Australia RU

Australia slideshow

(L-R) Captains from Hong Kong, Japan, Italy, New Zealand, France, Ireland, England, Canada, Australia, US Wales and Spain pose with the trophy in Dublin ahead of the women's rugby union World Cup on August 6, 2017

(L-R) Captains from Hong Kong, Japan, Italy, New Zealand, France, Ireland, England, Canada, Australia, US Wales and Spain pose with the trophy in Dublin ahead of the women's rugby union World Cup on August 6, 2017

(L-R) Captains from Hong Kong, Japan, Italy, New Zealand, France, Ireland, England, Canada, Australia, US Wales and Spain pose with the trophy in Dublin ahead of the women's rugby union World Cup on August 6, 2017 (AFP Photo/Paul FAITH)

(L-R) Captains from Hong Kong, Japan, Italy, New Zealand, France, Ireland, England, Canada, Australia, US Wales and Spain pose with the trophy in Dublin ahead of the women's rugby union World Cup on August 6, 2017

New rugby union competition for women in Australia

Rugby Australia women's competition

New rugby union competition for women in Australia

New rugby union competition for women in Australia

New rugby union competition for women in Australia

New rugby union competition for women in Australia

New rugby union competition for women in Australia

New rugby union competition for women in Australia

New rugby union competition for women in Australia

New rugby union competition for women in Australia

New rugby union competition for women in Australia

New rugby union competition for women in Australia

New rugby union competition for women in Australia

New rugby union competition for women in Australia

Australia's Castle shatters rugby union glass ceiling

Australia's Castle shatters rugby union glass ceiling

Australia's Castle shatters rugby union glass ceiling

Australia's Castle shatters rugby union glass ceiling

Australia's Castle shatters rugby union glass ceiling

Australia's Castle shatters rugby union glass ceiling

Australia's Castle shatters rugby union glass ceiling

Australia's Castle shatters rugby union glass ceiling

Australia's Castle shatters rugby union glass ceiling

Australia's Castle shatters rugby union glass ceiling

Australia's Castle shatters rugby union glass ceiling

Australia's Castle shatters rugby union glass ceiling

Australia's Castle shatters rugby union glass ceiling

Australia's Castle shatters rugby union glass ceiling

Australia's Castle shatters rugby union glass ceiling

Australia's Castle shatters rugby union glass ceiling

Australia's Castle shatters rugby union glass ceiling

Australia's Castle shatters rugby union glass ceiling

Australia's Castle shatters rugby union glass ceiling

Australia's Castle shatters rugby union glass ceiling

Australia's Castle shatters rugby union glass ceiling

Australia's Castle shatters rugby union glass ceiling

Australia's Castle shatters rugby union glass ceiling

Australia's Castle shatters rugby union glass ceiling

What's on TV tonight: Catching a Killer and Love, Lies & Records

Thursday 7 December Catching a Killer: A Bullet Through The Window Channel 4, 9.00pm The most striking thing about Catching a Killer, Channel 4’s ongoing look at how police murder and missing persons investigations work, is the level of access involved. This film follows the fallout from the death of 19-year-old Suhaib Mohammed. It begins with the terrified 999 call stating “My friend just got shot” and ends with the eventual arrest of his killers. Along the way a complex story emerges of a naive teenager who drifted away from his family and whose death was a terrible case of being in the wrong place with the wrong people. It’s Senior Investigating Officer Mike Lynch’s last case before retirement and one he’s therefore doubly determined to solve, but as the investigation continues so his quiet fury over the way in which the dead teenager’s death is dismissed as just another gang death increases. As always though, it is the testimony of the victim’s family which lingers longest. “We knew he’d become more distant, more private, more closed off but I don’t think we realised he was hanging with the wrong people,” says his sister quietly. His devastated father simply notes: “His heart was very soft… he had big dreams.” Sarah Hughes Ross Noble: Off Road Dave, 8.00pm As fans of his previous Dave series (Ross Noble Freewheeling) can tell you, the comedian is a true petrolhead. However, even the enthusiastic Noble might have bitten off more than he can chew this time as he attempts the Scottish Six Days Trial, an event where the world’s best motorbike riders race 100 miles every day across unforgiving terrain. SH Love, Lies & Records BBC One, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s enjoyable drama continues with Judy (Rebecca Front) sending Rob (Adrian Bower) a video of his fiancé Kate’s (Ashley Jensen) “moment of madness” with Rick (Kenny Doughty) – but can Kate get to it first? SH Blitz: The Bombs That Changed Britain BBC Two, 9.00pm This week’s focus is Scotland, where a series of Luftwaffe raids over three nights in March 1941 devastated a community, killing 528 people, including 15 members of the same family. For the tightknit society of shipbuilders and factory workers, the aftermath was devastating; many left Clydebank, never to return. SH Live at the Apollo BBC Two, 10.00pm Our host is the sharp, smart and amiable Nish Kumar. He’s joined by the laid-back Irish comic David O’Doherty and rising star Luisa Omielan, who recently rewrote her whole act in the light of her mother’s death from cancer. SH When Rock Arrived in North Korea: Liberation Day: Storyville BBC Four, 11.00pm This hugely entertaining look at how Slovenian art rockers Laibach became the first Western band to play in North Korea works largely because of the eccentric Norwegian director Morten Traavik’s bureaucrat-wrangling skills. The band themselves prove elusive, although the concert footage hammers home just how odd the occasion was. “There are all kinds of music – now I know there’s this kind of music too,” notes one bemused attendee. SH Born to Be Free: Saving Russia’s Whales Channel 4, 11.25pm No documentary is likely to make you angrier this week than Gayane Petrosyan’s bleak and brilliant film about the trade in Beluga whales. She uncovers the terrible fates of 18 belugas bought to Utrish Marine Station to be sold to aquariums across the world. SH Rugby Union: Varsity Match: Oxford University v Cambridge University Thursday, BBC Two, 2.45pm The 136th staging of the annual contest between the two universities takes place at Twickenham. Cambridge prevailed last year to end Oxford’s record-breaking six-year winning streak, and have the superior head-to-head record with 62 wins to their opponents’ 59. The match kicks off at 3.00pm. SH Austin Powers: The Spy Who S*****d Me (1999) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 9.00pm The successful franchise remains nothing more than daft entertainment, but its puerile jokes and cultural referencing still manage to elicit laughs. The “groovy” spy with the wonky teeth (Mike Myers) has his mojo stolen by his arch nemesis Dr Evil (also Myers) and must travel back in time to the swinging Sixties to get it back. Black Sea (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Written by Dennis Kelly (who co-wrote the musical Matilda) and starring Jude Law, this submarine thriller about a hunt for Nazi gold in a long-lost U-boat is less than the sum of its parts. However, a host of decent character actors – the best of whom, David Threlfall, steals the show – keep things buoyant and the set piece outside the sub, involving aquatic spacesuits and bars of gold, is pulse-pinging. 16 Blocks (2006) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 11.35pm Steered brilliantly by director Richard Donner (Superman, The Goonies) Bruce Willis plays Jack Mosley, a detective who’s assigned to escort prisoner Eddie Bunker (Mos Def) to a Grand Jury hearing in this frantic buddy-action film. This may sound simple, but Mosley’s colleagues don’t want Bunker to make it – because he’s a witness in a police corruption case that could bring their worlds crashing down. Friday 8 December Claire Foy in 'The Crown' The Crown Netflix, from today Expectations could hardly be higher for the return of Netflix’s most lavish series. Although the spectacle and horror of the war have passed, the era of Anthony Eden and Harold McMillan is arguably more intriguing for being less frequently dramatised, and Peter Morgan explores the hypocrisies and compromises inherent in the politics of a nation whose global influence is in decline. Anton Lesser makes a ruthless, discreet McMillan, while Jeremy Northam is once again superb as Eden, a man not low on self-confidence yet forced to face his limitations as the Suez Crisis sees him outmanoeuvred. But the focal point of course is the royal family, and specifically the relationship between Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip: fundamentally solid in its early years, but now subject to considerable stress and strain as the couple drift apart over niggling doubts and suspected betrayals. Claire Foy and Matt Smith are magnificent in the lead roles, rising to the challenges of Morgan’s script to make plausible his educated guesswork and speculations over long-rumoured private affairs. The blend of spectacle and attention to detail remains striking. Gabriel Tate The Grand Tour Amazon Prime Video, from today Jeremy Clarkson, Richard Hammond and James May return for a second go-round of megastar guests, big-budget stunts in exotic locales, and parochial studio chat. The series opens with Ricky Wilson v David Hasselhoff in new segment Celebrity Face Off, and a comparison of a Lamborghini, a hybrid Honda and an electric supercar in a hill-climb race that – as anyone who recalls the headlines from earlier this year will know – goes horribly wrong. GT Judge Rinder’s Crown Court ITV, 8.00pm Two daytime television classics, one ancient and one modern, collide in this bizarre two-parter which sees Judge Robert Rinder, mediator of petty domestic disputes, presiding over a fictional case of arsenic poisoning. As per the original Crown Court, the jurors are members of the public. GT Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm The chefs meet a childhood hero as Mark Hamill, soon to return to cinemas as Luke Skywalker, joins them to learn about making perfect roast beef and Yorkshire puddings, plus a Caesar salad and a seafood feast. GT Brunel: the Man Who Built Britain Channel 5, 8.00pm A giant of the Industrial Revolution, Isambard Kingdom Brunel had a curious private life to match his towering professional achievements. The ever-reliable Rob Bell begins his two-part profile with Brunel’s first major project, the Thames Tunnel. GT The Year in Music 2017 BBC Two, 9.00pm The BBC Music Awards follow in the footsteps of BBC Sports Personality of the Year and incorporate a review of the year into the bargain. Here, Claudia Winkelman and Clara Amfo look back on the past 12 months with contributors including Stormzy, Nile Rodgers and Liam Gallagher. GT Classic Album: American Pie: Don McLean BBC Four, 9.00pm McLean’s sophomore album is these days less venerated than other landmarks of the era (Blue, Tapestry, After the Goldrush); it is perhaps overshadowed by its monumental title song whose allusive, elusive lyrics offered an alternate history of rock ’n’ roll and eulogy for the hippy dream. Yet there was always more to it, as this diligent documentary asserts. GT Prisoners (2013) ★★★☆☆ More4, 9.00pm This drama, which centres on the abduction of two girls, is harrowing but it succeeds in sustaining its tension to the end. Hugh Jackman is cast into darkness when his six-year-old daughter is kidnapped. Jake Gyllenhaal is the detective in charge of the case, and the pair lock horns early on. What we are then presented with is a criminal puzzle and a very committed cast, which also includes Terrence Howard.  Legend (2015) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Tom Hardy gives a solid, convincing performance as east London gangster Reggie Kray but his caricatured portrayal of twin brother Ronnie lets him down, and his inconsistent performance leads to an entertaining though muddled film. Emily Browning, however, gives just the right mix of defiance and despair as Frances Shea, Reggie’s put-upon wife. Watch out for some particularly gory scenes. Dead Calm (1989) ★★★☆☆ W, 9.00pm In her first big film role, Nicole Kidman displays pluck and vulnerability as Rae Ingram, a woman who loses her infant son in a car accident, and consents to a long recovery at sea, on a luxury yacht called the Saracen. Her husband John (Sam Neill) is an experienced naval officer and stand-up guy, and though he knows banishing Rae’s guilt and grief is going to be tough, he has no idea what shock therapy fate has in mind. Saturday 9 December John Noakes and Shep in 1978 Credit: HULTON  John Noakes: TV Hero BBC Two, 5.30pm One quarter of the definitive Blue Peter foursome, alongside Peter Purves, Valerie Singleton and Shep, John Noakes was both its longest-serving presenter and one of its very finest. A gifted communicator, earnest when he had to be but more often game for anything, whether that be a laugh or a lunatic stunt. This affectionate profile of Noakes, who died in May, aged 83, after many years with Alzheimer’s, pivots on perhaps his two best-loved moments. First, there’s a climb up Nelson’s Column, sans ropes or safety harnesses, that was every bit as daft and dangerous as it looked and ample testament to his dauntlessness. That impish sense of humour is demonstrated by the notorious appearance of Lulu the elephant, who relieved herself on the floor before rampaging across the studio and over Noakes’s foot. Ever the entertainer, he milked both for all they were worth. His relationship with the series was an equivocal one and he reportedly resented his clownish persona, but this tribute skirts any controversy in favour of warm nostalgia, with familiar Blue Peter faces including Biddy Baxter and Lesley Judd recalling the man and his work. GT Premier League Football: West Ham United v Chelsea Sky Sports Main Event, 11.30am Having recovered from a goal down to beat Newcastle 3-1 last Saturday, with Eden Hazard helping himself to a brace, Chelsea travel across London to face West Ham United. The home side, who are currently in the relegation zone, will have taken plenty of positives from their 2-1 defeat at Manchester City last Sunday – namely, their defensive display. A similarly obdurate performance here and new manager David Moyes might get a share of the spoils this time. When these sides met at the London Stadium last season, West Ham lost 2-1. PS European Rugby Champions Cup: Toulon v Bath Sky Sports Main Event, 5.15pm Two wins from two reads the stats for both sides so far in this season’s European Champions Cup – at least one of these 100 per cent records will end at Stade Mayol. Bath come into this match on the back of a 42-29 defeat by Exeter, but before that they’d won four on the bounce, with Freddie Burns impressing at fly-half. After the autumn internationals, director of rugby Todd Blackadder now has an embarrassment of riches from which to pick: most notably, England backs Anthony Watson, Semesa Rokoduguni and Jonathan Joseph. Toulon, meanwhile, ended a three-match losing streak on Saturday when they beat Lyon 39-11. PS Strictly Come Dancing BBC One, 6.45pm The five remaining couples must perform two routines in this semi-final, and with barely a strand of lace between them, expect forensic criticism from the judges. Sunday’s results show will reveal the final four and there will be a performance from Craig David. GT Michael McIntyre’s Big Show BBC One, 8.20pm Wringing his contacts book dry, McIntyre ropes in guests including TV presenters Marvin and Rochelle Humes (taking part in the game Send to All) and pop rock band The Vamps for more fun. GT Witnesses: a Frozen Death BBC Four, 9.00pm and 9.55pm Even in this saturated market for foreign-language thrillers, Witnesses stands out for its lack of gimmicks – though without ever quite scaling the heights of The Bridge or Spiral. Here, Sandra’s (Marie Dompnier) pursuit of the killer takes her into a forest and an orphanage. GT The White Princess Drama, 9.00pm and 10.20pm The excellent Jodie Comer anchors the series to its conclusion