Australia RU

Australia slideshow

Rugby Union - RugbyU: Wallabies revival faces ultimate test against All Blacks

Australia's Wallabies Kurtley Beale (L) runs past Argentina's Los Pumas Joaquin Tuculet (R) during the Rugby Championship 2017 test match at Malvinas Argentinas stadium in Mendoza, some 1050 km west of Buenos Aires, Argentina on October 07, 2017. (AFP Photo/Andres Larrovere)

Rugby Union - RugbyU: Wallabies overlook Hunt for All Blacks clash

Karmichael Hunt of Australia passes the ball during the international rugby match between Australia and Italy at Suncorp Stadium in Brisbane on June 24, 2017. (AFP Photo/Patrick HAMILTON)

Rugby Union - Championship - Argentina Pumas v New Zealand All Blacks

Rugby Union - Championship - Argentina Pumas v Australia Wallabies - Malvinas Argentinas stadium, Mendoza, Argentina - October 7, 2017 - Australia's head coach Michael Cheika throws a ball in the air before the match. REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci

Rugby Union - RugbyU: South African flanker Louw suspended

South Africa's flank Francois Louw (C) vies with Australia's players during the Castle Lager Rugby Championship International test match between South Africa and Australia at Loftus Versfeld Stadium on October 1, 2016 in Pretoria. (AFP Photo/GIANLUIGI GUERCIA)

Rugby Union - RugbyU: Head concerns see All Blacks pull Barrett from Wallaby clash

All Blacks flyhalf Beauden Barrett will be rested for the game against Australia (AFP Photo/ALEJANDRO PAGNI)

Australian Wallabies stuffed toy is pictured alongside Ireland's President Higgins and Deputy Prime Minister Fitzgerald during their visit to the new Australian Rugby Union Headquarters in Sydney

An Australian Wallabies stuffed toy is pictured alongside Ireland's President Michael Higgins and Deputy Prime Minister Frances Fitzgerald during their visit to the new Australian Rugby Union Headquarters in Sydney, Australia, October 18, 2017. REUTERS/Jason Reed

Ireland's President Higgins holds a rugby ball during his visit to the new Australian Rugby Union Headquarters in Sydney

Ireland's President Michael Higgins (2nd R) holds a rugby ball alongside (L-R) Ireland's Deputy Prime Minister Frances Fitzgerald, his wife Sabina and Australian Rugby Union chief executive Bill Pulver during Higgins' visit to the new Australian Rugby Union Headquarters in Sydney, Australia, October 18, 2017. REUTERS/Jason Reed

Ireland's President Michael Higgins holds a rugby ball during his visit to the new Australian Rugby Union Headquarters in Sydney

Ireland's President Michael Higgins holds a rugby ball during his visit to the new Australian Rugby Union Headquarters in Sydney, Australia, October 18, 2017. REUTERS/Jason Reed

Ireland's President Higgins shakes hands with Australian Rugby Union chief executive Pulver during a visit to the new Australian Rugby Union Headquarters in Sydney

Ireland's President Michael Higgins shakes hands with Australian Rugby Union chief executive Bill Pulver during a visit to the new Australian Rugby Union Headquarters in Sydney, Australia, October 18, 2017. REUTERS/Jason Reed

A rugby ball is passed to Ireland's President Higgins during his visit to the new Australian Rugby Union Headquarters in Sydney

A rugby ball is passed to Ireland's President Michael Higgins (2nd R) as he is flanked by (L-R) Ireland's Deputy Prime Minister Frances Fitzgerald, his wife Sabina and Australian Rugby Union chief executive Bill Pulver during Higgins' visit to the new Australian Rugby Union Headquarters in Sydney, Australia, October 18, 2017. REUTERS/Jason Reed

Rugby Union - Championship - Australia's Wallabies captain's run

FILE PHOTO - Rugby Union - Championship - Australia's Wallabies captain's run - Malvinas Argentinas stadium, Mendoza, Argentina - October 6, 2017. REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci

Former Australian rugby union coach Alan Jones, right, clowns around with current Australian coach Michael Cheika before a press conference ahead of their exhibition match in Sydney, Australia, Friday, Oct. 13, 2017. Jones, a critic of the current state of rugby in Australia, will coach the Barbarians in the match on Oct. 28. (AP Photo/Rick Rycroft)

File photo: Australia Rugby Union - Australia's Captain's Run - Stade de France, Saint-Denis near Paris

File photo: Australia Rugby Union - Australia's Captain's Run - Stade de France, Saint-Denis near Paris, France - 18/11/16 Australia's forwards coach Mario Ledesma during the captain's run the day before a match between France and Australia. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier

