Accrington Stanley

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Meet Shrewsbury Town defender Toto: Congolese refugee has battled his demons to face West Ham in FA Cup

When West Ham arrive at Shrewsbury Town for their FA Cup tie on Sunday afternoon, there is one home player who will have a particularly close eye on who steps off the coach. Aristote Nsiala, the towering Town centre-back known universally as Toto, is very keen that Andy Carroll is among the visitors, because he has made a bet with the club physio about what will happen if he faces up to the West Ham striker. “If I get a black eye, if he doesn’t score and if I win more headers than him, I win,” he smiles. “It’s for £100, which is worth getting a black eye for. I’ve got loads of stitches and scars on my face for nothing, so £100 is definitely worth it.” The excitement at the prospect of pitching himself against Carroll is evident, which is no surprise, for the ebullient Nsiala, the Congolese refugee with a Scouse accent so thick Joey Barton might struggle to decipher it, this is a footballing opportunity he feared might never come.  Nsiala’s story of how he progressed from Kinshasa to Shrewsbury is one of extraordinary scrapes and diversions, encompassing everything from bouts of depression, anger management, even a detour to Vietnam. Plus shin pads – or rather the lack of them – which brought a speedy end to his first chance to step into the big time. It was back in December 2009 when, as a 17-year-old, he was named on the bench by the then Everton manager, David Moyes, for a Europa League fixture against BATE Borisov. “I got called to get stripped but I didn’t have any shinnies, and I was that nervous I took too long, so Steve Round [then Everton assistant manager] told Shkodran Mustafi [now at Arsenal] to go on instead. I missed my chance. I’ve killed myself thinking about it. The thing was, I’d spent the appearance bonus already. I was well skint for a couple of months.” Embarrassing as the memory is, he doubts Moyes will recall the incident when the pair meet up again on Sunday afternoon. Indeed, Nsiala is not certain the West Ham manager will even remember who he is, given he reckons they only had two conversations during their time together at Goodison. The first was a verbal dressing-down. “I didn’t say thank you to the dinner lady and she wasn’t happy. It got back to him and he told us off. I was that scared of him I couldn’t look him in the eye.” And the second brief encounter came when he was released as an 18-year-old. Nsiala played under David Moyes at Everton, though the player reckons the Scot will not remember him  Credit: Getty Images  “He just said I needed to get out and get more games and experience. I’m glad it happened because it’s made me the person I am.” Not that he thought so at the time. He had arrived in Liverpool as a 10-year-old from Paris, to where his parents had fled Congo’s civil war. He had never played football before, but soon found it the best way to assimilate. He was quickly picked up by the Everton academy and then, at 16, promoted to train with the first team. However, despite his pace, bravery and physical scale, his somewhat chaotic approach to life told against him being retained. He was picked up by Accrington Stanley. But it was not a happy time. “My dad became paralysed from the waist down because of a tumour in his spine which ended up messing up his nervous system. He’d been there for me all through, watching every game, giving me loads of advice even though he didn’t have a clue about football. “It took a lot out of my family and messed with my head, made me angry all the time. On the pitch I was getting loads of yellow cards.” Off the pitch things were even worse: he fell out with the Accrington manager, Leam Richardson, and stormed out of the club. “I thought that was it, I was finished with football.” I was getting loads of cards and wanted to fight everyone, loved a two-footer He spent much of the next year alone in his room. “I don’t know if it was depression or something near to it, but I used to get up at about half 12 and just sit on the end of the bed, and think, ‘What am I doing?’ “Then after a year my mum said I might as well give football another go. I had a few trials, then I went to Vietnam.” There he signed a contract for TDCS Dong Thap. And quickly discovered that being a 6ft 4in black man meant he rather stood out. “Everywhere I walked, they would be taking pictures. It was so weird. Once I was getting treatment and the physio starting rubbing my skin to see if it would come off. One night I went out for food and found a KFC. After I’d eaten I stood up and banged my head on the light because it was such a low ceiling. Everyone just stood and laughed. I went mad, woke up next morning and thought, ‘I’m done with this’, and booked a flight home. Oh, and I never got paid.” Back in England, an old Accrington contact got him a place at Southport. And from there he was signed by Paul Hurst, then managing Grimsby in the Conference. “What makes him good is his man-management,” says Nsiala of Hurst, the manager who has now transformed fortunes at Shrewsbury. “I was still getting lots of yellow cards and wanted to fight everyone, loved a two-footer. But he worked hard on me – he knew what I was about and he took his time.” Nsiala has had some troubled times, though says he has found himself under Town manager Paul Hurst  Credit: Getty Images  Hurst suggested the young defender take counselling. And the strategies the therapist gave him proved successful. “Something would happen on the pitch and I could feel myself getting angry, so he told me to press my finger and think of a happy thought – say my mum or dad. That worked wonders. I still use the technique a lot. If I get booked now, I’m beating myself up about it.” After helping Grimsby back into the Football League, Nsiala moved to Hartlepool and then was one of the first signings Hurst made when he took charge at Shrewsbury. The logic was simple: “I needed someone who could head the ball,” the manager says. And since he has arrived in Shropshire – and become a father – the player has made himself a fixture in the flourishing League One side, beloved by home fans. Looking back, he reckons his unorthodox apprenticeship has given him the appetite to succeed. “If I was still at Everton earning a lot more money, I don’t think I would have been able to control myself. When you’re young and earning a decent wage, you don’t really see the purpose of money because you know it’s going to come again. But if you’ve lost it all and gone through the struggle, it means much more.” Not least that £100 prize should he get the better of Andy Carroll.

