Barnsley

Barnsley slideshow

Bromley FC is a proud old club, but not a successful one. Dave Roberts’ book The Bromley Boys chronicles the author following the team in the 1960s, when it had an authentic claim to being the worst in the country. The town it represents has a higher population than Crewe, Shrewsbury and Accrington but has never hosted the league football expected in those places. Instead, Bromley have just completed a third season of steady improvement in the National League, the highest level the club have ever reached. They have visited Wembley once, for the final of the old FA Amateur Cup in 1949 for a 1-0 win over Romford in front of 96,000. They return on Sunday for the FA Trophy final and have a player to call on who has already played three times under the arch, seeking a redemptive coda to a varied career. Centre-back Roger Johnson was part of the Birmingham City side who beat Arsenal in the 2011 League Cup final, and with Cardiff when they lost the FA Cup final to Portsmouth in 2008 but beat Barnsley in the semi at Wembley. “Everyone says ‘just try and relax and enjoy the day’ but it’s very stressful,” he says. “The anxiety, getting there, the build-up. I’m sure once we’re out there and the whistle blows we’ll be fine.” Johnson, 35, looks remarkably lean as we talk after a video analysis session at Bromley’s Hayes Lane home. An armful of tattoos indicates his tour of duty in the modern Premier League, where he shone at Birmingham, endured a tougher spell at Wolves and turned out four times for West Ham as recently as 2014. The Wembley opponents are Brackley Town from the tier below and while Bromley have sold an impressive 20,000 tickets the stadium will still be sparsely occupied. Nevertheless, Johnson puts the game on a par with his most notable previous visit. “Winning on Sunday would mean as much as the Birmingham win,” he says. “Yeah it’s not an 89,000 sell-out against an Arsenal team with Robin van Persie in it who beat Barcelona nine days before, but we’re we’re there on merit.” Surprisingly heartfelt words from a man who came close to the England squad while with Birmingham. “I got six England call-ups for the 30-man squad, but nobody got injured so I didn’t make the 23,” he says. It was a rapid ascension after a long apprenticeship at Wycombe Wanderers, where he made his debut at 17. Cardiff eventually took a gamble on him in 2006 before Johnson stepped up to the Premier League with Birmingham. That solid side finished ninth in his first season but were relegated three months after their Wembley win. Johnson joined Bromley after 18 months at Charlton Athletic Credit: JULIAN SIMMONDS for The Telegraph A move to Wolves followed to prolong his top-flight career but little went to plan. He strongly disputes stories he once arrived at training worse for wear from the night before, but addresses his time at Molineux with candour. “I blame myself,” he says. “I had a dip in form, in a team of people that had a dip in form. I was blocking shots and it was going in off me, I was making stupid errors that I never make. “A regret is taking the captaincy when it was offered to me. It made my signing even bigger because I was the team captain and if things are going wrong the skipper has to answer for it. “It was hard to dig people out and have an opinion on what was going wrong, because I was one of the things that wasn’t working.” Loans to Sheffield Wednesday and West Ham took him away from the West Midlands before two spells at Charlton, either side of a sojourn in India with Pune City and unlikely team-mates Adrian Mutu and Didier Zokora. “I’d never choose to go to that side of the world personally, but I’ve seen the whole of India now. Goa was good, but the north-east was tough. There was no phone signal. Some of the flights were very dodgy, but it’s a tick in a box.” A far cry from Bromley’s Hayes Lane, surely one of the country’s only grounds which is approached via a road next to a field of grazing horses. Johnson celebrates Birmingham's victory over Arsenal in the 2011 League Cup final in the traditional fashion Credit: Action Images/Lee Smith After a knee injury and a subsequent blood poisoning from the surgery to treat it, Johnson is happy to be back playing the game he loves. “I’m not going to sit here and think I’ve had a failed career,” he says. “Every player wants to reach the Premier League and play for their country, I did one of them and got very close to the other.” Calm and philosophical, he seems every inch the elder statesmen and you can easily imagine him coaching. “I’m not too proud to go down the divisions but I probably wouldn’t drop any further, unless there was a player-coach role. I can’t see myself doing pub football. “There are some horrible people out there, who want to bad mouth you and write nonsense on social media. But have they been a footballer? No they haven’t. “My career, my stats, and what I’ve won speak for themselves. Wikipedia it, then write me something on social media.”
Roger Johnson returns for another shot at Wembley
Bromley FC is a proud old club, but not a successful one. Dave Roberts’ book The Bromley Boys chronicles the author following the team in the 1960s, when it had an authentic claim to being the worst in the country. The town it represents has a higher population than Crewe, Shrewsbury and Accrington but has never hosted the league football expected in those places. Instead, Bromley have just completed a third season of steady improvement in the National League, the highest level the club have ever reached. They have visited Wembley once, for the final of the old FA Amateur Cup in 1949 for a 1-0 win over Romford in front of 96,000. They return on Sunday for the FA Trophy final and have a player to call on who has already played three times under the arch, seeking a redemptive coda to a varied career. Centre-back Roger Johnson was part of the Birmingham City side who beat Arsenal in the 2011 League Cup final, and with Cardiff when they lost the FA Cup final to Portsmouth in 2008 but beat Barnsley in the semi at Wembley. “Everyone says ‘just try and relax and enjoy the day’ but it’s very stressful,” he says. “The anxiety, getting there, the build-up. I’m sure once we’re out there and the whistle blows we’ll be fine.” Johnson, 35, looks remarkably lean as we talk after a video analysis session at Bromley’s Hayes Lane home. An armful of tattoos indicates his tour of duty in the modern Premier League, where he shone at Birmingham, endured a tougher spell at Wolves and turned out four times for West Ham as recently as 2014. The Wembley opponents are Brackley Town from the tier below and while Bromley have sold an impressive 20,000 tickets the stadium will still be sparsely occupied. Nevertheless, Johnson puts the game on a par with his most notable previous visit. “Winning on Sunday would mean as much as the Birmingham win,” he says. “Yeah it’s not an 89,000 sell-out against an Arsenal team with Robin van Persie in it who beat Barcelona nine days before, but we’re we’re there on merit.” Surprisingly heartfelt words from a man who came close to the England squad while with Birmingham. “I got six England call-ups for the 30-man squad, but nobody got injured so I didn’t make the 23,” he says. It was a rapid ascension after a long apprenticeship at Wycombe Wanderers, where he made his debut at 17. Cardiff eventually took a gamble on him in 2006 before Johnson stepped up to the Premier League with Birmingham. That solid side finished ninth in his first season but were relegated three months after their Wembley win. Johnson joined Bromley after 18 months at Charlton Athletic Credit: JULIAN SIMMONDS for The Telegraph A move to Wolves followed to prolong his top-flight career but little went to plan. He strongly disputes stories he once arrived at training worse for wear from the night before, but addresses his time at Molineux with candour. “I blame myself,” he says. “I had a dip in form, in a team of people that had a dip in form. I was blocking shots and it was going in off me, I was making stupid errors that I never make. “A regret is taking the captaincy when it was offered to me. It made my signing even bigger because I was the team captain and if things are going wrong the skipper has to answer for it. “It was hard to dig people out and have an opinion on what was going wrong, because I was one of the things that wasn’t working.” Loans to Sheffield Wednesday and West Ham took him away from the West Midlands before two spells at Charlton, either side of a sojourn in India with Pune City and unlikely team-mates Adrian Mutu and Didier Zokora. “I’d never choose to go to that side of the world personally, but I’ve seen the whole of India now. Goa was good, but the north-east was tough. There was no phone signal. Some of the flights were very dodgy, but it’s a tick in a box.” A far cry from Bromley’s Hayes Lane, surely one of the country’s only grounds which is approached via a road next to a field of grazing horses. Johnson celebrates Birmingham's victory over Arsenal in the 2011 League Cup final in the traditional fashion Credit: Action Images/Lee Smith After a knee injury and a subsequent blood poisoning from the surgery to treat it, Johnson is happy to be back playing the game he loves. “I’m not going to sit here and think I’ve had a failed career,” he says. “Every player wants to reach the Premier League and play for their country, I did one of them and got very close to the other.” Calm and philosophical, he seems every inch the elder statesmen and you can easily imagine him coaching. “I’m not too proud to go down the divisions but I probably wouldn’t drop any further, unless there was a player-coach role. I can’t see myself doing pub football. “There are some horrible people out there, who want to bad mouth you and write nonsense on social media. But have they been a footballer? No they haven’t. “My career, my stats, and what I’ve won speak for themselves. Wikipedia it, then write me something on social media.”
Bromley FC is a proud old club, but not a successful one. Dave Roberts’ book The Bromley Boys chronicles the author following the team in the 1960s, when it had an authentic claim to being the worst in the country. The town it represents has a higher population than Crewe, Shrewsbury and Accrington but has never hosted the league football expected in those places. Instead, Bromley have just completed a third season of steady improvement in the National League, the highest level the club have ever reached. They have visited Wembley once, for the final of the old FA Amateur Cup in 1949 for a 1-0 win over Romford in front of 96,000. They return on Sunday for the FA Trophy final and have a player to call on who has already played three times under the arch, seeking a redemptive coda to a varied career. Centre-back Roger Johnson was part of the Birmingham City side who beat Arsenal in the 2011 League Cup final, and with Cardiff when they lost the FA Cup final to Portsmouth in 2008 but beat Barnsley in the semi at Wembley. “Everyone says ‘just try and relax and enjoy the day’ but it’s very stressful,” he says. “The anxiety, getting there, the build-up. I’m sure once we’re out there and the whistle blows we’ll be fine.” Johnson, 35, looks remarkably lean as we talk after a video analysis session at Bromley’s Hayes Lane home. An armful of tattoos indicates his tour of duty in the modern Premier League, where he shone at Birmingham, endured a tougher spell at Wolves and turned out four times for West Ham as recently as 2014. The Wembley opponents are Brackley Town from the tier below and while Bromley have sold an impressive 20,000 tickets the stadium will still be sparsely occupied. Nevertheless, Johnson puts the game on a par with his most notable previous visit. “Winning on Sunday would mean as much as the Birmingham win,” he says. “Yeah it’s not an 89,000 sell-out against an Arsenal team with Robin van Persie in it who beat Barcelona nine days before, but we’re we’re there on merit.” Surprisingly heartfelt words from a man who came close to the England squad while with Birmingham. “I got six England call-ups for the 30-man squad, but nobody got injured so I didn’t make the 23,” he says. It was a rapid ascension after a long apprenticeship at Wycombe Wanderers, where he made his debut at 17. Cardiff eventually took a gamble on him in 2006 before Johnson stepped up to the Premier League with Birmingham. That solid side finished ninth in his first season but were relegated three months after their Wembley win. Johnson joined Bromley after 18 months at Charlton Athletic Credit: JULIAN SIMMONDS for The Telegraph A move to Wolves followed to prolong his top-flight career but little went to plan. He strongly disputes stories he once arrived at training worse for wear from the night before, but addresses his time at Molineux with candour. “I blame myself,” he says. “I had a dip in form, in a team of people that had a dip in form. I was blocking shots and it was going in off me, I was making stupid errors that I never make. “A regret is taking the captaincy when it was offered to me. It made my signing even bigger because I was the team captain and if things are going wrong the skipper has to answer for it. “It was hard to dig people out and have an opinion on what was going wrong, because I was one of the things that wasn’t working.” Loans to Sheffield Wednesday and West Ham took him away from the West Midlands before two spells at Charlton, either side of a sojourn in India with Pune City and unlikely team-mates Adrian Mutu and Didier Zokora. “I’d never choose to go to that side of the world personally, but I’ve seen the whole of India now. Goa was good, but the north-east was tough. There was no phone signal. Some of the flights were very dodgy, but it’s a tick in a box.” A far cry from Bromley’s Hayes Lane, surely one of the country’s only grounds which is approached via a road next to a field of grazing horses. Johnson celebrates Birmingham's victory over Arsenal in the 2011 League Cup final in the traditional fashion Credit: Action Images/Lee Smith After a knee injury and a subsequent blood poisoning from the surgery to treat it, Johnson is happy to be back playing the game he loves. “I’m not going to sit here and think I’ve had a failed career,” he says. “Every player wants to reach the Premier League and play for their country, I did one of them and got very close to the other.” Calm and philosophical, he seems every inch the elder statesmen and you can easily imagine him coaching. “I’m not too proud to go down the divisions but I probably wouldn’t drop any further, unless there was a player-coach role. I can’t see myself doing pub football. “There are some horrible people out there, who want to bad mouth you and write nonsense on social media. But have they been a footballer? No they haven’t. “My career, my stats, and what I’ve won speak for themselves. Wikipedia it, then write me something on social media.”
Roger Johnson returns for another shot at Wembley
Bromley FC is a proud old club, but not a successful one. Dave Roberts’ book The Bromley Boys chronicles the author following the team in the 1960s, when it had an authentic claim to being the worst in the country. The town it represents has a higher population than Crewe, Shrewsbury and Accrington but has never hosted the league football expected in those places. Instead, Bromley have just completed a third season of steady improvement in the National League, the highest level the club have ever reached. They have visited Wembley once, for the final of the old FA Amateur Cup in 1949 for a 1-0 win over Romford in front of 96,000. They return on Sunday for the FA Trophy final and have a player to call on who has already played three times under the arch, seeking a redemptive coda to a varied career. Centre-back Roger Johnson was part of the Birmingham City side who beat Arsenal in the 2011 League Cup final, and with Cardiff when they lost the FA Cup final to Portsmouth in 2008 but beat Barnsley in the semi at Wembley. “Everyone says ‘just try and relax and enjoy the day’ but it’s very stressful,” he says. “The anxiety, getting there, the build-up. I’m sure once we’re out there and the whistle blows we’ll be fine.” Johnson, 35, looks remarkably lean as we talk after a video analysis session at Bromley’s Hayes Lane home. An armful of tattoos indicates his tour of duty in the modern Premier League, where he shone at Birmingham, endured a tougher spell at Wolves and turned out four times for West Ham as recently as 2014. The Wembley opponents are Brackley Town from the tier below and while Bromley have sold an impressive 20,000 tickets the stadium will still be sparsely occupied. Nevertheless, Johnson puts the game on a par with his most notable previous visit. “Winning on Sunday would mean as much as the Birmingham win,” he says. “Yeah it’s not an 89,000 sell-out against an Arsenal team with Robin van Persie in it who beat Barcelona nine days before, but we’re we’re there on merit.” Surprisingly heartfelt words from a man who came close to the England squad while with Birmingham. “I got six England call-ups for the 30-man squad, but nobody got injured so I didn’t make the 23,” he says. It was a rapid ascension after a long apprenticeship at Wycombe Wanderers, where he made his debut at 17. Cardiff eventually took a gamble on him in 2006 before Johnson stepped up to the Premier League with Birmingham. That solid side finished ninth in his first season but were relegated three months after their Wembley win. Johnson joined Bromley after 18 months at Charlton Athletic Credit: JULIAN SIMMONDS for The Telegraph A move to Wolves followed to prolong his top-flight career but little went to plan. He strongly disputes stories he once arrived at training worse for wear from the night before, but addresses his time at Molineux with candour. “I blame myself,” he says. “I had a dip in form, in a team of people that had a dip in form. I was blocking shots and it was going in off me, I was making stupid errors that I never make. “A regret is taking the captaincy when it was offered to me. It made my signing even bigger because I was the team captain and if things are going wrong the skipper has to answer for it. “It was hard to dig people out and have an opinion on what was going wrong, because I was one of the things that wasn’t working.” Loans to Sheffield Wednesday and West Ham took him away from the West Midlands before two spells at Charlton, either side of a sojourn in India with Pune City and unlikely team-mates Adrian Mutu and Didier Zokora. “I’d never choose to go to that side of the world personally, but I’ve seen the whole of India now. Goa was good, but the north-east was tough. There was no phone signal. Some of the flights were very dodgy, but it’s a tick in a box.” A far cry from Bromley’s Hayes Lane, surely one of the country’s only grounds which is approached via a road next to a field of grazing horses. Johnson celebrates Birmingham's victory over Arsenal in the 2011 League Cup final in the traditional fashion Credit: Action Images/Lee Smith After a knee injury and a subsequent blood poisoning from the surgery to treat it, Johnson is happy to be back playing the game he loves. “I’m not going to sit here and think I’ve had a failed career,” he says. “Every player wants to reach the Premier League and play for their country, I did one of them and got very close to the other.” Calm and philosophical, he seems every inch the elder statesmen and you can easily imagine him coaching. “I’m not too proud to go down the divisions but I probably wouldn’t drop any further, unless there was a player-coach role. I can’t see myself doing pub football. “There are some horrible people out there, who want to bad mouth you and write nonsense on social media. But have they been a footballer? No they haven’t. “My career, my stats, and what I’ve won speak for themselves. Wikipedia it, then write me something on social media.”
Bromley FC is a proud old club, but not a successful one. Dave Roberts’ book The Bromley Boys chronicles the author following the team in the 1960s, when it had an authentic claim to being the worst in the country. The town it represents has a higher population than Crewe, Shrewsbury and Accrington but has never hosted the league football expected in those places. Instead, Bromley have just completed a third season of steady improvement in the National League, the highest level the club have ever reached. They have visited Wembley once, for the final of the old FA Amateur Cup in 1949 for a 1-0 win over Romford in front of 96,000. They return on Sunday for the FA Trophy final and have a player to call on who has already played three times under the arch, seeking a redemptive coda to a varied career. Centre-back Roger Johnson was part of the Birmingham City side who beat Arsenal in the 2011 League Cup final, and with Cardiff when they lost the FA Cup final to Portsmouth in 2008 but beat Barnsley in the semi at Wembley. “Everyone says ‘just try and relax and enjoy the day’ but it’s very stressful,” he says. “The anxiety, getting there, the build-up. I’m sure once we’re out there and the whistle blows we’ll be fine.” Johnson, 35, looks remarkably lean as we talk after a video analysis session at Bromley’s Hayes Lane home. An armful of tattoos indicates his tour of duty in the modern Premier League, where he shone at Birmingham, endured a tougher spell at Wolves and turned out four times for West Ham as recently as 2014. The Wembley opponents are Brackley Town from the tier below and while Bromley have sold an impressive 20,000 tickets the stadium will still be sparsely occupied. Nevertheless, Johnson puts the game on a par with his most notable previous visit. “Winning on Sunday would mean as much as the Birmingham win,” he says. “Yeah it’s not an 89,000 sell-out against an Arsenal team with Robin van Persie in it who beat Barcelona nine days before, but we’re we’re there on merit.” Surprisingly heartfelt words from a man who came close to the England squad while with Birmingham. “I got six England call-ups for the 30-man squad, but nobody got injured so I didn’t make the 23,” he says. It was a rapid ascension after a long apprenticeship at Wycombe Wanderers, where he made his debut at 17. Cardiff eventually took a gamble on him in 2006 before Johnson stepped up to the Premier League with Birmingham. That solid side finished ninth in his first season but were relegated three months after their Wembley win. Johnson joined Bromley after 18 months at Charlton Athletic Credit: JULIAN SIMMONDS for The Telegraph A move to Wolves followed to prolong his top-flight career but little went to plan. He strongly disputes stories he once arrived at training worse for wear from the night before, but addresses his time at Molineux with candour. “I blame myself,” he says. “I had a dip in form, in a team of people that had a dip in form. I was blocking shots and it was going in off me, I was making stupid errors that I never make. “A regret is taking the captaincy when it was offered to me. It made my signing even bigger because I was the team captain and if things are going wrong the skipper has to answer for it. “It was hard to dig people out and have an opinion on what was going wrong, because I was one of the things that wasn’t working.” Loans to Sheffield Wednesday and West Ham took him away from the West Midlands before two spells at Charlton, either side of a sojourn in India with Pune City and unlikely team-mates Adrian Mutu and Didier Zokora. “I’d never choose to go to that side of the world personally, but I’ve seen the whole of India now. Goa was good, but the north-east was tough. There was no phone signal. Some of the flights were very dodgy, but it’s a tick in a box.” A far cry from Bromley’s Hayes Lane, surely one of the country’s only grounds which is approached via a road next to a field of grazing horses. Johnson celebrates Birmingham's victory over Arsenal in the 2011 League Cup final in the traditional fashion Credit: Action Images/Lee Smith After a knee injury and a subsequent blood poisoning from the surgery to treat it, Johnson is happy to be back playing the game he loves. “I’m not going to sit here and think I’ve had a failed career,” he says. “Every player wants to reach the Premier League and play for their country, I did one of them and got very close to the other.” Calm and philosophical, he seems every inch the elder statesmen and you can easily imagine him coaching. “I’m not too proud to go down the divisions but I probably wouldn’t drop any further, unless there was a player-coach role. I can’t see myself doing pub football. “There are some horrible people out there, who want to bad mouth you and write nonsense on social media. But have they been a footballer? No they haven’t. “My career, my stats, and what I’ve won speak for themselves. Wikipedia it, then write me something on social media.”
Roger Johnson returns for another shot at Wembley
Bromley FC is a proud old club, but not a successful one. Dave Roberts’ book The Bromley Boys chronicles the author following the team in the 1960s, when it had an authentic claim to being the worst in the country. The town it represents has a higher population than Crewe, Shrewsbury and Accrington but has never hosted the league football expected in those places. Instead, Bromley have just completed a third season of steady improvement in the National League, the highest level the club have ever reached. They have visited Wembley once, for the final of the old FA Amateur Cup in 1949 for a 1-0 win over Romford in front of 96,000. They return on Sunday for the FA Trophy final and have a player to call on who has already played three times under the arch, seeking a redemptive coda to a varied career. Centre-back Roger Johnson was part of the Birmingham City side who beat Arsenal in the 2011 League Cup final, and with Cardiff when they lost the FA Cup final to Portsmouth in 2008 but beat Barnsley in the semi at Wembley. “Everyone says ‘just try and relax and enjoy the day’ but it’s very stressful,” he says. “The anxiety, getting there, the build-up. I’m sure once we’re out there and the whistle blows we’ll be fine.” Johnson, 35, looks remarkably lean as we talk after a video analysis session at Bromley’s Hayes Lane home. An armful of tattoos indicates his tour of duty in the modern Premier League, where he shone at Birmingham, endured a tougher spell at Wolves and turned out four times for West Ham as recently as 2014. The Wembley opponents are Brackley Town from the tier below and while Bromley have sold an impressive 20,000 tickets the stadium will still be sparsely occupied. Nevertheless, Johnson puts the game on a par with his most notable previous visit. “Winning on Sunday would mean as much as the Birmingham win,” he says. “Yeah it’s not an 89,000 sell-out against an Arsenal team with Robin van Persie in it who beat Barcelona nine days before, but we’re we’re there on merit.” Surprisingly heartfelt words from a man who came close to the England squad while with Birmingham. “I got six England call-ups for the 30-man squad, but nobody got injured so I didn’t make the 23,” he says. It was a rapid ascension after a long apprenticeship at Wycombe Wanderers, where he made his debut at 17. Cardiff eventually took a gamble on him in 2006 before Johnson stepped up to the Premier League with Birmingham. That solid side finished ninth in his first season but were relegated three months after their Wembley win. Johnson joined Bromley after 18 months at Charlton Athletic Credit: JULIAN SIMMONDS for The Telegraph A move to Wolves followed to prolong his top-flight career but little went to plan. He strongly disputes stories he once arrived at training worse for wear from the night before, but addresses his time at Molineux with candour. “I blame myself,” he says. “I had a dip in form, in a team of people that had a dip in form. I was blocking shots and it was going in off me, I was making stupid errors that I never make. “A regret is taking the captaincy when it was offered to me. It made my signing even bigger because I was the team captain and if things are going wrong the skipper has to answer for it. “It was hard to dig people out and have an opinion on what was going wrong, because I was one of the things that wasn’t working.” Loans to Sheffield Wednesday and West Ham took him away from the West Midlands before two spells at Charlton, either side of a sojourn in India with Pune City and unlikely team-mates Adrian Mutu and Didier Zokora. “I’d never choose to go to that side of the world personally, but I’ve seen the whole of India now. Goa was good, but the north-east was tough. There was no phone signal. Some of the flights were very dodgy, but it’s a tick in a box.” A far cry from Bromley’s Hayes Lane, surely one of the country’s only grounds which is approached via a road next to a field of grazing horses. Johnson celebrates Birmingham's victory over Arsenal in the 2011 League Cup final in the traditional fashion Credit: Action Images/Lee Smith After a knee injury and a subsequent blood poisoning from the surgery to treat it, Johnson is happy to be back playing the game he loves. “I’m not going to sit here and think I’ve had a failed career,” he says. “Every player wants to reach the Premier League and play for their country, I did one of them and got very close to the other.” Calm and philosophical, he seems every inch the elder statesmen and you can easily imagine him coaching. “I’m not too proud to go down the divisions but I probably wouldn’t drop any further, unless there was a player-coach role. I can’t see myself doing pub football. “There are some horrible people out there, who want to bad mouth you and write nonsense on social media. But have they been a footballer? No they haven’t. “My career, my stats, and what I’ve won speak for themselves. Wikipedia it, then write me something on social media.”
Huddersfield's battling draw with Chelsea completed a remarkable season in which every team that won promotion to English football's top leagues remain in the division. David Wagner's side earned a vital point at Stamford Bridge on Wednesday night to guarantee their Premier League safety for another season. The result meant that Huddersfield joined fellow promoted sides Brighton and Newcastle in safely avoiding a return the Championship as Stoke, West Brom and - barring a miracle - Swansea all dropped out of the top flight. For the first time since the 2001-02 season, when Fulham, Blackburn and Bolton defied the odds, every single team that earned promotion to one of English football's top four leagues avoided relegation. Alan Alger, PR manager at bookmakers Betway, said the odds on such an outcome would have been bigger than Leicester City's Premier League title triumph in 2016. Stoke City lost to Crystal Palace last weekend to end their 10-year stay in the Premier League Credit: Getty Images In the Championship, Burton Albion and Barnsley were relegated on a dramatic final day after Sunderland's fate had been sealed a week earlier. Below the top-flight, Championship new-boys Sheffield United and Millwall both enjoyed top-half finishes while Bolton Wanderers escaped the drop on the final day. In League One, Portsmouth, Plymouth Argyle, Doncaster Rovers, Blackpool all stayed well clear of the bottom four as Bury, MK Dons, Northampton Town, and Oldham Athletic were relegated to the fourth tier. League Two's Forest Green narrowly avoided an immediate return to the Vanarama National League while fellow promoted side Lincoln enjoyed a seventh-place finish, booking their place in the play-offs. Bolton Wanderers came from behind to beat Nottingham Forest on the final day and avoid an instant return to League One Credit: Getty Images In fact, the trend extends beyond the Football League, with Maidenhead United, Ebbsfleet United, Halifax Town and Fylde all securing safety after earning promotion to National League One last season. Huddersfield manager David Wagner was last night quick to praise his players for the "incredible achievement" of defying Premier League relegation. “This is an absolute over-achievement,” said Wagner. Huddersfield came up via the Championship play-offs Credit: PA “It's a bigger achievement than the promotion last season. Last year we were predicted to be relegated and we got promoted. This season we were predicted to be a team relegated by miles and I understand it. “We work under circumstances which are not even Championship circumstances. But part of our DNA, the Huddersfield Town DNA, is to try it. "To have passion, desire... how big you are doesn't count. It's about trying everything. We are humble. We are ambitious, too. We search a chance in every game. Today we were chance-less, more or less. It's an incredible achievement for us. It feels like another trophy.” Promoted teams avoid relegation | English football's top five leagues
Year of the underdog: Every single promoted team in English football's top four divisions avoids relegation
Huddersfield's battling draw with Chelsea completed a remarkable season in which every team that won promotion to English football's top leagues remain in the division. David Wagner's side earned a vital point at Stamford Bridge on Wednesday night to guarantee their Premier League safety for another season. The result meant that Huddersfield joined fellow promoted sides Brighton and Newcastle in safely avoiding a return the Championship as Stoke, West Brom and - barring a miracle - Swansea all dropped out of the top flight. For the first time since the 2001-02 season, when Fulham, Blackburn and Bolton defied the odds, every single team that earned promotion to one of English football's top four leagues avoided relegation. Alan Alger, PR manager at bookmakers Betway, said the odds on such an outcome would have been bigger than Leicester City's Premier League title triumph in 2016. Stoke City lost to Crystal Palace last weekend to end their 10-year stay in the Premier League Credit: Getty Images In the Championship, Burton Albion and Barnsley were relegated on a dramatic final day after Sunderland's fate had been sealed a week earlier. Below the top-flight, Championship new-boys Sheffield United and Millwall both enjoyed top-half finishes while Bolton Wanderers escaped the drop on the final day. In League One, Portsmouth, Plymouth Argyle, Doncaster Rovers, Blackpool all stayed well clear of the bottom four as Bury, MK Dons, Northampton Town, and Oldham Athletic were relegated to the fourth tier. League Two's Forest Green narrowly avoided an immediate return to the Vanarama National League while fellow promoted side Lincoln enjoyed a seventh-place finish, booking their place in the play-offs. Bolton Wanderers came from behind to beat Nottingham Forest on the final day and avoid an instant return to League One Credit: Getty Images In fact, the trend extends beyond the Football League, with Maidenhead United, Ebbsfleet United, Halifax Town and Fylde all securing safety after earning promotion to National League One last season. Huddersfield manager David Wagner was last night quick to praise his players for the "incredible achievement" of defying Premier League relegation. “This is an absolute over-achievement,” said Wagner. Huddersfield came up via the Championship play-offs Credit: PA “It's a bigger achievement than the promotion last season. Last year we were predicted to be relegated and we got promoted. This season we were predicted to be a team relegated by miles and I understand it. “We work under circumstances which are not even Championship circumstances. But part of our DNA, the Huddersfield Town DNA, is to try it. "To have passion, desire... how big you are doesn't count. It's about trying everything. We are humble. We are ambitious, too. We search a chance in every game. Today we were chance-less, more or less. It's an incredible achievement for us. It feels like another trophy.” Promoted teams avoid relegation | English football's top five leagues
Huddersfield's battling draw with Chelsea completed a remarkable season in which every team that won promotion to English football's top leagues remain in the division. David Wagner's side earned a vital point at Stamford Bridge on Wednesday night to guarantee their Premier League safety for another season. The result meant that Huddersfield joined fellow promoted sides Brighton and Newcastle in safely avoiding a return the Championship as Stoke, West Brom and - barring a miracle - Swansea all dropped out of the top flight. For the first time since the 2001-02 season, when Fulham, Blackburn and Bolton defied the odds, every single team that earned promotion to one of English football's top four leagues avoided relegation. Alan Alger, PR manager at bookmakers Betway, said the odds on such an outcome would have been bigger than Leicester City's Premier League title triumph in 2016. Stoke City lost to Crystal Palace last weekend to end their 10-year stay in the Premier League Credit: Getty Images In the Championship, Burton Albion and Barnsley were relegated on a dramatic final day after Sunderland's fate had been sealed a week earlier. Below the top-flight, Championship new-boys Sheffield United and Millwall both enjoyed top-half finishes while Bolton Wanderers escaped the drop on the final day. In League One, Portsmouth, Plymouth Argyle, Doncaster Rovers, Blackpool all stayed well clear of the bottom four as Bury, MK Dons, Northampton Town, and Oldham Athletic were relegated to the fourth tier. League Two's Forest Green narrowly avoided an immediate return to the Vanarama National League while fellow promoted side Lincoln enjoyed a seventh-place finish, booking their place in the play-offs. Bolton Wanderers came from behind to beat Nottingham Forest on the final day and avoid an instant return to League One Credit: Getty Images In fact, the trend extends beyond the Football League, with Maidenhead United, Ebbsfleet United, Halifax Town and Fylde all securing safety after earning promotion to National League One last season. Huddersfield manager David Wagner was last night quick to praise his players for the "incredible achievement" of defying Premier League relegation. “This is an absolute over-achievement,” said Wagner. Huddersfield came up via the Championship play-offs Credit: PA “It's a bigger achievement than the promotion last season. Last year we were predicted to be relegated and we got promoted. This season we were predicted to be a team relegated by miles and I understand it. “We work under circumstances which are not even Championship circumstances. But part of our DNA, the Huddersfield Town DNA, is to try it. "To have passion, desire... how big you are doesn't count. It's about trying everything. We are humble. We are ambitious, too. We search a chance in every game. Today we were chance-less, more or less. It's an incredible achievement for us. It feels like another trophy.” Promoted teams avoid relegation | English football's top five leagues
Year of the underdog: Every single promoted team in English football's top four divisions avoids relegation
Huddersfield's battling draw with Chelsea completed a remarkable season in which every team that won promotion to English football's top leagues remain in the division. David Wagner's side earned a vital point at Stamford Bridge on Wednesday night to guarantee their Premier League safety for another season. The result meant that Huddersfield joined fellow promoted sides Brighton and Newcastle in safely avoiding a return the Championship as Stoke, West Brom and - barring a miracle - Swansea all dropped out of the top flight. For the first time since the 2001-02 season, when Fulham, Blackburn and Bolton defied the odds, every single team that earned promotion to one of English football's top four leagues avoided relegation. Alan Alger, PR manager at bookmakers Betway, said the odds on such an outcome would have been bigger than Leicester City's Premier League title triumph in 2016. Stoke City lost to Crystal Palace last weekend to end their 10-year stay in the Premier League Credit: Getty Images In the Championship, Burton Albion and Barnsley were relegated on a dramatic final day after Sunderland's fate had been sealed a week earlier. Below the top-flight, Championship new-boys Sheffield United and Millwall both enjoyed top-half finishes while Bolton Wanderers escaped the drop on the final day. In League One, Portsmouth, Plymouth Argyle, Doncaster Rovers, Blackpool all stayed well clear of the bottom four as Bury, MK Dons, Northampton Town, and Oldham Athletic were relegated to the fourth tier. League Two's Forest Green narrowly avoided an immediate return to the Vanarama National League while fellow promoted side Lincoln enjoyed a seventh-place finish, booking their place in the play-offs. Bolton Wanderers came from behind to beat Nottingham Forest on the final day and avoid an instant return to League One Credit: Getty Images In fact, the trend extends beyond the Football League, with Maidenhead United, Ebbsfleet United, Halifax Town and Fylde all securing safety after earning promotion to National League One last season. Huddersfield manager David Wagner was last night quick to praise his players for the "incredible achievement" of defying Premier League relegation. “This is an absolute over-achievement,” said Wagner. Huddersfield came up via the Championship play-offs Credit: PA “It's a bigger achievement than the promotion last season. Last year we were predicted to be relegated and we got promoted. This season we were predicted to be a team relegated by miles and I understand it. “We work under circumstances which are not even Championship circumstances. But part of our DNA, the Huddersfield Town DNA, is to try it. "To have passion, desire... how big you are doesn't count. It's about trying everything. We are humble. We are ambitious, too. We search a chance in every game. Today we were chance-less, more or less. It's an incredible achievement for us. It feels like another trophy.” Promoted teams avoid relegation | English football's top five leagues
Huddersfield's battling draw with Chelsea completed a remarkable season in which every team that won promotion to English football's top leagues remain in the division. David Wagner's side earned a vital point at Stamford Bridge on Wednesday night to guarantee their Premier League safety for another season. The result meant that Huddersfield joined fellow promoted sides Brighton and Newcastle in safely avoiding a return the Championship as Stoke, West Brom and - barring a miracle - Swansea all dropped out of the top flight. For the first time since the 2001-02 season, when Fulham, Blackburn and Bolton defied the odds, every single team that earned promotion to one of English football's top four leagues avoided relegation. Alan Alger, PR manager at bookmakers Betway, said the odds on such an outcome would have been bigger than Leicester City's Premier League title triumph in 2016. Stoke City lost to Crystal Palace last weekend to end their 10-year stay in the Premier League Credit: Getty Images In the Championship, Burton Albion and Barnsley were relegated on a dramatic final day after Sunderland's fate had been sealed a week earlier. Below the top-flight, Championship new-boys Sheffield United and Millwall both enjoyed top-half finishes while Bolton Wanderers escaped the drop on the final day. In League One, Portsmouth, Plymouth Argyle, Doncaster Rovers, Blackpool all stayed well clear of the bottom four as Bury, MK Dons, Northampton Town, and Oldham Athletic were relegated to the fourth tier. League Two's Forest Green narrowly avoided an immediate return to the Vanarama National League while fellow promoted side Lincoln enjoyed a seventh-place finish, booking their place in the play-offs. Bolton Wanderers came from behind to beat Nottingham Forest on the final day and avoid an instant return to League One Credit: Getty Images In fact, the trend extends beyond the Football League, with Maidenhead United, Ebbsfleet United, Halifax Town and Fylde all securing safety after earning promotion to National League One last season. Huddersfield manager David Wagner was last night quick to praise his players for the "incredible achievement" of defying Premier League relegation. “This is an absolute over-achievement,” said Wagner. Huddersfield came up via the Championship play-offs Credit: PA “It's a bigger achievement than the promotion last season. Last year we were predicted to be relegated and we got promoted. This season we were predicted to be a team relegated by miles and I understand it. “We work under circumstances which are not even Championship circumstances. But part of our DNA, the Huddersfield Town DNA, is to try it. "To have passion, desire... how big you are doesn't count. It's about trying everything. We are humble. We are ambitious, too. We search a chance in every game. Today we were chance-less, more or less. It's an incredible achievement for us. It feels like another trophy.” Promoted teams avoid relegation | English football's top five leagues
Year of the underdog: Every single promoted team in English football's top four divisions avoids relegation
Huddersfield's battling draw with Chelsea completed a remarkable season in which every team that won promotion to English football's top leagues remain in the division. David Wagner's side earned a vital point at Stamford Bridge on Wednesday night to guarantee their Premier League safety for another season. The result meant that Huddersfield joined fellow promoted sides Brighton and Newcastle in safely avoiding a return the Championship as Stoke, West Brom and - barring a miracle - Swansea all dropped out of the top flight. For the first time since the 2001-02 season, when Fulham, Blackburn and Bolton defied the odds, every single team that earned promotion to one of English football's top four leagues avoided relegation. Alan Alger, PR manager at bookmakers Betway, said the odds on such an outcome would have been bigger than Leicester City's Premier League title triumph in 2016. Stoke City lost to Crystal Palace last weekend to end their 10-year stay in the Premier League Credit: Getty Images In the Championship, Burton Albion and Barnsley were relegated on a dramatic final day after Sunderland's fate had been sealed a week earlier. Below the top-flight, Championship new-boys Sheffield United and Millwall both enjoyed top-half finishes while Bolton Wanderers escaped the drop on the final day. In League One, Portsmouth, Plymouth Argyle, Doncaster Rovers, Blackpool all stayed well clear of the bottom four as Bury, MK Dons, Northampton Town, and Oldham Athletic were relegated to the fourth tier. League Two's Forest Green narrowly avoided an immediate return to the Vanarama National League while fellow promoted side Lincoln enjoyed a seventh-place finish, booking their place in the play-offs. Bolton Wanderers came from behind to beat Nottingham Forest on the final day and avoid an instant return to League One Credit: Getty Images In fact, the trend extends beyond the Football League, with Maidenhead United, Ebbsfleet United, Halifax Town and Fylde all securing safety after earning promotion to National League One last season. Huddersfield manager David Wagner was last night quick to praise his players for the "incredible achievement" of defying Premier League relegation. “This is an absolute over-achievement,” said Wagner. Huddersfield came up via the Championship play-offs Credit: PA “It's a bigger achievement than the promotion last season. Last year we were predicted to be relegated and we got promoted. This season we were predicted to be a team relegated by miles and I understand it. “We work under circumstances which are not even Championship circumstances. But part of our DNA, the Huddersfield Town DNA, is to try it. "To have passion, desire... how big you are doesn't count. It's about trying everything. We are humble. We are ambitious, too. We search a chance in every game. Today we were chance-less, more or less. It's an incredible achievement for us. It feels like another trophy.” Promoted teams avoid relegation | English football's top five leagues
Huddersfield's battling draw with Chelsea completed a remarkable season in which every team that won promotion to English football's top leagues remain in the division. David Wagner's side earned a vital point at Stamford Bridge on Wednesday night to guarantee their Premier League safety for another season. The result meant that Huddersfield joined fellow promoted sides Brighton and Newcastle in safely avoiding a return the Championship as Stoke, West Brom and - barring a miracle - Swansea all dropped out of the top flight. For the first time since the 2001-02 season, when Fulham, Blackburn and Bolton defied the odds, every single team that earned promotion to one of English football's top four leagues avoided relegation. Alan Alger, PR manager at bookmakers Betway, said the odds on such an outcome would have been bigger than Leicester City's Premier League title triumph in 2016. Stoke City lost to Crystal Palace last weekend to end their 10-year stay in the Premier League Credit: Getty Images In the Championship, Burton Albion and Barnsley were relegated on a dramatic final day after Sunderland's fate had been sealed a week earlier. Below the top-flight, Championship new-boys Sheffield United and Millwall both enjoyed top-half finishes while Bolton Wanderers escaped the drop on the final day. In League One, Portsmouth, Plymouth Argyle, Doncaster Rovers, Blackpool all stayed well clear of the bottom four as Bury, MK Dons, Northampton Town, and Oldham Athletic were relegated to the fourth tier. League Two's Forest Green narrowly avoided an immediate return to the Vanarama National League while fellow promoted side Lincoln enjoyed a seventh-place finish, booking their place in the play-offs. Bolton Wanderers came from behind to beat Nottingham Forest on the final day and avoid an instant return to League One Credit: Getty Images In fact, the trend extends beyond the Football League, with Maidenhead United, Ebbsfleet United, Halifax Town and Fylde all securing safety after earning promotion to National League One last season. Huddersfield manager David Wagner was last night quick to praise his players for the "incredible achievement" of defying Premier League relegation. “This is an absolute over-achievement,” said Wagner. Huddersfield came up via the Championship play-offs Credit: PA “It's a bigger achievement than the promotion last season. Last year we were predicted to be relegated and we got promoted. This season we were predicted to be a team relegated by miles and I understand it. “We work under circumstances which are not even Championship circumstances. But part of our DNA, the Huddersfield Town DNA, is to try it. "To have passion, desire... how big you are doesn't count. It's about trying everything. We are humble. We are ambitious, too. We search a chance in every game. Today we were chance-less, more or less. It's an incredible achievement for us. It feels like another trophy.” Promoted teams avoid relegation | English football's top five leagues
Year of the underdog: Every single promoted team in English football's top four divisions avoids relegation
Huddersfield's battling draw with Chelsea completed a remarkable season in which every team that won promotion to English football's top leagues remain in the division. David Wagner's side earned a vital point at Stamford Bridge on Wednesday night to guarantee their Premier League safety for another season. The result meant that Huddersfield joined fellow promoted sides Brighton and Newcastle in safely avoiding a return the Championship as Stoke, West Brom and - barring a miracle - Swansea all dropped out of the top flight. For the first time since the 2001-02 season, when Fulham, Blackburn and Bolton defied the odds, every single team that earned promotion to one of English football's top four leagues avoided relegation. Alan Alger, PR manager at bookmakers Betway, said the odds on such an outcome would have been bigger than Leicester City's Premier League title triumph in 2016. Stoke City lost to Crystal Palace last weekend to end their 10-year stay in the Premier League Credit: Getty Images In the Championship, Burton Albion and Barnsley were relegated on a dramatic final day after Sunderland's fate had been sealed a week earlier. Below the top-flight, Championship new-boys Sheffield United and Millwall both enjoyed top-half finishes while Bolton Wanderers escaped the drop on the final day. In League One, Portsmouth, Plymouth Argyle, Doncaster Rovers, Blackpool all stayed well clear of the bottom four as Bury, MK Dons, Northampton Town, and Oldham Athletic were relegated to the fourth tier. League Two's Forest Green narrowly avoided an immediate return to the Vanarama National League while fellow promoted side Lincoln enjoyed a seventh-place finish, booking their place in the play-offs. Bolton Wanderers came from behind to beat Nottingham Forest on the final day and avoid an instant return to League One Credit: Getty Images In fact, the trend extends beyond the Football League, with Maidenhead United, Ebbsfleet United, Halifax Town and Fylde all securing safety after earning promotion to National League One last season. Huddersfield manager David Wagner was last night quick to praise his players for the "incredible achievement" of defying Premier League relegation. “This is an absolute over-achievement,” said Wagner. Huddersfield came up via the Championship play-offs Credit: PA “It's a bigger achievement than the promotion last season. Last year we were predicted to be relegated and we got promoted. This season we were predicted to be a team relegated by miles and I understand it. “We work under circumstances which are not even Championship circumstances. But part of our DNA, the Huddersfield Town DNA, is to try it. "To have passion, desire... how big you are doesn't count. It's about trying everything. We are humble. We are ambitious, too. We search a chance in every game. Today we were chance-less, more or less. It's an incredible achievement for us. It feels like another trophy.” Promoted teams avoid relegation | English football's top five leagues
Ahead of the first legs of the Championship play-off semi-finals between Fulham vs Derby and Aston Villa vs Middlesbrough later this week, we assess the form of the four clubs all vying for promotion back to the promised land and offer our prediction as to how they will play out. Fulham Form guide Slavisa Jokanovic's side would not have been in the play-offs mix had they won or drawn their final Championship match at Birmingham. The Craven Cottage outfit suffered their first league defeat of 2018 at St Andrews as Birmingham staved off relegation. It meant Fulham finished two points off second-placed Cardiff City. The blip at Birmingham aside, Fulham have been in sensational form, winning 18 of their last 26 league games since a 1-0 loss at Sunderland back in mid-December. Goals have been easy to come by for the west Londoners who have struck more than three per game in seven matches this season which also included a 6-0 hammering of Burton. Ryan Sessegnon was the first player outside the Premier League to be nominated for the Young Player of the Year award Credit: PA Star player Ryan Sessegnon was crowned Championship Player of the Season last month and was the first ever non-Premier League nominee of the PFA Young Player of the Year award. The 17-year-old, who made his debut for England Under-21s against Ukraine in March, has scored 14 goals in 43 Championship appearances and has been touted as a potential wildcard for Gareth Southgate's senior squad for Russia this summer. A striker in his youth, then winger, then left-back and now back on the left of midfield, Sessegnon has been linked with moves to Tottenham and PSG even if Fulham win promotion via the play-offs. Play-off record Fulham can use the pain of losing in the Championship play-offs semi-finals last season as a catalyst for going one step further this time around. Jokanovic's side lost 2-1 on aggregate to Reading with Ali Al Habsi pulling off a string of saves in the second leg to deny the Cottagers. Their only other appearance in the play-off lottery was back in 1996/97 when they lost in the Old Division Two semi-finals. Odds 13/8 Prediction To beat Derby and win final. Aston Villa Form guide Like Fulham, Steve Bruce's Villa fell to defeat on the final day of the regulation season for their first loss in five league games. Villa have been prolific at home this season, scoring 42 goals at Villa Park and collecting 49 points overall. They have only suffered defeat twice in their back yard this season - against Sheffield Wednesday back in November and QPR in March. Defensively, Villa have been tight, shipping just two goals in their last five matches. Sam Johnstone has been a key figure for Aston Villa this season Credit: Getty Images Star player While captain and defender John Terry has been an influential figure on and off the pitch following his move from Chelsea last summer and Albert Adomah has contributed at the other end with 15 goals, goalkeeper Sam Johnstone just shades the pair. The 25-year-old has spent the season on loan at Villa from Manchester United and has arguably been the best keeper in the Championship keeping 20 clean sheets from 45 appearances. He is likely to be a transfer priority of Villa's this summer regardless of whether they secure promotion. Play-off record It is unchartered territory for Aston Villa who have never contested the Championship play-offs before. Odds 11/4 Prediction To beat Boro but lose to Fulham in final. Middlesbrough Form guide Patrick Bamford's 97th-minute header ensured Tony Pulis' men didn't end the regulation season with defeat at Ipswich and stretched their unbeaten run to four matches. Boro's home form has been patchy. They have lost six at the Riverside this term for the joint-worst record of any of the play-off contenders (with Derby). They also have the lowest goal return of the four teams who have extended their season. Boro have struck 33 goals at home, nine fewer than their semi-final opponents Villa. They make up for it on the road, where they have scored one more on their travels but are equally prone to ship a few more than you would expect from a Pulis set-up. Adama Traore has perked up since the arrival of Tony Pulis Credit: Getty Images Star player Adama Traore has enjoyed a stunning second half to the season since the arrival of Pulis. The speedy Spaniard has scored five goals and made 10 assists under the experienced tutelage of Pulis which hasn't gone unnoticed by Chelsea and others. The former Barcelona man has a much improved end product to his game and at 22-years-old still has plenty of time on his side. Play-off record You have to go back 30 years for the last time Middlesbrough won promotion via an altogether different play-off format. Back in 1988 the team that finished in the position above the relegation places in the First Divsion would be thrown into the play-off mix instead of the sixth-place finisher in the Second Division. This threw up a two-legged final between Boro and Chelsea which the Teessiders won 2-1 on aggregate. Boro have since lost in the semi-finals in 1991 and suffered a 2-0 defeat to Norwich in the 2015 final at Wembley. Odds 11/4 Prediction To lose semi-final against Villa. Derby County Form guide The only team of the play-off four to win their final league match of the season, which ultimately sealed their sixth-place finish, Derby are unbeaten in three after suffering a run of three straight losses during April as nerves took hold of Gary Rowett's side. Derby have scored one less than their semi-final opponents Fulham at home this term (41) but only eight wins on the road - the second worst of the top 10 in the division - has been their Achilles heel. Derby secured a 1-1 draw at Craven Cottage earlier in the season but lost the return fixture 2-1 in early March. Matej Vydra won this year's Championship Golden Boot Credit: Getty Images Star player Matej Vydra claimed his 21st league goal of the season, the most in his career, in Derby's 4-1 win over Barnsley on Sunday as the Czech Republic international won the Championship Golden Boot award. It is the most goals any player has managed since Derby moved to Pride Park in 1997 as Vydra's tally surpassed that of Chris Martin's 20 scored in the 2013/14 Championship campaign. Play-off record Derby are familiar to the ways and workings of the play-offs after featuring six times in the last 26 years. Half of those appearances have ended at the semi-final stages and only on one occasion have they won promotion to the Premier League. That was back in 2007 when they edged a narrow final against West Brom 1-0 to return to the top flight after a five-year absence. Odds 9/2 Prediction To lose to Fulham in semi-finals.
