to take him on. Matt Tyrnauer’s punchy documentary pulls together an inspiring tale out of unlikely material – the debate of community culture versus “slum clearance”, one which continues to this day in cities across the world. GT Bridge to Terabithia (2007) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.10pm  Talented child stars AnnaSophia Robb and Josh Hutcherson (who went on to star in The Hunger Games) play two young misfits who become friends and create a magical world of the imagination in a remote part of the forest. This quality Disney production, adapted from Katherine Paterson’s classic novel, ventures into unexpectedly dark territory and packs an emotional punch that will have you reaching for your hankie. Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief (2015) ★★★★☆ Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Based on a book by the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Lawrence Wright, director Alex Gibney’s documentary about the Church of Scientology is a gripping, painstakingly researched exposé of one of the world’s most enigmatic organisations. At its core are a series of chilling allegations by former Scientology members, who describe a culture of abuse. The Lost Boys (1987) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 9.00pm Teen flick meets horror in this Eighties hit about two boys (Jason Patric and Corey Haim) who move to a quiet, northern California town where they become involved with a group of bloodthirsty vampires. These days it has to compete with the likes of Twilight and The Vampire Diaries, but there’s still enough action, intrigue, danger and romance to keep you hooked. Kiefer Sutherland and Corey Feldman also star. Thursday 10 July Princess Diana with Raine, Comtesse De Chambrun  Credit: Channel 4 Princess Diana’s “Wicked” Stepmother Channel 4, 9.00pm A gossipy, full-throttle and altogether naughty documentary about Diana, Princess of Wales’s stepmother Raine, Countess Spencer, who died last October. The daughter of romantic novelist Barbara Cartland, Raine was a prodigious social climber described here as “a famous socialite, a feisty politician and all-round force of nature” (“Nobody gets to be a countess three times by accident,” says one contributor). It seems like an accurate fit.  Named “Debutante of the Year” in 1947, Raine went on to bag a future Earl for a husband at the age of 18, became the youngest member of Westminster City Council at 23, before going on to become a noted conservation campaigner. The main focus here, though, is how she went on to marry a second Earl, John Spencer, in circumstances that earned her the entrenched enmity of his children, prime among them being his then 15-year-old daughter, Lady Diana. Yet when Diana’s own marriage ran into trouble it was Raine, so it’s claimed, that she turned to for support; the once “sworn enemy was transformed into her closest confidante”. The contributors include Downton Abbey writer Julian Fellowes and royal biographer Penny Junor. Gerard O’Donovan Natwest T20 Blast Cricket: Hampshire v Glamorgan Sky Sports Cricket, 6.00pm All the action from the Ageas Bowl for this South Division match. The home side are one of the most successful in the history of domestic T20 cricket, having won the competition twice and appeared in another four Finals Days. 10 Puppies and Us BBC Two, 8.00pm Here are more tales of new dog owners and their pups. This week, a mother seeks a canine companion for her son who has Down’s syndrome; the conflict between rival Chihuahuas Rocky and Chloe deepens; and a newlywed couple call in the behaviourist when a pug objects to their connubial bliss.  James Martin’s French Adventure ITV, 8.30pm Chef James Martin heads to the hilly Jura region, where a pear orchard proves to be the source of the perfect chutney for barbecued duck, and a visit to the citadel at Fort des Rousses shows why dungeons make the best cheese cellars. Top of the Lake: China Girl BBC Two, 9.00pm In the wake of last week’s shock revelation, Jane Campion’s off-kilter crime drama continues, with troubled detective Robin Griffin (Elisabeth Moss) pointing the China Girl investigation in a new direction, that of a surrogacy deal gone wrong. Meanwhile, Robin must face demons from her past when her former police chief Al Parker (David Wenham) arrives from New Zealand. Inside London Fire Brigade ITV, 9.00pm As the documentary series concludes, retiring crew manager Al passes the baton on to 25-year-old rookie Joe, who faces a tough test fighting his first big fire. GO A Premier League of Their Own Sky1, 9.00pm Ahead of next weekend’s opening matches in the Premier League, James Corden and pals begin the new season of the panel show with a special edition. Guests Thierry Henry, Jeff Stelling and Kelly Cates will be celebrating all things football alongside the show’s regulars Freddie Flintoff, Jack Whitehall and Jamie Redknapp. Plus McFly’s Danny Jones, singer Kate Nash and R&B star Lemar will be stepping up to the spot for Popstar Penalties. Laurel and Hardy: Their Lives and Magic Sky Arts, 9.00pm Fans of Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy will enjoy this superb assemblage of clips and out-takes. This enthralling documentary follows the life and work of the world’s most beloved comedy duo, and includes rare footage of Laurel in his later years, as well as an even rarer interview with his daughter, Lois. There’s also a tribute to the unusually strong friendship that the two stars enjoyed throughout their working lives. GO Dr Seuss’ The Lorax (2012) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 2.55pm This animated adaptation of Dr Seuss’s quirky story follows a boy (voiced by Zac Efron) who goes in search of a tree to impress a nature-loving girl (Taylor Swift). But he stumbles on the Once-ler (Ed Helms), the man responsible for harvesting all the world’s plant life. Children will enjoy it, even if the film does sacrifice a measure of its literary magic to the god of cinematic entertainment. Wild (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm  The Pacific Crest Trail, which runs up the entire western spine of the United States, is a challenge of fabled arduousness and rugged beauty. In 1995, aged 26, Cheryl Strayed (played by a superb Reese Witherspoon) walked it, to get clearance in her head after a decade of loss and personal meltdown. Wild powerfully reveals Strayed’s terrors and pleasures as she forges ahead on the journey. Wilde (1996) ★★★☆☆ BBC Four, 10.00pm  Many feel that Stephen Fry was born to play the part of the tragic and devastatingly brilliant Oscar Wilde. He’s terrific, but is only one of several superb players in a film which is held together by its performances. There’s Tom Wilkinson as the odious bully Queensberry and Jude Law on wonderfully petulant form as Bosie, the cause of Wilde’s downfall. Wilde’s story The Selfish Giant is woven throughout the film. Friday 11 August The Royal Albert Hall Credit: BBC BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 8.00pm Swapping tuxes for cowboy hats, the Proms continues tonight with a staging of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s beloved 1943 musical Oklahoma!  Expect plenty of whip-cracking, thigh-slapping, wild-west antics at the Royal Albert Hall, as conductor John Wilson and his orchestra add their signature élan to this story of a love affair between dashing cowboy Curly McLain (Nathaniel Hackmann) and farmer’s daughter Laurey Williams (Scarlett Strallen). Playing Jud Fy, the brooding, bestial social misfit with designs on Laurey himself, meanwhile, is David Seadon-Young. Elsewhere, Belinda Lang stars as the clucking Aunt Eller, and comedian Marcus Brigstocke is Ali Hakim, the Persian huckster battling with the cowboy Will Parker (Robert Fairchild) for the affections of fickle Ado Annie (Lizzy Connolly). The dance routines are balletic and fast, the hits frequent: the jaunty Surrey With the Fringe on Top, the romantic People Will Say We’re in Love, the lovely I Cain’t Say No, and, of course, the unmistakable opening song, Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin’. Rachel Kavanaugh, who directed an acclaimed touring production of Oklahoma! in 2015, is at the helm again here. Patrick Smith Premier League Football: Arsenal v Leicester City Sky Sports Premier League/Sky Sports Main Event, 7.00pm After three months of bluster and big-spending in the transfer market, the Premier League returns – and for the first time, the season gets under way on a Friday. All eyes tonight will be on Arsenal’s Alexandre Lacazette, the French striker who joined the Gunners for a club record fee of £52 million. Can he be the man to fire Arsenal back into the top four? Leicester City, meanwhile, will be keen to bounce back from a disappointing season that saw Claudio Ranieri sacked as manager despite having won them the league nine months previously. When these sides last met, at the end of April, a late own goal from Robert Huth handed Arsenal a 1-0 victory. Teach My Pet to Do That ITV, 8.00pm Arriving in the dog days of summer, this fluffy new series is presented by Alexander Amstrong, who asks such questions as: can a cat be trained to ride a labrador? Helping him teach tricks to the pets – among them, a dachshund labrador cross called Eric and a miniature horse called Aslan – are animal trainers Nando Brown and Jo-Rosie Haffenden.  Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm Throughout this week Steve Jones, Kate Quilton and Supervet Noel Fitzpatrick have been trying to find permanent homes for every animal in the Newcastle Dog and Cat Shelter. Tonight, they make one final push.  Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm Green fingers at the ready as Monty Don advises on how to cut and maintain hedges, while Adam Frost reveals the secrets of successful planting combinations. The Street ITV3, 9.00pm Previously shown in 2009, Jimmy McGovern’s gloom-ridden series comprised six stand-alone episodes focusing on the lives of the inhabitants of a single street in Liverpool. In this instalment, Anna Friel, recently seen in McGovern’s latest drama Broken, plays a single mother trying to hold down two jobs, pay the mortgage and get her two sons into a better school. Starring opposite her is Daniel Mays – with whom she also appeared in Tony Marchant’s similarly bleak drama Public Enemies – as the plumber whom she begins dating. What unfolds is expertly crafted and at times gut-wrenching to watch.  The Agony & the Ecstasy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This entertainingly nostalgic four-part series looks at how the UK’s rave scene exploded in the Eighties, fuelled by the party drug ecstasy. With the help of DJs such as Goldie, Paul Oakenfold and Annie Mac, it also explores how the genre evolved over the next three decades. Reach for the lasers. PS Eden: Paradise Lost Channel 4, 10.00pm The off-grid experiment – in which 23 people were stranded on the west coast of Scotland to fend for themselves – arrived on Channel 4 a year ago amid great fanfare but ended up being an unmitigated flop, with only 10 participants making it through to the end. In tonight’s finale, the action takes us from Christmas Day through to March, when those who remained were finally released. PS Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm  This first of a potentially limitless spin-off series of “Star Wars Stories” follows rebel live-wire Jyn Erso (Felicity Jones), who leads a band of self-styled “spies, saboteurs and assassins” on a death-or-glory mission to steal the Death Star plans from an Imperial stronghold, via some genuinely breathtaking planetary vistas and earth-ripping set-pieces.  The Firm (1993) ★★★☆☆ W, 9.00pm  Sydney Pollack directed this accomplished yet curiously uninvolving adaptation of John Grisham’s legal potboiler. Tom Cruise plays Mitch McDeere, an ambitious young lawyer who takes a well-paid job at a Memphis law firm that sounds too good to be true. And it is: the firm launders money for the Mob. Can Mitch escape with his morals and marriage intact? Gene Hackman co-stars as Cruise’s father figure. Strictly Ballroom (1992) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 11.05pm  Paul Mercurio plays a rebellious ballroom dancer who breaks all the rules and paso dobles his way to victory in this crowd-pleasing Australian comedy. Baz Luhrmann’s writing and directing debut is just as brash as Moulin Rouge! but a lot less pleased with itself. There’s romance between our hero and his ugly duckling partner, and it’s set against an enjoyable parade of sequin-decked caricatures and high camp. Watch here on TVPlayer Television previewers Catherine Gee, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: The Secret Life of the Holiday Resort and Icarus

  Friday 4 August The Secret Life of the Holiday Resort Channel 4, 8.00pm Spain hosted 10 million British holidaymakers in 2016, two million more than in the previous year. With the package holiday one of the main beneficiaries of this apparent rekindling of Anglo-Spanish love in the wake of Brexit, Katherine Patrick’s documentary travels to Holidayworld, the biggest all-inclusive resort on the Costa del Sol, where three-quarters of the 3,000 guests are from the UK. There, we meet three four-person families seeking brief respite from the gruelling jobs that generally keep them apart, and some of the 500 heroic staff. The Secret Life of the Holiday Resort is rather harmless, unenlightening stuff, propped up by an exhausting procession of vague statistics and meaningless survey results (“a third of parents say the most frequent rows abroad are between them and their kids”, that sort of thing) reeled off by narrator Blake Harrison (of The Inbetweeners). All the expected boxes are ticked – techniques for bagging sunbeds, the artery-clogging buffets, the pros and cons of families spending a week in such proximity – but it’s good-natured throughout, even during the inevitable and perfunctory drift into Brexit chat. The very essence of silly season programming. GT Icarus Netflix, from today In what is a coup for Netflix, this award-winning documentary from Bryan Fogel began as a Supersize Me-style experiment into the effects of doping. But after Fogel connected with renegade scientist Dr Grigory Rodchenkov, it became a lid-lifting investigation into a widespread Russian scandal that seemingly goes as high as Putin. GT Cleverman BBC Three, from 10.00am Series two of the fun, if labyrinthine, dystopian drama from Australia will be made available today in its entirety. Wearing X-Men’s influence on its sleeve, it follows the leader of the “Hairies”, superpowered people trying to live alongside humans that persecute and subjugate them. GT BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 8.00pm The music of Ella Fitzgerald and Dizzy Gillespie is celebrated in the centenary year of their births, with musicians, including singer Diane Reeves, performing with the BBC Concert Orchestra. GT The Secret World of Posh Pets ITV, 8.00pm; not UTV/STV/Wales This final part finds 21-year-old Rory roping in his father to expand his niche business of exporting jellyfish, while there’s evidence that horse-grooming has reached genuinely berserk levels, with unicorn horns and nail polish the latest must-haves for those benighted equine attractions at children’s parties. GT Only Connect BBC Two, 8.30pm Viking experts take on geocachers (participants in a GPS-driven treasure hunt), with one (relatively straightforward) challenge involving finding the link between exhibit, salt and pepper, outcast and roots manoeuvre. GT Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm Irises, pelargonium cuttings, growing plants inside and managing a shaded, sloping town garden are among the challenges facing Monty Don and his team in tonight’s edition of the hardy perennial. GT Autopsy: Kurt Cobain Channel 5, 10.05pm Forensic pathologist Dr Jason Payne-James turns his attention to the alleged suicide of Kurt Cobain. Alleged, because certain conspiracy theorists assert that he had too much heroin in his system to be able to have inflicted the gunshot wound to his head. Probably best not to expect any definitive results here, however. GT This Is 40 (2012) ★★★☆☆ E4, 9.00pm  Judd Apatow revisits two characters from his 2007 hit Knocked Up. Leslie Mann, Apatow’s wife, and Paul Rudd play a stressed-out Los Angeles couple whose 40th birthdays bookend the film. Apatow and Mann’s real-life daughters also play their children. It’s a perceptive comedy on middle-age and one that guarantees big laughs alongside some of Apatow’s most pertinent observations on love. The Green Mile (1999) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm  Tom Hanks stars in this Oscar-nominated adaptation of Stephen King’s entrancingly strange novel. Stolid prison guard Paul Edgecomb (Hanks) is shaken by the arrival of a convict (Michael Clarke Duncan) who has supernatural powers. Although a little lightweight compared with director Frank Darabont’s previous prison film, The Shawshank Redemption, it’s pleasingly creepy. The Help (2011) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm  Emma Stone sparkles among the fine female cast in this enjoyable adaptation of Kathryn Stockett’s bestselling 2009 novel. She stars as a budding journalist working in Sixties Jackson, Mississippi, who convinces two black maids (Viola Davis and the Oscar-winning Octavia Spencer) to work secretly with her on a book and reveal the hardships inflicted on them. Bryce Dallas Howard is a delightfully hissable villain. Saturday 5 August Billy Connolly in front of John Byrne's portrait in mural form in Glasgow's Osborne Street Credit: BBC Billy Connolly: Portrait of a Lifetime BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 10.30pm “Glasgow belongs to me,” says Billy Connolly of his hometown in this heart-warming documentary to mark the comedian’s 75th birthday in November. And he’s not wrong as three imposing 50ft tribute portraits have recently been unveiled on wallends in the city. They were created by Scottish artists John Byrne, Jack Vettriano and Rachel MacLean, and this accompanying film not only gives a neat history of the area, but serves as a celebration of the Big Yin’s career.  Interspersed with clips of his stand-up routines, including his cheeky first appearance on Parkinson in 1975 when he told the bum joke that turned him into a star, the programme see Connolly sit quietly for the artists – not one of his strong points as he admits: “I’ve been very patient. I think I’m due an episode.” Watching them at work in their studios is inspiring and Connolly is taken aback by the results. “It’s like looking into a mirror. You know my soul,” he says to Byrne, who used to design album covers for Connolly’s band The Humblebums. “I’m amazed at the effect these have had on me, they’ve stunned me.” From tomorrow, the original portraits will be hung in the People’s Palace. Rachel Ward Athletics: World Championships BBC Two, 9.30am & BBC One, 6.30pm Day two at the London Stadium in Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park sees Usain Bolt – in all likeliness – going for gold in the men’s 100 m final (9.45pm) as he makes his final individual appearance at a major championships. His main threats are expected to come from former champions Justin Gatlin and Yohan Blake, as well as emerging star Christian Coleman. Earlier in the day, British medal hope Katarina Johnson-Thompson gets her heptathlon bid under way with the 100 m hurdles at 10.05am. Sadly not in action today is Greg Rutherford, who, because of an ankle injury, won’t be competing in the men’s long jump final (8.05pm).  Little Big Shots USA ITV, 5.00pm Steve Harvey showcases more talented youngsters while mocking his own stupidity in this family friendly show exec-produced by Ellen DeGeneres. Tonight, there’s a maths genius and a Motown singer. Royal Cousins at War BBC Two, 7.30pm; NI, 8.00pm A welcome repeat for this riveting analysis of the relationship between Kaiser Bill, Tsar Nicholas II of Russia and our own King George V, and the disastrous effect that their rivalry had on the First World War.  Paul O’Grady’s Hollywood Channel 4, 8.00pm This new series sees Paul O’Grady delve into cinematic history to find out what it takes to make a masterpiece. He begins with “weepies”, where the host’s caustic wit serves as the perfect antidote as talking heads, including Sigourney Weaver and Celine Dion, reach for the tissues as they relate films such as Brief Encounter, Titanic and, quite possibly the saddest in movie history, The Champ.    Dad’s Army BBC Two, 8.30pm; not NI This is a gem of an episode loaded with slapstick fun from 1970. It’s the one where Corporal Jones (Clive Dunn) dresses as a tree trunk during an exercise pitting Mainwaring (Arthur Lowe) and his crew against their pompous arch-rival Captain Square. RW The L.A. Riots: 25 Years Later History, 9.00pm Twenty-five years after Los Angeles erupted into one of the most destructive civil disturbances in US history (11,000 people were arrested and an estimated 63 people were killed), this documentary looks back at the decades of racial injustice that led to the incident and the history of police relations with LA’s black community. Citizens, council members and even those who committed crimes talk about how South Central was beset by mass riots, looting, and fires.  Cambridge Folk Festival 2017 Sky Arts, 9.00pm Broadcaster Mark Radcliffe and musician Julie Fowlis present highlights from this year’s festival, an event that attracts 10,000 visitors. These include Jon Boden, formerly of Bellowhead, performing new material with his band The Remnant Kings. There’s also music from Jake Bugg, electric punk stars Oysterband and Lisa Hannigan, once as a member of Damien Rice’s band. RW The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies (2014) ★★☆☆☆ ITV, 8.00pm  The battle of the title was barely mentioned by JRR Tolkein in The Hobbit, but it was seemingly enough for Peter Jackson to pad out his franchise even further. Picking up where the last film left off, our heroes had just unleashed the wrath of dragon Smaug (Benedict Cumberbatch). But there’s another battle looming, one between themselves which is fuelled by greed. Red (2010) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm  A starry line-up of actors of pensionable age is the attraction of this light-hearted adaptation of Warren Ellis’s graphic novel, and it’s hard to resist Helen Mirren with a submachine gun. RED stands for “Retired Extremely Dangerous”, which is what the CIA has labelled former agents Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich and Mirren, who team up to find out who has marked them for assassination, and why. I Know What You Did Last Summer (1997) ★★☆☆☆ BBC One, 11.55pm  This routine slasher flick, written by Kevin Williamson of Scream fame, will certainly make you jump but it’s unlikely to give you many sleepless nights. When a carful of American teenagers hits and kills a man, they panic and dump the body. Months later, the inevitable slaughter begins. A hapless cast, featuring Sarah Michelle Gellar, brings unintentional levity to proceedings. Sunday 6 August Diana, Princess of Wales Credit: Rex Diana: In Her Own Words Channel 4, 8.00pm Much controversy has surrounded this documentary, which broadcasts – for the first time in the UK – video footage recorded in 1992 and 1993 by Diana, Princess of Wales’s voice coach, Peter Settelen. Hired to help Diana reframe her public image and put forward her own side of the story regarding her marriage, Settelen saw his work bear fruit in his client’s Panorama interview. Now there is undoubted interest in watching Diana recount key events in her life unmediated, with candour and a seductive mix of charm and steel. “He chatted me up like a bad rash,” she recalls of her future husband at one point; at another, she remembers being “completely thrown” by the Prince of Wales’s peculiar response to a question about them being in love. In truth, director Kevin Sim rather crams the at-times uncomfortably intimate footage into the first and final thirds of the documentary, leaving assorted friends and confidants to tell the rest of the very familiar story, and the melodrama is laid on a little thick at times. Exploitative? Perhaps. Fascinating? In patches, although it probably won’t entirely satisfy either those looking for genuinely fresh insights or an opportunity to be outraged. Gabriel Tate Community Shield Football: Arsenal v Chelsea BT Sport 1, 1.00pm Arsenal and Chelsea meet for the second time in as many weeks, with Antonio Conte’s Blues favourites to lift the Community Shield today having won 3-0 in Beijing thanks to a brace from Michy Batshuayi.  