What's on TV tonight: Louis Theroux returns, plus more Electric Dreams

Sunday 8 October Louis Theroux: Dark States – Heroin Town BBC Two, 9.00pm Louis Theroux’s second coming as a chronicler of society’s underdogs, outcasts and victims continues with this examination of life and death on the fringes (documentaries on murder and sex trafficking are to come). He is in Huntington, West Virginia, a former industrial town in the grip of a drug epidemic fuelled by Big Pharma’s record of encouraging doctors to overmedicate workplace injuries: here fatal-overdose rates are 13 times the national average and one in 10 babies are born with an opiate addiction. Such is the extent of the problem that local efforts are focused on containment as much as prevention, and the emergency services are overstretched while the rehab centres struggling. As ever, Theroux’s combination of apparent guilelessness and fearlessness bears fruit in the intimate encounters. Whether teasing out the distressing realities of one addict and the partner who assists her, or prodding away at the motives of another who seems superficially content, he gleans genuinely valuable insights. One thing is clear in this incisive and troubling film, their spirits crushed, any potential is strangled and optimism is in diminishing supply. Gabriel Tate Formula 1: Japanese Grand Prix Sky Sports F1, 5.30am Despite Max Verstappen’s impressive victory in the Malaysian Grand Prix, Lewis Hamilton has plenty to be cheerful about as F1 heads to Japan. Indeed, by finishing second last weekend, having toiled with his Mercedes all weekend, Hamilton extended his lead in the drivers’ championship to 34 points, with five races of the season remaining. His nearest rival, Sebastian Vettel, on the other hand, is out of sorts: having not finished in Singapore, then started at the back of the grid in Malaysia but finished in fourth place. He’ll need to be much improved at the Suzuka Circuit. Premiership Rugby Union: Saracens v Wasps BT Sport 1, 2.30pm Having lost three of their opening five matches, the most recent of which was a 25-9 defeat at home to Bath, Wasps need a win to boost morale. The problem is they’re away at Saracens, who’ve won four from five and are looking imperious, as anyone who witnessed their 25-3 trouncing of Worcester last weekend will attest. Among the scorers that day was England full-back Alex Goode.  International Football: Lithuania v England ITV, 4.30pm England round off an eventful qualifying campaign that began with them replacing Sam Allardyce as manager with Gareth Southgate. Since then Wayne Rooney, England’s top scorer, has called time on his international career, while younger players such as Harry Kane and Dele Alli have grown in stature. The former, who has been in sublime form for Spurs this season, has been named captain and will be confident of adding to tally this afternoon at the LFF Stadium in Vilnius. When these sides met in Match, goals from Jermain Defoe – his first for England since 2013 – and Jamie Vardy gave Southgate’s side a 2-0 victory.  The Last Post BBC One, 9.00pm Peter Moffat’s evocative Sixties drama continues with the arrival of an American war reporter, Martha Franklin (Essie Davis), which disrupts the delicate dynamic on the military base, while insurgent leader Abdul-Kadir Hakim is targeted for the murder of Captain Page (Joseph Kennedy). Electric Dreams: Crazy Diamond Channel 4, 9.00pm In this episode of the Philip K Dick adaptations, Ed Morris (Steve Buscemi) is offered a chance to inject some excitement into his drab life with wife Sally (Julia Davis) by Jill (Sidse Babbett Knudsen), a synthetic human. The plot is cluttered, but the ending is satisfying indeed. The Gifted Fox, 9.00pm Marvel’s colonisation of the small screen continues with this entry in the X-Men universe. While The Gifted is a far cry from the mind-bending visions of Noah Hawley’s Legion, it provides plenty of bang for your buck in its tales of a family, headed by True Blood’s Stephen Moyer, that is rocked by revelations that its children have mutant abilities and go on the run from dastardly government forces. Festival No 6 Sky Arts, 9.00pm Highlights from the deeply eccentric beanfeast in Portmeirion, the Italianate Welsh coastal home of The Prisoner TV series. Expect music from Mogwai, Bloc Party and the wonderful Flaming Lips. The Sky at Night BBC Four, 10.00pm Maggie Aderin-Pocock considers the renewal of interest in manned missions to the moon, and the role of tech companies in funding and driving these new initiatives. GT Snowfall BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI This new 10-parter from John Singleton (Boyz N the Hood) traces the shockwaves from the crack cocaine epidemic that ravaged Los Angeles in the Eighties. In the first episode, we meet Franklin Saint (Damson Idris), who is living with his mum and senses an opportunity that will change his life, and his city. It’s a notch below Narcos, but it’s still compelling and sharp. Sir Bobby Charlton at 80 BBC One, 10.30pm Alex Ferguson, Eric Cantona and more pay tribute to an Old Trafford great in a hagiography, yet Charlton is a man of such decency and dignity that it’s hard to object. GT Dial M for Murder (1954) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 1.15pm  It’s not quite on the same plane of brilliance as Vertigo, but Hitchcock’s adaptation of Frederick Knott’s stage play is still a briskly efficient exercise in suspense. Tony Wendice (Ray Milland) is trying to have his socialite wife Margot (Grace Kelly) murdered, after she has an affair with a writer. When Tony’s first plan fails, he dreams up another that’s even more devious. This Sporting Life (1963) ★★★★ London Live, 8.00pm  It’s Yorkshire accents and monochrome realism as Richard Harris goes down the mines, plays rugby and has an affair. As an uncompromising portrait of male attitudes, Lindsay Anderson’s stunning adaptation of David Storey’s novel is like a punch to the gut, and a direct antecedent of Scorsese’s Raging Bull. Rachel Roberts (star of earlier kitchen sink drama Saturday Night and Sunday Morning) co-stars. The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (2013) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 11.05pm  Mild-mannered Walter Mitty’s life is controlled  by his overbearing mother. He finds his escape by imagining himself living in the worlds pictured on the covers of Life magazine  and becoming a pilot, a sea captain and couturier.  Ben Stiller directs and stars in this loose revamping of the James Thurber’s story: the result is a flawed but  still entertaining and enjoyable adventure. Monday 9 October At your service: Steph and Dom Parker Credit: Channel 4 Steph and Dom’s One Star to Five Star Channel 4, 5.30pm Daytime programming isn’t normally where we look for originality, so it comes as no surprise to find little in this new weekday show hosted by Steph and Dom Parker, those once, seemingly ever-sozzled breakout stars from Gogglebox. What there is, though, is fun and lots of it, even if at times it can be hard to tell whether it is intentional or not. Like the illegitimate offspring of Four in a Bed and any number of hackneyed Hotel Inspector-style shows, this series sees the Parkers take their own limited experience as B & B owners in Kent as proof that they know everything there is to know about the international hospitality industry and descend on an ailing hotel for a week with a view to making it marginally more appealing.  They begin with the dowdy Ransdale Hotel in Bridlington, a slightly tatty, underperforming establishment where they reckon seaside-themed rooms, kedgeree for breakfast and a party atmosphere in the bar will get the occupancy levels up from the current “negligible”. Could getting the clientele drunk cause the approval ratings to peak? It’s probably more likely than the kedgeree. Gerard O’Donovan The Human Body: Secrets of Your Life Revealed BBC Two, 9.00pm In the series’ concluding part, Chris and Xand van Tulleken explore how experiences shape our minds and bodies, and show for the very first time how memories are formed in the brain and continue to influence us throughout our lives.  Tunes for Tyrants: Music and Power with Suzy Klein BBC Four, 9.00pm In this edition of the documentary series, Suzy Klein explores the Thirties and how classical music, while it was exploited to idealise violent nationalism and prop up the totalitarian regimes of the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany, was also be a source of coded resistance. Liar ITV, 9.00pm In a torrid penultimate episode, Laura (Joanne Froggatt) convinces ex-boyfriend Tom (Warren Brown) to help bring Andrew Earlham (Ioan Gruffudd) to justice as she’s forced to resort to a somewhat unusual method of forcing a confession out of him. W1A BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI This is a terrific edition of the sitcom. As the crisis over the axing of the BBC’s Big Swing Band goes viral, Head of Values Ian Fletcher (Hugh Bonneville) once again finds himself caught in the media cross-hairs.  The Vietnam War BBC Four, 10.00pm & 10.55pm Another double helping of Ken Burns’s stately and impeccably researched history of the Vietnam War rolls us on through 1967 when, with casualties mounting and the Viet Cong striking back in the infamous Tet offensive, a US victory looked increasingly beyond reach. Timewasters ITV2, 10.00pm & 10.30pm ITV2 launches a season of new comedies with this sharply scripted sitcom about a struggling four-piece jazz band who get stuck in Twenties London when their time machine breaks down. GO After the News ITV, 10.45pm; NI, 12.45am; not STV; Wales, 11.15pm Current affairs presenters Emma Barnett and Nick Ferrari are hot tickets just now following some hard-hitting “holiday cover” hosting on Newsnight this summer. Now ITV has signed them up for this new nightly debate show that takes its subject matter straight from ITV News at Ten. After the unmitigated flop of The Nightly Show, ITV will be keen to for this to shine. GO Pimpernel Smith (1941, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 3.50pm  Leslie Howard, famed for his role in Gone with the Wind, directs and stars in this deft drama set in 1939 Berlin. An academic (Howard) recruits students to go to Europe under the guise of an archaeological dig. However, his real mission is to smuggle victims of Nazi persecution out of Germany. An absorbing film and, retrospectively, quite haunting since Howard was shot down in the war by a Nazi plane two years later. The Birth of a Nation (2016) ★★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 4.10pm and daily  Writer-director-star Nate Parker’s attempt to reappropriate the notorious racism of DW Griffith’s 1915 foundation myth and spin it on its axis is a graceless, pretentious mallet to the head of history. Parker (whose galvanising performance is much the strongest) tells the story of Nat Turner’s 1831 slave rebellion from the side of the true victims. Se7en (1995) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm  Gluttony, avarice, envy, sloth, wrath, lust and pride; the seven deadly sins are explored graphically, and imaginatively, in this gloomy thriller from director David Fincher. It follows a detective (an outstanding Morgan Freeman) and his rookie partner (Brad Pitt) on the hunt for a maniac who kills those guilty of the above vices. Brutal and gripping, with an ending you won’t forget in a hurry. Gwyneth Paltrow and Kevin Spacey co-star. Tuesday 10 October In the field: Michelle Keegan as Georgie Lane Credit: BBC Our Girl: Nepal Tour BBC One, 9.00pm Michelle Keegan returns as dedicated army medic Georgie Lane in Tony Grounds’s entertaining if soapy army drama. This time the main action is in Nepal, where Georgie and the rest of 2 Section, including Ben Aldridge’s patrician Captain Charles James, are posted to provide humanitarian relief following an earthquake.  This being Our Girl, the personal relationships are as important as the action and Georgie soon finds herself having a perfectly arched eyebrow-off with new recruit Maisie Richards (the excellent Shalom Brune-Franklin). Yet behind the jokes there are serious points raised about the way in which the army operates, and whether individualism ever has a place. Fans of the will they/won’t they romance between Georgie and her slick former fiancé Elvis (Luke Pasqualino) will be disappointed by how little the latter features in this opening episode (just one brief scene in Syria before the main action begins), although Rudi Dharmalingam gallantly steps into the breach as impassioned NGO worker Milan. The real joy, however, comes not from the plot twists but from the expert way in which Grounds captures both the banter and boredom of army life. Sarah Hughes Once Upon a Time Netflix, from today This popular fantasy series that follows fairy-tale characters living in the real world returns for its seventh season. It marks a reboot of sorts, with our now-adult hero Henry Mills (Jared S Gilmore) finding himself in the same position as when the story began. The Great British Bake Off Channel 4, 8.00pm The cooking competition continues to roll out new themes, with this episode marking the first Italian Week. But you can be sure that it won’t have anything to do with making a bog-standard spag bol. Unfortunately the weather is not on their side, as the contestants suffer in the hottest temperatures ever recorded in the tent. Russia 1917: Countdown to Revolution BBC Two, 9.00pm Juliet Stevenson narrates this insightful documentary made to mark the centenary of the Russian Revolution. Martin Amis, Orlando Figes and Helen Rappaport are among those discussing and recounting how Russia transitioned from a tsarist autocracy to become the first communist state – and the roles played by Lenin, Trotsky and Stalin. Concorde: A Supersonic Story BBC Four, 9.00pm The Concorde was considered the “most glamorous plane ever built” – until it was retired in 2003 following the crash of Air France Flight 4590. But its story is a fascinating one. Sophie Okonedo narrates this tale of rows between French and British governments, while former passengers recount queuing for the lavatory with celebrities.  The Deuce Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Vincent (James Franco) is putting the finishing touches to his new bar, in this third episode of the gritty, Seventies New York-set drama. But then an unexpected silent partner turns up. CG Celebrity Hunted Channel 4, 9.15pm The real-life thriller returns for a celebrity charity edition. Anneka Rice and former Strictly winner Jay McGuiness are among those attempting to avoid detection.  