Championship play-offs 2018 guide: Form, star player and prediction
Ahead of the first legs of the Championship play-off semi-finals between Fulham vs Derby and Aston Villa vs Middlesbrough later this week, we assess the form of the four clubs all vying for promotion back to the promised land and offer our prediction as to how they will play out. Fulham Form guide Slavisa Jokanovic's side would not have been in the play-offs mix had they won or drawn their final Championship match at Birmingham. The Craven Cottage outfit suffered their first league defeat of 2018 at St Andrews as Birmingham staved off relegation. It meant Fulham finished two points off second-placed Cardiff City. The blip at Birmingham aside, Fulham have been in sensational form, winning 18 of their last 26 league games since a 1-0 loss at Sunderland back in mid-December. Goals have been easy to come by for the west Londoners who have struck more than three per game in seven matches this season which also included a 6-0 hammering of Burton. Ryan Sessegnon was the first player outside the Premier League to be nominated for the Young Player of the Year award Credit: PA Star player Ryan Sessegnon was crowned Championship Player of the Season last month and was the first ever non-Premier League nominee of the PFA Young Player of the Year award. The 17-year-old, who made his debut for England Under-21s against Ukraine in March, has scored 14 goals in 43 Championship appearances and has been touted as a potential wildcard for Gareth Southgate's senior squad for Russia this summer. A striker in his youth, then winger, then left-back and now back on the left of midfield, Sessegnon has been linked with moves to Tottenham and PSG even if Fulham win promotion via the play-offs. Play-off record Fulham can use the pain of losing in the Championship play-offs semi-finals last season as a catalyst for going one step further this time around. Jokanovic's side lost 2-1 on aggregate to Reading with Ali Al Habsi pulling off a string of saves in the second leg to deny the Cottagers. Their only other appearance in the play-off lottery was back in 1996/97 when they lost in the Old Division Two semi-finals. Odds 13/8 Prediction To beat Derby and win final. Aston Villa Form guide Like Fulham, Steve Bruce's Villa fell to defeat on the final day of the regulation season for their first loss in five league games. Villa have been prolific at home this season, scoring 42 goals at Villa Park and collecting 49 points overall. They have only suffered defeat twice in their back yard this season - against Sheffield Wednesday back in November and QPR in March. Defensively, Villa have been tight, shipping just two goals in their last five matches. Sam Johnstone has been a key figure for Aston Villa this season Credit: Getty Images Star player While captain and defender John Terry has been an influential figure on and off the pitch following his move from Chelsea last summer and Albert Adomah has contributed at the other end with 15 goals, goalkeeper Sam Johnstone just shades the pair. The 25-year-old has spent the season on loan at Villa from Manchester United and has arguably been the best keeper in the Championship keeping 20 clean sheets from 45 appearances. He is likely to be a transfer priority of Villa's this summer regardless of whether they secure promotion. Play-off record It is unchartered territory for Aston Villa who have never contested the Championship play-offs before. Odds 11/4 Prediction To beat Boro but lose to Fulham in final. Middlesbrough Form guide Patrick Bamford's 97th-minute header ensured Tony Pulis' men didn't end the regulation season with defeat at Ipswich and stretched their unbeaten run to four matches. Boro's home form has been patchy. They have lost six at the Riverside this term for the joint-worst record of any of the play-off contenders (with Derby). They also have the lowest goal return of the four teams who have extended their season. Boro have struck 33 goals at home, nine fewer than their semi-final opponents Villa. They make up for it on the road, where they have scored one more on their travels but are equally prone to ship a few more than you would expect from a Pulis set-up. Adama Traore has perked up since the arrival of Tony Pulis Credit: Getty Images Star player Adama Traore has enjoyed a stunning second half to the season since the arrival of Pulis. The speedy Spaniard has scored five goals and made 10 assists under the experienced tutelage of Pulis which hasn't gone unnoticed by Chelsea and others. The former Barcelona man has a much improved end product to his game and at 22-years-old still has plenty of time on his side. Play-off record You have to go back 30 years for the last time Middlesbrough won promotion via an altogether different play-off format. Back in 1988 the team that finished in the position above the relegation places in the First Divsion would be thrown into the play-off mix instead of the sixth-place finisher in the Second Division. This threw up a two-legged final between Boro and Chelsea which the Teessiders won 2-1 on aggregate. Boro have since lost in the semi-finals in 1991 and suffered a 2-0 defeat to Norwich in the 2015 final at Wembley. Odds 11/4 Prediction To lose semi-final against Villa. Derby County Form guide The only team of the play-off four to win their final league match of the season, which ultimately sealed their sixth-place finish, Derby are unbeaten in three after suffering a run of three straight losses during April as nerves took hold of Gary Rowett's side. Derby have scored one less than their semi-final opponents Fulham at home this term (41) but only eight wins on the road - the second worst of the top 10 in the division - has been their Achilles heel. Derby secured a 1-1 draw at Craven Cottage earlier in the season but lost the return fixture 2-1 in early March. Matej Vydra won this year's Championship Golden Boot Credit: Getty Images Star player Matej Vydra claimed his 21st league goal of the season, the most in his career, in Derby's 4-1 win over Barnsley on Sunday as the Czech Republic international won the Championship Golden Boot award. It is the most goals any player has managed since Derby moved to Pride Park in 1997 as Vydra's tally surpassed that of Chris Martin's 20 scored in the 2013/14 Championship campaign. Play-off record Derby are familiar to the ways and workings of the play-offs after featuring six times in the last 26 years. Half of those appearances have ended at the semi-final stages and only on one occasion have they won promotion to the Premier League. That was back in 2007 when they edged a narrow final against West Brom 1-0 to return to the top flight after a five-year absence. Odds 9/2 Prediction To lose to Fulham in semi-finals.
Ahead of the first legs of the Championship play-off semi-finals between Fulham vs Derby and Aston Villa vs Middlesbrough later this week, we assess the form of the four clubs all vying for promotion back to the promised land and offer our prediction as to how they will play out. Fulham Form guide Slavisa Jokanovic's side would not have been in the play-offs mix had they won or drawn their final Championship match at Birmingham. The Craven Cottage outfit suffered their first league defeat of 2018 at St Andrews as Birmingham staved off relegation. It meant Fulham finished two points off second-placed Cardiff City. The blip at Birmingham aside, Fulham have been in sensational form, winning 18 of their last 26 league games since a 1-0 loss at Sunderland back in mid-December. Goals have been easy to come by for the west Londoners who have struck more than three per game in seven matches this season which also included a 6-0 hammering of Burton. Ryan Sessegnon was the first player outside the Premier League to be nominated for the Young Player of the Year award Credit: PA Star player Ryan Sessegnon was crowned Championship Player of the Season last month and was the first ever non-Premier League nominee of the PFA Young Player of the Year award. The 17-year-old, who made his debut for England Under-21s against Ukraine in March, has scored 14 goals in 43 Championship appearances and has been touted as a potential wildcard for Gareth Southgate's senior squad for Russia this summer. A striker in his youth, then winger, then left-back and now back on the left of midfield, Sessegnon has been linked with moves to Tottenham and PSG even if Fulham win promotion via the play-offs. Play-off record Fulham can use the pain of losing in the Championship play-offs semi-finals last season as a catalyst for going one step further this time around. Jokanovic's side lost 2-1 on aggregate to Reading with Ali Al Habsi pulling off a string of saves in the second leg to deny the Cottagers. Their only other appearance in the play-off lottery was back in 1996/97 when they lost in the Old Division Two semi-finals. Odds 13/8 Prediction To beat Derby and win final. Aston Villa Form guide Like Fulham, Steve Bruce's Villa fell to defeat on the final day of the regulation season for their first loss in five league games. Villa have been prolific at home this season, scoring 42 goals at Villa Park and collecting 49 points overall. They have only suffered defeat twice in their back yard this season - against Sheffield Wednesday back in November and QPR in March. Defensively, Villa have been tight, shipping just two goals in their last five matches. Sam Johnstone has been a key figure for Aston Villa this season Credit: Getty Images Star player While captain and defender John Terry has been an influential figure on and off the pitch following his move from Chelsea last summer and Albert Adomah has contributed at the other end with 15 goals, goalkeeper Sam Johnstone just shades the pair. The 25-year-old has spent the season on loan at Villa from Manchester United and has arguably been the best keeper in the Championship keeping 20 clean sheets from 45 appearances. He is likely to be a transfer priority of Villa's this summer regardless of whether they secure promotion. Play-off record It is unchartered territory for Aston Villa who have never contested the Championship play-offs before. Odds 11/4 Prediction To beat Boro but lose to Fulham in final. Middlesbrough Form guide Patrick Bamford's 97th-minute header ensured Tony Pulis' men didn't end the regulation season with defeat at Ipswich and stretched their unbeaten run to four matches. Boro's home form has been patchy. They have lost six at the Riverside this term for the joint-worst record of any of the play-off contenders (with Derby). They also have the lowest goal return of the four teams who have extended their season. Boro have struck 33 goals at home, nine fewer than their semi-final opponents Villa. They make up for it on the road, where they have scored one more on their travels but are equally prone to ship a few more than you would expect from a Pulis set-up. Adama Traore has perked up since the arrival of Tony Pulis Credit: Getty Images Star player Adama Traore has enjoyed a stunning second half to the season since the arrival of Pulis. The speedy Spaniard has scored five goals and made 10 assists under the experienced tutelage of Pulis which hasn't gone unnoticed by Chelsea and others. The former Barcelona man has a much improved end product to his game and at 22-years-old still has plenty of time on his side. Play-off record You have to go back 30 years for the last time Middlesbrough won promotion via an altogether different play-off format. Back in 1988 the team that finished in the position above the relegation places in the First Divsion would be thrown into the play-off mix instead of the sixth-place finisher in the Second Division. This threw up a two-legged final between Boro and Chelsea which the Teessiders won 2-1 on aggregate. Boro have since lost in the semi-finals in 1991 and suffered a 2-0 defeat to Norwich in the 2015 final at Wembley. Odds 11/4 Prediction To lose semi-final against Villa. Derby County Form guide The only team of the play-off four to win their final league match of the season, which ultimately sealed their sixth-place finish, Derby are unbeaten in three after suffering a run of three straight losses during April as nerves took hold of Gary Rowett's side. Derby have scored one less than their semi-final opponents Fulham at home this term (41) but only eight wins on the road - the second worst of the top 10 in the division - has been their Achilles heel. Derby secured a 1-1 draw at Craven Cottage earlier in the season but lost the return fixture 2-1 in early March. Matej Vydra won this year's Championship Golden Boot Credit: Getty Images Star player Matej Vydra claimed his 21st league goal of the season, the most in his career, in Derby's 4-1 win over Barnsley on Sunday as the Czech Republic international won the Championship Golden Boot award. It is the most goals any player has managed since Derby moved to Pride Park in 1997 as Vydra's tally surpassed that of Chris Martin's 20 scored in the 2013/14 Championship campaign. Play-off record Derby are familiar to the ways and workings of the play-offs after featuring six times in the last 26 years. Half of those appearances have ended at the semi-final stages and only on one occasion have they won promotion to the Premier League. That was back in 2007 when they edged a narrow final against West Brom 1-0 to return to the top flight after a five-year absence. Odds 9/2 Prediction To lose to Fulham in semi-finals.
Championship play-offs 2018 guide: Form, star player and prediction
Ahead of the first legs of the Championship play-off semi-finals between Fulham vs Derby and Aston Villa vs Middlesbrough later this week, we assess the form of the four clubs all vying for promotion back to the promised land and offer our prediction as to how they will play out. Fulham Form guide Slavisa Jokanovic's side would not have been in the play-offs mix had they won or drawn their final Championship match at Birmingham. The Craven Cottage outfit suffered their first league defeat of 2018 at St Andrews as Birmingham staved off relegation. It meant Fulham finished two points off second-placed Cardiff City. The blip at Birmingham aside, Fulham have been in sensational form, winning 18 of their last 26 league games since a 1-0 loss at Sunderland back in mid-December. Goals have been easy to come by for the west Londoners who have struck more than three per game in seven matches this season which also included a 6-0 hammering of Burton. Ryan Sessegnon was the first player outside the Premier League to be nominated for the Young Player of the Year award Credit: PA Star player Ryan Sessegnon was crowned Championship Player of the Season last month and was the first ever non-Premier League nominee of the PFA Young Player of the Year award. The 17-year-old, who made his debut for England Under-21s against Ukraine in March, has scored 14 goals in 43 Championship appearances and has been touted as a potential wildcard for Gareth Southgate's senior squad for Russia this summer. A striker in his youth, then winger, then left-back and now back on the left of midfield, Sessegnon has been linked with moves to Tottenham and PSG even if Fulham win promotion via the play-offs. Play-off record Fulham can use the pain of losing in the Championship play-offs semi-finals last season as a catalyst for going one step further this time around. Jokanovic's side lost 2-1 on aggregate to Reading with Ali Al Habsi pulling off a string of saves in the second leg to deny the Cottagers. Their only other appearance in the play-off lottery was back in 1996/97 when they lost in the Old Division Two semi-finals. Odds 13/8 Prediction To beat Derby and win final. Aston Villa Form guide Like Fulham, Steve Bruce's Villa fell to defeat on the final day of the regulation season for their first loss in five league games. Villa have been prolific at home this season, scoring 42 goals at Villa Park and collecting 49 points overall. They have only suffered defeat twice in their back yard this season - against Sheffield Wednesday back in November and QPR in March. Defensively, Villa have been tight, shipping just two goals in their last five matches. Sam Johnstone has been a key figure for Aston Villa this season Credit: Getty Images Star player While captain and defender John Terry has been an influential figure on and off the pitch following his move from Chelsea last summer and Albert Adomah has contributed at the other end with 15 goals, goalkeeper Sam Johnstone just shades the pair. The 25-year-old has spent the season on loan at Villa from Manchester United and has arguably been the best keeper in the Championship keeping 20 clean sheets from 45 appearances. He is likely to be a transfer priority of Villa's this summer regardless of whether they secure promotion. Play-off record It is unchartered territory for Aston Villa who have never contested the Championship play-offs before. Odds 11/4 Prediction To beat Boro but lose to Fulham in final. Middlesbrough Form guide Patrick Bamford's 97th-minute header ensured Tony Pulis' men didn't end the regulation season with defeat at Ipswich and stretched their unbeaten run to four matches. Boro's home form has been patchy. They have lost six at the Riverside this term for the joint-worst record of any of the play-off contenders (with Derby). They also have the lowest goal return of the four teams who have extended their season. Boro have struck 33 goals at home, nine fewer than their semi-final opponents Villa. They make up for it on the road, where they have scored one more on their travels but are equally prone to ship a few more than you would expect from a Pulis set-up. Adama Traore has perked up since the arrival of Tony Pulis Credit: Getty Images Star player Adama Traore has enjoyed a stunning second half to the season since the arrival of Pulis. The speedy Spaniard has scored five goals and made 10 assists under the experienced tutelage of Pulis which hasn't gone unnoticed by Chelsea and others. The former Barcelona man has a much improved end product to his game and at 22-years-old still has plenty of time on his side. Play-off record You have to go back 30 years for the last time Middlesbrough won promotion via an altogether different play-off format. Back in 1988 the team that finished in the position above the relegation places in the First Divsion would be thrown into the play-off mix instead of the sixth-place finisher in the Second Division. This threw up a two-legged final between Boro and Chelsea which the Teessiders won 2-1 on aggregate. Boro have since lost in the semi-finals in 1991 and suffered a 2-0 defeat to Norwich in the 2015 final at Wembley. Odds 11/4 Prediction To lose semi-final against Villa. Derby County Form guide The only team of the play-off four to win their final league match of the season, which ultimately sealed their sixth-place finish, Derby are unbeaten in three after suffering a run of three straight losses during April as nerves took hold of Gary Rowett's side. Derby have scored one less than their semi-final opponents Fulham at home this term (41) but only eight wins on the road - the second worst of the top 10 in the division - has been their Achilles heel. Derby secured a 1-1 draw at Craven Cottage earlier in the season but lost the return fixture 2-1 in early March. Matej Vydra won this year's Championship Golden Boot Credit: Getty Images Star player Matej Vydra claimed his 21st league goal of the season, the most in his career, in Derby's 4-1 win over Barnsley on Sunday as the Czech Republic international won the Championship Golden Boot award. It is the most goals any player has managed since Derby moved to Pride Park in 1997 as Vydra's tally surpassed that of Chris Martin's 20 scored in the 2013/14 Championship campaign. Play-off record Derby are familiar to the ways and workings of the play-offs after featuring six times in the last 26 years. Half of those appearances have ended at the semi-final stages and only on one occasion have they won promotion to the Premier League. That was back in 2007 when they edged a narrow final against West Brom 1-0 to return to the top flight after a five-year absence. Odds 9/2 Prediction To lose to Fulham in semi-finals.
Ahead of the first legs of the Championship play-off semi-finals between Fulham vs Derby and Aston Villa vs Middlesbrough later this week, we assess the form of the four clubs all vying for promotion back to the promised land and offer our prediction as to how they will play out. Fulham Form guide Slavisa Jokanovic's side would not have been in the play-offs mix had they won or drawn their final Championship match at Birmingham. The Craven Cottage outfit suffered their first league defeat of 2018 at St Andrews as Birmingham staved off relegation. It meant Fulham finished two points off second-placed Cardiff City. The blip at Birmingham aside, Fulham have been in sensational form, winning 18 of their last 26 league games since a 1-0 loss at Sunderland back in mid-December. Goals have been easy to come by for the west Londoners who have struck more than three per game in seven matches this season which also included a 6-0 hammering of Burton. Ryan Sessegnon was the first player outside the Premier League to be nominated for the Young Player of the Year award Credit: PA Star player Ryan Sessegnon was crowned Championship Player of the Season last month and was the first ever non-Premier League nominee of the PFA Young Player of the Year award. The 17-year-old, who made his debut for England Under-21s against Ukraine in March, has scored 14 goals in 43 Championship appearances and has been touted as a potential wildcard for Gareth Southgate's senior squad for Russia this summer. A striker in his youth, then winger, then left-back and now back on the left of midfield, Sessegnon has been linked with moves to Tottenham and PSG even if Fulham win promotion via the play-offs. Play-off record Fulham can use the pain of losing in the Championship play-offs semi-finals last season as a catalyst for going one step further this time around. Jokanovic's side lost 2-1 on aggregate to Reading with Ali Al Habsi pulling off a string of saves in the second leg to deny the Cottagers. Their only other appearance in the play-off lottery was back in 1996/97 when they lost in the Old Division Two semi-finals. Odds 13/8 Prediction To beat Derby and win final. Aston Villa Form guide Like Fulham, Steve Bruce's Villa fell to defeat on the final day of the regulation season for their first loss in five league games. Villa have been prolific at home this season, scoring 42 goals at Villa Park and collecting 49 points overall. They have only suffered defeat twice in their back yard this season - against Sheffield Wednesday back in November and QPR in March. Defensively, Villa have been tight, shipping just two goals in their last five matches. Sam Johnstone has been a key figure for Aston Villa this season Credit: Getty Images Star player While captain and defender John Terry has been an influential figure on and off the pitch following his move from Chelsea last summer and Albert Adomah has contributed at the other end with 15 goals, goalkeeper Sam Johnstone just shades the pair. The 25-year-old has spent the season on loan at Villa from Manchester United and has arguably been the best keeper in the Championship keeping 20 clean sheets from 45 appearances. He is likely to be a transfer priority of Villa's this summer regardless of whether they secure promotion. Play-off record It is unchartered territory for Aston Villa who have never contested the Championship play-offs before. Odds 11/4 Prediction To beat Boro but lose to Fulham in final. Middlesbrough Form guide Patrick Bamford's 97th-minute header ensured Tony Pulis' men didn't end the regulation season with defeat at Ipswich and stretched their unbeaten run to four matches. Boro's home form has been patchy. They have lost six at the Riverside this term for the joint-worst record of any of the play-off contenders (with Derby). They also have the lowest goal return of the four teams who have extended their season. Boro have struck 33 goals at home, nine fewer than their semi-final opponents Villa. They make up for it on the road, where they have scored one more on their travels but are equally prone to ship a few more than you would expect from a Pulis set-up. Adama Traore has perked up since the arrival of Tony Pulis Credit: Getty Images Star player Adama Traore has enjoyed a stunning second half to the season since the arrival of Pulis. The speedy Spaniard has scored five goals and made 10 assists under the experienced tutelage of Pulis which hasn't gone unnoticed by Chelsea and others. The former Barcelona man has a much improved end product to his game and at 22-years-old still has plenty of time on his side. Play-off record You have to go back 30 years for the last time Middlesbrough won promotion via an altogether different play-off format. Back in 1988 the team that finished in the position above the relegation places in the First Divsion would be thrown into the play-off mix instead of the sixth-place finisher in the Second Division. This threw up a two-legged final between Boro and Chelsea which the Teessiders won 2-1 on aggregate. Boro have since lost in the semi-finals in 1991 and suffered a 2-0 defeat to Norwich in the 2015 final at Wembley. Odds 11/4 Prediction To lose semi-final against Villa. Derby County Form guide The only team of the play-off four to win their final league match of the season, which ultimately sealed their sixth-place finish, Derby are unbeaten in three after suffering a run of three straight losses during April as nerves took hold of Gary Rowett's side. Derby have scored one less than their semi-final opponents Fulham at home this term (41) but only eight wins on the road - the second worst of the top 10 in the division - has been their Achilles heel. Derby secured a 1-1 draw at Craven Cottage earlier in the season but lost the return fixture 2-1 in early March. Matej Vydra won this year's Championship Golden Boot Credit: Getty Images Star player Matej Vydra claimed his 21st league goal of the season, the most in his career, in Derby's 4-1 win over Barnsley on Sunday as the Czech Republic international won the Championship Golden Boot award. It is the most goals any player has managed since Derby moved to Pride Park in 1997 as Vydra's tally surpassed that of Chris Martin's 20 scored in the 2013/14 Championship campaign. Play-off record Derby are familiar to the ways and workings of the play-offs after featuring six times in the last 26 years. Half of those appearances have ended at the semi-final stages and only on one occasion have they won promotion to the Premier League. That was back in 2007 when they edged a narrow final against West Brom 1-0 to return to the top flight after a five-year absence. Odds 9/2 Prediction To lose to Fulham in semi-finals.
Championship play-offs 2018 guide: Form, star player and prediction
Ahead of the first legs of the Championship play-off semi-finals between Fulham vs Derby and Aston Villa vs Middlesbrough later this week, we assess the form of the four clubs all vying for promotion back to the promised land and offer our prediction as to how they will play out. Fulham Form guide Slavisa Jokanovic's side would not have been in the play-offs mix had they won or drawn their final Championship match at Birmingham. The Craven Cottage outfit suffered their first league defeat of 2018 at St Andrews as Birmingham staved off relegation. It meant Fulham finished two points off second-placed Cardiff City. The blip at Birmingham aside, Fulham have been in sensational form, winning 18 of their last 26 league games since a 1-0 loss at Sunderland back in mid-December. Goals have been easy to come by for the west Londoners who have struck more than three per game in seven matches this season which also included a 6-0 hammering of Burton. Ryan Sessegnon was the first player outside the Premier League to be nominated for the Young Player of the Year award Credit: PA Star player Ryan Sessegnon was crowned Championship Player of the Season last month and was the first ever non-Premier League nominee of the PFA Young Player of the Year award. The 17-year-old, who made his debut for England Under-21s against Ukraine in March, has scored 14 goals in 43 Championship appearances and has been touted as a potential wildcard for Gareth Southgate's senior squad for Russia this summer. A striker in his youth, then winger, then left-back and now back on the left of midfield, Sessegnon has been linked with moves to Tottenham and PSG even if Fulham win promotion via the play-offs. Play-off record Fulham can use the pain of losing in the Championship play-offs semi-finals last season as a catalyst for going one step further this time around. Jokanovic's side lost 2-1 on aggregate to Reading with Ali Al Habsi pulling off a string of saves in the second leg to deny the Cottagers. Their only other appearance in the play-off lottery was back in 1996/97 when they lost in the Old Division Two semi-finals. Odds 13/8 Prediction To beat Derby and win final. Aston Villa Form guide Like Fulham, Steve Bruce's Villa fell to defeat on the final day of the regulation season for their first loss in five league games. Villa have been prolific at home this season, scoring 42 goals at Villa Park and collecting 49 points overall. They have only suffered defeat twice in their back yard this season - against Sheffield Wednesday back in November and QPR in March. Defensively, Villa have been tight, shipping just two goals in their last five matches. Sam Johnstone has been a key figure for Aston Villa this season Credit: Getty Images Star player While captain and defender John Terry has been an influential figure on and off the pitch following his move from Chelsea last summer and Albert Adomah has contributed at the other end with 15 goals, goalkeeper Sam Johnstone just shades the pair. The 25-year-old has spent the season on loan at Villa from Manchester United and has arguably been the best keeper in the Championship keeping 20 clean sheets from 45 appearances. He is likely to be a transfer priority of Villa's this summer regardless of whether they secure promotion. Play-off record It is unchartered territory for Aston Villa who have never contested the Championship play-offs before. Odds 11/4 Prediction To beat Boro but lose to Fulham in final. Middlesbrough Form guide Patrick Bamford's 97th-minute header ensured Tony Pulis' men didn't end the regulation season with defeat at Ipswich and stretched their unbeaten run to four matches. Boro's home form has been patchy. They have lost six at the Riverside this term for the joint-worst record of any of the play-off contenders (with Derby). They also have the lowest goal return of the four teams who have extended their season. Boro have struck 33 goals at home, nine fewer than their semi-final opponents Villa. They make up for it on the road, where they have scored one more on their travels but are equally prone to ship a few more than you would expect from a Pulis set-up. Adama Traore has perked up since the arrival of Tony Pulis Credit: Getty Images Star player Adama Traore has enjoyed a stunning second half to the season since the arrival of Pulis. The speedy Spaniard has scored five goals and made 10 assists under the experienced tutelage of Pulis which hasn't gone unnoticed by Chelsea and others. The former Barcelona man has a much improved end product to his game and at 22-years-old still has plenty of time on his side. Play-off record You have to go back 30 years for the last time Middlesbrough won promotion via an altogether different play-off format. Back in 1988 the team that finished in the position above the relegation places in the First Divsion would be thrown into the play-off mix instead of the sixth-place finisher in the Second Division. This threw up a two-legged final between Boro and Chelsea which the Teessiders won 2-1 on aggregate. Boro have since lost in the semi-finals in 1991 and suffered a 2-0 defeat to Norwich in the 2015 final at Wembley. Odds 11/4 Prediction To lose semi-final against Villa. Derby County Form guide The only team of the play-off four to win their final league match of the season, which ultimately sealed their sixth-place finish, Derby are unbeaten in three after suffering a run of three straight losses during April as nerves took hold of Gary Rowett's side. Derby have scored one less than their semi-final opponents Fulham at home this term (41) but only eight wins on the road - the second worst of the top 10 in the division - has been their Achilles heel. Derby secured a 1-1 draw at Craven Cottage earlier in the season but lost the return fixture 2-1 in early March. Matej Vydra won this year's Championship Golden Boot Credit: Getty Images Star player Matej Vydra claimed his 21st league goal of the season, the most in his career, in Derby's 4-1 win over Barnsley on Sunday as the Czech Republic international won the Championship Golden Boot award. It is the most goals any player has managed since Derby moved to Pride Park in 1997 as Vydra's tally surpassed that of Chris Martin's 20 scored in the 2013/14 Championship campaign. Play-off record Derby are familiar to the ways and workings of the play-offs after featuring six times in the last 26 years. Half of those appearances have ended at the semi-final stages and only on one occasion have they won promotion to the Premier League. That was back in 2007 when they edged a narrow final against West Brom 1-0 to return to the top flight after a five-year absence. Odds 9/2 Prediction To lose to Fulham in semi-finals.
