Abandoned Sukhumi massacre site

Eerie photographs reveal the abandoned burned-down parliament building where hundreds were killed in the Sukhumi massacre. More than two decades since the conflict, the site remains a visual scar and a reminder of Abkhazia’s battle for independence from Georgia.

Photographer Bob Thissen, 31, visited the historical site where more than 500 people lost their lives as guerrilla fighters sought to oust Georgian forces from the city in September 1993.

Six years after the bloodshed, known as the Sukhumi massacre, Abkhazia was declared an independent nation. Now, the former-Georgian parliament building lies scorched, its corridors a clash of derelict decay and overgrown roots that entwine around foundation posts.

Thissen, from Heerlen, the Netherlands, has been an urban explorer for over 10 years. He found the site to be eerie and haunted by its gory history. (Caters News)

To see more of Thissen’s work visit: www.bobthissen.com

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Abandoned Sukhumi massacre site

Eerie photographs reveal the abandoned burned-down parliament building where 500 people were killed in the Sukhumi massacre. More than two decades since the conflict, the site remains a visual scar and a reminder of Abkhazia’s battle for independence from Georgia. (Photo: Bob Thissen/Caters News)

Abandoned Sukhumi massacre site

Photographer Bob Thissen, 31, visited the historical site — where more than 500 people lost their lives as guerrilla fighters sought to oust Georgian forces from the city in September 1993. (Photo: Bob Thissen/Caters News)

Abandoned Sukhumi massacre site

Six years after the bloodshed, known as the Sukhumi massacre, Abkhazia was declared an independent nation. (Photo: Bob Thissen/Caters News)

Abandoned Sukhumi massacre site

Now, the former-Georgian parliament building lies scorched, its corridors a clash of derelict decay and overgrown roots that entwine around foundation posts. Thissen, from Heerlen, the Netherlands, who has been an urban explorer for over 10 years, believes the site was eerie and haunted by its gory history. (Photo: Bob Thissen/Caters News)

Abandoned Sukhumi massacre site

Thissen said: “I was exploring alone here and did not feel really comfortable at first, because the building is in the middle of the city. There was a big chance that there were junkies or homeless people inside, and most people in Abkhazia have guns.” (Photo: Bob Thissen/Caters News)

Abandoned Sukhumi massacre site

“Once inside, the lower floors were used as a local dump and toilet, not too pleasant and I expected somebody could turn up every second. The side buildings have some gorgeous stairs, it must have looked awesome in its heyday.” (Photo: Bob Thissen/Caters News)

Abandoned Sukhumi massacre site

The nation situated on the eastern coast of the Black Sea, was engulfed multiple times by Georgia as well as Turkey and Russia. The former parliament building still haunts many of those granted the chance to see its eerie remains. (Photo: Bob Thissen/Caters News)

Abandoned Sukhumi massacre site

Thissen said: “The building was nice to explore, but I felt a bit sad and disturbed at the same time. I saw some images on the Internet of dead people lying in front of the parliament building, which left a big impression.” (Photo: Bob Thissen/Caters News)

Abandoned Sukhumi massacre site

“I loved the decay in this building, weeds were growing everywhere and the walls had nice texture.” (Photo: Bob Thissen/Caters News)

Abandoned Sukhumi massacre site

Except for some paperwork, most of the building was burned. You can still see the black covered bricks on the facade of the building. Abkhazia has a long history of war and battling for freedom since its origins in 756 AD. (Photo: Bob Thissen/Caters News)

Abandoned Sukhumi massacre site

The nation, situated on the eastern coast of the Black Sea, was engulfed multiple times by Georgia as well as Turkey and Russia. (Photo: Bob Thissen/Caters News)

Abandoned Sukhumi massacre site

The former parliament building still haunts many of those granted the chance to see its eerie remains. (Photo: Bob Thissen/Caters News)

Abandoned Sukhumi massacre site

Thissen said: “The building was nice to explore, but I felt a bit sad and disturbed at the same time.” (Photo: Bob Thissen/Caters News)

Abandoned Sukhumi massacre site

“I saw some images on the internet of dead people lying in front of the parliament building, which left a big impression.” (Photo: Bob Thissen/Caters News)

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