Meet Shrewsbury Town defender Toto: Congolese refugee has battled his demons to face West Ham in FA Cup

When West Ham arrive at Shrewsbury Town for their FA Cup tie on Sunday afternoon, there is one home player who will have a particularly close eye on who steps off the coach. Aristote Nsiala, the towering Town centre-back known universally as Toto, is very keen that Andy Carroll is among the visitors, because he has made a bet with the club physio about what will happen if he faces up to the West Ham striker. “If I get a black eye, if he doesn’t score and if I win more headers than him, I win,” he smiles. “It’s for £100, which is worth getting a black eye for. I’ve got loads of stitches and scars on my face for nothing, so £100 is definitely worth it.” The excitement at the prospect of pitching himself against Carroll is evident, which is no surprise, for the ebullient Nsiala, the Congolese refugee with a Scouse accent so thick Joey Barton might struggle to decipher it, this is a footballing opportunity he feared might never come.  Nsiala’s story of how he progressed from Kinshasa to Shrewsbury is one of extraordinary scrapes and diversions, encompassing everything from bouts of depression, anger management, even a detour to Vietnam. Plus shin pads – or rather the lack of them – which brought a speedy end to his first chance to step into the big time. It was back in December 2009 when, as a 17-year-old, he was named on the bench by the then Everton manager, David Moyes, for a Europa League fixture against BATE Borisov. “I got called to get stripped but I didn’t have any shinnies, and I was that nervous I took too long, so Steve Round [then Everton assistant manager] told Shkodran Mustafi [now at Arsenal] to go on instead. I missed my chance. I’ve killed myself thinking about it. The thing was, I’d spent the appearance bonus already. I was well skint for a couple of months.” Embarrassing as the memory is, he doubts Moyes will recall the incident when the pair meet up again on Sunday afternoon. Indeed, Nsiala is not certain the West Ham manager will even remember who he is, given he reckons they only had two conversations during their time together at Goodison. The first was a verbal dressing-down. “I didn’t say thank you to the dinner lady and she wasn’t happy. It got back to him and he told us off. I was that scared of him I couldn’t look him in the eye.” And the second brief encounter came when he was released as an 18-year-old. Nsiala played under David Moyes at Everton, though the player reckons the Scot will not remember him  Credit: Getty Images  “He just said I needed to get out and get more games and experience. I’m glad it happened because it’s made me the person I am.” Not that he thought so at the time. He had arrived in Liverpool as a 10-year-old from Paris, to where his parents had fled Congo’s civil war. He had never played football before, but soon found it the best way to assimilate. He was quickly picked up by the Everton academy and then, at 16, promoted to train with the first team. However, despite his pace, bravery and physical scale, his somewhat chaotic approach to life told against him being retained. He was picked up by Accrington Stanley. But it was not a happy time. “My dad became paralysed from the waist down because of a tumour in his spine which ended up messing up his nervous system. He’d been