tonight with another double bill, as Elizabeth of York (Comer) and Henry VII (Jacob Collins-Levy) struggle to maintain a united front. GT Peter Blake: Pop Art Life Sky Arts, 9.00pm While there is more to Peter Blake’s work than his cover for Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, music has played a crucial role in the development of his art and reputation. This engaging film digs deeply into a mutually fruitful relationship. GT Casualty BBC One, 9.20pm Christmas approaches, bringing annual trauma and discord for the A&E team. Tonight finds Elle’s (Jaye Griffiths) tearaway son Blake (Kai Thorne) going off the rails in response to her suggestion that she spend the festive period with her new boyfriend. Polly (Sophia Di Martino), meanwhile, continues to be unimpressed by Max (Jamie Davis). GT Through the Keyhole: I’m a Celebrity… get me out of here! ITV, 9.50pm The living, breathing definition of an acquired taste, Keith Lemon returns for a fifth series of the show once helmed by David Frost. Guests include Jimmy Carr, Myleene Klass and Tony Blackburn. GT Gremlins 2: The New Batch (1990) ★★★☆☆ Christmas Gold, 9.40pm Whereas Joe Dante’s original monster hit was a deliciously dark horror flick (and staple Christmas hit) with touches of wry humour, this inferior sequel is essentially a straight-up, riotous comedy, replete with in-jokes and movie references. This time, the gremlins run amok in a Manhattan high-rise building called Clamp Tower, owned by John Glover’s Donald Trump-like mogul. The Cider House Rules (1999) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.15pm John Irving’s adaptation of his own 1985 novel features a fine Tobey Maguire and Michael Caine, who won an Oscar (only his second at the time). Irving won one too, for Best Screenplay, and there’s no doubt the story is moving, though this version – about an orphan (Maguire) and a doctor (Caine) who performs illegal abortions – is at times a bit saccharine. Paul Rudd co-stars; Lasse Hallström directs. The Drop (2014) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 11.35pm Tom Hardy anchors this tale of simmering malfeasance as the tender of a Brooklyn bar designated as the drop for ill-gotten gains. Dennis Lehane adapts his own short story Animal Rescue, and makes a perfect team with Belgian director Michaël R Roskam, who gets a tamped-down, shuffling and beautifully calibrated star turn out of Hardy. Sopranos star James Gandolfini adds a burly gravitas in what would be his final movie. Sunday 10 December Jumbo with keeper Matthew Scott in 1882 Credit: BBC Attenborough and the Giant Elephant BBC One, 9.00pm Can we ever have too much Attenborough? It seems not, as right in the foaming wake of the fabulous Blue Planet II (which concludes tonight, see preview below) comes this absorbing, bittersweet tale of the world’s first animal superstar – Jumbo the elephant. It’s a sad story, really. Jumbo shot to fame shortly after his arrival at London Zoo as an orphan in around 1861, but he didn’t get much from the deal. As Attenborough says, his captive life was “troubled, fuelled by alcohol, terrifying fits of violence, a near mystical relationship with his keeper and a tragic end that seems hard to believe”. Which is more than enough to hold the attention for an hour as he joins an international team examining Jumbo’s preserved skeleton at New York’s Museum of Natural History. Attenborough also pokes about in archives at London Zoo, sanctuaries in the Maasai Mara and Tennessee, and Ontario where Jumbo met his very sad end, building as complete a picture of this magnificent creature and his global travels as has ever been assembled. All the while it spreads a positive conservationist message and gives thanks that attitudes are more enlightened now than in Victorian times. GO Premier League Football: Liverpool v Everton & Manchester United v Manchester City Sky Sports Main Event, 1.15pm & 4.15pm “Super Sunday” lives up to its hyperbolic billing, with two potentially exhilarating derbies. First up, we’re at Anfield where Liverpool, fresh from their 5-1 demolition of Brighton, host Everton, who found some form last week, following up their 4-0 win at home to West Ham United with a 2-0 victory against Huddersfield. Later, in the 4.30pm kick-off, José Mourinho and Pep Guardiola renew rivalries as second-placed United host leaders City at Old Trafford. Expect it to be tight. PS Britain’s Wildest Weather 2017 Channel 4, 6.30pm This year has not, so far, been as extreme as some but, given the number of smartphone-wielding citizen journalists, there’s plenty of jaw-dropping footage of every extreme weather event that occurred, among them devastating floods, tornadoes and hair-raising lightning strikes. GO  Blue Planet II BBC One, 8.00pm This extraordinary series concludes with an undeniably depressing assessment of mankind’s impact on the marine environment. But David Attenborough, as ever, prefers to put the emphasis on hope. So there’s plenty of uplift too with stories of species brought back from extinction’s brink. GO Coastal Railways with Julie Walters Channel 4, 8.00pm Julie Walters heads for Cornwall on the Great Western route, recalling her childhood holidays in Torquay. She then boards a steam train at Paignton, hears tales of smugglers in Polperro and fills up on cakes in Penzance. GO Leonora Carrington: the Lost Surrealist BBC Four, 9.00pm This fascinating film tells the story of rebellious upper-class British artist Leonora Carrington, who worked alongside Ernst, Breton and Éluard in Paris at the height of the surrealist movement, yet died in 2011 all but forgotten in Mexico. Director Teresa Griffiths mixes interviews and biographical material with experimental animation and tableaux to bring Carrington’s work vividly to life. GO I’m a Celebrity… Get Me Out of Here! ITV, 9.00pm Seventeen series in and the public appetite for watching celebrities endure humiliation and repulsion shows little sign of drying up. This year’s launch pulled in ITV’s biggest audience of 2017. The final will no doubt draw as big a crowd again. GO Babylon Berlin Sky Atlantic, from 9.00pm Three more atmospheric episodes of the gripping crime series set in the bohemian, political Weimar Germany of the late Twenties. Detective Rath’s (Volker Bruch) investigation uncovers dangerous evidence of a shocking military conspiracy. GO The Sky At Night BBC Four, 10.00pm As well as more stargazing from the Royal Observatory, Maggie Aderin-Pocock is in Norway to see the Northern Lights. GO Ben-Hur (1959) ★★★★★ ITV3, 2.45pm A majestic slice of Hollywood history, this Roman-era melodrama directed by William Wyler and starring Charlton Heston won 11 Academy Awards (not equalled until Titanic in 1997). It still makes for magnificent viewing. Set in 26AD, it tells the story of a Jewish prince who clashes with the Roman governor and ends up enslaved, desperately plotting his revenge. The Sorcerer’s Apprentice (2010) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 3.00pm Jerry Bruckheimer gives the famous sequence from Disney’s Fantasia a fun, live-action reboot. Student Dave (Jay Baruchel) inherits Merlin’s powers, placing him in a power struggle between Balthazar (Nicolas Cage) and Horvath (Alfred Molina). Sadly there are just two scenes with broomsticks to link it to the original. Toby Kebbel is amusing as a stage musician co-opted by the forces of evil. Toy Story (1995) ★★★★★ BBC One, 3.35pm The idea of the first fully computer-generated animated film didn’t have those who had been weaned on the hand-drawn delights of Disney jumping for joy. However, with this beautiful tale, Pixar pushed animation to a new level – the premise, pace and emotion are all pitched perfectly. Whether it’s your first or 400th viewing, the story of toy cowboy Woody (Tom Hanks) and plastic spaceman Buzz Lightyear (Tim Allen) is a joy. Monday 11 December Faye Marsa, Sarah Parish and Amara Karan in Bancroft Credit: ITV Bancroft ITV, 9.00pm With so many crime dramas clogging up the television schedules it can be hard for a new series to stand out and at first ITV’s latest four-parter seems unlikely to break the mould. There’s an ambitious female cop with a possibly troubled past (the always reliable Sarah Parish), a striving younger cop who is desperate to move up the ranks (Faye Marsay) and the usual crop of jobsworths and strivers (Charles Babalola is particularly good as the married fellow officer Marsay’s Katherine should be steering well clear of). It’s all perfectly well done with a solid script from Kate Brooke (Mr Selfridge) but it seems like nothing special. Then, three quarters of the way through this first episode, something genuinely interesting happens: Bancroft’s secrets are revealed to be very dark indeed just as Katherine’s cold case involving the break-in and violent murder of a young woman in 1990 starts hotting up. With the stakes suddenly raised Bancroft spins off into a dark tale of the lengths that people go to keep the past buried and the stage is set for an intriguing game of secrets and lies. Smart scheduling sees the rest of the story play out over consecutive nights. SH Street Auction BBC One, 11.00am Paul Martin returns with a new series of the surprisingly addictive show in which people band together to raise funds for a member of their community by auctioning off hidden treasures. The fun comes from the unusual objects unearthed from garages and attics. SH Nigella’s Christmas Table BBC Two, 8.00pm If anything is guaranteed to Nigella put into purring overload it’s Christmas. The food on offer includes roast duck with orange, soy and ginger, but this is really about mood rather than food. SH   Paul Hollywood: A Baker’s Life Channel 4, 8.00pm Episode three of this genial series sees Hollywood looking back over his career and his time spent working at the Cliveden House Hotel in Berkshire. There’s also a festive get-together in Merseyside and some seasonal Danish pastries, which look delicious. SH The Art That Made Mexico: Paradise, Power and Prayers BBC Four, 9.00pm It’s always a pleasure to find a series that sheds new light on a subject, and so it is with artist Alinka Echeverria’s enthralling films about Mexico’s art. Of course, there are the key points: conquest, independence, dictatorship, revolution and figures such as Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo, but what the commentary gives us here is the context for both the history and the artists. This is true of this episode that looks at the relationship between art and power, colonialism and control while examining the enduring power of Kahlo’s work and myth. SH Handmade in Mexico BBC Four, 10.00pm The focus here is on Mexico’s celebrated Tree of Life sculptures, those gaudy, gorgeous interpretations of everything from the creation myth to the resurrection of Christ and the Day of the Dead. It’s a fascinating half-hour in which we see the amount of work and detail that goes into each piece. SH White Right: Meeting the Enemy: Exposure ITV, 10.40pm; STV, 11.05pm; UTV, 11.40pm; Wales, 11.10pm This intriguing-sounding documentary sees the Bafta-nominated Deeyah Khan (Jihad: A Story of the Others) investigate white extremism in the US. Khan visits white nationalist groups, attends a far-right rally and asks why this poisonous ideology is resurgent. SH The Black Swan (1942) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 2.35pm No, this is not the film about the ageing ballet dancer and the young ingénue; this is about high adventure on the seven seas. When Laird Cregar’s Captain Morgan becomes Governor of Jamaica, he promises to put an end to piracy. But things don’t go smoothly, especially when his assistant (Tyrone Power) kidnaps the ex-governor’s beautiful daughter (Maureen O’Hara). This was the final film of silent star Helene Costello. Mamma Mia! (2008) ★★★☆☆ ITV3, 7.50pm This musical comedy, directed by Phyllida Lloyd and set to Abba’s hits, is pure escapism. It’s naff, but that’s its selling point, as stars Meryl Streep, Pierce Brosnan and Julie Walters place tongues firmly in cheeks. At 59, Streep deserved more credit for doing the splits than for her role as a boho mother living on a Greek island whose daughter (Amanda Seyfried) tries to find out who her biological father is. Blood Diamond (2006) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 8.00pm The diamond industry of Sierra Leone is the subject of this striking thriller. Djimon Hounsou stars as a fisherman forced to work in the fields, who finds and hides a rare pink gem. His life is changed when he meets Leonardo DiCaprio’s self-serving mercenary and Jennifer Connelly’s well-meaning journalist. DiCaprio was Oscar-nominated, but lost to Forest Whitaker for The Last King of Scotland. Tuesday 12 December Paul Ready, Diane Morgan and Anna Maxwell-Martin Credit: BBC Motherland BBC Two, 10.00pm Dispensing with the calamitous set pieces of previous episodes and instead documenting the quiet desperation of this ill-starred band of sisters (plus one brother), this superb, exhausting sitcom from a writing supergroup including Graham Linehan and Sharon Horgan has been an exquisitely painful delight. We join Julia (Anna Maxwell Martin) in an unusually good place, with everything running smoothly thanks to her new Australian nanny, Lyndsey (Sarah Kendall). The kids are clean and happy, the school run is easy, the fridge is stocked – but could she be too good to be true? Amanda (Lucy Punch) has gone to ground after the revelation over her threesome, while her hapless confidant, Kevin (Paul Ready), is desperate to avoid having to get a job. And, should all the mugging get too much, there’s deadpan Liz (Diane Morgan), negotiating tricky relations with her dismal ex and his new, pregnant partner. After an orgy of passive aggression and desperate people in denial, the façades crack, just a little. Happily everyone reverts to fundamentally appalling type just in time for the end of the series and a surely inevitable recommission. GT Judd Apatow: the Return Netflix, from today After 25 years away from stand-up, the comedy zelig whose fingerprints are over everything from Knocked Up and Girls to Freaks and Geeks and Bridesmaids returns for a special set in Montreal, recorded in July. GT Masterchef: the Professionals BBC Two, 8.00pm After the hopefuls have tackled an invention test and rustled up a dish dedicated to one of their inspirations, Marcus Wareing, Monica Galletti and Gregg Wallace eliminate another two contenders, leaving only six in the contest. GT The A Word BBC One, 9.00pm Joe’s (brilliant Max Vento) family comes together for an end of year show at his old school – tears, acrimony and reconciliation ensue in the conclusion of Peter Bowker’s finely wrought, well-performed drama. A third series should surely be a formality. GT Invasion! with Sam Willis BBC Four, 9.00pm While not quite attaining Lucy Worsley levels of gonzo history, Dr Sam Willis is an enthusiastic and knowledgeable host not above the odd stunt to prove a point. This second episode of a series documenting the incursions that have shaped our nation and its bloodline examines the differing techniques and goals of the invaders. There are the Barbary Corsaire pirates who settled on Lundy Island, King Louis the Lion, invited to invade and crowned by disgruntled nobles, and the Dutch forces that negotiated the Medway just a year prior to the Glorious Revolution. Further proof, if any were needed, that Britain is a mongrel nation and all the better for it. GT The World’s Most Expensive Presents Channel 4, 9.00pm Eyeball-melting opulence and appalling lack of taste do battle with considerable craftsmanship and class in this startling film featuring everything from gold-plated pushbikes to a poker set in alligator-hide case. GT Sports Personality of the Year 2017: The Contenders BBC One, 10.45pm; Wales, 11.10pm; Scotland, 11.45pm With reigning title-holder Andy Murray’s injury-hit year effectively ruling him out of contention, Anthony Joshua, Chris Froome, Lewis Hamilton, Jo Konta and Mo Farah will be headlining this year’s roster after another 12 months of outstanding achievement in British sport. The runners and riders are introduced tonight. GT Shane (1953) ★★★★☆ Film4, 3.45pm There are few Westerns that examine the depths of human emotions, but this film by George Stevens is one of them and has become a landmark of cinema. Shane (Alan