Women’s Football: Euro 2017 Channel 4, 3.00pm After a thrilling tournament – during which a record 3.3 million people tuned in to watch England’s Lionesses beat France 1-0 – we’re at the FC Twente Stadion in Enschede, Holland, as the successors to Germany are crowned.   LSO Sky Arts, 6.00pm Originally, and rather impishly, hinting at a “greatest hits” of Haydn, Simon Rattle and his Imaginary Orchestral Journey instead took movements from 11 of the Austrian composer’s works, many of them rarely performed, and realigned them joyfully and perceptively in this concert with the London Symphony Orchestra. Works from Bartók and an extract from Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde provide the hors d’oeuvre for this enticing programme.   BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 7.00pm One of the most anticipated events of every Prom season, the National Youth Orchestra of Great Britain brings its energy and drive to the Royal Albert Hall. First comes the London premiere of Francisco Coll’s “grotesque symphony” Mural and Thomas Adès conducting his own work, Polaris, for the first time in the capital. The climax comes courtesy of Igor Stravinsky and his agelessly thrilling Rite of Spring. It is introduced by Suzy Klein and Lloyd Coleman. GT Secrets of Silicon Valley BBC Two, 8.00pm Blogger Jamie Bartlett investigates whether technological progress should be made at any cost. On the one side, he meets those tackling climate change; on the other, those paying the price for the success of Uber and, somewhere in the middle, the pioneers of self-driving cars.    Poldark BBC One, 9.00pm Having barrelled along entertainingly, with the undercurrent of hardscrabble misery intact, this third series concludes with sightings of French sails spotted on the horizon and Cornwall put on high alert. Meanwhile, Cap’n Ross (Aidan Turner) contends with a broadside from George Warleggan  (Jack Farthing).   The Last Days of Patrick Swayze Channel 5, 10.00pm Given the fact that he died from pancreatic cancer aged 57, we can reasonably surmise that the Dirty Dancing star’s final hours were not wholly pleasant. So, what can forensic pathologist Jason Payne-James, perusing Swayze’s medical records, add to the story?   Gareth Thomas: Hate in the Beautiful Game BBC Two, 10.30pm; not NI Former Welsh rugby union captain Gareth Thomas, who came out in 2009 while still playing, asks why football has shamefully remained a bastion of open homophobia – perhaps the last in sport. GT Frozen (2013) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 1.40pm  Disney’s 53rd feature is an enchanting combination of fairytale derring-do and heart-popping musical numbers that has left children and adults powerless to its charms (even if some parents may have grown rather tired of it). Elsa (Idina Menzel) is a shy princess driven into exile when her magical powers are discovered. Her sister Anna (Kristen Bell) gallops off to fetch her from her beautiful ice palace. The King’s Speech (2010) ★★★★★ Channel 4, 9.50pm  Tom Hooper’s film about the future George VI’s struggle to overcome his stammer in the nation’s hour of need won multiple Academy Awards, including a deserved Best Actor gong for Colin Firth. But it’s his double-act with Geoffrey Rush as his speech therapist Lionel Logue that gives the film its heart, and the doublehanders between them are fraught and fascinating. Point Break (1991) ★★★☆☆ Channel 5, 11.05pm Kathryn Bigelow’s cult surfing/crime film elevated Patrick Swayze’s actor status to true action hero. Keanu Reeves plays Johnny Utah, an FBI agent who goes undercover to infiltrate the Ex-Presidents, a gang of bankrobbing surfers led by the charismatic Bodhi (Swayze). The action heats up when Bodhi and Utah find they share a similar attitude towards danger. Lori Petty is the surfer who catches Johnny’s eye. Monday 7 August Eden: Paradise Lost - the participants Credit: Channel 4 Eden: Paradise Lost Channel 4, 10.00pm In March 2016, 23 idealists set out to take part in Channel 4’s Eden experiment, which, a touch grandiosely, sought to establish “a new society” from scratch, cut off from the modern world on a remote Scottish peninsula for an entire year. “What if we could start again?” was the much-hyped tag line. And the answer was… well, we never got to find out the answer because the series was pulled last summer, after just four episodes, when viewing figures took a dive from 1.7 million to less than 800,000.  Not that Channel 4 or production company Keo Films thought to tell the participants that. Instead they were left to get on with it. Rumours swirled of Lord of the Flies levels of acrimony, mass defections, starvation, health problems, people eating chicken feed to survive. So it could make for absorbing viewing in this five-part update, which airs every night this week. Although probably the greatest fascination will be in seeing the reactions of the 10 participants who suffered through to the end as they emerged from the nightmare in March this year only to discover that their efforts have mostly been in vain – and that the political landscape has drastically altered while they were gone. Gerard O’Donovan Stacey Dooley Investigates: Divide and National Pride in Northern Ireland  BBC Three, from 10.00am The intrepid reporter discovers that bitter political divisions persist in Northern Ireland as she seeks to discover more about Prime Minister Theresa May’s new allies in the Democratic Unionist Party. The Bug Grub Couple BBC One, 7.30pm Bug burger or beef burger? That’s the choice at the Grub restaurant in Pembrokeshire, part of entomologist Dr Sarah Beynon and chef Andy Holcroft’s Bug Farm – an insect zoo, research centre and insect eaterie. Here they struggle to convince us why we all should learn to love eating insect protein.   Masters Tennis: The Rogers Cup Sky Sports Main Event, 7.00pm The Uniprix Stadium in Montreal is the setting, as the Rogers Cup gets under way. Novak Djokovic lifted the trophy in 2016 for the fourth time, defeating Kei Nishikori in the final. The Serbian misses out this time around, though, due to injury.  Tornado: The 100mph Steam Engine BBC Four, 8.00pm If phrases like “it’s a Peppercorn class A1 Pacific” get you all steamed up you’ll be in heaven with this account of how a bunch of engineering enthusiasts got the massive locomotive they took 18 years to build from scratch to take on the ultimate test: hitting 100 miles per hour, a speed no British steam train has achieved since 1967.    Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm This new, live, animal rescue show with Steve Jones, Kate Quilton and Noel Fitzpatrick attempts to rehome a whole shelter’s worth of dogs, cats and assorted other species. Among the celebs espousing the joy of pets in this opener is pop singer Leona Lewis. Continues until Friday.   Man in an Orange Shirt BBC Two, 9.00pm In part two of novelist Patrick Gale’s drama for the Gay Britannia season, more than half a century on, Flora (Vanessa Redgrave) gives her late husband’s cottage to their grandson Adam (Julian Morris), who finds himself drawn to his architect, Steve (David Gyasi).   Inside Heston’s World Good Food, 9.00pm This four-part series chronicles chef Heston Blumenthal’s attempt to bring a flavour of his Fat Duck restaurant to Australia, in a multi-million pound move to Melbourne last year. GO Make or Break? Channel 5, 10.00pm A new reality series, stripped across the week, in which eight troubled couples test the strength of their relationships at a Mexican holiday resort, where alongside counselling and therapy sessions, they have to swap partners every two days. GO Doctor Dolittle (1967) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 5.05pm  This is not the Eddie Murphy comedy version from 1998 but the charming Sixties musical directed by Richard Fleischer. Rex Harrison stars as the terse, eponymous doctor who has the uncanny ability to speak to animals and so embarks on a voyage to find an elusive pink sea snail and a giant lunar moth. Samantha Egger, 20 years Harrison’s junior, co-stars as the adventurous stowaway who falls in love with the doctor.  Storks (2016) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 6.20pm  Warner Animation Group’s first film since 2014’s The Lego Movie is spectacularly daft but manages to be both moving and very fun. Here the storks of the title have moved on from delivering babies to big business and now transport products for an Amazon-style website. But then the old baby-making machine, gathering dust in the corner, is accidentally reactivated and suddenly they have a baby to get home.  American History X (1998) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm  Tony Kaye directs this compellingly violent and brutal examination of white supremacism in America. Edward Norton is both mesmerising and terrifying as Derek, a student drawn into the Neo-Nazi movement who mercilessly kills two black youths. After a stint in prison he’s reformed but returns  home to find his younger brother Danny (Edward Furlong) on the same track he was. Tuesday 8 August Jodie Whittaker and Emun Elliott Credit: BBC Trust Me BBC One, 9.00pm Before she becomes the Doctor in Doctor Who, Jodie Whittaker stars in a drama about… pretending to be a doctor. No doubt there will soon be many jokes about that floating around. In this new four-part drama, written by real-life doctor Dan Sefton, Whittaker stars as Cath, a downtrodden ward sister who is fired when she takes her concerns about the conditions in her Sheffield hospital to the trust. Then, when at the leaving party for her best friend Alison – who’s about to begin a new life in New Zealand – she spots Alison’s CV and medical degree certificate in a bin.  So Cath decides to adopt Alison’s identity and, hoping that her nursing skills will be enough to get by, find a job as a doctor far away in Edinburgh. Though the premise may sound a little daft, it’s actually surprisingly – and worryingly – common. Sefton uses his hospital know-how to bring a sense of authenticity to what is a really quite gripping drama.  Whittaker, rather than channelling a cocky Leonardo DiCaprio in Catch Me if You Can, is every inch the terrified woman flying by the seat of her pants. Excellent, too, is Emun Elliot as the colleague who catches her eye. Catherine Gee EastEnders BBC One, 7.30pm Mick’s (Danny Dyer) dastardly behaviour comes to a head in this special three-hander episode. He decides to tell wife Linda (Kellie Bright) the truth about what he’s been up to while she was away: namely cheating on her with their daughter-in-law Whitney (Shona McGarty).    Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm It’s the second nightly visit to this admirable project, which seeks to rehouse all the animals  in a Newcastle shelter in just a week. While we meet the wide range of animals and see how many still remain, Dom Joly also learns what happens to micropigs when they grow up.     The Dog Rescuers with Alan Davies Channel 5, 8.00pm Among the five unlucky pups needing some loving care from the team this week are an abandoned staffie who’s given a second chance and a young spaniel with a nasty neck wound.     Get a House for Free Channel 4, 9.00pm Marco Robinson is a very rich man – £25 million rich, in fact. He made his fortune through a business and property empire and now he wants to give back. So he’s decided to give away a three-bed flat in Preston to the person who he thinks will benefit the most. This film follows him as he attempts to sift through 8,000 applications. CG Utopia: In Search of the Dream BBC Four, 9.00pm It’s 500 years since the term “utopia” was coined by Sir Thomas More in 1516. In this documentary, art historian Professor Richard Clay examines five centuries of the concept of utopia and the impact it has had on our way of thinking. Often used as a method of criticism of the current system, it is a powerful vision. Clay considers some of our “greatest utopian dreamers”, including Jonathan Swift, author of Gulliver’s Travels, and Gene Roddenberry, creator of Star Trek, and the common themes that run through the ideal.     The Yorkshire Dales and the Lakes More4, 9.00pm The cosy documentary series continues with a farmer finding an unusual method to keep track of his sheep: day-glo paint. Elsewhere in the Dales, we follow the Dent Brewery boys as they create their own craft ales and in the Lake District we see Jon Bennett make his daily ascent to the summit of Helvellyn. CG The Parent Trap (1961) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am   In a film that helped pioneer the split-screen technique, Hayley Mills plays both Susan Evers and Sharon McKendrick, twins unaware of each other’s existence and separated as babies following their parents’ divorce. When they meet, years later, at summer camp, the pair scheme to reunite their parents. This classic Disney comedy spawned three sequels and a 1998 remake starring a young Lindsay Lohan. Tootsie (1982) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.30pm  When actor Michael Dorsey transforms himself into Dorothy Michaels in a desperate attempt to get work, complications arise as he falls for a female friend (Jessica Lange) and her father (Charles Durning)  falls for him. Although you never quite believe that Dustin Hoffman in drag would convince everyone that he’s a woman, it doesn’t matter: Tootsie is lots of fun – and it’s a sharply observed social satire, too. Groundhog Day (1993) ★★★★☆ Sky1, 9.00pm  In this wonderful comedy drama, a surly, sardonic weatherman (Bill Murray) is sent to the small US town of Punxsutawney to cover the annual groundhog festival, but finds himself experiencing precisely the same events over and over – then realises that he can free himself from the loop only by being a nicer person. One criticism: as always, Murray is so much more likeable as the malevolent grouch… Wednesday 9 August My Family, Partition and Me: India 1947 - Anita Rani  Credit: BBC My Family, Partition and Me: India 1947 BBC One, 9.00pm Two years ago, Anita Rani learnt how her family history was forever marked by the 1947 Partition of India in a memorable episode of Who Do You Think You Are? Now, she has wrangled three members of the public – one Hindu, one Christian and one Muslim – to explore how their own lives, and those of their ancestors, were affected by the appalling and widespread outbreaks of religious violence in the wake of Britain’s messy, compromised withdrawal, and the troubled legacy left by the Empire. In addition to eyewitness testimonies, the descendants of the survivors travel back to India, Pakistan and Bangladesh to retrace the journeys their relatives were forced to make. Their discoveries are in equal parts shocking, distressing and uplifting, and its treatment is rightly sensitive for events still in living memory: tears flow freely, yet it’s never sentimental. If there isn’t much space to dig into the wider political situation, the complex reasons behind the violence and longer-term implications, the detail of the personal recollections and anecdotes tells its own powerful tale. Rani returns to her own ancestral story in next week’s concluding part. Gabriel Tate Super Small Animals BBC One, 8.00pm Biologist Patrick Aryee demonstrates that size isn’t everything in the natural world, observing the extraordinary feats of strength, endurance and ingenuity of everything from hummingbirds  and seahorses to beetles and armadillos. Love Your Garden ITV, 8.00pm Alan Titchmarsh and his team turn an uninspiring patch of lumpy lawn and uneven paving into a sensory garden for a four-year-old girl with a very rare degenerative eye disease. Long Lost Family ITV, 9.00pm This episode of the always engaging and emotionally gruelling series reuniting long-estranged relatives charts the story of a woman who gave up her son only to adopt two boys herself, and a man whose mother put him up for adoption through an advert in the local press. My Big Gay Jewish Conversion BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.20pm First shown on BBC Three, this smart and sobering documentary follows Simon Atkins – who is Catholic and gay – as he looks at convert to Judaism, a religion that would allow him to marry his boyfriend, Matthew. Atkin’s journey is both spiritual and literal, as he travels to relatively tolerant Tel Aviv and more conservative Jerusalem, hoping to reconcile his sexuality with his religious beliefs. GT The South Bank Show Sky Arts, 8.00pm Singer-songwriter Benjamin Clementine, who won the Mercury Prize in 2015, talks to Melvyn Bragg about his early years on the streets and being hailed perhaps the brightest musical talent of his generation. In Search of Arcadia BBC Four, 9.00pm This contemplative documentary sees Dr Janina Ramirez and John Bailey explore the roots of the Arcadian cultural revolutionaries that sprang up along the Thames in the 17th and 18th centuries. Citizen Jane: Battle for the City BBC Four, 10.00pm When she saw the controversial development projects proposed by Robert Moses in Sixties New York, Jane Jacobs decided to take him on. Matt Tyrnauer’s punchy documentary pulls together an inspiring tale out of unlikely material – the debate of community culture versus “slum clearance”, one which continues to this day in cities across the world. GT Bridge to Terabithia (2007) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.10pm  Talented child stars AnnaSophia Robb and Josh Hutcherson (who went on to star in The Hunger Games) play two young misfits who become friends and create a magical world of the imagination in a remote part of the forest. This quality Disney production, adapted from Katherine Paterson’s classic novel, ventures into unexpectedly dark territory and packs an emotional punch that will have you reaching for your hankie. Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief (2015) ★★★★☆ Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Based on a book by the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Lawrence Wright, director Alex Gibney’s documentary about the Church of Scientology is a gripping, painstakingly researched exposé of one of the world’s most enigmatic organisations. At its core are a series of chilling allegations by former Scientology members, who describe a culture of abuse. The Lost Boys (1987) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 9.00pm Teen flick meets horror in this Eighties hit about two boys (Jason Patric and Corey Haim) who move to a quiet, northern California town where they become involved with a group of bloodthirsty vampires. These days it has to compete with the likes of Twilight and The Vampire Diaries, but there’s still enough action, intrigue, danger and romance to keep you hooked. Kiefer Sutherland and Corey Feldman also star. Thursday 10 July Princess Diana with Raine, Comtesse De Chambrun  Credit: Channel 4 Princess Diana’s “Wicked” Stepmother Channel 4, 9.00pm A gossipy, full-throttle and altogether naughty documentary about Diana, Princess of Wales’s stepmother Raine, Countess Spencer, who died last October. The daughter of romantic novelist Barbara Cartland, Raine was a prodigious social climber described here as “a famous socialite, a feisty politician and all-round force of nature” (“Nobody gets to be a countess three times by accident,” says one contributor). It seems like an accurate fit.  Named “Debutante of the Year” in 1947, Raine went on to bag a future Earl for a husband at the age of 18, became the youngest member of Westminster City Council at 23, before going on to become a noted conservation campaigner. The main focus here, though, is how she went on to marry a second Earl, John Spencer, in circumstances that earned her the entrenched enmity of his children, prime among them being his then 15-year-old daughter, Lady Diana. Yet when Diana’s own marriage ran into trouble it was Raine, so it’s claimed, that she turned to for support; the once “sworn enemy was transformed into her closest confidante”. The contributors include Downton Abbey writer Julian Fellowes and royal biographer Penny Junor. Gerard O’Donovan Natwest T20 Blast Cricket: Hampshire v Glamorgan Sky Sports Cricket, 6.00pm All the action from the Ageas Bowl for this South Division match. The home side are one of the most successful in the history of domestic T20 cricket, having won the competition twice and appeared in another four Finals Days. 10 Puppies and Us BBC Two, 8.00pm Here are more tales of new dog owners and their pups. This week, a mother seeks a canine companion for her son who has Down’s syndrome; the conflict between rival Chihuahuas Rocky and Chloe deepens; and a newlywed couple call in the behaviourist when a pug objects to their connubial bliss.  James Martin’s French Adventure ITV, 8.30pm Chef James Martin heads to the hilly Jura region, where a pear orchard proves to be the source of the perfect chutney for barbecued duck, and a visit to the citadel at Fort des Rousses shows why dungeons make the best cheese cellars. Top of the Lake: China Girl BBC Two, 9.00pm In the wake of last week’s shock revelation, Jane Campion’s off-kilter crime drama continues, with troubled detective Robin Griffin (Elisabeth Moss) pointing the China Girl investigation in a new direction, that of a surrogacy deal gone wrong. Meanwhile, Robin must face demons from her past when her former police chief Al Parker (David Wenham) arrives from New Zealand. Inside London Fire Brigade ITV, 9.00pm As the documentary series concludes, retiring crew manager Al passes the baton on to 25-year-old rookie Joe, who faces a tough test fighting his first big fire. GO A Premier League of Their Own Sky1, 9.00pm Ahead of next weekend’s opening matches in the Premier League, James Corden and pals begin the new season of the panel show with a special edition. Guests Thierry Henry, Jeff Stelling and Kelly Cates will be celebrating all things football alongside the show’s regulars Freddie Flintoff, Jack Whitehall and Jamie Redknapp. Plus McFly’s Danny Jones, singer Kate Nash and R&B star Lemar will be stepping up to the spot for Popstar Penalties. Laurel and Hardy: Their Lives and Magic Sky Arts, 9.00pm Fans of Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy will enjoy this superb assemblage of clips and out-takes. This enthralling documentary follows the life and work of the world’s most beloved comedy duo, and includes rare footage of Laurel in his later years, as well as an even rarer interview with his daughter, Lois. There’s also a tribute to the unusually strong friendship that the two stars enjoyed throughout their working lives. GO Dr Seuss’ The Lorax (2012) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 2.55pm This animated adaptation of Dr Seuss’s quirky story follows a boy (voiced by Zac Efron) who goes in search of a tree to impress a nature-loving girl (Taylor Swift). But he stumbles on the Once-ler (Ed Helms), the man responsible for harvesting all the world’s plant life. Children will enjoy it, even if the film does sacrifice a measure of its literary magic to the god of cinematic entertainment. Wild (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm  The Pacific Crest Trail, which runs up the entire western spine of the United States, is a challenge of fabled arduousness and rugged beauty. In 1995, aged 26, Cheryl Strayed (played by a superb Reese Witherspoon) walked it, to get clearance in her head after a decade of loss and personal meltdown. Wild powerfully reveals Strayed’s terrors and pleasures as she forges ahead on the journey. Wilde (1996) ★★★☆☆ BBC Four, 10.00pm  Many feel that Stephen Fry was born to play the part of the tragic and devastatingly brilliant Oscar Wilde. He’s terrific, but is only one of several superb players in a film which is held together by its performances. There’s Tom Wilkinson as the odious bully Queensberry and Jude Law on wonderfully petulant form as Bosie, the cause of Wilde’s downfall. Wilde’s story The Selfish Giant is woven throughout the film. Friday 11 August The Royal Albert Hall Credit: BBC BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 8.00pm Swapping tuxes for cowboy hats, the Proms continues tonight with a staging of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s beloved 1943 musical Oklahoma!  