Later Live… with Jools Holland BBC Two, 10.00pm; N Ireland, 11.15pm Former Led Zeppelin singer Robert Plant performs live with his band Sensational Space Shifters. He’s joined by Beck, with songs from his first new album in three years. Catherine Gee Ice Age: Continental Drift (2012) ★★☆☆☆ E4, 8.00pm Surprisingly, the Ice Age series has accrued more lucre than Pixar’s Toy Story trilogy. But this fourth film is the thinnest and redeemed only by a demented squirrel. Once again, the story revolves around Manny the mammoth (Ray Romano), Sid the sloth (John Leguizamo) and Diego the smilodon (Denis Leary), who are separated from their herd thanks to the shifting of the Earth’s land masses. Southpaw (2015) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Jake Gyllenhaal lays his body on the line for 0a boxing drama so predictable that you could set your watch by it. If only someone had devoted equivalent stamina to the screenplay, we might have an actual movie on our hands. Nevertheless, it’s rousingly entertaining as Gyllenhaal’s Billy “The Great” Hope learns the art of subterfuge from a new coach (Forest Whitaker). Rachel McAdams co-stars. I Origins (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film 4, 11.25pm  Eyes and souls have been cinematically intertwined since at least 1929, when, in Un Chien Andalou, Buñuel and Dalí carved out their visionary manifesto with the quick swipe of a razor blade across a plump and oozing eyeball. In Mike Cahill’s film, the metaphor trots off down a strange and lyrical new trail when a biology student (Michael Pitt) encounters a model (Astrid Bergès-Frisbey) who makes him question scientific fact. Wednesday 11 October Not sitting well: David Mitchell as Stephen Credit: Channel 4 Back Channel 4, 10.00pm The ratings may have been a little underwhelming, but in contrast to David Mitchell and Robert Webb’s tonally uncertain and muddled Ambassadors, Back has been a triumph. Simon Blackwell’s often brutal, witheringly funny script has granted the leading men roles that riff on their Peep Show personas of Mark and Jez without ever becoming beholden to them. Prodigal foster son Andrew’s (Webb) victory over biological offspring Stephen (Mitchell) is apparently complete, as the former struts around his flourishing gastropub, bragging about his chef’s clafoutis while the latter moulders in a caravan. “He’s stolen my life and he’s living it better than me,” Stephen fumes, impotently. Their father’s memorial party – and the associated speeches – offer Stephen one final shot at redemption: when a clutch of other returning foster children eclipse Andrew’s efforts to ingratiate himself, Stephen has a revelation that sends him on a demented trip of vengeance to fill the gaps in his rival’s life story. Finding profound bathos in often gasp-inducing misanthropy and reuniting the best British double act around (pace Vic and Bob), Back undoubtedly merits a return. Gabriel Tate The Apprentice BBC One, 9.00pm Enjoying a new lease of life after a disappointing series last year, reality TV’s version of an extended job interview this week unleashes the candidates’ aesthetic pretensions by asking them to turn interior designers at a five-star hotel. The mind boggles at the bills that needed settling at the end of this particular stay. The Detectives: Murder on the Streets BBC Two, 9.00pm This utterly involving and consistently impressive documentary series comes to a climax with the arrival of the trial in the case of the murder of young homeless man Daniel Smith. This is true crime of the most empathetic and socially responsible kind. Britain’s Lost Masterpieces BBC Four, 9.00pm Dr Bendor Grosvenor and Emma Dabiri visit Carmathenshire County Museum, home to a damaged portrait of a 16th-century Earl whose provenance is disputed. Doc Martin ITV, 9.00pm Receptionist Morwenna’s (Jessica Ransom) parents pay her a surprise visit and present Doc Martin (Martin Clunes) with a dilemma as the amiable comedy drama ambles through another hour. Ray Donovan Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Susan Sarandon has been both a welcome addition and much-needed counterpart to this occasionally testosterone-heavy series, with Liev Schreiber’s eponymous heavy facing the repercussions of years of making enemies in high places. Norskov Channel 4, 10.35pm The titular Danish industrial port is blighted by a drug problem. Enter ace detective Tom Noack (Thomas Levin), an old acquaintance of the city’s mayor to clean the place up and, inevitably, disturb a few ghosts. It’s a slick Nordic noir – the whole series will be available on C4’s online service Walter Presents after this episode airs. GT Inside Birmingham Children’s Hospital More4, 10.00pm The BBC and Channel 4 continue to match each other, blow for blow, with medical documentaries. This latest series follows a girl diagnosed with a life-changing condition, a boy with leukaemia and a five-year-old whose epilepsy is proving increasingly hard to manage. As so often, their stoicism and resilience are humbling and very affecting. GT Charade (1963) ★★★★☆ Film4, 4.35pm Audrey Hepburn as a temperamental-but-alluring damsel in distress and Cary Grant as a shadowy charmer are characters that the two actors played over and over during their careers. But they do so exceptionally in this suspense comedy from Stanley Donen, often referred to as the best Hitchcock movie that Hitchcock never made. Hepburn is the widow being trailed by four men hunting for her late husband’s stolen fortune. Starship Troopers (1997) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 10.00pm  On first appearances, this Oscar-nominated sci-fi action thriller looks distressingly silly: in the distant future, a group of American high-school friends join the armed forces to do intergalactic war with some malicious insectoid aliens, or “Bugs”. The whole of humanity is at risk. Thankfully director Paul Verhoeven deftly underpins the whole thing with wicked satirical verve and no-nonsense action. Dying Laughing (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Arts, 10.30pm  Dozens of stand-up comics, including Kevin Hart, Jerry Seinfeld and Amy Schumer, contribute to this understated but rather wonderful documentary film about the infrequent highs and relentless lows of trying to make people laugh. It can be painful – one anecdote about “bombing” on stage is particularly uncomfortable – but then a comic will recall that first great gig and you can just tell that all the anguish has been worth it. Thursday 12 October Every second counts: McDonald follows a murder investigation Credit: ITV An Hour to Catch a Killer with Trevor McDonald ITV, 9.00pm Trevor McDonald’s abiding fascination with such murky matters as serial murder and organised crime, especially in the United States, is well established. For the first programme in ITV’s new Crime and Punishment season, McDonald examines a key concept of modern crime detection: how the decisions made by investigating officers in the so-called “Golden Hour” – the first 60 minutes of a murder inquiry – have a vital impact on whether or not a killer is caught and successfully prosecuted. And here he examines a case much closer to home. With full access to the Northumbria Police Homicide Unit’s investigation into the murder of 24-year-old graduate Alice Ruggles last October, the film follows the case from the moment the murder was reported, through every layer of the investigation as it develops, to the moment the all-too-obvious prime suspect is located and charged.  Later in this series, Susannah Reid, Piers Morgan, Ross Kemp and, more randomly, Gordon Ramsay will present reports on subjects as diverse as the lucrative international cocaine trade and gang warfare inside the notorious Barlinnie Prison in Glasgow. Gerard O’Donovan Mr Robot Amazon Prime, from today Techno-paranoia is still the name of the game as the US hacker drama returns for a much-anticipated third series. With 10 new episodes to get through, clearly the first thing to sort out is the fate of the not-always-reliable narrator Elliot Alderson (Rami Malek), who was shot in last season’s cliffhanger. Dynasty Netflix, from today As in the original, bling, bubbles and bonking dominate this 22-episode reboot of one of the Eighties’ silliest US soap operas. Once again it follows the boardroom and bedroom escapades of Denver’s super-rich Carrington clan.  PGA Tour Golf: The CIMB Classic Sky Sports Main Event, 6.00am Coverage of the opening day’s play at the annual event from the Kuala Lumpur Golf & Country Club in Malaysia, where Justin Thomas has won the last two titles.  Council House Crackdown BBC One, 8.00pm Michelle Ackerley uncovers more tales of social housing fraud as council investigators stake out a woman suspected of faking a disability and a tenant alleged to be illegally subletting housing association property. Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm; BBC Two Wales, 9.00pm The final programme in this affecting series again focuses on the tough decisions the London Ambulance Service faces when its slim resources are stretched to capacity and calls must be prioritised. Russia with Simon Reeve BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 11.15pm This is by far the best travelogue Reeve has done for a while, and for this final leg, the adventurer starts in Crimea, where he weighs up the political and economic costs of its annexation by Russia. From there, he travels north through the vast plains of western Russia to where the country’s real power has always resided, Moscow and St Petersburg.  Educating Greater Manchester Channel 4, 9.00pm In tonight’s episode, it’s Valentine’s Day and romance is in the air for even the school’s youngest pupils. Plus, a recently qualified teacher who’s come to Harrop Fold looking for a new challenge gets more than he bargained for. GO The History of Comedy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This new documentary has an overambitious title for a series that focuses almost entirely on US comedy of fairly recent vintage. Still, it’s an interesting thematic survey of how certain types of laughter making have evolved in the last century. GO Titanic (1997) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Eleven Oscars won and more than a billion dollars taken worldwide in ticket sales. James Cameron deserved his success with this opulent blockbuster about the sinking of the RMS Titanic, a story that has a grand romance between penniless artist Jack (Leonardo DiCaprio) and rich American girl Rose (Kate Winslet) at its heart. Even viewers determined to find it soppy are liable to be swept along by the emotion. Heist (2001) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 10.50pm  Prepare to be triple-crossed, duped and bewildered by this piece of con-artistry, which pulls the rug out from under your feet with such regularity that it’s tempting just to give up and lie down. Gene Hackman, Danny DeVito and Rebecca Pidgeon set out to steal some gold; needless to say, it does not go smoothly. There are excellent performances, plus endless twists and cracking dialogue. Just Go with It (2011) ★★☆☆☆ 5STAR, 11.00pm  Adam Sandler stars in this remake of the 1971 comedy Cactus Flower (itself adapted from a Broadway stage play by Abe Burrows), as Danny, a single plastic surgeon in Los Angeles who feigns an unhappy marriage in order to have no-strings-attached flings with women. What follows is a complex low-grade romantic farce which is saved by a sparky performance from Jennifer Aniston as Danny’s office manager and best friend. Friday 13 October Life on the edge: Ray Mears is in Australia Credit: ITV Australian Wilderness with Ray Mears ITV, 8.00pm; not STV/UTV/Wales The great appeal of Ray Mears’s wildlife documentaries is his no-nonsense approach. Where other presenters rush around telling you how exciting and amazing and wonderful everything is, Mears tends to amble gently through it, explaining a few facts and otherwise allowing you to gaze at the beauty unfurling across your TV screen. It’s an approach that pays high dividends in this new series about the Australian wilderness, a landscape that is vast, beautiful and oddly eerie.  The opening episode focuses more on sea than land (although there is time for a quick trek through rocky desert towards the Indian Ocean) as Mears dives on Ningaloo Reef, the longest fringing coral reef in the world. After a pleasant meeting with some friendly stingrays and a few “wish you were here” shots of the turquoise sea, the real star of the show heaves into sight as Mears and his companions find themselves swimming alongside a passing whale shark, the largest fish in the world. “This is what we’ve all been waiting for,” says Mears as the fish floats into view. It’s a breathtaking, beautiful moment and one which manages to shake even Mears out of his habitual calm. Sarah Hughes Lore Amazon Prime, from today Not for the faint of heart, this disquieting new documentary series is based on Aaron Mahnke’s popular podcast of the same name, with each episode exploring the story behind pop culture’s most legendary horror myths, from vampires and werewolves to possessed dolls.  Mindhunter Netflix, from today Imagine Se7en crossed with Zodiac and Silence of the Lambs and you’ll get the gist of this excellent new detective drama executive produced by David Fincher and Charlize Theron. Based on the non-fiction book Mind Hunter: Inside the FBI’s Elite Serial Crime Unit and set in the late Seventies, it follows a pair of FBI agents (Jonathan Groff and Holt McCallany) who interview and analyse imprisoned mass murderers in order to better understand serial killers. The first episode, which is shot by master of murk Fincher, moves languidly – but is no less absorbing. PS International T20 Cricket: India v Australia Friday, Sky Sports Main Event, 2.20pm The Rajiv Gandhi International Stadium in Hyderabad is the setting as India and Australia contest the final game in a three-match T20 series. Unreported World Channel 4, 7.30pm On August 14, a mudslide in Sierra Leone, caused by torrential rain, destroyed the small town of Regent on the outskirts of the capital, Freetown. Hundreds lost their lives. In this affecting report, Seyi Rhodes talks to the survivors and the rescue teams desperately trying to find those still missing.  Crystal Maze / Have I Got News for You Channel 4, 8.00pm / BBC One, 9.00pm Richard Ayoade fans, rejoice: tonight you can see him twice – somewhat fitting given that he once wrote and directed a black comedy called The Double. First up, he continues to add warmth and irony to a rousing revamp of The Crystal Maze, as the current series concludes. Then, in HIGNFY, he puts that bone-dry wit to good use yet again, as he guest presents the long-running news quiz.  Cold Feet ITV, 9.00pm Affectionate writing and a great ensemble are the foundations on which Mark Bullen’s middle-aged comedy drama are built. Tonight, as this Nineties-show revival continues, Adam (James Nesbitt) and Pete (John Thomson) throw a joint 50th birthday dinner.  Porridge BBC One, 9.30pm  On the subject of revivals, this sort-of sequel to the classic Seventies comedy continues to be so-so. Tonight, there’s a new prison officer on the scene. Patrick Smith The Meyerowitz Stories (2017) ★★★★☆ Netflix, from today  It’s been a long time coming but Adam Sandler is finally in a good film. He plays Danny, a New Yorker whose unemployment and divorce has left him defined purely in terms of his bloodline. The narrative arc is about Danny, sister Jean and half-brother Matthew reconciling themselves with their curmudgeon father Harold (Dustin Hoffman). Emma Thompson is woozily uproarious as Harold’s wife. Lion (2016) ★★★★☆ Amazon Prime, from today Derived from a 2012 memoir by the grown Saroo Brierley, called A Long Way Home, this is the story of a lost boy: a five-year-old Indian who grew up in the Eighties in the area around Khandwa. With no paper trail or family name, he becomes a lost cause, eventually shipped off to kindly foster parents in Tasmania, played by Nicole Kidman and David Wenham. The excellent script, by Luke Davies, sticks rigidly to Saroo’s own point of view. Good Will Hunting (1997) ★★★★☆ W, 9.00pm  Matt Damon and Ben Affleck won an Oscar for Best Screenplay with this stirring if occasionally gloopy story. Will Hunting (Damon) is a hot-headed, 20-year-old janitor with a photographic memory and an untapped genius for mathematics. Robin Williams plays the inspiring therapist who channels Will’s rage into solving quadratics, and Minnie Driver is his brainy, Harvard graduate love interest.   Television previewers Catherine Gee, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: Louis Theroux returns, plus more Electric Dreams