Ladd) is a cowboy who finds himself idolised for the way that he handles himself in the face of a landowner’s heavies. The climax is a face-off between Shane and smiling, whispering, Oscar-nominated Jack Palance, as the original man in black. A must-see. Mr & Mrs Smith (2005) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 9.00pm A daft comedy thriller which is perhaps best remembered for being the film that introduced Brad Pitt to Angelina Jolie. They play a couple whose failing marriage is spiced up dramatically when each discovers that the other secretly works as an assassin. Let down by a weak script, the film is held together by the chemistry between its two leads. Vince Vaughn and Adam Brody co-star. Moonraker (1979) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm The 11th film in the Bond series, and the fourth to star Roger Moore as the dapper MI6 agent, involves the theft of a space shuttle. It’s one of the weaker Bond films and at times seems more of a comedy than a tense action adventure, but it’s enjoyably frivolous. Michael Lonsdale plays resident baddie Hugo Drax who pinches the aforementioned space shuttle to help along his plan to wipe out the world’s population. Wednesday 13 December Barbara Schulz in Vanished by the Lake Credit: Channel 4 Vanished by the Lake Channel 4, 10.00pm This haunting French crime drama centres on a teenage girl who goes missing at a festival. It’s hardly an original set-up, but much like last year’s hit Gallic import The Disappearance, based on an almost identical premise, the mix of youthful promise cut short and fierce small-town intrigue quickly compels. The girl in question is Chloé Delval (Charlie Joirkin), and as news of her disappearance spreads, memories of a similar 15-year-old case in which two other girls vanished at the same celebration are revived. Into the fray steps striking Parisian detective Lise Stocker (Barbara Schulz), who has returned home to look after her ill mother, but is soon swept up by the case as its personal implications begin to unfold. All of the hallmarks of the Nordic noir genre are present, from the evocative setting (here a Broadchurch-style coastal backdrop) to the close-knit neighbours with secrets to hide. Nevertheless, this opening episode is an effective tension builder and the human impact of the mystery – particularly on Chloé’s fracturing parents – is powerfully moving. Once episode one finishes, the full series will be available to watch on All 4. TD Mary Berry’s Country House Secrets BBC One, 8.00pm Mary Berry rounds off her tour of Britain’s stately homes at Goodwood House, where she is suitably gushing over its royal history and grand interiors. Berry is treated to a hair-raising lap of the nearby motor circuit and whips up a four-tier cake for the cricket tea. TD The Secret Life of the Zoo Channel 4, 8.00pm The plight of the endangered Javan green magpie is on the agenda as keepers at Chester Zoo attempt to breed youngster Permata with older bird Netuba. Elsewhere, a zebra battle breaks out when newcomer Okoth arrives. TD Peaky Blinders BBC Two, 9.00pm A burst of gunfire opens the penultimate episode of period gangster antics, as Tommy Shelby (Cillian Murphy) faces off against mafia honcho Luca Changretta (Adrien Brody). An army colonel, meanwhile, questions Ada (Sophie Rundle) about her Communist past. TD The Channel: The World’s Busiest Waterway Channel 4, 9.00pm The fallout from Project Nemo, the new underwater electricity cable being laid between Belgium and Britain, is explored. We follow the Nemo manager struggling to avoid costly delays and the fisherman whose catch is being compromised by the work. TD Royal Academy: Painting the Future Sky Arts, 9.00pm Virtual reality (VR) is predicted to become the go-to place for everything from entertainment to work. The Royal Academy is getting in on the act with a new exhibition which explores the potential of the medium. This film follows the show’s creation with the artists, including sculptor Antony Gormley, portraitist Jonathan Yeo and Turner Prize-nominee Yinka Shonibare, who are producing works that use the technology to trace the history of the body in art. TD David Hockney: Time Reclaimed Sky Arts, 10.30pm This tribute to David Hockney aims to get beyond the glamour that surrounds his reputation, and focus on the personal aspects of his work. Anecdotes, images and analysis of the pictures themselves highlight the individuality expressed in each period of Hockney’s career, suggesting a diverse oeuvre that defies classification. TD Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am George Roy Hill directed two of the most popular films ever: Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969) and The Sting (1973). But this indifferent Julie Andrews musical of the flapper era was first. There’s much to enjoy in the story of a naive woman who leaves her rural roots behind to seek fortune and romance in Twenties New York. James Fox, as a spiffing salesman, is a particular highlight. The Three Musketeers (2011) ★★☆☆☆ E4, 8.00pm Paul W S Anderson’s adaptation of Alexandre Dumas’ novel is faithful in plot – Porthos, Athos and Aramis (Ray Stevenson, Matthew Macfadyen, Luke Evans), and disciple d’Artagnan (Logan Lerman), are sent to retrieve the French Queen’s (Juno Temple) necklace. The tone, however, is half action-pantomime, half candy-coloured steampunk comic – fun but terribly slapdash. Poltergeist (1982) ★★★★☆ TCM, 11.15pm Director Tobe Hooper, who made The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, tones down the gut-churning horror but still ramps up the tension to nightmare levels in this Steven Spielberg-produced chiller. It has one of cinema’s most spine-tinglingly scary moments: “They’re here,” sing-songs a little girl kneeling before the TV. “They” are the spirits, at first playful then increasingly malevolent, who terrorise a suburban family. Thursday 14 December Lord Sugar Credit: BBC The Apprentice: Why I Fired Them BBC One, 8.00pm In the wake of last night’s excoriating interview round, and with this Sunday’s final rapidly approaching to decide who will win a £250,000 investment and the mentoring opportunity of a lifetime, Lord Sugar makes his most personal appearance of the series. Other than those brief to-camera inserts that roll out as taxi cabs ferry freshly defenestrated candidates away from Sugar Towers to forever dream of fortunes that might have been made, this is one of few occasions in each “process” when Lord Sugar appears on screen away from the wannabe tycoons and talking to viewers directly. And he makes the most of it with his trademark witty-gritty line in East End charm, although professionalism usually prevents him from really dishing the behind-the-scenes dirt on why he thought 16 of them worthy only of the tip of his boot. Instead he looks back over this 13th series identifying the key commercial and strategic errors that led to each of his firing finger decisions, and what ultimately marked out the two finalists from the others. It’s a lot to get through in an hour but, as series recaps go, it’s usually a hoot. GO Ashes Cricket: Australia v England BT Sport 1, 1.30am The enduring Ashes Down Under conundrum: wake up early to watch it or stay up late? The third Test, held at the WACA Ground in Perth, gets under way in the early hours of Thursday morning, with England hoping to bounce back from two demoralising defeats. Lose this one and captain Joe Root will have to surrender the urn to the Aussies. PS European Tour Golf: The Indonesian Masters Sky Sports Main Event, 6.00am It’s the opening day of the tournament at the Royale Jakarta Golf Club, where Thailand’s Poom Saksansin won the title last year. Saksansin shot an overall score of 270 to finish on -18, five strokes ahead of joint runners-up Masahiro Kawamura of Japan and fellow Thai players Phachara Khongwatmai and Suradit Yongcharoenchai. PS Amazing Spaces Snow and Ice Special Channel 4, 8.00pm George Clarke and his inventive sidekick Will Hardie travel to Norway’s remoter parts to check out why this small country on the edge of Europe punches above its weight in architecture and design. Could it be something to do with the cold weather, they wonder? GO Love, Lies & Records BBC One, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama about the romance of working at a Leeds registry office delivers on melodrama, if not subtlety. In this penultimate episode Kate (Ashley Jensen) struggles to make a decision after Rob’s (Adrian Bower) surprise proposal. GO Blitz: the Bombs That Changed Britain BBC Two, 9.00pm The final edition looks at the horrific impact of German incendiary bombs, in particular one that set a church ablaze in Bristol in November 1940 and started a firestorm that ravaged the city’s historic centre. GO The Tunnel: Vengeance Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Sky’s award-winning version of The Bridge (its milieu that of British and French police teams linked by the Channel Tunnel) returns for a third and final run. A pity, as Stephen Dillane as spiky detective and Clémence Poésy as his emotionally remote French opposite number make an appealing pair. This first of six episodes packs in plenty of action as the pair set out to find the link between a burnt-out trawler and a maintenance worker attacked by a plague of rats. GO Extraordinary Teens: School of Life and Deaf Channel 4, 10.00pm This absorbing film follows a year in the life of Mary Hare Boarding School for deaf pupils in Berkshire. Seen through the eyes of a 15-year-old about to undergo a potentially life-changing cochlear implant, this film gives a profound sense of the physical and emotional complexities of growing up deaf. GO The Russell Howard Hour Sky One, 10.00pm We’ve reached the penultimate episode of this excellent topical comedy series. It’s little more than an extended version of BBC Three’s (and later BBC Two’s) Good News but that’s exactly what fans (and Sky, who snapped Howard up) wanted and he has delivered, pushing his brand of highly topical, politically aware, positive reinforcement stand-up with aplomb. GO Life (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Daniel Espinosa’s Earth-orbiting suspense flick was released less than two months before Ridley Scott’s new chapter in his Alien franchise, and bears many of the same hallmarks. It’s also a little bit Gravity. Ryan Reynolds is one of a crew of astronauts aboard a space station conducting research into life on Mars. In terms of entertainment, the film does its baseline job of getting you to chew your nails off. There’s Something About Mary (1998) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 9.00pm There are bad taste jokes in abundance in this comedy from the Farrelly Brothers. Ben Stiller stars as Ted, a shy man who realises he’s still in love with Mary (Cameron Diaz, proving her comic abilities), the date he tried to take to prom 13 years ago. So, to track her down, he hires an oily private eye (Matt Dillon) who also fallsin love with her and sets out to keep the pair apart. Gone in 60 Seconds (2000) ★★★☆☆ Universal Channel, 9.00pm Nicolas Cage has top billing in Dominic Sena’s remake of the 1974 cult film – a mind-numbingly testosterone-laced ride. Cage and Angelina Jolie are among a crew of thieves who must steal 50 cars in 72 hours to stop the murder of Cage’s brother. It’s more than serviceable entertainment, plus car aficionados will have fun spotting the Cadillacs and Corvettes. Friday 15 December Paul, Andy, Cynthia and Diana in The Sweet Makers Credit: BBC The Sweet Makers at Christmas BBC Two, 9.00pm Following their enjoyable three-part series earlier this year, BBC Two’s Sweet Makers return for this one-off Christmas special looking at changing treats from Georgian times to the Twenties. As before, the show is a lovely mix of baking and interesting social history with Emma Dabiri and Dr Annie Gray, who fill us in on how each era viewed Christmas and how confectionery changes over time. The show’s highlight comes during the Victorian Era, also known as the moment when Christmas as we know it was invented, as chocolatiers Paul A Young and Diane Short, bespoke cake decorator Cynthia Stroud and sweet consultant Andy Baxendale recreate a Boar’s Head cake. “That’s the most bonkers thing we’ve ever made,” notes Young, looking at the finished result, which is rich in chocolate, beautifully decorated and featuring unnervingly glazed eyes. He’s right but it also looks fabulous, as do the intricate Twelfth Cakes, a speciality in Georgian times. The Twenties brings with it the wonderful news that before Terry’s invented the chocolate orange they introduced the chocolate apple to the world, before looking to the future and the invention of Lord Mackintosh’s Quality Street. SH Jean-Claude Van Johnson Amazon Prime Video, from today This delightfully silly new series sees Jean-Claude Van Damme as a retired action film star with a secret: he’s a special agent and he wants back in the game. It’s inspired mayhem anchored by a winning performance from the laconic Van Damme. SH Trollhunters Netflix, from today Guillermo del Toro’s inventive animation returns for a second series, and it features the voice of the late Anton Yelchin as reluctant hero Jim Lake Jnr. The story continues where the first series left off, and sees Jim adventure deeper into the Troll world to battle the leader of the Darklands. This series also features Mark Hamill and Game of Thrones’s Lena Headey. SH Judge Rinder’s Crown Court ITV, 8.00pm; not STV or UTV; Wales, 11.10pm Judge Rinder’s reboot of classic Seventies series Crown Court might lack the big-name actors of the original but its meld of real-life crime and courtroom drama is just as addictive. Tonight, the jury decides if James Byron (Rupert Young) murdered his wife. SH Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Sarah Millican is a brave guest of Oliver and Doherty – brave because it swiftly transpires that cooking really isn’t her thing. But Oliver manages to bite his tongue while showing her how to cook her favourite microwave meal from scratch. SH Have I Got News for You BBC One, 9.00pm The 54th series of the satirical news quiz comes to an end with the ever-reliable David Tennant in the host’s chair. It has been a patchy series, which was marked by a new low when Jo Brand had to explain why sexual harassment jokes weren’t funny to the male panellists. So let’s hope it goes out on a high. SH Roy Orbison: Love Hurts BBC Four, 9.30pm Roy Orbison’s three sons, Wesley, Roy Jnr and Alex, take centre stage to discuss their father in this emotional documentary. SH The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm Prepare for Star Wars: The Last Jedi overload as John Boyega, Daisy Ridley and Mark Hamill join Norton on the sofa. Don’t expect any spoilers but there’s sure to be some nice eulogies to the late Carrie Fisher. SH Before I Go to Sleep (2014) ★★★☆☆ More4, 9.00pm Nicole Kidman and Colin Firth star in this uninvolving thriller based on SJ Watson’s twisty bestseller. Kidman plays a woman who, after suffering a head injury, has no idea who she is or who the man sleeping next to her might be (it’s Colin Firth, playing her husband). She keeps a daily video diary but starts to notice discrepancies between what she’s recorded and what Firth tells her. The Pledge (2001) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 9.00pm A tense mystery directed by Sean Penn with a fine cast including Jack Nicholson, Helen Mirren, Robin Wright Penn, Aaron Eckhart and Vanessa Redgrave. Nicholson is a detective who has to handle a horrific case on the day of his retirement – the murder of a seven-year-old girl. He promises to bring the killer to justice, only to find that the case is far from straightforward. A powerful, unsettling film. Hyena (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.15pm This violent thriller about corrupt drug-squad officers is very violent indeed, so be prepared to cover your eyes for some parts of writer-director Gerard Johnson’s film. Michael Logan (an intense Peter Ferdinand) is the leader of this special force, assigned to tackle drug trafficking among the Balkan gangs. Stephen Graham, as his dubious boss, is as reliable as ever. Above all, it’s a grisly exploration of the criminal mind. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: Catching a Killer and Love, Lies & Records

