David Haye knows he has to let his fighters do the talking if he is to succeed as a boxing promoter

Sports Staff
Haye is already preparing for life after boxing: Getty

David Haye has acknowledged he will have to learn to stop being a "control freak" if he is to progress in his future career as a boxing promoter.

The 37-year-old on Friday oversees the professional debut of Rio 2016 Olympian Joe Joyce at London's Indigo at the 02 Arena, where the heavyweight will risk fighting the respected Ian Lewison.

Haye has combined with Richard Schaefer to form Hayemaker Ringstar and, though he has officially promoted before, this latest venture comes with him widely thought to be heading into his final fights and pursuing a new path.

When combining with former trainer and manager Adam Booth, Haye also remained largely independent and in control of his own career while succeeding without combining with Britain's traditional promoters.

He has high hopes for the 32-year-old Joyce, and fellow professional debutant Michael 'Venom' Page who crosses over from MMA, but told Press Association Sport: "As these fights go on I'm going to need to let go a little bit, because I'm a bit of a control freak.

"You're not in control: when it's my fights I know all I need to do is make sure I'm on point mentally, physically. When it's down to someone else being in good shape, you have to take their word for it, and assume that the people around them have got them in the best condition, haven't been up all night stressing about whatever it's going to be.

"I like to know how everybody's feeling, how's they're training, how did their massage go, what did they eat today? There's going to be so many fighters at one stage, I'll have to take a backward step and understand I need to let go a little bit.

"I've invested a lot in (Joyce, Page, and Willy Hutchinson, another debutant) already. My future as a boxing promoter: these guys will be instrumental in giving me clout and credibility."

Haye has high hopes for Joyce (Getty)

The preferred route for even the finest amateur fighters is to face a far less challenging first professional opponent than Lewison is for Joyce. The Olympic silver medallist, however, has taken some of his fight preparations to America and insists his amateur achievements means he feels little pressure.

"I've had a lot of experience on the amateur scene, at many majors, the Commonwealth Games and Olympic Games, so I'm quite comfortable," he said. "My experience in the World Series of Boxing will stand me in good stead because I've had 15 fights in that.

"I'm feeling confident and I'm ready; have done some great rounds of sparring in the US, to put on a great show for my main event debut."

Asked if he sought advice from Team GB head coach Rob McCracken or others involved in the Olympics setup, he responded: "I haven't. (But) I should."

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