Ahead of the first legs of the Championship play-off semi-finals between Fulham vs Derby and Aston Villa vs Middlesbrough later this week, we assess the form of the four clubs all vying for promotion back to the promised land and offer our prediction as to how they will play out. Fulham Form guide Slavisa Jokanovic's side would not have been in the play-offs mix had they won or drawn their final Championship match at Birmingham. The Craven Cottage outfit suffered their first league defeat of 2018 at St Andrews as Birmingham staved off relegation. It meant Fulham finished two points off second-placed Cardiff City. The blip at Birmingham aside, Fulham have been in sensational form, winning 18 of their last 26 league games since a 1-0 loss at Sunderland back in mid-December. Goals have been easy to come by for the west Londoners who have struck more than three per game in seven matches this season which also included a 6-0 hammering of Burton. Ryan Sessegnon was the first player outside the Premier League to be nominated for the Young Player of the Year award Credit: PA Star player Ryan Sessegnon was crowned Championship Player of the Season last month and was the first ever non-Premier League nominee of the PFA Young Player of the Year award. The 17-year-old, who made his debut for England Under-21s against Ukraine in March, has scored 14 goals in 43 Championship appearances and has been touted as a potential wildcard for Gareth Southgate's senior squad for Russia this summer. A striker in his youth, then winger, then left-back and now back on the left of midfield, Sessegnon has been linked with moves to Tottenham and PSG even if Fulham win promotion via the play-offs. Play-off record Fulham can use the pain of losing in the Championship play-offs semi-finals last season as a catalyst for going one step further this time around. Jokanovic's side lost 2-1 on aggregate to Reading with Ali Al Habsi pulling off a string of saves in the second leg to deny the Cottagers. Their only other appearance in the play-off lottery was back in 1996/97 when they lost in the Old Division Two semi-finals. Odds 13/8 Prediction To beat Derby and win final. Aston Villa Form guide Like Fulham, Steve Bruce's Villa fell to defeat on the final day of the regulation season for their first loss in five league games. Villa have been prolific at home this season, scoring 42 goals at Villa Park and collecting 49 points overall. They have only suffered defeat twice in their back yard this season - against Sheffield Wednesday back in November and QPR in March. Defensively, Villa have been tight, shipping just two goals in their last five matches. Sam Johnstone has been a key figure for Aston Villa this season Credit: Getty Images Star player While captain and defender John Terry has been an influential figure on and off the pitch following his move from Chelsea last summer and Albert Adomah has contributed at the other end with 15 goals, goalkeeper Sam Johnstone just shades the pair. The 25-year-old has spent the season on loan at Villa from Manchester United and has arguably been the best keeper in the Championship keeping 20 clean sheets from 45 appearances. He is likely to be a transfer priority of Villa's this summer regardless of whether they secure promotion. Play-off record It is unchartered territory for Aston Villa who have never contested the Championship play-offs before. Odds 11/4 Prediction To beat Boro but lose to Fulham in final. Middlesbrough Form guide Patrick Bamford's 97th-minute header ensured Tony Pulis' men didn't end the regulation season with defeat at Ipswich and stretched their unbeaten run to four matches. Boro's home form has been patchy. They have lost six at the Riverside this term for the joint-worst record of any of the play-off contenders (with Derby). They also have the lowest goal return of the four teams who have extended their season. Boro have struck 33 goals at home, nine fewer than their semi-final opponents Villa. They make up for it on the road, where they have scored one more on their travels but are equally prone to ship a few more than you would expect from a Pulis set-up. Adama Traore has perked up since the arrival of Tony Pulis Credit: Getty Images Star player Adama Traore has enjoyed a stunning second half to the season since the arrival of Pulis. The speedy Spaniard has scored five goals and made 10 assists under the experienced tutelage of Pulis which hasn't gone unnoticed by Chelsea and others. The former Barcelona man has a much improved end product to his game and at 22-years-old still has plenty of time on his side. Play-off record You have to go back 30 years for the last time Middlesbrough won promotion via an altogether different play-off format. Back in 1988 the team that finished in the position above the relegation places in the First Divsion would be thrown into the play-off mix instead of the sixth-place finisher in the Second Division. This threw up a two-legged final between Boro and Chelsea which the Teessiders won 2-1 on aggregate. Boro have since lost in the semi-finals in 1991 and suffered a 2-0 defeat to Norwich in the 2015 final at Wembley. Odds 11/4 Prediction To lose semi-final against Villa. Derby County Form guide The only team of the play-off four to win their final league match of the season, which ultimately sealed their sixth-place finish, Derby are unbeaten in three after suffering a run of three straight losses during April as nerves took hold of Gary Rowett's side. Derby have scored one less than their semi-final opponents Fulham at home this term (41) but only eight wins on the road - the second worst of the top 10 in the division - has been their Achilles heel. Derby secured a 1-1 draw at Craven Cottage earlier in the season but lost the return fixture 2-1 in early March. Matej Vydra won this year's Championship Golden Boot Credit: Getty Images Star player Matej Vydra claimed his 21st league goal of the season, the most in his career, in Derby's 4-1 win over Barnsley on Sunday as the Czech Republic international won the Championship Golden Boot award. It is the most goals any player has managed since Derby moved to Pride Park in 1997 as Vydra's tally surpassed that of Chris Martin's 20 scored in the 2013/14 Championship campaign. Play-off record Derby are familiar to the ways and workings of the play-offs after featuring six times in the last 26 years. Half of those appearances have ended at the semi-final stages and only on one occasion have they won promotion to the Premier League. That was back in 2007 when they edged a narrow final against West Brom 1-0 to return to the top flight after a five-year absence. Odds 9/2 Prediction To lose to Fulham in semi-finals.
Championship play-offs 2018 guide: Form, star player and prediction
Ahead of the first legs of the Championship play-off semi-finals between Fulham vs Derby and Aston Villa vs Middlesbrough later this week, we assess the form of the four clubs all vying for promotion back to the promised land and offer our prediction as to how they will play out. Fulham Form guide Slavisa Jokanovic's side would not have been in the play-offs mix had they won or drawn their final Championship match at Birmingham. The Craven Cottage outfit suffered their first league defeat of 2018 at St Andrews as Birmingham staved off relegation. It meant Fulham finished two points off second-placed Cardiff City. The blip at Birmingham aside, Fulham have been in sensational form, winning 18 of their last 26 league games since a 1-0 loss at Sunderland back in mid-December. Goals have been easy to come by for the west Londoners who have struck more than three per game in seven matches this season which also included a 6-0 hammering of Burton. Ryan Sessegnon was the first player outside the Premier League to be nominated for the Young Player of the Year award Credit: PA Star player Ryan Sessegnon was crowned Championship Player of the Season last month and was the first ever non-Premier League nominee of the PFA Young Player of the Year award. The 17-year-old, who made his debut for England Under-21s against Ukraine in March, has scored 14 goals in 43 Championship appearances and has been touted as a potential wildcard for Gareth Southgate's senior squad for Russia this summer. A striker in his youth, then winger, then left-back and now back on the left of midfield, Sessegnon has been linked with moves to Tottenham and PSG even if Fulham win promotion via the play-offs. Play-off record Fulham can use the pain of losing in the Championship play-offs semi-finals last season as a catalyst for going one step further this time around. Jokanovic's side lost 2-1 on aggregate to Reading with Ali Al Habsi pulling off a string of saves in the second leg to deny the Cottagers. Their only other appearance in the play-off lottery was back in 1996/97 when they lost in the Old Division Two semi-finals. Odds 13/8 Prediction To beat Derby and win final. Aston Villa Form guide Like Fulham, Steve Bruce's Villa fell to defeat on the final day of the regulation season for their first loss in five league games. Villa have been prolific at home this season, scoring 42 goals at Villa Park and collecting 49 points overall. They have only suffered defeat twice in their back yard this season - against Sheffield Wednesday back in November and QPR in March. Defensively, Villa have been tight, shipping just two goals in their last five matches. Sam Johnstone has been a key figure for Aston Villa this season Credit: Getty Images Star player While captain and defender John Terry has been an influential figure on and off the pitch following his move from Chelsea last summer and Albert Adomah has contributed at the other end with 15 goals, goalkeeper Sam Johnstone just shades the pair. The 25-year-old has spent the season on loan at Villa from Manchester United and has arguably been the best keeper in the Championship keeping 20 clean sheets from 45 appearances. He is likely to be a transfer priority of Villa's this summer regardless of whether they secure promotion. Play-off record It is unchartered territory for Aston Villa who have never contested the Championship play-offs before. Odds 11/4 Prediction To beat Boro but lose to Fulham in final. Middlesbrough Form guide Patrick Bamford's 97th-minute header ensured Tony Pulis' men didn't end the regulation season with defeat at Ipswich and stretched their unbeaten run to four matches. Boro's home form has been patchy. They have lost six at the Riverside this term for the joint-worst record of any of the play-off contenders (with Derby). They also have the lowest goal return of the four teams who have extended their season. Boro have struck 33 goals at home, nine fewer than their semi-final opponents Villa. They make up for it on the road, where they have scored one more on their travels but are equally prone to ship a few more than you would expect from a Pulis set-up. Adama Traore has perked up since the arrival of Tony Pulis Credit: Getty Images Star player Adama Traore has enjoyed a stunning second half to the season since the arrival of Pulis. The speedy Spaniard has scored five goals and made 10 assists under the experienced tutelage of Pulis which hasn't gone unnoticed by Chelsea and others. The former Barcelona man has a much improved end product to his game and at 22-years-old still has plenty of time on his side. Play-off record You have to go back 30 years for the last time Middlesbrough won promotion via an altogether different play-off format. Back in 1988 the team that finished in the position above the relegation places in the First Divsion would be thrown into the play-off mix instead of the sixth-place finisher in the Second Division. This threw up a two-legged final between Boro and Chelsea which the Teessiders won 2-1 on aggregate. Boro have since lost in the semi-finals in 1991 and suffered a 2-0 defeat to Norwich in the 2015 final at Wembley. Odds 11/4 Prediction To lose semi-final against Villa. Derby County Form guide The only team of the play-off four to win their final league match of the season, which ultimately sealed their sixth-place finish, Derby are unbeaten in three after suffering a run of three straight losses during April as nerves took hold of Gary Rowett's side. Derby have scored one less than their semi-final opponents Fulham at home this term (41) but only eight wins on the road - the second worst of the top 10 in the division - has been their Achilles heel. Derby secured a 1-1 draw at Craven Cottage earlier in the season but lost the return fixture 2-1 in early March. Matej Vydra won this year's Championship Golden Boot Credit: Getty Images Star player Matej Vydra claimed his 21st league goal of the season, the most in his career, in Derby's 4-1 win over Barnsley on Sunday as the Czech Republic international won the Championship Golden Boot award. It is the most goals any player has managed since Derby moved to Pride Park in 1997 as Vydra's tally surpassed that of Chris Martin's 20 scored in the 2013/14 Championship campaign. Play-off record Derby are familiar to the ways and workings of the play-offs after featuring six times in the last 26 years. Half of those appearances have ended at the semi-final stages and only on one occasion have they won promotion to the Premier League. That was back in 2007 when they edged a narrow final against West Brom 1-0 to return to the top flight after a five-year absence. Odds 9/2 Prediction To lose to Fulham in semi-finals.
Ahead of the first legs of the Championship play-off semi-finals between Fulham vs Derby and Aston Villa vs Middlesbrough later this week, we assess the form of the four clubs all vying for promotion back to the promised land and offer our prediction as to how they will play out. Fulham Form guide Slavisa Jokanovic's side would not have been in the play-offs mix had they won or drawn their final Championship match at Birmingham. The Craven Cottage outfit suffered their first league defeat of 2018 at St Andrews as Birmingham staved off relegation. It meant Fulham finished two points off second-placed Cardiff City. The blip at Birmingham aside, Fulham have been in sensational form, winning 18 of their last 26 league games since a 1-0 loss at Sunderland back in mid-December. Goals have been easy to come by for the west Londoners who have struck more than three per game in seven matches this season which also included a 6-0 hammering of Burton. Ryan Sessegnon was the first player outside the Premier League to be nominated for the Young Player of the Year award Credit: PA Star player Ryan Sessegnon was crowned Championship Player of the Season last month and was the first ever non-Premier League nominee of the PFA Young Player of the Year award. The 17-year-old, who made his debut for England Under-21s against Ukraine in March, has scored 14 goals in 43 Championship appearances and has been touted as a potential wildcard for Gareth Southgate's senior squad for Russia this summer. A striker in his youth, then winger, then left-back and now back on the left of midfield, Sessegnon has been linked with moves to Tottenham and PSG even if Fulham win promotion via the play-offs. Play-off record Fulham can use the pain of losing in the Championship play-offs semi-finals last season as a catalyst for going one step further this time around. Jokanovic's side lost 2-1 on aggregate to Reading with Ali Al Habsi pulling off a string of saves in the second leg to deny the Cottagers. Their only other appearance in the play-off lottery was back in 1996/97 when they lost in the Old Division Two semi-finals. Odds 13/8 Prediction To beat Derby and win final. Aston Villa Form guide Like Fulham, Steve Bruce's Villa fell to defeat on the final day of the regulation season for their first loss in five league games. Villa have been prolific at home this season, scoring 42 goals at Villa Park and collecting 49 points overall. They have only suffered defeat twice in their back yard this season - against Sheffield Wednesday back in November and QPR in March. Defensively, Villa have been tight, shipping just two goals in their last five matches. Sam Johnstone has been a key figure for Aston Villa this season Credit: Getty Images Star player While captain and defender John Terry has been an influential figure on and off the pitch following his move from Chelsea last summer and Albert Adomah has contributed at the other end with 15 goals, goalkeeper Sam Johnstone just shades the pair. The 25-year-old has spent the season on loan at Villa from Manchester United and has arguably been the best keeper in the Championship keeping 20 clean sheets from 45 appearances. He is likely to be a transfer priority of Villa's this summer regardless of whether they secure promotion. Play-off record It is unchartered territory for Aston Villa who have never contested the Championship play-offs before. Odds 11/4 Prediction To beat Boro but lose to Fulham in final. Middlesbrough Form guide Patrick Bamford's 97th-minute header ensured Tony Pulis' men didn't end the regulation season with defeat at Ipswich and stretched their unbeaten run to four matches. Boro's home form has been patchy. They have lost six at the Riverside this term for the joint-worst record of any of the play-off contenders (with Derby). They also have the lowest goal return of the four teams who have extended their season. Boro have struck 33 goals at home, nine fewer than their semi-final opponents Villa. They make up for it on the road, where they have scored one more on their travels but are equally prone to ship a few more than you would expect from a Pulis set-up. Adama Traore has perked up since the arrival of Tony Pulis Credit: Getty Images Star player Adama Traore has enjoyed a stunning second half to the season since the arrival of Pulis. The speedy Spaniard has scored five goals and made 10 assists under the experienced tutelage of Pulis which hasn't gone unnoticed by Chelsea and others. The former Barcelona man has a much improved end product to his game and at 22-years-old still has plenty of time on his side. Play-off record You have to go back 30 years for the last time Middlesbrough won promotion via an altogether different play-off format. Back in 1988 the team that finished in the position above the relegation places in the First Divsion would be thrown into the play-off mix instead of the sixth-place finisher in the Second Division. This threw up a two-legged final between Boro and Chelsea which the Teessiders won 2-1 on aggregate. Boro have since lost in the semi-finals in 1991 and suffered a 2-0 defeat to Norwich in the 2015 final at Wembley. Odds 11/4 Prediction To lose semi-final against Villa. Derby County Form guide The only team of the play-off four to win their final league match of the season, which ultimately sealed their sixth-place finish, Derby are unbeaten in three after suffering a run of three straight losses during April as nerves took hold of Gary Rowett's side. Derby have scored one less than their semi-final opponents Fulham at home this term (41) but only eight wins on the road - the second worst of the top 10 in the division - has been their Achilles heel. Derby secured a 1-1 draw at Craven Cottage earlier in the season but lost the return fixture 2-1 in early March. Matej Vydra won this year's Championship Golden Boot Credit: Getty Images Star player Matej Vydra claimed his 21st league goal of the season, the most in his career, in Derby's 4-1 win over Barnsley on Sunday as the Czech Republic international won the Championship Golden Boot award. It is the most goals any player has managed since Derby moved to Pride Park in 1997 as Vydra's tally surpassed that of Chris Martin's 20 scored in the 2013/14 Championship campaign. Play-off record Derby are familiar to the ways and workings of the play-offs after featuring six times in the last 26 years. Half of those appearances have ended at the semi-final stages and only on one occasion have they won promotion to the Premier League. That was back in 2007 when they edged a narrow final against West Brom 1-0 to return to the top flight after a five-year absence. Odds 9/2 Prediction To lose to Fulham in semi-finals.
Championship play-offs 2018 guide: Form, star player and prediction
Ahead of the first legs of the Championship play-off semi-finals between Fulham vs Derby and Aston Villa vs Middlesbrough later this week, we assess the form of the four clubs all vying for promotion back to the promised land and offer our prediction as to how they will play out. Fulham Form guide Slavisa Jokanovic's side would not have been in the play-offs mix had they won or drawn their final Championship match at Birmingham. The Craven Cottage outfit suffered their first league defeat of 2018 at St Andrews as Birmingham staved off relegation. It meant Fulham finished two points off second-placed Cardiff City. The blip at Birmingham aside, Fulham have been in sensational form, winning 18 of their last 26 league games since a 1-0 loss at Sunderland back in mid-December. Goals have been easy to come by for the west Londoners who have struck more than three per game in seven matches this season which also included a 6-0 hammering of Burton. Ryan Sessegnon was the first player outside the Premier League to be nominated for the Young Player of the Year award Credit: PA Star player Ryan Sessegnon was crowned Championship Player of the Season last month and was the first ever non-Premier League nominee of the PFA Young Player of the Year award. The 17-year-old, who made his debut for England Under-21s against Ukraine in March, has scored 14 goals in 43 Championship appearances and has been touted as a potential wildcard for Gareth Southgate's senior squad for Russia this summer. A striker in his youth, then winger, then left-back and now back on the left of midfield, Sessegnon has been linked with moves to Tottenham and PSG even if Fulham win promotion via the play-offs. Play-off record Fulham can use the pain of losing in the Championship play-offs semi-finals last season as a catalyst for going one step further this time around. Jokanovic's side lost 2-1 on aggregate to Reading with Ali Al Habsi pulling off a string of saves in the second leg to deny the Cottagers. Their only other appearance in the play-off lottery was back in 1996/97 when they lost in the Old Division Two semi-finals. Odds 13/8 Prediction To beat Derby and win final. Aston Villa Form guide Like Fulham, Steve Bruce's Villa fell to defeat on the final day of the regulation season for their first loss in five league games. Villa have been prolific at home this season, scoring 42 goals at Villa Park and collecting 49 points overall. They have only suffered defeat twice in their back yard this season - against Sheffield Wednesday back in November and QPR in March. Defensively, Villa have been tight, shipping just two goals in their last five matches. Sam Johnstone has been a key figure for Aston Villa this season Credit: Getty Images Star player While captain and defender John Terry has been an influential figure on and off the pitch following his move from Chelsea last summer and Albert Adomah has contributed at the other end with 15 goals, goalkeeper Sam Johnstone just shades the pair. The 25-year-old has spent the season on loan at Villa from Manchester United and has arguably been the best keeper in the Championship keeping 20 clean sheets from 45 appearances. He is likely to be a transfer priority of Villa's this summer regardless of whether they secure promotion. Play-off record It is unchartered territory for Aston Villa who have never contested the Championship play-offs before. Odds 11/4 Prediction To beat Boro but lose to Fulham in final. Middlesbrough Form guide Patrick Bamford's 97th-minute header ensured Tony Pulis' men didn't end the regulation season with defeat at Ipswich and stretched their unbeaten run to four matches. Boro's home form has been patchy. They have lost six at the Riverside this term for the joint-worst record of any of the play-off contenders (with Derby). They also have the lowest goal return of the four teams who have extended their season. Boro have struck 33 goals at home, nine fewer than their semi-final opponents Villa. They make up for it on the road, where they have scored one more on their travels but are equally prone to ship a few more than you would expect from a Pulis set-up. Adama Traore has perked up since the arrival of Tony Pulis Credit: Getty Images Star player Adama Traore has enjoyed a stunning second half to the season since the arrival of Pulis. The speedy Spaniard has scored five goals and made 10 assists under the experienced tutelage of Pulis which hasn't gone unnoticed by Chelsea and others. The former Barcelona man has a much improved end product to his game and at 22-years-old still has plenty of time on his side. Play-off record You have to go back 30 years for the last time Middlesbrough won promotion via an altogether different play-off format. Back in 1988 the team that finished in the position above the relegation places in the First Divsion would be thrown into the play-off mix instead of the sixth-place finisher in the Second Division. This threw up a two-legged final between Boro and Chelsea which the Teessiders won 2-1 on aggregate. Boro have since lost in the semi-finals in 1991 and suffered a 2-0 defeat to Norwich in the 2015 final at Wembley. Odds 11/4 Prediction To lose semi-final against Villa. Derby County Form guide The only team of the play-off four to win their final league match of the season, which ultimately sealed their sixth-place finish, Derby are unbeaten in three after suffering a run of three straight losses during April as nerves took hold of Gary Rowett's side. Derby have scored one less than their semi-final opponents Fulham at home this term (41) but only eight wins on the road - the second worst of the top 10 in the division - has been their Achilles heel. Derby secured a 1-1 draw at Craven Cottage earlier in the season but lost the return fixture 2-1 in early March. Matej Vydra won this year's Championship Golden Boot Credit: Getty Images Star player Matej Vydra claimed his 21st league goal of the season, the most in his career, in Derby's 4-1 win over Barnsley on Sunday as the Czech Republic international won the Championship Golden Boot award. It is the most goals any player has managed since Derby moved to Pride Park in 1997 as Vydra's tally surpassed that of Chris Martin's 20 scored in the 2013/14 Championship campaign. Play-off record Derby are familiar to the ways and workings of the play-offs after featuring six times in the last 26 years. Half of those appearances have ended at the semi-final stages and only on one occasion have they won promotion to the Premier League. That was back in 2007 when they edged a narrow final against West Brom 1-0 to return to the top flight after a five-year absence. Odds 9/2 Prediction To lose to Fulham in semi-finals.
After the Tykes' relegation to League One was confirmed, Barnsley announced the sacking of former Jose Mourinho assistant Jose Morais.
Former Mourinho assistant Morais sacked after three months at Barnsley
After the Tykes' relegation to League One was confirmed, Barnsley announced the sacking of former Jose Mourinho assistant Jose Morais.
Cardiff promoted to Premier League while Burton and Barnsley drop out of the Championship
Cardiff promoted to Premier League while Burton and Barnsley drop out of the Championship
Cardiff promoted to Premier League while Burton and Barnsley drop out of the Championship
Cardiff promoted to Premier League while Burton and Barnsley drop out of the Championship
Cardiff promoted to Premier League while Burton and Barnsley drop out of the Championship
Cardiff promoted to Premier League while Burton and Barnsley drop out of the Championship
Cardiff City were promoted to the Premier League after a goalless draw against Reading on Sunday secured them second place in England's second tier Championship. Cardiff finished with 90 points, two points ahead of third-placed Fulham, who suffered a shock 3-1 defeat at Birmingham City on the final day of the campaign. Cardiff re-enter the top-flight for the first time since the 2013-14 season. Cardiff boss Neil Warnock told Sky Sports: "The biggest achievement in my 38-year career by an absolute country mile. Nobody gave us a chance. I am so proud of them. I was better when I heard the Birmingham score. I feel really proud at the job I have done. I didn't think we would get in the play-offs let alone the Premier League." Sean Morrison celebrates with fans Credit: REUTERS Cardiff defender Sean Morrison told Sky Sports: "A roller-coaster year. But we have an incredible set of lads here. To finish on 90 points over the season is fantastic. The gaffer has rallied us all year." Morrison's centre-back partner Sol Bamba added: "I love everything about it (the club). It was wonderful. We have got what we deserved. A lot of people did not think we could do it, but we did. I can't wait (for the Premier League)." Cardiff promoted to the Premier League | Neil Warnock's eighth promotion as manager Barnsley, who lost 4-1 at Derby, and Burton - defeated 2-1 by Preston - have been relegated to League One. Elsewhere, Fulham blew their chance of automatic promotion to the Premier League after suffering a 3-1 defeat at survivors Birmingham. Victory would have sent the Cottagers back to the top flight after Cardiff could only draw 0-0 with Reading. But goals from Lukas Jutkiewicz, Harlee Dean and Che Adams ensured the hosts beat relegation on the final day and denied the visitors second place. Tom Cairney briefly made it 2-1 but Fulham must rely on the play-offs - where they will face Derby - to return to the Premier League after a four-year absence. Birmingham sealed their place in the Sky Bet Championship after a season-long battle against the drop, finally finishing five points above the bottom three. Championship | Final day results
Cardiff promoted to the Premier League on final day as Burton and Barnsley drop to League One
Cardiff City were promoted to the Premier League after a goalless draw against Reading on Sunday secured them second place in England's second tier Championship. Cardiff finished with 90 points, two points ahead of third-placed Fulham, who suffered a shock 3-1 defeat at Birmingham City on the final day of the campaign. Cardiff re-enter the top-flight for the first time since the 2013-14 season. Cardiff boss Neil Warnock told Sky Sports: "The biggest achievement in my 38-year career by an absolute country mile. Nobody gave us a chance. I am so proud of them. I was better when I heard the Birmingham score. I feel really proud at the job I have done. I didn't think we would get in the play-offs let alone the Premier League." Sean Morrison celebrates with fans Credit: REUTERS Cardiff defender Sean Morrison told Sky Sports: "A roller-coaster year. But we have an incredible set of lads here. To finish on 90 points over the season is fantastic. The gaffer has rallied us all year." Morrison's centre-back partner Sol Bamba added: "I love everything about it (the club). It was wonderful. We have got what we deserved. A lot of people did not think we could do it, but we did. I can't wait (for the Premier League)." Cardiff promoted to the Premier League | Neil Warnock's eighth promotion as manager Barnsley, who lost 4-1 at Derby, and Burton - defeated 2-1 by Preston - have been relegated to League One. Elsewhere, Fulham blew their chance of automatic promotion to the Premier League after suffering a 3-1 defeat at survivors Birmingham. Victory would have sent the Cottagers back to the top flight after Cardiff could only draw 0-0 with Reading. But goals from Lukas Jutkiewicz, Harlee Dean and Che Adams ensured the hosts beat relegation on the final day and denied the visitors second place. Tom Cairney briefly made it 2-1 but Fulham must rely on the play-offs - where they will face Derby - to return to the Premier League after a four-year absence. Birmingham sealed their place in the Sky Bet Championship after a season-long battle against the drop, finally finishing five points above the bottom three. Championship | Final day results
Cardiff City were promoted to the Premier League after a goalless draw against Reading on Sunday secured them second place in England's second tier Championship. Cardiff finished with 90 points, two points ahead of third-placed Fulham, who suffered a shock 3-1 defeat at Birmingham City on the final day of the campaign. Cardiff re-enter the top-flight for the first time since the 2013-14 season. Cardiff boss Neil Warnock told Sky Sports: "The biggest achievement in my 38-year career by an absolute country mile. Nobody gave us a chance. I am so proud of them. I was better when I heard the Birmingham score. I feel really proud at the job I have done. I didn't think we would get in the play-offs let alone the Premier League." Sean Morrison celebrates with fans Credit: REUTERS Cardiff defender Sean Morrison told Sky Sports: "A roller-coaster year. But we have an incredible set of lads here. To finish on 90 points over the season is fantastic. The gaffer has rallied us all year." Morrison's centre-back partner Sol Bamba added: "I love everything about it (the club). It was wonderful. We have got what we deserved. A lot of people did not think we could do it, but we did. I can't wait (for the Premier League)." Cardiff promoted to the Premier League | Neil Warnock's eighth promotion as manager Barnsley, who lost 4-1 at Derby, and Burton - defeated 2-1 by Preston - have been relegated to League One. Elsewhere, Fulham blew their chance of automatic promotion to the Premier League after suffering a 3-1 defeat at survivors Birmingham. Victory would have sent the Cottagers back to the top flight after Cardiff could only draw 0-0 with Reading. But goals from Lukas Jutkiewicz, Harlee Dean and Che Adams ensured the hosts beat relegation on the final day and denied the visitors second place. Tom Cairney briefly made it 2-1 but Fulham must rely on the play-offs - where they will face Derby - to return to the Premier League after a four-year absence. Birmingham sealed their place in the Sky Bet Championship after a season-long battle against the drop, finally finishing five points above the bottom three. Championship | Final day results
Cardiff promoted to the Premier League on final day as Burton and Barnsley drop to League One
Cardiff City were promoted to the Premier League after a goalless draw against Reading on Sunday secured them second place in England's second tier Championship. Cardiff finished with 90 points, two points ahead of third-placed Fulham, who suffered a shock 3-1 defeat at Birmingham City on the final day of the campaign. Cardiff re-enter the top-flight for the first time since the 2013-14 season. Cardiff boss Neil Warnock told Sky Sports: "The biggest achievement in my 38-year career by an absolute country mile. Nobody gave us a chance. I am so proud of them. I was better when I heard the Birmingham score. I feel really proud at the job I have done. I didn't think we would get in the play-offs let alone the Premier League." Sean Morrison celebrates with fans Credit: REUTERS Cardiff defender Sean Morrison told Sky Sports: "A roller-coaster year. But we have an incredible set of lads here. To finish on 90 points over the season is fantastic. The gaffer has rallied us all year." Morrison's centre-back partner Sol Bamba added: "I love everything about it (the club). It was wonderful. We have got what we deserved. A lot of people did not think we could do it, but we did. I can't wait (for the Premier League)." Cardiff promoted to the Premier League | Neil Warnock's eighth promotion as manager Barnsley, who lost 4-1 at Derby, and Burton - defeated 2-1 by Preston - have been relegated to League One. Elsewhere, Fulham blew their chance of automatic promotion to the Premier League after suffering a 3-1 defeat at survivors Birmingham. Victory would have sent the Cottagers back to the top flight after Cardiff could only draw 0-0 with Reading. But goals from Lukas Jutkiewicz, Harlee Dean and Che Adams ensured the hosts beat relegation on the final day and denied the visitors second place. Tom Cairney briefly made it 2-1 but Fulham must rely on the play-offs - where they will face Derby - to return to the Premier League after a four-year absence. Birmingham sealed their place in the Sky Bet Championship after a season-long battle against the drop, finally finishing five points above the bottom three. Championship | Final day results
Derby stroll to win to secure play-off place and relegate Barnsley
Derby stroll to win to secure play-off place and relegate Barnsley
Derby stroll to win to secure play-off place and relegate Barnsley
Derby stroll to win to secure play-off place and relegate Barnsley
Derby stroll to win to secure play-off place and relegate Barnsley
Derby stroll to win to secure play-off place and relegate Barnsley
Derby stroll to win to secure play-off place and relegate Barnsley
Derby stroll to win to secure play-off place and relegate Barnsley
Derby stroll to win to secure play-off place and relegate Barnsley
Derby stroll to win to secure play-off place and relegate Barnsley
Derby stroll to win to secure play-off place and relegate Barnsley
Derby stroll to win to secure play-off place and relegate Barnsley
Derby stroll to win to secure play-off place and relegate Barnsley
Derby stroll to win to secure play-off place and relegate Barnsley
Derby stroll to win to secure play-off place and relegate Barnsley
Lewis Grabban’s late equaliser meant next to nothing to Aston Villa but might still mean everything for Derby County. Grabban struck his eighth goal for Villa to rescue a point but, almost simultaneously, Sean Morrison’s goal for Cardiff City at Hull confirmed a 2-0 win and the end of Steve Bruce’s Villa side’s slim hopes of automatic promotion. It mean Grabban’s strike was more important to him and to Derby than it can possible prove for Bruce, for whom a fightback of sorts was little more than a morale boost ahead of their play-off campaign. For Derby, though, two dropped points could yet deny them a place alongside Villa in the play-offs, although manager Gary Rowett, was still positive ahead of his side’s final-day match with Barnsley at Pride Park. “If we can get there we’ll be that team who probably didn’t feel they were going to get there.” he said. Villa, meanwhile, have looked certainties for the play-offs and long-shots for automatic promotion for several weeks – a situation welcomed by assistant manager Colin Calderwood. “We won’t have the disappointment of missing out,” he said. After a disjointed opening, Andreas Weimann, the former Villa winger, turned provider for the opening goal in the 14th minute, crossing for Cameron Jerome, who found the bottom corner from 12 yards. Jerome should have doubled the visitors’ lead when he arrived at the far post to meet an angled cross by Andre Wisdom but headed too close to Sam Johnstone in the Villa goal. In the second half, Derby scrambled away two crosses by Robert Snodgrass before a third fell for Grabban, who contrived to miss from close range at the far post. It was little surprise when John Terry’s flick fell to Grabban, who found the net to end his own frustration at his previous wastefulness and give Villa the equaliser they deserved.
Lewis Grabban rescues late point for Aston Villa after Derby ride their luck
Lewis Grabban’s late equaliser meant next to nothing to Aston Villa but might still mean everything for Derby County. Grabban struck his eighth goal for Villa to rescue a point but, almost simultaneously, Sean Morrison’s goal for Cardiff City at Hull confirmed a 2-0 win and the end of Steve Bruce’s Villa side’s slim hopes of automatic promotion. It mean Grabban’s strike was more important to him and to Derby than it can possible prove for Bruce, for whom a fightback of sorts was little more than a morale boost ahead of their play-off campaign. For Derby, though, two dropped points could yet deny them a place alongside Villa in the play-offs, although manager Gary Rowett, was still positive ahead of his side’s final-day match with Barnsley at Pride Park. “If we can get there we’ll be that team who probably didn’t feel they were going to get there.” he said. Villa, meanwhile, have looked certainties for the play-offs and long-shots for automatic promotion for several weeks – a situation welcomed by assistant manager Colin Calderwood. “We won’t have the disappointment of missing out,” he said. After a disjointed opening, Andreas Weimann, the former Villa winger, turned provider for the opening goal in the 14th minute, crossing for Cameron Jerome, who found the bottom corner from 12 yards. Jerome should have doubled the visitors’ lead when he arrived at the far post to meet an angled cross by Andre Wisdom but headed too close to Sam Johnstone in the Villa goal. In the second half, Derby scrambled away two crosses by Robert Snodgrass before a third fell for Grabban, who contrived to miss from close range at the far post. It was little surprise when John Terry’s flick fell to Grabban, who found the net to end his own frustration at his previous wastefulness and give Villa the equaliser they deserved.