Thursday 7 December Catching a Killer: A Bullet Through The Window Channel 4, 9.00pm The most striking thing about Catching a Killer, Channel 4’s ongoing look at how police murder and missing persons investigations work, is the level of access involved. This film follows the fallout from the death of 19-year-old Suhaib Mohammed. It begins with the terrified 999 call stating “My friend just got shot” and ends with the eventual arrest of his killers. Along the way a complex story emerges of a naive teenager who drifted away from his family and whose death was a terrible case of being in the wrong place with the wrong people. It’s Senior Investigating Officer Mike Lynch’s last case before retirement and one he’s therefore doubly determined to solve, but as the investigation continues so his quiet fury over the way in which the dead teenager’s death is dismissed as just another gang death increases. As always though, it is the testimony of the victim’s family which lingers longest. “We knew he’d become more distant, more private, more closed off but I don’t think we realised he was hanging with the wrong people,” says his sister quietly. His devastated father simply notes: “His heart was very soft… he had big dreams.” Sarah Hughes Ross Noble: Off Road Dave, 8.00pm As fans of his previous Dave series (Ross Noble Freewheeling) can tell you, the comedian is a true petrolhead. However, even the enthusiastic Noble might have bitten off more than he can chew this time as he attempts the Scottish Six Days Trial, an event where the world’s best motorbike riders race 100 miles every day across unforgiving terrain. SH Love, Lies & Records BBC One, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s enjoyable drama continues with Judy (Rebecca Front) sending Rob (Adrian Bower) a video of his fiancé Kate’s (Ashley Jensen) “moment of madness” with Rick (Kenny Doughty) – but can Kate get to it first? SH Blitz: The Bombs That Changed Britain BBC Two, 9.00pm This week’s focus is Scotland, where a series of Luftwaffe raids over three nights in March 1941 devastated a community, killing 528 people, including 15 members of the same family. For the tightknit society of shipbuilders and factory workers, the aftermath was devastating; many left Clydebank, never to return. SH Live at the Apollo BBC Two, 10.00pm Our host is the sharp, smart and amiable Nish Kumar. He’s joined by the laid-back Irish comic David O’Doherty and rising star Luisa Omielan, who recently rewrote her whole act in the light of her mother’s death from cancer. SH When Rock Arrived in North Korea: Liberation Day: Storyville BBC Four, 11.00pm This hugely entertaining look at how Slovenian art rockers Laibach became the first Western band to play in North Korea works largely because of the eccentric Norwegian director Morten Traavik’s bureaucrat-wrangling skills. The band themselves prove elusive, although the concert footage hammers home just how odd the occasion was. “There are all kinds of music – now I know there’s this kind of music too,” notes one bemused attendee. SH Born to Be Free: Saving Russia’s Whales Channel 4, 11.25pm No documentary is likely to make you angrier this week than Gayane Petrosyan’s bleak and brilliant film about the trade in Beluga whales. She uncovers the terrible fates of 18 belugas bought to Utrish Marine Station to be sold to aquariums across the world. SH Rugby Union: Varsity Match: Oxford University v Cambridge University Thursday, BBC Two, 2.45pm The 136th staging of the annual contest between the two universities takes place at Twickenham. Cambridge prevailed last year to end Oxford’s record-breaking six-year winning streak, and have the superior head-to-head record with 62 wins to their opponents’ 59. The match kicks off at 3.00pm. SH Austin Powers: The Spy Who S*****d Me (1999) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 9.00pm The successful franchise remains nothing more than daft entertainment, but its puerile jokes and cultural referencing still manage to elicit laughs. The “groovy” spy with the wonky teeth (Mike Myers) has his mojo stolen by his arch nemesis Dr Evil (also Myers) and must travel back in time to the swinging Sixties to get it back. Black Sea (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Written by Dennis Kelly (who co-wrote the musical Matilda) and starring Jude Law, this submarine thriller about a hunt for Nazi gold in a long-lost U-boat is less than the sum of its parts. However, a host of decent character actors – the best of whom, David Threlfall, steals the show – keep things buoyant and the set piece outside the sub, involving aquatic spacesuits and bars of gold, is pulse-pinging. 16 Blocks (2006) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 11.35pm Steered brilliantly by director Richard Donner (Superman, The Goonies) Bruce Willis plays Jack Mosley, a detective who’s assigned to escort prisoner Eddie Bunker (Mos Def) to a Grand Jury hearing in this frantic buddy-action film. This may sound simple, but Mosley’s colleagues don’t want Bunker to make it – because he’s a witness in a police corruption case that could bring their worlds crashing down. Friday 8 December Claire Foy in 'The Crown' The Crown Netflix, from today Expectations could hardly be higher for the return of Netflix’s most lavish series. Although the spectacle and horror of the war have passed, the era of Anthony Eden and Harold McMillan is arguably more intriguing for being less frequently dramatised, and Peter Morgan explores the hypocrisies and compromises inherent in the politics of a nation whose global influence is in decline. Anton Lesser makes a ruthless, discreet McMillan, while Jeremy Northam is once again superb as Eden, a man not low on self-confidence yet forced to face his limitations as the Suez Crisis sees him outmanoeuvred. But the focal point of course is the royal family, and specifically the relationship between Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip: fundamentally solid in its early years, but now subject to considerable stress and strain as the couple drift apart over niggling doubts and suspected betrayals. Claire Foy and Matt Smith are magnificent in the lead roles, rising to the challenges of Morgan’s script to make plausible his educated guesswork and speculations over long-rumoured private affairs. The blend of spectacle and attention to detail remains striking. Gabriel Tate The Grand Tour Amazon Prime Video, from today Jeremy Clarkson, Richard Hammond and James May return for a second go-round of megastar guests, big-budget stunts in exotic locales, and parochial studio chat. The series opens with Ricky Wilson v David Hasselhoff in new segment Celebrity Face Off, and a comparison of a Lamborghini, a hybrid Honda and an electric supercar in a hill-climb race that – as anyone who recalls the headlines from earlier this year will know – goes horribly wrong. GT Judge Rinder’s Crown Court ITV, 8.00pm Two daytime television classics, one ancient and one modern, collide in this bizarre two-parter which sees Judge Robert Rinder, mediator of petty domestic disputes, presiding over a fictional case of arsenic poisoning. As per the original Crown Court, the jurors are members of the public. GT Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm The chefs meet a childhood hero as Mark Hamill, soon to return to cinemas as Luke Skywalker, joins them to learn about making perfect roast beef and Yorkshire puddings, plus a Caesar salad and a seafood feast. GT Brunel: the Man Who Built Britain Channel 5, 8.00pm A giant of the Industrial Revolution, Isambard Kingdom Brunel had a curious private life to match his towering professional achievements. The ever-reliable Rob Bell begins his two-part profile with Brunel’s first major project, the Thames Tunnel. GT The Year in Music 2017 BBC Two, 9.00pm The BBC Music Awards follow in the footsteps of BBC Sports Personality of the Year and incorporate a review of the year into the bargain. Here, Claudia Winkelman and Clara Amfo look back on the past 12 months with contributors including Stormzy, Nile Rodgers and Liam Gallagher. GT Classic Album: American Pie: Don McLean BBC Four, 9.00pm McLean’s sophomore album is these days less venerated than other landmarks of the era (Blue, Tapestry, After the Goldrush); it is perhaps overshadowed by its monumental title song whose allusive, elusive lyrics offered an alternate history of rock ’n’ roll and eulogy for the hippy dream. Yet there was always more to it, as this diligent documentary asserts. GT Prisoners (2013) ★★★☆☆ More4, 9.00pm This drama, which centres on the abduction of two girls, is harrowing but it succeeds in sustaining its tension to the end. Hugh Jackman is cast into darkness when his six-year-old daughter is kidnapped. Jake Gyllenhaal is the detective in charge of the case, and the pair lock horns early on. What we are then presented with is a criminal puzzle and a very committed cast, which also includes Terrence Howard.  Legend (2015) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Tom Hardy gives a solid, convincing performance as east London gangster Reggie Kray but his caricatured portrayal of twin brother Ronnie lets him down, and his inconsistent performance leads to an entertaining though muddled film. Emily Browning, however, gives just the right mix of defiance and despair as Frances Shea, Reggie’s put-upon wife. Watch out for some particularly gory scenes. Dead Calm (1989) ★★★☆☆ W, 9.00pm In her first big film role, Nicole Kidman displays pluck and vulnerability as Rae Ingram, a woman who loses her infant son in a car accident, and consents to a long recovery at sea, on a luxury yacht called the Saracen. Her husband John (Sam Neill) is an experienced naval officer and stand-up guy, and though he knows banishing Rae’s guilt and grief is going to be tough, he has no idea what shock therapy fate has in mind. Saturday 9 December John Noakes and Shep in 1978 Credit: HULTON  John Noakes: TV Hero BBC Two, 5.30pm One quarter of the definitive Blue Peter foursome, alongside Peter Purves, Valerie Singleton and Shep, John Noakes was both its longest-serving presenter and one of its very finest. A gifted communicator, earnest when he had to be but more often game for anything, whether that be a laugh or a lunatic stunt. This affectionate profile of Noakes, who died in May, aged 83, after many years with Alzheimer’s, pivots on perhaps his two best-loved moments. First, there’s a climb up Nelson’s Column, sans ropes or safety harnesses, that was every bit as daft and dangerous as it looked and ample testament to his dauntlessness. That impish sense of humour is demonstrated by the notorious appearance of Lulu the elephant, who relieved herself on the floor before rampaging across the studio and over Noakes’s foot. Ever the entertainer, he milked both for all they were worth. His relationship with the series was an equivocal one and he reportedly resented his clownish persona, but this tribute skirts any controversy in favour of warm nostalgia, with familiar Blue Peter faces including Biddy Baxter and Lesley Judd recalling the man and his work. GT Premier League Football: West Ham United v Chelsea Sky Sports Main Event, 11.30am Having recovered from a goal down to beat Newcastle 3-1 last Saturday, with Eden Hazard helping himself to a brace, Chelsea travel across London to face West Ham United. The home side, who are currently in the relegation zone, will have taken plenty of positives from their 2-1 defeat at Manchester City last Sunday – namely, their defensive display. A similarly obdurate performance here and new manager David Moyes might get a share of the spoils this time. When these sides met at the London Stadium last season, West Ham lost 2-1. PS European Rugby Champions Cup: Toulon v Bath Sky Sports Main Event, 5.15pm Two wins from two reads the stats for both sides so far in this season’s European Champions Cup – at least one of these 100 per cent records will end at Stade Mayol. Bath come into this match on the back of a 42-29 defeat by Exeter, but before that they’d won four on the bounce, with Freddie Burns impressing at fly-half. After the autumn internationals, director of rugby Todd Blackadder now has an embarrassment of riches from which to pick: most notably, England backs Anthony Watson, Semesa Rokoduguni and Jonathan Joseph. Toulon, meanwhile, ended a three-match losing streak on Saturday when they beat Lyon 39-11. PS Strictly Come Dancing BBC One, 6.45pm The five remaining couples must perform two routines in this semi-final, and with barely a strand of lace between them, expect forensic criticism from the judges. Sunday’s results show will reveal the final four and there will be a performance from Craig David. GT Michael McIntyre’s Big Show BBC One, 8.20pm Wringing his contacts book dry, McIntyre ropes in guests including TV presenters Marvin and Rochelle Humes (taking part in the game Send to All) and pop rock band The Vamps for more fun. GT Witnesses: a Frozen Death BBC Four, 9.00pm and 9.55pm Even in this saturated market for foreign-language thrillers, Witnesses stands out for its lack of gimmicks – though without ever quite scaling the heights of The Bridge or Spiral. Here, Sandra’s (Marie Dompnier) pursuit of the killer takes her into a forest and an orphanage. GT The White Princess Drama, 9.00pm and 10.20pm The excellent Jodie Comer anchors the series to its conclusion tonight with another double bill, as Elizabeth of York (Comer) and Henry VII (Jacob Collins-Levy) struggle to maintain a united front. GT Peter Blake: Pop Art Life Sky Arts, 9.00pm While there is more to Peter Blake’s work than his cover for Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, music has played a crucial role in the development of his art and reputation. This engaging film digs deeply into a mutually fruitful relationship. GT Casualty BBC One, 9.20pm Christmas approaches, bringing annual trauma and discord for the A&E team. Tonight finds Elle’s (Jaye Griffiths) tearaway son Blake (Kai Thorne) going off the rails in response to her suggestion that she spend the festive period with her new boyfriend. Polly (Sophia Di Martino), meanwhile, continues to be unimpressed by Max (Jamie Davis). GT Through the Keyhole: I’m a Celebrity… get me out of here! ITV, 9.50pm The living, breathing definition of an acquired taste, Keith Lemon returns for a fifth series of the show once helmed by David Frost. Guests include Jimmy Carr, Myleene Klass and Tony Blackburn. GT Gremlins 2: The New Batch (1990) ★★★☆☆ Christmas Gold, 9.40pm Whereas Joe Dante’s original monster hit was a deliciously dark horror flick (and staple Christmas hit) with touches of wry humour, this inferior sequel is essentially a straight-up, riotous comedy, replete with in-jokes and movie references. This time, the gremlins run amok in a Manhattan high-rise building called Clamp Tower, owned by John Glover’s Donald Trump-like mogul. The Cider House Rules (1999) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.15pm John Irving’s adaptation of his own 1985 novel features a fine Tobey Maguire and Michael Caine, who won an Oscar (only his second at the time). Irving won one too, for Best Screenplay, and there’s no doubt the story is moving, though this version – about an orphan (Maguire) and a doctor (Caine) who performs illegal abortions – is at times a bit saccharine. Paul Rudd co-stars; Lasse Hallström