Sunday 8 October Louis Theroux: Dark States – Heroin Town BBC Two, 9.00pm Louis Theroux’s second coming as a chronicler of society’s underdogs, outcasts and victims continues with this examination of life and death on the fringes (documentaries on murder and sex trafficking are to come). He is in Huntington, West Virginia, a former industrial town in the grip of a drug epidemic fuelled by Big Pharma’s record of encouraging doctors to overmedicate workplace injuries: here fatal-overdose rates are 13 times the national average and one in 10 babies are born with an opiate addiction. Such is the extent of the problem that local efforts are focused on containment as much as prevention, and the emergency services are overstretched while the rehab centres struggling. As ever, Theroux’s combination of apparent guilelessness and fearlessness bears fruit in the intimate encounters. Whether teasing out the distressing realities of one addict and the partner who assists her, or prodding away at the motives of another who seems superficially content, he gleans genuinely valuable insights. One thing is clear in this incisive and troubling film, their spirits crushed, any potential is strangled and optimism is in diminishing supply. Gabriel Tate Formula 1: Japanese Grand Prix Sky Sports F1, 5.30am Despite Max Verstappen’s impressive victory in the Malaysian Grand Prix, Lewis Hamilton has plenty to be cheerful about as F1 heads to Japan. Indeed, by finishing second last weekend, having toiled with his Mercedes all weekend, Hamilton extended his lead in the drivers’ championship to 34 points, with five races of the season remaining. His nearest rival, Sebastian Vettel, on the other hand, is out of sorts: having not finished in Singapore, then started at the back of the grid in Malaysia but finished in fourth place. He’ll need to be much improved at the Suzuka Circuit. Premiership Rugby Union: Saracens v Wasps BT Sport 1, 2.30pm Having lost three of their opening five matches, the most recent of which was a 25-9 defeat at home to Bath, Wasps need a win to boost morale. The problem is they’re away at Saracens, who’ve won four from five and are looking imperious, as anyone who witnessed their 25-3 trouncing of Worcester last weekend will attest. Among the scorers that day was England full-back Alex Goode.  International Football: Lithuania v England ITV, 4.30pm England round off an eventful qualifying campaign that began with them replacing Sam Allardyce as manager with Gareth Southgate. Since then Wayne Rooney, England’s top scorer, has called time on his international career, while younger players such as Harry Kane and Dele Alli have grown in stature. The former, who has been in sublime form for Spurs this season, has been named captain and will be confident of adding to tally this afternoon at the LFF Stadium in Vilnius. When these sides met in Match, goals from Jermain Defoe – his first for England since 2013 – and Jamie Vardy gave Southgate’s side a 2-0 victory.  The Last Post BBC One, 9.00pm Peter Moffat’s evocative Sixties drama continues with the arrival of an American war reporter, Martha Franklin (Essie Davis), which disrupts the delicate dynamic on the military base, while insurgent leader Abdul-Kadir Hakim is targeted for the murder of Captain Page (Joseph Kennedy). Electric Dreams: Crazy Diamond Channel 4, 9.00pm In this episode of the Philip K Dick adaptations, Ed Morris (Steve Buscemi) is offered a chance to inject some excitement into his drab life with wife Sally (Julia Davis) by Jill (Sidse Babbett Knudsen), a synthetic human. The plot is cluttered, but the ending is satisfying indeed. The Gifted Fox, 9.00pm Marvel’s colonisation of the small screen continues with this entry in the X-Men universe. While The Gifted is a far cry from the mind-bending visions of Noah Hawley’s Legion, it provides plenty of bang for your buck in its tales of a family, headed by True Blood’s Stephen Moyer, that is rocked by revelations that its children have mutant abilities and go on the run from dastardly government forces. Festival No 6 Sky Arts, 9.00pm Highlights from the deeply eccentric beanfeast in Portmeirion, the Italianate Welsh coastal home of The Prisoner TV series. Expect music from Mogwai, Bloc Party and the wonderful Flaming Lips. The Sky at Night BBC Four, 10.00pm Maggie Aderin-Pocock considers the renewal of interest in manned missions to the moon, and the role of tech companies in funding and driving these new initiatives. GT Snowfall BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI This new 10-parter from John Singleton (Boyz N the Hood) traces the shockwaves from the crack cocaine epidemic that ravaged Los Angeles in the Eighties. In the first episode, we meet Franklin Saint (Damson Idris), who is living with his mum and senses an opportunity that will change his life, and his city. It’s a notch below Narcos, but it’s still compelling and sharp. Sir Bobby Charlton at 80 BBC One, 10.30pm Alex Ferguson, Eric Cantona and more pay tribute to an Old Trafford great in a hagiography, yet Charlton is a man of such decency and dignity that it’s hard to object. GT Dial M for Murder (1954) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 1.15pm  It’s not quite on the same plane of brilliance as Vertigo, but Hitchcock’s adaptation of Frederick Knott’s stage play is still a briskly efficient exercise in suspense. Tony Wendice (Ray Milland) is trying to have his socialite wife Margot (Grace Kelly) murdered, after she has an affair with a writer. When Tony’s first plan fails, he dreams up another that’s even more devious. This Sporting Life (1963) ★★★★ London Live, 8.00pm  It’s Yorkshire accents and monochrome realism as Richard Harris goes down the mines, plays rugby and has an affair. As an uncompromising portrait of male attitudes, Lindsay Anderson’s stunning adaptation of David Storey’s novel is like a punch to the gut, and a direct antecedent of Scorsese’s Raging Bull. Rachel Roberts (star of earlier kitchen sink drama Saturday Night and Sunday Morning) co-stars. The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (2013) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 11.05pm  Mild-mannered Walter Mitty’s life is controlled  by his overbearing mother. He finds his escape by imagining himself living in the worlds pictured on the covers of Life magazine  and becoming a pilot, a sea captain and couturier.  Ben Stiller directs and stars in this loose revamping of the James Thurber’s story: the result is a flawed but  still entertaining and enjoyable adventure. Monday 9 October At your service: Steph and Dom Parker Credit: Channel 4 Steph and Dom’s One Star to Five Star Channel 4, 5.30pm Daytime programming isn’t normally where we look for originality, so it comes as no surprise to find little in this new weekday show hosted by Steph and Dom Parker, those once, seemingly ever-sozzled breakout stars from Gogglebox. What there is, though, is fun and lots of it, even if at times it can be hard to tell whether it is intentional or not. Like the illegitimate offspring of Four in a Bed and any number of hackneyed Hotel Inspector-style shows, this series sees the Parkers take their own limited experience as B & B owners in Kent as proof that they know everything there is to know about the international hospitality industry and descend on an ailing hotel for a week with a view to making it marginally more appealing.  They begin with the dowdy Ransdale Hotel in Bridlington, a slightly tatty, underperforming establishment where they reckon seaside-themed rooms, kedgeree for breakfast and a party atmosphere in the bar will get the occupancy levels up from the current “negligible”. Could getting the clientele drunk cause the approval ratings to peak? It’s probably more likely than the kedgeree. Gerard O’Donovan The Human Body: Secrets of Your Life Revealed BBC Two, 9.00pm In the series’ concluding part, Chris and Xand van Tulleken explore how experiences shape our minds and bodies, and show for the very first time how memories are formed in the brain and continue to influence us throughout our lives.  Tunes for Tyrants: Music and Power with Suzy Klein BBC Four, 9.00pm In this edition of the documentary series, Suzy Klein explores the Thirties and how classical music, while it was exploited to idealise violent nationalism and prop up the totalitarian regimes of the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany, was also be a source of coded resistance. Liar ITV, 9.00pm In a torrid penultimate episode, Laura (Joanne Froggatt) convinces ex-boyfriend Tom (Warren Brown) to help bring Andrew Earlham (Ioan Gruffudd) to justice as she’s forced to resort to a somewhat unusual method of forcing a confession out of him. W1A BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI This is a terrific edition of the sitcom. As the crisis over the axing of the BBC’s Big Swing Band goes viral, Head of Values Ian Fletcher (Hugh Bonneville) once again finds himself caught in the media cross-hairs.  The Vietnam War BBC Four, 10.00pm & 10.55pm Another double helping of Ken Burns’s stately and impeccably researched history of the Vietnam War rolls us on through 1967 when, with casualties mounting and the Viet Cong striking back in the infamous Tet offensive, a US victory looked increasingly beyond reach. Timewasters ITV2, 10.00pm & 10.30pm ITV2 launches a season of new comedies with this sharply scripted sitcom about a struggling four-piece jazz band who get stuck in Twenties London when their time machine breaks down. GO After the News ITV, 10.45pm; NI, 12.45am; not STV; Wales, 11.15pm Current affairs presenters Emma Barnett and Nick Ferrari are hot tickets just now following some hard-hitting “holiday cover” hosting on Newsnight this summer. Now ITV has signed them up for this new nightly debate show that takes its subject matter straight from ITV News at Ten. After the unmitigated flop of The Nightly Show, ITV will be keen to for this to shine. GO Pimpernel Smith (1941, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 3.50pm  Leslie Howard, famed for his role in Gone with the Wind, directs and stars in this deft drama set in 1939 Berlin. An academic (Howard) recruits students to go to Europe under the guise of an archaeological dig. However, his real mission is to smuggle victims of Nazi persecution out of Germany. An absorbing film and, retrospectively, quite haunting since Howard was shot down in the war by a Nazi plane two years later. The Birth of a Nation (2016) ★★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 4.10pm and daily  Writer-director-star Nate Parker’s attempt to reappropriate the notorious racism of DW Griffith’s 1915 foundation myth and spin it on its axis is a graceless, pretentious mallet to the head of history. Parker (whose galvanising performance is much the strongest) tells the story of Nat Turner’s 1831 slave rebellion from the side of the true victims. Se7en (1995) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm  Gluttony, avarice, envy, sloth, wrath, lust and pride; the seven deadly sins are explored graphically, and imaginatively, in this gloomy thriller from director David Fincher. It follows a detective (an outstanding Morgan Freeman) and his rookie partner (Brad Pitt) on the hunt for a maniac who kills those guilty of the above vices. Brutal and gripping, with an ending you won’t forget in a hurry. Gwyneth Paltrow and Kevin Spacey co-star. Tuesday 10 October In the field: Michelle Keegan as Georgie Lane Credit: BBC Our Girl: Nepal Tour BBC One, 9.00pm Michelle Keegan returns as dedicated army medic Georgie Lane in Tony Grounds’s entertaining if soapy army drama. This time the main action is in Nepal, where Georgie and the rest of 2 Section, including Ben Aldridge’s patrician Captain Charles James, are posted to provide humanitarian relief following an earthquake.  This being Our Girl, the personal relationships are as important as the action and Georgie soon finds herself having a perfectly arched eyebrow-off with new recruit Maisie Richards (the excellent Shalom Brune-Franklin). Yet behind the jokes there are serious points raised about the way in which the army operates, and whether individualism ever has a place. Fans of the will they/won’t they romance between Georgie and her slick former fiancé Elvis (Luke Pasqualino) will be disappointed by how little the latter features in this opening episode (just one brief scene in Syria before the main action begins), although Rudi Dharmalingam gallantly steps into the breach as impassioned NGO worker Milan. The real joy, however, comes not from the plot twists but from the expert way in which Grounds captures both the banter and boredom of army life. Sarah Hughes Once Upon a Time Netflix, from today This popular fantasy series that follows fairy-tale characters living in the real world returns for its seventh season. It marks a reboot of sorts, with our now-adult hero Henry Mills (Jared S Gilmore) finding himself in the same position as when the story began. The Great British Bake Off Channel 4, 8.00pm The cooking competition continues to roll out new themes, with this episode marking the first Italian Week. But you can be sure that it won’t have anything to do with making a bog-standard spag bol. Unfortunately the weather is not on their side, as the contestants suffer in the hottest temperatures ever recorded in the tent. Russia 1917: Countdown to Revolution BBC Two, 9.00pm Juliet Stevenson narrates this insightful documentary made to mark the centenary of the Russian Revolution. Martin Amis, Orlando Figes and Helen Rappaport are among those discussing and recounting how Russia transitioned from a tsarist autocracy to become the first communist state – and the roles played by Lenin, Trotsky and Stalin. Concorde: A Supersonic Story BBC Four, 9.00pm The Concorde was considered the “most glamorous plane ever built” – until it was retired in 2003 following the crash of Air France Flight 4590. But its story is a fascinating one. Sophie Okonedo narrates this tale of rows between French and British governments, while former passengers recount queuing for the lavatory with celebrities.  The Deuce Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Vincent (James Franco) is putting the finishing touches to his new bar, in this third episode of the gritty, Seventies New York-set drama. But then an unexpected silent partner turns up. CG Celebrity Hunted Channel 4, 9.15pm The real-life thriller returns for a celebrity charity edition. Anneka Rice and former Strictly winner Jay McGuiness are among those attempting to avoid detection.  