The Great Escape II is on. Nigel Clough loves nothing more than reading a good thriller when he spends time away from Burton Albion, yet the final weeks of his latest relegation fight are proving an unbearably tense sequel to the original. Last season he defied the odds by guiding the Brewers to Championship safety with a game to spare but this survival mission is going right to the wire, ahead of a do-or-die encounter with Bolton Wanderers on Saturday. Clough’s strugglers face Bolton with the huge incentive of knowing that a victory could take them above their opponents and out of the bottom three, provided Barnsley fail to beat Brentford. The fact Clough even has a slim chance of survival is remarkable; Burton operate on a modest £8.5m wage bill, their record signing, Liam Boyce, cost £500,000 and has missed most of the season with injury, while their average gate at the Pirelli Stadium is just under 4,600. But optimism is building after last weekend’s heroics at Sunderland that another escapology act is on the way. “Last season it was a miracle to stay up, it will be an even bigger miracle if we do it again this year,” Ben Robinson, Burton’s chairman, told Telegraph Sport. Championship | What can still happen? “It’s David vs Goliath stuff for us every week but the dream is still alive. We’ve got a big chance of playing Championship football again next season, when we looked dead and buried just two games ago.” Burton’s dramatic 2-1 victory at the Stadium of Light last weekend, with Boyce heading the winner two minutes into added time, relegated the stricken Black Cats to set up their monumental meeting with Bolton. Clough’s old club, Nottingham Forest, then did him a favour on Tuesday night by thrashing Barnsley to raise hopes of a memorable finish to a difficult campaign. Forest, who approached Clough last year, also face Bolton on the final day. Nigel Clough encourages his players at Cardiff Credit: Athena Pictures/Getty Images Yet Clough’s hopes of success arguably depend on beating Bolton at home, with the 52-year-old battling valiantly this week to ease the pressure on his players. “If we lose, we’re down at 5pm on Saturday. But we’re very pleased to be in this position and our intention is to take it to the last day, as it has always been,” he says. “We wanted to improve and get better this season, it hasn’t worked out like that, we’re disappointed in an awful lot of ways but we’re still in with a chance. Of course, it's a massive game. “What would staying up again mean? It would be exactly the same next season, trying to finish fourth from bottom, there’s no sugar daddy here, the chairman gives us everything he can.” Liam Boyce celebrates scoring the goal that has kept Burton's survival hopes alive Credit: Dave Howarth/PA Clough has found this season even tougher than last year, the chasm growing ever wider between Burton and the majority of the Championship’s other 23 clubs. Earlier this month they played Middlesbrough, relegated from the top-flight last year, with a £15 million striker on the bench [Britt Assombalonga] and wage bill topping £30m. "Wolves have won the league and rightly so but they've got a £15m midfielder [Ruben Neves] who has played in the Champions League. It's a different world,” says Clough. “We're Burton Albion in the Championship. It's not so long ago we were in the Unibond League playing against Marine and Droylsden [Burton won the title in 2002 to reach the Conference]. “It puts it all into perspective and whatever league we're in next season it’s still an incredible achievement.” Chairman Ben Robinson, second left, and Clough, second right, toast their FA Cup tie against Manchester United back in 2006 Credit: DAVE THOMPSON/AP Robinson, who has been Burton’s chairman since 1995, released a statement earlier this month to remind supporters of their humble resources, in what he called a “reality check” following criticism of Clough on social media. Yet the Burton manager admits the continual fighting against bigger clubs, and the annual battle as the underdog, can take its toll. “It’s certainly demoralising at times when you go into games like Wolves knowing deep down you can’t compete. “The players aren’t daft either, when they look at the quality of players they come across at times. “Whether it’s Burton Albion or anywhere else, you ask any manager at this stage of this season, they will say they're tired. “But for us, competing at this level is very, very difficult so it's probably a bit more increased. At this stage of the season you're certainly looking forward to your holidays.” By 5pm on Saturday Clough will know if the final game of the season at Preston has any significance. But as his late father Brian once famously said, “I hope anybody’s not stupid enough to write us off…”
Burton Albion fighting for 'even bigger miracle' with great escape sequel
The Great Escape II is on. Nigel Clough loves nothing more than reading a good thriller when he spends time away from Burton Albion, yet the final weeks of his latest relegation fight are proving an unbearably tense sequel to the original. Last season he defied the odds by guiding the Brewers to Championship safety with a game to spare but this survival mission is going right to the wire, ahead of a do-or-die encounter with Bolton Wanderers on Saturday. Clough’s strugglers face Bolton with the huge incentive of knowing that a victory could take them above their opponents and out of the bottom three, provided Barnsley fail to beat Brentford. The fact Clough even has a slim chance of survival is remarkable; Burton operate on a modest £8.5m wage bill, their record signing, Liam Boyce, cost £500,000 and has missed most of the season with injury, while their average gate at the Pirelli Stadium is just under 4,600. But optimism is building after last weekend’s heroics at Sunderland that another escapology act is on the way. “Last season it was a miracle to stay up, it will be an even bigger miracle if we do it again this year,” Ben Robinson, Burton’s chairman, told Telegraph Sport. Championship | What can still happen? “It’s David vs Goliath stuff for us every week but the dream is still alive. We’ve got a big chance of playing Championship football again next season, when we looked dead and buried just two games ago.” Burton’s dramatic 2-1 victory at the Stadium of Light last weekend, with Boyce heading the winner two minutes into added time, relegated the stricken Black Cats to set up their monumental meeting with Bolton. Clough’s old club, Nottingham Forest, then did him a favour on Tuesday night by thrashing Barnsley to raise hopes of a memorable finish to a difficult campaign. Forest, who approached Clough last year, also face Bolton on the final day. Nigel Clough encourages his players at Cardiff Credit: Athena Pictures/Getty Images Yet Clough’s hopes of success arguably depend on beating Bolton at home, with the 52-year-old battling valiantly this week to ease the pressure on his players. “If we lose, we’re down at 5pm on Saturday. But we’re very pleased to be in this position and our intention is to take it to the last day, as it has always been,” he says. “We wanted to improve and get better this season, it hasn’t worked out like that, we’re disappointed in an awful lot of ways but we’re still in with a chance. Of course, it's a massive game. “What would staying up again mean? It would be exactly the same next season, trying to finish fourth from bottom, there’s no sugar daddy here, the chairman gives us everything he can.” Liam Boyce celebrates scoring the goal that has kept Burton's survival hopes alive Credit: Dave Howarth/PA Clough has found this season even tougher than last year, the chasm growing ever wider between Burton and the majority of the Championship’s other 23 clubs. Earlier this month they played Middlesbrough, relegated from the top-flight last year, with a £15 million striker on the bench [Britt Assombalonga] and wage bill topping £30m. "Wolves have won the league and rightly so but they've got a £15m midfielder [Ruben Neves] who has played in the Champions League. It's a different world,” says Clough. “We're Burton Albion in the Championship. It's not so long ago we were in the Unibond League playing against Marine and Droylsden [Burton won the title in 2002 to reach the Conference]. “It puts it all into perspective and whatever league we're in next season it’s still an incredible achievement.” Chairman Ben Robinson, second left, and Clough, second right, toast their FA Cup tie against Manchester United back in 2006 Credit: DAVE THOMPSON/AP Robinson, who has been Burton’s chairman since 1995, released a statement earlier this month to remind supporters of their humble resources, in what he called a “reality check” following criticism of Clough on social media. Yet the Burton manager admits the continual fighting against bigger clubs, and the annual battle as the underdog, can take its toll. “It’s certainly demoralising at times when you go into games like Wolves knowing deep down you can’t compete. “The players aren’t daft either, when they look at the quality of players they come across at times. “Whether it’s Burton Albion or anywhere else, you ask any manager at this stage of this season, they will say they're tired. “But for us, competing at this level is very, very difficult so it's probably a bit more increased. At this stage of the season you're certainly looking forward to your holidays.” By 5pm on Saturday Clough will know if the final game of the season at Preston has any significance. But as his late father Brian once famously said, “I hope anybody’s not stupid enough to write us off…”
The Great Escape II is on. Nigel Clough loves nothing more than reading a good thriller when he spends time away from Burton Albion, yet the final weeks of his latest relegation fight are proving an unbearably tense sequel to the original. Last season he defied the odds by guiding the Brewers to Championship safety with a game to spare but this survival mission is going right to the wire, ahead of a do-or-die encounter with Bolton Wanderers on Saturday. Clough’s strugglers face Bolton with the huge incentive of knowing that a victory could take them above their opponents and out of the bottom three, provided Barnsley fail to beat Brentford. The fact Clough even has a slim chance of survival is remarkable; Burton operate on a modest £8.5m wage bill, their record signing, Liam Boyce, cost £500,000 and has missed most of the season with injury, while their average gate at the Pirelli Stadium is just under 4,600. But optimism is building after last weekend’s heroics at Sunderland that another escapology act is on the way. “Last season it was a miracle to stay up, it will be an even bigger miracle if we do it again this year,” Ben Robinson, Burton’s chairman, told Telegraph Sport. Championship | What can still happen? “It’s David vs Goliath stuff for us every week but the dream is still alive. We’ve got a big chance of playing Championship football again next season, when we looked dead and buried just two games ago.” Burton’s dramatic 2-1 victory at the Stadium of Light last weekend, with Boyce heading the winner two minutes into added time, relegated the stricken Black Cats to set up their monumental meeting with Bolton. Clough’s old club, Nottingham Forest, then did him a favour on Tuesday night by thrashing Barnsley to raise hopes of a memorable finish to a difficult campaign. Forest, who approached Clough last year, also face Bolton on the final day. Nigel Clough encourages his players at Cardiff Credit: Athena Pictures/Getty Images Yet Clough’s hopes of success arguably depend on beating Bolton at home, with the 52-year-old battling valiantly this week to ease the pressure on his players. “If we lose, we’re down at 5pm on Saturday. But we’re very pleased to be in this position and our intention is to take it to the last day, as it has always been,” he says. “We wanted to improve and get better this season, it hasn’t worked out like that, we’re disappointed in an awful lot of ways but we’re still in with a chance. Of course, it's a massive game. “What would staying up again mean? It would be exactly the same next season, trying to finish fourth from bottom, there’s no sugar daddy here, the chairman gives us everything he can.” Liam Boyce celebrates scoring the goal that has kept Burton's survival hopes alive Credit: Dave Howarth/PA Clough has found this season even tougher than last year, the chasm growing ever wider between Burton and the majority of the Championship’s other 23 clubs. Earlier this month they played Middlesbrough, relegated from the top-flight last year, with a £15 million striker on the bench [Britt Assombalonga] and wage bill topping £30m. "Wolves have won the league and rightly so but they've got a £15m midfielder [Ruben Neves] who has played in the Champions League. It's a different world,” says Clough. “We're Burton Albion in the Championship. It's not so long ago we were in the Unibond League playing against Marine and Droylsden [Burton won the title in 2002 to reach the Conference]. “It puts it all into perspective and whatever league we're in next season it’s still an incredible achievement.” Chairman Ben Robinson, second left, and Clough, second right, toast their FA Cup tie against Manchester United back in 2006 Credit: DAVE THOMPSON/AP Robinson, who has been Burton’s chairman since 1995, released a statement earlier this month to remind supporters of their humble resources, in what he called a “reality check” following criticism of Clough on social media. Yet the Burton manager admits the continual fighting against bigger clubs, and the annual battle as the underdog, can take its toll. “It’s certainly demoralising at times when you go into games like Wolves knowing deep down you can’t compete. “The players aren’t daft either, when they look at the quality of players they come across at times. “Whether it’s Burton Albion or anywhere else, you ask any manager at this stage of this season, they will say they're tired. “But for us, competing at this level is very, very difficult so it's probably a bit more increased. At this stage of the season you're certainly looking forward to your holidays.” By 5pm on Saturday Clough will know if the final game of the season at Preston has any significance. But as his late father Brian once famously said, “I hope anybody’s not stupid enough to write us off…”
Burton Albion fighting for 'even bigger miracle' with great escape sequel
The Great Escape II is on. Nigel Clough loves nothing more than reading a good thriller when he spends time away from Burton Albion, yet the final weeks of his latest relegation fight are proving an unbearably tense sequel to the original. Last season he defied the odds by guiding the Brewers to Championship safety with a game to spare but this survival mission is going right to the wire, ahead of a do-or-die encounter with Bolton Wanderers on Saturday. Clough’s strugglers face Bolton with the huge incentive of knowing that a victory could take them above their opponents and out of the bottom three, provided Barnsley fail to beat Brentford. The fact Clough even has a slim chance of survival is remarkable; Burton operate on a modest £8.5m wage bill, their record signing, Liam Boyce, cost £500,000 and has missed most of the season with injury, while their average gate at the Pirelli Stadium is just under 4,600. But optimism is building after last weekend’s heroics at Sunderland that another escapology act is on the way. “Last season it was a miracle to stay up, it will be an even bigger miracle if we do it again this year,” Ben Robinson, Burton’s chairman, told Telegraph Sport. Championship | What can still happen? “It’s David vs Goliath stuff for us every week but the dream is still alive. We’ve got a big chance of playing Championship football again next season, when we looked dead and buried just two games ago.” Burton’s dramatic 2-1 victory at the Stadium of Light last weekend, with Boyce heading the winner two minutes into added time, relegated the stricken Black Cats to set up their monumental meeting with Bolton. Clough’s old club, Nottingham Forest, then did him a favour on Tuesday night by thrashing Barnsley to raise hopes of a memorable finish to a difficult campaign. Forest, who approached Clough last year, also face Bolton on the final day. Nigel Clough encourages his players at Cardiff Credit: Athena Pictures/Getty Images Yet Clough’s hopes of success arguably depend on beating Bolton at home, with the 52-year-old battling valiantly this week to ease the pressure on his players. “If we lose, we’re down at 5pm on Saturday. But we’re very pleased to be in this position and our intention is to take it to the last day, as it has always been,” he says. “We wanted to improve and get better this season, it hasn’t worked out like that, we’re disappointed in an awful lot of ways but we’re still in with a chance. Of course, it's a massive game. “What would staying up again mean? It would be exactly the same next season, trying to finish fourth from bottom, there’s no sugar daddy here, the chairman gives us everything he can.” Liam Boyce celebrates scoring the goal that has kept Burton's survival hopes alive Credit: Dave Howarth/PA Clough has found this season even tougher than last year, the chasm growing ever wider between Burton and the majority of the Championship’s other 23 clubs. Earlier this month they played Middlesbrough, relegated from the top-flight last year, with a £15 million striker on the bench [Britt Assombalonga] and wage bill topping £30m. "Wolves have won the league and rightly so but they've got a £15m midfielder [Ruben Neves] who has played in the Champions League. It's a different world,” says Clough. “We're Burton Albion in the Championship. It's not so long ago we were in the Unibond League playing against Marine and Droylsden [Burton won the title in 2002 to reach the Conference]. “It puts it all into perspective and whatever league we're in next season it’s still an incredible achievement.” Chairman Ben Robinson, second left, and Clough, second right, toast their FA Cup tie against Manchester United back in 2006 Credit: DAVE THOMPSON/AP Robinson, who has been Burton’s chairman since 1995, released a statement earlier this month to remind supporters of their humble resources, in what he called a “reality check” following criticism of Clough on social media. Yet the Burton manager admits the continual fighting against bigger clubs, and the annual battle as the underdog, can take its toll. “It’s certainly demoralising at times when you go into games like Wolves knowing deep down you can’t compete. “The players aren’t daft either, when they look at the quality of players they come across at times. “Whether it’s Burton Albion or anywhere else, you ask any manager at this stage of this season, they will say they're tired. “But for us, competing at this level is very, very difficult so it's probably a bit more increased. At this stage of the season you're certainly looking forward to your holidays.” By 5pm on Saturday Clough will know if the final game of the season at Preston has any significance. But as his late father Brian once famously said, “I hope anybody’s not stupid enough to write us off…”
The Great Escape II is on. Nigel Clough loves nothing more than reading a good thriller when he spends time away from Burton Albion, yet the final weeks of his latest relegation fight are proving an unbearably tense sequel to the original. Last season he defied the odds by guiding the Brewers to Championship safety with a game to spare but this survival mission is going right to the wire, ahead of a do-or-die encounter with Bolton Wanderers on Saturday. Clough’s strugglers face Bolton with the huge incentive of knowing that a victory could take them above their opponents and out of the bottom three, provided Barnsley fail to beat Brentford. The fact Clough even has a slim chance of survival is remarkable; Burton operate on a modest £8.5m wage bill, their record signing, Liam Boyce, cost £500,000 and has missed most of the season with injury, while their average gate at the Pirelli Stadium is just under 4,600. But optimism is building after last weekend’s heroics at Sunderland that another escapology act is on the way. “Last season it was a miracle to stay up, it will be an even bigger miracle if we do it again this year,” Ben Robinson, Burton’s chairman, told Telegraph Sport. Championship | What can still happen? “It’s David vs Goliath stuff for us every week but the dream is still alive. We’ve got a big chance of playing Championship football again next season, when we looked dead and buried just two games ago.” Burton’s dramatic 2-1 victory at the Stadium of Light last weekend, with Boyce heading the winner two minutes into added time, relegated the stricken Black Cats to set up their monumental meeting with Bolton. Clough’s old club, Nottingham Forest, then did him a favour on Tuesday night by thrashing Barnsley to raise hopes of a memorable finish to a difficult campaign. Forest, who approached Clough last year, also face Bolton on the final day. Nigel Clough encourages his players at Cardiff Credit: Athena Pictures/Getty Images Yet Clough’s hopes of success arguably depend on beating Bolton at home, with the 52-year-old battling valiantly this week to ease the pressure on his players. “If we lose, we’re down at 5pm on Saturday. But we’re very pleased to be in this position and our intention is to take it to the last day, as it has always been,” he says. “We wanted to improve and get better this season, it hasn’t worked out like that, we’re disappointed in an awful lot of ways but we’re still in with a chance. Of course, it's a massive game. “What would staying up again mean? It would be exactly the same next season, trying to finish fourth from bottom, there’s no sugar daddy here, the chairman gives us everything he can.” Liam Boyce celebrates scoring the goal that has kept Burton's survival hopes alive Credit: Dave Howarth/PA Clough has found this season even tougher than last year, the chasm growing ever wider between Burton and the majority of the Championship’s other 23 clubs. Earlier this month they played Middlesbrough, relegated from the top-flight last year, with a £15 million striker on the bench [Britt Assombalonga] and wage bill topping £30m. "Wolves have won the league and rightly so but they've got a £15m midfielder [Ruben Neves] who has played in the Champions League. It's a different world,” says Clough. “We're Burton Albion in the Championship. It's not so long ago we were in the Unibond League playing against Marine and Droylsden [Burton won the title in 2002 to reach the Conference]. “It puts it all into perspective and whatever league we're in next season it’s still an incredible achievement.” Chairman Ben Robinson, second left, and Clough, second right, toast their FA Cup tie against Manchester United back in 2006 Credit: DAVE THOMPSON/AP Robinson, who has been Burton’s chairman since 1995, released a statement earlier this month to remind supporters of their humble resources, in what he called a “reality check” following criticism of Clough on social media. Yet the Burton manager admits the continual fighting against bigger clubs, and the annual battle as the underdog, can take its toll. “It’s certainly demoralising at times when you go into games like Wolves knowing deep down you can’t compete. “The players aren’t daft either, when they look at the quality of players they come across at times. “Whether it’s Burton Albion or anywhere else, you ask any manager at this stage of this season, they will say they're tired. “But for us, competing at this level is very, very difficult so it's probably a bit more increased. At this stage of the season you're certainly looking forward to your holidays.” By 5pm on Saturday Clough will know if the final game of the season at Preston has any significance. But as his late father Brian once famously said, “I hope anybody’s not stupid enough to write us off…”
Burton Albion fighting for 'even bigger miracle' with great escape sequel
The Great Escape II is on. Nigel Clough loves nothing more than reading a good thriller when he spends time away from Burton Albion, yet the final weeks of his latest relegation fight are proving an unbearably tense sequel to the original. Last season he defied the odds by guiding the Brewers to Championship safety with a game to spare but this survival mission is going right to the wire, ahead of a do-or-die encounter with Bolton Wanderers on Saturday. Clough’s strugglers face Bolton with the huge incentive of knowing that a victory could take them above their opponents and out of the bottom three, provided Barnsley fail to beat Brentford. The fact Clough even has a slim chance of survival is remarkable; Burton operate on a modest £8.5m wage bill, their record signing, Liam Boyce, cost £500,000 and has missed most of the season with injury, while their average gate at the Pirelli Stadium is just under 4,600. But optimism is building after last weekend’s heroics at Sunderland that another escapology act is on the way. “Last season it was a miracle to stay up, it will be an even bigger miracle if we do it again this year,” Ben Robinson, Burton’s chairman, told Telegraph Sport. Championship | What can still happen? “It’s David vs Goliath stuff for us every week but the dream is still alive. We’ve got a big chance of playing Championship football again next season, when we looked dead and buried just two games ago.” Burton’s dramatic 2-1 victory at the Stadium of Light last weekend, with Boyce heading the winner two minutes into added time, relegated the stricken Black Cats to set up their monumental meeting with Bolton. Clough’s old club, Nottingham Forest, then did him a favour on Tuesday night by thrashing Barnsley to raise hopes of a memorable finish to a difficult campaign. Forest, who approached Clough last year, also face Bolton on the final day. Nigel Clough encourages his players at Cardiff Credit: Athena Pictures/Getty Images Yet Clough’s hopes of success arguably depend on beating Bolton at home, with the 52-year-old battling valiantly this week to ease the pressure on his players. “If we lose, we’re down at 5pm on Saturday. But we’re very pleased to be in this position and our intention is to take it to the last day, as it has always been,” he says. “We wanted to improve and get better this season, it hasn’t worked out like that, we’re disappointed in an awful lot of ways but we’re still in with a chance. Of course, it's a massive game. “What would staying up again mean? It would be exactly the same next season, trying to finish fourth from bottom, there’s no sugar daddy here, the chairman gives us everything he can.” Liam Boyce celebrates scoring the goal that has kept Burton's survival hopes alive Credit: Dave Howarth/PA Clough has found this season even tougher than last year, the chasm growing ever wider between Burton and the majority of the Championship’s other 23 clubs. Earlier this month they played Middlesbrough, relegated from the top-flight last year, with a £15 million striker on the bench [Britt Assombalonga] and wage bill topping £30m. "Wolves have won the league and rightly so but they've got a £15m midfielder [Ruben Neves] who has played in the Champions League. It's a different world,” says Clough. “We're Burton Albion in the Championship. It's not so long ago we were in the Unibond League playing against Marine and Droylsden [Burton won the title in 2002 to reach the Conference]. “It puts it all into perspective and whatever league we're in next season it’s still an incredible achievement.” Chairman Ben Robinson, second left, and Clough, second right, toast their FA Cup tie against Manchester United back in 2006 Credit: DAVE THOMPSON/AP Robinson, who has been Burton’s chairman since 1995, released a statement earlier this month to remind supporters of their humble resources, in what he called a “reality check” following criticism of Clough on social media. Yet the Burton manager admits the continual fighting against bigger clubs, and the annual battle as the underdog, can take its toll. “It’s certainly demoralising at times when you go into games like Wolves knowing deep down you can’t compete. “The players aren’t daft either, when they look at the quality of players they come across at times. “Whether it’s Burton Albion or anywhere else, you ask any manager at this stage of this season, they will say they're tired. “But for us, competing at this level is very, very difficult so it's probably a bit more increased. At this stage of the season you're certainly looking forward to your holidays.” By 5pm on Saturday Clough will know if the final game of the season at Preston has any significance. But as his late father Brian once famously said, “I hope anybody’s not stupid enough to write us off…”
The Great Escape II is on. Nigel Clough loves nothing more than reading a good thriller when he spends time away from Burton Albion, yet the final weeks of his latest relegation fight are proving an unbearably tense sequel to the original. Last season he defied the odds by guiding the Brewers to Championship safety with a game to spare but this survival mission is going right to the wire, ahead of a do-or-die encounter with Bolton Wanderers on Saturday. Clough’s strugglers face Bolton with the huge incentive of knowing that a victory could take them above their opponents and out of the bottom three, provided Barnsley fail to beat Brentford. The fact Clough even has a slim chance of survival is remarkable; Burton operate on a modest £8.5m wage bill, their record signing, Liam Boyce, cost £500,000 and has missed most of the season with injury, while their average gate at the Pirelli Stadium is just under 4,600. But optimism is building after last weekend’s heroics at Sunderland that another escapology act is on the way. “Last season it was a miracle to stay up, it will be an even bigger miracle if we do it again this year,” Ben Robinson, Burton’s chairman, told Telegraph Sport. Championship | What can still happen? “It’s David vs Goliath stuff for us every week but the dream is still alive. We’ve got a big chance of playing Championship football again next season, when we looked dead and buried just two games ago.” Burton’s dramatic 2-1 victory at the Stadium of Light last weekend, with Boyce heading the winner two minutes into added time, relegated the stricken Black Cats to set up their monumental meeting with Bolton. Clough’s old club, Nottingham Forest, then did him a favour on Tuesday night by thrashing Barnsley to raise hopes of a memorable finish to a difficult campaign. Forest, who approached Clough last year, also face Bolton on the final day. Nigel Clough encourages his players at Cardiff Credit: Athena Pictures/Getty Images Yet Clough’s hopes of success arguably depend on beating Bolton at home, with the 52-year-old battling valiantly this week to ease the pressure on his players. “If we lose, we’re down at 5pm on Saturday. But we’re very pleased to be in this position and our intention is to take it to the last day, as it has always been,” he says. “We wanted to improve and get better this season, it hasn’t worked out like that, we’re disappointed in an awful lot of ways but we’re still in with a chance. Of course, it's a massive game. “What would staying up again mean? It would be exactly the same next season, trying to finish fourth from bottom, there’s no sugar daddy here, the chairman gives us everything he can.” Liam Boyce celebrates scoring the goal that has kept Burton's survival hopes alive Credit: Dave Howarth/PA Clough has found this season even tougher than last year, the chasm growing ever wider between Burton and the majority of the Championship’s other 23 clubs. Earlier this month they played Middlesbrough, relegated from the top-flight last year, with a £15 million striker on the bench [Britt Assombalonga] and wage bill topping £30m. "Wolves have won the league and rightly so but they've got a £15m midfielder [Ruben Neves] who has played in the Champions League. It's a different world,” says Clough. “We're Burton Albion in the Championship. It's not so long ago we were in the Unibond League playing against Marine and Droylsden [Burton won the title in 2002 to reach the Conference]. “It puts it all into perspective and whatever league we're in next season it’s still an incredible achievement.” Chairman Ben Robinson, second left, and Clough, second right, toast their FA Cup tie against Manchester United back in 2006 Credit: DAVE THOMPSON/AP Robinson, who has been Burton’s chairman since 1995, released a statement earlier this month to remind supporters of their humble resources, in what he called a “reality check” following criticism of Clough on social media. Yet the Burton manager admits the continual fighting against bigger clubs, and the annual battle as the underdog, can take its toll. “It’s certainly demoralising at times when you go into games like Wolves knowing deep down you can’t compete. “The players aren’t daft either, when they look at the quality of players they come across at times. “Whether it’s Burton Albion or anywhere else, you ask any manager at this stage of this season, they will say they're tired. “But for us, competing at this level is very, very difficult so it's probably a bit more increased. At this stage of the season you're certainly looking forward to your holidays.” By 5pm on Saturday Clough will know if the final game of the season at Preston has any significance. But as his late father Brian once famously said, “I hope anybody’s not stupid enough to write us off…”
Burton Albion fighting for 'even bigger miracle' with great escape sequel
The Great Escape II is on. Nigel Clough loves nothing more than reading a good thriller when he spends time away from Burton Albion, yet the final weeks of his latest relegation fight are proving an unbearably tense sequel to the original. Last season he defied the odds by guiding the Brewers to Championship safety with a game to spare but this survival mission is going right to the wire, ahead of a do-or-die encounter with Bolton Wanderers on Saturday. Clough’s strugglers face Bolton with the huge incentive of knowing that a victory could take them above their opponents and out of the bottom three, provided Barnsley fail to beat Brentford. The fact Clough even has a slim chance of survival is remarkable; Burton operate on a modest £8.5m wage bill, their record signing, Liam Boyce, cost £500,000 and has missed most of the season with injury, while their average gate at the Pirelli Stadium is just under 4,600. But optimism is building after last weekend’s heroics at Sunderland that another escapology act is on the way. “Last season it was a miracle to stay up, it will be an even bigger miracle if we do it again this year,” Ben Robinson, Burton’s chairman, told Telegraph Sport. Championship | What can still happen? “It’s David vs Goliath stuff for us every week but the dream is still alive. We’ve got a big chance of playing Championship football again next season, when we looked dead and buried just two games ago.” Burton’s dramatic 2-1 victory at the Stadium of Light last weekend, with Boyce heading the winner two minutes into added time, relegated the stricken Black Cats to set up their monumental meeting with Bolton. Clough’s old club, Nottingham Forest, then did him a favour on Tuesday night by thrashing Barnsley to raise hopes of a memorable finish to a difficult campaign. Forest, who approached Clough last year, also face Bolton on the final day. Nigel Clough encourages his players at Cardiff Credit: Athena Pictures/Getty Images Yet Clough’s hopes of success arguably depend on beating Bolton at home, with the 52-year-old battling valiantly this week to ease the pressure on his players. “If we lose, we’re down at 5pm on Saturday. But we’re very pleased to be in this position and our intention is to take it to the last day, as it has always been,” he says. “We wanted to improve and get better this season, it hasn’t worked out like that, we’re disappointed in an awful lot of ways but we’re still in with a chance. Of course, it's a massive game. “What would staying up again mean? It would be exactly the same next season, trying to finish fourth from bottom, there’s no sugar daddy here, the chairman gives us everything he can.” Liam Boyce celebrates scoring the goal that has kept Burton's survival hopes alive Credit: Dave Howarth/PA Clough has found this season even tougher than last year, the chasm growing ever wider between Burton and the majority of the Championship’s other 23 clubs. Earlier this month they played Middlesbrough, relegated from the top-flight last year, with a £15 million striker on the bench [Britt Assombalonga] and wage bill topping £30m. "Wolves have won the league and rightly so but they've got a £15m midfielder [Ruben Neves] who has played in the Champions League. It's a different world,” says Clough. “We're Burton Albion in the Championship. It's not so long ago we were in the Unibond League playing against Marine and Droylsden [Burton won the title in 2002 to reach the Conference]. “It puts it all into perspective and whatever league we're in next season it’s still an incredible achievement.” Chairman Ben Robinson, second left, and Clough, second right, toast their FA Cup tie against Manchester United back in 2006 Credit: DAVE THOMPSON/AP Robinson, who has been Burton’s chairman since 1995, released a statement earlier this month to remind supporters of their humble resources, in what he called a “reality check” following criticism of Clough on social media. Yet the Burton manager admits the continual fighting against bigger clubs, and the annual battle as the underdog, can take its toll. “It’s certainly demoralising at times when you go into games like Wolves knowing deep down you can’t compete. “The players aren’t daft either, when they look at the quality of players they come across at times. “Whether it’s Burton Albion or anywhere else, you ask any manager at this stage of this season, they will say they're tired. “But for us, competing at this level is very, very difficult so it's probably a bit more increased. At this stage of the season you're certainly looking forward to your holidays.” By 5pm on Saturday Clough will know if the final game of the season at Preston has any significance. But as his late father Brian once famously said, “I hope anybody’s not stupid enough to write us off…”
Promotion number eight will have to wait for Neil Warnock, after the immutable law of the ex. Warnock’s hopes of securing a Premier League return are still hanging in the balance after a ­dramatic Derby County turnaround ensured the scramble for automatic promotion is set for the final day. Cardiff City old boy Cameron ­Jerome scored twice, while a goal from substitute Matej Vydra breathed fresh life into Derby’s ­previously sagging play-off bid to increase Warnock’s frustration over the original postponement. Five weeks ago this game was called off due to overnight snow but it was Derby who put the skids on Cardiff with a defiant response. Cardiff could still secure a top-two finish this weekend if they beat Hull City and rivals Fulham suffer a defeat against Sunderland, but the chase now seems certain to be a nail-biting experience. Cardiff are a point above Fulham with two games left. This was only Derby’s third win in 14 games, but lifted them above Millwall into the final play-off place. Warnock said: “We’ve got to ­regroup and go again. We’ve got to win at Hull and beat Reading, we’d have settled for that on July 15 when we started pre-season. “It’s exciting isn’t it? It was ­always going to the wire. It’s disappointing for us, they were Sunday league goals for us to concede and the players are flat. “You’d think Derby had won the World Cup at the final whistle. I can’t blame the weather and I’m pleased they managed to get a full team out this time.” Warnock reacts as his team loses to Derby County Credit: GETTY IMAGES Relations between Warnock and Derby’s Gary Rowett have become frosty after the initial fixture was controversially postponed last month. Warnock, a master of conspiracy theories, branded the decision a “disgrace” and hinted darkly that Derby wanted the game called off due to a lengthy injury list. The stakes in this rearranged game were huge and Cardiff took the lead after the 28th minute through a spectacular volley from Callum Paterson. Derby were nervy in the first half, Pride Park an arena of anxiety, and there was no hint of what was to follow. Yet they were vastly ­improved in the second half, and it was Jerome – who scored 27 goals between 2004-2006 for Cardiff – who pinched the equaliser after the 68th minute. Cardiff failed to adequately clear a corner and Richard Keogh headed the ball back into the area, with ­Jerome holding off Morrison to slide the ball past Neil Etheridge. Vydra put the game beyond the visitors nine minutes from time with an emphatic finish, his 20th of the season, before Jerome added a third in added time. Rowett said: “There are no ­second chances for us and we had to lay it all out on the pitch. “The players have shown ­tremendous character and it’s now in our own hands again. We’ve got Aston Villa on Saturday and then Barnsley who will be fighting for their lives, which is why we all love this division.” Teams Derby County (3-6-1) Carson; Keogh, Davies, Forsyth; Wisdom, Huddlestone, Johnson, Lawrence (Hanson 88), Olsson (Vydra 60), Weimann (Pearce 88); Jerome. Subs Roos (g), Palmer, Nugent, Ledley. Cardiff City (4-4-2) Etheridge; Ecuele Manga, Morrison, Bamba, Bennett; Paterson, Gunnarsson, Ralls, Ward (Wildschut 74); Hoilett (Pilkington 74), Madine (Zohore 67). Subs Murphy (g), Peltier, Mendez-Laing, Grujic. Booked Paterson, Manga, Bennett, Ralls Referee Andrew Madley (West Yorkshire).
Neil Warnock's wait for promotion continues as Derby County fight back to beat Cardiff
Promotion number eight will have to wait for Neil Warnock, after the immutable law of the ex. Warnock’s hopes of securing a Premier League return are still hanging in the balance after a ­dramatic Derby County turnaround ensured the scramble for automatic promotion is set for the final day. Cardiff City old boy Cameron ­Jerome scored twice, while a goal from substitute Matej Vydra breathed fresh life into Derby’s ­previously sagging play-off bid to increase Warnock’s frustration over the original postponement. Five weeks ago this game was called off due to overnight snow but it was Derby who put the skids on Cardiff with a defiant response. Cardiff could still secure a top-two finish this weekend if they beat Hull City and rivals Fulham suffer a defeat against Sunderland, but the chase now seems certain to be a nail-biting experience. Cardiff are a point above Fulham with two games left. This was only Derby’s third win in 14 games, but lifted them above Millwall into the final play-off place. Warnock said: “We’ve got to ­regroup and go again. We’ve got to win at Hull and beat Reading, we’d have settled for that on July 15 when we started pre-season. “It’s exciting isn’t it? It was ­always going to the wire. It’s disappointing for us, they were Sunday league goals for us to concede and the players are flat. “You’d think Derby had won the World Cup at the final whistle. I can’t blame the weather and I’m pleased they managed to get a full team out this time.” Warnock reacts as his team loses to Derby County Credit: GETTY IMAGES Relations between Warnock and Derby’s Gary Rowett have become frosty after the initial fixture was controversially postponed last month. Warnock, a master of conspiracy theories, branded the decision a “disgrace” and hinted darkly that Derby wanted the game called off due to a lengthy injury list. The stakes in this rearranged game were huge and Cardiff took the lead after the 28th minute through a spectacular volley from Callum Paterson. Derby were nervy in the first half, Pride Park an arena of anxiety, and there was no hint of what was to follow. Yet they were vastly ­improved in the second half, and it was Jerome – who scored 27 goals between 2004-2006 for Cardiff – who pinched the equaliser after the 68th minute. Cardiff failed to adequately clear a corner and Richard Keogh headed the ball back into the area, with ­Jerome holding off Morrison to slide the ball past Neil Etheridge. Vydra put the game beyond the visitors nine minutes from time with an emphatic finish, his 20th of the season, before Jerome added a third in added time. Rowett said: “There are no ­second chances for us and we had to lay it all out on the pitch. “The players have shown ­tremendous character and it’s now in our own hands again. We’ve got Aston Villa on Saturday and then Barnsley who will be fighting for their lives, which is why we all love this division.” Teams Derby County (3-6-1) Carson; Keogh, Davies, Forsyth; Wisdom, Huddlestone, Johnson, Lawrence (Hanson 88), Olsson (Vydra 60), Weimann (Pearce 88); Jerome. Subs Roos (g), Palmer, Nugent, Ledley. Cardiff City (4-4-2) Etheridge; Ecuele Manga, Morrison, Bamba, Bennett; Paterson, Gunnarsson, Ralls, Ward (Wildschut 74); Hoilett (Pilkington 74), Madine (Zohore 67). Subs Murphy (g), Peltier, Mendez-Laing, Grujic. Booked Paterson, Manga, Bennett, Ralls Referee Andrew Madley (West Yorkshire).
Promotion number eight will have to wait for Neil Warnock, after the immutable law of the ex. Warnock’s hopes of securing a Premier League return are still hanging in the balance after a ­dramatic Derby County turnaround ensured the scramble for automatic promotion is set for the final day. Cardiff City old boy Cameron ­Jerome scored twice, while a goal from substitute Matej Vydra breathed fresh life into Derby’s ­previously sagging play-off bid to increase Warnock’s frustration over the original postponement. Five weeks ago this game was called off due to overnight snow but it was Derby who put the skids on Cardiff with a defiant response. Cardiff could still secure a top-two finish this weekend if they beat Hull City and rivals Fulham suffer a defeat against Sunderland, but the chase now seems certain to be a nail-biting experience. Cardiff are a point above Fulham with two games left. This was only Derby’s third win in 14 games, but lifted them above Millwall into the final play-off place. Warnock said: “We’ve got to ­regroup and go again. We’ve got to win at Hull and beat Reading, we’d have settled for that on July 15 when we started pre-season. “It’s exciting isn’t it? It was ­always going to the wire. It’s disappointing for us, they were Sunday league goals for us to concede and the players are flat. “You’d think Derby had won the World Cup at the final whistle. I can’t blame the weather and I’m pleased they managed to get a full team out this time.” Warnock reacts as his team loses to Derby County Credit: GETTY IMAGES Relations between Warnock and Derby’s Gary Rowett have become frosty after the initial fixture was controversially postponed last month. Warnock, a master of conspiracy theories, branded the decision a “disgrace” and hinted darkly that Derby wanted the game called off due to a lengthy injury list. The stakes in this rearranged game were huge and Cardiff took the lead after the 28th minute through a spectacular volley from Callum Paterson. Derby were nervy in the first half, Pride Park an arena of anxiety, and there was no hint of what was to follow. Yet they were vastly ­improved in the second half, and it was Jerome – who scored 27 goals between 2004-2006 for Cardiff – who pinched the equaliser after the 68th minute. Cardiff failed to adequately clear a corner and Richard Keogh headed the ball back into the area, with ­Jerome holding off Morrison to slide the ball past Neil Etheridge. Vydra put the game beyond the visitors nine minutes from time with an emphatic finish, his 20th of the season, before Jerome added a third in added time. Rowett said: “There are no ­second chances for us and we had to lay it all out on the pitch. “The players have shown ­tremendous character and it’s now in our own hands again. We’ve got Aston Villa on Saturday and then Barnsley who will be fighting for their lives, which is why we all love this division.” Teams Derby County (3-6-1) Carson; Keogh, Davies, Forsyth; Wisdom, Huddlestone, Johnson, Lawrence (Hanson 88), Olsson (Vydra 60), Weimann (Pearce 88); Jerome. Subs Roos (g), Palmer, Nugent, Ledley. Cardiff City (4-4-2) Etheridge; Ecuele Manga, Morrison, Bamba, Bennett; Paterson, Gunnarsson, Ralls, Ward (Wildschut 74); Hoilett (Pilkington 74), Madine (Zohore 67). Subs Murphy (g), Peltier, Mendez-Laing, Grujic. Booked Paterson, Manga, Bennett, Ralls Referee Andrew Madley (West Yorkshire).
Neil Warnock's wait for promotion continues as Derby County fight back to beat Cardiff
Promotion number eight will have to wait for Neil Warnock, after the immutable law of the ex. Warnock’s hopes of securing a Premier League return are still hanging in the balance after a ­dramatic Derby County turnaround ensured the scramble for automatic promotion is set for the final day. Cardiff City old boy Cameron ­Jerome scored twice, while a goal from substitute Matej Vydra breathed fresh life into Derby’s ­previously sagging play-off bid to increase Warnock’s frustration over the original postponement. Five weeks ago this game was called off due to overnight snow but it was Derby who put the skids on Cardiff with a defiant response. Cardiff could still secure a top-two finish this weekend if they beat Hull City and rivals Fulham suffer a defeat against Sunderland, but the chase now seems certain to be a nail-biting experience. Cardiff are a point above Fulham with two games left. This was only Derby’s third win in 14 games, but lifted them above Millwall into the final play-off place. Warnock said: “We’ve got to ­regroup and go again. We’ve got to win at Hull and beat Reading, we’d have settled for that on July 15 when we started pre-season. “It’s exciting isn’t it? It was ­always going to the wire. It’s disappointing for us, they were Sunday league goals for us to concede and the players are flat. “You’d think Derby had won the World Cup at the final whistle. I can’t blame the weather and I’m pleased they managed to get a full team out this time.” Warnock reacts as his team loses to Derby County Credit: GETTY IMAGES Relations between Warnock and Derby’s Gary Rowett have become frosty after the initial fixture was controversially postponed last month. Warnock, a master of conspiracy theories, branded the decision a “disgrace” and hinted darkly that Derby wanted the game called off due to a lengthy injury list. The stakes in this rearranged game were huge and Cardiff took the lead after the 28th minute through a spectacular volley from Callum Paterson. Derby were nervy in the first half, Pride Park an arena of anxiety, and there was no hint of what was to follow. Yet they were vastly ­improved in the second half, and it was Jerome – who scored 27 goals between 2004-2006 for Cardiff – who pinched the equaliser after the 68th minute. Cardiff failed to adequately clear a corner and Richard Keogh headed the ball back into the area, with ­Jerome holding off Morrison to slide the ball past Neil Etheridge. Vydra put the game beyond the visitors nine minutes from time with an emphatic finish, his 20th of the season, before Jerome added a third in added time. Rowett said: “There are no ­second chances for us and we had to lay it all out on the pitch. “The players have shown ­tremendous character and it’s now in our own hands again. We’ve got Aston Villa on Saturday and then Barnsley who will be fighting for their lives, which is why we all love this division.” Teams Derby County (3-6-1) Carson; Keogh, Davies, Forsyth; Wisdom, Huddlestone, Johnson, Lawrence (Hanson 88), Olsson (Vydra 60), Weimann (Pearce 88); Jerome. Subs Roos (g), Palmer, Nugent, Ledley. Cardiff City (4-4-2) Etheridge; Ecuele Manga, Morrison, Bamba, Bennett; Paterson, Gunnarsson, Ralls, Ward (Wildschut 74); Hoilett (Pilkington 74), Madine (Zohore 67). Subs Murphy (g), Peltier, Mendez-Laing, Grujic. Booked Paterson, Manga, Bennett, Ralls Referee Andrew Madley (West Yorkshire).