directs. The Drop (2014) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 11.35pm Tom Hardy anchors this tale of simmering malfeasance as the tender of a Brooklyn bar designated as the drop for ill-gotten gains. Dennis Lehane adapts his own short story Animal Rescue, and makes a perfect team with Belgian director Michaël R Roskam, who gets a tamped-down, shuffling and beautifully calibrated star turn out of Hardy. Sopranos star James Gandolfini adds a burly gravitas in what would be his final movie. Sunday 10 December Jumbo with keeper Matthew Scott in 1882 Credit: BBC Attenborough and the Giant Elephant BBC One, 9.00pm Can we ever have too much Attenborough? It seems not, as right in the foaming wake of the fabulous Blue Planet II (which concludes tonight, see preview below) comes this absorbing, bittersweet tale of the world’s first animal superstar – Jumbo the elephant. It’s a sad story, really. Jumbo shot to fame shortly after his arrival at London Zoo as an orphan in around 1861, but he didn’t get much from the deal. As Attenborough says, his captive life was “troubled, fuelled by alcohol, terrifying fits of violence, a near mystical relationship with his keeper and a tragic end that seems hard to believe”. Which is more than enough to hold the attention for an hour as he joins an international team examining Jumbo’s preserved skeleton at New York’s Museum of Natural History. Attenborough also pokes about in archives at London Zoo, sanctuaries in the Maasai Mara and Tennessee, and Ontario where Jumbo met his very sad end, building as complete a picture of this magnificent creature and his global travels as has ever been assembled. All the while it spreads a positive conservationist message and gives thanks that attitudes are more enlightened now than in Victorian times. GO Premier League Football: Liverpool v Everton & Manchester United v Manchester City Sky Sports Main Event, 1.15pm & 4.15pm “Super Sunday” lives up to its hyperbolic billing, with two potentially exhilarating derbies. First up, we’re at Anfield where Liverpool, fresh from their 5-1 demolition of Brighton, host Everton, who found some form last week, following up their 4-0 win at home to West Ham United with a 2-0 victory against Huddersfield. Later, in the 4.30pm kick-off, José Mourinho and Pep Guardiola renew rivalries as second-placed United host leaders City at Old Trafford. Expect it to be tight. PS Britain’s Wildest Weather 2017 Channel 4, 6.30pm This year has not, so far, been as extreme as some but, given the number of smartphone-wielding citizen journalists, there’s plenty of jaw-dropping footage of every extreme weather event that occurred, among them devastating floods, tornadoes and hair-raising lightning strikes. GO  Blue Planet II BBC One, 8.00pm This extraordinary series concludes with an undeniably depressing assessment of mankind’s impact on the marine environment. But David Attenborough, as ever, prefers to put the emphasis on hope. So there’s plenty of uplift too with stories of species brought back from extinction’s brink. GO Coastal Railways with Julie Walters Channel 4, 8.00pm Julie Walters heads for Cornwall on the Great Western route, recalling her childhood holidays in Torquay. She then boards a steam train at Paignton, hears tales of smugglers in Polperro and fills up on cakes in Penzance. GO Leonora Carrington: the Lost Surrealist BBC Four, 9.00pm This fascinating film tells the story of rebellious upper-class British artist Leonora Carrington, who worked alongside Ernst, Breton and Éluard in Paris at the height of the surrealist movement, yet died in 2011 all but forgotten in Mexico. Director Teresa Griffiths mixes interviews and biographical material with experimental animation and tableaux to bring Carrington’s work vividly to life. GO I’m a Celebrity… Get Me Out of Here! ITV, 9.00pm Seventeen series in and the public appetite for watching celebrities endure humiliation and repulsion shows little sign of drying up. This year’s launch pulled in ITV’s biggest audience of 2017. The final will no doubt draw as big a crowd again. GO Babylon Berlin Sky Atlantic, from 9.00pm Three more atmospheric episodes of the gripping crime series set in the bohemian, political Weimar Germany of the late Twenties. Detective Rath’s (Volker Bruch) investigation uncovers dangerous evidence of a shocking military conspiracy. GO The Sky At Night BBC Four, 10.00pm As well as more stargazing from the Royal Observatory, Maggie Aderin-Pocock is in Norway to see the Northern Lights. GO Ben-Hur (1959) ★★★★★ ITV3, 2.45pm A majestic slice of Hollywood history, this Roman-era melodrama directed by William Wyler and starring Charlton Heston won 11 Academy Awards (not equalled until Titanic in 1997). It still makes for magnificent viewing. Set in 26AD, it tells the story of a Jewish prince who clashes with the Roman governor and ends up enslaved, desperately plotting his revenge. The Sorcerer’s Apprentice (2010) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 3.00pm Jerry Bruckheimer gives the famous sequence from Disney’s Fantasia a fun, live-action reboot. Student Dave (Jay Baruchel) inherits Merlin’s powers, placing him in a power struggle between Balthazar (Nicolas Cage) and Horvath (Alfred Molina). Sadly there are just two scenes with broomsticks to link it to the original. Toby Kebbel is amusing as a stage musician co-opted by the forces of evil. Toy Story (1995) ★★★★★ BBC One, 3.35pm The idea of the first fully computer-generated animated film didn’t have those who had been weaned on the hand-drawn delights of Disney jumping for joy. However, with this beautiful tale, Pixar pushed animation to a new level – the premise, pace and emotion are all pitched perfectly. Whether it’s your first or 400th viewing, the story of toy cowboy Woody (Tom Hanks) and plastic spaceman Buzz Lightyear (Tim Allen) is a joy. Monday 11 December Faye Marsa, Sarah Parish and Amara Karan in Bancroft Credit: ITV Bancroft ITV, 9.00pm With so many crime dramas clogging up the television schedules it can be hard for a new series to stand out and at first ITV’s latest four-parter seems unlikely to break the mould. There’s an ambitious female cop with a possibly troubled past (the always reliable Sarah Parish), a striving younger cop who is desperate to move up the ranks (Faye Marsay) and the usual crop of jobsworths and strivers (Charles Babalola is particularly good as the married fellow officer Marsay’s Katherine should be steering well clear of). It’s all perfectly well done with a solid script from Kate Brooke (Mr Selfridge) but it seems like nothing special. Then, three quarters of the way through this first episode, something genuinely interesting happens: Bancroft’s secrets are revealed to be very dark indeed just as Katherine’s cold case involving the break-in and violent murder of a young woman in 1990 starts hotting up. With the stakes suddenly raised Bancroft spins off into a dark tale of the lengths that people go to keep the past buried and the stage is set for an intriguing game of secrets and lies. Smart scheduling sees the rest of the story play out over consecutive nights. SH Street Auction BBC One, 11.00am Paul Martin returns with a new series of the surprisingly addictive show in which people band together to raise funds for a member of their community by auctioning off hidden treasures. The fun comes from the unusual objects unearthed from garages and attics. SH Nigella’s Christmas Table BBC Two, 8.00pm If anything is guaranteed to Nigella put into purring overload it’s Christmas. The food on offer includes roast duck with orange, soy and ginger, but this is really about mood rather than food. SH   Paul Hollywood: A Baker’s Life Channel 4, 8.00pm Episode three of this genial series sees Hollywood looking back over his career and his time spent working at the Cliveden House Hotel in Berkshire. There’s also a festive get-together in Merseyside and some seasonal Danish pastries, which look delicious. SH The Art That Made Mexico: Paradise, Power and Prayers BBC Four, 9.00pm It’s always a pleasure to find a series that sheds new light on a subject, and so it is with artist Alinka Echeverria’s enthralling films about Mexico’s art. Of course, there are the key points: conquest, independence, dictatorship, revolution and figures such as Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo, but what the commentary gives us here is the context for both the history and the artists. This is true of this episode that looks at the relationship between art and power, colonialism and control while examining the enduring power of Kahlo’s work and myth. SH Handmade in Mexico BBC Four, 10.00pm The focus here is on Mexico’s celebrated Tree of Life sculptures, those gaudy, gorgeous interpretations of everything from the creation myth to the resurrection of Christ and the Day of the Dead. It’s a fascinating half-hour in which we see the amount of work and detail that goes into each piece. SH White Right: Meeting the Enemy: Exposure ITV, 10.40pm; STV, 11.05pm; UTV, 11.40pm; Wales, 11.10pm This intriguing-sounding documentary sees the Bafta-nominated Deeyah Khan (Jihad: A Story of the Others) investigate white extremism in the US. Khan visits white nationalist groups, attends a far-right rally and asks why this poisonous ideology is resurgent. SH The Black Swan (1942) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 2.35pm No, this is not the film about the ageing ballet dancer and the young ingénue; this is about high adventure on the seven seas. When Laird Cregar’s Captain Morgan becomes Governor of Jamaica, he promises to put an end to piracy. But things don’t go smoothly, especially when his assistant (Tyrone Power) kidnaps the ex-governor’s beautiful daughter (Maureen O’Hara). This was the final film of silent star Helene Costello. Mamma Mia! (2008) ★★★☆☆ ITV3, 7.50pm This musical comedy, directed by Phyllida Lloyd and set to Abba’s hits, is pure escapism. It’s naff, but that’s its selling point, as stars Meryl Streep, Pierce Brosnan and Julie Walters place tongues firmly in cheeks. At 59, Streep deserved more credit for doing the splits than for her role as a boho mother living on a Greek island whose daughter (Amanda Seyfried) tries to find out who her biological father is. Blood Diamond (2006) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 8.00pm The diamond industry of Sierra Leone is the subject of this striking thriller. Djimon Hounsou stars as a fisherman forced to work in the fields, who finds and hides a rare pink gem. His life is changed when he meets Leonardo DiCaprio’s self-serving mercenary and Jennifer Connelly’s well-meaning journalist. DiCaprio was Oscar-nominated, but lost to Forest Whitaker for The Last King of Scotland. Tuesday 12 December Paul Ready, Diane Morgan and Anna Maxwell-Martin Credit: BBC Motherland BBC Two, 10.00pm Dispensing with the calamitous set pieces of previous episodes and instead documenting the quiet desperation of this ill-starred band of sisters (plus one brother), this superb, exhausting sitcom from a writing supergroup including Graham Linehan and Sharon Horgan has been an exquisitely painful delight. We join Julia (Anna Maxwell Martin) in an unusually good place, with everything running smoothly thanks to her new Australian nanny, Lyndsey (Sarah Kendall). The kids are clean and happy, the school run is easy, the fridge is stocked – but could she be too good to be true? Amanda (Lucy Punch) has gone to ground after the revelation over her threesome, while her hapless confidant, Kevin (Paul Ready), is desperate to avoid having to get a job. And, should all the mugging get too much, there’s deadpan Liz (Diane Morgan), negotiating tricky relations with her dismal ex and his new, pregnant partner. After an orgy of passive aggression and desperate people in denial, the façades crack, just a little. Happily everyone reverts to fundamentally appalling type just in time for the end of the series and a surely inevitable recommission. GT Judd Apatow: the Return Netflix, from today After 25 years away from stand-up, the comedy zelig whose fingerprints are over everything from Knocked Up and Girls to Freaks and Geeks and Bridesmaids returns for a special set in Montreal, recorded in July. GT Masterchef: the Professionals BBC Two, 8.00pm After the hopefuls have tackled an invention test and rustled up a dish dedicated to one of their inspirations, Marcus Wareing, Monica Galletti and Gregg Wallace eliminate another two contenders, leaving only six in the contest. GT The A Word BBC One, 9.00pm Joe’s (brilliant Max Vento) family comes together for an end of year show at his old school – tears, acrimony and reconciliation ensue in the conclusion of Peter Bowker’s finely wrought, well-performed drama. A third series should surely be a formality. GT Invasion! with Sam Willis BBC Four, 9.00pm While not quite attaining Lucy Worsley levels of gonzo history, Dr Sam Willis is an enthusiastic and knowledgeable host not above the odd stunt to prove a point. This second episode of a series documenting the incursions that have shaped our nation and its bloodline examines the differing techniques and goals of the invaders. There are the Barbary Corsaire pirates who settled on Lundy Island, King Louis the Lion, invited to invade and crowned by disgruntled nobles, and the Dutch forces that negotiated the Medway just a year prior to the Glorious Revolution. Further proof, if any were needed, that Britain is a mongrel nation and all the better for it. GT The World’s Most Expensive Presents Channel 4, 9.00pm Eyeball-melting opulence and appalling lack of taste do battle with considerable craftsmanship and class in this startling film featuring everything from gold-plated pushbikes to a poker set in alligator-hide case. GT Sports Personality of the Year 2017: The Contenders BBC One, 10.45pm; Wales, 11.10pm; Scotland, 11.45pm With reigning title-holder Andy Murray’s injury-hit year effectively ruling him out of contention, Anthony Joshua, Chris Froome, Lewis Hamilton, Jo Konta and Mo Farah will be headlining this year’s roster after another 12 months of outstanding achievement in British sport. The runners and riders are introduced tonight. GT Shane (1953) ★★★★☆ Film4, 3.45pm There are few Westerns that examine the depths of human emotions, but this film by George Stevens is one of them and has become a landmark of cinema. Shane (Alan Ladd) is a cowboy who finds himself idolised for the way that he handles himself in the face of a landowner’s heavies. The climax is a face-off between Shane and smiling, whispering, Oscar-nominated Jack Palance, as the original man in black. A must-see. Mr & Mrs Smith (2005) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 9.00pm A daft comedy thriller which is perhaps best remembered for being the film that introduced Brad Pitt to Angelina Jolie. They play a couple whose failing marriage is spiced up dramatically when each discovers that the other secretly works as an assassin. Let down by a weak script, the film is held together by the chemistry between its two leads. Vince Vaughn and Adam Brody co-star. Moonraker (1979) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm The 11th film in the Bond series, and the fourth to star Roger Moore as the dapper MI6 agent, involves the theft of a space shuttle. It’s one of the weaker Bond films and at times seems more of a comedy than a tense