Expect plenty of whip-cracking, thigh-slapping, wild-west antics at the Royal Albert Hall, as conductor John Wilson and his orchestra add their signature élan to this story of a love affair between dashing cowboy Curly McLain (Nathaniel Hackmann) and farmer’s daughter Laurey Williams (Scarlett Strallen). Playing Jud Fy, the brooding, bestial social misfit with designs on Laurey himself, meanwhile, is David Seadon-Young. Elsewhere, Belinda Lang stars as the clucking Aunt Eller, and comedian Marcus Brigstocke is Ali Hakim, the Persian huckster battling with the cowboy Will Parker (Robert Fairchild) for the affections of fickle Ado Annie (Lizzy Connolly). The dance routines are balletic and fast, the hits frequent: the jaunty Surrey With the Fringe on Top, the romantic People Will Say We’re in Love, the lovely I Cain’t Say No, and, of course, the unmistakable opening song, Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin’. Rachel Kavanaugh, who directed an acclaimed touring production of Oklahoma! in 2015, is at the helm again here. Patrick Smith Premier League Football: Arsenal v Leicester City Sky Sports Premier League/Sky Sports Main Event, 7.00pm After three months of bluster and big-spending in the transfer market, the Premier League returns – and for the first time, the season gets under way on a Friday. All eyes tonight will be on Arsenal’s Alexandre Lacazette, the French striker who joined the Gunners for a club record fee of £52 million. Can he be the man to fire Arsenal back into the top four? Leicester City, meanwhile, will be keen to bounce back from a disappointing season that saw Claudio Ranieri sacked as manager despite having won them the league nine months previously. When these sides last met, at the end of April, a late own goal from Robert Huth handed Arsenal a 1-0 victory. Teach My Pet to Do That ITV, 8.00pm Arriving in the dog days of summer, this fluffy new series is presented by Alexander Amstrong, who asks such questions as: can a cat be trained to ride a labrador? Helping him teach tricks to the pets – among them, a dachshund labrador cross called Eric and a miniature horse called Aslan – are animal trainers Nando Brown and Jo-Rosie Haffenden.  Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm Throughout this week Steve Jones, Kate Quilton and Supervet Noel Fitzpatrick have been trying to find permanent homes for every animal in the Newcastle Dog and Cat Shelter. Tonight, they make one final push.  Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm Green fingers at the ready as Monty Don advises on how to cut and maintain hedges, while Adam Frost reveals the secrets of successful planting combinations. The Street ITV3, 9.00pm Previously shown in 2009, Jimmy McGovern’s gloom-ridden series comprised six stand-alone episodes focusing on the lives of the inhabitants of a single street in Liverpool. In this instalment, Anna Friel, recently seen in McGovern’s latest drama Broken, plays a single mother trying to hold down two jobs, pay the mortgage and get her two sons into a better school. Starring opposite her is Daniel Mays – with whom she also appeared in Tony Marchant’s similarly bleak drama Public Enemies – as the plumber whom she begins dating. What unfolds is expertly crafted and at times gut-wrenching to watch.  The Agony & the Ecstasy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This entertainingly nostalgic four-part series looks at how the UK’s rave scene exploded in the Eighties, fuelled by the party drug ecstasy. With the help of DJs such as Goldie, Paul Oakenfold and Annie Mac, it also explores how the genre evolved over the next three decades. Reach for the lasers. PS Eden: Paradise Lost Channel 4, 10.00pm The off-grid experiment – in which 23 people were stranded on the west coast of Scotland to fend for themselves – arrived on Channel 4 a year ago amid great fanfare but ended up being an unmitigated flop, with only 10 participants making it through to the end. In tonight’s finale, the action takes us from Christmas Day through to March, when those who remained were finally released. PS Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm  This first of a potentially limitless spin-off series of “Star Wars Stories” follows rebel live-wire Jyn Erso (Felicity Jones), who leads a band of self-styled “spies, saboteurs and assassins” on a death-or-glory mission to steal the Death Star plans from an Imperial stronghold, via some genuinely breathtaking planetary vistas and earth-ripping set-pieces.  The Firm (1993) ★★★☆☆ W, 9.00pm  Sydney Pollack directed this accomplished yet curiously uninvolving adaptation of John Grisham’s legal potboiler. Tom Cruise plays Mitch McDeere, an ambitious young lawyer who takes a well-paid job at a Memphis law firm that sounds too good to be true. And it is: the firm launders money for the Mob. Can Mitch escape with his morals and marriage intact? Gene Hackman co-stars as Cruise’s father figure. Strictly Ballroom (1992) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 11.05pm  Paul Mercurio plays a rebellious ballroom dancer who breaks all the rules and paso dobles his way to victory in this crowd-pleasing Australian comedy. Baz Luhrmann’s writing and directing debut is just as brash as Moulin Rouge! but a lot less pleased with itself. There’s romance between our hero and his ugly duckling partner, and it’s set against an enjoyable parade of sequin-decked caricatures and high camp. Watch here on TVPlayer Television previewers Catherine Gee, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: The Secret Life of the Holiday Resort and Icarus

  Friday 4 August The Secret Life of the Holiday Resort Channel 4, 8.00pm Spain hosted 10 million British holidaymakers in 2016, two million more than in the previous year. With the package holiday one of the main beneficiaries of this apparent rekindling of Anglo-Spanish love in the wake of Brexit, Katherine Patrick’s documentary travels to Holidayworld, the biggest all-inclusive resort on the Costa del Sol, where three-quarters of the 3,000 guests are from the UK. There, we meet three four-person families seeking brief respite from the gruelling jobs that generally keep them apart, and some of the 500 heroic staff. The Secret Life of the Holiday Resort is rather harmless, unenlightening stuff, propped up by an exhausting procession of vague statistics and meaningless survey results (“a third of parents say the most frequent rows abroad are between them and their kids”, that sort of thing) reeled off by narrator Blake Harrison (of The Inbetweeners). All the expected boxes are ticked – techniques for bagging sunbeds, the artery-clogging buffets, the pros and cons of families spending a week in such proximity – but it’s good-natured throughout, even during the inevitable and perfunctory drift into Brexit chat. The very essence of silly season programming. GT Icarus Netflix, from today In what is a coup for Netflix, this award-winning documentary from Bryan Fogel began as a Supersize Me-style experiment into the effects of doping. But after Fogel connected with renegade scientist Dr Grigory Rodchenkov, it became a lid-lifting investigation into a widespread Russian scandal that seemingly goes as high as Putin. GT Cleverman BBC Three, from 10.00am Series two of the fun, if labyrinthine, dystopian drama from Australia will be made available today in its entirety. Wearing X-Men’s influence on its sleeve, it follows the leader of the “Hairies”, superpowered people trying to live alongside humans that persecute and subjugate them. GT BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 8.00pm The music of Ella Fitzgerald and Dizzy Gillespie is celebrated in the centenary year of their births, with musicians, including singer Diane Reeves, performing with the BBC Concert Orchestra. GT The Secret World of Posh Pets ITV, 8.00pm; not UTV/STV/Wales This final part finds 21-year-old Rory roping in his father to expand his niche business of exporting jellyfish, while there’s evidence that horse-grooming has reached genuinely berserk levels, with unicorn horns and nail polish the latest must-haves for those benighted equine attractions at children’s parties. GT Only Connect BBC Two, 8.30pm Viking experts take on geocachers (participants in a GPS-driven treasure hunt), with one (relatively straightforward) challenge involving finding the link between exhibit, salt and pepper, outcast and roots manoeuvre. GT Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm Irises, pelargonium cuttings, growing plants inside and managing a shaded, sloping town garden are among the challenges facing Monty Don and his team in tonight’s edition of the hardy perennial. GT Autopsy: Kurt Cobain Channel 5, 10.05pm Forensic pathologist Dr Jason Payne-James turns his attention to the alleged suicide of Kurt Cobain. Alleged, because certain conspiracy theorists assert that he had too much heroin in his system to be able to have inflicted the gunshot wound to his head. Probably best not to expect any definitive results here, however. GT This Is 40 (2012) ★★★☆☆ E4, 9.00pm  Judd Apatow revisits two characters from his 2007 hit Knocked Up. Leslie Mann, Apatow’s wife, and Paul Rudd play a stressed-out Los Angeles couple whose 40th birthdays bookend the film. Apatow and Mann’s real-life daughters also play their children. It’s a perceptive comedy on middle-age and one that guarantees big laughs alongside some of Apatow’s most pertinent observations on love. The Green Mile (1999) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm  Tom Hanks stars in this Oscar-nominated adaptation of Stephen King’s entrancingly strange novel. Stolid prison guard Paul Edgecomb (Hanks) is shaken by the arrival of a convict (Michael Clarke Duncan) who has supernatural powers. Although a little lightweight compared with director Frank Darabont’s previous prison film, The Shawshank Redemption, it’s pleasingly creepy. The Help (2011) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm  Emma Stone sparkles among the fine female cast in this enjoyable adaptation of Kathryn Stockett’s bestselling 2009 novel. She stars as a budding journalist working in Sixties Jackson, Mississippi, who convinces two black maids (Viola Davis and the Oscar-winning Octavia Spencer) to work secretly with her on a book and reveal the hardships inflicted on them. Bryce Dallas Howard is a delightfully hissable villain. Saturday 5 August Billy Connolly in front of John Byrne's portrait in mural form in Glasgow's Osborne Street Credit: BBC Billy Connolly: Portrait of a Lifetime BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 10.30pm “Glasgow belongs to me,” says Billy Connolly of his hometown in this heart-warming documentary to mark the comedian’s 75th birthday in November. And he’s not wrong as three imposing 50ft tribute portraits have recently been unveiled on wallends in the city. They were created by Scottish artists John Byrne, Jack Vettriano and Rachel MacLean, and this accompanying film not only gives a neat history of the area, but serves as a celebration of the Big Yin’s career.  Interspersed with clips of his stand-up routines, including his cheeky first appearance on Parkinson in 1975 when he told the bum joke that turned him into a star, the programme see Connolly sit quietly for the artists – not one of his strong points as he admits: “I’ve been very patient. I think I’m due an episode.” Watching them at work in their studios is inspiring and Connolly is taken aback by the results. “It’s like looking into a mirror. You know my soul,” he says to Byrne, who used to design album covers for Connolly’s band The Humblebums. “I’m amazed at the effect these have had on me, they’ve stunned me.” From tomorrow, the original portraits will be hung in the People’s Palace. Rachel Ward Athletics: World Championships BBC Two, 9.30am & BBC One, 6.30pm Day two at the London Stadium in Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park sees Usain Bolt – in all likeliness – going for gold in the men’s 100 m final (9.45pm) as he makes his final individual appearance at a major championships. His main threats are expected to come from former champions Justin Gatlin and Yohan Blake, as well as emerging star Christian Coleman. Earlier in the day, British medal hope Katarina Johnson-Thompson gets her heptathlon bid under way with the 100 m hurdles at 10.05am. Sadly not in action today is Greg Rutherford, who, because of an ankle injury, won’t be competing in the men’s long jump final (8.05pm).  Little Big Shots USA ITV, 5.00pm Steve Harvey showcases more talented youngsters while mocking his own stupidity in this family friendly show exec-produced by Ellen DeGeneres. Tonight, there’s a maths genius and a Motown singer. Royal Cousins at War BBC Two, 7.30pm; NI, 8.00pm A welcome repeat for this riveting analysis of the relationship between Kaiser Bill, Tsar Nicholas II of Russia and our own King George V, and the disastrous effect that their rivalry had on the First World War.  Paul O’Grady’s Hollywood Channel 4, 8.00pm This new series sees Paul O’Grady delve into cinematic history to find out what it takes to make a masterpiece. He begins with “weepies”, where the host’s caustic wit serves as the perfect antidote as talking heads, including Sigourney Weaver and Celine Dion, reach for the tissues as they relate films such as Brief Encounter, Titanic and, quite possibly the saddest in movie history, The Champ.    Dad’s Army BBC Two, 8.30pm; not NI This is a gem of an episode loaded with slapstick fun from 1970. It’s the one where Corporal Jones (Clive Dunn) dresses as a tree trunk during an exercise pitting Mainwaring (Arthur Lowe) and his crew against their pompous arch-rival Captain Square. RW The L.A. Riots: 25 Years Later History, 9.00pm Twenty-five years after Los Angeles erupted into one of the most destructive civil disturbances in US history (11,000 people were arrested and an estimated 63 people were killed), this documentary looks back at the decades of racial injustice that led to the incident and the history of police relations with LA’s black community. Citizens, council members and even those who committed crimes talk about how South Central was beset by mass riots, looting, and fires.  Cambridge Folk Festival 2017 Sky Arts, 9.00pm Broadcaster Mark Radcliffe and musician Julie Fowlis present highlights from this year’s festival, an event that attracts 10,000 visitors. These include Jon Boden, formerly of Bellowhead, performing new material with his band The Remnant Kings. There’s also music from Jake Bugg, electric punk stars Oysterband and Lisa Hannigan, once as a member of Damien Rice’s band. RW The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies (2014) ★★☆☆☆ ITV, 8.00pm  The battle of the title was barely mentioned by JRR Tolkein in The Hobbit, but it was seemingly enough for Peter Jackson to pad out his franchise even further. Picking up where the last film left off, our heroes had just unleashed the wrath of dragon Smaug (Benedict Cumberbatch). But there’s another battle looming, one between themselves which is fuelled by greed. Red (2010) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm  A starry line-up of actors of pensionable age is the attraction of this light-hearted adaptation of Warren Ellis’s graphic novel, and it’s hard to resist Helen Mirren with a submachine gun. RED stands for “Retired Extremely Dangerous”, which is what the CIA has labelled former agents Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich and Mirren, who team up to find out who has marked them for assassination, and why. I Know What You Did Last Summer (1997) ★★☆☆☆ BBC One, 11.55pm  This routine slasher flick, written by Kevin Williamson of Scream fame, will certainly make you jump but it’s unlikely to give you many sleepless nights. When a carful of American teenagers hits and kills a man, they panic and dump the body. Months later, the inevitable slaughter begins. A hapless cast, featuring Sarah Michelle Gellar, brings unintentional levity to proceedings. Sunday 6 August Diana, Princess of Wales Credit: Rex Diana: In Her Own Words Channel 4, 8.00pm Much controversy has surrounded this documentary, which broadcasts – for the first time in the UK – video footage recorded in 1992 and 1993 by Diana, Princess of Wales’s voice coach, Peter Settelen. Hired to help Diana reframe her public image and put forward her own side of the story regarding her marriage, Settelen saw his work bear fruit in his client’s Panorama interview. Now there is undoubted interest in watching Diana recount key events in her life unmediated, with candour and a seductive mix of charm and steel. “He chatted me up like a bad rash,” she recalls of her future husband at one point; at another, she remembers being “completely thrown” by the Prince of Wales’s peculiar response to a question about them being in love. In truth, director Kevin Sim rather crams the at-times uncomfortably intimate footage into the first and final thirds of the documentary, leaving assorted friends and confidants to tell the rest of the very familiar story, and the melodrama is laid on a little thick at times. Exploitative? Perhaps. Fascinating? In patches, although it probably won’t entirely satisfy either those looking for genuinely fresh insights or an opportunity to be outraged. Gabriel Tate Community Shield Football: Arsenal v Chelsea BT Sport 1, 1.00pm Arsenal and Chelsea meet for the second time in as many weeks, with Antonio Conte’s Blues favourites to lift the Community Shield today having won 3-0 in Beijing thanks to a brace from Michy Batshuayi.  Women’s Football: Euro 2017 Channel 4, 3.00pm After a thrilling tournament – during which a record 3.3 million people tuned in to watch England’s Lionesses beat France 1-0 – we’re at the FC Twente Stadion in Enschede, Holland, as the successors to Germany are crowned.   LSO Sky Arts, 6.00pm Originally, and rather impishly, hinting at a “greatest hits” of Haydn, Simon Rattle and his Imaginary Orchestral Journey instead took movements from 11 of the Austrian composer’s works, many of them rarely performed, and realigned them joyfully and perceptively in this concert with the London Symphony Orchestra. Works from Bartók and an extract from Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde provide the hors d’oeuvre for this enticing programme.   BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 7.00pm One of the most anticipated events of every Prom season, the National Youth Orchestra of Great Britain brings its energy and drive to the Royal Albert Hall. First comes the London premiere of Francisco Coll’s “grotesque symphony” Mural and Thomas Adès conducting his own work, Polaris, for the first time in the capital. The climax comes courtesy of Igor Stravinsky and his agelessly thrilling Rite of Spring. It is introduced by Suzy Klein and Lloyd Coleman. GT Secrets of Silicon Valley BBC Two, 8.00pm Blogger Jamie Bartlett investigates whether technological progress should be made at any cost. On the one side, he meets those tackling climate change; on the other, those paying the price for the success of Uber and, somewhere in the middle, the pioneers of self-driving cars.    Poldark BBC One, 9.00pm Having barrelled along entertainingly, with the undercurrent of hardscrabble misery intact, this third series concludes with sightings of French sails spotted on the horizon and Cornwall put on high alert. Meanwhile, Cap’n Ross (Aidan Turner) contends with a broadside from George Warleggan  (Jack Farthing).   The Last Days of Patrick Swayze Channel 5, 10.00pm Given the fact that he died from pancreatic cancer aged 57, we can reasonably surmise that the Dirty Dancing star’s final hours were not wholly pleasant. So, what can forensic pathologist Jason Payne-James, perusing Swayze’s medical records, add to the story?   Gareth Thomas: Hate in the Beautiful Game BBC Two, 10.30pm; not NI Former Welsh rugby union captain Gareth Thomas, who came out in 2009 while still playing, asks why football has shamefully remained a bastion of open homophobia – perhaps the last in sport. GT Frozen (2013) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 1.40pm  Disney’s 53rd feature is an enchanting combination of fairytale derring-do and heart-popping musical numbers that has left children and adults powerless to its charms (even if some parents may have grown rather tired of it). Elsa (Idina Menzel) is a shy princess driven into exile when her magical powers are discovered. Her sister Anna (Kristen Bell) gallops off to fetch her from her beautiful ice palace. The King’s Speech (2010) ★★★★★ Channel 4, 9.50pm  Tom Hooper’s film about the future George VI’s struggle to overcome his stammer in the nation’s hour of need won multiple Academy Awards, including a deserved Best Actor gong for Colin Firth. But it’s his double-act with Geoffrey Rush as his speech therapist Lionel Logue that gives the film its heart, and the doublehanders between them are fraught and fascinating. Point Break (1991) ★★★☆☆ Channel 5, 11.05pm Kathryn Bigelow’s cult surfing/crime film elevated Patrick Swayze’s actor status to true action hero. Keanu Reeves plays Johnny Utah, an FBI agent who goes undercover to infiltrate the Ex-Presidents, a gang of bankrobbing surfers led by the charismatic Bodhi (Swayze). The action heats up when Bodhi and Utah find they share a similar attitude towards danger. Lori Petty is the surfer who catches Johnny’s eye. Monday 7 August Eden: Paradise Lost - the participants Credit: Channel 4 Eden: Paradise Lost Channel 4, 10.00pm In March 2016, 23 idealists set out to take part in Channel 4’s Eden experiment, which, a touch grandiosely, sought to establish “a new society” from scratch, cut off from the modern world on a remote Scottish peninsula for an entire year. “What if we could start again?” was the much-hyped tag line. And the answer was… well, we never got to find out the answer because the series was pulled last summer, after just four episodes, when viewing figures took a dive from 1.7 million to less than 800,000.  