Cameron Jerome scored twice as Derby County rallied from a half-time deficit to dent Cardiff City's automatic promotion hopes.
Championship Review: Cardiff slip up as Barnsley stay in the relegation zone
Cameron Jerome scored twice as Derby County rallied from a half-time deficit to dent Cardiff City's automatic promotion hopes.
Soccer Football - Championship - Leeds United v Barnsley - Elland Road, Leeds, Britain - April 21, 2018 Leeds United's Tom Pearce celebrates scoring their first goal with team mates Action Images/Craig Brough
Championship - Leeds United v Barnsley
Soccer Football - Championship - Leeds United v Barnsley - Elland Road, Leeds, Britain - April 21, 2018 Leeds United's Tom Pearce celebrates scoring their first goal with team mates Action Images/Craig Brough
From the most exciting upcoming openings to the latest news, trends and events, keep up to date with our regularly updated guide to all that is hot in the world of hotels. • This month's best new hotel openings Under the sea Four Seasons has launched a new submarine experience at its Landaa Giraavaru resort in the Maldives, allowing guests to explore coral reefs and get up close to the abundant fish, sharks and turtles without the need for a wetsuit. The three-seater submersible, with capacity for two guests plus pilot, has bubblelike cockpits for 360-degree views, and has been designed to have minimal impact on the fragile reef ecosystem. • Villas from £1,234; submersible flight £1,184 (00960 66 00 888; fourseasons.com/maldiveslg) The Four Seasons Resort at Landaa Giraavaru has launched a submarine for guests wishing to explore the ocean floor. Hot hotel The spotlight is back on BBC Television Centre in west London with the opening of White City House, the latest members’ club and hotel from Nick Jones and the Soho House group. It has taken over the top floors of “The Doughnut”, where you can now find a buzzing bar filled with media types, a rooftop pool, and 45 sharply designed bedrooms for when the party’s over. • Rooms £120 (whitecityhouse.com) Members' club and hotel, White City House, has opened in the former BBC headquarters at Television Centre in White City. Credit: SIMON BROWN Let’s do sprunch This week “sprunch” joins the lexicon of dire travel words, courtesy of the Chelsea Harbour Hotel in London. Quite obviously a hybrid of “spa” and “brunch”, it involves a 60-minute treatment for two, then a night in a suite followed by a meal at the Chelsea Riverside Brasserie. • From £515 (020 7823 3000; millenniumhotels.com/london/the-chelsea-harbour-hotel) Sprunch: noun. A portmanteau of the words 'spa' and 'brunch'. Coined by the Chelsea Harbour Hotel for its new pamper package. Credit: MATTHEW SHAW Birthday dinner The Peninsula New York turns 30 this year, and to celebrate the hotel has announced a new Keys to the Kitchen programme in partnership with some of NYC’s top restaurants, including DANIEL and Jean-Georges. Each experience, bookable through the hotel’s concierge, involves a meal at the restaurant of choice, then a tour of the kitchens, a meet-and-greet with the chef, or a sample of a dish. • Rooms £496 (001 212 903 3915; newyork.peninsula.com) Celebrating its 30th birthday, the Peninsula New York is offering its guests exclusive experiences at top NYC restaurants such as Jean-Georges. Open for business The far-flung Andaman Islands sit well below the radar of most travellers, but that could be about to change with the opening of Taj Exotica Resort & Spa, the archipelago’s first luxury hotel. Guests can stay in stilted villas built in local style and dine on dishes drawn from Tamil, Keralan and Bengali cuisines. Experiences on offer include kayaking and scuba diving. • Rooms from £274 (0091 22 666 51198; tajhotels.com) The villas at the newly open Taj Andaman Islands have been inspired by the stilted huts of the local Jawara tribe. Credit: © Chris Caldicott Beck at Brown’s Mayfair welcomes Heinz Beck, the multi-Michelin-starred chef, to his new restaurant at Brown’s Hotel. The Beck at Brown’s promises classic Italian dishes to be enjoyed in the casual dining room, redesigned in vivid style by Olga Polizzi, designer-in-chief for Rocco Forte Hotels. • Rooms from £480 (020 518 4004; roccofortehotels.com/browns-hotel) Credit: Photographer Paul Winch-Furness/Photographer Paul Winch-Furness Singapore style Singapore welcomes a seriously hot new hotel this month with the opening of Six Senses Duxton, an Anouska Hempel-designed five-star in the city’s Chinatown district. Drawing on the vibrant location, Hempel has infused the property with an opulent Far East vibe: think a sultry black-and-gold colour scheme offset by Chinese calligraphy wallpaper. • Rooms from £179 (0065 6914 1428; sixsenses.com/duxton) Six Senses' new hot property in Singapore has been devised by celebrated designer Anouska Hempel. All abuzz St Ermin’s Hotel in Westminster has announced dates for its 2018 beekeeping workshops, held in the hotel’s rooftop garden where six hives house more than 350,000 honeybees. Each two-and-a-half-hour session gives budding apiarists a hands-on experience with the honeycomb, followed by either a honey cocktail at the hotel’s Caxton Bar or afternoon tea in the Tea Lounge. Book now for the first workshop on April 21. • Workshop from £40pp. Rooms £180 (020 7222 7888; sterminshotel.co.uk) The beehives in St Ermin's rooftop garden hold over 350,000 Buckfast honeybees. Garden party This year marks 100 years since the birth of celebrated gardener Rosemary Verey, who fashioned the delightful grounds at Barnsley House in the Cotswolds. To mark the centenary, the hotel is hosting events throughout the year. There is an open day on April 10, followed by a village festival on May 19. • Open day entry £5pp. Rooms £224 B&B (01285 740000; barnsleyhouse.com) This year, Barnsley House is celebrating the centenary of Rosemary Verey, the woman who created the hotel's famous garden. Artistic Amsterdam To celebrate the Van Gogh & Japan exhibition, which comes to Amsterdam this spring, the Conservatorium Hotel, just round the corner from the Museumplein, has two new Van Gogh suites. Guests can choose which of the artist’s famous works (reproductions) adorn the walls, indulge in a Van Gogh-themed afternoon tea, and make the most of complimentary tickets to the exhibition. • Available until June 24. Package from £805 per night (0031 20570 0000; conservatoriumhotel.com) To celebrate the new Van Gogh & Japan exhibition in Amsterdam, the Conservatorium Hotel has launched two themed packages inspired by the artist. Got a hot hotel tip? Email: thehotelegraph@telegraph.co.uk
Pillow Talk: The hottest openings, news and experiences in the world of hotels
From the most exciting upcoming openings to the latest news, trends and events, keep up to date with our regularly updated guide to all that is hot in the world of hotels. • This month's best new hotel openings Under the sea Four Seasons has launched a new submarine experience at its Landaa Giraavaru resort in the Maldives, allowing guests to explore coral reefs and get up close to the abundant fish, sharks and turtles without the need for a wetsuit. The three-seater submersible, with capacity for two guests plus pilot, has bubblelike cockpits for 360-degree views, and has been designed to have minimal impact on the fragile reef ecosystem. • Villas from £1,234; submersible flight £1,184 (00960 66 00 888; fourseasons.com/maldiveslg) The Four Seasons Resort at Landaa Giraavaru has launched a submarine for guests wishing to explore the ocean floor. Hot hotel The spotlight is back on BBC Television Centre in west London with the opening of White City House, the latest members’ club and hotel from Nick Jones and the Soho House group. It has taken over the top floors of “The Doughnut”, where you can now find a buzzing bar filled with media types, a rooftop pool, and 45 sharply designed bedrooms for when the party’s over. • Rooms £120 (whitecityhouse.com) Members' club and hotel, White City House, has opened in the former BBC headquarters at Television Centre in White City. Credit: SIMON BROWN Let’s do sprunch This week “sprunch” joins the lexicon of dire travel words, courtesy of the Chelsea Harbour Hotel in London. Quite obviously a hybrid of “spa” and “brunch”, it involves a 60-minute treatment for two, then a night in a suite followed by a meal at the Chelsea Riverside Brasserie. • From £515 (020 7823 3000; millenniumhotels.com/london/the-chelsea-harbour-hotel) Sprunch: noun. A portmanteau of the words 'spa' and 'brunch'. Coined by the Chelsea Harbour Hotel for its new pamper package. Credit: MATTHEW SHAW Birthday dinner The Peninsula New York turns 30 this year, and to celebrate the hotel has announced a new Keys to the Kitchen programme in partnership with some of NYC’s top restaurants, including DANIEL and Jean-Georges. Each experience, bookable through the hotel’s concierge, involves a meal at the restaurant of choice, then a tour of the kitchens, a meet-and-greet with the chef, or a sample of a dish. • Rooms £496 (001 212 903 3915; newyork.peninsula.com) Celebrating its 30th birthday, the Peninsula New York is offering its guests exclusive experiences at top NYC restaurants such as Jean-Georges. Open for business The far-flung Andaman Islands sit well below the radar of most travellers, but that could be about to change with the opening of Taj Exotica Resort & Spa, the archipelago’s first luxury hotel. Guests can stay in stilted villas built in local style and dine on dishes drawn from Tamil, Keralan and Bengali cuisines. Experiences on offer include kayaking and scuba diving. • Rooms from £274 (0091 22 666 51198; tajhotels.com) The villas at the newly open Taj Andaman Islands have been inspired by the stilted huts of the local Jawara tribe. Credit: © Chris Caldicott Beck at Brown’s Mayfair welcomes Heinz Beck, the multi-Michelin-starred chef, to his new restaurant at Brown’s Hotel. The Beck at Brown’s promises classic Italian dishes to be enjoyed in the casual dining room, redesigned in vivid style by Olga Polizzi, designer-in-chief for Rocco Forte Hotels. • Rooms from £480 (020 518 4004; roccofortehotels.com/browns-hotel) Credit: Photographer Paul Winch-Furness/Photographer Paul Winch-Furness Singapore style Singapore welcomes a seriously hot new hotel this month with the opening of Six Senses Duxton, an Anouska Hempel-designed five-star in the city’s Chinatown district. Drawing on the vibrant location, Hempel has infused the property with an opulent Far East vibe: think a sultry black-and-gold colour scheme offset by Chinese calligraphy wallpaper. • Rooms from £179 (0065 6914 1428; sixsenses.com/duxton) Six Senses' new hot property in Singapore has been devised by celebrated designer Anouska Hempel. All abuzz St Ermin’s Hotel in Westminster has announced dates for its 2018 beekeeping workshops, held in the hotel’s rooftop garden where six hives house more than 350,000 honeybees. Each two-and-a-half-hour session gives budding apiarists a hands-on experience with the honeycomb, followed by either a honey cocktail at the hotel’s Caxton Bar or afternoon tea in the Tea Lounge. Book now for the first workshop on April 21. • Workshop from £40pp. Rooms £180 (020 7222 7888; sterminshotel.co.uk) The beehives in St Ermin's rooftop garden hold over 350,000 Buckfast honeybees. Garden party This year marks 100 years since the birth of celebrated gardener Rosemary Verey, who fashioned the delightful grounds at Barnsley House in the Cotswolds. To mark the centenary, the hotel is hosting events throughout the year. There is an open day on April 10, followed by a village festival on May 19. • Open day entry £5pp. Rooms £224 B&B (01285 740000; barnsleyhouse.com) This year, Barnsley House is celebrating the centenary of Rosemary Verey, the woman who created the hotel's famous garden. Artistic Amsterdam To celebrate the Van Gogh & Japan exhibition, which comes to Amsterdam this spring, the Conservatorium Hotel, just round the corner from the Museumplein, has two new Van Gogh suites. Guests can choose which of the artist’s famous works (reproductions) adorn the walls, indulge in a Van Gogh-themed afternoon tea, and make the most of complimentary tickets to the exhibition. • Available until June 24. Package from £805 per night (0031 20570 0000; conservatoriumhotel.com) To celebrate the new Van Gogh & Japan exhibition in Amsterdam, the Conservatorium Hotel has launched two themed packages inspired by the artist. Got a hot hotel tip? Email: thehotelegraph@telegraph.co.uk
From the most exciting upcoming openings to the latest news, trends and events, keep up to date with our regularly updated guide to all that is hot in the world of hotels. • This month's best new hotel openings Under the sea Four Seasons has launched a new submarine experience at its Landaa Giraavaru resort in the Maldives, allowing guests to explore coral reefs and get up close to the abundant fish, sharks and turtles without the need for a wetsuit. The three-seater submersible, with capacity for two guests plus pilot, has bubblelike cockpits for 360-degree views, and has been designed to have minimal impact on the fragile reef ecosystem. • Villas from £1,234; submersible flight £1,184 (00960 66 00 888; fourseasons.com/maldiveslg) The Four Seasons Resort at Landaa Giraavaru has launched a submarine for guests wishing to explore the ocean floor. Hot hotel The spotlight is back on BBC Television Centre in west London with the opening of White City House, the latest members’ club and hotel from Nick Jones and the Soho House group. It has taken over the top floors of “The Doughnut”, where you can now find a buzzing bar filled with media types, a rooftop pool, and 45 sharply designed bedrooms for when the party’s over. • Rooms £120 (whitecityhouse.com) Members' club and hotel, White City House, has opened in the former BBC headquarters at Television Centre in White City. Credit: SIMON BROWN Let’s do sprunch This week “sprunch” joins the lexicon of dire travel words, courtesy of the Chelsea Harbour Hotel in London. Quite obviously a hybrid of “spa” and “brunch”, it involves a 60-minute treatment for two, then a night in a suite followed by a meal at the Chelsea Riverside Brasserie. • From £515 (020 7823 3000; millenniumhotels.com/london/the-chelsea-harbour-hotel) Sprunch: noun. A portmanteau of the words 'spa' and 'brunch'. Coined by the Chelsea Harbour Hotel for its new pamper package. Credit: MATTHEW SHAW Birthday dinner The Peninsula New York turns 30 this year, and to celebrate the hotel has announced a new Keys to the Kitchen programme in partnership with some of NYC’s top restaurants, including DANIEL and Jean-Georges. Each experience, bookable through the hotel’s concierge, involves a meal at the restaurant of choice, then a tour of the kitchens, a meet-and-greet with the chef, or a sample of a dish. • Rooms £496 (001 212 903 3915; newyork.peninsula.com) Celebrating its 30th birthday, the Peninsula New York is offering its guests exclusive experiences at top NYC restaurants such as Jean-Georges. Open for business The far-flung Andaman Islands sit well below the radar of most travellers, but that could be about to change with the opening of Taj Exotica Resort & Spa, the archipelago’s first luxury hotel. Guests can stay in stilted villas built in local style and dine on dishes drawn from Tamil, Keralan and Bengali cuisines. Experiences on offer include kayaking and scuba diving. • Rooms from £274 (0091 22 666 51198; tajhotels.com) The villas at the newly open Taj Andaman Islands have been inspired by the stilted huts of the local Jawara tribe. Credit: © Chris Caldicott Beck at Brown’s Mayfair welcomes Heinz Beck, the multi-Michelin-starred chef, to his new restaurant at Brown’s Hotel. The Beck at Brown’s promises classic Italian dishes to be enjoyed in the casual dining room, redesigned in vivid style by Olga Polizzi, designer-in-chief for Rocco Forte Hotels. • Rooms from £480 (020 518 4004; roccofortehotels.com/browns-hotel) Credit: Photographer Paul Winch-Furness/Photographer Paul Winch-Furness Singapore style Singapore welcomes a seriously hot new hotel this month with the opening of Six Senses Duxton, an Anouska Hempel-designed five-star in the city’s Chinatown district. Drawing on the vibrant location, Hempel has infused the property with an opulent Far East vibe: think a sultry black-and-gold colour scheme offset by Chinese calligraphy wallpaper. • Rooms from £179 (0065 6914 1428; sixsenses.com/duxton) Six Senses' new hot property in Singapore has been devised by celebrated designer Anouska Hempel. All abuzz St Ermin’s Hotel in Westminster has announced dates for its 2018 beekeeping workshops, held in the hotel’s rooftop garden where six hives house more than 350,000 honeybees. Each two-and-a-half-hour session gives budding apiarists a hands-on experience with the honeycomb, followed by either a honey cocktail at the hotel’s Caxton Bar or afternoon tea in the Tea Lounge. Book now for the first workshop on April 21. • Workshop from £40pp. Rooms £180 (020 7222 7888; sterminshotel.co.uk) The beehives in St Ermin's rooftop garden hold over 350,000 Buckfast honeybees. Garden party This year marks 100 years since the birth of celebrated gardener Rosemary Verey, who fashioned the delightful grounds at Barnsley House in the Cotswolds. To mark the centenary, the hotel is hosting events throughout the year. There is an open day on April 10, followed by a village festival on May 19. • Open day entry £5pp. Rooms £224 B&B (01285 740000; barnsleyhouse.com) This year, Barnsley House is celebrating the centenary of Rosemary Verey, the woman who created the hotel's famous garden. Artistic Amsterdam To celebrate the Van Gogh & Japan exhibition, which comes to Amsterdam this spring, the Conservatorium Hotel, just round the corner from the Museumplein, has two new Van Gogh suites. Guests can choose which of the artist’s famous works (reproductions) adorn the walls, indulge in a Van Gogh-themed afternoon tea, and make the most of complimentary tickets to the exhibition. • Available until June 24. Package from £805 per night (0031 20570 0000; conservatoriumhotel.com) To celebrate the new Van Gogh & Japan exhibition in Amsterdam, the Conservatorium Hotel has launched two themed packages inspired by the artist. Got a hot hotel tip? Email: thehotelegraph@telegraph.co.uk
Pillow Talk: The hottest openings, news and experiences in the world of hotels
From the most exciting upcoming openings to the latest news, trends and events, keep up to date with our regularly updated guide to all that is hot in the world of hotels. • This month's best new hotel openings Under the sea Four Seasons has launched a new submarine experience at its Landaa Giraavaru resort in the Maldives, allowing guests to explore coral reefs and get up close to the abundant fish, sharks and turtles without the need for a wetsuit. The three-seater submersible, with capacity for two guests plus pilot, has bubblelike cockpits for 360-degree views, and has been designed to have minimal impact on the fragile reef ecosystem. • Villas from £1,234; submersible flight £1,184 (00960 66 00 888; fourseasons.com/maldiveslg) The Four Seasons Resort at Landaa Giraavaru has launched a submarine for guests wishing to explore the ocean floor. Hot hotel The spotlight is back on BBC Television Centre in west London with the opening of White City House, the latest members’ club and hotel from Nick Jones and the Soho House group. It has taken over the top floors of “The Doughnut”, where you can now find a buzzing bar filled with media types, a rooftop pool, and 45 sharply designed bedrooms for when the party’s over. • Rooms £120 (whitecityhouse.com) Members' club and hotel, White City House, has opened in the former BBC headquarters at Television Centre in White City. Credit: SIMON BROWN Let’s do sprunch This week “sprunch” joins the lexicon of dire travel words, courtesy of the Chelsea Harbour Hotel in London. Quite obviously a hybrid of “spa” and “brunch”, it involves a 60-minute treatment for two, then a night in a suite followed by a meal at the Chelsea Riverside Brasserie. • From £515 (020 7823 3000; millenniumhotels.com/london/the-chelsea-harbour-hotel) Sprunch: noun. A portmanteau of the words 'spa' and 'brunch'. Coined by the Chelsea Harbour Hotel for its new pamper package. Credit: MATTHEW SHAW Birthday dinner The Peninsula New York turns 30 this year, and to celebrate the hotel has announced a new Keys to the Kitchen programme in partnership with some of NYC’s top restaurants, including DANIEL and Jean-Georges. Each experience, bookable through the hotel’s concierge, involves a meal at the restaurant of choice, then a tour of the kitchens, a meet-and-greet with the chef, or a sample of a dish. • Rooms £496 (001 212 903 3915; newyork.peninsula.com) Celebrating its 30th birthday, the Peninsula New York is offering its guests exclusive experiences at top NYC restaurants such as Jean-Georges. Open for business The far-flung Andaman Islands sit well below the radar of most travellers, but that could be about to change with the opening of Taj Exotica Resort & Spa, the archipelago’s first luxury hotel. Guests can stay in stilted villas built in local style and dine on dishes drawn from Tamil, Keralan and Bengali cuisines. Experiences on offer include kayaking and scuba diving. • Rooms from £274 (0091 22 666 51198; tajhotels.com) The villas at the newly open Taj Andaman Islands have been inspired by the stilted huts of the local Jawara tribe. Credit: © Chris Caldicott Beck at Brown’s Mayfair welcomes Heinz Beck, the multi-Michelin-starred chef, to his new restaurant at Brown’s Hotel. The Beck at Brown’s promises classic Italian dishes to be enjoyed in the casual dining room, redesigned in vivid style by Olga Polizzi, designer-in-chief for Rocco Forte Hotels. • Rooms from £480 (020 518 4004; roccofortehotels.com/browns-hotel) Credit: Photographer Paul Winch-Furness/Photographer Paul Winch-Furness Singapore style Singapore welcomes a seriously hot new hotel this month with the opening of Six Senses Duxton, an Anouska Hempel-designed five-star in the city’s Chinatown district. Drawing on the vibrant location, Hempel has infused the property with an opulent Far East vibe: think a sultry black-and-gold colour scheme offset by Chinese calligraphy wallpaper. • Rooms from £179 (0065 6914 1428; sixsenses.com/duxton) Six Senses' new hot property in Singapore has been devised by celebrated designer Anouska Hempel. All abuzz St Ermin’s Hotel in Westminster has announced dates for its 2018 beekeeping workshops, held in the hotel’s rooftop garden where six hives house more than 350,000 honeybees. Each two-and-a-half-hour session gives budding apiarists a hands-on experience with the honeycomb, followed by either a honey cocktail at the hotel’s Caxton Bar or afternoon tea in the Tea Lounge. Book now for the first workshop on April 21. • Workshop from £40pp. Rooms £180 (020 7222 7888; sterminshotel.co.uk) The beehives in St Ermin's rooftop garden hold over 350,000 Buckfast honeybees. Garden party This year marks 100 years since the birth of celebrated gardener Rosemary Verey, who fashioned the delightful grounds at Barnsley House in the Cotswolds. To mark the centenary, the hotel is hosting events throughout the year. There is an open day on April 10, followed by a village festival on May 19. • Open day entry £5pp. Rooms £224 B&B (01285 740000; barnsleyhouse.com) This year, Barnsley House is celebrating the centenary of Rosemary Verey, the woman who created the hotel's famous garden. Artistic Amsterdam To celebrate the Van Gogh & Japan exhibition, which comes to Amsterdam this spring, the Conservatorium Hotel, just round the corner from the Museumplein, has two new Van Gogh suites. Guests can choose which of the artist’s famous works (reproductions) adorn the walls, indulge in a Van Gogh-themed afternoon tea, and make the most of complimentary tickets to the exhibition. • Available until June 24. Package from £805 per night (0031 20570 0000; conservatoriumhotel.com) To celebrate the new Van Gogh & Japan exhibition in Amsterdam, the Conservatorium Hotel has launched two themed packages inspired by the artist. Got a hot hotel tip? Email: thehotelegraph@telegraph.co.uk
From the most exciting upcoming openings to the latest news, trends and events, keep up to date with our regularly updated guide to all that is hot in the world of hotels. • This month's best new hotel openings Under the sea Four Seasons has launched a new submarine experience at its Landaa Giraavaru resort in the Maldives, allowing guests to explore coral reefs and get up close to the abundant fish, sharks and turtles without the need for a wetsuit. The three-seater submersible, with capacity for two guests plus pilot, has bubblelike cockpits for 360-degree views, and has been designed to have minimal impact on the fragile reef ecosystem. • Villas from £1,234; submersible flight £1,184 (00960 66 00 888; fourseasons.com/maldiveslg) The Four Seasons Resort at Landaa Giraavaru has launched a submarine for guests wishing to explore the ocean floor. Hot hotel The spotlight is back on BBC Television Centre in west London with the opening of White City House, the latest members’ club and hotel from Nick Jones and the Soho House group. It has taken over the top floors of “The Doughnut”, where you can now find a buzzing bar filled with media types, a rooftop pool, and 45 sharply designed bedrooms for when the party’s over. • Rooms £120 (whitecityhouse.com) Members' club and hotel, White City House, has opened in the former BBC headquarters at Television Centre in White City. Credit: SIMON BROWN Let’s do sprunch This week “sprunch” joins the lexicon of dire travel words, courtesy of the Chelsea Harbour Hotel in London. Quite obviously a hybrid of “spa” and “brunch”, it involves a 60-minute treatment for two, then a night in a suite followed by a meal at the Chelsea Riverside Brasserie. • From £515 (020 7823 3000; millenniumhotels.com/london/the-chelsea-harbour-hotel) Sprunch: noun. A portmanteau of the words 'spa' and 'brunch'. Coined by the Chelsea Harbour Hotel for its new pamper package. Credit: MATTHEW SHAW Birthday dinner The Peninsula New York turns 30 this year, and to celebrate the hotel has announced a new Keys to the Kitchen programme in partnership with some of NYC’s top restaurants, including DANIEL and Jean-Georges. Each experience, bookable through the hotel’s concierge, involves a meal at the restaurant of choice, then a tour of the kitchens, a meet-and-greet with the chef, or a sample of a dish. • Rooms £496 (001 212 903 3915; newyork.peninsula.com) Celebrating its 30th birthday, the Peninsula New York is offering its guests exclusive experiences at top NYC restaurants such as Jean-Georges. Open for business The far-flung Andaman Islands sit well below the radar of most travellers, but that could be about to change with the opening of Taj Exotica Resort & Spa, the archipelago’s first luxury hotel. Guests can stay in stilted villas built in local style and dine on dishes drawn from Tamil, Keralan and Bengali cuisines. Experiences on offer include kayaking and scuba diving. • Rooms from £274 (0091 22 666 51198; tajhotels.com) The villas at the newly open Taj Andaman Islands have been inspired by the stilted huts of the local Jawara tribe. Credit: © Chris Caldicott Beck at Brown’s Mayfair welcomes Heinz Beck, the multi-Michelin-starred chef, to his new restaurant at Brown’s Hotel. The Beck at Brown’s promises classic Italian dishes to be enjoyed in the casual dining room, redesigned in vivid style by Olga Polizzi, designer-in-chief for Rocco Forte Hotels. • Rooms from £480 (020 518 4004; roccofortehotels.com/browns-hotel) Credit: Photographer Paul Winch-Furness/Photographer Paul Winch-Furness Singapore style Singapore welcomes a seriously hot new hotel this month with the opening of Six Senses Duxton, an Anouska Hempel-designed five-star in the city’s Chinatown district. Drawing on the vibrant location, Hempel has infused the property with an opulent Far East vibe: think a sultry black-and-gold colour scheme offset by Chinese calligraphy wallpaper. • Rooms from £179 (0065 6914 1428; sixsenses.com/duxton) Six Senses' new hot property in Singapore has been devised by celebrated designer Anouska Hempel. All abuzz St Ermin’s Hotel in Westminster has announced dates for its 2018 beekeeping workshops, held in the hotel’s rooftop garden where six hives house more than 350,000 honeybees. Each two-and-a-half-hour session gives budding apiarists a hands-on experience with the honeycomb, followed by either a honey cocktail at the hotel’s Caxton Bar or afternoon tea in the Tea Lounge. Book now for the first workshop on April 21. • Workshop from £40pp. Rooms £180 (020 7222 7888; sterminshotel.co.uk) The beehives in St Ermin's rooftop garden hold over 350,000 Buckfast honeybees. Garden party This year marks 100 years since the birth of celebrated gardener Rosemary Verey, who fashioned the delightful grounds at Barnsley House in the Cotswolds. To mark the centenary, the hotel is hosting events throughout the year. There is an open day on April 10, followed by a village festival on May 19. • Open day entry £5pp. Rooms £224 B&B (01285 740000; barnsleyhouse.com) This year, Barnsley House is celebrating the centenary of Rosemary Verey, the woman who created the hotel's famous garden. Artistic Amsterdam To celebrate the Van Gogh & Japan exhibition, which comes to Amsterdam this spring, the Conservatorium Hotel, just round the corner from the Museumplein, has two new Van Gogh suites. Guests can choose which of the artist’s famous works (reproductions) adorn the walls, indulge in a Van Gogh-themed afternoon tea, and make the most of complimentary tickets to the exhibition. • Available until June 24. Package from £805 per night (0031 20570 0000; conservatoriumhotel.com) To celebrate the new Van Gogh & Japan exhibition in Amsterdam, the Conservatorium Hotel has launched two themed packages inspired by the artist. Got a hot hotel tip? Email: thehotelegraph@telegraph.co.uk
Pillow Talk: The hottest openings, news and experiences in the world of hotels
From the most exciting upcoming openings to the latest news, trends and events, keep up to date with our regularly updated guide to all that is hot in the world of hotels. • This month's best new hotel openings Under the sea Four Seasons has launched a new submarine experience at its Landaa Giraavaru resort in the Maldives, allowing guests to explore coral reefs and get up close to the abundant fish, sharks and turtles without the need for a wetsuit. The three-seater submersible, with capacity for two guests plus pilot, has bubblelike cockpits for 360-degree views, and has been designed to have minimal impact on the fragile reef ecosystem. • Villas from £1,234; submersible flight £1,184 (00960 66 00 888; fourseasons.com/maldiveslg) The Four Seasons Resort at Landaa Giraavaru has launched a submarine for guests wishing to explore the ocean floor. Hot hotel The spotlight is back on BBC Television Centre in west London with the opening of White City House, the latest members’ club and hotel from Nick Jones and the Soho House group. It has taken over the top floors of “The Doughnut”, where you can now find a buzzing bar filled with media types, a rooftop pool, and 45 sharply designed bedrooms for when the party’s over. • Rooms £120 (whitecityhouse.com) Members' club and hotel, White City House, has opened in the former BBC headquarters at Television Centre in White City. Credit: SIMON BROWN Let’s do sprunch This week “sprunch” joins the lexicon of dire travel words, courtesy of the Chelsea Harbour Hotel in London. Quite obviously a hybrid of “spa” and “brunch”, it involves a 60-minute treatment for two, then a night in a suite followed by a meal at the Chelsea Riverside Brasserie. • From £515 (020 7823 3000; millenniumhotels.com/london/the-chelsea-harbour-hotel) Sprunch: noun. A portmanteau of the words 'spa' and 'brunch'. Coined by the Chelsea Harbour Hotel for its new pamper package. Credit: MATTHEW SHAW Birthday dinner The Peninsula New York turns 30 this year, and to celebrate the hotel has announced a new Keys to the Kitchen programme in partnership with some of NYC’s top restaurants, including DANIEL and Jean-Georges. Each experience, bookable through the hotel’s concierge, involves a meal at the restaurant of choice, then a tour of the kitchens, a meet-and-greet with the chef, or a sample of a dish. • Rooms £496 (001 212 903 3915; newyork.peninsula.com) Celebrating its 30th birthday, the Peninsula New York is offering its guests exclusive experiences at top NYC restaurants such as Jean-Georges. Open for business The far-flung Andaman Islands sit well below the radar of most travellers, but that could be about to change with the opening of Taj Exotica Resort & Spa, the archipelago’s first luxury hotel. Guests can stay in stilted villas built in local style and dine on dishes drawn from Tamil, Keralan and Bengali cuisines. Experiences on offer include kayaking and scuba diving. • Rooms from £274 (0091 22 666 51198; tajhotels.com) The villas at the newly open Taj Andaman Islands have been inspired by the stilted huts of the local Jawara tribe. Credit: © Chris Caldicott Beck at Brown’s Mayfair welcomes Heinz Beck, the multi-Michelin-starred chef, to his new restaurant at Brown’s Hotel. The Beck at Brown’s promises classic Italian dishes to be enjoyed in the casual dining room, redesigned in vivid style by Olga Polizzi, designer-in-chief for Rocco Forte Hotels. • Rooms from £480 (020 518 4004; roccofortehotels.com/browns-hotel) Credit: Photographer Paul Winch-Furness/Photographer Paul Winch-Furness Singapore style Singapore welcomes a seriously hot new hotel this month with the opening of Six Senses Duxton, an Anouska Hempel-designed five-star in the city’s Chinatown district. Drawing on the vibrant location, Hempel has infused the property with an opulent Far East vibe: think a sultry black-and-gold colour scheme offset by Chinese calligraphy wallpaper. • Rooms from £179 (0065 6914 1428; sixsenses.com/duxton) Six Senses' new hot property in Singapore has been devised by celebrated designer Anouska Hempel. All abuzz St Ermin’s Hotel in Westminster has announced dates for its 2018 beekeeping workshops, held in the hotel’s rooftop garden where six hives house more than 350,000 honeybees. Each two-and-a-half-hour session gives budding apiarists a hands-on experience with the honeycomb, followed by either a honey cocktail at the hotel’s Caxton Bar or afternoon tea in the Tea Lounge. Book now for the first workshop on April 21. • Workshop from £40pp. Rooms £180 (020 7222 7888; sterminshotel.co.uk) The beehives in St Ermin's rooftop garden hold over 350,000 Buckfast honeybees. Garden party This year marks 100 years since the birth of celebrated gardener Rosemary Verey, who fashioned the delightful grounds at Barnsley House in the Cotswolds. To mark the centenary, the hotel is hosting events throughout the year. There is an open day on April 10, followed by a village festival on May 19. • Open day entry £5pp. Rooms £224 B&B (01285 740000; barnsleyhouse.com) This year, Barnsley House is celebrating the centenary of Rosemary Verey, the woman who created the hotel's famous garden. Artistic Amsterdam To celebrate the Van Gogh & Japan exhibition, which comes to Amsterdam this spring, the Conservatorium Hotel, just round the corner from the Museumplein, has two new Van Gogh suites. Guests can choose which of the artist’s famous works (reproductions) adorn the walls, indulge in a Van Gogh-themed afternoon tea, and make the most of complimentary tickets to the exhibition. • Available until June 24. Package from £805 per night (0031 20570 0000; conservatoriumhotel.com) To celebrate the new Van Gogh & Japan exhibition in Amsterdam, the Conservatorium Hotel has launched two themed packages inspired by the artist. Got a hot hotel tip? Email: thehotelegraph@telegraph.co.uk
From the most exciting upcoming openings to the latest news, trends and events, keep up to date with our regularly updated guide to all that is hot in the world of hotels. • This month's best new hotel openings Under the sea Four Seasons has launched a new submarine experience at its Landaa Giraavaru resort in the Maldives, allowing guests to explore coral reefs and get up close to the abundant fish, sharks and turtles without the need for a wetsuit. The three-seater submersible, with capacity for two guests plus pilot, has bubblelike cockpits for 360-degree views, and has been designed to have minimal impact on the fragile reef ecosystem. • Villas from £1,234; submersible flight £1,184 (00960 66 00 888; fourseasons.com/maldiveslg) The Four Seasons Resort at Landaa Giraavaru has launched a submarine for guests wishing to explore the ocean floor. Hot hotel The spotlight is back on BBC Television Centre in west London with the opening of White City House, the latest members’ club and hotel from Nick Jones and the Soho House group. It has taken over the top floors of “The Doughnut”, where you can now find a buzzing bar filled with media types, a rooftop pool, and 45 sharply designed bedrooms for when the party’s over. • Rooms £120 (whitecityhouse.com) Members' club and hotel, White City House, has opened in the former BBC headquarters at Television Centre in White City. Credit: SIMON BROWN Let’s do sprunch This week “sprunch” joins the lexicon of dire travel words, courtesy of the Chelsea Harbour Hotel in London. Quite obviously a hybrid of “spa” and “brunch”, it involves a 60-minute treatment for two, then a night in a suite followed by a meal at the Chelsea Riverside Brasserie. • From £515 (020 7823 3000; millenniumhotels.com/london/the-chelsea-harbour-hotel) Sprunch: noun. A portmanteau of the words 'spa' and 'brunch'. Coined by the Chelsea Harbour Hotel for its new pamper package. Credit: MATTHEW SHAW Birthday dinner The Peninsula New York turns 30 this year, and to celebrate the hotel has announced a new Keys to the Kitchen programme in partnership with some of NYC’s top restaurants, including DANIEL and Jean-Georges. Each experience, bookable through the hotel’s concierge, involves a meal at the restaurant of choice, then a tour of the kitchens, a meet-and-greet with the chef, or a sample of a dish. • Rooms £496 (001 212 903 3915; newyork.peninsula.com) Celebrating its 30th birthday, the Peninsula New York is offering its guests exclusive experiences at top NYC restaurants such as Jean-Georges. Open for business The far-flung Andaman Islands sit well below the radar of most travellers, but that could be about to change with the opening of Taj Exotica Resort & Spa, the archipelago’s first luxury hotel. Guests can stay in stilted villas built in local style and dine on dishes drawn from Tamil, Keralan and Bengali cuisines. Experiences on offer include kayaking and scuba diving. • Rooms from £274 (0091 22 666 51198; tajhotels.com) The villas at the newly open Taj Andaman Islands have been inspired by the stilted huts of the local Jawara tribe. Credit: © Chris Caldicott Beck at Brown’s Mayfair welcomes Heinz Beck, the multi-Michelin-starred chef, to his new restaurant at Brown’s Hotel. The Beck at Brown’s promises classic Italian dishes to be enjoyed in the casual dining room, redesigned in vivid style by Olga Polizzi, designer-in-chief for Rocco Forte Hotels. • Rooms from £480 (020 518 4004; roccofortehotels.com/browns-hotel) Credit: Photographer Paul Winch-Furness/Photographer Paul Winch-Furness Singapore style Singapore welcomes a seriously hot new hotel this month with the opening of Six Senses Duxton, an Anouska Hempel-designed five-star in the city’s Chinatown district. Drawing on the vibrant location, Hempel has infused the property with an opulent Far East vibe: think a sultry black-and-gold colour scheme offset by Chinese calligraphy wallpaper. • Rooms from £179 (0065 6914 1428; sixsenses.com/duxton) Six Senses' new hot property in Singapore has been devised by celebrated designer Anouska Hempel. All abuzz St Ermin’s Hotel in Westminster has announced dates for its 2018 beekeeping workshops, held in the hotel’s rooftop garden where six hives house more than 350,000 honeybees. Each two-and-a-half-hour session gives budding apiarists a hands-on experience with the honeycomb, followed by either a honey cocktail at the hotel’s Caxton Bar or afternoon tea in the Tea Lounge. Book now for the first workshop on April 21. • Workshop from £40pp. Rooms £180 (020 7222 7888; sterminshotel.co.uk) The beehives in St Ermin's rooftop garden hold over 350,000 Buckfast honeybees. Garden party This year marks 100 years since the birth of celebrated gardener Rosemary Verey, who fashioned the delightful grounds at Barnsley House in the Cotswolds. To mark the centenary, the hotel is hosting events throughout the year. There is an open day on April 10, followed by a village festival on May 19. • Open day entry £5pp. Rooms £224 B&B (01285 740000; barnsleyhouse.com) This year, Barnsley House is celebrating the centenary of Rosemary Verey, the woman who created the hotel's famous garden. Artistic Amsterdam To celebrate the Van Gogh & Japan exhibition, which comes to Amsterdam this spring, the Conservatorium Hotel, just round the corner from the Museumplein, has two new Van Gogh suites. Guests can choose which of the artist’s famous works (reproductions) adorn the walls, indulge in a Van Gogh-themed afternoon tea, and make the most of complimentary tickets to the exhibition. • Available until June 24. Package from £805 per night (0031 20570 0000; conservatoriumhotel.com) To celebrate the new Van Gogh & Japan exhibition in Amsterdam, the Conservatorium Hotel has launched two themed packages inspired by the artist. Got a hot hotel tip? Email: thehotelegraph@telegraph.co.uk
Pillow Talk: The hottest openings, news and experiences in the world of hotels
From the most exciting upcoming openings to the latest news, trends and events, keep up to date with our regularly updated guide to all that is hot in the world of hotels. • This month's best new hotel openings Under the sea Four Seasons has launched a new submarine experience at its Landaa Giraavaru resort in the Maldives, allowing guests to explore coral reefs and get up close to the abundant fish, sharks and turtles without the need for a wetsuit. The three-seater submersible, with capacity for two guests plus pilot, has bubblelike cockpits for 360-degree views, and has been designed to have minimal impact on the fragile reef ecosystem. • Villas from £1,234; submersible flight £1,184 (00960 66 00 888; fourseasons.com/maldiveslg) The Four Seasons Resort at Landaa Giraavaru has launched a submarine for guests wishing to explore the ocean floor. Hot hotel The spotlight is back on BBC Television Centre in west London with the opening of White City House, the latest members’ club and hotel from Nick Jones and the Soho House group. It has taken over the top floors of “The Doughnut”, where you can now find a buzzing bar filled with media types, a rooftop pool, and 45 sharply designed bedrooms for when the party’s over. • Rooms £120 (whitecityhouse.com) Members' club and hotel, White City House, has opened in the former BBC headquarters at Television Centre in White City. Credit: SIMON BROWN Let’s do sprunch This week “sprunch” joins the lexicon of dire travel words, courtesy of the Chelsea Harbour Hotel in London. Quite obviously a hybrid of “spa” and “brunch”, it involves a 60-minute treatment for two, then a night in a suite followed by a meal at the Chelsea Riverside Brasserie. • From £515 (020 7823 3000; millenniumhotels.com/london/the-chelsea-harbour-hotel) Sprunch: noun. A portmanteau of the words 'spa' and 'brunch'. Coined by the Chelsea Harbour Hotel for its new pamper package. Credit: MATTHEW SHAW Birthday dinner The Peninsula New York turns 30 this year, and to celebrate the hotel has announced a new Keys to the Kitchen programme in partnership with some of NYC’s top restaurants, including DANIEL and Jean-Georges. Each experience, bookable through the hotel’s concierge, involves a meal at the restaurant of choice, then a tour of the kitchens, a meet-and-greet with the chef, or a sample of a dish. • Rooms £496 (001 212 903 3915; newyork.peninsula.com) Celebrating its 30th birthday, the Peninsula New York is offering its guests exclusive experiences at top NYC restaurants such as Jean-Georges. Open for business The far-flung Andaman Islands sit well below the radar of most travellers, but that could be about to change with the opening of Taj Exotica Resort & Spa, the archipelago’s first luxury hotel. Guests can stay in stilted villas built in local style and dine on dishes drawn from Tamil, Keralan and Bengali cuisines. Experiences on offer include kayaking and scuba diving. • Rooms from £274 (0091 22 666 51198; tajhotels.com) The villas at the newly open Taj Andaman Islands have been inspired by the stilted huts of the local Jawara tribe. Credit: © Chris Caldicott Beck at Brown’s Mayfair welcomes Heinz Beck, the multi-Michelin-starred chef, to his new restaurant at Brown’s Hotel. The Beck at Brown’s promises classic Italian dishes to be enjoyed in the casual dining room, redesigned in vivid style by Olga Polizzi, designer-in-chief for Rocco Forte Hotels. • Rooms from £480 (020 518 4004; roccofortehotels.com/browns-hotel) Credit: Photographer Paul Winch-Furness/Photographer Paul Winch-Furness Singapore style Singapore welcomes a seriously hot new hotel this month with the opening of Six Senses Duxton, an Anouska Hempel-designed five-star in the city’s Chinatown district. Drawing on the vibrant location, Hempel has infused the property with an opulent Far East vibe: think a sultry black-and-gold colour scheme offset by Chinese calligraphy wallpaper. • Rooms from £179 (0065 6914 1428; sixsenses.com/duxton) Six Senses' new hot property in Singapore has been devised by celebrated designer Anouska Hempel. All abuzz St Ermin’s Hotel in Westminster has announced dates for its 2018 beekeeping workshops, held in the hotel’s rooftop garden where six hives house more than 350,000 honeybees. Each two-and-a-half-hour session gives budding apiarists a hands-on experience with the honeycomb, followed by either a honey cocktail at the hotel’s Caxton Bar or afternoon tea in the Tea Lounge. Book now for the first workshop on April 21. • Workshop from £40pp. Rooms £180 (020 7222 7888; sterminshotel.co.uk) The beehives in St Ermin's rooftop garden hold over 350,000 Buckfast honeybees. Garden party This year marks 100 years since the birth of celebrated gardener Rosemary Verey, who fashioned the delightful grounds at Barnsley House in the Cotswolds. To mark the centenary, the hotel is hosting events throughout the year. There is an open day on April 10, followed by a village festival on May 19. • Open day entry £5pp. Rooms £224 B&B (01285 740000; barnsleyhouse.com) This year, Barnsley House is celebrating the centenary of Rosemary Verey, the woman who created the hotel's famous garden. Artistic Amsterdam To celebrate the Van Gogh & Japan exhibition, which comes to Amsterdam this spring, the Conservatorium Hotel, just round the corner from the Museumplein, has two new Van Gogh suites. Guests can choose which of the artist’s famous works (reproductions) adorn the walls, indulge in a Van Gogh-themed afternoon tea, and make the most of complimentary tickets to the exhibition. • Available until June 24. Package from £805 per night (0031 20570 0000; conservatoriumhotel.com) To celebrate the new Van Gogh & Japan exhibition in Amsterdam, the Conservatorium Hotel has launched two themed packages inspired by the artist. Got a hot hotel tip? Email: thehotelegraph@telegraph.co.uk
We're into the final month of the season across England's top four tiers, and there is still plenty to play for. The Premier League title is wrapped up, and the bottom three clubs are looking increasingly to be relegated, but lower down the footballing pyramid there is plenty still at stake. Here, we round-up who can still finish where in the Premier League and Football League. Premier League Every team has either four or five games remaining, but it wouldn't be all that surprising if everyone finished in exactly the position they currently find themselves - or at least in the positions that truly matter. Manchester City are champions, while Manchester United, Liverpool and Tottenham are looking good to finish in the top four, barring a significant late collapse coupled with a Chelsea recovery. Arsenal and Burnley are battling it out for sixth place (though Arsenal can technically still finish in the top four), with the losers of that race to go into the Europa League at the second qualifying stage - which starts on July 26. Everyone from Leicester in eighth and below can - mathematically - still be relegated, but it would take something dramatic for any of the teams above West Ham to be pulled back in to the dogfight. Southampton, Stoke and West Brom, all at least five points adrift of safety, are in real trouble. Premier League | Who can still get what? Championship Wolves are all but secure of the Championship title, 12 points clear of Cardiff, who have four games left and a vastly inferior goal difference. Cardiff are battling it out with Fulham and Aston Villa for the second remaining automatic play-off spot, though the Welsh side are in the best position to secure promotion. Two of those sides will go into the play-offs, joined by two more of Middlesbrough, Millwall, Derby, Preston, Sheffield United, Brentford and Bristol City, though the final four of those sides face an uphill task to sneak in. At the other end of the table, Sunderland are on the brink of a second successive relegation and last position, rooted to the foot of the Championship. Burton and Barnsley currently make up the bottom three, though Barnsley have a game in hand on Birmingham and Bolton, two points above them, just outside the relegation zone. Every side up to Nottingham Forest can still technically go down, but everyone from Reading and up should survive. Championship | What can still happen? League One Wigan and Blackburn look like they have won the race for the two automatic promotion spots, though Shrewsbury could technically still catch either. Whichever of those teams does not get into the top two will go into the play-offs, and with many sides still having to play five more games, the race for the three remaining play-off places is very, very open. Every team between Rotherham in fourth and Southend in 15th (apart from Fleetwood, due to the combination of other teams' games) can still make it into the play-offs, though realistically, it is unlikely that anyone below ninth will. At the bottom, Bury are down, while everyone up to Bradford in 10th could feasibly get sucked into the relegation battle. Given only eight points separate Rochdale in 21st and Doncaster in 12th, there is an awful lot still to play for. League One | What can still happen? League Two Accrington Stanley have sealed promotion to League One, and Luton will join them with one more win. Wycombe are in pole position to secure the third and final automatic promotion slot, but every side currently in the play-off places is still in contention. The play-off berths will be filled by four teams from those currently between second and 14th (apart from Crawley, who have too few games remaining to make it into seventh). Relegation from the Football League is looking perilously likely for both Chesterfield and Barnet, though everyone up to Crewe in 17th could still be dragged into the drop zone, however unlikely that actually is. League Two | What can still happen?