action adventure, but it’s enjoyably frivolous. Michael Lonsdale plays resident baddie Hugo Drax who pinches the aforementioned space shuttle to help along his plan to wipe out the world’s population. Wednesday 13 December Barbara Schulz in Vanished by the Lake Credit: Channel 4 Vanished by the Lake Channel 4, 10.00pm This haunting French crime drama centres on a teenage girl who goes missing at a festival. It’s hardly an original set-up, but much like last year’s hit Gallic import The Disappearance, based on an almost identical premise, the mix of youthful promise cut short and fierce small-town intrigue quickly compels. The girl in question is Chloé Delval (Charlie Joirkin), and as news of her disappearance spreads, memories of a similar 15-year-old case in which two other girls vanished at the same celebration are revived. Into the fray steps striking Parisian detective Lise Stocker (Barbara Schulz), who has returned home to look after her ill mother, but is soon swept up by the case as its personal implications begin to unfold. All of the hallmarks of the Nordic noir genre are present, from the evocative setting (here a Broadchurch-style coastal backdrop) to the close-knit neighbours with secrets to hide. Nevertheless, this opening episode is an effective tension builder and the human impact of the mystery – particularly on Chloé’s fracturing parents – is powerfully moving. Once episode one finishes, the full series will be available to watch on All 4. TD Mary Berry’s Country House Secrets BBC One, 8.00pm Mary Berry rounds off her tour of Britain’s stately homes at Goodwood House, where she is suitably gushing over its royal history and grand interiors. Berry is treated to a hair-raising lap of the nearby motor circuit and whips up a four-tier cake for the cricket tea. TD The Secret Life of the Zoo Channel 4, 8.00pm The plight of the endangered Javan green magpie is on the agenda as keepers at Chester Zoo attempt to breed youngster Permata with older bird Netuba. Elsewhere, a zebra battle breaks out when newcomer Okoth arrives. TD Peaky Blinders BBC Two, 9.00pm A burst of gunfire opens the penultimate episode of period gangster antics, as Tommy Shelby (Cillian Murphy) faces off against mafia honcho Luca Changretta (Adrien Brody). An army colonel, meanwhile, questions Ada (Sophie Rundle) about her Communist past. TD The Channel: The World’s Busiest Waterway Channel 4, 9.00pm The fallout from Project Nemo, the new underwater electricity cable being laid between Belgium and Britain, is explored. We follow the Nemo manager struggling to avoid costly delays and the fisherman whose catch is being compromised by the work. TD Royal Academy: Painting the Future Sky Arts, 9.00pm Virtual reality (VR) is predicted to become the go-to place for everything from entertainment to work. The Royal Academy is getting in on the act with a new exhibition which explores the potential of the medium. This film follows the show’s creation with the artists, including sculptor Antony Gormley, portraitist Jonathan Yeo and Turner Prize-nominee Yinka Shonibare, who are producing works that use the technology to trace the history of the body in art. TD David Hockney: Time Reclaimed Sky Arts, 10.30pm This tribute to David Hockney aims to get beyond the glamour that surrounds his reputation, and focus on the personal aspects of his work. Anecdotes, images and analysis of the pictures themselves highlight the individuality expressed in each period of Hockney’s career, suggesting a diverse oeuvre that defies classification. TD Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am George Roy Hill directed two of the most popular films ever: Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969) and The Sting (1973). But this indifferent Julie Andrews musical of the flapper era was first. There’s much to enjoy in the story of a naive woman who leaves her rural roots behind to seek fortune and romance in Twenties New York. James Fox, as a spiffing salesman, is a particular highlight. The Three Musketeers (2011) ★★☆☆☆ E4, 8.00pm Paul W S Anderson’s adaptation of Alexandre Dumas’ novel is faithful in plot – Porthos, Athos and Aramis (Ray Stevenson, Matthew Macfadyen, Luke Evans), and disciple d’Artagnan (Logan Lerman), are sent to retrieve the French Queen’s (Juno Temple) necklace. The tone, however, is half action-pantomime, half candy-coloured steampunk comic – fun but terribly slapdash. Poltergeist (1982) ★★★★☆ TCM, 11.15pm Director Tobe Hooper, who made The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, tones down the gut-churning horror but still ramps up the tension to nightmare levels in this Steven Spielberg-produced chiller. It has one of cinema’s most spine-tinglingly scary moments: “They’re here,” sing-songs a little girl kneeling before the TV. “They” are the spirits, at first playful then increasingly malevolent, who terrorise a suburban family. Thursday 14 December Lord Sugar Credit: BBC The Apprentice: Why I Fired Them BBC One, 8.00pm In the wake of last night’s excoriating interview round, and with this Sunday’s final rapidly approaching to decide who will win a £250,000 investment and the mentoring opportunity of a lifetime, Lord Sugar makes his most personal appearance of the series. Other than those brief to-camera inserts that roll out as taxi cabs ferry freshly defenestrated candidates away from Sugar Towers to forever dream of fortunes that might have been made, this is one of few occasions in each “process” when Lord Sugar appears on screen away from the wannabe tycoons and talking to viewers directly. And he makes the most of it with his trademark witty-gritty line in East End charm, although professionalism usually prevents him from really dishing the behind-the-scenes dirt on why he thought 16 of them worthy only of the tip of his boot. Instead he looks back over this 13th series identifying the key commercial and strategic errors that led to each of his firing finger decisions, and what ultimately marked out the two finalists from the others. It’s a lot to get through in an hour but, as series recaps go, it’s usually a hoot. GO Ashes Cricket: Australia v England BT Sport 1, 1.30am The enduring Ashes Down Under conundrum: wake up early to watch it or stay up late? The third Test, held at the WACA Ground in Perth, gets under way in the early hours of Thursday morning, with England hoping to bounce back from two demoralising defeats. Lose this one and captain Joe Root will have to surrender the urn to the Aussies. PS European Tour Golf: The Indonesian Masters Sky Sports Main Event, 6.00am It’s the opening day of the tournament at the Royale Jakarta Golf Club, where Thailand’s Poom Saksansin won the title last year. Saksansin shot an overall score of 270 to finish on -18, five strokes ahead of joint runners-up Masahiro Kawamura of Japan and fellow Thai players Phachara Khongwatmai and Suradit Yongcharoenchai. PS Amazing Spaces Snow and Ice Special Channel 4, 8.00pm George Clarke and his inventive sidekick Will Hardie travel to Norway’s remoter parts to check out why this small country on the edge of Europe punches above its weight in architecture and design. Could it be something to do with the cold weather, they wonder? GO Love, Lies & Records BBC One, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama about the romance of working at a Leeds registry office delivers on melodrama, if not subtlety. In this penultimate episode Kate (Ashley Jensen) struggles to make a decision after Rob’s (Adrian Bower) surprise proposal. GO Blitz: the Bombs That Changed Britain BBC Two, 9.00pm The final edition looks at the horrific impact of German incendiary bombs, in particular one that set a church ablaze in Bristol in November 1940 and started a firestorm that ravaged the city’s historic centre. GO The Tunnel: Vengeance Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Sky’s award-winning version of The Bridge (its milieu that of British and French police teams linked by the Channel Tunnel) returns for a third and final run. A pity, as Stephen Dillane as spiky detective and Clémence Poésy as his emotionally remote French opposite number make an appealing pair. This first of six episodes packs in plenty of action as the pair set out to find the link between a burnt-out trawler and a maintenance worker attacked by a plague of rats. GO Extraordinary Teens: School of Life and Deaf Channel 4, 10.00pm This absorbing film follows a year in the life of Mary Hare Boarding School for deaf pupils in Berkshire. Seen through the eyes of a 15-year-old about to undergo a potentially life-changing cochlear implant, this film gives a profound sense of the physical and emotional complexities of growing up deaf. GO The Russell Howard Hour Sky One, 10.00pm We’ve reached the penultimate episode of this excellent topical comedy series. It’s little more than an extended version of BBC Three’s (and later BBC Two’s) Good News but that’s exactly what fans (and Sky, who snapped Howard up) wanted and he has delivered, pushing his brand of highly topical, politically aware, positive reinforcement stand-up with aplomb. GO Life (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Daniel Espinosa’s Earth-orbiting suspense flick was released less than two months before Ridley Scott’s new chapter in his Alien franchise, and bears many of the same hallmarks. It’s also a little bit Gravity. Ryan Reynolds is one of a crew of astronauts aboard a space station conducting research into life on Mars. In terms of entertainment, the film does its baseline job of getting you to chew your nails off. There’s Something About Mary (1998) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 9.00pm There are bad taste jokes in abundance in this comedy from the Farrelly Brothers. Ben Stiller stars as Ted, a shy man who realises he’s still in love with Mary (Cameron Diaz, proving her comic abilities), the date he tried to take to prom 13 years ago. So, to track her down, he hires an oily private eye (Matt Dillon) who also fallsin love with her and sets out to keep the pair apart. Gone in 60 Seconds (2000) ★★★☆☆ Universal Channel, 9.00pm Nicolas Cage has top billing in Dominic Sena’s remake of the 1974 cult film – a mind-numbingly testosterone-laced ride. Cage and Angelina Jolie are among a crew of thieves who must steal 50 cars in 72 hours to stop the murder of Cage’s brother. It’s more than serviceable entertainment, plus car aficionados will have fun spotting the Cadillacs and Corvettes. Friday 15 December Paul, Andy, Cynthia and Diana in The Sweet Makers Credit: BBC The Sweet Makers at Christmas BBC Two, 9.00pm Following their enjoyable three-part series earlier this year, BBC Two’s Sweet Makers return for this one-off Christmas special looking at changing treats from Georgian times to the Twenties. As before, the show is a lovely mix of baking and interesting social history with Emma Dabiri and Dr Annie Gray, who fill us in on how each era viewed Christmas and how confectionery changes over time. The show’s highlight comes during the Victorian Era, also known as the moment when Christmas as we know it was invented, as chocolatiers Paul A Young and Diane Short, bespoke cake decorator Cynthia Stroud and sweet consultant Andy Baxendale recreate a Boar’s Head cake. “That’s the most bonkers thing we’ve ever made,” notes Young, looking at the finished result, which is rich in chocolate, beautifully decorated and featuring unnervingly glazed eyes. He’s right but it also looks fabulous, as do the intricate Twelfth Cakes, a speciality in Georgian times. The Twenties brings with it the wonderful news that before Terry’s invented the chocolate orange they introduced the chocolate apple to the world, before looking to the future and the invention of Lord Mackintosh’s Quality Street. SH Jean-Claude Van Johnson Amazon Prime Video, from today This delightfully silly new series sees Jean-Claude Van Damme as a retired action film star with a secret: he’s a special agent and he wants back in the game. It’s inspired mayhem anchored by a winning performance from the laconic Van Damme. SH Trollhunters Netflix, from today Guillermo del Toro’s inventive animation returns for a second series, and it features the voice of the late Anton Yelchin as reluctant hero Jim Lake Jnr. The story continues where the first series left off, and sees Jim adventure deeper into the Troll world to battle the leader of the Darklands. This series also features Mark Hamill and Game of Thrones’s Lena Headey. SH Judge Rinder’s Crown Court ITV, 8.00pm; not STV or UTV; Wales, 11.10pm Judge Rinder’s reboot of classic Seventies series Crown Court might lack the big-name actors of the original but its meld of real-life crime and courtroom drama is just as addictive. Tonight, the jury decides if James Byron (Rupert Young) murdered his wife. SH Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Sarah Millican is a brave guest of Oliver and Doherty – brave because it swiftly transpires that cooking really isn’t her thing. But Oliver manages to bite his tongue while showing her how to cook her favourite microwave meal from scratch. SH Have I Got News for You BBC One, 9.00pm The 54th series of the satirical news quiz comes to an end with the ever-reliable David Tennant in the host’s chair. It has been a patchy series, which was marked by a new low when Jo Brand had to explain why sexual harassment jokes weren’t funny to the male panellists. So let’s hope it goes out on a high. SH Roy Orbison: Love Hurts BBC Four, 9.30pm Roy Orbison’s three sons, Wesley, Roy Jnr and Alex, take centre stage to discuss their father in this emotional documentary. SH The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm Prepare for Star Wars: The Last Jedi overload as John Boyega, Daisy Ridley and Mark Hamill join Norton on the sofa. Don’t expect any spoilers but there’s sure to be some nice eulogies to the late Carrie Fisher. SH Before I Go to Sleep (2014) ★★★☆☆ More4, 9.00pm Nicole Kidman and Colin Firth star in this uninvolving thriller based on SJ Watson’s twisty bestseller. Kidman plays a woman who, after suffering a head injury, has no idea who she is or who the man sleeping next to her might be (it’s Colin Firth, playing her husband). She keeps a daily video diary but starts to notice discrepancies between what she’s recorded and what Firth tells her. The Pledge (2001) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 9.00pm A tense mystery directed by Sean Penn with a fine cast including Jack Nicholson, Helen Mirren, Robin Wright Penn, Aaron Eckhart and Vanessa Redgrave. Nicholson is a detective who has to handle a horrific case on the day of his retirement – the murder of a seven-year-old girl. He promises to bring the killer to justice, only to find that the case is far from straightforward. A powerful, unsettling film. Hyena (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.15pm This violent thriller about corrupt drug-squad officers is very violent indeed, so be prepared to cover your eyes for some parts of writer-director Gerard Johnson’s film. Michael Logan (an intense Peter Ferdinand) is the leader of this special force, assigned to tackle drug trafficking among the Balkan gangs. Stephen Graham, as his dubious boss, is as reliable as ever. Above all, it’s a grisly exploration of the criminal mind. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: Catching a Killer and Love, Lies & Records

