Why Kate Middleton doesn't wear brightly colored nail polish

According to Essie, Queen Elizabeth has been wearing the light pink “ballet slippers” nail polish since 1989 — and strictly that. As for the Duchess of Cambridge, she seemingly favors neutral colors as well. But this shared affinity for the same shades allegedly is more about royal etiquette than personal preference. Royal wardrobe guidelines state that no brightly colored nail polish should be worn during public engagements.

Nail polish isn’t the only thing that’s regulated. Scroll through the gallery for other things, from voting to flying, that the royal family is restricted in.

Follow us on InstagramFacebook, and Twitter for nonstop inspiration delivered fresh to your feed, every day.

Why Kate Middleton won’t wear brightly colored nail polish

Both the Duchess of Cambridge and the queen are always seen wearing neutral-colored nail polish, but this likely is more about royal etiquette than personal choice. Royal wardrobe rules state that no brightly colored nail polish should be worn during public engagements. Here, Kate Middleton’s pale nails are visible at an Olympic event during the London Games in 2012. (Photos: Getty Images)

The queen won’t wear brightly colored polish either

The queen follows this rule to a T. According to Essie, she’s been wearing “ballet slippers,” a pale pink sheer-finish nail polish shade, for nearly three decades! (Photos: Getty Images)

Why the royals won’t sign autographs

If you’re lucky, Kate Middleton might bestow a royal wave, hug, or a high-five upon you — but according to the Express, the Duchess of Cambridge has been banned from signing autographs due to the risk of signature forgery. The rule also applies to almost every senior member of the British royal family, including Queen Elizabeth II, Prince Charles, Prince William, and Prince Harry. (Photos: Getty Images)

Why the royals don’t exercise their right to vote

According to the U.K. Parliament, although not prohibited by law, it’s considered unconstitutional for the monarch to vote in an election. A Buckingham Palace spokesperson told Newsweek that senior members of the royal family who are “close to the Queen,” such as the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, also don’t exercise their right to vote. (Photos: Getty Images)

Why members of the royal family were advised not to eat shellfish

Historically, members of the British royal family were advised not to eat shellfish to avoid getting sick. Oysters, clams, and mussels, for example, may contain marine toxins that can lead to food poisoning — although that didn’t stop Prince Charles from sampling oysters at the Whitstable Oyster Festival! (Photos: Getty Images)

Why royals can’t run for political office

Royals can’t run for office or get involved in politics — this is to prevent them from swaying public opinion. (Photos: Getty Images)

Why guests can’t eat after the queen stops eating

This rule applies to other royals, as well as anyone else in the queen’s presence, during a formal banquet. According to Darren McGrady, the queen’s former personal chef: “As soon as [the queen] put down her knife and fork from the first course, [the palace steward] would hit the button for the lights to signal the footmen to come in. The course was over and they’d start clearing — even if you hadn’t finished, they’d be clearing the table.” (Photos: Getty Images)

Why two heirs can’t fly on the same flight

According to royal protocol, two heirs shouldn’t fly on the same flight together, to protect the royal lineage in case there’s an accident. Morbid, but … practical? Prince William has defied this order on previous occasions, such as when he and the Duchess of Cambridge took George and Charlotte on a tour of Canada last year. (Photos: Getty Images)

By using Yahoo you agree that Yahoo and partners may use Cookies for personalisation and other purposes