Yom Kippur eve

As the sun set on Sept. 28, 2017, Jewish worshipers in Israel took part in the Tashlich ritual during which “sins are cast into the water to the fish” and the Kaparot ritual, swinging a live chicken above one’s head to transfer the sins of the past year to the chicken, which is then slaughtered and traditionally given to the poor. Both are performed on the eve of Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, the most important day in the Jewish calendar, which this year will start at sunset on Sept. 29. (Getty Images)

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Boys pray along the Mediterranean Sea

Ultra-Orthodox Jewish boys pray along the Mediterranean Sea in the Israeli city of Herzliya, near Tel Aviv, while performing the “Tashlich” ritual on Sept. 28, 2017, during which “sins are cast into the water to the fish”. The “Tashlich” ritual is performed before the Day of Atonement, or Yom Kippur, the most important day in the Jewish calendar, which in 2017 starts at sunset on Sept. 29. (Photo: Jack Guez/AFP/Getty Images)

A man prays along the Mediterranean Sea

An Ultra-Orthodox Jewish man prays along the Mediterranean Sea in the Israeli city of Herzliya, near Tel Aviv, while performing the “Tashlich” ritual on Sept. 28, 2017, during which “sins are cast into the water to the fish”. The “Tashlich” ritual is performed before the Day of Atonement, or Yom Kippur, the most important day in the Jewish calendar, which in 2017 starts at sunset on on Sept. 29. (Photo: Jack Guez/AFP/Getty Images)

Boys perform the “Tashlich” ritual

Ultra-Orthodox Jewish boys perform the “Tashlich” ritual along the Mediterranean Sea in the Israeli city of Herzliya, near Tel Aviv, on Sept. 28, 2017, during which “sins are cast into the water to the fish”. The “Tashlich” ritual is performed before the Day of Atonement, or Yom Kippur, the most important day in the Jewish calendar, which in 2017 starts at sunset on Sept. 29. (Photo: Jack Guez/AFP/Getty Images)

Men pray along the Mediterranean Sea

A boy is covered in sand as ultra-Orthodox Jewish men of the Vizhnitz Hassidic sect pray at Mediterranean Sea shore as they participate in a Tashlich ceremony, in Herzeliya, Israel, Thursday, Sept. 28, 2017. Tashlich, which means “to cast away” in Hebrew, is the practice in which Jews go to a large flowing body of water and symbolically “throw away” their sins by throwing a piece of bread, or similar food, into the water before the Jewish holiday of Yom Kippur, which starts at sundown Friday. (Photo: Ariel Schalit/AP)

A man prays along the Mediterranean Sea

An ultra-Orthodox Jewish man prays along the Mediterranean Sea in the Israeli city of Herzliya, near Tel Aviv, while performing the “Tashlich” ritual on Sept. 28, 2017, during which “sins are cast into the water to the fish”. The “Tashlich” ritual is performed before the Day of Atonement, or Yom Kippur, the most important day in the Jewish calendar, which in 2017 starts at sunset on Sept. 29. (Photo: Jack Guez/AFP/Getty Images)

Men listen to their rabbi

Ultra-Orthodox Jewish men of the Vizhnitz Hassidic sect listen to their rabbi on a hill overlooking the Mediterranean Sea as they participate in a Tashlich ceremony in Herzeliya, Israel, Thursday, Sept. 28, 2017. Tashlich, which means “to cast away” in Hebrew, is the practice in which Jews go to a large flowing body of water and symbolically “throw away” their sins by throwing a piece of bread, or similar food, into the water before the Jewish holiday of Yom Kippur, which starts at sundown Friday. (Photo: Ariel Schalit/AP)

Men pray on a hill overlooking the Mediterranean Sea

Ultra-Orthodox Jewish men of the Vizhnitz Hassidic sect pray on a hill overlooking the Mediterranean Sea as they participate in a Tashlich ceremony in Herzeliya, Israel, Thursday, Sept. 28, 2017. Tashlich, which means “to cast away” in Hebrew, is the practice in which Jews go to a large flowing body of water and symbolically “throw away” their sins by throwing a piece of bread, or similar food, into the water before the Jewish holiday of Yom Kippur, which starts at sundown Friday. (Photo: Ariel Schalit/AP)

