UEFA defend Women’s Euro 2022 VAR usage after Sweden claim 50 per cent fewer cameras deployed than men’s game

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UEFA defend Women’s Euro 2022 VAR usage after Sweden claim 50 per cent fewer cameras deployed than men’s game
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UEFA have defended their use of VAR at Euro 2022 after Sweden star Kosovare Asllani labelled its implementation this summer “a catastrophe”.

Asllani had claimed that there are 50 per cent fewer cameras in use at the women’s European Championship compared to men’s games, leading to decisions not being as precise.

In response, this morning UEFA defended their use of VAR at the tournament and said the level of camera support was actually higher than the men’s Champions League and European Championship.

A UEFA spokesperson said: “The TV production for UEFA Women’s EURO 2022 is on a par with the standard production for the men’s UEFA Champions League.

“More importantly, VAR camera support at UEFA Women’s EURO 2022 is higher than for the men’s UEFA Champions League and men’s UEFA EURO due to the availability of additional offside and EPTS cameras.”

While UEFA have defended their use of VAR, Asllani’s complaint over the specific number of cameras is unresolved.

It is understood the exact number of cameras in dedicated use for VAR at grounds can be hard to clarify given some are in use as player cams or tracking.

UEFA remain adamant over the level of VAR in use, despite Sweden being angry at having had five goals ruled out during the tournament.

One of those in particular, Rebecka Blomqvist’s disallowed goal during a 2-1 win over Switzerland, left them so aggrieved that they lodged an official complaint with UEFA.

“Using 50 per cent fewer cameras in our tournament than the men’s game, that is a catastrophe really,” said Asllani.

“The decisions can’t be made with the same precision. It’s not just for us, for other teams. There are situations where I think you should have more cameras, that can be really decisive.”

Sweden head coach Peter Gerhardsson joined Asllani in her criticism after Swedish referee Jonas Eriksson pointed out the error for Blomqvist’s disallowed goal during an interview with a Swedish newspaper.

“My feeling is sometimes we put too much trust in it,” Gerhardsson said.

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