Not that Channel 4 or production company Keo Films thought to tell the participants that. Instead they were left to get on with it. Rumours swirled of Lord of the Flies levels of acrimony, mass defections, starvation, health problems, people eating chicken feed to survive. So it could make for absorbing viewing in this five-part update, which airs every night this week. Although probably the greatest fascination will be in seeing the reactions of the 10 participants who suffered through to the end as they emerged from the nightmare in March this year only to discover that their efforts have mostly been in vain – and that the political landscape has drastically altered while they were gone. Gerard O’Donovan Stacey Dooley Investigates: Divide and National Pride in Northern Ireland  BBC Three, from 10.00am The intrepid reporter discovers that bitter political divisions persist in Northern Ireland as she seeks to discover more about Prime Minister Theresa May’s new allies in the Democratic Unionist Party. The Bug Grub Couple BBC One, 7.30pm Bug burger or beef burger? That’s the choice at the Grub restaurant in Pembrokeshire, part of entomologist Dr Sarah Beynon and chef Andy Holcroft’s Bug Farm – an insect zoo, research centre and insect eaterie. Here they struggle to convince us why we all should learn to love eating insect protein.   Masters Tennis: The Rogers Cup Sky Sports Main Event, 7.00pm The Uniprix Stadium in Montreal is the setting, as the Rogers Cup gets under way. Novak Djokovic lifted the trophy in 2016 for the fourth time, defeating Kei Nishikori in the final. The Serbian misses out this time around, though, due to injury.  Tornado: The 100mph Steam Engine BBC Four, 8.00pm If phrases like “it’s a Peppercorn class A1 Pacific” get you all steamed up you’ll be in heaven with this account of how a bunch of engineering enthusiasts got the massive locomotive they took 18 years to build from scratch to take on the ultimate test: hitting 100 miles per hour, a speed no British steam train has achieved since 1967.    Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm This new, live, animal rescue show with Steve Jones, Kate Quilton and Noel Fitzpatrick attempts to rehome a whole shelter’s worth of dogs, cats and assorted other species. Among the celebs espousing the joy of pets in this opener is pop singer Leona Lewis. Continues until Friday.   Man in an Orange Shirt BBC Two, 9.00pm In part two of novelist Patrick Gale’s drama for the Gay Britannia season, more than half a century on, Flora (Vanessa Redgrave) gives her late husband’s cottage to their grandson Adam (Julian Morris), who finds himself drawn to his architect, Steve (David Gyasi).   Inside Heston’s World Good Food, 9.00pm This four-part series chronicles chef Heston Blumenthal’s attempt to bring a flavour of his Fat Duck restaurant to Australia, in a multi-million pound move to Melbourne last year. GO Make or Break? Channel 5, 10.00pm A new reality series, stripped across the week, in which eight troubled couples test the strength of their relationships at a Mexican holiday resort, where alongside counselling and therapy sessions, they have to swap partners every two days. GO Doctor Dolittle (1967) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 5.05pm  This is not the Eddie Murphy comedy version from 1998 but the charming Sixties musical directed by Richard Fleischer. Rex Harrison stars as the terse, eponymous doctor who has the uncanny ability to speak to animals and so embarks on a voyage to find an elusive pink sea snail and a giant lunar moth. Samantha Egger, 20 years Harrison’s junior, co-stars as the adventurous stowaway who falls in love with the doctor.  Storks (2016) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 6.20pm  Warner Animation Group’s first film since 2014’s The Lego Movie is spectacularly daft but manages to be both moving and very fun. Here the storks of the title have moved on from delivering babies to big business and now transport products for an Amazon-style website. But then the old baby-making machine, gathering dust in the corner, is accidentally reactivated and suddenly they have a baby to get home.  American History X (1998) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm  Tony Kaye directs this compellingly violent and brutal examination of white supremacism in America. Edward Norton is both mesmerising and terrifying as Derek, a student drawn into the Neo-Nazi movement who mercilessly kills two black youths. After a stint in prison he’s reformed but returns  home to find his younger brother Danny (Edward Furlong) on the same track he was. Tuesday 8 August Jodie Whittaker and Emun Elliott Credit: BBC Trust Me BBC One, 9.00pm Before she becomes the Doctor in Doctor Who, Jodie Whittaker stars in a drama about… pretending to be a doctor. No doubt there will soon be many jokes about that floating around. In this new four-part drama, written by real-life doctor Dan Sefton, Whittaker stars as Cath, a downtrodden ward sister who is fired when she takes her concerns about the conditions in her Sheffield hospital to the trust. Then, when at the leaving party for her best friend Alison – who’s about to begin a new life in New Zealand – she spots Alison’s CV and medical degree certificate in a bin.  So Cath decides to adopt Alison’s identity and, hoping that her nursing skills will be enough to get by, find a job as a doctor far away in Edinburgh. Though the premise may sound a little daft, it’s actually surprisingly – and worryingly – common. Sefton uses his hospital know-how to bring a sense of authenticity to what is a really quite gripping drama.  Whittaker, rather than channelling a cocky Leonardo DiCaprio in Catch Me if You Can, is every inch the terrified woman flying by the seat of her pants. Excellent, too, is Emun Elliot as the colleague who catches her eye. Catherine Gee EastEnders BBC One, 7.30pm Mick’s (Danny Dyer) dastardly behaviour comes to a head in this special three-hander episode. He decides to tell wife Linda (Kellie Bright) the truth about what he’s been up to while she was away: namely cheating on her with their daughter-in-law Whitney (Shona McGarty).    Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm It’s the second nightly visit to this admirable project, which seeks to rehouse all the animals  in a Newcastle shelter in just a week. While we meet the wide range of animals and see how many still remain, Dom Joly also learns what happens to micropigs when they grow up.     The Dog Rescuers with Alan Davies Channel 5, 8.00pm Among the five unlucky pups needing some loving care from the team this week are an abandoned staffie who’s given a second chance and a young spaniel with a nasty neck wound.     Get a House for Free Channel 4, 9.00pm Marco Robinson is a very rich man – £25 million rich, in fact. He made his fortune through a business and property empire and now he wants to give back. So he’s decided to give away a three-bed flat in Preston to the person who he thinks will benefit the most. This film follows him as he attempts to sift through 8,000 applications. CG Utopia: In Search of the Dream BBC Four, 9.00pm It’s 500 years since the term “utopia” was coined by Sir Thomas More in 1516. In this documentary, art historian Professor Richard Clay examines five centuries of the concept of utopia and the impact it has had on our way of thinking. Often used as a method of criticism of the current system, it is a powerful vision. Clay considers some of our “greatest utopian dreamers”, including Jonathan Swift, author of Gulliver’s Travels, and Gene Roddenberry, creator of Star Trek, and the common themes that run through the ideal.     The Yorkshire Dales and the Lakes More4, 9.00pm The cosy documentary series continues with a farmer finding an unusual method to keep track of his sheep: day-glo paint. Elsewhere in the Dales, we follow the Dent Brewery boys as they create their own craft ales and in the Lake District we see Jon Bennett make his daily ascent to the summit of Helvellyn. CG The Parent Trap (1961) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am   In a film that helped pioneer the split-screen technique, Hayley Mills plays both Susan Evers and Sharon McKendrick, twins unaware of each other’s existence and separated as babies following their parents’ divorce. When they meet, years later, at summer camp, the pair scheme to reunite their parents. This classic Disney comedy spawned three sequels and a 1998 remake starring a young Lindsay Lohan. Tootsie (1982) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.30pm  When actor Michael Dorsey transforms himself into Dorothy Michaels in a desperate attempt to get work, complications arise as he falls for a female friend (Jessica Lange) and her father (Charles Durning)  falls for him. Although you never quite believe that Dustin Hoffman in drag would convince everyone that he’s a woman, it doesn’t matter: Tootsie is lots of fun – and it’s a sharply observed social satire, too. Groundhog Day (1993) ★★★★☆ Sky1, 9.00pm  In this wonderful comedy drama, a surly, sardonic weatherman (Bill Murray) is sent to the small US town of Punxsutawney to cover the annual groundhog festival, but finds himself experiencing precisely the same events over and over – then realises that he can free himself from the loop only by being a nicer person. One criticism: as always, Murray is so much more likeable as the malevolent grouch… Wednesday 9 August My Family, Partition and Me: India 1947 - Anita Rani  Credit: BBC My Family, Partition and Me: India 1947 BBC One, 9.00pm Two years ago, Anita Rani learnt how her family history was forever marked by the 1947 Partition of India in a memorable episode of Who Do You Think You Are? Now, she has wrangled three members of the public – one Hindu, one Christian and one Muslim – to explore how their own lives, and those of their ancestors, were affected by the appalling and widespread outbreaks of religious violence in the wake of Britain’s messy, compromised withdrawal, and the troubled legacy left by the Empire. In addition to eyewitness testimonies, the descendants of the survivors travel back to India, Pakistan and Bangladesh to retrace the journeys their relatives were forced to make. Their discoveries are in equal parts shocking, distressing and uplifting, and its treatment is rightly sensitive for events still in living memory: tears flow freely, yet it’s never sentimental. If there isn’t much space to dig into the wider political situation, the complex reasons behind the violence and longer-term implications, the detail of the personal recollections and anecdotes tells its own powerful tale. Rani returns to her own ancestral story in next week’s concluding part. Gabriel Tate Super Small Animals BBC One, 8.00pm Biologist Patrick Aryee demonstrates that size isn’t everything in the natural world, observing the extraordinary feats of strength, endurance and ingenuity of everything from hummingbirds  and seahorses to beetles and armadillos. Love Your Garden ITV, 8.00pm Alan Titchmarsh and his team turn an uninspiring patch of lumpy lawn and uneven paving into a sensory garden for a four-year-old girl with a very rare degenerative eye disease. Long Lost Family ITV, 9.00pm This episode of the always engaging and emotionally gruelling series reuniting long-estranged relatives charts the story of a woman who gave up her son only to adopt two boys herself, and a man whose mother put him up for adoption through an advert in the local press. My Big Gay Jewish Conversion BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.20pm First shown on BBC Three, this smart and sobering documentary follows Simon Atkins – who is Catholic and gay – as he looks at convert to Judaism, a religion that would allow him to marry his boyfriend, Matthew. Atkin’s journey is both spiritual and literal, as he travels to relatively tolerant Tel Aviv and more conservative Jerusalem, hoping to reconcile his sexuality with his religious beliefs. GT The South Bank Show Sky Arts, 8.00pm Singer-songwriter Benjamin Clementine, who won the Mercury Prize in 2015, talks to Melvyn Bragg about his early years on the streets and being hailed perhaps the brightest musical talent of his generation. In Search of Arcadia BBC Four, 9.00pm This contemplative documentary sees Dr Janina Ramirez and John Bailey explore the roots of the Arcadian cultural revolutionaries that sprang up along the Thames in the 17th and 18th centuries. Citizen Jane: Battle for the City BBC Four, 10.00pm When she saw the controversial development projects proposed by Robert Moses in Sixties New York, Jane Jacobs decided to take him on. Matt Tyrnauer’s punchy documentary pulls together an inspiring tale out of unlikely material – the debate of community culture versus “slum clearance”, one which continues to this day in cities across the world. GT Bridge to Terabithia (2007) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.10pm  Talented child stars AnnaSophia Robb and Josh Hutcherson (who went on to star in The Hunger Games) play two young misfits who become friends and create a magical world of the imagination in a remote part of the forest. This quality Disney production, adapted from Katherine Paterson’s classic novel, ventures into unexpectedly dark territory and packs an emotional punch that will have you reaching for your hankie. Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief (2015) ★★★★☆ Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Based on a book by the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Lawrence Wright, director Alex Gibney’s documentary about the Church of Scientology is a gripping, painstakingly researched exposé of one of the world’s most enigmatic organisations. At its core are a series of chilling allegations by former Scientology members, who describe a culture of abuse. The Lost Boys (1987) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 9.00pm Teen flick meets horror in this Eighties hit about two boys (Jason Patric and Corey Haim) who move to a quiet, northern California town where they become involved with a group of bloodthirsty vampires. These days it has to compete with the likes of Twilight and The Vampire Diaries, but there’s still enough action, intrigue, danger and romance to keep you hooked. Kiefer Sutherland and Corey Feldman also star. Thursday 10 July Princess Diana with Raine, Comtesse De Chambrun  Credit: Channel 4 Princess Diana’s “Wicked” Stepmother Channel 4, 9.00pm A gossipy, full-throttle and altogether naughty documentary about Diana, Princess of Wales’s stepmother Raine, Countess Spencer, who died last October. The daughter of romantic novelist Barbara Cartland, Raine was a prodigious social climber described here as “a famous socialite, a feisty politician and all-round force of nature” (“Nobody gets to be a countess three times by accident,” says one contributor). It seems like an accurate fit.  Named “Debutante of the Year” in 1947, Raine went on to bag a future Earl for a husband at the age of 18, became the youngest member of Westminster City Council at 23, before going on to become a noted conservation campaigner. The main focus here, though, is how she went on to marry a second Earl, John Spencer, in circumstances that earned her the entrenched enmity of his children, prime among them being his then 15-year-old daughter, Lady Diana. Yet when Diana’s own marriage ran into trouble it was Raine, so it’s claimed, that she turned to for support; the once “sworn enemy was transformed into her closest confidante”. The contributors include Downton Abbey writer Julian Fellowes and royal biographer Penny Junor. Gerard O’Donovan Natwest T20 Blast Cricket: Hampshire v Glamorgan Sky Sports Cricket, 6.00pm All the action from the Ageas Bowl for this South Division match. The home side are one of the most successful in the history of domestic T20 cricket, having won the competition twice and appeared in another four Finals Days. 10 Puppies and Us BBC Two, 8.00pm Here are more tales of new dog owners and their pups. This week, a mother seeks a canine companion for her son who has Down’s syndrome; the conflict between rival Chihuahuas Rocky and Chloe deepens; and a newlywed couple call in the behaviourist when a pug objects to their connubial bliss.  James Martin’s French Adventure ITV, 8.30pm Chef James Martin heads to the hilly Jura region, where a pear orchard proves to be the source of the perfect chutney for barbecued duck, and a visit to the citadel at Fort des Rousses shows why dungeons make the best cheese cellars. Top of the Lake: China Girl BBC Two, 9.00pm In the wake of last week’s shock revelation, Jane Campion’s off-kilter crime drama continues, with troubled detective Robin Griffin (Elisabeth Moss) pointing the China Girl investigation in a new direction, that of a surrogacy deal gone wrong. Meanwhile, Robin must face demons from her past when her former police chief Al Parker (David Wenham) arrives from New Zealand. Inside London Fire Brigade ITV, 9.00pm As the documentary series concludes, retiring crew manager Al passes the baton on to 25-year-old rookie Joe, who faces a tough test fighting his first big fire. GO A Premier League of Their Own Sky1, 9.00pm Ahead of next weekend’s opening matches in the Premier League, James Corden and pals begin the new season of the panel show with a special edition. Guests Thierry Henry, Jeff Stelling and Kelly Cates will be celebrating all things football alongside the show’s regulars Freddie Flintoff, Jack Whitehall and Jamie Redknapp. Plus McFly’s Danny Jones, singer Kate Nash and R&B star Lemar will be stepping up to the spot for Popstar Penalties. Laurel and Hardy: Their Lives and Magic Sky Arts, 9.00pm Fans of Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy will enjoy this superb assemblage of clips and out-takes. This enthralling documentary follows the life and work of the world’s most beloved comedy duo, and includes rare footage of Laurel in his later years, as well as an even rarer interview with his daughter, Lois. There’s also a tribute to the unusually strong friendship that the two stars enjoyed throughout their working lives. GO Dr Seuss’ The Lorax (2012) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 2.55pm This animated adaptation of Dr Seuss’s quirky story follows a boy (voiced by Zac Efron) who goes in search of a tree to impress a nature-loving girl (Taylor Swift). But he stumbles on the Once-ler (Ed Helms), the man responsible for harvesting all the world’s plant life. Children will enjoy it, even if the film does sacrifice a measure of its literary magic to the god of cinematic entertainment. Wild (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm  The Pacific Crest Trail, which runs up the entire western spine of the United States, is a challenge of fabled arduousness and rugged beauty. In 1995, aged 26, Cheryl Strayed (played by a superb Reese Witherspoon) walked it, to get clearance in her head after a decade of loss and personal meltdown. Wild powerfully reveals Strayed’s terrors and pleasures as she forges ahead on the journey. Wilde (1996) ★★★☆☆ BBC Four, 10.00pm  Many feel that Stephen Fry was born to play the part of the tragic and devastatingly brilliant Oscar Wilde. He’s terrific, but is only one of several superb players in a film which is held together by its performances. There’s Tom Wilkinson as the odious bully Queensberry and Jude Law on wonderfully petulant form as Bosie, the cause of Wilde’s downfall. Wilde’s story The Selfish Giant is woven throughout the film. Friday 11 August The Royal Albert Hall Credit: BBC BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 8.00pm Swapping tuxes for cowboy hats, the Proms continues tonight with a staging of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s beloved 1943 musical Oklahoma!  Expect plenty of whip-cracking, thigh-slapping, wild-west antics at the Royal Albert Hall, as conductor John Wilson and his orchestra add their signature élan to this story of a love affair between dashing cowboy Curly McLain (Nathaniel Hackmann) and farmer’s daughter Laurey Williams (Scarlett Strallen). Playing Jud Fy, the brooding, bestial social misfit with designs on Laurey himself, meanwhile, is David Seadon-Young. Elsewhere, Belinda Lang stars as the clucking Aunt Eller, and comedian Marcus Brigstocke is Ali Hakim, the Persian huckster battling with the cowboy Will Parker (Robert Fairchild) for the affections of fickle Ado Annie (Lizzy Connolly). The dance routines are balletic and fast, the hits frequent: the jaunty Surrey With the Fringe on Top, the romantic People Will Say We’re in Love, the lovely I Cain’t Say No, and, of course, the unmistakable opening song, Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin’. Rachel Kavanaugh, who directed an acclaimed touring production of Oklahoma! in 2015, is at the helm again here. Patrick Smith Premier League Football: Arsenal v Leicester City Sky Sports Premier League/Sky Sports Main Event, 7.00pm After three months of bluster and big-spending in the transfer market, the Premier League returns – and for the first time, the season gets under way on a Friday. All eyes tonight will be on Arsenal’s Alexandre Lacazette, the French striker who joined the Gunners for a club record fee of £52 million. Can he be the man to fire Arsenal back into the top four? Leicester City, meanwhile, will be keen to bounce back from a disappointing season that saw Claudio Ranieri sacked as manager despite having won them the league nine months previously. When these sides last met, at the end of April, a late own goal from Robert Huth handed Arsenal a 1-0 victory. Teach My Pet to Do That ITV, 8.00pm Arriving in the dog days of summer, this fluffy new series is presented by Alexander Amstrong, who asks such questions as: can a cat be trained to ride a labrador? Helping him teach tricks to the pets – among them, a dachshund labrador cross called Eric and a miniature horse called Aslan – are animal trainers Nando Brown and Jo-Rosie Haffenden.  Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm Throughout this week Steve Jones, Kate Quilton and Supervet Noel Fitzpatrick have been trying to find permanent homes for every animal in the Newcastle Dog and Cat Shelter. Tonight, they make one final push.  Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm Green fingers at the ready as Monty Don advises on how to cut and maintain hedges, while Adam Frost reveals the secrets of successful planting combinations. The Street ITV3, 9.00pm Previously shown in 2009, Jimmy McGovern’s gloom-ridden series comprised six stand-alone episodes focusing on the lives of the inhabitants of a single street in Liverpool. In this instalment, Anna Friel, recently seen in McGovern’s latest drama Broken, plays a single mother trying to hold down two jobs, pay the mortgage and get her two sons into a better school. Starring opposite her is Daniel Mays – with whom she also appeared in Tony Marchant’s similarly bleak drama Public Enemies – as the plumber whom she begins dating. What unfolds is expertly crafted and at times gut-wrenching to watch.  The Agony & the Ecstasy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This entertainingly nostalgic four-part series looks at how the UK’s rave scene exploded in the Eighties, fuelled by the party drug ecstasy. With the help of DJs such as Goldie, Paul Oakenfold and Annie Mac, it also explores how the genre evolved over the next three decades. Reach for the lasers. PS Eden: Paradise Lost Channel 4, 10.00pm The off-grid experiment – in which 23 people were stranded on the west coast of Scotland to fend for themselves – arrived on Channel 4 a year ago amid great fanfare but ended up being an unmitigated flop, with only 10 participants making it through to the end. In tonight’s finale, the action takes us from Christmas Day through to March, when those who remained were finally released. PS Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm  This first of a potentially limitless spin-off series of “Star Wars Stories” follows rebel live-wire Jyn Erso (Felicity Jones), who leads a band of self-styled “spies, saboteurs and assassins” on a death-or-glory mission to steal the Death Star plans from an Imperial stronghold, via some genuinely breathtaking planetary vistas and earth-ripping set-pieces.  The Firm (1993) ★★★☆☆ W, 9.00pm  Sydney Pollack directed this accomplished yet curiously uninvolving adaptation of John Grisham’s legal potboiler. Tom Cruise plays Mitch McDeere, an ambitious young lawyer who takes a well-paid job at a Memphis law firm that sounds too good to be true. And it is: the firm launders money for the Mob. Can Mitch escape with his morals and marriage intact? Gene Hackman co-stars as Cruise’s father figure. Strictly Ballroom (1992) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 11.05pm  Paul Mercurio plays a rebellious ballroom dancer who breaks all the rules and paso dobles his way to victory in this crowd-pleasing Australian comedy. Baz Luhrmann’s writing and directing debut is just as brash as Moulin Rouge! but a lot less pleased with itself. There’s romance between our hero and his ugly duckling partner, and it’s set against an enjoyable parade of sequin-decked caricatures and high camp. Watch here on TVPlayer Television previewers Catherine Gee, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: Emma Willis on Who Do You Think You Are? plus Top of the Lake: China Girl