Thursday 7 December Catching a Killer: A Bullet Through The Window Channel 4, 9.00pm The most striking thing about Catching a Killer, Channel 4’s ongoing look at how police murder and missing persons investigations work, is the level of access involved. This film follows the fallout from the death of 19-year-old Suhaib Mohammed. It begins with the terrified 999 call stating “My friend just got shot” and ends with the eventual arrest of his killers. Along the way a complex story emerges of a naive teenager who drifted away from his family and whose death was a terrible case of being in the wrong place with the wrong people. It’s Senior Investigating Officer Mike Lynch’s last case before retirement and one he’s therefore doubly determined to solve, but as the investigation continues so his quiet fury over the way in which the dead teenager’s death is dismissed as just another gang death increases. As always though, it is the testimony of the victim’s family which lingers longest. “We knew he’d become more distant, more private, more closed off but I don’t think we realised he was hanging with the wrong people,” says his sister quietly. His devastated father simply notes: “His heart was very soft… he had big dreams.” Sarah Hughes Ross Noble: Off Road Dave, 8.00pm As fans of his previous Dave series (Ross Noble Freewheeling) can tell you, the comedian is a true petrolhead. However, even the enthusiastic Noble might have bitten off more than he can chew this time as he attempts the Scottish Six Days Trial, an event where the world’s best motorbike riders race 100 miles every day across unforgiving terrain. SH Love, Lies & Records BBC One, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s enjoyable drama continues with Judy (Rebecca Front) sending Rob (Adrian Bower) a video of his fiancé Kate’s (Ashley Jensen) “moment of madness” with Rick (Kenny Doughty) – but can Kate get to it first? SH Blitz: The Bombs That Changed Britain BBC Two, 9.00pm This week’s focus is Scotland, where a series of Luftwaffe raids over three nights in March 1941 devastated a community, killing 528 people, including 15 members of the same family. For the tightknit society of shipbuilders and factory workers, the aftermath was devastating; many left Clydebank, never to return. SH Live at the Apollo BBC Two, 10.00pm Our host is the sharp, smart and amiable Nish Kumar. He’s joined by the laid-back Irish comic David O’Doherty and rising star Luisa Omielan, who recently rewrote her whole act in the light of her mother’s death from cancer. SH When Rock Arrived in North Korea: Liberation Day: Storyville BBC Four, 11.00pm This hugely entertaining look at how Slovenian art rockers Laibach became the first Western band to play in North Korea works largely because of the eccentric Norwegian director Morten Traavik’s bureaucrat-wrangling skills. The band themselves prove elusive, although the concert footage hammers home just how odd the occasion was. “There are all kinds of music – now I know there’s this kind of music too,” notes one bemused attendee. SH Born to Be Free: Saving Russia’s Whales Channel 4, 11.25pm No documentary is likely to make you angrier this week than Gayane Petrosyan’s bleak and brilliant film about the trade in Beluga whales. She uncovers the terrible fates of 18 belugas bought to Utrish Marine Station to be sold to aquariums across the world. SH Rugby Union: Varsity Match: Oxford University v Cambridge University Thursday, BBC Two, 2.45pm The 136th staging of the annual contest between the two universities takes place at Twickenham. Cambridge prevailed last year to end Oxford’s record-breaking six-year winning streak, and have the superior head-to-head record with 62 wins to their opponents’ 59. The match kicks off at 3.00pm. SH Austin Powers: The Spy Who S*****d Me (1999) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 9.00pm The successful franchise remains nothing more than daft entertainment, but its puerile jokes and cultural referencing still manage to elicit laughs. The “groovy” spy with the wonky teeth (Mike Myers) has his mojo stolen by his arch nemesis Dr Evil (also Myers) and must travel back in time to the swinging Sixties to get it back. Black Sea (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Written by Dennis Kelly (who co-wrote the musical Matilda) and starring Jude Law, this submarine thriller about a hunt for Nazi gold in a long-lost U-boat is less than the sum of its parts. However, a host of decent character actors – the best of whom, David Threlfall, steals the show – keep things buoyant and the set piece outside the sub, involving aquatic spacesuits and bars of gold, is pulse-pinging. 16 Blocks (2006) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 11.35pm Steered brilliantly by director Richard Donner (Superman, The Goonies) Bruce Willis plays Jack Mosley, a detective who’s assigned to escort prisoner Eddie Bunker (Mos Def) to a Grand Jury hearing in this frantic buddy-action film. This may sound simple, but Mosley’s colleagues don’t want Bunker to make it – because he’s a witness in a police corruption case that could bring their worlds crashing down. Friday 8 December Claire Foy in 'The Crown' The Crown Netflix, from today Expectations could hardly be higher for the return of Netflix’s most lavish series. Although the spectacle and horror of the war have passed, the era of Anthony Eden and Harold McMillan is arguably more intriguing for being less frequently dramatised, and Peter Morgan explores the hypocrisies and compromises inherent in the politics of a nation whose global influence is in decline. Anton Lesser makes a ruthless, discreet McMillan, while Jeremy Northam is once again superb as Eden, a man not low on self-confidence yet forced to face his limitations as the Suez Crisis sees him outmanoeuvred. But the focal point of course is the royal family, and specifically the relationship between Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip: fundamentally solid in its early years, but now subject to considerable stress and strain as the couple drift apart over niggling doubts and suspected betrayals. Claire Foy and Matt Smith are magnificent in the lead roles, rising to the challenges of Morgan’s script to make plausible his educated guesswork and speculations over long-rumoured private affairs. The blend of spectacle and attention to detail remains striking. Gabriel Tate The Grand Tour Amazon Prime Video, from today Jeremy Clarkson, Richard Hammond and James May return for a second go-round of megastar guests, big-budget stunts in exotic locales, and parochial studio chat. The series opens with Ricky Wilson v David Hasselhoff in new segment Celebrity Face Off, and a comparison of a Lamborghini, a hybrid Honda and an electric supercar in a hill-climb race that – as anyone who recalls the headlines from earlier this year will know – goes horribly wrong. GT Judge Rinder’s Crown Court ITV, 8.00pm Two daytime television classics, one ancient and one modern, collide in this bizarre two-parter which sees Judge Robert Rinder, mediator of petty domestic disputes, presiding over a fictional case of arsenic poisoning. As per the original Crown Court, the jurors are members of the public. GT Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm The chefs meet a childhood hero as Mark Hamill, soon to return to cinemas as Luke Skywalker, joins them to learn about making perfect roast beef and Yorkshire puddings, plus a Caesar salad and a seafood feast. GT Brunel: the Man Who Built Britain Channel 5, 8.00pm A giant of the Industrial Revolution, Isambard Kingdom Brunel had a curious private life to match his towering professional achievements. The ever-reliable Rob Bell begins his two-part profile with Brunel’s first major project, the Thames Tunnel. GT The Year in Music 2017 BBC Two, 9.00pm The BBC Music Awards follow in the footsteps of BBC Sports Personality of the Year and incorporate a review of the year into the bargain. Here, Claudia Winkelman and Clara Amfo look back on the past 12 months with contributors including Stormzy, Nile Rodgers and Liam Gallagher. GT Classic Album: American Pie: Don McLean BBC Four, 9.00pm McLean’s sophomore album is these days less venerated than other landmarks of the era (Blue, Tapestry, After the Goldrush); it is perhaps overshadowed by its monumental title song whose allusive, elusive lyrics offered an alternate history of rock ’n’ roll and eulogy for the hippy dream. Yet there was always more to it, as this diligent documentary asserts. GT Prisoners (2013) ★★★☆☆ More4, 9.00pm This drama, which centres on the abduction of two girls, is harrowing but it succeeds in sustaining its tension to the end. Hugh Jackman is cast into darkness when his six-year-old daughter is kidnapped. Jake Gyllenhaal is the detective in charge of the case, and the pair lock horns early on. What we are then presented with is a criminal puzzle and a very committed cast, which also includes Terrence Howard.  Legend (2015) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Tom Hardy gives a solid, convincing performance as east London gangster Reggie Kray but his caricatured portrayal of twin brother Ronnie lets him down, and his inconsistent performance leads to an entertaining though muddled film. Emily Browning, however, gives just the right mix of defiance and despair as Frances Shea, Reggie’s put-upon wife. Watch out for some particularly gory scenes. Dead Calm (1989) ★★★☆☆ W, 9.00pm In her first big film role, Nicole Kidman displays pluck and vulnerability as Rae Ingram, a woman who loses her infant son in a car accident, and consents to a long recovery at sea, on a luxury yacht called the Saracen. Her husband John (Sam Neill) is an experienced naval officer and stand-up guy, and though he knows banishing Rae’s guilt and grief is going to be tough, he has no idea what shock therapy fate has in mind. Saturday 9 December John Noakes and Shep in 1978 Credit: HULTON  John Noakes: TV Hero BBC Two, 5.30pm One quarter of the definitive Blue Peter foursome, alongside Peter Purves, Valerie Singleton and Shep, John Noakes was both its longest-serving presenter and one of its very finest. A gifted communicator, earnest when he had to be but more often game for anything, whether that be a laugh or a lunatic stunt. This affectionate profile of Noakes, who died in May, aged 83, after many years with Alzheimer’s, pivots on perhaps his two best-loved moments. First, there’s a climb up Nelson’s Column, sans ropes or safety harnesses, that was every bit as daft and dangerous as it looked and ample testament to his dauntlessness. That impish sense of humour is demonstrated by the notorious appearance of Lulu the elephant, who relieved herself on the floor before rampaging across the studio and over Noakes’s foot. Ever the entertainer, he milked both for all they were worth. His relationship with the series was an equivocal one and he reportedly resented his clownish persona, but this tribute skirts any controversy in favour of warm nostalgia, with familiar Blue Peter faces including Biddy Baxter and Lesley Judd recalling the man and his work. GT Premier League Football: West Ham United v Chelsea Sky Sports Main Event, 11.30am Having recovered from a goal down to beat Newcastle 3-1 last Saturday, with Eden Hazard helping himself to a brace, Chelsea travel across London to face West Ham United. The home side, who are currently in the relegation zone, will have taken plenty of positives from their 2-1 defeat at Manchester City last Sunday – namely, their defensive display. A similarly obdurate performance here and new manager David Moyes might get a share of the spoils this time. When these sides met at the London Stadium last season, West Ham lost 2-1. PS European Rugby Champions Cup: Toulon v Bath Sky Sports Main Event, 5.15pm Two wins from two reads the stats for both sides so far in this season’s European Champions Cup – at least one of these 100 per cent records will end at Stade Mayol. Bath come into this match on the back of a 42-29 defeat by Exeter, but before that they’d won four on the bounce, with Freddie Burns impressing at fly-half. After the autumn internationals, director of rugby Todd Blackadder now has an embarrassment of riches from which to pick: most notably, England backs Anthony Watson, Semesa Rokoduguni and Jonathan Joseph. Toulon, meanwhile, ended a three-match losing streak on Saturday when they beat Lyon 39-11. PS Strictly Come Dancing BBC One, 6.45pm The five remaining couples must perform two routines in this semi-final, and with barely a strand of lace between them, expect forensic criticism from the judges. Sunday’s results show will reveal the final four and there will be a performance from Craig David. GT Michael McIntyre’s Big Show BBC One, 8.20pm Wringing his contacts book dry, McIntyre ropes in guests including TV presenters Marvin and Rochelle Humes (taking part in the game Send to All) and pop rock band The Vamps for more fun. GT Witnesses: a Frozen Death BBC Four, 9.00pm and 9.55pm Even in this saturated market for foreign-language thrillers, Witnesses stands out for its lack of gimmicks – though without ever quite scaling the heights of The Bridge or Spiral. Here, Sandra’s (Marie Dompnier) pursuit of the killer takes her into a forest and an orphanage. GT The White Princess Drama, 9.00pm and 10.20pm The excellent Jodie Comer anchors the series to its conclusion tonight with another double bill, as Elizabeth of York (Comer) and Henry VII (Jacob Collins-Levy) struggle to maintain a united front. GT Peter Blake: Pop Art Life Sky Arts, 9.00pm While there is more to Peter Blake’s work than his cover for Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, music has played a crucial role in the development of his art and reputation. This engaging film digs deeply into a mutually fruitful relationship. GT Casualty BBC One, 9.20pm Christmas approaches, bringing annual trauma and discord for the A&E team. Tonight finds Elle’s (Jaye Griffiths) tearaway son Blake (Kai Thorne) going off the rails in response to her suggestion that she spend the festive period with her new boyfriend. Polly (Sophia Di Martino), meanwhile, continues to be unimpressed by Max (Jamie Davis). GT Through the Keyhole: I’m a Celebrity… get me out of here! ITV, 9.50pm The living, breathing definition of an acquired taste, Keith Lemon returns for a fifth series of the show once helmed by David Frost. Guests include Jimmy Carr, Myleene Klass and Tony Blackburn. GT Gremlins 2: The New Batch (1990) ★★★☆☆ Christmas Gold, 9.40pm Whereas Joe Dante’s original monster hit was a deliciously dark horror flick (and staple Christmas hit) with touches of wry humour, this inferior sequel is essentially a straight-up, riotous comedy, replete with in-jokes and movie references. This time, the gremlins run amok in a Manhattan high-rise building called Clamp Tower, owned by John Glover’s Donald Trump-like mogul. The Cider House Rules (1999) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.15pm John Irving’s adaptation of his own 1985 novel features a fine Tobey Maguire and Michael Caine, who won an Oscar (only his second at the time). Irving won one too, for Best Screenplay, and there’s no doubt the story is moving, though this version – about an orphan (Maguire) and a doctor (Caine) who performs illegal abortions – is at times a bit saccharine. Paul Rudd co-stars; Lasse Hallström directs. The Drop (2014) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 11.35pm Tom Hardy anchors this tale of simmering malfeasance as the tender of a Brooklyn bar designated as the drop for ill-gotten gains. Dennis Lehane adapts his own short story Animal Rescue, and makes a perfect team with Belgian director Michaël R Roskam, who gets a tamped-down, shuffling and beautifully calibrated star turn out of Hardy. Sopranos star James Gandolfini adds a burly gravitas in what would be his final movie. Sunday 10 December Jumbo with keeper Matthew Scott in 1882 Credit: BBC Attenborough and the Giant Elephant BBC One, 9.00pm Can we ever have too much Attenborough? It seems not, as right in the foaming wake of the fabulous Blue Planet II (which concludes tonight, see preview below) comes this absorbing, bittersweet tale of the world’s first animal superstar – Jumbo the elephant. It’s a sad story, really. Jumbo shot to fame shortly after his arrival at London Zoo as an orphan in around 1861, but he didn’t get much from the deal. As Attenborough says, his captive life was “troubled, fuelled by alcohol, terrifying fits of violence, a near mystical relationship with his keeper and a tragic end that seems hard to believe”. Which is more than enough to hold the attention for an hour as he joins an international team examining Jumbo’s preserved skeleton at New York’s Museum of Natural History. Attenborough also pokes about in archives at London Zoo, sanctuaries in the Maasai Mara and Tennessee, and Ontario where Jumbo met his very sad end, building as complete a picture of this magnificent creature and his global travels as has ever been assembled. All the while it spreads a positive conservationist message and gives thanks that attitudes are more enlightened now than in Victorian times. GO Premier League Football: Liverpool v Everton & Manchester United v Manchester City Sky Sports Main Event, 1.15pm & 4.15pm “Super Sunday” lives up to its hyperbolic billing, with two potentially exhilarating derbies. First up, we’re at Anfield where Liverpool, fresh from their 5-1 demolition of Brighton, host Everton, who found some form last week, following up their 4-0 win at home to West Ham United with a 2-0 victory against Huddersfield. Later, in the 4.30pm kick-off, José Mourinho and Pep Guardiola renew rivalries as second-placed United host leaders City at Old Trafford. Expect it to be tight. PS Britain’s Wildest Weather 2017 Channel 4, 6.30pm This year has not, so far, been as extreme as some but, given the number of smartphone-wielding citizen journalists, there’s plenty of jaw-dropping footage of every extreme weather event that occurred, among them devastating floods, tornadoes and hair-raising lightning strikes. GO  Blue Planet II BBC One, 8.00pm This extraordinary series concludes with an undeniably depressing assessment of mankind’s impact on the marine environment. But David Attenborough, as ever, prefers to put the emphasis on hope. So there’s plenty of uplift too with stories of species brought back from extinction’s brink. GO Coastal Railways with Julie Walters Channel 4, 8.00pm Julie Walters heads for Cornwall on the Great Western route, recalling her childhood holidays in Torquay. She then boards a steam train at Paignton, hears tales of smugglers in Polperro and fills up on cakes in Penzance. GO Leonora Carrington: the Lost Surrealist BBC Four, 9.00pm This fascinating film tells the story of rebellious upper-class British artist Leonora Carrington, who worked alongside Ernst, Breton and Éluard in Paris at the height of the surrealist movement, yet died in 2011 all but forgotten in Mexico. Director Teresa Griffiths mixes interviews and biographical material with experimental animation and tableaux to bring Carrington’s work vividly to life. GO I’m a Celebrity… Get Me Out of Here! ITV, 9.00pm Seventeen series in and the public appetite for watching celebrities endure humiliation and repulsion shows little sign of drying up. This year’s launch pulled in ITV’s biggest audience of 2017. The final will no doubt draw as big a crowd again. GO Babylon Berlin Sky Atlantic, from 9.00pm Three more atmospheric episodes of the gripping crime series set in the bohemian, political Weimar Germany of the late Twenties. Detective Rath’s (Volker Bruch) investigation uncovers dangerous evidence of a shocking military conspiracy. GO The Sky At Night BBC Four, 10.00pm As well as more stargazing from the Royal Observatory, Maggie Aderin-Pocock is in Norway to see the Northern Lights. GO Ben-Hur (1959) ★★★★★ ITV3, 2.45pm A majestic slice of Hollywood history, this Roman-era melodrama directed by William Wyler and starring Charlton Heston won 11 Academy Awards (not equalled until Titanic in 1997). It still makes for magnificent viewing. Set in 26AD, it tells the story of a Jewish prince who clashes with the Roman governor and ends up enslaved, desperately plotting his revenge. The Sorcerer’s Apprentice (2010) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 3.00pm Jerry Bruckheimer gives the famous sequence from Disney’s Fantasia a fun, live-action reboot. Student Dave (Jay Baruchel) inherits Merlin’s powers, placing him in a power struggle between Balthazar (Nicolas Cage) and Horvath (Alfred Molina). Sadly there are just two scenes with broomsticks to link it to the original. Toby Kebbel is amusing as a stage musician co-opted by the forces of evil. Toy Story (1995) ★★★★★ BBC One, 3.35pm The idea of the first fully computer-generated animated film didn’t have those who had been weaned on the hand-drawn delights of Disney jumping for joy. However, with this beautiful tale, Pixar pushed animation to a new level – the premise, pace and emotion are all pitched perfectly. Whether it’s your first or 400th viewing, the story of toy cowboy Woody (Tom Hanks) and plastic spaceman Buzz Lightyear (Tim Allen) is a joy. Monday 11 December Faye Marsa, Sarah Parish and Amara Karan in Bancroft Credit: ITV Bancroft ITV, 9.00pm With so many crime dramas clogging up the television schedules it can be hard for a new series to stand out and at first ITV’s latest four-parter seems unlikely to break the mould. There’s an ambitious female cop with a possibly troubled past (the always reliable Sarah Parish), a striving younger cop who is desperate to move up the ranks (Faye Marsay) and the usual crop of jobsworths and strivers (Charles Babalola is particularly good as the married fellow officer Marsay’s Katherine should be steering well clear of). It’s all perfectly well done with a solid script from Kate Brooke (Mr Selfridge) but it seems like nothing special. Then, three quarters of the way through this first episode, something genuinely interesting happens: Bancroft’s secrets are revealed to be very dark indeed just as Katherine’s cold case involving the break-in and violent murder of a young woman in 1990 starts hotting up. With the stakes suddenly raised Bancroft spins off into a dark tale of the lengths that people go to keep the past buried and the stage is set for an intriguing game of secrets and lies. Smart scheduling sees the rest of the story play out over consecutive nights. SH Street Auction BBC One, 11.00am Paul Martin returns with a new series of the surprisingly addictive show in which people band together to raise funds for a member of their community by auctioning off hidden treasures. The fun comes from the unusual objects unearthed from garages and attics. SH Nigella’s Christmas Table BBC Two, 8.00pm If anything is guaranteed to Nigella put into purring overload it’s Christmas. The food on offer includes roast duck with orange, soy and ginger, but this is really about mood rather than food. SH   Paul Hollywood: A Baker’s Life Channel 