Storm Ophelia batters Ireland and northern England

Storm Ophelia is battering Scotland and northern England after leaving several people dead and hundreds of thousands without power in Ireland.

The former Atlantic hurricane downed trees and power lines, sent waves surging over coastal defenses and disrupted transport again Tuesday, a day after making landfall on Ireland’s south coast with gusts of almost 100 miles an hour (160 kilometers an hour).

Britain’s Met Office weather service said Scotland could see heavy rain and gusts of up to 70 mph (113 kph), with winds gradually diminishing through Tuesday.

Parts of southern Norway reported a smoky smell on Tuesday morning, which the local meteorological institute said it was likely carried there by Ophelia from the wave of forest fires in Portugal and Spain that killed at least 41 people over the weekend.

In Sweden, people in the capital of Stockholm and elsewhere launched a flurry of calls to authorities, saying the skies were much darker than usual Tuesday morning.

That was also probably due to Ophelia’s strong winds, which carried a mix of red sand from the Sahara and tiny particles from the Iberian forest fires across western Europe. (AP)

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Porthleven, Cornwall, southwestern Britain

Large waves crash along sea defenses and the harbor as storm Ophelia approaches Porthleven in Cornwall, south west Britain, Oct. 16, 2017. (Photo: Toby Melville/Reuters)

Cork, Ireland

Workmen survey the damage to the roof of Turners Cross stadium, home to the Munster Football Association, and League of Ireland side Cork City, in Irelands southwest city of Cork, on Oct. 17, 2017 after it was blown off in high winds brought by Storm Ophelia. (Photo: Ben Stansall/AFP/Getty Images)

Kilcock, Ireland

Workers in Kilcock, Ireland, clear fallen power lines after Hurricane Ophelia batterred the UK and Ireland with gusts of up to 80mph on Oct. 17, 2017. (Photo: Niall Carson/PA Images via Getty Images)

Glasgow, Scotland

The scene in Crosshill, the south side of Glasgow, after the front of a block of flats, which are due for demolition, was brought down in high winds as Storm Ophelia sweeps across Scotland on Oct. 17, 2017. (Photo: Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty Images)

Galway, Ireland

A ‘road closed’ sign is seen submerged in floodwater during Storm Ophelia in Galway, Ireland, Oct.16, 2017. (Photo: Clodagh Kilcoyne/Reuters)

Burren, Ireland

A worker clears fallen trees off a road with a chainsaw during Storm Ophelia in the County Clare area of the Burren, Ireland, Oct.16, 2017. (Photo: Clodagh Kilcoyne/Reuters)

Galway, Ireland

People walk on a seaweed-covered path during Storm Ophelia in Galway, Ireland, Oct.16, 2017. (Photo: Clodagh Kilcoyne/Reuters)

Galway, Ireland

People walk past a sandbagged chip shop during Storm Ophelia in Galway, Ireland, Oct.16, 2017. (Photo: Clodagh Kilcoyne/Reuters)

Porthcawl, Wales, Britain

Waves crash over the lighthouse as storm Ophelia passes Porthcawl, Wales, Britain, Oct.16, 2017. (Photo: Rebecca Naden/REuters)

Lahinch, Ireland

A woman takes a picture during storm Ophelia in the County Clare town of Lahinch, Ireland, Oct.16, 2017. (Photo: Clodagh Kilcoyne/Reuters)

Holyhead, Wales

A car drives through sea foam whipped up by the wind of Hurricane Ophelia at Trearddur Bay on Oct. 16, 2017 in Holyhead, Wales (Photo: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

Sale, Britain

A police officer stands next to a fallen tree as storm Ophelia passes Sale, Britain, Oct. 16, 2017. (Photo: Phil Noble/Reuters

Galway, Ireland

The Galway Atlantaquaria National Aquarium of Ireland building is seen submerged in floodwater during Storm Ophelia in Galway, Ireland, Oct.16, 2017. (Photo: Clodagh Kilcoyne/Reuters)

Canary Wharf, London

Darkened sky over London is pictured at financial district of Canary Wharf, London on October 16, 2017. The darkening is caused by warm air and dust swept up by storm Ophelia. The sun shone red and the sky darkened to a foreboding orange and brown across parts of Britain (Photo: Alberto Pezzali/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

Howth, Dublin, Ireland

A family walks along a seawall during storm Ophelia on East Pier in Howth, Dublin, Ireland, as the remnants of Hurricane Ophelia batter Ireland and the United Kingdom with gusts of up to 80mph (129kph), Monday Oct. 16, 2017. (Photo: Caroline Quinn/PA via AP)

Porthleven, Cornwall, southwestern England

Waves break around the church in the harbour at Porthleven, Cornwall southwestern England, as the remnants of Hurricane Ophelia begins to hit parts of Britain and Ireland on Oct. 16, 2017. Ireland’s meteorological service is predicting wind gusts of 120 kph to 150 kph (75 mph to 93 mph), sparking fears of travel chaos. (Photo: Ben Birchall/PA via AP)

Porthleven, Cornwall, southwestern England

A woman stands as waves crash against the sea wall at Penzanze, Cornwall southwestern England, as the remnants of Hurricane Ophelia begins to hit parts of Britain and Ireland. Ireland’s meteorological service is predicting wind gusts of 120 kph to 150 kph (75 mph to 93 mph), sparking fears of travel chaos. Some flights have been cancelled, and aviation officials are warning travelers to check the latest information before going to the airport Monday. (Photo: Ben Birchall/PA via AP)

Cork, Ireland

Winds batter the harbor as storm Ophelia hits Cork, Ireland, Oct. 16, 2017, in this still images obtained from social media video. (Photo: Kieron O’Connor via Reuters)

Exeter, Britain

The sun is seen after dawn after the Met Office reported that storm Ophelia has drawn dust north from the Sahara, near Exeter, Britain, Oct.16, 2017. (Photo: Toby Melville/Reuters)

Hurricane Ophelia on Oct. 15, 2017

This satellite image released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shows Hurricane Ophelia, top center, on Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017, at 21:00 UTC. The remnants of Ophelia could bring 80 mile an hour (130 kilometer an hour) wind gusts, disruption and damage to Ireland and Britain as the work week gets underway, weather services said Sunday. (Photo: NOAA via AP)

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