Thursday 3 August Who Do You Think You Are? BBC One, 9.00pm This week’s edition of the genealogy show initially threatens to be one of those pleasant enough hours with no real surprises. Our subject is TV presenter Emma Willis, a proud Birmingham girl and the product of a close-knit, working-class background who explains that she has come from “a kind family” and hopes previous generations will turn out to have been similar.  Initially it seems as though those dreams will come true with an interesting but hardly ground-breaking trawl through generations of hard-working Brummie grafters who lurched from prosperity to the workhouse and back again, but appear to have stuck together through good times and bad. “When I look at that picture I think of Peaky Blinders,” Willis says early on about a family snapshot, but the reality is less criminal and more enterprise. Things take a more interesting, and altogether darker turn, however, once she heads across the sea to Ireland for a tale of violence, abuse of power and ultimately love, which uncovers a true working-class hero in the process. “We all want to have a nice story, right?” notes the likeable Willis. Her pleasure when she finally finds one is infectious. SC 10 Puppies and Us BBC Two, 8.00pm Imagine refusing to do anything unless you’re fed sausages. It’s not a bad way to go about life and certainly one that stubborn golden retriever Lola adopts. Canine behaviourist Louise Glazebrook is on hand to give advice to her struggling new owners.  RW  James Martin’s French Adventure ITV, 8.30pm The likeable chef heads to the lakeside town of Annecy, nicknamed the Pearl of the French Alps, where he selects ingredients from the local market to create a lobster dish. He also meets award-winning pastry chef Philippe Rigollot to sample his desserts. RW Top of the Lake: China Girl BBC Two, 9.00pm This second series of Jane Campion’s mystery drama is shaping up to be better than the first as it homes in on the central story without any wild distractions. Nicole Kidman, too, is chilling as an adoptive mother Julia. Tonight, an autopsy reveals that murdered victim China Girl was a sex worker, sending Detective Robin Griffin (Elisabeth Moss) and sidekick Miranda (Gwendoline Christie) in a new direction. RW Prejudice and Pride: The People’s History of LGBTQ Britain BBC Four, 9.00pm Comedians Susan Calman and Stephen K Amos present the second of two documentaries in which people share the objects that have defined their lives since homosexuality was partially decriminalised in 1967. There’s a pair of Ugg boots, and a racy school book, but for Shaun Duggan, the Brookside writer who gave us the first pre-watershed lesbian kiss on British television, it’s a letter from Morrissey. RW Insecure Sky Atlantic, 10.35pm This smart portrait of the life and friendships of twentysomething black women in LA is based on the internet series The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl by US comedian Issa Rae. Her writing is crisp and insightful and her performance, as the well-meaning member of an outreach programme for inner-city schools, is excellent. Tonight the series returns for a second run and Issa is trying to piece herself together post break-up. RW Kicked Out: From Care to Chaos BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm Rebecca Southworth explores why so many children lead troubled lives after leaving care. RW The Way Way Back (2013) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.00pm  This coming-of-age story feels like familiar terrain, but it’s agreeably done. Duncan (Liam James) learns about life, love and self-esteem from a gang of water-park employees, including the excellent Sam Rockwell, when forced to go on holiday with his mother (Toni Collette) and her boyfriend (Steve Carrell). The script flows and there’s enough melancholy and edge to the overall comic tone for its charm to prevail. The Island (2005) ★★☆☆☆ 5STAR, 9.00pm  Michael Bay’s sci-fi flop humbled Steven Spielberg’s DreamWorks. Not only was the original script scrapped, the film only just recouped the $ 126 million it cost to make, though it’s still a stylish offering. It stars Ewan McGregor as a human clone who lives in a controlled facility and dreams of going to “The Island”, the last uncontaminated place on Earth. Scarlett Johansson and Sean Bean buoy up the cast. Cliffhanger (1993) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 11.45pm  Living up to its title, Cliffhanger is a rollicking rollercoaster of a film. It stars Sylvester Stallone as a hotshot mountain climber, who becomes embroiled in a heist, along with Janine Turner. Set in the Rocky Mountains and featuring some stupendous stunts, it may be big-budget nonsense – but it’s entertaining big-budget nonsense with zesty lines and exhilarating cinematography. Renny Harlin directs.   Friday 4 August Sun-soaked: the biggest resort on the Costa del Sol  The Secret Life of the Holiday Resort Channel 4, 8.00pm Spain hosted 10 million British holidaymakers in 2016, two million more than in the previous year. With the package holiday one of the main beneficiaries of this apparent rekindling of Anglo-Spanish love in the wake of Brexit, Katherine Patrick’s documentary travels to Holidayworld, the biggest all-inclusive resort on the Costa del Sol, where three-quarters of the 3,000 guests are from the UK. There, we meet three four-person families seeking brief respite from the gruelling jobs that generally keep them apart, and some of the 500 heroic staff. The Secret Life of the Holiday Resort is rather harmless, unenlightening stuff, propped up by an exhausting procession of vague statistics and meaningless survey results (“a third of parents say the most frequent rows abroad are between them and their kids”, that sort of thing) reeled off by narrator Blake Harrison (of The Inbetweeners). All the expected boxes are ticked – techniques for bagging sunbeds, the artery-clogging buffets, the pros and cons of families spending a week in such proximity – but it’s good-natured throughout, even during the inevitable and perfunctory drift into Brexit chat. The very essence of silly season programming. GT Icarus Netflix, from today In what is a coup for Netflix, this award-winning documentary from Bryan Fogel began as a Supersize Me-style experiment into the effects of doping. But after Fogel connected with renegade scientist Dr Grigory Rodchenkov, it became a lid-lifting investigation into a widespread Russian scandal that seemingly goes as high as Putin. GT Cleverman BBC Three, from 10.00am Series two of the fun, if labyrinthine, dystopian drama from Australia will be made available today in its entirety. Wearing X-Men’s influence on its sleeve, it follows the leader of the “Hairies”, superpowered people trying to live alongside humans that persecute and subjugate them. GT BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 8.00pm The music of Ella Fitzgerald and Dizzy Gillespie is celebrated in the centenary year of their births, with musicians, including singer Diane Reeves, performing with the BBC Concert Orchestra. GT The Secret World of Posh Pets ITV, 8.00pm; not UTV/STV/Wales This final part finds 21-year-old Rory roping in his father to expand his niche business of exporting jellyfish, while there’s evidence that horse-grooming has reached genuinely berserk levels, with unicorn horns and nail polish the latest must-haves for those benighted equine attractions at children’s parties. GT Only Connect BBC Two, 8.30pm Viking experts take on geocachers (participants in a GPS-driven treasure hunt), with one (relatively straightforward) challenge involving finding the link between exhibit, salt and pepper, outcast and roots manoeuvre. GT Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm Irises, pelargonium cuttings, growing plants inside and managing a shaded, sloping town garden are among the challenges facing Monty Don and his team in tonight’s edition of the hardy perennial. GT Autopsy: Kurt Cobain Channel 5, 10.05pm Forensic pathologist Dr Jason Payne-James turns his attention to the alleged suicide of Kurt Cobain. Alleged, because certain conspiracy theorists assert that he had too much heroin in his system to be able to have inflicted the gunshot wound to his head. Probably best not to expect any definitive results here, however. GT This Is 40 (2012) ★★★☆☆ E4, 9.00pm  Judd Apatow revisits two characters from his 2007 hit Knocked Up. Leslie Mann, Apatow’s wife, and Paul Rudd play a stressed-out Los Angeles couple whose 40th birthdays bookend the film. Apatow and Mann’s real-life daughters also play their children. It’s a perceptive comedy on middle-age and one that guarantees big laughs alongside some of Apatow’s most pertinent observations on love. The Green Mile (1999) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm  Tom Hanks stars in this Oscar-nominated adaptation of Stephen King’s entrancingly strange novel. Stolid prison guard Paul Edgecomb (Hanks) is shaken by the arrival of a convict (Michael Clarke Duncan) who has supernatural powers. Although a little lightweight compared with director Frank Darabont’s previous prison film, The Shawshank Redemption, it’s pleasingly creepy. The Help (2011) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm  Emma Stone sparkles among the fine female cast in this enjoyable adaptation of Kathryn Stockett’s bestselling 2009 novel. She stars as a budding journalist working in Sixties Jackson, Mississippi, who convinces two black maids (Viola Davis and the Oscar-winning Octavia Spencer) to work secretly with her on a book and reveal the hardships inflicted on them. Bryce Dallas Howard is a delightfully hissable villain. Saturday 5 August Billy Connolly in front of John Byrne's portrait in mural form in Glasgow's Osborne Street Credit: BBC Billy Connolly: Portrait of a Lifetime BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 10.30pm “Glasgow belongs to me,” says Billy Connolly of his hometown in this heart-warming documentary to mark the comedian’s 75th birthday in November. And he’s not wrong as three imposing 50ft tribute portraits have recently been unveiled on wallends in the city. They were created by Scottish artists John Byrne, Jack Vettriano and Rachel MacLean, and this accompanying film not only gives a neat history of the area, but serves as a celebration of the Big Yin’s career.  Interspersed with clips of his stand-up routines, including his cheeky first appearance on Parkinson in 1975 when he told the bum joke that turned him into a star, the programme see Connolly sit quietly for the artists – not one of his strong points as he admits: “I’ve been very patient. I think I’m due an episode.” Watching them at work in their studios is inspiring and Connolly is taken aback by the results. “It’s like looking into a mirror. You know my soul,” he says to Byrne, who used to design album covers for Connolly’s band The Humblebums. “I’m amazed at the effect these have had on me, they’ve stunned me.” From tomorrow, the original portraits will be hung in the People’s Palace. Rachel Ward Athletics: World Championships BBC Two, 9.30am & BBC One, 6.30pm Day two at the London Stadium in Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park sees Usain Bolt – in all likeliness – going for gold in the men’s 100 m final (9.45pm) as he makes his final individual appearance at a major championships. His main threats are expected to come from former champions Justin Gatlin and Yohan Blake, as well as emerging star Christian Coleman. Earlier in the day, British medal hope Katarina Johnson-Thompson gets her heptathlon bid under way with the 100 m hurdles at 10.05am. Sadly not in action today is Greg Rutherford, who, because of an ankle injury, won’t be competing in the men’s long jump final (8.05pm).  Little Big Shots USA ITV, 5.00pm Steve Harvey showcases more talented youngsters while mocking his own stupidity in this family friendly show exec-produced by Ellen DeGeneres. Tonight, there’s a maths genius and a Motown singer. Royal Cousins at War BBC Two, 7.30pm; NI, 8.00pm A welcome repeat for this riveting analysis of the relationship between Kaiser Bill, Tsar Nicholas II of Russia and our own King George V, and the disastrous effect that their rivalry had on the First World War.  Paul O’Grady’s Hollywood Channel 4, 8.00pm This new series sees Paul O’Grady delve into cinematic history to find out what it takes to make a masterpiece. He begins with “weepies”, where the host’s caustic wit serves as the perfect antidote as talking heads, including Sigourney Weaver and Celine Dion, reach for the tissues as they relate films such as Brief Encounter, Titanic and, quite possibly the saddest in movie history, The Champ.    Dad’s Army BBC Two, 8.30pm; not NI This is a gem of an episode loaded with slapstick fun from 1970. It’s the one where Corporal Jones (Clive Dunn) dresses as a tree trunk during an exercise pitting Mainwaring (Arthur Lowe) and his crew against their pompous arch-rival Captain Square. RW The L.A. Riots: 25 Years Later History, 9.00pm Twenty-five years after Los Angeles erupted into one of the most destructive civil disturbances in US history (11,000 people were arrested and an estimated 63 people were killed), this documentary looks back at the decades of racial injustice that led to the incident and the history of police relations with LA’s black community. Citizens, council members and even those who committed crimes talk about how South Central was beset by mass riots, looting, and fires.  Cambridge Folk Festival 2017 Sky Arts, 9.00pm Broadcaster Mark Radcliffe and musician Julie Fowlis present highlights from this year’s festival, an event that attracts 10,000 visitors. These include Jon Boden, formerly of Bellowhead, performing new material with his band The Remnant Kings. There’s also music from Jake Bugg, electric punk stars Oysterband and Lisa Hannigan, once as a member of Damien Rice’s band. RW The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies (2014) ★★☆☆☆ ITV, 8.00pm  The battle of the title was barely mentioned by JRR Tolkein in The Hobbit, but it was seemingly enough for Peter Jackson to pad out his franchise even further. Picking up where the last film left off, our heroes had just unleashed the wrath of dragon Smaug (Benedict Cumberbatch). But there’s another battle looming, one between themselves which is fuelled by greed. Red (2010) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm  A starry line-up of actors of pensionable age is the attraction of this light-hearted adaptation of Warren Ellis’s graphic novel, and it’s hard to resist Helen Mirren with a submachine gun. RED stands for “Retired Extremely Dangerous”, which is what the CIA has labelled former agents Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich and Mirren, who team up to find out who has marked them for assassination, and why. I Know What You Did Last Summer (1997) ★★☆☆☆ BBC One, 11.55pm  This routine slasher flick, written by Kevin Williamson of Scream fame, will certainly make you jump but it’s unlikely to give you many sleepless nights. When a carful of American teenagers hits and kills a man, they panic and dump the body. Months later, the inevitable slaughter begins. A hapless cast, featuring Sarah Michelle Gellar, brings unintentional levity to proceedings. Sunday 6 August Diana, Princess of Wales Credit: Rex Diana: In Her Own Words Channel 4, 8.00pm Much controversy has surrounded this documentary, which broadcasts – for the first time in the UK – video footage recorded in 1992 and 1993 by Diana, Princess of Wales’s voice coach, Peter Settelen. Hired to help Diana reframe her public image and put forward her own side of the story regarding her marriage, Settelen saw his work bear fruit in his client’s Panorama interview. Now there is undoubted interest in watching Diana recount key events in her life unmediated, with candour and a seductive mix of charm and steel. “He chatted me up like a bad rash,” she recalls of her future husband at one point; at another, she remembers being “completely thrown” by the Prince of Wales’s peculiar response to a question about them being in love. In truth, director Kevin Sim rather crams the at-times uncomfortably intimate footage into the first and final thirds of the documentary, leaving assorted friends and confidants to tell the rest of the very familiar story, and the melodrama is laid on a little thick at times. Exploitative? Perhaps. Fascinating? In patches, although it probably won’t entirely satisfy either those looking for genuinely fresh insights or an opportunity to be outraged. Gabriel Tate Community Shield Football: Arsenal v Chelsea BT Sport 1, 1.00pm Arsenal and Chelsea meet for the second time in as many weeks, with Antonio Conte’s Blues favourites to lift the Community Shield today having won 3-0 in Beijing thanks to a brace from Michy Batshuayi.  Women’s Football: Euro 2017 Channel 4, 3.00pm After a thrilling tournament – during which a record 3.3 million people tuned in to watch England’s Lionesses beat France 1-0 – we’re at the FC Twente Stadion in Enschede, Holland, as the successors to Germany are crowned.   LSO Sky Arts, 6.00pm Originally, and rather impishly, hinting at a “greatest hits” of Haydn, Simon Rattle and his Imaginary Orchestral Journey instead took movements from 11 of the Austrian composer’s works, many of them rarely performed, and realigned them joyfully and perceptively in this concert with the London Symphony Orchestra. Works from Bartók and an extract from Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde provide the hors d’oeuvre for this enticing programme.   BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 7.00pm One of the most anticipated events of every Prom season, the National Youth Orchestra of Great Britain brings its energy and drive to the Royal Albert Hall. First comes the London premiere of Francisco Coll’s “grotesque symphony” Mural and Thomas Adès conducting his own work, Polaris, for the first time in the capital. The climax comes courtesy of Igor Stravinsky and his agelessly thrilling Rite of Spring. It is introduced by Suzy Klein and Lloyd Coleman. GT Secrets of Silicon Valley BBC Two, 8.00pm Blogger Jamie Bartlett investigates whether technological progress should be made at any cost. On the one side, he meets those tackling climate change; on the other, those paying the price for the success of Uber and, somewhere in the middle, the pioneers of self-driving cars.    Poldark BBC One, 9.00pm Having barrelled along entertainingly, with the undercurrent of hardscrabble misery intact, this third series concludes with sightings of French sails spotted on the horizon and Cornwall put on high alert. Meanwhile, Cap’n Ross (Aidan Turner) contends with a broadside from George Warleggan  (Jack Farthing).   The Last Days of Patrick Swayze Channel 5, 10.00pm Given the fact that he died from pancreatic cancer aged 57, we can reasonably surmise that the Dirty Dancing star’s final hours were not wholly pleasant. So, what can forensic pathologist Jason Payne-James, perusing Swayze’s medical records, add to the story?   Gareth Thomas: Hate in the Beautiful Game BBC Two, 10.30pm; not NI Former Welsh rugby union captain Gareth Thomas, who came out in 2009 while still playing, asks why football has shamefully remained a bastion of open homophobia – perhaps the last in sport. GT Frozen (2013) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 1.40pm  Disney’s 53rd feature is an enchanting combination of fairytale derring-do and heart-popping musical numbers that has left children and adults powerless to its charms (even if some parents may have grown rather tired of it). Elsa (Idina Menzel) is a shy princess driven into exile when her magical powers are discovered. Her sister Anna (Kristen Bell) gallops off to fetch her from her beautiful ice palace. The King’s Speech (2010) ★★★★★ Channel 4, 9.50pm  Tom Hooper’s film about the future George VI’s struggle to overcome his stammer in the nation’s hour of need won multiple Academy Awards, including a deserved Best Actor gong for Colin Firth. But it’s his double-act with Geoffrey Rush as his speech therapist Lionel Logue that gives the film its heart, and the doublehanders between them are fraught and fascinating. Point Break (1991) ★★★☆☆ Channel 5, 11.05pm Kathryn Bigelow’s cult surfing/crime film elevated Patrick Swayze’s actor status to true action hero. Keanu Reeves plays Johnny Utah, an FBI agent who goes undercover to infiltrate the Ex-Presidents, a gang of bankrobbing surfers led by the charismatic Bodhi (Swayze). The action heats up when Bodhi and Utah find they share a similar attitude towards danger. Lori Petty is the surfer who catches Johnny’s eye. Monday 7 August Eden: Paradise Lost - the participants Credit: Channel 4 Eden: Paradise Lost Channel 4, 10.00pm In March 2016, 23 idealists set out to take part in Channel 4’s Eden experiment, which, a touch grandiosely, sought to establish “a new society” from scratch, cut off from the modern world on a remote Scottish peninsula for an entire year. “What if we could start again?” was the much-hyped tag line. And the answer was… well, we never got to find out the answer because the series was pulled last summer, after just four episodes, when viewing figures took a dive from 1.7 million to less than 800,000.  Not that Channel 4 or production company Keo Films thought to tell the participants that. Instead they were left to get on with it. Rumours swirled of Lord of the Flies levels of acrimony, mass defections, starvation, health problems, people eating chicken feed to survive. So it could make for absorbing viewing in this five-part update, which airs every night this week. Although probably the greatest fascination will be in seeing the reactions of the 10 participants who suffered through to the end as they emerged from the nightmare in March this year only to discover that their efforts have mostly been in vain – and that the political landscape has drastically altered while they were gone. Gerard O’Donovan Stacey Dooley Investigates: Divide and National Pride in Northern Ireland  BBC Three, from 10.00am The intrepid reporter discovers that bitter political divisions persist in Northern Ireland as she seeks to discover more about Prime Minister Theresa May’s new allies in the Democratic Unionist Party. The Bug Grub Couple BBC One, 7.30pm Bug burger or beef burger? That’s the choice at the Grub restaurant in Pembrokeshire, part of entomologist Dr Sarah Beynon and chef Andy Holcroft’s Bug Farm – an insect zoo, research centre and insect eaterie. Here they struggle to convince us why we all should learn to love eating insect protein.   