4, 8.00pm Episode three of this genial series sees Hollywood looking back over his career and his time spent working at the Cliveden House Hotel in Berkshire. There’s also a festive get-together in Merseyside and some seasonal Danish pastries, which look delicious. SH The Art That Made Mexico: Paradise, Power and Prayers BBC Four, 9.00pm It’s always a pleasure to find a series that sheds new light on a subject, and so it is with artist Alinka Echeverria’s enthralling films about Mexico’s art. Of course, there are the key points: conquest, independence, dictatorship, revolution and figures such as Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo, but what the commentary gives us here is the context for both the history and the artists. This is true of this episode that looks at the relationship between art and power, colonialism and control while examining the enduring power of Kahlo’s work and myth. SH Handmade in Mexico BBC Four, 10.00pm The focus here is on Mexico’s celebrated Tree of Life sculptures, those gaudy, gorgeous interpretations of everything from the creation myth to the resurrection of Christ and the Day of the Dead. It’s a fascinating half-hour in which we see the amount of work and detail that goes into each piece. SH White Right: Meeting the Enemy: Exposure ITV, 10.40pm; STV, 11.05pm; UTV, 11.40pm; Wales, 11.10pm This intriguing-sounding documentary sees the Bafta-nominated Deeyah Khan (Jihad: A Story of the Others) investigate white extremism in the US. Khan visits white nationalist groups, attends a far-right rally and asks why this poisonous ideology is resurgent. SH The Black Swan (1942) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 2.35pm No, this is not the film about the ageing ballet dancer and the young ingénue; this is about high adventure on the seven seas. When Laird Cregar’s Captain Morgan becomes Governor of Jamaica, he promises to put an end to piracy. But things don’t go smoothly, especially when his assistant (Tyrone Power) kidnaps the ex-governor’s beautiful daughter (Maureen O’Hara). This was the final film of silent star Helene Costello. Mamma Mia! (2008) ★★★☆☆ ITV3, 7.50pm This musical comedy, directed by Phyllida Lloyd and set to Abba’s hits, is pure escapism. It’s naff, but that’s its selling point, as stars Meryl Streep, Pierce Brosnan and Julie Walters place tongues firmly in cheeks. At 59, Streep deserved more credit for doing the splits than for her role as a boho mother living on a Greek island whose daughter (Amanda Seyfried) tries to find out who her biological father is. Blood Diamond (2006) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 8.00pm The diamond industry of Sierra Leone is the subject of this striking thriller. Djimon Hounsou stars as a fisherman forced to work in the fields, who finds and hides a rare pink gem. His life is changed when he meets Leonardo DiCaprio’s self-serving mercenary and Jennifer Connelly’s well-meaning journalist. DiCaprio was Oscar-nominated, but lost to Forest Whitaker for The Last King of Scotland. Tuesday 12 December Paul Ready, Diane Morgan and Anna Maxwell-Martin Credit: BBC Motherland BBC Two, 10.00pm Dispensing with the calamitous set pieces of previous episodes and instead documenting the quiet desperation of this ill-starred band of sisters (plus one brother), this superb, exhausting sitcom from a writing supergroup including Graham Linehan and Sharon Horgan has been an exquisitely painful delight. We join Julia (Anna Maxwell Martin) in an unusually good place, with everything running smoothly thanks to her new Australian nanny, Lyndsey (Sarah Kendall). The kids are clean and happy, the school run is easy, the fridge is stocked – but could she be too good to be true? Amanda (Lucy Punch) has gone to ground after the revelation over her threesome, while her hapless confidant, Kevin (Paul Ready), is desperate to avoid having to get a job. And, should all the mugging get too much, there’s deadpan Liz (Diane Morgan), negotiating tricky relations with her dismal ex and his new, pregnant partner. After an orgy of passive aggression and desperate people in denial, the façades crack, just a little. Happily everyone reverts to fundamentally appalling type just in time for the end of the series and a surely inevitable recommission. GT Judd Apatow: the Return Netflix, from today After 25 years away from stand-up, the comedy zelig whose fingerprints are over everything from Knocked Up and Girls to Freaks and Geeks and Bridesmaids returns for a special set in Montreal, recorded in July. GT Masterchef: the Professionals BBC Two, 8.00pm After the hopefuls have tackled an invention test and rustled up a dish dedicated to one of their inspirations, Marcus Wareing, Monica Galletti and Gregg Wallace eliminate another two contenders, leaving only six in the contest. GT The A Word BBC One, 9.00pm Joe’s (brilliant Max Vento) family comes together for an end of year show at his old school – tears, acrimony and reconciliation ensue in the conclusion of Peter Bowker’s finely wrought, well-performed drama. A third series should surely be a formality. GT Invasion! with Sam Willis BBC Four, 9.00pm While not quite attaining Lucy Worsley levels of gonzo history, Dr Sam Willis is an enthusiastic and knowledgeable host not above the odd stunt to prove a point. This second episode of a series documenting the incursions that have shaped our nation and its bloodline examines the differing techniques and goals of the invaders. There are the Barbary Corsaire pirates who settled on Lundy Island, King Louis the Lion, invited to invade and crowned by disgruntled nobles, and the Dutch forces that negotiated the Medway just a year prior to the Glorious Revolution. Further proof, if any were needed, that Britain is a mongrel nation and all the better for it. GT The World’s Most Expensive Presents Channel 4, 9.00pm Eyeball-melting opulence and appalling lack of taste do battle with considerable craftsmanship and class in this startling film featuring everything from gold-plated pushbikes to a poker set in alligator-hide case. GT Sports Personality of the Year 2017: The Contenders BBC One, 10.45pm; Wales, 11.10pm; Scotland, 11.45pm With reigning title-holder Andy Murray’s injury-hit year effectively ruling him out of contention, Anthony Joshua, Chris Froome, Lewis Hamilton, Jo Konta and Mo Farah will be headlining this year’s roster after another 12 months of outstanding achievement in British sport. The runners and riders are introduced tonight. GT Shane (1953) ★★★★☆ Film4, 3.45pm There are few Westerns that examine the depths of human emotions, but this film by George Stevens is one of them and has become a landmark of cinema. Shane (Alan Ladd) is a cowboy who finds himself idolised for the way that he handles himself in the face of a landowner’s heavies. The climax is a face-off between Shane and smiling, whispering, Oscar-nominated Jack Palance, as the original man in black. A must-see. Mr & Mrs Smith (2005) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 9.00pm A daft comedy thriller which is perhaps best remembered for being the film that introduced Brad Pitt to Angelina Jolie. They play a couple whose failing marriage is spiced up dramatically when each discovers that the other secretly works as an assassin. Let down by a weak script, the film is held together by the chemistry between its two leads. Vince Vaughn and Adam Brody co-star. Moonraker (1979) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm The 11th film in the Bond series, and the fourth to star Roger Moore as the dapper MI6 agent, involves the theft of a space shuttle. It’s one of the weaker Bond films and at times seems more of a comedy than a tense action adventure, but it’s enjoyably frivolous. Michael Lonsdale plays resident baddie Hugo Drax who pinches the aforementioned space shuttle to help along his plan to wipe out the world’s population. Wednesday 13 December Barbara Schulz in Vanished by the Lake Credit: Channel 4 Vanished by the Lake Channel 4, 10.00pm This haunting French crime drama centres on a teenage girl who goes missing at a festival. It’s hardly an original set-up, but much like last year’s hit Gallic import The Disappearance, based on an almost identical premise, the mix of youthful promise cut short and fierce small-town intrigue quickly compels. The girl in question is Chloé Delval (Charlie Joirkin), and as news of her disappearance spreads, memories of a similar 15-year-old case in which two other girls vanished at the same celebration are revived. Into the fray steps striking Parisian detective Lise Stocker (Barbara Schulz), who has returned home to look after her ill mother, but is soon swept up by the case as its personal implications begin to unfold. All of the hallmarks of the Nordic noir genre are present, from the evocative setting (here a Broadchurch-style coastal backdrop) to the close-knit neighbours with secrets to hide. Nevertheless, this opening episode is an effective tension builder and the human impact of the mystery – particularly on Chloé’s fracturing parents – is powerfully moving. Once episode one finishes, the full series will be available to watch on All 4. TD Mary Berry’s Country House Secrets BBC One, 8.00pm Mary Berry rounds off her tour of Britain’s stately homes at Goodwood House, where she is suitably gushing over its royal history and grand interiors. Berry is treated to a hair-raising lap of the nearby motor circuit and whips up a four-tier cake for the cricket tea. TD The Secret Life of the Zoo Channel 4, 8.00pm The plight of the endangered Javan green magpie is on the agenda as keepers at Chester Zoo attempt to breed youngster Permata with older bird Netuba. Elsewhere, a zebra battle breaks out when newcomer Okoth arrives. TD Peaky Blinders BBC Two, 9.00pm A burst of gunfire opens the penultimate episode of period gangster antics, as Tommy Shelby (Cillian Murphy) faces off against mafia honcho Luca Changretta (Adrien Brody). An army colonel, meanwhile, questions Ada (Sophie Rundle) about her Communist past. TD The Channel: The World’s Busiest Waterway Channel 4, 9.00pm The fallout from Project Nemo, the new underwater electricity cable being laid between Belgium and Britain, is explored. We follow the Nemo manager struggling to avoid costly delays and the fisherman whose catch is being compromised by the work. TD Royal Academy: Painting the Future Sky Arts, 9.00pm Virtual reality (VR) is predicted to become the go-to place for everything from entertainment to work. The Royal Academy is getting in on the act with a new exhibition which explores the potential of the medium. This film follows the show’s creation with the artists, including sculptor Antony Gormley, portraitist Jonathan Yeo and Turner Prize-nominee Yinka Shonibare, who are producing works that use the technology to trace the history of the body in art. TD David Hockney: Time Reclaimed Sky Arts, 10.30pm This tribute to David Hockney aims to get beyond the glamour that surrounds his reputation, and focus on the personal aspects of his work. Anecdotes, images and analysis of the pictures themselves highlight the individuality expressed in each period of Hockney’s career, suggesting a diverse oeuvre that defies classification. TD Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am George Roy Hill directed two of the most popular films ever: Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969) and The Sting (1973). But this indifferent Julie Andrews musical of the flapper era was first. There’s much to enjoy in the story of a naive woman who leaves her rural roots behind to seek fortune and romance in Twenties New York. James Fox, as a spiffing salesman, is a particular highlight. The Three Musketeers (2011) ★★☆☆☆ E4, 8.00pm Paul W S Anderson’s adaptation of Alexandre Dumas’ novel is faithful in plot – Porthos, Athos and Aramis (Ray Stevenson, Matthew Macfadyen, Luke Evans), and disciple d’Artagnan (Logan Lerman), are sent to retrieve the French Queen’s (Juno Temple) necklace. The tone, however, is half action-pantomime, half candy-coloured steampunk comic – fun but terribly slapdash. Poltergeist (1982) ★★★★☆ TCM, 11.15pm Director Tobe Hooper, who made The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, tones down the gut-churning horror but still ramps up the tension to nightmare levels in this Steven Spielberg-produced chiller. It has one of cinema’s most spine-tinglingly scary moments: “They’re here,” sing-songs a little girl kneeling before the TV. “They” are the spirits, at first playful then increasingly malevolent, who terrorise a suburban family. Thursday 14 December Lord Sugar Credit: BBC The Apprentice: Why I Fired Them BBC One, 8.00pm In the wake of last night’s excoriating interview round, and with this Sunday’s final rapidly approaching to decide who will win a £250,000 investment and the mentoring opportunity of a lifetime, Lord Sugar makes his most personal appearance of the series. Other than those brief to-camera inserts that roll out as taxi cabs ferry freshly defenestrated candidates away from Sugar Towers to forever dream of fortunes that might have been made, this is one of few occasions in each “process” when Lord Sugar appears on screen away from the wannabe tycoons and talking to viewers directly. And he makes the most of it with his trademark witty-gritty line in East End charm, although professionalism usually prevents him from really dishing the behind-the-scenes dirt on why he thought 16 of them worthy only of the tip of his boot. Instead he looks back over this 13th series identifying the key commercial and strategic errors that led to each of his firing finger decisions, and what ultimately marked out the two finalists from the others. It’s a lot to get through in an hour but, as series recaps go, it’s usually a hoot. GO Ashes Cricket: Australia v England BT Sport 1, 1.30am The enduring Ashes Down Under conundrum: wake up early to watch it or stay up late? The third Test, held at the WACA Ground in Perth, gets under way in the early hours of Thursday morning, with England hoping to bounce back from two demoralising defeats. Lose this one and captain Joe Root will have to surrender the urn to the Aussies. PS European Tour Golf: The Indonesian Masters Sky Sports Main Event, 6.00am It’s the opening day of the tournament at the Royale Jakarta Golf Club, where Thailand’s Poom Saksansin won the title last year. Saksansin shot an overall score of 270 to finish on -18, five strokes ahead of joint runners-up Masahiro Kawamura of Japan and fellow Thai players Phachara Khongwatmai and Suradit Yongcharoenchai. PS Amazing Spaces Snow and Ice Special Channel 4, 8.00pm George Clarke and his inventive sidekick Will Hardie travel to Norway’s remoter parts to check out why this small country on the edge of Europe punches above its weight in architecture and design. Could it be something to do with the cold weather, they wonder? GO Love, Lies & Records BBC One, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama about the romance of working at a Leeds registry office delivers on melodrama, if not subtlety. In this penultimate episode Kate (Ashley Jensen) struggles to make a decision after Rob’s (Adrian Bower) surprise proposal. GO Blitz: the Bombs That Changed Britain BBC Two, 9.00pm The final edition looks at the horrific impact of German incendiary bombs, in particular one that set a church ablaze in Bristol in November 1940 and started a firestorm that ravaged the city’s historic centre. GO The Tunnel: Vengeance Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Sky’s award-winning version of The Bridge (its milieu that of British and French police teams linked by the Channel Tunnel) returns for a third and final run. A pity, as Stephen Dillane as spiky detective and Clémence Poésy as his emotionally remote French opposite number make an appealing pair. This first of six episodes packs in plenty of action as the pair set out to find the link between a burnt-out trawler and a maintenance worker attacked by a plague of rats. GO Extraordinary Teens: School of Life and Deaf Channel 4, 10.00pm This absorbing film follows a year in the life of Mary Hare Boarding School for deaf pupils in Berkshire. Seen through the eyes of a 15-year-old about to undergo a potentially life-changing cochlear implant, this film gives a profound sense of the physical and emotional complexities of growing up deaf. GO The Russell Howard Hour Sky One, 10.00pm We’ve reached the penultimate episode of this excellent topical comedy series. It’s little more than an extended version of BBC Three’s (and later BBC Two’s) Good News but that’s exactly what fans (and Sky, who snapped Howard up) wanted and he has delivered, pushing his brand of highly topical, politically aware, positive reinforcement stand-up with aplomb. GO Life (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Daniel Espinosa’s Earth-orbiting suspense flick was released less than two months before Ridley Scott’s new chapter in his Alien franchise, and bears many of the same hallmarks. It’s also a little bit Gravity. Ryan Reynolds is one of a crew of astronauts aboard a space station conducting research into life on Mars. In terms of entertainment, the film does its baseline job of getting you to chew your nails off. There’s Something About Mary (1998) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 9.00pm There are bad taste jokes in abundance in this comedy from the Farrelly Brothers. Ben Stiller stars as Ted, a shy man who realises he’s still in love with Mary (Cameron Diaz, proving her comic abilities), the date he tried to take to prom 13 years ago. So, to track her down, he hires an oily private eye (Matt Dillon) who also fallsin love with her and sets out to keep the pair apart. Gone in 60 Seconds (2000) ★★★☆☆ Universal Channel, 9.00pm Nicolas Cage has top billing in Dominic Sena’s remake of the 1974 cult film – a mind-numbingly testosterone-laced ride. Cage and Angelina Jolie are among a crew of thieves who must steal 50 cars in 72 hours to stop the murder of Cage’s brother. It’s more than serviceable entertainment, plus car aficionados will have fun spotting the Cadillacs and Corvettes. Friday 15 December Paul, Andy, Cynthia and Diana in The Sweet Makers Credit: BBC The Sweet Makers at Christmas BBC Two, 9.00pm Following their enjoyable three-part series earlier this year, BBC Two’s Sweet Makers return for this one-off Christmas special looking at changing treats from Georgian times to the Twenties. As before, the show is a lovely mix of baking and interesting social history with Emma Dabiri and Dr Annie Gray, who fill us in on how each era viewed Christmas and how confectionery changes over time. The show’s highlight comes during the Victorian Era, also known as the moment when Christmas as we know it was invented, as chocolatiers Paul A Young and Diane Short, bespoke cake decorator Cynthia Stroud and sweet consultant Andy Baxendale recreate a Boar’s Head cake. “That’s the most bonkers thing we’ve ever made,” notes Young, looking at the finished result, which is rich in chocolate, beautifully decorated and featuring unnervingly glazed eyes. He’s right but it also looks fabulous, as do the intricate Twelfth Cakes, a speciality in Georgian times. The Twenties brings with it the wonderful news that before Terry’s invented the chocolate orange they introduced the chocolate apple to the world, before looking to the future and the invention of Lord Mackintosh’s Quality Street. SH Jean-Claude Van Johnson Amazon Prime Video, from today This delightfully silly new series sees Jean-Claude Van Damme as a retired action film star with a secret: he’s a special agent and he wants back in the game. It’s inspired mayhem anchored by a winning performance from the laconic Van Damme. SH Trollhunters Netflix, from today Guillermo del Toro’s inventive animation returns for a second series, and it features the voice of the late Anton Yelchin as reluctant hero Jim Lake Jnr. The story continues where the first series left off, and sees Jim adventure deeper into the Troll world to battle the leader of the Darklands. This series also features Mark Hamill and Game of Thrones’s Lena Headey. SH Judge Rinder’s Crown Court ITV, 8.00pm; not STV or UTV; Wales, 11.10pm Judge Rinder’s reboot of classic Seventies series Crown Court might lack the big-name actors of the original but its meld of real-life crime and courtroom drama is just as addictive. Tonight, the jury decides if James Byron (Rupert Young) murdered his wife. SH Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Sarah Millican is a brave guest of Oliver and Doherty – brave because it swiftly transpires that cooking really isn’t her thing. But Oliver manages to bite his tongue while showing her how to cook her favourite microwave meal from scratch. SH Have I Got News for You BBC One, 9.00pm The 54th series of the satirical news quiz comes to an end with the ever-reliable David Tennant in the host’s chair. It has been a patchy series, which was marked by a new low when Jo Brand had to explain why sexual harassment jokes weren’t funny to the male panellists. So let’s hope it goes out on a high. SH Roy Orbison: Love Hurts BBC Four, 9.30pm Roy Orbison’s three sons, Wesley, Roy Jnr and Alex, take centre stage to discuss their father in this emotional documentary. SH The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm Prepare for Star Wars: The Last Jedi overload as John Boyega, Daisy Ridley and Mark Hamill join Norton on the sofa. Don’t expect any spoilers but there’s sure to be some nice eulogies to the late Carrie Fisher. SH Before I Go to Sleep (2014) ★★★☆☆ More4, 9.00pm Nicole Kidman and Colin Firth star in this uninvolving thriller based on SJ Watson’s twisty bestseller. Kidman plays a woman who, after suffering a head injury, has no idea who she is or who the man sleeping next to her might be (it’s Colin Firth, playing her husband). She keeps a daily video diary but starts to notice discrepancies between what she’s recorded and what Firth tells her. The Pledge (2001) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 9.00pm A tense mystery directed by Sean Penn with a fine cast including Jack Nicholson, Helen Mirren, Robin Wright Penn, Aaron Eckhart and Vanessa Redgrave. Nicholson is a detective who has to handle a horrific case on the day of his retirement – the murder of a seven-year-old girl. He promises to bring the killer to justice, only to find that the case is far from straightforward. A powerful, unsettling film. Hyena (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.15pm This violent thriller about corrupt drug-squad officers is very violent indeed, so be prepared to cover your eyes for some parts of writer-director Gerard Johnson’s film. Michael Logan (an intense Peter Ferdinand) is the leader of this special force, assigned to tackle drug trafficking among the Balkan gangs. Stephen Graham, as his dubious boss, is as reliable as ever. Above all, it’s a grisly exploration of the criminal mind. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

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