Wembley arch lit up in Brazil colours as football world mourns the death of Pele

Wembley arch lit up in Brazil colours as football world mourns the death of Pele

The Wembley arch has been lit in the Brazilian colours in tribute to Pele.

Arguably the greatest footballer of all time, he is the only player to have lifted the World Cup three times, winning sport’s biggest prize in 1958, 1962 and 1970.

Pele faced health problems in recent years and spent Christmas in hospital, after being readmitted late in November.

The 82-year-old died on Thursday “due to the failure of multiple organs, a result of the progression of colon cancer associated with his previous clinical condition”, according to a statement from the Albert Einstein Hospital in Sao Paulo.

On Thursday night the Wembley arch turned yellow and green in his memory, as football mourned a true icon.

To view this content, you'll need to update your privacy settings.
Please click here to do so.

In 2018, Pele tweeted: “I don’t have many regrets as a footballer but I wish I had played at Wembley - even once, even in a friendly.”

Tributes have flooded in since the news of Pele’s death, with messages posted on social media from current stars including Kylian Mbappe and Cristiano Ronaldo.

Brazil’s current number 10 Neymar paid tribute to the most famous owner of that shirt, posting an emotional tribute to “the king” on Instagram.

In Pictures | Pele

Pele: Netflix (Netflix)
Pele: Netflix (Netflix)
Pele with the World Cup in 2015 (Getty Images)
Pele with the World Cup in 2015 (Getty Images)
Pele wearing his Santos jersey in 1961 (AFP via Getty Images)
Pele wearing his Santos jersey in 1961 (AFP via Getty Images)
Brazil’s Pele is hoisted on the shoulders of his teammates after Brazil won the World Cup final against Italy, 4-1, in Mexico City’s Estadio Azteca, June 21, 1970 (AP)
Brazil’s Pele is hoisted on the shoulders of his teammates after Brazil won the World Cup final against Italy, 4-1, in Mexico City’s Estadio Azteca, June 21, 1970 (AP)
Brazilian soccer legend Edson Arantes do Nascimento, known as Pele cries during his marriage to Brazilian Assiria Seixas Lemos on 30 April 1994 in Recife, Brazi (AFP via Getty Images)
Brazilian soccer legend Edson Arantes do Nascimento, known as Pele cries during his marriage to Brazilian Assiria Seixas Lemos on 30 April 1994 in Recife, Brazi (AFP via Getty Images)
Pele with the World Cup in Mexico City, 1970. Pele scored the first of his team's goals in the match (Popperfoto/Getty Images)
Pele with the World Cup in Mexico City, 1970. Pele scored the first of his team's goals in the match (Popperfoto/Getty Images)
Brazilian striker Pele (Getty Images)
Brazilian striker Pele (Getty Images)
Brazilian forward Pele dribbles past a defender during a friendly match vs Malmoe in 1960 (AFP/Getty Images)
Brazilian forward Pele dribbles past a defender during a friendly match vs Malmoe in 1960 (AFP/Getty Images)
Pele as a goalkeeper during a training session in 1963 (Getty Images)
Pele as a goalkeeper during a training session in 1963 (Getty Images)
Pele stands by a display to celebrate his 1000th professional goal in 1969 (Getty Images)
Pele stands by a display to celebrate his 1000th professional goal in 1969 (Getty Images)
Pele shoots for goal vs Czechoslovakia in the 1970 World Cup in Mexico (Getty Images)
Pele shoots for goal vs Czechoslovakia in the 1970 World Cup in Mexico (Getty Images)

“Before Pele, ‘10’ was only a number,” Neymar wrote. “I read this phrase somewhere, sometime in my life.

“But this phrase, beautiful, is incomplete. I would say that before Pele, football was solely a sport.

“Pele changed everything. He transformed football into art, into entertainment. He gave voice to the poor, to black people, and most importantly: He gave visibility to Brazil.

“Football and Brazil elevated their status thanks to the King! He is gone, but his magic will stay.

“Pele is eternal!!”