Masters Tennis: The Rogers Cup Sky Sports Main Event, 7.00pm The Uniprix Stadium in Montreal is the setting, as the Rogers Cup gets under way. Novak Djokovic lifted the trophy in 2016 for the fourth time, defeating Kei Nishikori in the final. The Serbian misses out this time around, though, due to injury.  Tornado: The 100mph Steam Engine BBC Four, 8.00pm If phrases like “it’s a Peppercorn class A1 Pacific” get you all steamed up you’ll be in heaven with this account of how a bunch of engineering enthusiasts got the massive locomotive they took 18 years to build from scratch to take on the ultimate test: hitting 100 miles per hour, a speed no British steam train has achieved since 1967.    Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm This new, live, animal rescue show with Steve Jones, Kate Quilton and Noel Fitzpatrick attempts to rehome a whole shelter’s worth of dogs, cats and assorted other species. Among the celebs espousing the joy of pets in this opener is pop singer Leona Lewis. Continues until Friday.   Man in an Orange Shirt BBC Two, 9.00pm In part two of novelist Patrick Gale’s drama for the Gay Britannia season, more than half a century on, Flora (Vanessa Redgrave) gives her late husband’s cottage to their grandson Adam (Julian Morris), who finds himself drawn to his architect, Steve (David Gyasi).   Inside Heston’s World Good Food, 9.00pm This four-part series chronicles chef Heston Blumenthal’s attempt to bring a flavour of his Fat Duck restaurant to Australia, in a multi-million pound move to Melbourne last year. GO Make or Break? Channel 5, 10.00pm A new reality series, stripped across the week, in which eight troubled couples test the strength of their relationships at a Mexican holiday resort, where alongside counselling and therapy sessions, they have to swap partners every two days. GO Doctor Dolittle (1967) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 5.05pm  This is not the Eddie Murphy comedy version from 1998 but the charming Sixties musical directed by Richard Fleischer. Rex Harrison stars as the terse, eponymous doctor who has the uncanny ability to speak to animals and so embarks on a voyage to find an elusive pink sea snail and a giant lunar moth. Samantha Egger, 20 years Harrison’s junior, co-stars as the adventurous stowaway who falls in love with the doctor.  Storks (2016) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 6.20pm  Warner Animation Group’s first film since 2014’s The Lego Movie is spectacularly daft but manages to be both moving and very fun. Here the storks of the title have moved on from delivering babies to big business and now transport products for an Amazon-style website. But then the old baby-making machine, gathering dust in the corner, is accidentally reactivated and suddenly they have a baby to get home.  American History X (1998) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm  Tony Kaye directs this compellingly violent and brutal examination of white supremacism in America. Edward Norton is both mesmerising and terrifying as Derek, a student drawn into the Neo-Nazi movement who mercilessly kills two black youths. After a stint in prison he’s reformed but returns  home to find his younger brother Danny (Edward Furlong) on the same track he was. Tuesday 8 August Jodie Whittaker and Emun Elliott Credit: BBC Trust Me BBC One, 9.00pm Before she becomes the Doctor in Doctor Who, Jodie Whittaker stars in a drama about… pretending to be a doctor. No doubt there will soon be many jokes about that floating around. In this new four-part drama, written by real-life doctor Dan Sefton, Whittaker stars as Cath, a downtrodden ward sister who is fired when she takes her concerns about the conditions in her Sheffield hospital to the trust. Then, when at the leaving party for her best friend Alison – who’s about to begin a new life in New Zealand – she spots Alison’s CV and medical degree certificate in a bin.  So Cath decides to adopt Alison’s identity and, hoping that her nursing skills will be enough to get by, find a job as a doctor far away in Edinburgh. Though the premise may sound a little daft, it’s actually surprisingly – and worryingly – common. Sefton uses his hospital know-how to bring a sense of authenticity to what is a really quite gripping drama.  Whittaker, rather than channelling a cocky Leonardo DiCaprio in Catch Me if You Can, is every inch the terrified woman flying by the seat of her pants. Excellent, too, is Emun Elliot as the colleague who catches her eye. Catherine Gee EastEnders BBC One, 7.30pm Mick’s (Danny Dyer) dastardly behaviour comes to a head in this special three-hander episode. He decides to tell wife Linda (Kellie Bright) the truth about what he’s been up to while she was away: namely cheating on her with their daughter-in-law Whitney (Shona McGarty).    Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm It’s the second nightly visit to this admirable project, which seeks to rehouse all the animals  in a Newcastle shelter in just a week. While we meet the wide range of animals and see how many still remain, Dom Joly also learns what happens to micropigs when they grow up.     The Dog Rescuers with Alan Davies Channel 5, 8.00pm Among the five unlucky pups needing some loving care from the team this week are an abandoned staffie who’s given a second chance and a young spaniel with a nasty neck wound.     Get a House for Free Channel 4, 9.00pm Marco Robinson is a very rich man – £25 million rich, in fact. He made his fortune through a business and property empire and now he wants to give back. So he’s decided to give away a three-bed flat in Preston to the person who he thinks will benefit the most. This film follows him as he attempts to sift through 8,000 applications. CG Utopia: In Search of the Dream BBC Four, 9.00pm It’s 500 years since the term “utopia” was coined by Sir Thomas More in 1516. In this documentary, art historian Professor Richard Clay examines five centuries of the concept of utopia and the impact it has had on our way of thinking. Often used as a method of criticism of the current system, it is a powerful vision. Clay considers some of our “greatest utopian dreamers”, including Jonathan Swift, author of Gulliver’s Travels, and Gene Roddenberry, creator of Star Trek, and the common themes that run through the ideal.     The Yorkshire Dales and the Lakes More4, 9.00pm The cosy documentary series continues with a farmer finding an unusual method to keep track of his sheep: day-glo paint. Elsewhere in the Dales, we follow the Dent Brewery boys as they create their own craft ales and in the Lake District we see Jon Bennett make his daily ascent to the summit of Helvellyn. CG The Parent Trap (1961) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am   In a film that helped pioneer the split-screen technique, Hayley Mills plays both Susan Evers and Sharon McKendrick, twins unaware of each other’s existence and separated as babies following their parents’ divorce. When they meet, years later, at summer camp, the pair scheme to reunite their parents. This classic Disney comedy spawned three sequels and a 1998 remake starring a young Lindsay Lohan. Tootsie (1982) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.30pm  When actor Michael Dorsey transforms himself into Dorothy Michaels in a desperate attempt to get work, complications arise as he falls for a female friend (Jessica Lange) and her father (Charles Durning)  falls for him. Although you never quite believe that Dustin Hoffman in drag would convince everyone that he’s a woman, it doesn’t matter: Tootsie is lots of fun – and it’s a sharply observed social satire, too. Groundhog Day (1993) ★★★★☆ Sky1, 9.00pm  In this wonderful comedy drama, a surly, sardonic weatherman (Bill Murray) is sent to the small US town of Punxsutawney to cover the annual groundhog festival, but finds himself experiencing precisely the same events over and over – then realises that he can free himself from the loop only by being a nicer person. One criticism: as always, Murray is so much more likeable as the malevolent grouch… Wednesday 9 August My Family, Partition and Me: India 1947 - Anita Rani  Credit: BBC My Family, Partition and Me: India 1947 BBC One, 9.00pm Two years ago, Anita Rani learnt how her family history was forever marked by the 1947 Partition of India in a memorable episode of Who Do You Think You Are? Now, she has wrangled three members of the public – one Hindu, one Christian and one Muslim – to explore how their own lives, and those of their ancestors, were affected by the appalling and widespread outbreaks of religious violence in the wake of Britain’s messy, compromised withdrawal, and the troubled legacy left by the Empire. In addition to eyewitness testimonies, the descendants of the survivors travel back to India, Pakistan and Bangladesh to retrace the journeys their relatives were forced to make. Their discoveries are in equal parts shocking, distressing and uplifting, and its treatment is rightly sensitive for events still in living memory: tears flow freely, yet it’s never sentimental. If there isn’t much space to dig into the wider political situation, the complex reasons behind the violence and longer-term implications, the detail of the personal recollections and anecdotes tells its own powerful tale. Rani returns to her own ancestral story in next week’s concluding part. Gabriel Tate Super Small Animals BBC One, 8.00pm Biologist Patrick Aryee demonstrates that size isn’t everything in the natural world, observing the extraordinary feats of strength, endurance and ingenuity of everything from hummingbirds  and seahorses to beetles and armadillos. Love Your Garden ITV, 8.00pm Alan Titchmarsh and his team turn an uninspiring patch of lumpy lawn and uneven paving into a sensory garden for a four-year-old girl with a very rare degenerative eye disease. Long Lost Family ITV, 9.00pm This episode of the always engaging and emotionally gruelling series reuniting long-estranged relatives charts the story of a woman who gave up her son only to adopt two boys herself, and a man whose mother put him up for adoption through an advert in the local press. My Big Gay Jewish Conversion BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.20pm First shown on BBC Three, this smart and sobering documentary follows Simon Atkins – who is Catholic and gay – as he looks at convert to Judaism, a religion that would allow him to marry his boyfriend, Matthew. Atkin’s journey is both spiritual and literal, as he travels to relatively tolerant Tel Aviv and more conservative Jerusalem, hoping to reconcile his sexuality with his religious beliefs. GT The South Bank Show Sky Arts, 8.00pm Singer-songwriter Benjamin Clementine, who won the Mercury Prize in 2015, talks to Melvyn Bragg about his early years on the streets and being hailed perhaps the brightest musical talent of his generation. In Search of Arcadia BBC Four, 9.00pm This contemplative documentary sees Dr Janina Ramirez and John Bailey explore the roots of the Arcadian cultural revolutionaries that sprang up along the Thames in the 17th and 18th centuries. Citizen Jane: Battle for the City BBC Four, 10.00pm When she saw the controversial development projects proposed by Robert Moses in Sixties New York, Jane Jacobs decided to take him on. Matt Tyrnauer’s punchy documentary pulls together an inspiring tale out of unlikely material – the debate of community culture versus “slum clearance”, one which continues to this day in cities across the world. GT Bridge to Terabithia (2007) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.10pm  Talented child stars AnnaSophia Robb and Josh Hutcherson (who went on to star in The Hunger Games) play two young misfits who become friends and create a magical world of the imagination in a remote part of the forest. This quality Disney production, adapted from Katherine Paterson’s classic novel, ventures into unexpectedly dark territory and packs an emotional punch that will have you reaching for your hankie. Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief (2015) ★★★★☆ Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Based on a book by the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Lawrence Wright, director Alex Gibney’s documentary about the Church of Scientology is a gripping, painstakingly researched exposé of one of the world’s most enigmatic organisations. At its core are a series of chilling allegations by former Scientology members, who describe a culture of abuse. The Lost Boys (1987) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 9.00pm Teen flick meets horror in this Eighties hit about two boys (Jason Patric and Corey Haim) who move to a quiet, northern California town where they become involved with a group of bloodthirsty vampires. These days it has to compete with the likes of Twilight and The Vampire Diaries, but there’s still enough action, intrigue, danger and romance to keep you hooked. Kiefer Sutherland and Corey Feldman also star. Thursday 10 July Princess Diana with Raine, Comtesse De Chambrun  Credit: Channel 4 Princess Diana’s “Wicked” Stepmother Channel 4, 9.00pm A gossipy, full-throttle and altogether naughty documentary about Diana, Princess of Wales’s stepmother Raine, Countess Spencer, who died last October. The daughter of romantic novelist Barbara Cartland, Raine was a prodigious social climber described here as “a famous socialite, a feisty politician and all-round force of nature” (“Nobody gets to be a countess three times by accident,” says one contributor). It seems like an accurate fit.  Named “Debutante of the Year” in 1947, Raine went on to bag a future Earl for a husband at the age of 18, became the youngest member of Westminster City Council at 23, before going on to become a noted conservation campaigner. The main focus here, though, is how she went on to marry a second Earl, John Spencer, in circumstances that earned her the entrenched enmity of his children, prime among them being his then 15-year-old daughter, Lady Diana. Yet when Diana’s own marriage ran into trouble it was Raine, so it’s claimed, that she turned to for support; the once “sworn enemy was transformed into her closest confidante”. The contributors include Downton Abbey writer Julian Fellowes and royal biographer Penny Junor. Gerard O’Donovan Natwest T20 Blast Cricket: Hampshire v Glamorgan Sky Sports Cricket, 6.00pm All the action from the Ageas Bowl for this South Division match. The home side are one of the most successful in the history of domestic T20 cricket, having won the competition twice and appeared in another four Finals Days. 10 Puppies and Us BBC Two, 8.00pm Here are more tales of new dog owners and their pups. This week, a mother seeks a canine companion for her son who has Down’s syndrome; the conflict between rival Chihuahuas Rocky and Chloe deepens; and a newlywed couple call in the behaviourist when a pug objects to their connubial bliss.  James Martin’s French Adventure ITV, 8.30pm Chef James Martin heads to the hilly Jura region, where a pear orchard proves to be the source of the perfect chutney for barbecued duck, and a visit to the citadel at Fort des Rousses shows why dungeons make the best cheese cellars. Top of the Lake: China Girl BBC Two, 9.00pm In the wake of last week’s shock revelation, Jane Campion’s off-kilter crime drama continues, with troubled detective Robin Griffin (Elisabeth Moss) pointing the China Girl investigation in a new direction, that of a surrogacy deal gone wrong. Meanwhile, Robin must face demons from her past when her former police chief Al Parker (David Wenham) arrives from New Zealand. Inside London Fire Brigade ITV, 9.00pm As the documentary series concludes, retiring crew manager Al passes the baton on to 25-year-old rookie Joe, who faces a tough test fighting his first big fire. GO A Premier League of Their Own Sky1, 9.00pm Ahead of next weekend’s opening matches in the Premier League, James Corden and pals begin the new season of the panel show with a special edition. Guests Thierry Henry, Jeff Stelling and Kelly Cates will be celebrating all things football alongside the show’s regulars Freddie Flintoff, Jack Whitehall and Jamie Redknapp. Plus McFly’s Danny Jones, singer Kate Nash and R&B star Lemar will be stepping up to the spot for Popstar Penalties. Laurel and Hardy: Their Lives and Magic Sky Arts, 9.00pm Fans of Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy will enjoy this superb assemblage of clips and out-takes. This enthralling documentary follows the life and work of the world’s most beloved comedy duo, and includes rare footage of Laurel in his later years, as well as an even rarer interview with his daughter, Lois. There’s also a tribute to the unusually strong friendship that the two stars enjoyed throughout their working lives. GO Dr Seuss’ The Lorax (2012) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 2.55pm This animated adaptation of Dr Seuss’s quirky story follows a boy (voiced by Zac Efron) who goes in search of a tree to impress a nature-loving girl (Taylor Swift). But he stumbles on the Once-ler (Ed Helms), the man responsible for harvesting all the world’s plant life. Children will enjoy it, even if the film does sacrifice a measure of its literary magic to the god of cinematic entertainment. Wild (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm  The Pacific Crest Trail, which runs up the entire western spine of the United States, is a challenge of fabled arduousness and rugged beauty. In 1995, aged 26, Cheryl Strayed (played by a superb Reese Witherspoon) walked it, to get clearance in her head after a decade of loss and personal meltdown. Wild powerfully reveals Strayed’s terrors and pleasures as she forges ahead on the journey. Wilde (1996) ★★★☆☆ BBC Four, 10.00pm  Many feel that Stephen Fry was born to play the part of the tragic and devastatingly brilliant Oscar Wilde. He’s terrific, but is only one of several superb players in a film which is held together by its performances. There’s Tom Wilkinson as the odious bully Queensberry and Jude Law on wonderfully petulant form as Bosie, the cause of Wilde’s downfall. Wilde’s story The Selfish Giant is woven throughout the film. Friday 11 August The Royal Albert Hall Credit: BBC BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 8.00pm Swapping tuxes for cowboy hats, the Proms continues tonight with a staging of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s beloved 1943 musical Oklahoma!  Expect plenty of whip-cracking, thigh-slapping, wild-west antics at the Royal Albert Hall, as conductor John Wilson and his orchestra add their signature élan to this story of a love affair between dashing cowboy Curly McLain (Nathaniel Hackmann) and farmer’s daughter Laurey Williams (Scarlett Strallen). Playing Jud Fy, the brooding, bestial social misfit with designs on Laurey himself, meanwhile, is David Seadon-Young. Elsewhere, Belinda Lang stars as the clucking Aunt Eller, and comedian Marcus Brigstocke is Ali Hakim, the Persian huckster battling with the cowboy Will Parker (Robert Fairchild) for the affections of fickle Ado Annie (Lizzy Connolly). The dance routines are balletic and fast, the hits frequent: the jaunty Surrey With the Fringe on Top, the romantic People Will Say We’re in Love, the lovely I Cain’t Say No, and, of course, the unmistakable opening song, Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin’. Rachel Kavanaugh, who directed an acclaimed touring production of Oklahoma! in 2015, is at the helm again here. Patrick Smith Premier League Football: Arsenal v Leicester City Sky Sports Premier League/Sky Sports Main Event, 7.00pm After three months of bluster and big-spending in the transfer market, the Premier League returns – and for the first time, the season gets under way on a Friday. All eyes tonight will be on Arsenal’s Alexandre Lacazette, the French striker who joined the Gunners for a club record fee of £52 million. Can he be the man to fire Arsenal back into the top four? Leicester City, meanwhile, will be keen to bounce back from a disappointing season that saw Claudio Ranieri sacked as manager despite having won them the league nine months previously. When these sides last met, at the end of April, a late own goal from Robert Huth handed Arsenal a 1-0 victory. Teach My Pet to Do That ITV, 8.00pm Arriving in the dog days of summer, this fluffy new series is presented by Alexander Amstrong, who asks such questions as: can a cat be trained to ride a labrador? Helping him teach tricks to the pets – among them, a dachshund labrador cross called Eric and a miniature horse called Aslan – are animal trainers Nando Brown and Jo-Rosie Haffenden.  Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm Throughout this week Steve Jones, Kate Quilton and Supervet Noel Fitzpatrick have been trying to find permanent homes for every animal in the Newcastle Dog and Cat Shelter. Tonight, they make one final push.  Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm Green fingers at the ready as Monty Don advises on how to cut and maintain hedges, while Adam Frost reveals the secrets of successful planting combinations. The Street ITV3, 9.00pm Previously shown in 2009, Jimmy McGovern’s gloom-ridden series comprised six stand-alone episodes focusing on the lives of the inhabitants of a single street in Liverpool. In this instalment, Anna Friel, recently seen in McGovern’s latest drama Broken, plays a single mother trying to hold down two jobs, pay the mortgage and get her two sons into a better school. Starring opposite her is Daniel Mays – with whom she also appeared in Tony Marchant’s similarly bleak drama Public Enemies – as the plumber whom she begins dating. What unfolds is expertly crafted and at times gut-wrenching to watch.  The Agony & the Ecstasy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This entertainingly nostalgic four-part series looks at how the UK’s rave scene exploded in the Eighties, fuelled by the party drug ecstasy. With the help of DJs such as Goldie, Paul Oakenfold and Annie Mac, it also explores how the genre evolved over the next three decades. Reach for the lasers. PS Eden: Paradise Lost Channel 4, 10.00pm The off-grid experiment – in which 23 people were stranded on the west coast of Scotland to fend for themselves – arrived on Channel 4 a year ago amid great fanfare but ended up being an unmitigated flop, with only 10 participants making it through to the end. In tonight’s finale, the action takes us from Christmas Day through to March, when those who remained were finally released. PS Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm  This first of a potentially limitless spin-off series of “Star Wars Stories” follows rebel live-wire Jyn Erso (Felicity Jones), who leads a band of self-styled “spies, saboteurs and assassins” on a death-or-glory mission to steal the Death Star plans from an Imperial stronghold, via some genuinely breathtaking planetary vistas and earth-ripping set-pieces.  The Firm (1993) ★★★☆☆ W, 9.00pm  Sydney Pollack directed this accomplished yet curiously uninvolving adaptation of John Grisham’s legal potboiler. Tom Cruise plays Mitch McDeere, an ambitious young lawyer who takes a well-paid job at a Memphis law firm that sounds too good to be true. And it is: the firm launders money for the Mob. Can Mitch escape with his morals and marriage intact? Gene Hackman co-stars as Cruise’s father figure. Strictly Ballroom (1992) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 11.05pm  Paul Mercurio plays a rebellious ballroom dancer who breaks all the rules and paso dobles his way to victory in this crowd-pleasing Australian comedy. Baz Luhrmann’s writing and directing debut is just as brash as Moulin Rouge! but a lot less pleased with itself. There’s romance between our hero and his ugly duckling partner, and it’s set against an enjoyable parade of sequin-decked caricatures and high camp. Watch here on TVPlayer Television previewers Catherine Gee, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: Emma Willis on Who Do You Think You Are? plus Top of the Lake: China Girl