Later Live… with Jools Holland BBC Two, 10.00pm; N Ireland, 11.15pm Former Led Zeppelin singer Robert Plant performs live with his band Sensational Space Shifters. He’s joined by Beck, with songs from his first new album in three years. Catherine Gee Ice Age: Continental Drift (2012) ★★☆☆☆ E4, 8.00pm Surprisingly, the Ice Age series has accrued more lucre than Pixar’s Toy Story trilogy. But this fourth film is the thinnest and redeemed only by a demented squirrel. Once again, the story revolves around Manny the mammoth (Ray Romano), Sid the sloth (John Leguizamo) and Diego the smilodon (Denis Leary), who are separated from their herd thanks to the shifting of the Earth’s land masses. Southpaw (2015) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Jake Gyllenhaal lays his body on the line for 0a boxing drama so predictable that you could set your watch by it. If only someone had devoted equivalent stamina to the screenplay, we might have an actual movie on our hands. Nevertheless, it’s rousingly entertaining as Gyllenhaal’s Billy “The Great” Hope learns the art of subterfuge from a new coach (Forest Whitaker). Rachel McAdams co-stars. I Origins (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film 4, 11.25pm  Eyes and souls have been cinematically intertwined since at least 1929, when, in Un Chien Andalou, Buñuel and Dalí carved out their visionary manifesto with the quick swipe of a razor blade across a plump and oozing eyeball. In Mike Cahill’s film, the metaphor trots off down a strange and lyrical new trail when a biology student (Michael Pitt) encounters a model (Astrid Bergès-Frisbey) who makes him question scientific fact. Wednesday 11 October Not sitting well: David Mitchell as Stephen Credit: Channel 4 Back Channel 4, 10.00pm The ratings may have been a little underwhelming, but in contrast to David Mitchell and Robert Webb’s tonally uncertain and muddled Ambassadors, Back has been a triumph. Simon Blackwell’s often brutal, witheringly funny script has granted the leading men roles that riff on their Peep Show personas of Mark and Jez without ever becoming beholden to them. Prodigal foster son Andrew’s (Webb) victory over biological offspring Stephen (Mitchell) is apparently complete, as the former struts around his flourishing gastropub, bragging about his chef’s clafoutis while the latter moulders in a caravan. “He’s stolen my life and he’s living it better than me,” Stephen fumes, impotently. Their father’s memorial party – and the associated speeches – offer Stephen one final shot at redemption: when a clutch of other returning foster children eclipse Andrew’s efforts to ingratiate himself, Stephen has a revelation that sends him on a demented trip of vengeance to fill the gaps in his rival’s life story. Finding profound bathos in often gasp-inducing misanthropy and reuniting the best British double act around (pace Vic and Bob), Back undoubtedly merits a return. Gabriel Tate The Apprentice BBC One, 9.00pm Enjoying a new lease of life after a disappointing series last year, reality TV’s version of an extended job interview this week unleashes the candidates’ aesthetic pretensions by asking them to turn interior designers at a five-star hotel. The mind boggles at the bills that needed settling at the end of this particular stay. The Detectives: Murder on the Streets BBC Two, 9.00pm This utterly involving and consistently impressive documentary series comes to a climax with the arrival of the trial in the case of the murder of young homeless man Daniel Smith. This is true crime of the most empathetic and socially responsible kind. Britain’s Lost Masterpieces BBC Four, 9.00pm Dr Bendor Grosvenor and Emma Dabiri visit Carmathenshire County Museum, home to a damaged portrait of a 16th-century Earl whose provenance is disputed. Doc Martin ITV, 9.00pm Receptionist Morwenna’s (Jessica Ransom) parents pay her a surprise visit and present Doc Martin (Martin Clunes) with a dilemma as the amiable comedy drama ambles through another hour. Ray Donovan Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Susan Sarandon has been both a welcome addition and much-needed counterpart to this occasionally testosterone-heavy series, with Liev Schreiber’s eponymous heavy facing the repercussions of years of making enemies in high places. Norskov Channel 4, 10.35pm The titular Danish industrial port is blighted by a drug problem. Enter ace detective Tom Noack (Thomas Levin), an old acquaintance of the city’s mayor to clean the place up and, inevitably, disturb a few ghosts. It’s a slick Nordic noir – the whole series will be available on C4’s online service Walter Presents after this episode airs. GT Inside Birmingham Children’s Hospital More4, 10.00pm The BBC and Channel 4 continue to match each other, blow for blow, with medical documentaries. This latest series follows a girl diagnosed with a life-changing condition, a boy with leukaemia and a five-year-old whose epilepsy is proving increasingly hard to manage. As so often, their stoicism and resilience are humbling and very affecting. GT Charade (1963) ★★★★☆ Film4, 4.35pm Audrey Hepburn as a temperamental-but-alluring damsel in distress and Cary Grant as a shadowy charmer are characters that the two actors played over and over during their careers. But they do so exceptionally in this suspense comedy from Stanley Donen, often referred to as the best Hitchcock movie that Hitchcock never made. Hepburn is the widow being trailed by four men hunting for her late husband’s stolen fortune. Starship Troopers (1997) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 10.00pm  On first appearances, this Oscar-nominated sci-fi action thriller looks distressingly silly: in the distant future, a group of American high-school friends join the armed forces to do intergalactic war with some malicious insectoid aliens, or “Bugs”. The whole of humanity is at risk. Thankfully director Paul Verhoeven deftly underpins the whole thing with wicked satirical verve and no-nonsense action. Dying Laughing (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Arts, 10.30pm  Dozens of stand-up comics, including Kevin Hart, Jerry Seinfeld and Amy Schumer, contribute to this understated but rather wonderful documentary film about the infrequent highs and relentless lows of trying to make people laugh. It can be painful – one anecdote about “bombing” on stage is particularly uncomfortable – but then a comic will recall that first great gig and you can just tell that all the anguish has been worth it. Thursday 12 October Every second counts: McDonald follows a murder investigation Credit: ITV An Hour to Catch a Killer with Trevor McDonald ITV, 9.00pm Trevor McDonald’s abiding fascination with such murky matters as serial murder and organised crime, especially in the United States, is well established. For the first programme in ITV’s new Crime and Punishment season, McDonald examines a key concept of modern crime detection: how the decisions made by investigating officers in the so-called “Golden Hour” – the first 60 minutes of a murder inquiry – have a vital impact on whether or not a killer is caught and successfully prosecuted. And here he examines a case much closer to home. With full access to the Northumbria Police Homicide Unit’s investigation into the murder of 24-year-old graduate Alice Ruggles last October, the film follows the case from the moment the murder was reported, through every layer of the investigation as it develops, to the moment the all-too-obvious prime suspect is located and charged.  Later in this series, Susannah Reid, Piers Morgan, Ross Kemp and, more randomly, Gordon Ramsay will present reports on subjects as diverse as the lucrative international cocaine trade and gang warfare inside the notorious Barlinnie Prison in Glasgow. Gerard O’Donovan Mr Robot Amazon Prime, from today Techno-paranoia is still the name of the game as the US hacker drama returns for a much-anticipated third series. With 10 new episodes to get through, clearly the first thing to sort out is the fate of the not-always-reliable narrator Elliot Alderson (Rami Malek), who was shot in last season’s cliffhanger. Dynasty Netflix, from today As in the original, bling, bubbles and bonking dominate this 22-episode reboot of one of the Eighties’ silliest US soap operas. Once again it follows the boardroom and bedroom escapades of Denver’s super-rich Carrington clan.  PGA Tour Golf: The CIMB Classic Sky Sports Main Event, 6.00am Coverage of the opening day’s play at the annual event from the Kuala Lumpur Golf & Country Club in Malaysia, where Justin Thomas has won the last two titles.  Council House Crackdown BBC One, 8.00pm Michelle Ackerley uncovers more tales of social housing fraud as council investigators stake out a woman suspected of faking a disability and a tenant alleged to be illegally subletting housing association property. Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm; BBC Two Wales, 9.00pm The final programme in this affecting series again focuses on the tough decisions the London Ambulance Service faces when its slim resources are stretched to capacity and calls must be prioritised. Russia with Simon Reeve BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 11.15pm This is by far the best travelogue Reeve has done for a while, and for this final leg, the adventurer starts in Crimea, where he weighs up the political and economic costs of its annexation by Russia. From there, he travels north through the vast plains of western Russia to where the country’s real power has always resided, Moscow and St Petersburg.  Educating Greater Manchester Channel 4, 9.00pm In tonight’s episode, it’s Valentine’s Day and romance is in the air for even the school’s youngest pupils. Plus, a recently qualified teacher who’s come to Harrop Fold looking for a new challenge gets more than he bargained for. GO The History of Comedy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This new documentary has an overambitious title for a series that focuses almost entirely on US comedy of fairly recent vintage. Still, it’s an interesting thematic survey of how certain types of laughter making have evolved in the last century. GO Titanic (1997) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Eleven Oscars won and more than a billion dollars taken worldwide in ticket sales. James Cameron deserved his success with this opulent blockbuster about the sinking of the RMS Titanic, a story that has a grand romance between penniless artist Jack (Leonardo DiCaprio) and rich American girl Rose (Kate Winslet) at its heart. Even viewers determined to find it soppy are liable to be swept along by the emotion. Heist (2001) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 10.50pm  Prepare to be triple-crossed, duped and bewildered by this piece of con-artistry, which pulls the rug out from under your feet with such regularity that it’s tempting just to give up and lie down. Gene Hackman, Danny DeVito and Rebecca Pidgeon set out to steal some gold; needless to say, it does not go smoothly. There are excellent performances, plus endless twists and cracking dialogue. Just Go with It (2011) ★★☆☆☆ 5STAR, 11.00pm  Adam Sandler stars in this remake of the 1971 comedy Cactus Flower (itself adapted from a Broadway stage play by Abe Burrows), as Danny, a single plastic surgeon in Los Angeles who feigns an unhappy marriage in order to have no-strings-attached flings with women. What follows is a complex low-grade romantic farce which is saved by a sparky performance from Jennifer Aniston as Danny’s office manager and best friend. Friday 13 October Life on the edge: Ray Mears is in Australia Credit: ITV Australian Wilderness with Ray Mears ITV, 8.00pm; not STV/UTV/Wales The great appeal of Ray Mears’s wildlife documentaries is his no-nonsense approach. Where other presenters rush around telling you how exciting and amazing and wonderful everything is, Mears tends to amble gently through it, explaining a few facts and otherwise allowing you to gaze at the beauty unfurling across your TV screen. It’s an approach that pays high dividends in this new series about the Australian wilderness, a landscape that is vast, beautiful and oddly eerie.  The opening episode focuses more on sea than land (although there is time for a quick trek through rocky desert towards the Indian Ocean) as Mears dives on Ningaloo Reef, the longest fringing coral reef in the world. After a pleasant meeting with some friendly stingrays and a few “wish you were here” shots of the turquoise sea, the real star of the show heaves into sight as Mears and his companions find themselves swimming alongside a passing whale shark, the largest fish in the world. “This is what we’ve all been waiting for,” says Mears as the fish floats into view. It’s a breathtaking, beautiful moment and one which manages to shake even Mears out of his habitual calm. Sarah Hughes Lore Amazon Prime, from today Not for the faint of heart, this disquieting new documentary series is based on Aaron Mahnke’s popular podcast of the same name, with each episode exploring the story behind pop culture’s most legendary horror myths, from vampires and werewolves to possessed dolls.  Mindhunter Netflix, from today Imagine Se7en crossed with Zodiac and Silence of the Lambs and you’ll get the gist of this excellent new detective drama executive produced by David Fincher and Charlize Theron. Based on the non-fiction book Mind Hunter: Inside the FBI’s Elite Serial Crime Unit and set in the late Seventies, it follows a pair of FBI agents (Jonathan Groff and Holt McCallany) who interview and analyse imprisoned mass murderers in order to better understand serial killers. The first episode, which is shot by master of murk Fincher, moves languidly – but is no less absorbing. PS International T20 Cricket: India v Australia Friday, Sky Sports Main Event, 2.20pm The Rajiv Gandhi International Stadium in Hyderabad is the setting as India and Australia contest the final game in a three-match T20 series. Unreported World Channel 4, 7.30pm On August 14, a mudslide in Sierra Leone, caused by torrential rain, destroyed the small town of Regent on the outskirts of the capital, Freetown. Hundreds lost their lives. In this affecting report, Seyi Rhodes talks to the survivors and the rescue teams desperately trying to find those still missing.  Crystal Maze / Have I Got News for You Channel 4, 8.00pm / BBC One, 9.00pm Richard Ayoade fans, rejoice: tonight you can see him twice – somewhat fitting given that he once wrote and directed a black comedy called The Double. First up, he continues to add warmth and irony to a rousing revamp of The Crystal Maze, as the current series concludes. Then, in HIGNFY, he puts that bone-dry wit to good use yet again, as he guest presents the long-running news quiz.  Cold Feet ITV, 9.00pm Affectionate writing and a great ensemble are the foundations on which Mark Bullen’s middle-aged comedy drama are built. Tonight, as this Nineties-show revival continues, Adam (James Nesbitt) and Pete (John Thomson) throw a joint 50th birthday dinner.  Porridge BBC One, 9.30pm  On the subject of revivals, this sort-of sequel to the classic Seventies comedy continues to be so-so. Tonight, there’s a new prison officer on the scene. Patrick Smith The Meyerowitz Stories (2017) ★★★★☆ Netflix, from today  It’s been a long time coming but Adam Sandler is finally in a good film. He plays Danny, a New Yorker whose unemployment and divorce has left him defined purely in terms of his bloodline. The narrative arc is about Danny, sister Jean and half-brother Matthew reconciling themselves with their curmudgeon father Harold (Dustin Hoffman). Emma Thompson is woozily uproarious as Harold’s wife. Lion (2016) ★★★★☆ Amazon Prime, from today Derived from a 2012 memoir by the grown Saroo Brierley, called A Long Way Home, this is the story of a lost boy: a five-year-old Indian who grew up in the Eighties in the area around Khandwa. With no paper trail or family name, he becomes a lost cause, eventually shipped off to kindly foster parents in Tasmania, played by Nicole Kidman and David Wenham. The excellent script, by Luke Davies, sticks rigidly to Saroo’s own point of view. Good Will Hunting (1997) ★★★★☆ W, 9.00pm  Matt Damon and Ben Affleck won an Oscar for Best Screenplay with this stirring if occasionally gloopy story. Will Hunting (Damon) is a hot-headed, 20-year-old janitor with a photographic memory and an untapped genius for mathematics. Robin Williams plays the inspiring therapist who channels Will’s rage into solving quadratics, and Minnie Driver is his brainy, Harvard graduate love interest.   Television previewers Catherine Gee, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: Louis Theroux returns, plus more Electric Dreams