Premier League and Football League relegation, promotion and play-offs: who can still finish where?
We're into the final month of the season across England's top four tiers, and there is still plenty to play for. The Premier League title is wrapped up, and the bottom three clubs are looking increasingly to be relegated, but lower down the footballing pyramid there is plenty still at stake. Here, we round-up who can still finish where in the Premier League and Football League. Premier League Every team has either four or five games remaining, but it wouldn't be all that surprising if everyone finished in exactly the position they currently find themselves - or at least in the positions that truly matter. Manchester City are champions, while Manchester United, Liverpool and Tottenham are looking good to finish in the top four, barring a significant late collapse coupled with a Chelsea recovery. Arsenal and Burnley are battling it out for sixth place (though Arsenal can technically still finish in the top four), with the losers of that race to go into the Europa League at the second qualifying stage - which starts on July 26. Everyone from Leicester in eighth and below can - mathematically - still be relegated, but it would take something dramatic for any of the teams above West Ham to be pulled back in to the dogfight. Southampton, Stoke and West Brom, all at least five points adrift of safety, are in real trouble. Premier League | Who can still get what? Championship Wolves are all but secure of the Championship title, 12 points clear of Cardiff, who have four games left and a vastly inferior goal difference. Cardiff are battling it out with Fulham and Aston Villa for the second remaining automatic play-off spot, though the Welsh side are in the best position to secure promotion. Two of those sides will go into the play-offs, joined by two more of Middlesbrough, Millwall, Derby, Preston, Sheffield United, Brentford and Bristol City, though the final four of those sides face an uphill task to sneak in. At the other end of the table, Sunderland are on the brink of a second successive relegation and last position, rooted to the foot of the Championship. Burton and Barnsley currently make up the bottom three, though Barnsley have a game in hand on Birmingham and Bolton, two points above them, just outside the relegation zone. Every side up to Nottingham Forest can still technically go down, but everyone from Reading and up should survive. Championship | What can still happen? League One Wigan and Blackburn look like they have won the race for the two automatic promotion spots, though Shrewsbury could technically still catch either. Whichever of those teams does not get into the top two will go into the play-offs, and with many sides still having to play five more games, the race for the three remaining play-off places is very, very open. Every team between Rotherham in fourth and Southend in 15th (apart from Fleetwood, due to the combination of other teams' games) can still make it into the play-offs, though realistically, it is unlikely that anyone below ninth will. At the bottom, Bury are down, while everyone up to Bradford in 10th could feasibly get sucked into the relegation battle. Given only eight points separate Rochdale in 21st and Doncaster in 12th, there is an awful lot still to play for. League One | What can still happen? League Two Accrington Stanley have sealed promotion to League One, and Luton will join them with one more win. Wycombe are in pole position to secure the third and final automatic promotion slot, but every side currently in the play-off places is still in contention. The play-off berths will be filled by four teams from those currently between second and 14th (apart from Crawley, who have too few games remaining to make it into seventh). Relegation from the Football League is looking perilously likely for both Chesterfield and Barnet, though everyone up to Crewe in 17th could still be dragged into the drop zone, however unlikely that actually is. League Two | What can still happen?
From the most exciting upcoming openings to the latest news, trends and events, keep up to date with our regularly updated guide to all that is hot in the world of hotels. • This month's best new hotel openings Birthday dinner The Peninsula New York turns 30 this year, and to celebrate the hotel has announced a new Keys to the Kitchen programme in partnership with some of NYC’s top restaurants, including DANIEL and Jean-Georges. Each experience, bookable through the hotel’s concierge, involves a meal at the restaurant of choice, then a tour of the kitchens, a meet-and-greet with the chef, or a sample of a dish. • Rooms £496 (001 212 903 3915; newyork.peninsula.com) Celebrating its 30th birthday, the Peninsula New York is offering its guests exclusive experiences at top NYC restaurants such as Jean-Georges. Open for business The far-flung Andaman Islands sit well below the radar of most travellers, but that could be about to change with the opening of Taj Exotica Resort & Spa, the archipelago’s first luxury hotel. Guests can stay in stilted villas built in local style and dine on dishes drawn from Tamil, Keralan and Bengali cuisines. Experiences on offer include kayaking and scuba diving. • Rooms from £274 (0091 22 666 51198; tajhotels.com) The villas at the newly open Taj Andaman Islands have been inspired by the stilted huts of the local Jawara tribe. Credit: © Chris Caldicott Beck at Brown’s Mayfair welcomes Heinz Beck, the multi-Michelin-starred chef, to his new restaurant at Brown’s Hotel. The Beck at Brown’s promises classic Italian dishes to be enjoyed in the casual dining room, redesigned in vivid style by Olga Polizzi, designer-in-chief for Rocco Forte Hotels. • Rooms from £480 (020 518 4004; roccofortehotels.com/browns-hotel) Credit: Photographer Paul Winch-Furness/Photographer Paul Winch-Furness Singapore style Singapore welcomes a seriously hot new hotel this month with the opening of Six Senses Duxton, an Anouska Hempel-designed five-star in the city’s Chinatown district. Drawing on the vibrant location, Hempel has infused the property with an opulent Far East vibe: think a sultry black-and-gold colour scheme offset by Chinese calligraphy wallpaper. • Rooms from £179 (0065 6914 1428; sixsenses.com/duxton) Six Senses' new hot property in Singapore has been devised by celebrated designer Anouska Hempel. All abuzz St Ermin’s Hotel in Westminster has announced dates for its 2018 beekeeping workshops, held in the hotel’s rooftop garden where six hives house more than 350,000 honeybees. Each two-and-a-half-hour session gives budding apiarists a hands-on experience with the honeycomb, followed by either a honey cocktail at the hotel’s Caxton Bar or afternoon tea in the Tea Lounge. Book now for the first workshop on April 21. • Workshop from £40pp. Rooms £180 (020 7222 7888; sterminshotel.co.uk) The beehives in St Ermin's rooftop garden hold over 350,000 Buckfast honeybees. Garden party This year marks 100 years since the birth of celebrated gardener Rosemary Verey, who fashioned the delightful grounds at Barnsley House in the Cotswolds. To mark the centenary, the hotel is hosting events throughout the year. There is an open day on April 10, followed by a village festival on May 19. • Open day entry £5pp. Rooms £224 B&B (01285 740000; barnsleyhouse.com) This year, Barnsley House is celebrating the centenary of Rosemary Verey, the woman who created the hotel's famous garden. Artistic Amsterdam To celebrate the Van Gogh & Japan exhibition, which comes to Amsterdam this spring, the Conservatorium Hotel, just round the corner from the Museumplein, has two new Van Gogh suites. Guests can choose which of the artist’s famous works (reproductions) adorn the walls, indulge in a Van Gogh-themed afternoon tea, and make the most of complimentary tickets to the exhibition. • Available until June 24. Package from £805 per night (0031 20570 0000; conservatoriumhotel.com) To celebrate the new Van Gogh & Japan exhibition in Amsterdam, the Conservatorium Hotel has launched two themed packages inspired by the artist. Milanese aromas The Hotel Principe di Savoia in Milan has revived its Secret Scents of Milan tours: a series of aromatic expeditions to the city’s gardens and perfumeries where, under the guidance of perfumer Mariangela Rossi, guests can discover the secrets of choosing, using, and creating the perfect fragrance. • Classic room from £430 (0039 2 62301; dorchestercollection.com/hotel-principe-di-savoia) The Hotel Principe di Savoia is offering its guests the chance to join 'scented tours' of the city's gardens, markets and perfumeries. Lava luxe The Blue Lagoon, one of Iceland’s best-known attractions, has been made even more alluring by the launch of its first luxury hotel. The Retreat offers a subterranean spa carved into the 800-year-old lava flow, an Icelandic restaurant, and 62 suites, the best of which open out on to a private section of mineral-rich heated water. • Suites from £1,030 (00354 4208700; retreat.bluelagoon.com) The Residence at the Blue Lagoon offers 62 suites, the best of which open out on to a private section of mineral-rich heated water. Equine adventure Don Totu, a chic little hotel embedded in rural Puglia, has teamed up with a local stables to offer horse-riding designed to immerse guests in the Arcadian landscape of Italy’s “heel”. Each five-day course includes daily rides, six nights’ accommodation in the palazzo and an Italian breakfast each day. Available May 13 to 19. • £590pp (0039 0836 992374; dontotu.it) Don Totu has set itself up as a chic base for multi-day horse riding excursions into the pristine Puglian countryside. Got a hot hotel tip? Email: thehotelegraph@telegraph.co.uk
Pillow Talk: The hottest openings, news and experiences in the world of hotels
From the most exciting upcoming openings to the latest news, trends and events, keep up to date with our regularly updated guide to all that is hot in the world of hotels. • This month's best new hotel openings Birthday dinner The Peninsula New York turns 30 this year, and to celebrate the hotel has announced a new Keys to the Kitchen programme in partnership with some of NYC’s top restaurants, including DANIEL and Jean-Georges. Each experience, bookable through the hotel’s concierge, involves a meal at the restaurant of choice, then a tour of the kitchens, a meet-and-greet with the chef, or a sample of a dish. • Rooms £496 (001 212 903 3915; newyork.peninsula.com) Celebrating its 30th birthday, the Peninsula New York is offering its guests exclusive experiences at top NYC restaurants such as Jean-Georges. Open for business The far-flung Andaman Islands sit well below the radar of most travellers, but that could be about to change with the opening of Taj Exotica Resort & Spa, the archipelago’s first luxury hotel. Guests can stay in stilted villas built in local style and dine on dishes drawn from Tamil, Keralan and Bengali cuisines. Experiences on offer include kayaking and scuba diving. • Rooms from £274 (0091 22 666 51198; tajhotels.com) The villas at the newly open Taj Andaman Islands have been inspired by the stilted huts of the local Jawara tribe. Credit: © Chris Caldicott Beck at Brown’s Mayfair welcomes Heinz Beck, the multi-Michelin-starred chef, to his new restaurant at Brown’s Hotel. The Beck at Brown’s promises classic Italian dishes to be enjoyed in the casual dining room, redesigned in vivid style by Olga Polizzi, designer-in-chief for Rocco Forte Hotels. • Rooms from £480 (020 518 4004; roccofortehotels.com/browns-hotel) Credit: Photographer Paul Winch-Furness/Photographer Paul Winch-Furness Singapore style Singapore welcomes a seriously hot new hotel this month with the opening of Six Senses Duxton, an Anouska Hempel-designed five-star in the city’s Chinatown district. Drawing on the vibrant location, Hempel has infused the property with an opulent Far East vibe: think a sultry black-and-gold colour scheme offset by Chinese calligraphy wallpaper. • Rooms from £179 (0065 6914 1428; sixsenses.com/duxton) Six Senses' new hot property in Singapore has been devised by celebrated designer Anouska Hempel. All abuzz St Ermin’s Hotel in Westminster has announced dates for its 2018 beekeeping workshops, held in the hotel’s rooftop garden where six hives house more than 350,000 honeybees. Each two-and-a-half-hour session gives budding apiarists a hands-on experience with the honeycomb, followed by either a honey cocktail at the hotel’s Caxton Bar or afternoon tea in the Tea Lounge. Book now for the first workshop on April 21. • Workshop from £40pp. Rooms £180 (020 7222 7888; sterminshotel.co.uk) The beehives in St Ermin's rooftop garden hold over 350,000 Buckfast honeybees. Garden party This year marks 100 years since the birth of celebrated gardener Rosemary Verey, who fashioned the delightful grounds at Barnsley House in the Cotswolds. To mark the centenary, the hotel is hosting events throughout the year. There is an open day on April 10, followed by a village festival on May 19. • Open day entry £5pp. Rooms £224 B&B (01285 740000; barnsleyhouse.com) This year, Barnsley House is celebrating the centenary of Rosemary Verey, the woman who created the hotel's famous garden. Artistic Amsterdam To celebrate the Van Gogh & Japan exhibition, which comes to Amsterdam this spring, the Conservatorium Hotel, just round the corner from the Museumplein, has two new Van Gogh suites. Guests can choose which of the artist’s famous works (reproductions) adorn the walls, indulge in a Van Gogh-themed afternoon tea, and make the most of complimentary tickets to the exhibition. • Available until June 24. Package from £805 per night (0031 20570 0000; conservatoriumhotel.com) To celebrate the new Van Gogh & Japan exhibition in Amsterdam, the Conservatorium Hotel has launched two themed packages inspired by the artist. Milanese aromas The Hotel Principe di Savoia in Milan has revived its Secret Scents of Milan tours: a series of aromatic expeditions to the city’s gardens and perfumeries where, under the guidance of perfumer Mariangela Rossi, guests can discover the secrets of choosing, using, and creating the perfect fragrance. • Classic room from £430 (0039 2 62301; dorchestercollection.com/hotel-principe-di-savoia) The Hotel Principe di Savoia is offering its guests the chance to join 'scented tours' of the city's gardens, markets and perfumeries. Lava luxe The Blue Lagoon, one of Iceland’s best-known attractions, has been made even more alluring by the launch of its first luxury hotel. The Retreat offers a subterranean spa carved into the 800-year-old lava flow, an Icelandic restaurant, and 62 suites, the best of which open out on to a private section of mineral-rich heated water. • Suites from £1,030 (00354 4208700; retreat.bluelagoon.com) The Residence at the Blue Lagoon offers 62 suites, the best of which open out on to a private section of mineral-rich heated water. Equine adventure Don Totu, a chic little hotel embedded in rural Puglia, has teamed up with a local stables to offer horse-riding designed to immerse guests in the Arcadian landscape of Italy’s “heel”. Each five-day course includes daily rides, six nights’ accommodation in the palazzo and an Italian breakfast each day. Available May 13 to 19. • £590pp (0039 0836 992374; dontotu.it) Don Totu has set itself up as a chic base for multi-day horse riding excursions into the pristine Puglian countryside. Got a hot hotel tip? Email: thehotelegraph@telegraph.co.uk
From the most exciting upcoming openings to the latest news, trends and events, keep up to date with our regularly updated guide to all that is hot in the world of hotels. • This month's best new hotel openings Birthday dinner The Peninsula New York turns 30 this year, and to celebrate the hotel has announced a new Keys to the Kitchen programme in partnership with some of NYC’s top restaurants, including DANIEL and Jean-Georges. Each experience, bookable through the hotel’s concierge, involves a meal at the restaurant of choice, then a tour of the kitchens, a meet-and-greet with the chef, or a sample of a dish. • Rooms £496 (001 212 903 3915; newyork.peninsula.com) Celebrating its 30th birthday, the Peninsula New York is offering its guests exclusive experiences at top NYC restaurants such as Jean-Georges. Open for business The far-flung Andaman Islands sit well below the radar of most travellers, but that could be about to change with the opening of Taj Exotica Resort & Spa, the archipelago’s first luxury hotel. Guests can stay in stilted villas built in local style and dine on dishes drawn from Tamil, Keralan and Bengali cuisines. Experiences on offer include kayaking and scuba diving. • Rooms from £274 (0091 22 666 51198; tajhotels.com) The villas at the newly open Taj Andaman Islands have been inspired by the stilted huts of the local Jawara tribe. Credit: © Chris Caldicott Beck at Brown’s Mayfair welcomes Heinz Beck, the multi-Michelin-starred chef, to his new restaurant at Brown’s Hotel. The Beck at Brown’s promises classic Italian dishes to be enjoyed in the casual dining room, redesigned in vivid style by Olga Polizzi, designer-in-chief for Rocco Forte Hotels. • Rooms from £480 (020 518 4004; roccofortehotels.com/browns-hotel) Credit: Photographer Paul Winch-Furness/Photographer Paul Winch-Furness Singapore style Singapore welcomes a seriously hot new hotel this month with the opening of Six Senses Duxton, an Anouska Hempel-designed five-star in the city’s Chinatown district. Drawing on the vibrant location, Hempel has infused the property with an opulent Far East vibe: think a sultry black-and-gold colour scheme offset by Chinese calligraphy wallpaper. • Rooms from £179 (0065 6914 1428; sixsenses.com/duxton) Six Senses' new hot property in Singapore has been devised by celebrated designer Anouska Hempel. All abuzz St Ermin’s Hotel in Westminster has announced dates for its 2018 beekeeping workshops, held in the hotel’s rooftop garden where six hives house more than 350,000 honeybees. Each two-and-a-half-hour session gives budding apiarists a hands-on experience with the honeycomb, followed by either a honey cocktail at the hotel’s Caxton Bar or afternoon tea in the Tea Lounge. Book now for the first workshop on April 21. • Workshop from £40pp. Rooms £180 (020 7222 7888; sterminshotel.co.uk) The beehives in St Ermin's rooftop garden hold over 350,000 Buckfast honeybees. Garden party This year marks 100 years since the birth of celebrated gardener Rosemary Verey, who fashioned the delightful grounds at Barnsley House in the Cotswolds. To mark the centenary, the hotel is hosting events throughout the year. There is an open day on April 10, followed by a village festival on May 19. • Open day entry £5pp. Rooms £224 B&B (01285 740000; barnsleyhouse.com) This year, Barnsley House is celebrating the centenary of Rosemary Verey, the woman who created the hotel's famous garden. Artistic Amsterdam To celebrate the Van Gogh & Japan exhibition, which comes to Amsterdam this spring, the Conservatorium Hotel, just round the corner from the Museumplein, has two new Van Gogh suites. Guests can choose which of the artist’s famous works (reproductions) adorn the walls, indulge in a Van Gogh-themed afternoon tea, and make the most of complimentary tickets to the exhibition. • Available until June 24. Package from £805 per night (0031 20570 0000; conservatoriumhotel.com) To celebrate the new Van Gogh & Japan exhibition in Amsterdam, the Conservatorium Hotel has launched two themed packages inspired by the artist. Milanese aromas The Hotel Principe di Savoia in Milan has revived its Secret Scents of Milan tours: a series of aromatic expeditions to the city’s gardens and perfumeries where, under the guidance of perfumer Mariangela Rossi, guests can discover the secrets of choosing, using, and creating the perfect fragrance. • Classic room from £430 (0039 2 62301; dorchestercollection.com/hotel-principe-di-savoia) The Hotel Principe di Savoia is offering its guests the chance to join 'scented tours' of the city's gardens, markets and perfumeries. Lava luxe The Blue Lagoon, one of Iceland’s best-known attractions, has been made even more alluring by the launch of its first luxury hotel. The Retreat offers a subterranean spa carved into the 800-year-old lava flow, an Icelandic restaurant, and 62 suites, the best of which open out on to a private section of mineral-rich heated water. • Suites from £1,030 (00354 4208700; retreat.bluelagoon.com) The Residence at the Blue Lagoon offers 62 suites, the best of which open out on to a private section of mineral-rich heated water. Equine adventure Don Totu, a chic little hotel embedded in rural Puglia, has teamed up with a local stables to offer horse-riding designed to immerse guests in the Arcadian landscape of Italy’s “heel”. Each five-day course includes daily rides, six nights’ accommodation in the palazzo and an Italian breakfast each day. Available May 13 to 19. • £590pp (0039 0836 992374; dontotu.it) Don Totu has set itself up as a chic base for multi-day horse riding excursions into the pristine Puglian countryside. Got a hot hotel tip? Email: thehotelegraph@telegraph.co.uk
Pillow Talk: The hottest openings, news and experiences in the world of hotels
From the most exciting upcoming openings to the latest news, trends and events, keep up to date with our regularly updated guide to all that is hot in the world of hotels. • This month's best new hotel openings Birthday dinner The Peninsula New York turns 30 this year, and to celebrate the hotel has announced a new Keys to the Kitchen programme in partnership with some of NYC’s top restaurants, including DANIEL and Jean-Georges. Each experience, bookable through the hotel’s concierge, involves a meal at the restaurant of choice, then a tour of the kitchens, a meet-and-greet with the chef, or a sample of a dish. • Rooms £496 (001 212 903 3915; newyork.peninsula.com) Celebrating its 30th birthday, the Peninsula New York is offering its guests exclusive experiences at top NYC restaurants such as Jean-Georges. Open for business The far-flung Andaman Islands sit well below the radar of most travellers, but that could be about to change with the opening of Taj Exotica Resort & Spa, the archipelago’s first luxury hotel. Guests can stay in stilted villas built in local style and dine on dishes drawn from Tamil, Keralan and Bengali cuisines. Experiences on offer include kayaking and scuba diving. • Rooms from £274 (0091 22 666 51198; tajhotels.com) The villas at the newly open Taj Andaman Islands have been inspired by the stilted huts of the local Jawara tribe. Credit: © Chris Caldicott Beck at Brown’s Mayfair welcomes Heinz Beck, the multi-Michelin-starred chef, to his new restaurant at Brown’s Hotel. The Beck at Brown’s promises classic Italian dishes to be enjoyed in the casual dining room, redesigned in vivid style by Olga Polizzi, designer-in-chief for Rocco Forte Hotels. • Rooms from £480 (020 518 4004; roccofortehotels.com/browns-hotel) Credit: Photographer Paul Winch-Furness/Photographer Paul Winch-Furness Singapore style Singapore welcomes a seriously hot new hotel this month with the opening of Six Senses Duxton, an Anouska Hempel-designed five-star in the city’s Chinatown district. Drawing on the vibrant location, Hempel has infused the property with an opulent Far East vibe: think a sultry black-and-gold colour scheme offset by Chinese calligraphy wallpaper. • Rooms from £179 (0065 6914 1428; sixsenses.com/duxton) Six Senses' new hot property in Singapore has been devised by celebrated designer Anouska Hempel. All abuzz St Ermin’s Hotel in Westminster has announced dates for its 2018 beekeeping workshops, held in the hotel’s rooftop garden where six hives house more than 350,000 honeybees. Each two-and-a-half-hour session gives budding apiarists a hands-on experience with the honeycomb, followed by either a honey cocktail at the hotel’s Caxton Bar or afternoon tea in the Tea Lounge. Book now for the first workshop on April 21. • Workshop from £40pp. Rooms £180 (020 7222 7888; sterminshotel.co.uk) The beehives in St Ermin's rooftop garden hold over 350,000 Buckfast honeybees. Garden party This year marks 100 years since the birth of celebrated gardener Rosemary Verey, who fashioned the delightful grounds at Barnsley House in the Cotswolds. To mark the centenary, the hotel is hosting events throughout the year. There is an open day on April 10, followed by a village festival on May 19. • Open day entry £5pp. Rooms £224 B&B (01285 740000; barnsleyhouse.com) This year, Barnsley House is celebrating the centenary of Rosemary Verey, the woman who created the hotel's famous garden. Artistic Amsterdam To celebrate the Van Gogh & Japan exhibition, which comes to Amsterdam this spring, the Conservatorium Hotel, just round the corner from the Museumplein, has two new Van Gogh suites. Guests can choose which of the artist’s famous works (reproductions) adorn the walls, indulge in a Van Gogh-themed afternoon tea, and make the most of complimentary tickets to the exhibition. • Available until June 24. Package from £805 per night (0031 20570 0000; conservatoriumhotel.com) To celebrate the new Van Gogh & Japan exhibition in Amsterdam, the Conservatorium Hotel has launched two themed packages inspired by the artist. Milanese aromas The Hotel Principe di Savoia in Milan has revived its Secret Scents of Milan tours: a series of aromatic expeditions to the city’s gardens and perfumeries where, under the guidance of perfumer Mariangela Rossi, guests can discover the secrets of choosing, using, and creating the perfect fragrance. • Classic room from £430 (0039 2 62301; dorchestercollection.com/hotel-principe-di-savoia) The Hotel Principe di Savoia is offering its guests the chance to join 'scented tours' of the city's gardens, markets and perfumeries. Lava luxe The Blue Lagoon, one of Iceland’s best-known attractions, has been made even more alluring by the launch of its first luxury hotel. The Retreat offers a subterranean spa carved into the 800-year-old lava flow, an Icelandic restaurant, and 62 suites, the best of which open out on to a private section of mineral-rich heated water. • Suites from £1,030 (00354 4208700; retreat.bluelagoon.com) The Residence at the Blue Lagoon offers 62 suites, the best of which open out on to a private section of mineral-rich heated water. Equine adventure Don Totu, a chic little hotel embedded in rural Puglia, has teamed up with a local stables to offer horse-riding designed to immerse guests in the Arcadian landscape of Italy’s “heel”. Each five-day course includes daily rides, six nights’ accommodation in the palazzo and an Italian breakfast each day. Available May 13 to 19. • £590pp (0039 0836 992374; dontotu.it) Don Totu has set itself up as a chic base for multi-day horse riding excursions into the pristine Puglian countryside. Got a hot hotel tip? Email: thehotelegraph@telegraph.co.uk
From the most exciting upcoming openings to the latest news, trends and events, keep up to date with our regularly updated guide to all that is hot in the world of hotels. • This month's best new hotel openings Birthday dinner The Peninsula New York turns 30 this year, and to celebrate the hotel has announced a new Keys to the Kitchen programme in partnership with some of NYC’s top restaurants, including DANIEL and Jean-Georges. Each experience, bookable through the hotel’s concierge, involves a meal at the restaurant of choice, then a tour of the kitchens, a meet-and-greet with the chef, or a sample of a dish. • Rooms £496 (001 212 903 3915; newyork.peninsula.com) Celebrating its 30th birthday, the Peninsula New York is offering its guests exclusive experiences at top NYC restaurants such as Jean-Georges. Open for business The far-flung Andaman Islands sit well below the radar of most travellers, but that could be about to change with the opening of Taj Exotica Resort & Spa, the archipelago’s first luxury hotel. Guests can stay in stilted villas built in local style and dine on dishes drawn from Tamil, Keralan and Bengali cuisines. Experiences on offer include kayaking and scuba diving. • Rooms from £274 (0091 22 666 51198; tajhotels.com) The villas at the newly open Taj Andaman Islands have been inspired by the stilted huts of the local Jawara tribe. Credit: © Chris Caldicott Beck at Brown’s Mayfair welcomes Heinz Beck, the multi-Michelin-starred chef, to his new restaurant at Brown’s Hotel. The Beck at Brown’s promises classic Italian dishes to be enjoyed in the casual dining room, redesigned in vivid style by Olga Polizzi, designer-in-chief for Rocco Forte Hotels. • Rooms from £480 (020 518 4004; roccofortehotels.com/browns-hotel) Credit: Photographer Paul Winch-Furness/Photographer Paul Winch-Furness Singapore style Singapore welcomes a seriously hot new hotel this month with the opening of Six Senses Duxton, an Anouska Hempel-designed five-star in the city’s Chinatown district. Drawing on the vibrant location, Hempel has infused the property with an opulent Far East vibe: think a sultry black-and-gold colour scheme offset by Chinese calligraphy wallpaper. • Rooms from £179 (0065 6914 1428; sixsenses.com/duxton) Six Senses' new hot property in Singapore has been devised by celebrated designer Anouska Hempel. All abuzz St Ermin’s Hotel in Westminster has announced dates for its 2018 beekeeping workshops, held in the hotel’s rooftop garden where six hives house more than 350,000 honeybees. Each two-and-a-half-hour session gives budding apiarists a hands-on experience with the honeycomb, followed by either a honey cocktail at the hotel’s Caxton Bar or afternoon tea in the Tea Lounge. Book now for the first workshop on April 21. • Workshop from £40pp. Rooms £180 (020 7222 7888; sterminshotel.co.uk) The beehives in St Ermin's rooftop garden hold over 350,000 Buckfast honeybees. Garden party This year marks 100 years since the birth of celebrated gardener Rosemary Verey, who fashioned the delightful grounds at Barnsley House in the Cotswolds. To mark the centenary, the hotel is hosting events throughout the year. There is an open day on April 10, followed by a village festival on May 19. • Open day entry £5pp. Rooms £224 B&B (01285 740000; barnsleyhouse.com) This year, Barnsley House is celebrating the centenary of Rosemary Verey, the woman who created the hotel's famous garden. Artistic Amsterdam To celebrate the Van Gogh & Japan exhibition, which comes to Amsterdam this spring, the Conservatorium Hotel, just round the corner from the Museumplein, has two new Van Gogh suites. Guests can choose which of the artist’s famous works (reproductions) adorn the walls, indulge in a Van Gogh-themed afternoon tea, and make the most of complimentary tickets to the exhibition. • Available until June 24. Package from £805 per night (0031 20570 0000; conservatoriumhotel.com) To celebrate the new Van Gogh & Japan exhibition in Amsterdam, the Conservatorium Hotel has launched two themed packages inspired by the artist. Milanese aromas The Hotel Principe di Savoia in Milan has revived its Secret Scents of Milan tours: a series of aromatic expeditions to the city’s gardens and perfumeries where, under the guidance of perfumer Mariangela Rossi, guests can discover the secrets of choosing, using, and creating the perfect fragrance. • Classic room from £430 (0039 2 62301; dorchestercollection.com/hotel-principe-di-savoia) The Hotel Principe di Savoia is offering its guests the chance to join 'scented tours' of the city's gardens, markets and perfumeries. Lava luxe The Blue Lagoon, one of Iceland’s best-known attractions, has been made even more alluring by the launch of its first luxury hotel. The Retreat offers a subterranean spa carved into the 800-year-old lava flow, an Icelandic restaurant, and 62 suites, the best of which open out on to a private section of mineral-rich heated water. • Suites from £1,030 (00354 4208700; retreat.bluelagoon.com) The Residence at the Blue Lagoon offers 62 suites, the best of which open out on to a private section of mineral-rich heated water. Equine adventure Don Totu, a chic little hotel embedded in rural Puglia, has teamed up with a local stables to offer horse-riding designed to immerse guests in the Arcadian landscape of Italy’s “heel”. Each five-day course includes daily rides, six nights’ accommodation in the palazzo and an Italian breakfast each day. Available May 13 to 19. • £590pp (0039 0836 992374; dontotu.it) Don Totu has set itself up as a chic base for multi-day horse riding excursions into the pristine Puglian countryside. Got a hot hotel tip? Email: thehotelegraph@telegraph.co.uk
Pillow Talk: The hottest openings, news and experiences in the world of hotels
From the most exciting upcoming openings to the latest news, trends and events, keep up to date with our regularly updated guide to all that is hot in the world of hotels. • This month's best new hotel openings Birthday dinner The Peninsula New York turns 30 this year, and to celebrate the hotel has announced a new Keys to the Kitchen programme in partnership with some of NYC’s top restaurants, including DANIEL and Jean-Georges. Each experience, bookable through the hotel’s concierge, involves a meal at the restaurant of choice, then a tour of the kitchens, a meet-and-greet with the chef, or a sample of a dish. • Rooms £496 (001 212 903 3915; newyork.peninsula.com) Celebrating its 30th birthday, the Peninsula New York is offering its guests exclusive experiences at top NYC restaurants such as Jean-Georges. Open for business The far-flung Andaman Islands sit well below the radar of most travellers, but that could be about to change with the opening of Taj Exotica Resort & Spa, the archipelago’s first luxury hotel. Guests can stay in stilted villas built in local style and dine on dishes drawn from Tamil, Keralan and Bengali cuisines. Experiences on offer include kayaking and scuba diving. • Rooms from £274 (0091 22 666 51198; tajhotels.com) The villas at the newly open Taj Andaman Islands have been inspired by the stilted huts of the local Jawara tribe. Credit: © Chris Caldicott Beck at Brown’s Mayfair welcomes Heinz Beck, the multi-Michelin-starred chef, to his new restaurant at Brown’s Hotel. The Beck at Brown’s promises classic Italian dishes to be enjoyed in the casual dining room, redesigned in vivid style by Olga Polizzi, designer-in-chief for Rocco Forte Hotels. • Rooms from £480 (020 518 4004; roccofortehotels.com/browns-hotel) Credit: Photographer Paul Winch-Furness/Photographer Paul Winch-Furness Singapore style Singapore welcomes a seriously hot new hotel this month with the opening of Six Senses Duxton, an Anouska Hempel-designed five-star in the city’s Chinatown district. Drawing on the vibrant location, Hempel has infused the property with an opulent Far East vibe: think a sultry black-and-gold colour scheme offset by Chinese calligraphy wallpaper. • Rooms from £179 (0065 6914 1428; sixsenses.com/duxton) Six Senses' new hot property in Singapore has been devised by celebrated designer Anouska Hempel. All abuzz St Ermin’s Hotel in Westminster has announced dates for its 2018 beekeeping workshops, held in the hotel’s rooftop garden where six hives house more than 350,000 honeybees. Each two-and-a-half-hour session gives budding apiarists a hands-on experience with the honeycomb, followed by either a honey cocktail at the hotel’s Caxton Bar or afternoon tea in the Tea Lounge. Book now for the first workshop on April 21. • Workshop from £40pp. Rooms £180 (020 7222 7888; sterminshotel.co.uk) The beehives in St Ermin's rooftop garden hold over 350,000 Buckfast honeybees. Garden party This year marks 100 years since the birth of celebrated gardener Rosemary Verey, who fashioned the delightful grounds at Barnsley House in the Cotswolds. To mark the centenary, the hotel is hosting events throughout the year. There is an open day on April 10, followed by a village festival on May 19. • Open day entry £5pp. Rooms £224 B&B (01285 740000; barnsleyhouse.com) This year, Barnsley House is celebrating the centenary of Rosemary Verey, the woman who created the hotel's famous garden. Artistic Amsterdam To celebrate the Van Gogh & Japan exhibition, which comes to Amsterdam this spring, the Conservatorium Hotel, just round the corner from the Museumplein, has two new Van Gogh suites. Guests can choose which of the artist’s famous works (reproductions) adorn the walls, indulge in a Van Gogh-themed afternoon tea, and make the most of complimentary tickets to the exhibition. • Available until June 24. Package from £805 per night (0031 20570 0000; conservatoriumhotel.com) To celebrate the new Van Gogh & Japan exhibition in Amsterdam, the Conservatorium Hotel has launched two themed packages inspired by the artist. Milanese aromas The Hotel Principe di Savoia in Milan has revived its Secret Scents of Milan tours: a series of aromatic expeditions to the city’s gardens and perfumeries where, under the guidance of perfumer Mariangela Rossi, guests can discover the secrets of choosing, using, and creating the perfect fragrance. • Classic room from £430 (0039 2 62301; dorchestercollection.com/hotel-principe-di-savoia) The Hotel Principe di Savoia is offering its guests the chance to join 'scented tours' of the city's gardens, markets and perfumeries. Lava luxe The Blue Lagoon, one of Iceland’s best-known attractions, has been made even more alluring by the launch of its first luxury hotel. The Retreat offers a subterranean spa carved into the 800-year-old lava flow, an Icelandic restaurant, and 62 suites, the best of which open out on to a private section of mineral-rich heated water. • Suites from £1,030 (00354 4208700; retreat.bluelagoon.com) The Residence at the Blue Lagoon offers 62 suites, the best of which open out on to a private section of mineral-rich heated water. Equine adventure Don Totu, a chic little hotel embedded in rural Puglia, has teamed up with a local stables to offer horse-riding designed to immerse guests in the Arcadian landscape of Italy’s “heel”. Each five-day course includes daily rides, six nights’ accommodation in the palazzo and an Italian breakfast each day. Available May 13 to 19. • £590pp (0039 0836 992374; dontotu.it) Don Totu has set itself up as a chic base for multi-day horse riding excursions into the pristine Puglian countryside. Got a hot hotel tip? Email: thehotelegraph@telegraph.co.uk