Worshippers take part in the Tashlich ritual

Jewish worshippers take part in the Tashlich ritual on the shore of the Mediterranean Sea, ahead of Yom Kippur, the Jewish Day of Atonement, in Palmachim, Israel, Sept. 28, 2017. (Photo: Nir Elias/Reuters)

Women pray at Western Wall

Religious Jewish women pray at the women’s section of the Western Wall in the Old City of Jerusalem on the eve of Yom Kippur also known as the Day of Atonement, the holiest day of the year in Judaism, on Sept. 28, 2017. (Photo: Thomas Coex/AFP/Getty Images)

Men pray at the Western Wal

Ultra-Orthodox Jewish men pray at the Western Wall in the Old City of Jerusalem on the eve of Yom Kippur also known as the Day of Atonement, the holiest day of the year in Judaism, on on Sept. 28, 2017. (Photo: Thomas Coex/AFP/Getty Images)

Men pray with a Torah scroll at the Western Wall

Jewish men pray with a Torah scroll at the Western Wall in the Old City of Jerusalem on the eve of Yom Kippur also known as the Day of Atonement, the holiest day of the year in Judaism, on Sept. 28, 2017. (Photo: Thomas Coex/AFP/Getty Images)

A boy holds a chicken

An ultra-Orthodox Jewish boy holds a chicken at the area where people perform the Kaparot ritual, where white chickens are slaughtered as a symbolic gesture of atonement, ahead of Yom Kippur, the Jewish Day of Atonement, in Ashdod, Israel, Sept. 27, 2017. (Photo: Amir Cohen/Reuters)

A man performs the Kaparot ritual

An ultra-Orthodox Jewish man holds a chicken as he performs the Kaparot ritual, where white chickens are slaughtered as a symbolic gesture of atonement, ahead of Yom Kippur, the Jewish Day of Atonement, in Jerusalem’s Mea Shearim neighborhood, Sept. 27, 2017. (Photo: Ronen Zvulun/Reuters)

A boy stands next to his chicken

An ultra-Orthodox Jewish youth stands next to his chicken during the Kaparot ritual in Bnei Brak, Israel, Thursday, Sept. 28, 2017. Observant Jews believe the ritual transfers one’s sins from the past year into the chicken, and is performed before the Day of Atonement, Yom Kippur, the holiest day in the Jewish year which starts at sundown Friday. (Photo: Oded Balilty/AP)

A girl holds a toy gun

An ultra-Orthodox Jewish girl holds a toy gun during the Kapparot ceremony on Sept. 27, 2017 in Jerusalem, Israel. It is believed that the Jewish ritual, which involves swinging a live chicken above one’s head, transfers the sins of the past year to the chicken, which is then slaughtered and traditionally given to the poor. It is performed before the Day of Atonement, or Yom Kippur, the most important day in the Jewish calendar, which this year will start on sunset on Sept. 29. (Photo: Lior Mizrahi/Getty Images)

Chickens are carried during the Kaparot ritual

Ultra-Orthodox Jews hold chickens during the Kaparot ritual in Bnei Brak, Israel, Thursday, Sept. 28, 2017. Observant Jews believe the ritual transfers one’s sins from the past year into the chicken, and is performed before the Day of Atonement, Yom Kippur, the holiest day in the Jewish year which starts at sundown Friday. (Photo: Oded Balilty/AP)

A man swings a chicken over his family

An ultra-Orthodox Jewish man swings a chicken over his family as they perform the Kapparot ceremony on Sept. 27, 2017 in Jerusalem, Israel. It is believed that the Jewish ritual, which involves swinging a live chicken above one’s head, transfers the sins of the past year to the chicken, which is then slaughtered and traditionally given to the poor. It is performed before the Day of Atonement, or Yom Kippur, the most important day in the Jewish calendar, which this year will start on sunset on September 29. (Photo: Lior Mizrahi/Getty Images)

Chickens are selected

Ultra-Orthodox Jews select a chicken to perform the Kaparot ceremony in the religious neighbourhood of Mea Shearim in Jerusalem on Sept. 27, 2017. The Jewish ritual is supposed to transfer the sins of the past year to the chicken, and is performed before the Day of Atonement, or Yom Kippur, the most important day in the Jewish calendar, which will start this year on September 29 at sunset. (Photo: Menahem Kahana/AFP/Getty Images)

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