Sunday 8 October Louis Theroux: Dark States – Heroin Town BBC Two, 9.00pm Louis Theroux’s second coming as a chronicler of society’s underdogs, outcasts and victims continues with this examination of life and death on the fringes (documentaries on murder and sex trafficking are to come). He is in Huntington, West Virginia, a former industrial town in the grip of a drug epidemic fuelled by Big Pharma’s record of encouraging doctors to overmedicate workplace injuries: here fatal-overdose rates are 13 times the national average and one in 10 babies are born with an opiate addiction. Such is the extent of the problem that local efforts are focused on containment as much as prevention, and the emergency services are overstretched while the rehab centres struggling. As ever, Theroux’s combination of apparent guilelessness and fearlessness bears fruit in the intimate encounters. Whether teasing out the distressing realities of one addict and the partner who assists her, or prodding away at the motives of another who seems superficially content, he gleans genuinely valuable insights. One thing is clear in this incisive and troubling film, their spirits crushed, any potential is strangled and optimism is in diminishing supply. Gabriel Tate Formula 1: Japanese Grand Prix Sky Sports F1, 5.30am Despite Max Verstappen’s impressive victory in the Malaysian Grand Prix, Lewis Hamilton has plenty to be cheerful about as F1 heads to Japan. Indeed, by finishing second last weekend, having toiled with his Mercedes all weekend, Hamilton extended his lead in the drivers’ championship to 34 points, with five races of the season remaining. His nearest rival, Sebastian Vettel, on the other hand, is out of sorts: having not finished in Singapore, then started at the back of the grid in Malaysia but finished in fourth place. He’ll need to be much improved at the Suzuka Circuit. Premiership Rugby Union: Saracens v Wasps BT Sport 1, 2.30pm Having lost three of their opening five matches, the most recent of which was a 25-9 defeat at home to Bath, Wasps need a win to boost morale. The problem is they’re away at Saracens, who’ve won four from five and are looking imperious, as anyone who witnessed their 25-3 trouncing of Worcester last weekend will attest. Among the scorers that day was England full-back Alex Goode.  International Football: Lithuania v England ITV, 4.30pm England round off an eventful qualifying campaign that began with them replacing Sam Allardyce as manager with Gareth Southgate. Since then Wayne Rooney, England’s top scorer, has called time on his international career, while younger players such as Harry Kane and Dele Alli have grown in stature. The former, who has been in sublime form for Spurs this season, has been named captain and will be confident of adding to tally this afternoon at the LFF Stadium in Vilnius. When these sides met in Match, goals from Jermain Defoe – his first for England since 2013 – and Jamie Vardy gave Southgate’s side a 2-0 victory.  The Last Post BBC One, 9.00pm Peter Moffat’s evocative Sixties drama continues with the arrival of an American war reporter, Martha Franklin (Essie Davis), which disrupts the delicate dynamic on the military base, while insurgent leader Abdul-Kadir Hakim is targeted for the murder of Captain Page (Joseph Kennedy). Electric Dreams: Crazy Diamond Channel 4, 9.00pm In this episode of the Philip K Dick adaptations, Ed Morris (Steve Buscemi) is offered a chance to inject some excitement into his drab life with wife Sally (Julia Davis) by Jill (Sidse Babbett Knudsen), a synthetic human. The plot is cluttered, but the ending is satisfying indeed. The Gifted Fox, 9.00pm Marvel’s colonisation of the small screen continues with this entry in the X-Men universe. While The Gifted is a far cry from the mind-bending visions of Noah Hawley’s Legion, it provides plenty of bang for your buck in its tales of a family, headed by True Blood’s Stephen Moyer, that is rocked by revelations that its children have mutant abilities and go on the run from dastardly government forces. Festival No 6 Sky Arts, 9.00pm Highlights from the deeply eccentric beanfeast in Portmeirion, the Italianate Welsh coastal home of The Prisoner TV series. Expect music from Mogwai, Bloc Party and the wonderful Flaming Lips. The Sky at Night BBC Four, 10.00pm Maggie Aderin-Pocock considers the renewal of interest in manned missions to the moon, and the role of tech companies in funding and driving these new initiatives. GT Snowfall BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI This new 10-parter from John Singleton (Boyz N the Hood) traces the shockwaves from the crack cocaine epidemic that ravaged Los Angeles in the Eighties. In the first episode, we meet Franklin Saint (Damson Idris), who is living with his mum and senses an opportunity that will change his life, and his city. It’s a notch below Narcos, but it’s still compelling and sharp. Sir Bobby Charlton at 80 BBC One, 10.30pm Alex Ferguson, Eric Cantona and more pay tribute to an Old Trafford great in a hagiography, yet Charlton is a man of such decency and dignity that it’s hard to object. GT Dial M for Murder (1954) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 1.15pm  It’s not quite on the same plane of brilliance as Vertigo, but Hitchcock’s adaptation of Frederick Knott’s stage play is still a briskly efficient exercise in suspense. Tony Wendice (Ray Milland) is trying to have his socialite wife Margot (Grace Kelly) murdered, after she has an affair with a writer. When Tony’s first plan fails, he dreams up another that’s even more devious. This Sporting Life (1963) ★★★★ London Live, 8.00pm  It’s Yorkshire accents and monochrome realism as Richard Harris goes down the mines, plays rugby and has an affair. As an uncompromising portrait of male attitudes, Lindsay Anderson’s stunning adaptation of David Storey’s novel is like a punch to the gut, and a direct antecedent of Scorsese’s Raging Bull. Rachel Roberts (star of earlier kitchen sink drama Saturday Night and Sunday Morning) co-stars. The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (2013) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 11.05pm  Mild-mannered Walter Mitty’s life is controlled  by his overbearing mother. He finds his escape by imagining himself living in the worlds pictured on the covers of Life magazine  and becoming a pilot, a sea captain and couturier.  Ben Stiller directs and stars in this loose revamping of the James Thurber’s story: the result is a flawed but  still entertaining and enjoyable adventure. Monday 9 October At your service: Steph and Dom Parker Credit: Channel 4 Steph and Dom’s One Star to Five Star Channel 4, 5.30pm Daytime programming isn’t normally where we look for originality, so it comes as no surprise to find little in this new weekday show hosted by Steph and Dom Parker, those once, seemingly ever-sozzled breakout stars from Gogglebox. What there is, though, is fun and lots of it, even if at times it can be hard to tell whether it is intentional or not. Like the illegitimate offspring of Four in a Bed and any number of hackneyed Hotel Inspector-style shows, this series sees the Parkers take their own limited experience as B & B owners in Kent as proof that they know everything there is to know about the international hospitality industry and descend on an ailing hotel for a week with a view to making it marginally more appealing.  They begin with the dowdy Ransdale Hotel in Bridlington, a slightly tatty, underperforming establishment where they reckon seaside-themed rooms, kedgeree for breakfast and a party atmosphere in the bar will get the occupancy levels up from the current “negligible”. Could getting the clientele drunk cause the approval ratings to peak? It’s probably more likely than the kedgeree. Gerard O’Donovan The Human Body: Secrets of Your Life Revealed BBC Two, 9.00pm In the series’ concluding part, Chris and Xand van Tulleken explore how experiences shape our minds and bodies, and show for the very first time how memories are formed in the brain and continue to influence us throughout our lives.  Tunes for Tyrants: Music and Power with Suzy Klein BBC Four, 9.00pm In this edition of the documentary series, Suzy Klein explores the Thirties and how classical music, while it was exploited to idealise violent nationalism and prop up the totalitarian regimes of the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany, was also be a source of coded resistance. Liar ITV, 9.00pm In a torrid penultimate episode, Laura (Joanne Froggatt) convinces ex-boyfriend Tom (Warren Brown) to help bring Andrew Earlham (Ioan Gruffudd) to justice as she’s forced to resort to a somewhat unusual method of forcing a confession out of him. W1A BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI This is a terrific edition of the sitcom. As the crisis over the axing of the BBC’s Big Swing Band goes viral, Head of Values Ian Fletcher (Hugh Bonneville) once again finds himself caught in the media cross-hairs.  The Vietnam War BBC Four, 10.00pm & 10.55pm Another double helping of Ken Burns’s stately and impeccably researched history of the Vietnam War rolls us on through 1967 when, with casualties mounting and the Viet Cong striking back in the infamous Tet offensive, a US victory looked increasingly beyond reach. Timewasters ITV2, 10.00pm & 10.30pm ITV2 launches a season of new comedies with this sharply scripted sitcom about a struggling four-piece jazz band who get stuck in Twenties London when their time machine breaks down. GO After the News ITV, 10.45pm; NI, 12.45am; not STV; Wales, 11.15pm Current affairs presenters Emma Barnett and Nick Ferrari are hot tickets just now following some hard-hitting “holiday cover” hosting on Newsnight this summer. Now ITV has signed them up for this new nightly debate show that takes its subject matter straight from ITV News at Ten. After the unmitigated flop of The Nightly Show, ITV will be keen to for this to shine. GO Pimpernel Smith (1941, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 3.50pm  Leslie Howard, famed for his role in Gone with the Wind, directs and stars in this deft drama set in 1939 Berlin. An academic (Howard) recruits students to go to Europe under the guise of an archaeological dig. However, his real mission is to smuggle victims of Nazi persecution out of Germany. An absorbing film and, retrospectively, quite haunting since Howard was shot down in the war by a Nazi plane two years later. The Birth of a Nation (2016) ★★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 4.10pm and daily  Writer-director-star Nate Parker’s attempt to reappropriate the notorious racism of DW Griffith’s 1915 foundation myth and spin it on its axis is a graceless, pretentious mallet to the head of history. Parker (whose galvanising performance is much the strongest) tells the story of Nat Turner’s 1831 slave rebellion from the side of the true victims. Se7en (1995) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm  Gluttony, avarice, envy, sloth, wrath, lust and pride; the seven deadly sins are explored graphically, and imaginatively, in this gloomy thriller from director David Fincher. It follows a detective (an outstanding Morgan Freeman) and his rookie partner (Brad Pitt) on the hunt for a maniac who kills those guilty of the above vices. Brutal and gripping, with an ending you won’t forget in a hurry. Gwyneth Paltrow and Kevin Spacey co-star. Tuesday 10 October In the field: Michelle Keegan as Georgie Lane Credit: BBC Our Girl: Nepal Tour BBC One, 9.00pm Michelle Keegan returns as dedicated army medic Georgie Lane in Tony Grounds’s entertaining if soapy army drama. This time the main action is in Nepal, where Georgie and the rest of 2 Section, including Ben Aldridge’s patrician Captain Charles James, are posted to provide humanitarian relief following an earthquake.  This being Our Girl, the personal relationships are as important as the action and Georgie soon finds herself having a perfectly arched eyebrow-off with new recruit Maisie Richards (the excellent Shalom Brune-Franklin). Yet behind the jokes there are serious points raised about the way in which the army operates, and whether individualism ever has a place. Fans of the will they/won’t they romance between Georgie and her slick former fiancé Elvis (Luke Pasqualino) will be disappointed by how little the latter features in this opening episode (just one brief scene in Syria before the main action begins), although Rudi Dharmalingam gallantly steps into the breach as impassioned NGO worker Milan. The real joy, however, comes not from the plot twists but from the expert way in which Grounds captures both the banter and boredom of army life. Sarah Hughes Once Upon a Time Netflix, from today This popular fantasy series that follows fairy-tale characters living in the real world returns for its seventh season. It marks a reboot of sorts, with our now-adult hero Henry Mills (Jared S Gilmore) finding himself in the same position as when the story began. The Great British Bake Off Channel 4, 8.00pm The cooking competition continues to roll out new themes, with this episode marking the first Italian Week. But you can be sure that it won’t have anything to do with making a bog-standard spag bol. Unfortunately the weather is not on their side, as the contestants suffer in the hottest temperatures ever recorded in the tent. Russia 1917: Countdown to Revolution BBC Two, 9.00pm Juliet Stevenson narrates this insightful documentary made to mark the centenary of the Russian Revolution. Martin Amis, Orlando Figes and Helen Rappaport are among those discussing and recounting how Russia transitioned from a tsarist autocracy to become the first communist state – and the roles played by Lenin, Trotsky and Stalin. Concorde: A Supersonic Story BBC Four, 9.00pm The Concorde was considered the “most glamorous plane ever built” – until it was retired in 2003 following the crash of Air France Flight 4590. But its story is a fascinating one. Sophie Okonedo narrates this tale of rows between French and British governments, while former passengers recount queuing for the lavatory with celebrities.  The Deuce Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Vincent (James Franco) is putting the finishing touches to his new bar, in this third episode of the gritty, Seventies New York-set drama. But then an unexpected silent partner turns up. CG Celebrity Hunted Channel 4, 9.15pm The real-life thriller returns for a celebrity charity edition. Anneka Rice and former Strictly winner Jay McGuiness are among those attempting to avoid detection.  