Wolves secured a return to the Premier League without kicking a ball on Saturday after Brentford stole a dramatic 1-1 draw at promotion-chasing Fulham. The Cottagers needed a win in the late kick-off to regain second place from Cardiff in the Sky Bet Championship and to deny Wolves a top-flight spot for the first time since 2012. Aleksandar Mitrovic's 70th-minute goal had looked like putting Wolves' party on hold but Neal Maupay's last-gasp header for Brentford sent Nuno Espirito Santo's side up. Wolves can celebrate at home to Birmingham on Sunday, but third-placed Fulham will have to gather themselves after falling a point and a place behind Cardiff - who have a game in hand. The Bluebirds left it late but kept themselves on course for an automatic promotion place with a 2-0 win at Norwich. Neil Warnock's side know three wins from their remaining four games will be enough to join Wolves in the Premier League but they had to dig deep to earn a vital three points at Carrow Road. Kenneth Zohore squeezed the ball past Angus Gunn in the 86th minute before Junior Hoilett's goal in added time ensured Cardiff's two-game losing streak was brought to an end. Junior Hoilett celebrates his injury time goal in Cardiff City's 2-0 win over Norwich Credit: PA Middlesbrough stormed into the play-off places after coming from behind to beat Bristol City 2-1 at the Riverside Stadium. Milan Djuric volleyed the visitors into a 13th-minute lead before George Friend levelled for Boro five minutes later. Daniel Ayala then headed home the winner in the 68th minute, moving Middlesbrough up to fifth while also denting Bristol City's own top-six hopes. Veteran striker Steve Morison struck his fifth goal of the season for Millwall as they came back to draw 1-1 against fellow play-off hopefuls Sheffield United in the early kick-off. Leon Clarke opened the scoring for the Blades in the 74th minute, but Morison equalised instantly to grab his side a point. The sixth-placed Lions remain unbeaten in the league since New Year's Day and Sheffield United, who are ninth, have not lost at home since late January. Ryan Sessegnon (L) was unable to help Fulham get all three points against Brentford and Romaine Sawyers (R) Derby slipped out of the top six, but Burton moved off the bottom and to within five points of safety after a 3-1 victory over the Rams at the Pirelli Stadium. Liam Boyce tapped home from close range to put the hosts in front after 24 minutes, but their lead did not last long as David Nugent equalised moments later. Luke Murphy curled a beautiful effort past Scott Carson to restore the Brewers' lead just before the break and Lucas Akins added a third in the 68th minute. Oli McBurnie's added-time equaliser secured a vital 2-2 draw for Barnsley at home to fellow strugglers Bolton. Gary Gardner scored from 10 yards midway through the first half for the Tykes before Adam Le Fondre levelled from the spot after 82 minutes. Craig Noone thought he had won it for Bolton three minutes later, but McBurnie had the final say to keep Barnsley within two points of the 21st-placed Trotters. Sunderland slipped to the foot of the table and remain six points below Bolton after drawing 2-2 at Reading. Liam Kelly gave the Royals the lead from the penalty spot after Lee Camp brought down Jon Dadi Bodvarsson in the box after 20 minutes. Paddy McNair fired home a stunning equaliser for the Black Cats just after the break before Lee Cattermole's first goal since August 2014 put the visitors in front in the 66th minute. Yann Kermorgant restored parity for Reading with 11 minutes remaining to leave Chris Coleman's side on the brink with three games left. Ben Brereton's late penalty and Joe Lolley's goal in added time secured an unlikely 2-1 win for Nottingham Forest against Ipswich, who had led through Grant Ward's first-half header. Elsewhere, Callum Robinson's double sealed a 2-1 win for Preston against QPR, who had Matt Smith on the scoresheet, while Jordan
Wolves seal promotion to Premier League as Fulham concede late goal
Wolves secured a return to the Premier League without kicking a ball on Saturday after Brentford stole a dramatic 1-1 draw at promotion-chasing Fulham. The Cottagers needed a win in the late kick-off to regain second place from Cardiff in the Sky Bet Championship and to deny Wolves a top-flight spot for the first time since 2012. Aleksandar Mitrovic's 70th-minute goal had looked like putting Wolves' party on hold but Neal Maupay's last-gasp header for Brentford sent Nuno Espirito Santo's side up. Wolves can celebrate at home to Birmingham on Sunday, but third-placed Fulham will have to gather themselves after falling a point and a place behind Cardiff - who have a game in hand. The Bluebirds left it late but kept themselves on course for an automatic promotion place with a 2-0 win at Norwich. Neil Warnock's side know three wins from their remaining four games will be enough to join Wolves in the Premier League but they had to dig deep to earn a vital three points at Carrow Road. Kenneth Zohore squeezed the ball past Angus Gunn in the 86th minute before Junior Hoilett's goal in added time ensured Cardiff's two-game losing streak was brought to an end. Junior Hoilett celebrates his injury time goal in Cardiff City's 2-0 win over Norwich Credit: PA Middlesbrough stormed into the play-off places after coming from behind to beat Bristol City 2-1 at the Riverside Stadium. Milan Djuric volleyed the visitors into a 13th-minute lead before George Friend levelled for Boro five minutes later. Daniel Ayala then headed home the winner in the 68th minute, moving Middlesbrough up to fifth while also denting Bristol City's own top-six hopes. Veteran striker Steve Morison struck his fifth goal of the season for Millwall as they came back to draw 1-1 against fellow play-off hopefuls Sheffield United in the early kick-off. Leon Clarke opened the scoring for the Blades in the 74th minute, but Morison equalised instantly to grab his side a point. The sixth-placed Lions remain unbeaten in the league since New Year's Day and Sheffield United, who are ninth, have not lost at home since late January. Ryan Sessegnon (L) was unable to help Fulham get all three points against Brentford and Romaine Sawyers (R) Derby slipped out of the top six, but Burton moved off the bottom and to within five points of safety after a 3-1 victory over the Rams at the Pirelli Stadium. Liam Boyce tapped home from close range to put the hosts in front after 24 minutes, but their lead did not last long as David Nugent equalised moments later. Luke Murphy curled a beautiful effort past Scott Carson to restore the Brewers' lead just before the break and Lucas Akins added a third in the 68th minute. Oli McBurnie's added-time equaliser secured a vital 2-2 draw for Barnsley at home to fellow strugglers Bolton. Gary Gardner scored from 10 yards midway through the first half for the Tykes before Adam Le Fondre levelled from the spot after 82 minutes. Craig Noone thought he had won it for Bolton three minutes later, but McBurnie had the final say to keep Barnsley within two points of the 21st-placed Trotters. Sunderland slipped to the foot of the table and remain six points below Bolton after drawing 2-2 at Reading. Liam Kelly gave the Royals the lead from the penalty spot after Lee Camp brought down Jon Dadi Bodvarsson in the box after 20 minutes. Paddy McNair fired home a stunning equaliser for the Black Cats just after the break before Lee Cattermole's first goal since August 2014 put the visitors in front in the 66th minute. Yann Kermorgant restored parity for Reading with 11 minutes remaining to leave Chris Coleman's side on the brink with three games left. Ben Brereton's late penalty and Joe Lolley's goal in added time secured an unlikely 2-1 win for Nottingham Forest against Ipswich, who had led through Grant Ward's first-half header. Elsewhere, Callum Robinson's double sealed a 2-1 win for Preston against QPR, who had Matt Smith on the scoresheet, while Jordan
Wolves secured a return to the Premier League without kicking a ball on Saturday after Brentford stole a dramatic 1-1 draw at promotion-chasing Fulham. The Cottagers needed a win in the late kick-off to regain second place from Cardiff in the Sky Bet Championship and to deny Wolves a top-flight spot for the first time since 2012. Aleksandar Mitrovic's 70th-minute goal had looked like putting Wolves' party on hold but Neal Maupay's last-gasp header for Brentford sent Nuno Espirito Santo's side up. Wolves can celebrate at home to Birmingham on Sunday, but third-placed Fulham will have to gather themselves after falling a point and a place behind Cardiff - who have a game in hand. The Bluebirds left it late but kept themselves on course for an automatic promotion place with a 2-0 win at Norwich. Neil Warnock's side know three wins from their remaining four games will be enough to join Wolves in the Premier League but they had to dig deep to earn a vital three points at Carrow Road. Kenneth Zohore squeezed the ball past Angus Gunn in the 86th minute before Junior Hoilett's goal in added time ensured Cardiff's two-game losing streak was brought to an end. Junior Hoilett celebrates his injury time goal in Cardiff City's 2-0 win over Norwich Credit: PA Middlesbrough stormed into the play-off places after coming from behind to beat Bristol City 2-1 at the Riverside Stadium. Milan Djuric volleyed the visitors into a 13th-minute lead before George Friend levelled for Boro five minutes later. Daniel Ayala then headed home the winner in the 68th minute, moving Middlesbrough up to fifth while also denting Bristol City's own top-six hopes. Veteran striker Steve Morison struck his fifth goal of the season for Millwall as they came back to draw 1-1 against fellow play-off hopefuls Sheffield United in the early kick-off. Leon Clarke opened the scoring for the Blades in the 74th minute, but Morison equalised instantly to grab his side a point. The sixth-placed Lions remain unbeaten in the league since New Year's Day and Sheffield United, who are ninth, have not lost at home since late January. Ryan Sessegnon (L) was unable to help Fulham get all three points against Brentford and Romaine Sawyers (R) Derby slipped out of the top six, but Burton moved off the bottom and to within five points of safety after a 3-1 victory over the Rams at the Pirelli Stadium. Liam Boyce tapped home from close range to put the hosts in front after 24 minutes, but their lead did not last long as David Nugent equalised moments later. Luke Murphy curled a beautiful effort past Scott Carson to restore the Brewers' lead just before the break and Lucas Akins added a third in the 68th minute. Oli McBurnie's added-time equaliser secured a vital 2-2 draw for Barnsley at home to fellow strugglers Bolton. Gary Gardner scored from 10 yards midway through the first half for the Tykes before Adam Le Fondre levelled from the spot after 82 minutes. Craig Noone thought he had won it for Bolton three minutes later, but McBurnie had the final say to keep Barnsley within two points of the 21st-placed Trotters. Sunderland slipped to the foot of the table and remain six points below Bolton after drawing 2-2 at Reading. Liam Kelly gave the Royals the lead from the penalty spot after Lee Camp brought down Jon Dadi Bodvarsson in the box after 20 minutes. Paddy McNair fired home a stunning equaliser for the Black Cats just after the break before Lee Cattermole's first goal since August 2014 put the visitors in front in the 66th minute. Yann Kermorgant restored parity for Reading with 11 minutes remaining to leave Chris Coleman's side on the brink with three games left. Ben Brereton's late penalty and Joe Lolley's goal in added time secured an unlikely 2-1 win for Nottingham Forest against Ipswich, who had led through Grant Ward's first-half header. Elsewhere, Callum Robinson's double sealed a 2-1 win for Preston against QPR, who had Matt Smith on the scoresheet, while Jordan
Wolves seal promotion to Premier League as Fulham concede late goal
Wolves secured a return to the Premier League without kicking a ball on Saturday after Brentford stole a dramatic 1-1 draw at promotion-chasing Fulham. The Cottagers needed a win in the late kick-off to regain second place from Cardiff in the Sky Bet Championship and to deny Wolves a top-flight spot for the first time since 2012. Aleksandar Mitrovic's 70th-minute goal had looked like putting Wolves' party on hold but Neal Maupay's last-gasp header for Brentford sent Nuno Espirito Santo's side up. Wolves can celebrate at home to Birmingham on Sunday, but third-placed Fulham will have to gather themselves after falling a point and a place behind Cardiff - who have a game in hand. The Bluebirds left it late but kept themselves on course for an automatic promotion place with a 2-0 win at Norwich. Neil Warnock's side know three wins from their remaining four games will be enough to join Wolves in the Premier League but they had to dig deep to earn a vital three points at Carrow Road. Kenneth Zohore squeezed the ball past Angus Gunn in the 86th minute before Junior Hoilett's goal in added time ensured Cardiff's two-game losing streak was brought to an end. Junior Hoilett celebrates his injury time goal in Cardiff City's 2-0 win over Norwich Credit: PA Middlesbrough stormed into the play-off places after coming from behind to beat Bristol City 2-1 at the Riverside Stadium. Milan Djuric volleyed the visitors into a 13th-minute lead before George Friend levelled for Boro five minutes later. Daniel Ayala then headed home the winner in the 68th minute, moving Middlesbrough up to fifth while also denting Bristol City's own top-six hopes. Veteran striker Steve Morison struck his fifth goal of the season for Millwall as they came back to draw 1-1 against fellow play-off hopefuls Sheffield United in the early kick-off. Leon Clarke opened the scoring for the Blades in the 74th minute, but Morison equalised instantly to grab his side a point. The sixth-placed Lions remain unbeaten in the league since New Year's Day and Sheffield United, who are ninth, have not lost at home since late January. Ryan Sessegnon (L) was unable to help Fulham get all three points against Brentford and Romaine Sawyers (R) Derby slipped out of the top six, but Burton moved off the bottom and to within five points of safety after a 3-1 victory over the Rams at the Pirelli Stadium. Liam Boyce tapped home from close range to put the hosts in front after 24 minutes, but their lead did not last long as David Nugent equalised moments later. Luke Murphy curled a beautiful effort past Scott Carson to restore the Brewers' lead just before the break and Lucas Akins added a third in the 68th minute. Oli McBurnie's added-time equaliser secured a vital 2-2 draw for Barnsley at home to fellow strugglers Bolton. Gary Gardner scored from 10 yards midway through the first half for the Tykes before Adam Le Fondre levelled from the spot after 82 minutes. Craig Noone thought he had won it for Bolton three minutes later, but McBurnie had the final say to keep Barnsley within two points of the 21st-placed Trotters. Sunderland slipped to the foot of the table and remain six points below Bolton after drawing 2-2 at Reading. Liam Kelly gave the Royals the lead from the penalty spot after Lee Camp brought down Jon Dadi Bodvarsson in the box after 20 minutes. Paddy McNair fired home a stunning equaliser for the Black Cats just after the break before Lee Cattermole's first goal since August 2014 put the visitors in front in the 66th minute. Yann Kermorgant restored parity for Reading with 11 minutes remaining to leave Chris Coleman's side on the brink with three games left. Ben Brereton's late penalty and Joe Lolley's goal in added time secured an unlikely 2-1 win for Nottingham Forest against Ipswich, who had led through Grant Ward's first-half header. Elsewhere, Callum Robinson's double sealed a 2-1 win for Preston against QPR, who had Matt Smith on the scoresheet, while Jordan
Mick McCarthy has announced he is leaving Ipswich Town with immediate effect, bringing an early end to his five-and-a-half-year spell at the club. The 59-year-old had been due to leave the Championship outfit at the end of the season but instead quit after Jonas Knudsen's 54th-minute goal left the team 12th in the table and above rivals Norwich on goal difference. The decision, McCarthy revealed, had been made at the weekend. "I said I would see the season out but it's been a new experience and it's not one I have been enjoying to be honest," he told the club's official website. �� | Mick McCarthy spoke with iFollow Ipswich shortly after the full-time whistle at Portman Road this evening as he confirmed his departure from the Club. pic.twitter.com/TEFfbLGOkA— Ipswich Town FC (@Official_ITFC) April 10, 2018 "I have continued to do my job to the best of my ability but there is something missing and I'm not comfortable with that. "I have had a great time here and worked with some great people and to all those who have given me wonderful support over the last five and a half years - and there are many - I want to put on record my personal thanks." BREAKING: Mick McCarthy has quit #itfc - Speaks for 3mins about game then says on reaction to Cotter sub: 'That was disgraceful reaction but listen I won't have to listen to it again because that's my last game, I'm out of here'. Bangs desk with hands and marches out press room— Stuart Watson (@Stuart_Watson) April 10, 2018 The former Republic of Ireland manager had been linked with becoming Barnsley's manager earlier in the season after Paul Heckingbottom left Oakwell to manage Leeds. He added: “I’ll also be looking forward to a new challenge elsewhere. I’ve still got a lot of football in me.”
Mick McCarthy announces Ipswich departure minutes after win over Barnsley: 'I'm out of here'
Mick McCarthy has announced he is leaving Ipswich Town with immediate effect, bringing an early end to his five-and-a-half-year spell at the club. The 59-year-old had been due to leave the Championship outfit at the end of the season but instead quit after Jonas Knudsen's 54th-minute goal left the team 12th in the table and above rivals Norwich on goal difference. The decision, McCarthy revealed, had been made at the weekend. "I said I would see the season out but it's been a new experience and it's not one I have been enjoying to be honest," he told the club's official website. �� | Mick McCarthy spoke with iFollow Ipswich shortly after the full-time whistle at Portman Road this evening as he confirmed his departure from the Club. pic.twitter.com/TEFfbLGOkA— Ipswich Town FC (@Official_ITFC) April 10, 2018 "I have continued to do my job to the best of my ability but there is something missing and I'm not comfortable with that. "I have had a great time here and worked with some great people and to all those who have given me wonderful support over the last five and a half years - and there are many - I want to put on record my personal thanks." BREAKING: Mick McCarthy has quit #itfc - Speaks for 3mins about game then says on reaction to Cotter sub: 'That was disgraceful reaction but listen I won't have to listen to it again because that's my last game, I'm out of here'. Bangs desk with hands and marches out press room— Stuart Watson (@Stuart_Watson) April 10, 2018 The former Republic of Ireland manager had been linked with becoming Barnsley's manager earlier in the season after Paul Heckingbottom left Oakwell to manage Leeds. He added: “I’ll also be looking forward to a new challenge elsewhere. I’ve still got a lot of football in me.”
Mick McCarthy has left Ipswich with immediate effect after the win over Barnsley.
‘I’m out of here’: McCarthy leaves Ipswich post despite victory over Barnsley
Mick McCarthy has left Ipswich with immediate effect after the win over Barnsley.
‘I’m out of here’: McCarthy leaves Ipswich post despite victory over Barnsley
‘I’m out of here’: McCarthy leaves Ipswich post despite victory over Barnsley
‘I’m out of here’: McCarthy leaves Ipswich post despite victory over Barnsley
‘I’m out of here’: McCarthy leaves Ipswich post despite victory over Barnsley
‘I’m out of here’: McCarthy leaves Ipswich post despite victory over Barnsley
‘I’m out of here’: McCarthy leaves Ipswich post despite victory over Barnsley
From the most exciting upcoming openings to the latest news, trends and events, keep up to date with our regularly updated guide to all that is hot in the world of hotels. • This month's best new hotel openings Hot hotel Singapore welcomes a seriously hot new hotel this month with the opening of Six Senses Duxton, an Anouska Hempel-designed five-star in the city’s Chinatown district. Drawing on the vibrant location, Hempel has infused the property with an opulent Far East vibe: think a sultry black-and-gold colour scheme offset by Chinese calligraphy wallpaper. • Rooms from £179 (0065 6914 1428; sixsenses.com/duxton) Six Senses' new hot property in Singapore has been devised by celebrated designer Anouska Hempel. All abuzz St Ermin’s Hotel in Westminster has announced dates for its 2018 beekeeping workshops, held in the hotel’s rooftop garden where six hives house more than 350,000 honeybees. Each two-and-a-half-hour session gives budding apiarists a hands-on experience with the honeycomb, followed by either a honey cocktail at the hotel’s Caxton Bar or afternoon tea in the Tea Lounge. Book now for the first workshop on April 21. • Workshop from £40pp. Rooms £180 (020 7222 7888; sterminshotel.co.uk) The beehives in St Ermin's rooftop garden hold over 350,000 Buckfast honeybees. Garden party This year marks 100 years since the birth of celebrated gardener Rosemary Verey, who fashioned the delightful grounds at Barnsley House in the Cotswolds. To mark the centenary, the hotel is hosting events throughout the year. There is an open day on April 10, followed by a village festival on May 19. • Open day entry £5pp. Rooms £224 B&B (01285 740000; barnsleyhouse.com) This year, Barnsley House is celebrating the centenary of Rosemary Verey, the woman who created the hotel's famous garden. Artistic Amsterdam To celebrate the Van Gogh & Japan exhibition, which comes to Amsterdam this spring, the Conservatorium Hotel, just round the corner from the Museumplein, has two new Van Gogh suites. Guests can choose which of the artist’s famous works (reproductions) adorn the walls, indulge in a Van Gogh-themed afternoon tea, and make the most of complimentary tickets to the exhibition. • Available until June 24. Package from £805 per night (0031 20570 0000; conservatoriumhotel.com) To celebrate the new Van Gogh & Japan exhibition in Amsterdam, the Conservatorium Hotel has launched two themed packages inspired by the artist. Milanese aromas The Hotel Principe di Savoia in Milan has revived its Secret Scents of Milan tours: a series of aromatic expeditions to the city’s gardens and perfumeries where, under the guidance of perfumer Mariangela Rossi, guests can discover the secrets of choosing, using, and creating the perfect fragrance. • Classic room from £430 (0039 2 62301; dorchestercollection.com/hotel-principe-di-savoia) The Hotel Principe di Savoia is offering its guests the chance to join 'scented tours' of the city's gardens, markets and perfumeries. Lava luxe The Blue Lagoon, one of Iceland’s best-known attractions, has been made even more alluring by the launch of its first luxury hotel. The Retreat offers a subterranean spa carved into the 800-year-old lava flow, an Icelandic restaurant, and 62 suites, the best of which open out on to a private section of mineral-rich heated water. • Suites from £1,030 (00354 4208700; retreat.bluelagoon.com) The Residence at the Blue Lagoon offers 62 suites, the best of which open out on to a private section of mineral-rich heated water. Equine adventure Don Totu, a chic little hotel embedded in rural Puglia, has teamed up with a local stables to offer horse-riding designed to immerse guests in the Arcadian landscape of Italy’s “heel”. Each five-day course includes daily rides, six nights’ accommodation in the palazzo and an Italian breakfast each day. Available May 13 to 19. • £590pp (0039 0836 992374; dontotu.it) Don Totu has set itself up as a chic base for multi-day horse riding excursions into the pristine Puglian countryside. Artistic Norfolk In celebration of Damien Hirst’s new exhibition at Houghton Hall in Norfolk, which opens today, nearby Congham Hall Hotel is relaunching its popular art trail, which maps out some of the county’s best galleries, exhibitions and installations. Hirst’s works are included, as are the GroundWork Gallery in King’s Lynn and The Old Skating Rink Gallery in Norwich. The trail is available free on the hotel website and from the reception desk. • Rooms £135 (01485 600250; conghamhallhotel.co.uk) Congham Hall has reinstated its Norfolk art trail: a curated journey through some of the county's creative hotspots. Hot hotel The Costa del Sol is set for a boost to its party scene next week with the opening of Nobu Marbella, an 81-room social hub set midway between the old town and dynamic Puerto Banús. Aside from the signature restaurant from Nobuyuki “Nobu” Matsuhisa, it promises a secluded pool with bar, sunset DJ sessions and a mixology cart. • Rooms £260 (0034 952 77 85 85; nobuhotels.com/hotels/marbella) Nobu Marbella is promising plenty of party vibes when it opens this March. Credit: CHARLY SIMON PHOTOGRAPHY Venice by night In days gone by, wealthy merchants and noblemen hired the codegas (guides) of Venice to escort them through its labyrinthine streets, lighting the way ahead during perilous night-time journeys. The city’s Baglioni Hotel Luna is reviving the tradition with its new Codega Experience, a post-sunset tour of the city’s narrow alleyways and hidden squares, led by a lamp-wielding guide and rounded off with a Signature Aperitivo back at the hotel. • Tour £321pp; rooms from £223 (0039 041 9655930; baglionihotels.com/venice) Baglioni Hotel Luna's Codega Experiences take guests on a evening tour of Venice. Mexican luxe Mexican heritage style meets contemporary design at Hotel Amapa, a new boutique hotel in Puerto Vallarta. The laid-back beach design is inspired by national design figures such as Luis Barragán, whose purist approach to colour and form can be found throughout the 55 guest rooms, Mexican restaurant, and rooftop pool and bar. • Rooms from £97 (hotelamapa.com) Hotel Amapa's style has been inspired by Mexican designers such as Luis Barragán. Credit: Petr Myska Got a hot hotel tip? Email: thehotelegraph@telegraph.co.uk
Pillow Talk: The hottest openings, news and experiences in the world of hotels
From the most exciting upcoming openings to the latest news, trends and events, keep up to date with our regularly updated guide to all that is hot in the world of hotels. • This month's best new hotel openings Hot hotel Singapore welcomes a seriously hot new hotel this month with the opening of Six Senses Duxton, an Anouska Hempel-designed five-star in the city’s Chinatown district. Drawing on the vibrant location, Hempel has infused the property with an opulent Far East vibe: think a sultry black-and-gold colour scheme offset by Chinese calligraphy wallpaper. • Rooms from £179 (0065 6914 1428; sixsenses.com/duxton) Six Senses' new hot property in Singapore has been devised by celebrated designer Anouska Hempel. All abuzz St Ermin’s Hotel in Westminster has announced dates for its 2018 beekeeping workshops, held in the hotel’s rooftop garden where six hives house more than 350,000 honeybees. Each two-and-a-half-hour session gives budding apiarists a hands-on experience with the honeycomb, followed by either a honey cocktail at the hotel’s Caxton Bar or afternoon tea in the Tea Lounge. Book now for the first workshop on April 21. • Workshop from £40pp. Rooms £180 (020 7222 7888; sterminshotel.co.uk) The beehives in St Ermin's rooftop garden hold over 350,000 Buckfast honeybees. Garden party This year marks 100 years since the birth of celebrated gardener Rosemary Verey, who fashioned the delightful grounds at Barnsley House in the Cotswolds. To mark the centenary, the hotel is hosting events throughout the year. There is an open day on April 10, followed by a village festival on May 19. • Open day entry £5pp. Rooms £224 B&B (01285 740000; barnsleyhouse.com) This year, Barnsley House is celebrating the centenary of Rosemary Verey, the woman who created the hotel's famous garden. Artistic Amsterdam To celebrate the Van Gogh & Japan exhibition, which comes to Amsterdam this spring, the Conservatorium Hotel, just round the corner from the Museumplein, has two new Van Gogh suites. Guests can choose which of the artist’s famous works (reproductions) adorn the walls, indulge in a Van Gogh-themed afternoon tea, and make the most of complimentary tickets to the exhibition. • Available until June 24. Package from £805 per night (0031 20570 0000; conservatoriumhotel.com) To celebrate the new Van Gogh & Japan exhibition in Amsterdam, the Conservatorium Hotel has launched two themed packages inspired by the artist. Milanese aromas The Hotel Principe di Savoia in Milan has revived its Secret Scents of Milan tours: a series of aromatic expeditions to the city’s gardens and perfumeries where, under the guidance of perfumer Mariangela Rossi, guests can discover the secrets of choosing, using, and creating the perfect fragrance. • Classic room from £430 (0039 2 62301; dorchestercollection.com/hotel-principe-di-savoia) The Hotel Principe di Savoia is offering its guests the chance to join 'scented tours' of the city's gardens, markets and perfumeries. Lava luxe The Blue Lagoon, one of Iceland’s best-known attractions, has been made even more alluring by the launch of its first luxury hotel. The Retreat offers a subterranean spa carved into the 800-year-old lava flow, an Icelandic restaurant, and 62 suites, the best of which open out on to a private section of mineral-rich heated water. • Suites from £1,030 (00354 4208700; retreat.bluelagoon.com) The Residence at the Blue Lagoon offers 62 suites, the best of which open out on to a private section of mineral-rich heated water. Equine adventure Don Totu, a chic little hotel embedded in rural Puglia, has teamed up with a local stables to offer horse-riding designed to immerse guests in the Arcadian landscape of Italy’s “heel”. Each five-day course includes daily rides, six nights’ accommodation in the palazzo and an Italian breakfast each day. Available May 13 to 19. • £590pp (0039 0836 992374; dontotu.it) Don Totu has set itself up as a chic base for multi-day horse riding excursions into the pristine Puglian countryside. Artistic Norfolk In celebration of Damien Hirst’s new exhibition at Houghton Hall in Norfolk, which opens today, nearby Congham Hall Hotel is relaunching its popular art trail, which maps out some of the county’s best galleries, exhibitions and installations. Hirst’s works are included, as are the GroundWork Gallery in King’s Lynn and The Old Skating Rink Gallery in Norwich. The trail is available free on the hotel website and from the reception desk. • Rooms £135 (01485 600250; conghamhallhotel.co.uk) Congham Hall has reinstated its Norfolk art trail: a curated journey through some of the county's creative hotspots. Hot hotel The Costa del Sol is set for a boost to its party scene next week with the opening of Nobu Marbella, an 81-room social hub set midway between the old town and dynamic Puerto Banús. Aside from the signature restaurant from Nobuyuki “Nobu” Matsuhisa, it promises a secluded pool with bar, sunset DJ sessions and a mixology cart. • Rooms £260 (0034 952 77 85 85; nobuhotels.com/hotels/marbella) Nobu Marbella is promising plenty of party vibes when it opens this March. Credit: CHARLY SIMON PHOTOGRAPHY Venice by night In days gone by, wealthy merchants and noblemen hired the codegas (guides) of Venice to escort them through its labyrinthine streets, lighting the way ahead during perilous night-time journeys. The city’s Baglioni Hotel Luna is reviving the tradition with its new Codega Experience, a post-sunset tour of the city’s narrow alleyways and hidden squares, led by a lamp-wielding guide and rounded off with a Signature Aperitivo back at the hotel. • Tour £321pp; rooms from £223 (0039 041 9655930; baglionihotels.com/venice) Baglioni Hotel Luna's Codega Experiences take guests on a evening tour of Venice. Mexican luxe Mexican heritage style meets contemporary design at Hotel Amapa, a new boutique hotel in Puerto Vallarta. The laid-back beach design is inspired by national design figures such as Luis Barragán, whose purist approach to colour and form can be found throughout the 55 guest rooms, Mexican restaurant, and rooftop pool and bar. • Rooms from £97 (hotelamapa.com) Hotel Amapa's style has been inspired by Mexican designers such as Luis Barragán. Credit: Petr Myska Got a hot hotel tip? Email: thehotelegraph@telegraph.co.uk
From the most exciting upcoming openings to the latest news, trends and events, keep up to date with our regularly updated guide to all that is hot in the world of hotels. • This month's best new hotel openings Hot hotel Singapore welcomes a seriously hot new hotel this month with the opening of Six Senses Duxton, an Anouska Hempel-designed five-star in the city’s Chinatown district. Drawing on the vibrant location, Hempel has infused the property with an opulent Far East vibe: think a sultry black-and-gold colour scheme offset by Chinese calligraphy wallpaper. • Rooms from £179 (0065 6914 1428; sixsenses.com/duxton) Six Senses' new hot property in Singapore has been devised by celebrated designer Anouska Hempel. All abuzz St Ermin’s Hotel in Westminster has announced dates for its 2018 beekeeping workshops, held in the hotel’s rooftop garden where six hives house more than 350,000 honeybees. Each two-and-a-half-hour session gives budding apiarists a hands-on experience with the honeycomb, followed by either a honey cocktail at the hotel’s Caxton Bar or afternoon tea in the Tea Lounge. Book now for the first workshop on April 21. • Workshop from £40pp. Rooms £180 (020 7222 7888; sterminshotel.co.uk) The beehives in St Ermin's rooftop garden hold over 350,000 Buckfast honeybees. Garden party This year marks 100 years since the birth of celebrated gardener Rosemary Verey, who fashioned the delightful grounds at Barnsley House in the Cotswolds. To mark the centenary, the hotel is hosting events throughout the year. There is an open day on April 10, followed by a village festival on May 19. • Open day entry £5pp. Rooms £224 B&B (01285 740000; barnsleyhouse.com) This year, Barnsley House is celebrating the centenary of Rosemary Verey, the woman who created the hotel's famous garden. Artistic Amsterdam To celebrate the Van Gogh & Japan exhibition, which comes to Amsterdam this spring, the Conservatorium Hotel, just round the corner from the Museumplein, has two new Van Gogh suites. Guests can choose which of the artist’s famous works (reproductions) adorn the walls, indulge in a Van Gogh-themed afternoon tea, and make the most of complimentary tickets to the exhibition. • Available until June 24. Package from £805 per night (0031 20570 0000; conservatoriumhotel.com) To celebrate the new Van Gogh & Japan exhibition in Amsterdam, the Conservatorium Hotel has launched two themed packages inspired by the artist. Milanese aromas The Hotel Principe di Savoia in Milan has revived its Secret Scents of Milan tours: a series of aromatic expeditions to the city’s gardens and perfumeries where, under the guidance of perfumer Mariangela Rossi, guests can discover the secrets of choosing, using, and creating the perfect fragrance. • Classic room from £430 (0039 2 62301; dorchestercollection.com/hotel-principe-di-savoia) The Hotel Principe di Savoia is offering its guests the chance to join 'scented tours' of the city's gardens, markets and perfumeries. Lava luxe The Blue Lagoon, one of Iceland’s best-known attractions, has been made even more alluring by the launch of its first luxury hotel. The Retreat offers a subterranean spa carved into the 800-year-old lava flow, an Icelandic restaurant, and 62 suites, the best of which open out on to a private section of mineral-rich heated water. • Suites from £1,030 (00354 4208700; retreat.bluelagoon.com) The Residence at the Blue Lagoon offers 62 suites, the best of which open out on to a private section of mineral-rich heated water. Equine adventure Don Totu, a chic little hotel embedded in rural Puglia, has teamed up with a local stables to offer horse-riding designed to immerse guests in the Arcadian landscape of Italy’s “heel”. Each five-day course includes daily rides, six nights’ accommodation in the palazzo and an Italian breakfast each day. Available May 13 to 19. • £590pp (0039 0836 992374; dontotu.it) Don Totu has set itself up as a chic base for multi-day horse riding excursions into the pristine Puglian countryside. Artistic Norfolk In celebration of Damien Hirst’s new exhibition at Houghton Hall in Norfolk, which opens today, nearby Congham Hall Hotel is relaunching its popular art trail, which maps out some of the county’s best galleries, exhibitions and installations. Hirst’s works are included, as are the GroundWork Gallery in King’s Lynn and The Old Skating Rink Gallery in Norwich. The trail is available free on the hotel website and from the reception desk. • Rooms £135 (01485 600250; conghamhallhotel.co.uk) Congham Hall has reinstated its Norfolk art trail: a curated journey through some of the county's creative hotspots. Hot hotel The Costa del Sol is set for a boost to its party scene next week with the opening of Nobu Marbella, an 81-room social hub set midway between the old town and dynamic Puerto Banús. Aside from the signature restaurant from Nobuyuki “Nobu” Matsuhisa, it promises a secluded pool with bar, sunset DJ sessions and a mixology cart. • Rooms £260 (0034 952 77 85 85; nobuhotels.com/hotels/marbella) Nobu Marbella is promising plenty of party vibes when it opens this March. Credit: CHARLY SIMON PHOTOGRAPHY Venice by night In days gone by, wealthy merchants and noblemen hired the codegas (guides) of Venice to escort them through its labyrinthine streets, lighting the way ahead during perilous night-time journeys. The city’s Baglioni Hotel Luna is reviving the tradition with its new Codega Experience, a post-sunset tour of the city’s narrow alleyways and hidden squares, led by a lamp-wielding guide and rounded off with a Signature Aperitivo back at the hotel. • Tour £321pp; rooms from £223 (0039 041 9655930; baglionihotels.com/venice) Baglioni Hotel Luna's Codega Experiences take guests on a evening tour of Venice. Mexican luxe Mexican heritage style meets contemporary design at Hotel Amapa, a new boutique hotel in Puerto Vallarta. The laid-back beach design is inspired by national design figures such as Luis Barragán, whose purist approach to colour and form can be found throughout the 55 guest rooms, Mexican restaurant, and rooftop pool and bar. • Rooms from £97 (hotelamapa.com) Hotel Amapa's style has been inspired by Mexican designers such as Luis Barragán. Credit: Petr Myska Got a hot hotel tip? Email: thehotelegraph@telegraph.co.uk
Pillow Talk: The hottest openings, news and experiences in the world of hotels