there for me all through, watching every game, giving me loads of advice even though he didn’t have a clue about football. “It took a lot out of my family and messed with my head, made me angry all the time. On the pitch I was getting loads of yellow cards.” Off the pitch things were even worse: he fell out with the Accrington manager, Leam Richardson, and stormed out of the club. “I thought that was it, I was finished with football.” I was getting loads of cards and wanted to fight everyone, loved a two-footer He spent much of the next year alone in his room. “I don’t know if it was depression or something near to it, but I used to get up at about half 12 and just sit on the end of the bed, and think, ‘What am I doing?’ “Then after a year my mum said I might as well give football another go. I had a few trials, then I went to Vietnam.” There he signed a contract for TDCS Dong Thap. And quickly discovered that being a 6ft 4in black man meant he rather stood out. “Everywhere I walked, they would be taking pictures. It was so weird. Once I was getting treatment and the physio starting rubbing my skin to see if it would come off. One night I went out for food and found a KFC. After I’d eaten I stood up and banged my head on the light because it was such a low ceiling. Everyone just stood and laughed. I went mad, woke up next morning and thought, ‘I’m done with this’, and booked a flight home. Oh, and I never got paid.” Back in England, an old Accrington contact got him a place at Southport. And from there he was signed by Paul Hurst, then managing Grimsby in the Conference. “What makes him good is his man-management,” says Nsiala of Hurst, the manager who has now transformed fortunes at Shrewsbury. “I was still getting lots of yellow cards and wanted to fight everyone, loved a two-footer. But he worked hard on me – he knew what I was about and he took his time.” Nsiala has had some troubled times, though says he has found himself under Town manager Paul Hurst  Credit: Getty Images  Hurst suggested the young defender take counselling. And the strategies the therapist gave him proved successful. “Something would happen on the pitch and I could feel myself getting angry, so he told me to press my finger and think of a happy thought – say my mum or dad. That worked wonders. I still use the technique a lot. If I get booked now, I’m beating myself up about it.” After helping Grimsby back into the Football League, Nsiala moved to Hartlepool and then was one of the first signings Hurst made when he took charge at Shrewsbury. The logic was simple: “I needed someone who could head the ball,” the manager says. And since he has arrived in Shropshire – and become a father – the player has made himself a fixture in the flourishing League One side, beloved by home fans. Looking back, he reckons his unorthodox apprenticeship has given him the appetite to succeed. “If I was still at Everton earning a lot more money, I don’t think I would have been able to control myself. When you’re young and earning a decent wage, you don’t really see the purpose of money because you know it’s going to come again. But if you’ve lost it all and gone through the struggle, it means much more.” Not least that £100 prize should he get the better of Andy Carroll.

Meet Shrewsbury Town defender Toto: Congolese refugee has battled his demons to face West Ham in FA Cup