Later Live… with Jools Holland BBC Two, 10.00pm; N Ireland, 11.15pm Former Led Zeppelin singer Robert Plant performs live with his band Sensational Space Shifters. He’s joined by Beck, with songs from his first new album in three years. Catherine Gee Ice Age: Continental Drift (2012) ★★☆☆☆ E4, 8.00pm Surprisingly, the Ice Age series has accrued more lucre than Pixar’s Toy Story trilogy. But this fourth film is the thinnest and redeemed only by a demented squirrel. Once again, the story revolves around Manny the mammoth (Ray Romano), Sid the sloth (John Leguizamo) and Diego the smilodon (Denis Leary), who are separated from their herd thanks to the shifting of the Earth’s land masses. Southpaw (2015) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Jake Gyllenhaal lays his body on the line for 0a boxing drama so predictable that you could set your watch by it. If only someone had devoted equivalent stamina to the screenplay, we might have an actual movie on our hands. Nevertheless, it’s rousingly entertaining as Gyllenhaal’s Billy “The Great” Hope learns the art of subterfuge from a new coach (Forest Whitaker). Rachel McAdams co-stars. I Origins (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film 4, 11.25pm  Eyes and souls have been cinematically intertwined since at least 1929, when, in Un Chien Andalou, Buñuel and Dalí carved out their visionary manifesto with the quick swipe of a razor blade across a plump and oozing eyeball. In Mike Cahill’s film, the metaphor trots off down a strange and lyrical new trail when a biology student (Michael Pitt) encounters a model (Astrid Bergès-Frisbey) who makes him question scientific fact. Wednesday 11 October Not sitting well: David Mitchell as Stephen Credit: Channel 4 Back Channel 4, 10.00pm The ratings may have been a little underwhelming, but in contrast to David Mitchell and Robert Webb’s tonally uncertain and muddled Ambassadors, Back has been a triumph. Simon Blackwell’s often brutal, witheringly funny script has granted the leading men roles that riff on their Peep Show personas of Mark and Jez without ever becoming beholden to them. Prodigal foster son Andrew’s (Webb) victory over biological offspring Stephen (Mitchell) is apparently complete, as the former struts around his flourishing gastropub, bragging about his chef’s clafoutis while the latter moulders in a caravan. “He’s stolen my life and he’s living it better than me,” Stephen fumes, impotently. Their father’s memorial party – and the associated speeches – offer Stephen one final shot at redemption: when a clutch of other returning foster children eclipse Andrew’s efforts to ingratiate himself, Stephen has a revelation that sends him on a demented trip of vengeance to fill the gaps in his rival’s life story. Finding profound bathos in often gasp-inducing misanthropy and reuniting the best British double act around (pace Vic and Bob), Back undoubtedly merits a return. Gabriel Tate The Apprentice BBC One, 9.00pm Enjoying a new lease of life after a disappointing series last year, reality TV’s version of an extended job interview this week unleashes the candidates’ aesthetic pretensions by asking them to turn interior designers at a five-star hotel. The mind boggles at the bills that needed settling at the end of this particular stay. The Detectives: Murder on the Streets BBC Two, 9.00pm This utterly involving and consistently impressive documentary series comes to a climax with the arrival of the trial in the case of the murder of young homeless man Daniel Smith. This is true crime of the most empathetic and socially responsible kind. Britain’s Lost Masterpieces BBC Four, 9.00pm Dr Bendor Grosvenor and Emma Dabiri visit Carmathenshire County Museum, home to a damaged portrait of a 16th-century Earl whose provenance is disputed. Doc Martin ITV, 9.00pm Receptionist Morwenna’s (Jessica Ransom) parents pay her a surprise visit and present Doc Martin (Martin Clunes) with a dilemma as the amiable comedy drama ambles through another hour. Ray Donovan Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Susan Sarandon has been both a welcome addition and much-needed counterpart to this occasionally testosterone-heavy series, with Liev Schreiber’s eponymous heavy facing the repercussions of years of making enemies in high places. Norskov Channel 4, 10.35pm The titular Danish industrial port is blighted by a drug problem. Enter ace detective Tom Noack (Thomas Levin), an old acquaintance of the city’s mayor to clean the place up and, inevitably, disturb a few ghosts. It’s a slick Nordic noir – the whole series will be available on C4’s online service Walter Presents after this episode airs. GT Inside Birmingham Children’s Hospital More4, 10.00pm The BBC and Channel 4 continue to match each other, blow for blow, with medical documentaries. This latest series follows a girl diagnosed with a life-changing condition, a boy with leukaemia and a five-year-old whose epilepsy is proving increasingly hard to manage. As so often, their stoicism and resilience are humbling and very affecting. GT Charade (1963) ★★★★☆ Film4, 4.35pm Audrey Hepburn as a temperamental-but-alluring damsel in distress and Cary Grant as a shadowy charmer are characters that the two actors played over and over during their careers. But they do so exceptionally in this suspense comedy from Stanley Donen, often referred to as the best Hitchcock movie that Hitchcock never made. Hepburn is the widow being trailed by four men hunting for her late husband’s stolen fortune. Starship Troopers (1997) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 10.00pm  On first appearances, this Oscar-nominated sci-fi action thriller looks distressingly silly: in the distant future, a group of American high-school friends join the armed forces to do intergalactic war with some malicious insectoid aliens, or “Bugs”. The whole of humanity is at risk. Thankfully director Paul Verhoeven deftly underpins the whole thing with wicked satirical verve and no-nonsense action. Dying Laughing (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Arts, 10.30pm  Dozens of stand-up comics, including Kevin Hart, Jerry Seinfeld and Amy Schumer, contribute to this understated but rather wonderful documentary film about the infrequent highs and relentless lows of trying to make people laugh. It can be painful – one anecdote about “bombing” on stage is particularly uncomfortable – but then a comic will recall that first great gig and you can just tell that all the anguish has been worth it. Thursday 12 October Every second counts: McDonald follows a murder investigation Credit: ITV An Hour to Catch a Killer with Trevor McDonald ITV, 9.00pm Trevor McDonald’s abiding fascination with such murky matters as serial murder and organised crime, especially in the United States, is well established. For the first programme in ITV’s new Crime and Punishment season, McDonald examines a key concept of modern crime detection: how the decisions made by investigating officers in the so-called “Golden Hour” – the first 60 minutes of a murder inquiry – have a vital impact on whether or not a killer is caught and successfully prosecuted. And here he examines a case much closer to home. With full access to the Northumbria Police Homicide Unit’s investigation into the murder of 24-year-old graduate Alice Ruggles last October, the film follows the case from the moment the murder was reported, through every layer of the investigation as it develops, to the moment the all-too-obvious prime suspect is located and charged.  Later in this series, Susannah Reid, Piers Morgan, Ross Kemp and, more randomly, Gordon Ramsay will present reports on subjects as diverse as the lucrative international cocaine trade and gang warfare inside the notorious Barlinnie Prison in Glasgow. Gerard O’Donovan Mr Robot Amazon Prime, from today Techno-paranoia is still the name of the game as the US hacker drama returns for a much-anticipated third series. With 10 new episodes to get through, clearly the first thing to sort out is the fate of the not-always-reliable narrator Elliot Alderson (Rami Malek), who was shot in last season’s cliffhanger. Dynasty Netflix, from today As in the original, bling, bubbles and bonking dominate this 22-episode reboot of one of the Eighties’ silliest US soap operas. Once again it follows the boardroom and bedroom escapades of Denver’s super-rich Carrington clan.  PGA Tour Golf: The CIMB Classic Sky Sports Main Event, 6.00am Coverage of the opening day’s play at the annual event from the Kuala Lumpur Golf & Country Club in Malaysia, where Justin Thomas has won the last two titles.  Council House Crackdown BBC One, 8.00pm Michelle Ackerley uncovers more tales of social housing fraud as council investigators stake out a woman suspected of faking a disability and a tenant alleged to be illegally subletting housing association property. Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm; BBC Two Wales, 9.00pm The final programme in this affecting series again focuses on the tough decisions the London Ambulance Service faces when its slim resources are stretched to capacity and calls must be prioritised. Russia with Simon Reeve BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 11.15pm This is by far the best travelogue Reeve has done for a while, and for this final leg, the adventurer starts in Crimea, where he weighs up the political and economic costs of its annexation by Russia. From there, he travels north through the vast plains of western Russia to where the country’s real power has always resided, Moscow and St Petersburg.  Educating Greater Manchester Channel 4, 9.00pm In tonight’s episode, it’s Valentine’s Day and romance is in the air for even the school’s youngest pupils. Plus, a recently qualified teacher who’s come to Harrop Fold looking for a new challenge gets more than he bargained for. GO The History of Comedy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This new documentary has an overambitious title for a series that focuses almost entirely on US comedy of fairly recent vintage. Still, it’s an interesting thematic survey of how certain types of laughter making have evolved in the last century. GO Titanic (1997) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Eleven Oscars won and more than a billion dollars taken worldwide in ticket sales. James Cameron deserved his success with this opulent blockbuster about the sinking of the RMS Titanic, a story that has a grand romance between penniless artist Jack (Leonardo DiCaprio) and rich American girl Rose (Kate Winslet) at its heart. Even viewers determined to find it soppy are liable to be swept along by the emotion. Heist (2001) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 10.50pm  Prepare to be triple-crossed, duped and bewildered by this piece of con-artistry, which pulls the rug out from under your feet with such regularity that it’s tempting just to give up and lie down. Gene Hackman, Danny DeVito and Rebecca Pidgeon set out to steal some gold; needless to say, it does not go smoothly. There are excellent performances, plus endless twists and cracking dialogue. Just Go with It (2011) ★★☆☆☆ 5STAR, 11.00pm  Adam Sandler stars in this remake of the 1971 comedy Cactus Flower (itself adapted from a Broadway stage play by Abe Burrows), as Danny, a single plastic surgeon in Los Angeles who feigns an unhappy marriage in order to have no-strings-attached flings with women. What follows is a complex low-grade romantic farce which is saved by a sparky performance from Jennifer Aniston as Danny’s office manager and best friend. Friday 13 October Life on the edge: Ray Mears is in Australia Credit: ITV Australian Wilderness with Ray Mears ITV, 8.00pm; not STV/UTV/Wales The great appeal of Ray Mears’s wildlife documentaries is his no-nonsense approach. Where other presenters rush around telling you how exciting and amazing and wonderful everything is, Mears tends to amble gently through it, explaining a few facts and otherwise allowing you to gaze at the beauty unfurling across your TV screen. It’s an approach that pays high dividends in this new series about the Australian wilderness, a landscape that is vast, beautiful and oddly eerie.  The opening episode focuses more on sea than land (although there is time for a quick trek through rocky desert towards the Indian Ocean) as Mears dives on Ningaloo Reef, the longest fringing coral reef in the world. After a pleasant meeting with some friendly stingrays and a few “wish you were here” shots of the turquoise sea, the real star of the show heaves into sight as Mears and his companions find themselves swimming alongside a passing whale shark, the largest fish in the world. “This is what we’ve all been waiting for,” says Mears as the fish floats into view. It’s a breathtaking, beautiful moment and one which manages to shake even Mears out of his habitual calm. Sarah Hughes Lore Amazon Prime, from today Not for the faint of heart, this disquieting new documentary series is based on Aaron Mahnke’s popular podcast of the same name, with each episode exploring the story behind pop culture’s most legendary horror myths, from vampires and werewolves to possessed dolls.  Mindhunter Netflix, from today Imagine Se7en crossed with Zodiac and Silence of the Lambs and you’ll get the gist of this excellent new detective drama executive produced by David Fincher and Charlize Theron. Based on the non-fiction book Mind Hunter: Inside the FBI’s Elite Serial Crime Unit and set in the late Seventies, it follows a pair of FBI agents (Jonathan Groff and Holt McCallany) who interview and analyse imprisoned mass murderers in order to better understand serial killers. The first episode, which is shot by master of murk Fincher, moves languidly – but is no less absorbing. PS International T20 Cricket: India v Australia Friday, Sky Sports Main Event, 2.20pm The Rajiv Gandhi International Stadium in Hyderabad is the setting as India and Australia contest the final game in a three-match T20 series. Unreported World Channel 4, 7.30pm On August 14, a mudslide in Sierra Leone, caused by torrential rain, destroyed the small town of Regent on the outskirts of the capital, Freetown. Hundreds lost their lives. In this affecting report, Seyi Rhodes talks to the survivors and the rescue teams desperately trying to find those still missing.  Crystal Maze / Have I Got News for You Channel 4, 8.00pm / BBC One, 9.00pm Richard Ayoade fans, rejoice: tonight you can see him twice – somewhat fitting given that he once wrote and directed a black comedy called The Double. First up, he continues to add warmth and irony to a rousing revamp of The Crystal Maze, as the current series concludes. Then, in HIGNFY, he puts that bone-dry wit to good use yet again, as he guest presents the long-running news quiz.  Cold Feet ITV, 9.00pm Affectionate writing and a great ensemble are the foundations on which Mark Bullen’s middle-aged comedy drama are built. Tonight, as this Nineties-show revival continues, Adam (James Nesbitt) and Pete (John Thomson) throw a joint 50th birthday dinner.  Porridge BBC One, 9.30pm  On the subject of revivals, this sort-of sequel to the classic Seventies comedy continues to be so-so. Tonight, there’s a new prison officer on the scene. Patrick Smith The Meyerowitz Stories (2017) ★★★★☆ Netflix, from today  It’s been a long time coming but Adam Sandler is finally in a good film. He plays Danny, a New Yorker whose unemployment and divorce has left him defined purely in terms of his bloodline. The narrative arc is about Danny, sister Jean and half-brother Matthew reconciling themselves with their curmudgeon father Harold (Dustin Hoffman). Emma Thompson is woozily uproarious as Harold’s wife. Lion (2016) ★★★★☆ Amazon Prime, from today Derived from a 2012 memoir by the grown Saroo Brierley, called A Long Way Home, this is the story of a lost boy: a five-year-old Indian who grew up in the Eighties in the area around Khandwa. With no paper trail or family name, he becomes a lost cause, eventually shipped off to kindly foster parents in Tasmania, played by Nicole Kidman and David Wenham. The excellent script, by Luke Davies, sticks rigidly to Saroo’s own point of view. Good Will Hunting (1997) ★★★★☆ W, 9.00pm  Matt Damon and Ben Affleck won an Oscar for Best Screenplay with this stirring if occasionally gloopy story. Will Hunting (Damon) is a hot-headed, 20-year-old janitor with a photographic memory and an untapped genius for mathematics. Robin Williams plays the inspiring therapist who channels Will’s rage into solving quadratics, and Minnie Driver is his brainy, Harvard graduate love interest.   Television previewers Catherine Gee, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