Thursday 3 August Who Do You Think You Are? BBC One, 9.00pm This week’s edition of the genealogy show initially threatens to be one of those pleasant enough hours with no real surprises. Our subject is TV presenter Emma Willis, a proud Birmingham girl and the product of a close-knit, working-class background who explains that she has come from “a kind family” and hopes previous generations will turn out to have been similar.  Initially it seems as though those dreams will come true with an interesting but hardly ground-breaking trawl through generations of hard-working Brummie grafters who lurched from prosperity to the workhouse and back again, but appear to have stuck together through good times and bad. “When I look at that picture I think of Peaky Blinders,” Willis says early on about a family snapshot, but the reality is less criminal and more enterprise. Things take a more interesting, and altogether darker turn, however, once she heads across the sea to Ireland for a tale of violence, abuse of power and ultimately love, which uncovers a true working-class hero in the process. “We all want to have a nice story, right?” notes the likeable Willis. Her pleasure when she finally finds one is infectious. SC 10 Puppies and Us BBC Two, 8.00pm Imagine refusing to do anything unless you’re fed sausages. It’s not a bad way to go about life and certainly one that stubborn golden retriever Lola adopts. Canine behaviourist Louise Glazebrook is on hand to give advice to her struggling new owners.  RW  James Martin’s French Adventure ITV, 8.30pm The likeable chef heads to the lakeside town of Annecy, nicknamed the Pearl of the French Alps, where he selects ingredients from the local market to create a lobster dish. He also meets award-winning pastry chef Philippe Rigollot to sample his desserts. RW Top of the Lake: China Girl BBC Two, 9.00pm This second series of Jane Campion’s mystery drama is shaping up to be better than the first as it homes in on the central story without any wild distractions. Nicole Kidman, too, is chilling as an adoptive mother Julia. Tonight, an autopsy reveals that murdered victim China Girl was a sex worker, sending Detective Robin Griffin (Elisabeth Moss) and sidekick Miranda (Gwendoline Christie) in a new direction. RW Prejudice and Pride: The People’s History of LGBTQ Britain BBC Four, 9.00pm Comedians Susan Calman and Stephen K Amos present the second of two documentaries in which people share the objects that have defined their lives since homosexuality was partially decriminalised in 1967. There’s a pair of Ugg boots, and a racy school book, but for Shaun Duggan, the Brookside writer who gave us the first pre-watershed lesbian kiss on British television, it’s a letter from Morrissey. RW Insecure Sky Atlantic, 10.35pm This smart portrait of the life and friendships of twentysomething black women in LA is based on the internet series The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl by US comedian Issa Rae. Her writing is crisp and insightful and her performance, as the well-meaning member of an outreach programme for inner-city schools, is excellent. Tonight the series returns for a second run and Issa is trying to piece herself together post break-up. RW Kicked Out: From Care to Chaos BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm Rebecca Southworth explores why so many children lead troubled lives after leaving care. RW The Way Way Back (2013) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.00pm  This coming-of-age story feels like familiar terrain, but it’s agreeably done. Duncan (Liam James) learns about life, love and self-esteem from a gang of water-park employees, including the excellent Sam Rockwell, when forced to go on holiday with his mother (Toni Collette) and her boyfriend (Steve Carrell). The script flows and there’s enough melancholy and edge to the overall comic tone for its charm to prevail. The Island (2005) ★★☆☆☆ 5STAR, 9.00pm  Michael Bay’s sci-fi flop humbled Steven Spielberg’s DreamWorks. Not only was the original script scrapped, the film only just recouped the $ 126 million it cost to make, though it’s still a stylish offering. It stars Ewan McGregor as a human clone who lives in a controlled facility and dreams of going to “The Island”, the last uncontaminated place on Earth. Scarlett Johansson and Sean Bean buoy up the cast. Cliffhanger (1993) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 11.45pm  Living up to its title, Cliffhanger is a rollicking rollercoaster of a film. It stars Sylvester Stallone as a hotshot mountain climber, who becomes embroiled in a heist, along with Janine Turner. Set in the Rocky Mountains and featuring some stupendous stunts, it may be big-budget nonsense – but it’s entertaining big-budget nonsense with zesty lines and exhilarating cinematography. Renny Harlin directs.   Friday 4 August Sun-soaked: the biggest resort on the Costa del Sol  The Secret Life of the Holiday Resort Channel 4, 8.00pm Spain hosted 10 million British holidaymakers in 2016, two million more than in the previous year. With the package holiday one of the main beneficiaries of this apparent rekindling of Anglo-Spanish love in the wake of Brexit, Katherine Patrick’s documentary travels to Holidayworld, the biggest all-inclusive resort on the Costa del Sol, where three-quarters of the 3,000 guests are from the UK. There, we meet three four-person families seeking brief respite from the gruelling jobs that generally keep them apart, and some of the 500 heroic staff. The Secret Life of the Holiday Resort is rather harmless, unenlightening stuff, propped up by an exhausting procession of vague statistics and meaningless survey results (“a third of parents say the most frequent rows abroad are between them and their kids”, that sort of thing) reeled off by narrator Blake Harrison (of The Inbetweeners). All the expected boxes are ticked – techniques for bagging sunbeds, the artery-clogging buffets, the pros and cons of families spending a week in such proximity – but it’s good-natured throughout, even during the inevitable and perfunctory drift into Brexit chat. The very essence of silly season programming. GT Icarus Netflix, from today In what is a coup for Netflix, this award-winning documentary from Bryan Fogel began as a Supersize Me-style experiment into the effects of doping. But after Fogel connected with renegade scientist Dr Grigory Rodchenkov, it became a lid-lifting investigation into a widespread Russian scandal that seemingly goes as high as Putin. GT Cleverman BBC Three, from 10.00am Series two of the fun, if labyrinthine, dystopian drama from Australia will be made available today in its entirety. Wearing X-Men’s influence on its sleeve, it follows the leader of the “Hairies”, superpowered people trying to live alongside humans that persecute and subjugate them. GT BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 8.00pm The music of Ella Fitzgerald and Dizzy Gillespie is celebrated in the centenary year of their births, with musicians, including singer Diane Reeves, performing with the BBC Concert Orchestra. GT The Secret World of Posh Pets ITV, 8.00pm; not UTV/STV/Wales This final part finds 21-year-old Rory roping in his father to expand his niche business of exporting jellyfish, while there’s evidence that horse-grooming has reached genuinely berserk levels, with unicorn horns and nail polish the latest must-haves for those benighted equine attractions at children’s parties. GT Only Connect BBC Two, 8.30pm Viking experts take on geocachers (participants in a GPS-driven treasure hunt), with one (relatively straightforward) challenge involving finding the link between exhibit, salt and pepper, outcast and roots manoeuvre. GT Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm Irises, pelargonium cuttings, growing plants inside and managing a shaded, sloping town garden are among the challenges facing Monty Don and his team in tonight’s edition of the hardy perennial. GT Autopsy: Kurt Cobain Channel 5, 10.05pm Forensic pathologist Dr Jason Payne-James turns his attention to the alleged suicide of Kurt Cobain. Alleged, because certain conspiracy theorists assert that he had too much heroin in his system to be able to have inflicted the gunshot wound to his head. Probably best not to expect any definitive results here, however. GT This Is 40 (2012) ★★★☆☆ E4, 9.00pm  Judd Apatow revisits two characters from his 2007 hit Knocked Up. Leslie Mann, Apatow’s wife, and Paul Rudd play a stressed-out Los Angeles couple whose 40th birthdays bookend the film. Apatow and Mann’s real-life daughters also play their children. It’s a perceptive comedy on middle-age and one that guarantees big laughs alongside some of Apatow’s most pertinent observations on love. The Green Mile (1999) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm  Tom Hanks stars in this Oscar-nominated adaptation of Stephen King’s entrancingly strange novel. Stolid prison guard Paul Edgecomb (Hanks) is shaken by the arrival of a convict (Michael Clarke Duncan) who has supernatural powers. Although a little lightweight compared with director Frank Darabont’s previous prison film, The Shawshank Redemption, it’s pleasingly creepy. The Help (2011) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm  Emma Stone sparkles among the fine female cast in this enjoyable adaptation of Kathryn Stockett’s bestselling 2009 novel. She stars as a budding journalist working in Sixties Jackson, Mississippi, who convinces two black maids (Viola Davis and the Oscar-winning Octavia Spencer) to work secretly with her on a book and reveal the hardships inflicted on them. Bryce Dallas Howard is a delightfully hissable villain. Saturday 5 August Billy Connolly in front of John Byrne's portrait in mural form in Glasgow's Osborne Street Credit: BBC Billy Connolly: Portrait of a Lifetime BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 10.30pm “Glasgow belongs to me,” says Billy Connolly of his hometown in this heart-warming documentary to mark the comedian’s 75th birthday in November. And he’s not wrong as three imposing 50ft tribute portraits have recently been unveiled on wallends in the city. They were created by Scottish artists John Byrne, Jack Vettriano and Rachel MacLean, and this accompanying film not only gives a neat history of the area, but serves as a celebration of the Big Yin’s career.  Interspersed with clips of his stand-up routines, including his cheeky first appearance on Parkinson in 1975 when he told the bum joke that turned him into a star, the programme see Connolly sit quietly for the artists – not one of his strong points as he admits: “I’ve been very patient. I think I’m due an episode.” Watching them at work in their studios is inspiring and Connolly is taken aback by the results. “It’s like looking into a mirror. You know my soul,” he says to Byrne, who used to design album covers for Connolly’s band The Humblebums. “I’m amazed at the effect these have had on me, they’ve stunned me.” From tomorrow, the original portraits will be hung in the People’s Palace. Rachel Ward Athletics: World Championships BBC Two, 9.30am & BBC One, 6.30pm Day two at the London Stadium in Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park sees Usain Bolt – in all likeliness – going for gold in the men’s 100 m final (9.45pm) as he makes his final individual appearance at a major championships. His main threats are expected to come from former champions Justin Gatlin and Yohan Blake, as well as emerging star Christian Coleman. Earlier in the day, British medal hope Katarina Johnson-Thompson gets her heptathlon bid under way with the 100 m hurdles at 10.05am. Sadly not in action today is Greg Rutherford, who, because of an ankle injury, won’t be competing in the men’s long jump final (8.05pm).  Little Big Shots USA ITV, 5.00pm Steve Harvey showcases more talented youngsters while mocking his own stupidity in this family friendly show exec-produced by Ellen DeGeneres. Tonight, there’s a maths genius and a Motown singer. Royal Cousins at War BBC Two, 7.30pm; NI, 8.00pm A welcome repeat for this riveting analysis of the relationship between Kaiser Bill, Tsar Nicholas II of Russia and our own King George V, and the disastrous effect that their rivalry had on the First World War.  Paul O’Grady’s Hollywood Channel 4, 8.00pm This new series sees Paul O’Grady delve into cinematic history to find out what it takes to make a masterpiece. He begins with “weepies”, where the host’s caustic wit serves as the perfect antidote as talking heads, including Sigourney Weaver and Celine Dion, reach for the tissues as they relate films such as Brief Encounter, Titanic and, quite possibly the saddest in movie history, The Champ.    Dad’s Army BBC Two, 8.30pm; not NI This is a gem of an episode loaded with slapstick fun from 1970. It’s the one where Corporal Jones (Clive Dunn) dresses as a tree trunk during an exercise pitting Mainwaring (Arthur Lowe) and his crew against their pompous arch-rival Captain Square. RW The L.A. Riots: 25 Years Later History, 9.00pm Twenty-five years after Los Angeles erupted into one of the most destructive civil disturbances in US history (11,000 people were arrested and an estimated 63 people were killed), this documentary looks back at the decades of racial injustice that led to the incident and the history of police relations with LA’s black community. Citizens, council members and even those who committed crimes talk about how South Central was beset by mass riots, looting, and fires.  Cambridge Folk Festival 2017 Sky Arts, 9.00pm Broadcaster Mark Radcliffe and musician Julie Fowlis present highlights from this year’s festival, an event that attracts 10,000 visitors. These include Jon Boden, formerly of Bellowhead, performing new material with his band The Remnant Kings. There’s also music from Jake Bugg, electric punk stars Oysterband and Lisa Hannigan, once as a member of Damien Rice’s band. RW The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies (2014) ★★☆☆☆ ITV, 8.00pm  The battle of the title was barely mentioned by JRR Tolkein in The Hobbit, but it was seemingly enough for Peter Jackson to pad out his franchise even further. Picking up where the last film left off, our heroes had just unleashed the wrath of dragon Smaug (Benedict Cumberbatch). But there’s another battle looming, one between themselves which is fuelled by greed. Red (2010) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm  A starry line-up of actors of pensionable age is the attraction of this light-hearted adaptation of Warren Ellis’s graphic novel, and it’s hard to resist Helen Mirren with a submachine gun. RED stands for “Retired Extremely Dangerous”, which is what the CIA has labelled former agents Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich and Mirren, who team up to find out who has marked them for assassination, and why. I Know What You Did Last Summer (1997) ★★☆☆☆ BBC One, 11.55pm  This routine slasher flick, written by Kevin Williamson of Scream fame, will certainly make you jump but it’s unlikely to give you many sleepless nights. When a carful of American teenagers hits and kills a man, they panic and dump the body. Months later, the inevitable slaughter begins. A hapless cast, featuring Sarah Michelle Gellar, brings unintentional levity to proceedings. Sunday 6 August Diana, Princess of Wales Credit: Rex Diana: In Her Own Words Channel 4, 8.00pm Much controversy has surrounded this documentary, which broadcasts – for the first time in the UK – video footage recorded in 1992 and 1993 by Diana, Princess of Wales’s voice coach, Peter Settelen. Hired to help Diana reframe her public image and put forward her own side of the story regarding her marriage, Settelen saw his work bear fruit in his client’s Panorama interview. Now there is undoubted interest in watching Diana recount key events in her life unmediated, with candour and a seductive mix of charm and steel. “He chatted me up like a bad rash,” she recalls of her future husband at one point; at another, she remembers being “completely thrown” by the Prince of Wales’s peculiar response to a question about them being in love. In truth, director Kevin Sim rather crams the at-times uncomfortably intimate footage into the first and final thirds of the documentary, leaving assorted friends and confidants to tell the rest of the very familiar story, and the melodrama is laid on a little thick at times. Exploitative? Perhaps. Fascinating? In patches, although it probably won’t entirely satisfy either those looking for genuinely fresh insights or an opportunity to be outraged. Gabriel Tate Community Shield Football: Arsenal v Chelsea BT Sport 1, 1.00pm Arsenal and Chelsea meet for the second time in as many weeks, with Antonio Conte’s Blues favourites to lift the Community Shield today having won 3-0 in Beijing thanks to a brace from Michy Batshuayi.  Women’s Football: Euro 2017 Channel 4, 3.00pm After a thrilling tournament – during which a record 3.3 million people tuned in to watch England’s Lionesses beat France 1-0 – we’re at the FC Twente Stadion in Enschede, Holland, as the successors to Germany are crowned.   LSO Sky Arts, 6.00pm Originally, and rather impishly, hinting at a “greatest hits” of Haydn, Simon Rattle and his Imaginary Orchestral Journey instead took movements from 11 of the Austrian composer’s works, many of them rarely performed, and realigned them joyfully and perceptively in this concert with the London Symphony Orchestra. Works from Bartók and an extract from Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde provide the hors d’oeuvre for this enticing programme.   BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 7.00pm One of the most anticipated events of every Prom season, the National Youth Orchestra of Great Britain brings its energy and drive to the Royal Albert Hall. First comes the London premiere of Francisco Coll’s “grotesque symphony” Mural and Thomas Adès conducting his own work, Polaris, for the first time in the capital. The climax comes courtesy of Igor Stravinsky and his agelessly thrilling Rite of Spring. It is introduced by Suzy Klein and Lloyd Coleman. GT Secrets of Silicon Valley BBC Two, 8.00pm Blogger Jamie Bartlett investigates whether technological progress should be made at any cost. On the one side, he meets those tackling climate change; on the other, those paying the price for the success of Uber and, somewhere in the middle, the pioneers of self-driving cars.    Poldark BBC One, 9.00pm Having barrelled along entertainingly, with the undercurrent of hardscrabble misery intact, this third series concludes with sightings of French sails spotted on the horizon and Cornwall put on high alert. Meanwhile, Cap’n Ross (Aidan Turner) contends with a broadside from George Warleggan  (Jack Farthing).   The Last Days of Patrick Swayze Channel 5, 10.00pm Given the fact that he died from pancreatic cancer aged 57, we can reasonably surmise that the Dirty Dancing star’s final hours were not wholly pleasant. So, what can forensic pathologist Jason Payne-James, perusing Swayze’s medical records, add to the story?   Gareth Thomas: Hate in the Beautiful Game BBC Two, 10.30pm; not NI Former Welsh rugby union captain Gareth Thomas, who came out in 2009 while still playing, asks why football has shamefully remained a bastion of open homophobia – perhaps the last in sport. GT Frozen (2013) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 1.40pm  Disney’s 53rd feature is an enchanting combination of fairytale derring-do and heart-popping musical numbers that has left children and adults powerless to its charms (even if some parents may have grown rather tired of it). Elsa (Idina Menzel) is a shy princess driven into exile when her magical powers are discovered. Her sister Anna (Kristen Bell) gallops off to fetch her from her beautiful ice palace. The King’s Speech (2010) ★★★★★ Channel 4, 9.50pm  Tom Hooper’s film about the future George VI’s struggle to overcome his stammer in the nation’s hour of need won multiple Academy Awards, including a deserved Best Actor gong for Colin Firth. But it’s his double-act with Geoffrey Rush as his speech therapist Lionel Logue that gives the film its heart, and the doublehanders between them are fraught and fascinating. Point Break (1991) ★★★☆☆ Channel 5, 11.05pm Kathryn Bigelow’s cult surfing/crime film elevated Patrick Swayze’s actor status to true action hero. Keanu Reeves plays Johnny Utah, an FBI agent who goes undercover to infiltrate the Ex-Presidents, a gang of bankrobbing surfers led by the charismatic Bodhi (Swayze). The action heats up when Bodhi and Utah find they share a similar attitude towards danger. Lori Petty is the surfer who catches Johnny’s eye. Monday 7 August Eden: Paradise Lost - the participants Credit: Channel 4 Eden: Paradise Lost Channel 4, 10.00pm In March 2016, 23 idealists set out to take part in Channel 4’s Eden experiment, which, a touch grandiosely, sought to establish “a new society” from scratch, cut off from the modern world on a remote Scottish peninsula for an entire year. “What if we could start again?” was the much-hyped tag line. And the answer was… well, we never got to find out the answer because the series was pulled last summer, after just four episodes, when viewing figures took a dive from 1.7 million to less than 800,000.  Not that Channel 4 or production company Keo Films thought to tell the participants that. Instead they were left to get on with it. Rumours swirled of Lord of the Flies levels of acrimony, mass defections, starvation, health problems, people eating chicken feed to survive. So it could make for absorbing viewing in this five-part update, which airs every night this week. Although probably the greatest fascination will be in seeing the reactions of the 10 participants who suffered through to the end as they emerged from the nightmare in March this year only to discover that their efforts have mostly been in vain – and that the political landscape has drastically altered while they were gone. Gerard O’Donovan Stacey Dooley Investigates: Divide and National Pride in Northern Ireland  BBC Three, from 10.00am The intrepid reporter discovers that bitter political divisions persist in Northern Ireland as she seeks to discover more about Prime Minister Theresa May’s new allies in the Democratic Unionist Party. The Bug Grub Couple BBC One, 7.30pm Bug burger or beef burger? That’s the choice at the Grub restaurant in Pembrokeshire, part of entomologist Dr Sarah Beynon and chef Andy Holcroft’s Bug Farm – an insect zoo, research centre and insect eaterie. Here they struggle to convince us why we all should learn to love eating insect protein.   Masters Tennis: The Rogers Cup Sky Sports Main Event, 7.00pm The Uniprix Stadium in Montreal is the setting, as the Rogers Cup gets under way. Novak Djokovic lifted the trophy in 2016 for the fourth time, defeating Kei Nishikori in the final. The Serbian misses out this time around, though, due to injury.  