All or Nothing Arsenal review: Gunners documentary makes steady start but major fireworks are still to come

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All or Nothing Arsenal review: Gunners documentary makes steady start but major fireworks are still to come
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The first three episodes of ‘All or Nothing: Arsenal’ represent a steady start to the series, but fans will be hoping there is more drama to come.

That should be expected given that many of the most dramatic moments of the Gunners’ season happened during the second half of the campaign.

Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang being stripped of the captaincy and, of course, Arsenal losing the vital north London derby against Tottenham in May should make for captivating viewing.

The first few episodes, however, contain fewer fireworks and there is a sense of the series finding its feet early on.

There is disappointment that the Covid-19 chaos at the start of the season is only touched upon, while there is no dressing-room footage from the shock opening-day loss at Brentford.

As the episodes progress, though, so does the insight into the club — and manager Mikel Arteta’s team talks are a particular highlight.

His love of a whiteboard and “crazy ideas” on the training pitch make for great viewing, and they offer a genuine look at how he works. By the time we reach episode three, the show appears to be finding its stride as the dressing-room footage flows non-stop. That, more than anything, is what football fans want to see and it is the best part of the series so far.

As with any documentary, you want to come away feeling like you have learned something new, and All or Nothing: Arsenal achieves that in places.

As well as Arteta’s innovative coaching methods, one hears about Kieran Tierney’s homesickness and the club’s concerns over how Nuno Tavares is settling.

Some of the most enjoyable moments also come in the form of snippets from the club canteen, where we hear Bukayo Saka telling new signing Albert Sambi Lokonga why he has to visit Thorpe Park.

It’s an inconsequential scene, but the kind of footage that makes the documentary feel authentic — which isn’t always the case with series like this.

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