When West Ham arrive at Shrewsbury Town for their FA Cup tie on Sunday afternoon, there is one home player who will have a particularly close eye on who steps off the coach. Aristote Nsiala, the towering Town centre-back known universally as Toto, is very keen that Andy Carroll is among the visitors, because he has made a bet with the club physio about what will happen if he faces up to the West Ham striker. “If I get a black eye, if he doesn’t score and if I win more headers than him, I win,” he smiles. “It’s for £100, which is worth getting a black eye for. I’ve got loads of stitches and scars on my face for nothing, so £100 is definitely worth it.” The excitement at the prospect of pitching himself against Carroll is evident, which is no surprise, for the ebullient Nsiala, the Congolese refugee with a Scouse accent so thick Joey Barton might struggle to decipher it, this is a footballing opportunity he feared might never come.  Nsiala’s story of how he progressed from Kinshasa to Shrewsbury is one of extraordinary scrapes and diversions, encompassing everything from bouts of depression, anger management, even a detour to Vietnam. Plus shin pads – or rather the lack of them – which brought a speedy end to his first chance to step into the big time. It was back in December 2009 when, as a 17-year-old, he was named on the bench by the then Everton manager, David Moyes, for a Europa League fixture against BATE Borisov. “I got called to get stripped but I didn’t have any shinnies, and I was that nervous I took too long, so Steve Round [then Everton assistant manager] told Shkodran Mustafi [now at Arsenal] to go on instead. I missed my chance. I’ve killed myself thinking about it. The thing was, I’d spent the appearance bonus already. I was well skint for a couple of months.” Embarrassing as the memory is, he doubts Moyes will recall the incident when the pair meet up again on Sunday afternoon. Indeed, Nsiala is not certain the West Ham manager will even remember who he is, given he reckons they only had two conversations during their time together at Goodison. The first was a verbal dressing-down. “I didn’t say thank you to the dinner lady and she wasn’t happy. It got back to him and he told us off. I was that scared of him I couldn’t look him in the eye.” And the second brief encounter came when he was released as an 18-year-old. Nsiala played under David Moyes at Everton, though the player reckons the Scot will not remember him  Credit: Getty Images  “He just said I needed to get out and get more games and experience. I’m glad it happened because it’s made me the person I am.” Not that he thought so at the time. He had arrived in Liverpool as a 10-year-old from Paris, to where his parents had fled Congo’s civil war. He had never played football before, but soon found it the best way to assimilate. He was quickly picked up by the Everton academy and then, at 16, promoted to train with the first team. However, despite his pace, bravery and physical scale, his somewhat chaotic approach to life told against him being retained. He was picked up by Accrington Stanley. But it was not a happy time. “My dad became paralysed from the waist down because of a tumour in his spine which ended up messing up his nervous system. He’d been there for me all through, watching every game, giving me loads of advice even though he didn’t have a clue about football. “It took a lot out of my family and messed with my head, made me angry all the time. On the pitch I was getting loads of yellow cards.” Off the pitch things were even worse: he fell out with the Accrington manager, Leam Richardson, and stormed out of the club. “I thought that was it, I was finished with football.” I was getting loads of cards and wanted to fight everyone, loved a two-footer He spent much of the next year alone in his room. “I don’t know if it was depression or something near to it, but I used to get up at about half 12 and just sit on the end of the bed, and think, ‘What am I doing?’ “Then after a year my mum said I might as well give football another go. I had a few trials, then I went to Vietnam.” There he signed a contract for TDCS Dong Thap. And quickly discovered that being a 6ft 4in black man meant he rather stood out. “Everywhere I walked, they would be taking pictures. It was so weird. Once I was getting treatment and the physio starting rubbing my skin to see if it would come off. One night I went out for food and found a KFC. After I’d eaten I stood up and banged my head on the light because it was such a low ceiling. Everyone just stood and laughed. I went mad, woke up next morning and thought, ‘I’m done with this’, and booked a flight home. Oh, and I never got paid.” Back in England, an old Accrington contact got him a place at Southport. And from there he was signed by Paul Hurst, then managing Grimsby in the Conference. “What makes him good is his man-management,” says Nsiala of Hurst, the manager who has now transformed fortunes at Shrewsbury. “I was still getting lots of yellow cards and wanted to fight everyone, loved a two-footer. But he worked hard on me – he knew what I was about and he took his time.” Nsiala has had some troubled times, though says he has found himself under Town manager Paul Hurst  Credit: Getty Images  Hurst suggested the young defender take counselling. And the strategies the therapist gave him proved successful. “Something would happen on the pitch and I could feel myself getting angry, so he told me to press my finger and think of a happy thought – say my mum or dad. That worked wonders. I still use the technique a lot. If I get booked now, I’m beating myself up about it.” After helping Grimsby back into the Football League, Nsiala moved to Hartlepool and then was one of the first signings Hurst made when he took charge at Shrewsbury. The logic was simple: “I needed someone who could head the ball,” the manager says. And since he has arrived in Shropshire – and become a father – the player has made himself a fixture in the flourishing League One side, beloved by home fans. Looking back, he reckons his unorthodox apprenticeship has given him the appetite to succeed. “If I was still at Everton earning a lot more money, I don’t think I would have been able to control myself. When you’re young and earning a decent wage, you don’t really see the purpose of money because you know it’s going to come again. But if you’ve lost it all and gone through the struggle, it means much more.” Not least that £100 prize should he get the better of Andy Carroll.

FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley

Soccer Football - FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley - Wham Stadium, Accrington, Britain - November 14, 2017 Accrington Stanley's Aaron Chapman looks dejected Action Images/Craig Brough

FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley

Soccer Football - FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley - Wham Stadium, Accrington, Britain - November 14, 2017 Accrington Stanley Manager John Coleman looks dejected Action Images/Craig Brough

FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley

Soccer Football - FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley - Wham Stadium, Accrington, Britain - November 14, 2017 Guiseley's Jonathan Maxted makes a save during the penalty shootout Action Images/Craig Brough

FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley

Soccer Football - FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley - Wham Stadium, Accrington, Britain - November 14, 2017 Accrington Stanley players look dejected Action Images/Craig Brough

FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley

Soccer Football - FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley - Wham Stadium, Accrington, Britain - November 14, 2017 Guiseley's Connor Brown scores during the penalty shootout Action Images/Craig Brough

FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley

Soccer Football - FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley - Wham Stadium, Accrington, Britain - November 14, 2017 Guiseley's Jonathan Maxted celebrates with the fans after the match Action Images/Craig Brough

FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley

Soccer Football - FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley - Wham Stadium, Accrington, Britain - November 14, 2017 Guiseley players celebrate after winning the match Action Images/Craig Brough

FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley

Soccer Football - FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley - Wham Stadium, Accrington, Britain - November 14, 2017 Guiseley players celebrate after winning the match Action Images/Craig Brough

FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley

Soccer Football - FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley - Wham Stadium, Accrington, Britain - November 14, 2017 Guiseley manager Paul Cox celebrates after the match Action Images/Craig Brough

FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley

Soccer Football - FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley - Wham Stadium, Accrington, Britain - November 14, 2017 Guiseley's Jonathan Maxted applauds the fans after the match Action Images/Craig Brough

FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley

Soccer Football - FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley - Wham Stadium, Accrington, Britain - November 14, 2017 Guiseley's John Rooney scores his sides first goal from a penalty Action Images/Craig Brough

FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley

Soccer Football - FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley - Wham Stadium, Accrington, Britain - November 14, 2017 Guiseley's John Rooney (L) in action with Accrington Stanley's Callum Johnson Action Images/Craig Brough

FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley

Soccer Football - FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley - Wham Stadium, Accrington, Britain - November 14, 2017 Accrington Stanley's Sean McConville celebrates with teammates after he scores his sides first goal Action Images/Craig Brough

FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley

Soccer Football - FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley - Wham Stadium, Accrington, Britain - November 14, 2017 Accrington Stanley's Sean McConville (R) scores his sides first goal Action Images/Craig Brough

FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley

Soccer Football - FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley - Wham Stadium, Accrington, Britain - November 14, 2017 Guiseley's Chris M'Boungou (L) in action with Accrington Stanley's Billy Kee Action Images/Craig Brough

FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley

Soccer Football - FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley - Wham Stadium, Accrington, Britain - November 14, 2017 Accrington Stanley's Billy Kee looks dejected after seeing his goal disallowed Action Images/Craig Brough

FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley

Soccer Football - FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley - Wham Stadium, Accrington, Britain - November 14, 2017 Accrington Stanley's Mekhi Leacock-McLeod (L) in action with Guiseley's Darren Holden Action Images/Craig Brough

FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley

Soccer Football - FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley - Wham Stadium, Accrington, Britain - November 14, 2017 Guiseley's Chris M'Boungou is sent off after receiving a second Yellow card Action Images/Craig Brough

FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley

Soccer Football - FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley - Wham Stadium, Accrington, Britain - November 14, 2017 Accrington Stanley's Ben Richards-Everton (L) in action with Guiseley's Mike Fondop Action Images/Craig Brough

FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley

Soccer Football - FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley - Wham Stadium, Accrington, Britain - November 14, 2017 Guiseley's Jean-Yves Koue Niate in action Action Images/Craig Brough

FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley

Soccer Football - FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley - Wham Stadium, Accrington, Britain - November 14, 2017 Guiseley Manager Paul Cox Action Images/Craig Brough

FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley

Soccer Football - FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley - Wham Stadium, Accrington, Britain - November 14, 2017 Accrington Stanley's Aaron Chapman Action Images/Craig Brough

FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley

Soccer Football - FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley - Wham Stadium, Accrington, Britain - November 14, 2017 Accrington Stanley and Guiseley Players walk out onto the pitch Action Images/Craig Brough

FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley

Soccer Football - FA Cup First Round Replay - Accrington Stanley vs Guiseley - Wham Stadium, Accrington, Britain - November 14, 2017 Accrington Stanley Manager John Coleman Action Images/Craig Brough

League Two - Cambridge United vs Accrington Stanley

Soccer Football - League Two - Cambridge United vs Accrington Stanley - Cambs Glass Stadium, Cambridge, Britain - November 11, 2017 Accrington Stanley's Billy Kee heads wide Action Images/Adam Holt

League Two - Cambridge United vs Accrington Stanley

Soccer Football - League Two - Cambridge United vs Accrington Stanley - Cambs Glass Stadium, Cambridge, Britain - November 11, 2017 Accrington Stanley's Kayden Jackson in action with Cambridge United's Brad Halliday Action Images/Adam Holt

League Two - Cambridge United vs Accrington Stanley

Soccer Football - League Two - Cambridge United vs Accrington Stanley - Cambs Glass Stadium, Cambridge, Britain - November 11, 2017 General view of Cambridge Uniteds David Forde with a poppy on his shirt Action Images/Adam Holt

League Two - Cambridge United vs Accrington Stanley

Soccer Football - League Two - Cambridge United vs Accrington Stanley - Cambs Glass Stadium, Cambridge, Britain - November 11, 2017 Accrington Stanleys Janoi Donacien in action with Cambridge Uniteds Jabo Ibehre Action Images/Adam Holt

League Two - Cambridge United vs Accrington Stanley

Soccer Football - League Two - Cambridge United vs Accrington Stanley - Cambs Glass Stadium, Cambridge, Britain - November 11, 2017 Accrington Stanleys Billy Kee shoots at goal Action Images/Adam Holt

League Two - Cambridge United vs Accrington Stanley

Soccer Football - League Two - Cambridge United vs Accrington Stanley - Cambs Glass Stadium, Cambridge, Britain - November 11, 2017 Accrington Stanley manager John Coleman Action Images/Adam Holt

League Two - Cambridge United vs Accrington Stanley

Soccer Football - League Two - Cambridge United vs Accrington Stanley - Cambs Glass Stadium, Cambridge, Britain - November 11, 2017 Accrington Stanley manager John Coleman Action Images/Adam Holt

League Two - Cambridge United vs Accrington Stanley

Soccer Football - League Two - Cambridge United vs Accrington Stanley - Cambs Glass Stadium, Cambridge, Britain - November 11, 2017 Cambridge Uniteds Uche Ikpeazu in action with Accrington Stanleys Jordan Thorniley Action Images/Adam Holt

League Two - Cambridge United vs Accrington Stanley

Soccer Football - League Two - Cambridge United vs Accrington Stanley - Cambs Glass Stadium, Cambridge, Britain - November 11, 2017 Cambridge United manager Shaun Derry Action Images/Adam Holt

League Two - Cambridge United vs Accrington Stanley

Soccer Football - League Two - Cambridge United vs Accrington Stanley - Cambs Glass Stadium, Cambridge, Britain - November 11, 2017 General view during a minutes silence as part of remembrance commemorations before the match Action Images/Adam Holt

League Two - Cambridge United vs Accrington Stanley

Soccer Football - League Two - Cambridge United vs Accrington Stanley - Cambs Glass Stadium, Cambridge, Britain - November 11, 2017 General view during a minutes silence as part of remembrance commemorations before the match Action Images/Adam Holt

League Two - Cambridge United vs Accrington Stanley

Soccer Football - League Two - Cambridge United vs Accrington Stanley - Cambs Glass Stadium, Cambridge, Britain - November 11, 2017 General view of a Union Jack flag with a poppy on it as part of remembrance commemorations before the match Action Images/Adam Holt

FA Cup second-round draw: Fylde host 2013 winners Wigan, Boreham Wood sent to Coventry