Tornado: The 100mph Steam Engine BBC Four, 8.00pm If phrases like “it’s a Peppercorn class A1 Pacific” get you all steamed up you’ll be in heaven with this account of how a bunch of engineering enthusiasts got the massive locomotive they took 18 years to build from scratch to take on the ultimate test: hitting 100 miles per hour, a speed no British steam train has achieved since 1967.    Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm This new, live, animal rescue show with Steve Jones, Kate Quilton and Noel Fitzpatrick attempts to rehome a whole shelter’s worth of dogs, cats and assorted other species. Among the celebs espousing the joy of pets in this opener is pop singer Leona Lewis. Continues until Friday.   Man in an Orange Shirt BBC Two, 9.00pm In part two of novelist Patrick Gale’s drama for the Gay Britannia season, more than half a century on, Flora (Vanessa Redgrave) gives her late husband’s cottage to their grandson Adam (Julian Morris), who finds himself drawn to his architect, Steve (David Gyasi).   Inside Heston’s World Good Food, 9.00pm This four-part series chronicles chef Heston Blumenthal’s attempt to bring a flavour of his Fat Duck restaurant to Australia, in a multi-million pound move to Melbourne last year. GO Make or Break? Channel 5, 10.00pm A new reality series, stripped across the week, in which eight troubled couples test the strength of their relationships at a Mexican holiday resort, where alongside counselling and therapy sessions, they have to swap partners every two days. GO Doctor Dolittle (1967) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 5.05pm  This is not the Eddie Murphy comedy version from 1998 but the charming Sixties musical directed by Richard Fleischer. Rex Harrison stars as the terse, eponymous doctor who has the uncanny ability to speak to animals and so embarks on a voyage to find an elusive pink sea snail and a giant lunar moth. Samantha Egger, 20 years Harrison’s junior, co-stars as the adventurous stowaway who falls in love with the doctor.  Storks (2016) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 6.20pm  Warner Animation Group’s first film since 2014’s The Lego Movie is spectacularly daft but manages to be both moving and very fun. Here the storks of the title have moved on from delivering babies to big business and now transport products for an Amazon-style website. But then the old baby-making machine, gathering dust in the corner, is accidentally reactivated and suddenly they have a baby to get home.  American History X (1998) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm  Tony Kaye directs this compellingly violent and brutal examination of white supremacism in America. Edward Norton is both mesmerising and terrifying as Derek, a student drawn into the Neo-Nazi movement who mercilessly kills two black youths. After a stint in prison he’s reformed but returns  home to find his younger brother Danny (Edward Furlong) on the same track he was. Tuesday 8 August Jodie Whittaker and Emun Elliott Credit: BBC Trust Me BBC One, 9.00pm Before she becomes the Doctor in Doctor Who, Jodie Whittaker stars in a drama about… pretending to be a doctor. No doubt there will soon be many jokes about that floating around. In this new four-part drama, written by real-life doctor Dan Sefton, Whittaker stars as Cath, a downtrodden ward sister who is fired when she takes her concerns about the conditions in her Sheffield hospital to the trust. Then, when at the leaving party for her best friend Alison – who’s about to begin a new life in New Zealand – she spots Alison’s CV and medical degree certificate in a bin.  So Cath decides to adopt Alison’s identity and, hoping that her nursing skills will be enough to get by, find a job as a doctor far away in Edinburgh. Though the premise may sound a little daft, it’s actually surprisingly – and worryingly – common. Sefton uses his hospital know-how to bring a sense of authenticity to what is a really quite gripping drama.  Whittaker, rather than channelling a cocky Leonardo DiCaprio in Catch Me if You Can, is every inch the terrified woman flying by the seat of her pants. Excellent, too, is Emun Elliot as the colleague who catches her eye. Catherine Gee EastEnders BBC One, 7.30pm Mick’s (Danny Dyer) dastardly behaviour comes to a head in this special three-hander episode. He decides to tell wife Linda (Kellie Bright) the truth about what he’s been up to while she was away: namely cheating on her with their daughter-in-law Whitney (Shona McGarty).    Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm It’s the second nightly visit to this admirable project, which seeks to rehouse all the animals  in a Newcastle shelter in just a week. While we meet the wide range of animals and see how many still remain, Dom Joly also learns what happens to micropigs when they grow up.     The Dog Rescuers with Alan Davies Channel 5, 8.00pm Among the five unlucky pups needing some loving care from the team this week are an abandoned staffie who’s given a second chance and a young spaniel with a nasty neck wound.     Get a House for Free Channel 4, 9.00pm Marco Robinson is a very rich man – £25 million rich, in fact. He made his fortune through a business and property empire and now he wants to give back. So he’s decided to give away a three-bed flat in Preston to the person who he thinks will benefit the most. This film follows him as he attempts to sift through 8,000 applications. CG Utopia: In Search of the Dream BBC Four, 9.00pm It’s 500 years since the term “utopia” was coined by Sir Thomas More in 1516. In this documentary, art historian Professor Richard Clay examines five centuries of the concept of utopia and the impact it has had on our way of thinking. Often used as a method of criticism of the current system, it is a powerful vision. Clay considers some of our “greatest utopian dreamers”, including Jonathan Swift, author of Gulliver’s Travels, and Gene Roddenberry, creator of Star Trek, and the common themes that run through the ideal.     The Yorkshire Dales and the Lakes More4, 9.00pm The cosy documentary series continues with a farmer finding an unusual method to keep track of his sheep: day-glo paint. Elsewhere in the Dales, we follow the Dent Brewery boys as they create their own craft ales and in the Lake District we see Jon Bennett make his daily ascent to the summit of Helvellyn. CG The Parent Trap (1961) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am   In a film that helped pioneer the split-screen technique, Hayley Mills plays both Susan Evers and Sharon McKendrick, twins unaware of each other’s existence and separated as babies following their parents’ divorce. When they meet, years later, at summer camp, the pair scheme to reunite their parents. This classic Disney comedy spawned three sequels and a 1998 remake starring a young Lindsay Lohan. Tootsie (1982) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.30pm  When actor Michael Dorsey transforms himself into Dorothy Michaels in a desperate attempt to get work, complications arise as he falls for a female friend (Jessica Lange) and her father (Charles Durning)  falls for him. Although you never quite believe that Dustin Hoffman in drag would convince everyone that he’s a woman, it doesn’t matter: Tootsie is lots of fun – and it’s a sharply observed social satire, too. Groundhog Day (1993) ★★★★☆ Sky1, 9.00pm  In this wonderful comedy drama, a surly, sardonic weatherman (Bill Murray) is sent to the small US town of Punxsutawney to cover the annual groundhog festival, but finds himself experiencing precisely the same events over and over – then realises that he can free himself from the loop only by being a nicer person. One criticism: as always, Murray is so much more likeable as the malevolent grouch… Wednesday 9 August My Family, Partition and Me: India 1947 - Anita Rani  Credit: BBC My Family, Partition and Me: India 1947 BBC One, 9.00pm Two years ago, Anita Rani learnt how her family history was forever marked by the 1947 Partition of India in a memorable episode of Who Do You Think You Are? Now, she has wrangled three members of the public – one Hindu, one Christian and one Muslim – to explore how their own lives, and those of their ancestors, were affected by the appalling and widespread outbreaks of religious violence in the wake of Britain’s messy, compromised withdrawal, and the troubled legacy left by the Empire. In addition to eyewitness testimonies, the descendants of the survivors travel back to India, Pakistan and Bangladesh to retrace the journeys their relatives were forced to make. Their discoveries are in equal parts shocking, distressing and uplifting, and its treatment is rightly sensitive for events still in living memory: tears flow freely, yet it’s never sentimental. If there isn’t much space to dig into the wider political situation, the complex reasons behind the violence and longer-term implications, the detail of the personal recollections and anecdotes tells its own powerful tale. Rani returns to her own ancestral story in next week’s concluding part. Gabriel Tate Super Small Animals BBC One, 8.00pm Biologist Patrick Aryee demonstrates that size isn’t everything in the natural world, observing the extraordinary feats of strength, endurance and ingenuity of everything from hummingbirds  and seahorses to beetles and armadillos. Love Your Garden ITV, 8.00pm Alan Titchmarsh and his team turn an uninspiring patch of lumpy lawn and uneven paving into a sensory garden for a four-year-old girl with a very rare degenerative eye disease. Long Lost Family ITV, 9.00pm This episode of the always engaging and emotionally gruelling series reuniting long-estranged relatives charts the story of a woman who gave up her son only to adopt two boys herself, and a man whose mother put him up for adoption through an advert in the local press. My Big Gay Jewish Conversion BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.20pm First shown on BBC Three, this smart and sobering documentary follows Simon Atkins – who is Catholic and gay – as he looks at convert to Judaism, a religion that would allow him to marry his boyfriend, Matthew. Atkin’s journey is both spiritual and literal, as he travels to relatively tolerant Tel Aviv and more conservative Jerusalem, hoping to reconcile his sexuality with his religious beliefs. GT The South Bank Show Sky Arts, 8.00pm Singer-songwriter Benjamin Clementine, who won the Mercury Prize in 2015, talks to Melvyn Bragg about his early years on the streets and being hailed perhaps the brightest musical talent of his generation. In Search of Arcadia BBC Four, 9.00pm This contemplative documentary sees Dr Janina Ramirez and John Bailey explore the roots of the Arcadian cultural revolutionaries that sprang up along the Thames in the 17th and 18th centuries. Citizen Jane: Battle for the City BBC Four, 10.00pm When she saw the controversial development projects proposed by Robert Moses in Sixties New York, Jane Jacobs decided to take him on. Matt Tyrnauer’s punchy documentary pulls together an inspiring tale out of unlikely material – the debate of community culture versus “slum clearance”, one which continues to this day in cities across the world. GT Bridge to Terabithia (2007) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.10pm  Talented child stars AnnaSophia Robb and Josh Hutcherson (who went on to star in The Hunger Games) play two young misfits who become friends and create a magical world of the imagination in a remote part of the forest. This quality Disney production, adapted from Katherine Paterson’s classic novel, ventures into unexpectedly dark territory and packs an emotional punch that will have you reaching for your hankie. Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief (2015) ★★★★☆ Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Based on a book by the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Lawrence Wright, director Alex Gibney’s documentary about the Church of Scientology is a gripping, painstakingly researched exposé of one of the world’s most enigmatic organisations. At its core are a series of chilling allegations by former Scientology members, who describe a culture of abuse. The Lost Boys (1987) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 9.00pm Teen flick meets horror in this Eighties hit about two boys (Jason Patric and Corey Haim) who move to a quiet, northern California town where they become involved with a group of bloodthirsty vampires. These days it has to compete with the likes of Twilight and The Vampire Diaries, but there’s still enough action, intrigue, danger and romance to keep you hooked. Kiefer Sutherland and Corey Feldman also star. Thursday 10 July Princess Diana with Raine, Comtesse De Chambrun  Credit: Channel 4 Princess Diana’s “Wicked” Stepmother Channel 4, 9.00pm A gossipy, full-throttle and altogether naughty documentary about Diana, Princess of Wales’s stepmother Raine, Countess Spencer, who died last October. The daughter of romantic novelist Barbara Cartland, Raine was a prodigious social climber described here as “a famous socialite, a feisty politician and all-round force of nature” (“Nobody gets to be a countess three times by accident,” says one contributor). It seems like an accurate fit.  Named “Debutante of the Year” in 1947, Raine went on to bag a future Earl for a husband at the age of 18, became the youngest member of Westminster City Council at 23, before going on to become a noted conservation campaigner. The main focus here, though, is how she went on to marry a second Earl, John Spencer, in circumstances that earned her the entrenched enmity of his children, prime among them being his then 15-year-old daughter, Lady Diana. Yet when Diana’s own marriage ran into trouble it was Raine, so it’s claimed, that she turned to for support; the once “sworn enemy was transformed into her closest confidante”. The contributors include Downton Abbey writer Julian Fellowes and royal biographer Penny Junor. Gerard O’Donovan Natwest T20 Blast Cricket: Hampshire v Glamorgan Sky Sports Cricket, 6.00pm All the action from the Ageas Bowl for this South Division match. The home side are one of the most successful in the history of domestic T20 cricket, having won the competition twice and appeared in another four Finals Days. 10 Puppies and Us BBC Two, 8.00pm Here are more tales of new dog owners and their pups. This week, a mother seeks a canine companion for her son who has Down’s syndrome; the conflict between rival Chihuahuas Rocky and Chloe deepens; and a newlywed couple call in the behaviourist when a pug objects to their connubial bliss.  James Martin’s French Adventure ITV, 8.30pm Chef James Martin heads to the hilly Jura region, where a pear orchard proves to be the source of the perfect chutney for barbecued duck, and a visit to the citadel at Fort des Rousses shows why dungeons make the best cheese cellars. Top of the Lake: China Girl BBC Two, 9.00pm In the wake of last week’s shock revelation, Jane Campion’s off-kilter crime drama continues, with troubled detective Robin Griffin (Elisabeth Moss) pointing the China Girl investigation in a new direction, that of a surrogacy deal gone wrong. Meanwhile, Robin must face demons from her past when her former police chief Al Parker (David Wenham) arrives from New Zealand. Inside London Fire Brigade ITV, 9.00pm As the documentary series concludes, retiring crew manager Al passes the baton on to 25-year-old rookie Joe, who faces a tough test fighting his first big fire. GO A Premier League of Their Own Sky1, 9.00pm Ahead of next weekend’s opening matches in the Premier League, James Corden and pals begin the new season of the panel show with a special edition. Guests Thierry Henry, Jeff Stelling and Kelly Cates will be celebrating all things football alongside the show’s regulars Freddie Flintoff, Jack Whitehall and Jamie Redknapp. Plus McFly’s Danny Jones, singer Kate Nash and R&B star Lemar will be stepping up to the spot for Popstar Penalties. Laurel and Hardy: Their Lives and Magic Sky Arts, 9.00pm Fans of Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy will enjoy this superb assemblage of clips and out-takes. This enthralling documentary follows the life and work of the world’s most beloved comedy duo, and includes rare footage of Laurel in his later years, as well as an even rarer interview with his daughter, Lois. There’s also a tribute to the unusually strong friendship that the two stars enjoyed throughout their working lives. GO Dr Seuss’ The Lorax (2012) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 2.55pm This animated adaptation of Dr Seuss’s quirky story follows a boy (voiced by Zac Efron) who goes in search of a tree to impress a nature-loving girl (Taylor Swift). But he stumbles on the Once-ler (Ed Helms), the man responsible for harvesting all the world’s plant life. Children will enjoy it, even if the film does sacrifice a measure of its literary magic to the god of cinematic entertainment. Wild (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm  The Pacific Crest Trail, which runs up the entire western spine of the United States, is a challenge of fabled arduousness and rugged beauty. In 1995, aged 26, Cheryl Strayed (played by a superb Reese Witherspoon) walked it, to get clearance in her head after a decade of loss and personal meltdown. Wild powerfully reveals Strayed’s terrors and pleasures as she forges ahead on the journey. Wilde (1996) ★★★☆☆ BBC Four, 10.00pm  Many feel that Stephen Fry was born to play the part of the tragic and devastatingly brilliant Oscar Wilde. He’s terrific, but is only one of several superb players in a film which is held together by its performances. There’s Tom Wilkinson as the odious bully Queensberry and Jude Law on wonderfully petulant form as Bosie, the cause of Wilde’s downfall. Wilde’s story The Selfish Giant is woven throughout the film. Friday 11 August The Royal Albert Hall Credit: BBC BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 8.00pm Swapping tuxes for cowboy hats, the Proms continues tonight with a staging of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s beloved 1943 musical Oklahoma!  Expect plenty of whip-cracking, thigh-slapping, wild-west antics at the Royal Albert Hall, as conductor John Wilson and his orchestra add their signature élan to this story of a love affair between dashing cowboy Curly McLain (Nathaniel Hackmann) and farmer’s daughter Laurey Williams (Scarlett Strallen). Playing Jud Fy, the brooding, bestial social misfit with designs on Laurey himself, meanwhile, is David Seadon-Young. Elsewhere, Belinda Lang stars as the clucking Aunt Eller, and comedian Marcus Brigstocke is Ali Hakim, the Persian huckster battling with the cowboy Will Parker (Robert Fairchild) for the affections of fickle Ado Annie (Lizzy Connolly). The dance routines are balletic and fast, the hits frequent: the jaunty Surrey With the Fringe on Top, the romantic People Will Say We’re in Love, the lovely I Cain’t Say No, and, of course, the unmistakable opening song, Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin’. Rachel Kavanaugh, who directed an acclaimed touring production of Oklahoma! in 2015, is at the helm again here. Patrick Smith Premier League Football: Arsenal v Leicester City Sky Sports Premier League/Sky Sports Main Event, 7.00pm After three months of bluster and big-spending in the transfer market, the Premier League returns – and for the first time, the season gets under way on a Friday. All eyes tonight will be on Arsenal’s Alexandre Lacazette, the French striker who joined the Gunners for a club record fee of £52 million. Can he be the man to fire Arsenal back into the top four? Leicester City, meanwhile, will be keen to bounce back from a disappointing season that saw Claudio Ranieri sacked as manager despite having won them the league nine months previously. When these sides last met, at the end of April, a late own goal from Robert Huth handed Arsenal a 1-0 victory. Teach My Pet to Do That ITV, 8.00pm Arriving in the dog days of summer, this fluffy new series is presented by Alexander Amstrong, who asks such questions as: can a cat be trained to ride a labrador? Helping him teach tricks to the pets – among them, a dachshund labrador cross called Eric and a miniature horse called Aslan – are animal trainers Nando Brown and Jo-Rosie Haffenden.  Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm Throughout this week Steve Jones, Kate Quilton and Supervet Noel Fitzpatrick have been trying to find permanent homes for every animal in the Newcastle Dog and Cat Shelter. Tonight, they make one final push.  Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm Green fingers at the ready as Monty Don advises on how to cut and maintain hedges, while Adam Frost reveals the secrets of successful planting combinations. The Street ITV3, 9.00pm Previously shown in 2009, Jimmy McGovern’s gloom-ridden series comprised six stand-alone episodes focusing on the lives of the inhabitants of a single street in Liverpool. In this instalment, Anna Friel, recently seen in McGovern’s latest drama Broken, plays a single mother trying to hold down two jobs, pay the mortgage and get her two sons into a better school. Starring opposite her is Daniel Mays – with whom she also appeared in Tony Marchant’s similarly bleak drama Public Enemies – as the plumber whom she begins dating. What unfolds is expertly crafted and at times gut-wrenching to watch.  The Agony & the Ecstasy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This entertainingly nostalgic four-part series looks at how the UK’s rave scene exploded in the Eighties, fuelled by the party drug ecstasy. With the help of DJs such as Goldie, Paul Oakenfold and Annie Mac, it also explores how the genre evolved over the next three decades. Reach for the lasers. PS Eden: Paradise Lost Channel 4, 10.00pm The off-grid experiment – in which 23 people were stranded on the west coast of Scotland to fend for themselves – arrived on Channel 4 a year ago amid great fanfare but ended up being an unmitigated flop, with only 10 participants making it through to the end. In tonight’s finale, the action takes us from Christmas Day through to March, when those who remained were finally released. PS Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm  This first of a potentially limitless spin-off series of “Star Wars Stories” follows rebel live-wire Jyn Erso (Felicity Jones), who leads a band of self-styled “spies, saboteurs and assassins” on a death-or-glory mission to steal the Death Star plans from an Imperial stronghold, via some genuinely breathtaking planetary vistas and earth-ripping set-pieces.  The Firm (1993) ★★★☆☆ W, 9.00pm  Sydney Pollack directed this accomplished yet curiously uninvolving adaptation of John Grisham’s legal potboiler. Tom Cruise plays Mitch McDeere, an ambitious young lawyer who takes a well-paid job at a Memphis law firm that sounds too good to be true. And it is: the firm launders money for the Mob. Can Mitch escape with his morals and marriage intact? Gene Hackman co-stars as Cruise’s father figure. Strictly Ballroom (1992) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 11.05pm  Paul Mercurio plays a rebellious ballroom dancer who breaks all the rules and paso dobles his way to victory in this crowd-pleasing Australian comedy. Baz Luhrmann’s writing and directing debut is just as brash as Moulin Rouge! but a lot less pleased with itself. There’s romance between our hero and his ugly duckling partner, and it’s set against an enjoyable parade of sequin-decked caricatures and high camp. Watch here on TVPlayer Television previewers Catherine Gee, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

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