Rugby Union - Championship - Argentina Pumas v New Zealand All Blacks

Rugby Union - Championship - Argentina Pumas v Australia Wallabies - Malvinas Argentinas stadium, Mendoza, Argentina - October 7, 2017 - Australia's Jack Dempsey in action. REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci

Rugby Union - Championship - Argentina Pumas v New Zealand All Blacks

Rugby Union - Championship - Argentina Pumas v Australia Wallabies - Malvinas Argentinas stadium, Mendoza, Argentina - October 7, 2017 - Australia's Marika Koroibete and teammate Will Genia react after he scored a try. REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci

Rugby Union - Championship - Argentina Pumas v New Zealand All Blacks

Rugby Union - Championship - Argentina Pumas v Australia Wallabies - Malvinas Argentinas stadium, Mendoza, Argentina - October 7, 2017 - Australia's head coach Michael Cheika throws a ball in the air before the match. REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci

Rugby Union - Championship - Argentina Pumas v New Zealand All Blacks

Rugby Union - Championship - Argentina Pumas v Australia Wallabies - Malvinas Argentinas stadium, Mendoza, Argentina - October 7, 2017 - Australia's Marika Koroibete runs past Argentina's Javier Ortega Desio to score a try. REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci

Rugby Union - Australia beat Argentina to finish runners-up

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Rugby Union - Championship - Argentina Pumas v New Zealand All Blacks

Rugby Union - Championship - Argentina Pumas v Australia Wallabies - Malvinas Argentinas stadium, Mendoza, Argentina - October 7, 2017 - Australia's Michael Hooper embraces Jack Dempsey at the end of the match. REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci

Rugby Union - Championship - Argentina Pumas v New Zealand All Blacks

Rugby Union - Championship - Argentina Pumas v Australia Wallabies - Malvinas Argentinas stadium, Mendoza, Argentina - October 7, 2017 - Australia's Jack Dempsey in action. REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci

Rugby Union - Championship - Argentina Pumas v New Zealand All Blacks

Rugby Union - Championship - Argentina Pumas v Australia Wallabies - Malvinas Argentinas stadium, Mendoza, Argentina - October 7, 2017 - Australia's Reece Hodge receives the ball from Samu Kerevi and runs for a try. REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci

Rugby Union - Championship - Argentina Pumas v New Zealand All Blacks

Rugby Union - Championship - Argentina Pumas v Australia Wallabies - Malvinas Argentinas stadium, Mendoza, Argentina - October 7, 2017 - Australia's Samu Kerevi passes the ball as he is tackled by Argentina's Matias Moroni. REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci

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