FA Cup second round draw National League side AFC Fylde will host 2013 FA Cup winners Wigan in the second round of the competition. Fylde, through to this stage of the competition for the first time in their history following a victory over Kidderminster, were paired with the League One side when the second round draw was made on Monday. Fylde's fellow non-League side Boreham Wood will also face former winners of the competition in the shape of Coventry, who lifted the cup in 1987. Coventry will be at home for the tie. There were a total of 12 non-League sides in the draw. National League South Oxford City were drawn away to Notts County. Seventh-tier Hereford, the lowest-ranked side through to the second round, will face either Chorley or Fleetwood after their tie on Monday night. Leatherhead, who are ranked lower than Hereford, would go away to Wycombe if they win their replay against Billericay Town. Woking or Bury vs Tranmere or Peterborough MK Dons v Maidstone United Newport Co v Cambridge Utd Wycombe v Leatherhead or Billericay Port Vale v Yeovil Town Shrewsbury v Morecambe Doncaster Rovers v Northampton or Scunthorpe Slough Town v Rochdale AFC Wimbledon v Charlton Athletic Stevenage v Swindon Town Mansfield Town v Guiseley or Accrington Stanley Gateshead v Luton Town Bradford City v Plymouth Argyle Blackburn Rovers v Crewe Alexandra AFC Fylde v Wigan Athletic Gillingham v Carlisle Utd Notts Co v Oxford City Forest Green v Exeter City Chorley or Fleetwood v Hereford Coventry City v Boreham Wood Town 7:28PM There you go Everyone present with 'Mark' Chapman professes themselves pleased with the draw. There's not much more I can add to the raw draw. Enjoy! Thanks for your company.  7:24PM TV picks I would guess would be Slough v Rochdale and Fylde v Wigan. Gateshead v Luton would be worth watching.  7:23PM The second round draw in full Woking or Bury vs Tranmere or Peterborough MK Dons v Maidstone United Newport Co v Cambridge Utd Wycombe v Leatherhead or Billericay Port Vale v Yeovil Town Shrewsbury v Morecambe Doncaster Rovers v Northampton or Scunthorpe Slough Town v Rochdale AFC Wimbledon v Charlton Athletic Stevenage v Swindon Town Mansfield Town v Guiseley or Accrington Stanley Gateshead v Luton Town Bradford City v Plymouth Argyle Blackburn Rovers v Crewe Alexandra AFC Fylde v Wigan Athletic Gillingham v Carlisle Utd Notts Co v Oxford City Forest Green v Exeter City Chorley or Fleetwood v Hereford Coventry City v Boreham Wood 7:19PM Tie 20  Coventry City v Boreham Wood 7:19PM Tie 19 Chorley or Fleetwood v Hereford 7:18PM Tie 18 Forest Green v Exeter City 7:18PM Tie 17 Notts Co v Oxford City 7:18PM Tie 16 Gillingham v Carlisle Utd 7:17PM Tie 15 AFC Fylde v Wigan Athletic 7:17PM Tie 14 Blackburn Rovers v Crewe Alexandra 7:17PM Tie 13 Bradford City v Plymouth Argyle 7:16PM Tie 12 Gateshead v Luton Town 7:16PM Tie 11 Mansfield Town v Guiseley or Accrington Stanley 7:16PM Tie 10 Stevenage v Swindon Town 7:16PM Tie nine AFC Wimbledon v Charlton Athletic 7:15PM Tie eight Slough Town v Rochdale 7:15PM Tie seven Donny Rovers v Northampton or Scunthorpe 7:15PM Tie six Shrewsbury v Morecambe 7:14PM Tie five Port Vale v Yeovil Town 7:14PM Tie four Wycombe v Leatherhead or Billericay 7:14PM Tie three Newport Co v Cambridge Utd 7:13PM Tie two MK Dons v Maidstone United 7:13PM First out Woking or Bury vs Tranmere or Peterborough 7:10PM Andy Cole and Kevin Davies Will draw the balls.  7:10PM Here we go The BBC hands over to BT Sport 7:09PM The draw will take place in 10 minutes Mark Chapman interviews Saturday's Slough Town heroes who thrashed Gainsborough Trinity 6-0. Everyone displays his/her poppy pinned to a tracksuit top. Chapman has his in his buttonhole. I'm perplexed that Chapman, a Manc, allows himself to be called 'Chappers'. That's a bit rah, isn't it? 