Brits spend a staggering £1bn to get fit

Photo: Meghan Holmes/Unsplash
Photo: Meghan Holmes/Unsplash

Brits spend over a £1bn and hundreds of working hours every single year on personal trainers, according to new research.

Analysis by Golf Support, based on data from from The National Register of Personal Trainers (NRPT) and the Office for National Statistics (ONS) shows that Brits spend about £3,983.85 on personal trainers per year.

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On top of this, there are about 57,000 personal trainers and 278,730 people using personal trainers in the UK —equating to about £1bn being spent across the nation.

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Those in Liverpool spend the highest percentage of their annual salary – 15% – and the most working hours – 319 – on a personal trainer.

Wakefield comes in at a close second, spending 15% of their annual salary and working 312 hours every year to afford their personal trainer.

However, if you live in the south, Cambridge gets you the best value for money and the least amount of your annual salary spent – 9% – while only working 197 hours every year.

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In the south of England, the average spend is £4,095 every year. Whereas, the average price in the north of England is less, with clients spending £3,872.57 every year –£222.56 more than southerners, who have five sessions less for the same price.

Unsurprisingly, Londoners spend the most per session – £53.36 – and per year – £5,549.44 – on a personal trainer.

In fact, if you were spending the same amount on a personal trainer as Londoners every year, you would have enough money to study a course at University for almost two terms.

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According to HomeLet, the average rent in London for new tenancies is £1,665 a month.

If you got rid of a personal trainer for just over three months, and swapped it for a gym membership – about £33.98 per month – you could save enough to afford one months’ rent in London.


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