'Chappy', 'Chap', 'grizzly' or 'face farm' would be far more Manc 7:03PM Former winners Bradford, Charlton, Blackburn, Wimbledon (oh, yes), Coventry and Wigan are all in the 'hat'. I use the quotation marks advisedly, unless you favour adorning your swede with a jaunty, plastic transparent bowl. And let's face it, who doesn't.   6:51PM Good evening All first-round winners have bagged their £18,000 prize money and set off in pursuit of the £27,000 on offer for a victory in the second round this evening. What, it's not about the money, it's about the glory? Could have fooled me after years of Premier League and Championship numpties fielding scratch sides to concentrate on the consolidation of 12th place.  For years the FA has allowed its Challenge Cup to be abused by myopic, soulless blowhards and yet it still thrives. We shall celebrate it here today as we find out who stands in the way of teams on the next leg of the road to Wembley (for the semi-finals! Gah! See what they've done there? Audrey, the screens!)   6:40PM A second-round FA Cup draw primer What is it? It's the draw for the second round of the 2017 FA Cup. When is it? It's on Monday November 6. - ie today. What time does it start? It will begin after 19.00 GMT - before the Chorley vs Fleetwood match on Monday night. What TV channel is it on? The match and draw will be on BT Sport 1 and BBC 2. Alternatively, you can follow the draw here. What's left of this weekend's action? First-round review Exeter assistant manager Matt Oakley was delighted to progress to round two of the FA Cup after seeing his side see off gallant Heybridge Swifts 3-1 at St James' Park. Two Jayden Stockley goals shortly past the hour mark gave the Grecians a commanding lead, but Samuel Bentick turned in a cross to reduce the arrears and give the Swifts hope. But any hopes of a comeback were ended by Liam McAlinden, whose shot squeezed through the legs of goalkeeper Danny Sambridge, much to the relief of Oakley, who was standing in for the absent Paul Tisdale. "I'm very pleased. It was a banana skin waiting to happen for us, when you see the draw come out," Oakley said. Relief for Exeter as they see off Heybridge Swifts Credit:  PA "I am very pleased with the result, very pleased with the second half performance and pleased to come in at half-time with a clean sheet. "We had a very difficult time at Warrington a few years ago when we conceded after a few minutes and we couldn't break them down after that. It was one of the messages we talked about before the game, so I was very pleased. "They put us under a lot of pressure and probably came out after the first half with a bit more confidence than we did. I thought we started the game really well, I was really pleased with the start, but then we started losing the ball and a few misplaced touches and they grew in confidence and came into it. "They didn't threaten our goal too much, so I wasn't too worried about it. We just needed to tighten up in certain areas and improve our attacking play in wide areas and we did that well in the second half." What are the draw numbers? STEVENAGE  BRADFORD CITY  PORT VALE  NEWPORT COUNTY MORECAMBE YEOVIL TOWN PETERBOROUGH UNITED OR TRANMERE ROVERS     CAMBRIDGE UNITED FOREST GREEN ROVERS AFC FYLDE  LUTON TOWN SHREWSBURY TOWN  HEREFORD GUISELEY OR ACCRINGTON STANLEY  BLACKBURN ROVERS  DONCASTER ROVERS     LEATHERHEAD OR BILLERICAY TOWN  BOREHAM WOOD  MANSFIELD TOWN  OXFORD CITY     PLYMOUTH ARGYLE  AFC WIMBLEDON  ROCHDALE COVENTRY CITY  CHORLEY OR FLEETWOOD TOWN CARLISLE UNITED NOTTS COUNTY  SWINDON TOWN  MAIDSTONE UNITED  WOKING OR BURY     CREWE ALEXANDRA GILLINGHAM MILTON KEYNES DONS  SLOUGH TOWN     WYCOMBE WANDERERS  NORTHAMPTON TOWN OR SCUNTHORPE UNITED     CHARLTON ATHELTIC  WIGAN ATHLETIC GATESHEAD EXETER CITY When will the second round fixtures take place? Weekend of December 2 and 3. What are the latest FA Cup odds? Chelsea - 5/1 Man City - 5/1 Man Utd - 6/1 Tottenham - 8/1 Arsenal - 8/1 Liverpool - 9/1

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