From the most exciting upcoming openings to the latest news, trends and events, keep up to date with our regularly updated guide to all that is hot in the world of hotels. • This month's best new hotel openings Hot hotel Singapore welcomes a seriously hot new hotel this month with the opening of Six Senses Duxton, an Anouska Hempel-designed five-star in the city’s Chinatown district. Drawing on the vibrant location, Hempel has infused the property with an opulent Far East vibe: think a sultry black-and-gold colour scheme offset by Chinese calligraphy wallpaper. • Rooms from £179 (0065 6914 1428; sixsenses.com/duxton) Six Senses' new hot property in Singapore has been devised by celebrated designer Anouska Hempel. All abuzz St Ermin’s Hotel in Westminster has announced dates for its 2018 beekeeping workshops, held in the hotel’s rooftop garden where six hives house more than 350,000 honeybees. Each two-and-a-half-hour session gives budding apiarists a hands-on experience with the honeycomb, followed by either a honey cocktail at the hotel’s Caxton Bar or afternoon tea in the Tea Lounge. Book now for the first workshop on April 21. • Workshop from £40pp. Rooms £180 (020 7222 7888; sterminshotel.co.uk) The beehives in St Ermin's rooftop garden hold over 350,000 Buckfast honeybees. Garden party This year marks 100 years since the birth of celebrated gardener Rosemary Verey, who fashioned the delightful grounds at Barnsley House in the Cotswolds. To mark the centenary, the hotel is hosting events throughout the year. There is an open day on April 10, followed by a village festival on May 19. • Open day entry £5pp. Rooms £224 B&B (01285 740000; barnsleyhouse.com) This year, Barnsley House is celebrating the centenary of Rosemary Verey, the woman who created the hotel's famous garden. Artistic Amsterdam To celebrate the Van Gogh & Japan exhibition, which comes to Amsterdam this spring, the Conservatorium Hotel, just round the corner from the Museumplein, has two new Van Gogh suites. Guests can choose which of the artist’s famous works (reproductions) adorn the walls, indulge in a Van Gogh-themed afternoon tea, and make the most of complimentary tickets to the exhibition. • Available until June 24. Package from £805 per night (0031 20570 0000; conservatoriumhotel.com) To celebrate the new Van Gogh & Japan exhibition in Amsterdam, the Conservatorium Hotel has launched two themed packages inspired by the artist. Milanese aromas The Hotel Principe di Savoia in Milan has revived its Secret Scents of Milan tours: a series of aromatic expeditions to the city’s gardens and perfumeries where, under the guidance of perfumer Mariangela Rossi, guests can discover the secrets of choosing, using, and creating the perfect fragrance. • Classic room from £430 (0039 2 62301; dorchestercollection.com/hotel-principe-di-savoia) The Hotel Principe di Savoia is offering its guests the chance to join 'scented tours' of the city's gardens, markets and perfumeries. Lava luxe The Blue Lagoon, one of Iceland’s best-known attractions, has been made even more alluring by the launch of its first luxury hotel. The Retreat offers a subterranean spa carved into the 800-year-old lava flow, an Icelandic restaurant, and 62 suites, the best of which open out on to a private section of mineral-rich heated water. • Suites from £1,030 (00354 4208700; retreat.bluelagoon.com) The Residence at the Blue Lagoon offers 62 suites, the best of which open out on to a private section of mineral-rich heated water. Equine adventure Don Totu, a chic little hotel embedded in rural Puglia, has teamed up with a local stables to offer horse-riding designed to immerse guests in the Arcadian landscape of Italy’s “heel”. Each five-day course includes daily rides, six nights’ accommodation in the palazzo and an Italian breakfast each day. Available May 13 to 19. • £590pp (0039 0836 992374; dontotu.it) Don Totu has set itself up as a chic base for multi-day horse riding excursions into the pristine Puglian countryside. Artistic Norfolk In celebration of Damien Hirst’s new exhibition at Houghton Hall in Norfolk, which opens today, nearby Congham Hall Hotel is relaunching its popular art trail, which maps out some of the county’s best galleries, exhibitions and installations. Hirst’s works are included, as are the GroundWork Gallery in King’s Lynn and The Old Skating Rink Gallery in Norwich. The trail is available free on the hotel website and from the reception desk. • Rooms £135 (01485 600250; conghamhallhotel.co.uk) Congham Hall has reinstated its Norfolk art trail: a curated journey through some of the county's creative hotspots. Hot hotel The Costa del Sol is set for a boost to its party scene next week with the opening of Nobu Marbella, an 81-room social hub set midway between the old town and dynamic Puerto Banús. Aside from the signature restaurant from Nobuyuki “Nobu” Matsuhisa, it promises a secluded pool with bar, sunset DJ sessions and a mixology cart. • Rooms £260 (0034 952 77 85 85; nobuhotels.com/hotels/marbella) Nobu Marbella is promising plenty of party vibes when it opens this March. Credit: CHARLY SIMON PHOTOGRAPHY Venice by night In days gone by, wealthy merchants and noblemen hired the codegas (guides) of Venice to escort them through its labyrinthine streets, lighting the way ahead during perilous night-time journeys. The city’s Baglioni Hotel Luna is reviving the tradition with its new Codega Experience, a post-sunset tour of the city’s narrow alleyways and hidden squares, led by a lamp-wielding guide and rounded off with a Signature Aperitivo back at the hotel. • Tour £321pp; rooms from £223 (0039 041 9655930; baglionihotels.com/venice) Baglioni Hotel Luna's Codega Experiences take guests on a evening tour of Venice. Mexican luxe Mexican heritage style meets contemporary design at Hotel Amapa, a new boutique hotel in Puerto Vallarta. The laid-back beach design is inspired by national design figures such as Luis Barragán, whose purist approach to colour and form can be found throughout the 55 guest rooms, Mexican restaurant, and rooftop pool and bar. • Rooms from £97 (hotelamapa.com) Hotel Amapa's style has been inspired by Mexican designers such as Luis Barragán. Credit: Petr Myska Got a hot hotel tip? Email: thehotelegraph@telegraph.co.uk
From the most exciting upcoming openings to the latest news, trends and events, keep up to date with our regularly updated guide to all that is hot in the world of hotels. • This month's best new hotel openings Hot hotel Singapore welcomes a seriously hot new hotel this month with the opening of Six Senses Duxton, an Anouska Hempel-designed five-star in the city’s Chinatown district. Drawing on the vibrant location, Hempel has infused the property with an opulent Far East vibe: think a sultry black-and-gold colour scheme offset by Chinese calligraphy wallpaper. • Rooms from £179 (0065 6914 1428; sixsenses.com/duxton) Six Senses' new hot property in Singapore has been devised by celebrated designer Anouska Hempel. All abuzz St Ermin’s Hotel in Westminster has announced dates for its 2018 beekeeping workshops, held in the hotel’s rooftop garden where six hives house more than 350,000 honeybees. Each two-and-a-half-hour session gives budding apiarists a hands-on experience with the honeycomb, followed by either a honey cocktail at the hotel’s Caxton Bar or afternoon tea in the Tea Lounge. Book now for the first workshop on April 21. • Workshop from £40pp. Rooms £180 (020 7222 7888; sterminshotel.co.uk) The beehives in St Ermin's rooftop garden hold over 350,000 Buckfast honeybees. Garden party This year marks 100 years since the birth of celebrated gardener Rosemary Verey, who fashioned the delightful grounds at Barnsley House in the Cotswolds. To mark the centenary, the hotel is hosting events throughout the year. There is an open day on April 10, followed by a village festival on May 19. • Open day entry £5pp. Rooms £224 B&B (01285 740000; barnsleyhouse.com) This year, Barnsley House is celebrating the centenary of Rosemary Verey, the woman who created the hotel's famous garden. Artistic Amsterdam To celebrate the Van Gogh & Japan exhibition, which comes to Amsterdam this spring, the Conservatorium Hotel, just round the corner from the Museumplein, has two new Van Gogh suites. Guests can choose which of the artist’s famous works (reproductions) adorn the walls, indulge in a Van Gogh-themed afternoon tea, and make the most of complimentary tickets to the exhibition. • Available until June 24. Package from £805 per night (0031 20570 0000; conservatoriumhotel.com) To celebrate the new Van Gogh & Japan exhibition in Amsterdam, the Conservatorium Hotel has launched two themed packages inspired by the artist. Milanese aromas The Hotel Principe di Savoia in Milan has revived its Secret Scents of Milan tours: a series of aromatic expeditions to the city’s gardens and perfumeries where, under the guidance of perfumer Mariangela Rossi, guests can discover the secrets of choosing, using, and creating the perfect fragrance. • Classic room from £430 (0039 2 62301; dorchestercollection.com/hotel-principe-di-savoia) The Hotel Principe di Savoia is offering its guests the chance to join 'scented tours' of the city's gardens, markets and perfumeries. Lava luxe The Blue Lagoon, one of Iceland’s best-known attractions, has been made even more alluring by the launch of its first luxury hotel. The Retreat offers a subterranean spa carved into the 800-year-old lava flow, an Icelandic restaurant, and 62 suites, the best of which open out on to a private section of mineral-rich heated water. • Suites from £1,030 (00354 4208700; retreat.bluelagoon.com) The Residence at the Blue Lagoon offers 62 suites, the best of which open out on to a private section of mineral-rich heated water. Equine adventure Don Totu, a chic little hotel embedded in rural Puglia, has teamed up with a local stables to offer horse-riding designed to immerse guests in the Arcadian landscape of Italy’s “heel”. Each five-day course includes daily rides, six nights’ accommodation in the palazzo and an Italian breakfast each day. Available May 13 to 19. • £590pp (0039 0836 992374; dontotu.it) Don Totu has set itself up as a chic base for multi-day horse riding excursions into the pristine Puglian countryside. Artistic Norfolk In celebration of Damien Hirst’s new exhibition at Houghton Hall in Norfolk, which opens today, nearby Congham Hall Hotel is relaunching its popular art trail, which maps out some of the county’s best galleries, exhibitions and installations. Hirst’s works are included, as are the GroundWork Gallery in King’s Lynn and The Old Skating Rink Gallery in Norwich. The trail is available free on the hotel website and from the reception desk. • Rooms £135 (01485 600250; conghamhallhotel.co.uk) Congham Hall has reinstated its Norfolk art trail: a curated journey through some of the county's creative hotspots. Hot hotel The Costa del Sol is set for a boost to its party scene next week with the opening of Nobu Marbella, an 81-room social hub set midway between the old town and dynamic Puerto Banús. Aside from the signature restaurant from Nobuyuki “Nobu” Matsuhisa, it promises a secluded pool with bar, sunset DJ sessions and a mixology cart. • Rooms £260 (0034 952 77 85 85; nobuhotels.com/hotels/marbella) Nobu Marbella is promising plenty of party vibes when it opens this March. Credit: CHARLY SIMON PHOTOGRAPHY Venice by night In days gone by, wealthy merchants and noblemen hired the codegas (guides) of Venice to escort them through its labyrinthine streets, lighting the way ahead during perilous night-time journeys. The city’s Baglioni Hotel Luna is reviving the tradition with its new Codega Experience, a post-sunset tour of the city’s narrow alleyways and hidden squares, led by a lamp-wielding guide and rounded off with a Signature Aperitivo back at the hotel. • Tour £321pp; rooms from £223 (0039 041 9655930; baglionihotels.com/venice) Baglioni Hotel Luna's Codega Experiences take guests on a evening tour of Venice. Mexican luxe Mexican heritage style meets contemporary design at Hotel Amapa, a new boutique hotel in Puerto Vallarta. The laid-back beach design is inspired by national design figures such as Luis Barragán, whose purist approach to colour and form can be found throughout the 55 guest rooms, Mexican restaurant, and rooftop pool and bar. • Rooms from £97 (hotelamapa.com) Hotel Amapa's style has been inspired by Mexican designers such as Luis Barragán. Credit: Petr Myska Got a hot hotel tip? Email: thehotelegraph@telegraph.co.uk
Pillow Talk: The hottest openings, news and experiences in the world of hotels
From the most exciting upcoming openings to the latest news, trends and events, keep up to date with our regularly updated guide to all that is hot in the world of hotels. • This month's best new hotel openings Hot hotel Singapore welcomes a seriously hot new hotel this month with the opening of Six Senses Duxton, an Anouska Hempel-designed five-star in the city’s Chinatown district. Drawing on the vibrant location, Hempel has infused the property with an opulent Far East vibe: think a sultry black-and-gold colour scheme offset by Chinese calligraphy wallpaper. • Rooms from £179 (0065 6914 1428; sixsenses.com/duxton) Six Senses' new hot property in Singapore has been devised by celebrated designer Anouska Hempel. All abuzz St Ermin’s Hotel in Westminster has announced dates for its 2018 beekeeping workshops, held in the hotel’s rooftop garden where six hives house more than 350,000 honeybees. Each two-and-a-half-hour session gives budding apiarists a hands-on experience with the honeycomb, followed by either a honey cocktail at the hotel’s Caxton Bar or afternoon tea in the Tea Lounge. Book now for the first workshop on April 21. • Workshop from £40pp. Rooms £180 (020 7222 7888; sterminshotel.co.uk) The beehives in St Ermin's rooftop garden hold over 350,000 Buckfast honeybees. Garden party This year marks 100 years since the birth of celebrated gardener Rosemary Verey, who fashioned the delightful grounds at Barnsley House in the Cotswolds. To mark the centenary, the hotel is hosting events throughout the year. There is an open day on April 10, followed by a village festival on May 19. • Open day entry £5pp. Rooms £224 B&B (01285 740000; barnsleyhouse.com) This year, Barnsley House is celebrating the centenary of Rosemary Verey, the woman who created the hotel's famous garden. Artistic Amsterdam To celebrate the Van Gogh & Japan exhibition, which comes to Amsterdam this spring, the Conservatorium Hotel, just round the corner from the Museumplein, has two new Van Gogh suites. Guests can choose which of the artist’s famous works (reproductions) adorn the walls, indulge in a Van Gogh-themed afternoon tea, and make the most of complimentary tickets to the exhibition. • Available until June 24. Package from £805 per night (0031 20570 0000; conservatoriumhotel.com) To celebrate the new Van Gogh & Japan exhibition in Amsterdam, the Conservatorium Hotel has launched two themed packages inspired by the artist. Milanese aromas The Hotel Principe di Savoia in Milan has revived its Secret Scents of Milan tours: a series of aromatic expeditions to the city’s gardens and perfumeries where, under the guidance of perfumer Mariangela Rossi, guests can discover the secrets of choosing, using, and creating the perfect fragrance. • Classic room from £430 (0039 2 62301; dorchestercollection.com/hotel-principe-di-savoia) The Hotel Principe di Savoia is offering its guests the chance to join 'scented tours' of the city's gardens, markets and perfumeries. Lava luxe The Blue Lagoon, one of Iceland’s best-known attractions, has been made even more alluring by the launch of its first luxury hotel. The Retreat offers a subterranean spa carved into the 800-year-old lava flow, an Icelandic restaurant, and 62 suites, the best of which open out on to a private section of mineral-rich heated water. • Suites from £1,030 (00354 4208700; retreat.bluelagoon.com) The Residence at the Blue Lagoon offers 62 suites, the best of which open out on to a private section of mineral-rich heated water. Equine adventure Don Totu, a chic little hotel embedded in rural Puglia, has teamed up with a local stables to offer horse-riding designed to immerse guests in the Arcadian landscape of Italy’s “heel”. Each five-day course includes daily rides, six nights’ accommodation in the palazzo and an Italian breakfast each day. Available May 13 to 19. • £590pp (0039 0836 992374; dontotu.it) Don Totu has set itself up as a chic base for multi-day horse riding excursions into the pristine Puglian countryside. Artistic Norfolk In celebration of Damien Hirst’s new exhibition at Houghton Hall in Norfolk, which opens today, nearby Congham Hall Hotel is relaunching its popular art trail, which maps out some of the county’s best galleries, exhibitions and installations. Hirst’s works are included, as are the GroundWork Gallery in King’s Lynn and The Old Skating Rink Gallery in Norwich. The trail is available free on the hotel website and from the reception desk. • Rooms £135 (01485 600250; conghamhallhotel.co.uk) Congham Hall has reinstated its Norfolk art trail: a curated journey through some of the county's creative hotspots. Hot hotel The Costa del Sol is set for a boost to its party scene next week with the opening of Nobu Marbella, an 81-room social hub set midway between the old town and dynamic Puerto Banús. Aside from the signature restaurant from Nobuyuki “Nobu” Matsuhisa, it promises a secluded pool with bar, sunset DJ sessions and a mixology cart. • Rooms £260 (0034 952 77 85 85; nobuhotels.com/hotels/marbella) Nobu Marbella is promising plenty of party vibes when it opens this March. Credit: CHARLY SIMON PHOTOGRAPHY Venice by night In days gone by, wealthy merchants and noblemen hired the codegas (guides) of Venice to escort them through its labyrinthine streets, lighting the way ahead during perilous night-time journeys. The city’s Baglioni Hotel Luna is reviving the tradition with its new Codega Experience, a post-sunset tour of the city’s narrow alleyways and hidden squares, led by a lamp-wielding guide and rounded off with a Signature Aperitivo back at the hotel. • Tour £321pp; rooms from £223 (0039 041 9655930; baglionihotels.com/venice) Baglioni Hotel Luna's Codega Experiences take guests on a evening tour of Venice. Mexican luxe Mexican heritage style meets contemporary design at Hotel Amapa, a new boutique hotel in Puerto Vallarta. The laid-back beach design is inspired by national design figures such as Luis Barragán, whose purist approach to colour and form can be found throughout the 55 guest rooms, Mexican restaurant, and rooftop pool and bar. • Rooms from £97 (hotelamapa.com) Hotel Amapa's style has been inspired by Mexican designers such as Luis Barragán. Credit: Petr Myska Got a hot hotel tip? Email: thehotelegraph@telegraph.co.uk
From the most exciting upcoming openings to the latest news, trends and events, keep up to date with our regularly updated guide to all that is hot in the world of hotels. • This month's best new hotel openings Hot hotel Singapore welcomes a seriously hot new hotel this month with the opening of Six Senses Duxton, an Anouska Hempel-designed five-star in the city’s Chinatown district. Drawing on the vibrant location, Hempel has infused the property with an opulent Far East vibe: think a sultry black-and-gold colour scheme offset by Chinese calligraphy wallpaper. • Rooms from £179 (0065 6914 1428; sixsenses.com/duxton) Six Senses' new hot property in Singapore has been devised by celebrated designer Anouska Hempel. All abuzz St Ermin’s Hotel in Westminster has announced dates for its 2018 beekeeping workshops, held in the hotel’s rooftop garden where six hives house more than 350,000 honeybees. Each two-and-a-half-hour session gives budding apiarists a hands-on experience with the honeycomb, followed by either a honey cocktail at the hotel’s Caxton Bar or afternoon tea in the Tea Lounge. Book now for the first workshop on April 21. • Workshop from £40pp. Rooms £180 (020 7222 7888; sterminshotel.co.uk) The beehives in St Ermin's rooftop garden hold over 350,000 Buckfast honeybees. Garden party This year marks 100 years since the birth of celebrated gardener Rosemary Verey, who fashioned the delightful grounds at Barnsley House in the Cotswolds. To mark the centenary, the hotel is hosting events throughout the year. There is an open day on April 10, followed by a village festival on May 19. • Open day entry £5pp. Rooms £224 B&B (01285 740000; barnsleyhouse.com) This year, Barnsley House is celebrating the centenary of Rosemary Verey, the woman who created the hotel's famous garden. Artistic Amsterdam To celebrate the Van Gogh & Japan exhibition, which comes to Amsterdam this spring, the Conservatorium Hotel, just round the corner from the Museumplein, has two new Van Gogh suites. Guests can choose which of the artist’s famous works (reproductions) adorn the walls, indulge in a Van Gogh-themed afternoon tea, and make the most of complimentary tickets to the exhibition. • Available until June 24. Package from £805 per night (0031 20570 0000; conservatoriumhotel.com) To celebrate the new Van Gogh & Japan exhibition in Amsterdam, the Conservatorium Hotel has launched two themed packages inspired by the artist. Milanese aromas The Hotel Principe di Savoia in Milan has revived its Secret Scents of Milan tours: a series of aromatic expeditions to the city’s gardens and perfumeries where, under the guidance of perfumer Mariangela Rossi, guests can discover the secrets of choosing, using, and creating the perfect fragrance. • Classic room from £430 (0039 2 62301; dorchestercollection.com/hotel-principe-di-savoia) The Hotel Principe di Savoia is offering its guests the chance to join 'scented tours' of the city's gardens, markets and perfumeries. Lava luxe The Blue Lagoon, one of Iceland’s best-known attractions, has been made even more alluring by the launch of its first luxury hotel. The Retreat offers a subterranean spa carved into the 800-year-old lava flow, an Icelandic restaurant, and 62 suites, the best of which open out on to a private section of mineral-rich heated water. • Suites from £1,030 (00354 4208700; retreat.bluelagoon.com) The Residence at the Blue Lagoon offers 62 suites, the best of which open out on to a private section of mineral-rich heated water. Equine adventure Don Totu, a chic little hotel embedded in rural Puglia, has teamed up with a local stables to offer horse-riding designed to immerse guests in the Arcadian landscape of Italy’s “heel”. Each five-day course includes daily rides, six nights’ accommodation in the palazzo and an Italian breakfast each day. Available May 13 to 19. • £590pp (0039 0836 992374; dontotu.it) Don Totu has set itself up as a chic base for multi-day horse riding excursions into the pristine Puglian countryside. Artistic Norfolk In celebration of Damien Hirst’s new exhibition at Houghton Hall in Norfolk, which opens today, nearby Congham Hall Hotel is relaunching its popular art trail, which maps out some of the county’s best galleries, exhibitions and installations. Hirst’s works are included, as are the GroundWork Gallery in King’s Lynn and The Old Skating Rink Gallery in Norwich. The trail is available free on the hotel website and from the reception desk. • Rooms £135 (01485 600250; conghamhallhotel.co.uk) Congham Hall has reinstated its Norfolk art trail: a curated journey through some of the county's creative hotspots. Hot hotel The Costa del Sol is set for a boost to its party scene next week with the opening of Nobu Marbella, an 81-room social hub set midway between the old town and dynamic Puerto Banús. Aside from the signature restaurant from Nobuyuki “Nobu” Matsuhisa, it promises a secluded pool with bar, sunset DJ sessions and a mixology cart. • Rooms £260 (0034 952 77 85 85; nobuhotels.com/hotels/marbella) Nobu Marbella is promising plenty of party vibes when it opens this March. Credit: CHARLY SIMON PHOTOGRAPHY Venice by night In days gone by, wealthy merchants and noblemen hired the codegas (guides) of Venice to escort them through its labyrinthine streets, lighting the way ahead during perilous night-time journeys. The city’s Baglioni Hotel Luna is reviving the tradition with its new Codega Experience, a post-sunset tour of the city’s narrow alleyways and hidden squares, led by a lamp-wielding guide and rounded off with a Signature Aperitivo back at the hotel. • Tour £321pp; rooms from £223 (0039 041 9655930; baglionihotels.com/venice) Baglioni Hotel Luna's Codega Experiences take guests on a evening tour of Venice. Mexican luxe Mexican heritage style meets contemporary design at Hotel Amapa, a new boutique hotel in Puerto Vallarta. The laid-back beach design is inspired by national design figures such as Luis Barragán, whose purist approach to colour and form can be found throughout the 55 guest rooms, Mexican restaurant, and rooftop pool and bar. • Rooms from £97 (hotelamapa.com) Hotel Amapa's style has been inspired by Mexican designers such as Luis Barragán. Credit: Petr Myska Got a hot hotel tip? Email: thehotelegraph@telegraph.co.uk
Pillow Talk: The hottest openings, news and experiences in the world of hotels
From the most exciting upcoming openings to the latest news, trends and events, keep up to date with our regularly updated guide to all that is hot in the world of hotels. • This month's best new hotel openings Hot hotel Singapore welcomes a seriously hot new hotel this month with the opening of Six Senses Duxton, an Anouska Hempel-designed five-star in the city’s Chinatown district. Drawing on the vibrant location, Hempel has infused the property with an opulent Far East vibe: think a sultry black-and-gold colour scheme offset by Chinese calligraphy wallpaper. • Rooms from £179 (0065 6914 1428; sixsenses.com/duxton) Six Senses' new hot property in Singapore has been devised by celebrated designer Anouska Hempel. All abuzz St Ermin’s Hotel in Westminster has announced dates for its 2018 beekeeping workshops, held in the hotel’s rooftop garden where six hives house more than 350,000 honeybees. Each two-and-a-half-hour session gives budding apiarists a hands-on experience with the honeycomb, followed by either a honey cocktail at the hotel’s Caxton Bar or afternoon tea in the Tea Lounge. Book now for the first workshop on April 21. • Workshop from £40pp. Rooms £180 (020 7222 7888; sterminshotel.co.uk) The beehives in St Ermin's rooftop garden hold over 350,000 Buckfast honeybees. Garden party This year marks 100 years since the birth of celebrated gardener Rosemary Verey, who fashioned the delightful grounds at Barnsley House in the Cotswolds. To mark the centenary, the hotel is hosting events throughout the year. There is an open day on April 10, followed by a village festival on May 19. • Open day entry £5pp. Rooms £224 B&B (01285 740000; barnsleyhouse.com) This year, Barnsley House is celebrating the centenary of Rosemary Verey, the woman who created the hotel's famous garden. Artistic Amsterdam To celebrate the Van Gogh & Japan exhibition, which comes to Amsterdam this spring, the Conservatorium Hotel, just round the corner from the Museumplein, has two new Van Gogh suites. Guests can choose which of the artist’s famous works (reproductions) adorn the walls, indulge in a Van Gogh-themed afternoon tea, and make the most of complimentary tickets to the exhibition. • Available until June 24. Package from £805 per night (0031 20570 0000; conservatoriumhotel.com) To celebrate the new Van Gogh & Japan exhibition in Amsterdam, the Conservatorium Hotel has launched two themed packages inspired by the artist. Milanese aromas The Hotel Principe di Savoia in Milan has revived its Secret Scents of Milan tours: a series of aromatic expeditions to the city’s gardens and perfumeries where, under the guidance of perfumer Mariangela Rossi, guests can discover the secrets of choosing, using, and creating the perfect fragrance. • Classic room from £430 (0039 2 62301; dorchestercollection.com/hotel-principe-di-savoia) The Hotel Principe di Savoia is offering its guests the chance to join 'scented tours' of the city's gardens, markets and perfumeries. Lava luxe The Blue Lagoon, one of Iceland’s best-known attractions, has been made even more alluring by the launch of its first luxury hotel. The Retreat offers a subterranean spa carved into the 800-year-old lava flow, an Icelandic restaurant, and 62 suites, the best of which open out on to a private section of mineral-rich heated water. • Suites from £1,030 (00354 4208700; retreat.bluelagoon.com) The Residence at the Blue Lagoon offers 62 suites, the best of which open out on to a private section of mineral-rich heated water. Equine adventure Don Totu, a chic little hotel embedded in rural Puglia, has teamed up with a local stables to offer horse-riding designed to immerse guests in the Arcadian landscape of Italy’s “heel”. Each five-day course includes daily rides, six nights’ accommodation in the palazzo and an Italian breakfast each day. Available May 13 to 19. • £590pp (0039 0836 992374; dontotu.it) Don Totu has set itself up as a chic base for multi-day horse riding excursions into the pristine Puglian countryside. Artistic Norfolk In celebration of Damien Hirst’s new exhibition at Houghton Hall in Norfolk, which opens today, nearby Congham Hall Hotel is relaunching its popular art trail, which maps out some of the county’s best galleries, exhibitions and installations. Hirst’s works are included, as are the GroundWork Gallery in King’s Lynn and The Old Skating Rink Gallery in Norwich. The trail is available free on the hotel website and from the reception desk. • Rooms £135 (01485 600250; conghamhallhotel.co.uk) Congham Hall has reinstated its Norfolk art trail: a curated journey through some of the county's creative hotspots. Hot hotel The Costa del Sol is set for a boost to its party scene next week with the opening of Nobu Marbella, an 81-room social hub set midway between the old town and dynamic Puerto Banús. Aside from the signature restaurant from Nobuyuki “Nobu” Matsuhisa, it promises a secluded pool with bar, sunset DJ sessions and a mixology cart. • Rooms £260 (0034 952 77 85 85; nobuhotels.com/hotels/marbella) Nobu Marbella is promising plenty of party vibes when it opens this March. Credit: CHARLY SIMON PHOTOGRAPHY Venice by night In days gone by, wealthy merchants and noblemen hired the codegas (guides) of Venice to escort them through its labyrinthine streets, lighting the way ahead during perilous night-time journeys. The city’s Baglioni Hotel Luna is reviving the tradition with its new Codega Experience, a post-sunset tour of the city’s narrow alleyways and hidden squares, led by a lamp-wielding guide and rounded off with a Signature Aperitivo back at the hotel. • Tour £321pp; rooms from £223 (0039 041 9655930; baglionihotels.com/venice) Baglioni Hotel Luna's Codega Experiences take guests on a evening tour of Venice. Mexican luxe Mexican heritage style meets contemporary design at Hotel Amapa, a new boutique hotel in Puerto Vallarta. The laid-back beach design is inspired by national design figures such as Luis Barragán, whose purist approach to colour and form can be found throughout the 55 guest rooms, Mexican restaurant, and rooftop pool and bar. • Rooms from £97 (hotelamapa.com) Hotel Amapa's style has been inspired by Mexican designers such as Luis Barragán. Credit: Petr Myska Got a hot hotel tip? Email: thehotelegraph@telegraph.co.uk
From the most exciting upcoming openings to the latest news, trends and events, keep up to date with our regularly updated guide to all that is hot in the world of hotels. • This month's best new hotel openings Hot hotel Singapore welcomes a seriously hot new hotel this month with the opening of Six Senses Duxton, an Anouska Hempel-designed five-star in the city’s Chinatown district. Drawing on the vibrant location, Hempel has infused the property with an opulent Far East vibe: think a sultry black-and-gold colour scheme offset by Chinese calligraphy wallpaper. • Rooms from £179 (0065 6914 1428; sixsenses.com/duxton) Six Senses' new hot property in Singapore has been devised by celebrated designer Anouska Hempel. All abuzz St Ermin’s Hotel in Westminster has announced dates for its 2018 beekeeping workshops, held in the hotel’s rooftop garden where six hives house more than 350,000 honeybees. Each two-and-a-half-hour session gives budding apiarists a hands-on experience with the honeycomb, followed by either a honey cocktail at the hotel’s Caxton Bar or afternoon tea in the Tea Lounge. Book now for the first workshop on April 21. • Workshop from £40pp. Rooms £180 (020 7222 7888; sterminshotel.co.uk) The beehives in St Ermin's rooftop garden hold over 350,000 Buckfast honeybees. Garden party This year marks 100 years since the birth of celebrated gardener Rosemary Verey, who fashioned the delightful grounds at Barnsley House in the Cotswolds. To mark the centenary, the hotel is hosting events throughout the year. There is an open day on April 10, followed by a village festival on May 19. • Open day entry £5pp. Rooms £224 B&B (01285 740000; barnsleyhouse.com) This year, Barnsley House is celebrating the centenary of Rosemary Verey, the woman who created the hotel's famous garden. Artistic Amsterdam To celebrate the Van Gogh & Japan exhibition, which comes to Amsterdam this spring, the Conservatorium Hotel, just round the corner from the Museumplein, has two new Van Gogh suites. Guests can choose which of the artist’s famous works (reproductions) adorn the walls, indulge in a Van Gogh-themed afternoon tea, and make the most of complimentary tickets to the exhibition. • Available until June 24. Package from £805 per night (0031 20570 0000; conservatoriumhotel.com) To celebrate the new Van Gogh & Japan exhibition in Amsterdam, the Conservatorium Hotel has launched two themed packages inspired by the artist. Milanese aromas The Hotel Principe di Savoia in Milan has revived its Secret Scents of Milan tours: a series of aromatic expeditions to the city’s gardens and perfumeries where, under the guidance of perfumer Mariangela Rossi, guests can discover the secrets of choosing, using, and creating the perfect fragrance. • Classic room from £430 (0039 2 62301; dorchestercollection.com/hotel-principe-di-savoia) The Hotel Principe di Savoia is offering its guests the chance to join 'scented tours' of the city's gardens, markets and perfumeries. Lava luxe The Blue Lagoon, one of Iceland’s best-known attractions, has been made even more alluring by the launch of its first luxury hotel. The Retreat offers a subterranean spa carved into the 800-year-old lava flow, an Icelandic restaurant, and 62 suites, the best of which open out on to a private section of mineral-rich heated water. • Suites from £1,030 (00354 4208700; retreat.bluelagoon.com) The Residence at the Blue Lagoon offers 62 suites, the best of which open out on to a private section of mineral-rich heated water. Equine adventure Don Totu, a chic little hotel embedded in rural Puglia, has teamed up with a local stables to offer horse-riding designed to immerse guests in the Arcadian landscape of Italy’s “heel”. Each five-day course includes daily rides, six nights’ accommodation in the palazzo and an Italian breakfast each day. Available May 13 to 19. • £590pp (0039 0836 992374; dontotu.it) Don Totu has set itself up as a chic base for multi-day horse riding excursions into the pristine Puglian countryside. Artistic Norfolk In celebration of Damien Hirst’s new exhibition at Houghton Hall in Norfolk, which opens today, nearby Congham Hall Hotel is relaunching its popular art trail, which maps out some of the county’s best galleries, exhibitions and installations. Hirst’s works are included, as are the GroundWork Gallery in King’s Lynn and The Old Skating Rink Gallery in Norwich. The trail is available free on the hotel website and from the reception desk. • Rooms £135 (01485 600250; conghamhallhotel.co.uk) Congham Hall has reinstated its Norfolk art trail: a curated journey through some of the county's creative hotspots. Hot hotel The Costa del Sol is set for a boost to its party scene next week with the opening of Nobu Marbella, an 81-room social hub set midway between the old town and dynamic Puerto Banús. Aside from the signature restaurant from Nobuyuki “Nobu” Matsuhisa, it promises a secluded pool with bar, sunset DJ sessions and a mixology cart. • Rooms £260 (0034 952 77 85 85; nobuhotels.com/hotels/marbella) Nobu Marbella is promising plenty of party vibes when it opens this March. Credit: CHARLY SIMON PHOTOGRAPHY Venice by night In days gone by, wealthy merchants and noblemen hired the codegas (guides) of Venice to escort them through its labyrinthine streets, lighting the way ahead during perilous night-time journeys. The city’s Baglioni Hotel Luna is reviving the tradition with its new Codega Experience, a post-sunset tour of the city’s narrow alleyways and hidden squares, led by a lamp-wielding guide and rounded off with a Signature Aperitivo back at the hotel. • Tour £321pp; rooms from £223 (0039 041 9655930; baglionihotels.com/venice) Baglioni Hotel Luna's Codega Experiences take guests on a evening tour of Venice. Mexican luxe Mexican heritage style meets contemporary design at Hotel Amapa, a new boutique hotel in Puerto Vallarta. The laid-back beach design is inspired by national design figures such as Luis Barragán, whose purist approach to colour and form can be found throughout the 55 guest rooms, Mexican restaurant, and rooftop pool and bar. • Rooms from £97 (hotelamapa.com) Hotel Amapa's style has been inspired by Mexican designers such as Luis Barragán. Credit: Petr Myska Got a hot hotel tip? Email: thehotelegraph@telegraph.co.uk
Pillow Talk: The hottest openings, news and experiences in the world of hotels
From the most exciting upcoming openings to the latest news, trends and events, keep up to date with our regularly updated guide to all that is hot in the world of hotels. • This month's best new hotel openings Hot hotel Singapore welcomes a seriously hot new hotel this month with the opening of Six Senses Duxton, an Anouska Hempel-designed five-star in the city’s Chinatown district. Drawing on the vibrant location, Hempel has infused the property with an opulent Far East vibe: think a sultry black-and-gold colour scheme offset by Chinese calligraphy wallpaper. • Rooms from £179 (0065 6914 1428; sixsenses.com/duxton) Six Senses' new hot property in Singapore has been devised by celebrated designer Anouska Hempel. All abuzz St Ermin’s Hotel in Westminster has announced dates for its 2018 beekeeping workshops, held in the hotel’s rooftop garden where six hives house more than 350,000 honeybees. Each two-and-a-half-hour session gives budding apiarists a hands-on experience with the honeycomb, followed by either a honey cocktail at the hotel’s Caxton Bar or afternoon tea in the Tea Lounge. Book now for the first workshop on April 21. • Workshop from £40pp. Rooms £180 (020 7222 7888; sterminshotel.co.uk) The beehives in St Ermin's rooftop garden hold over 350,000 Buckfast honeybees. Garden party This year marks 100 years since the birth of celebrated gardener Rosemary Verey, who fashioned the delightful grounds at Barnsley House in the Cotswolds. To mark the centenary, the hotel is hosting events throughout the year. There is an open day on April 10, followed by a village festival on May 19. • Open day entry £5pp. Rooms £224 B&B (01285 740000; barnsleyhouse.com) This year, Barnsley House is celebrating the centenary of Rosemary Verey, the woman who created the hotel's famous garden. Artistic Amsterdam To celebrate the Van Gogh & Japan exhibition, which comes to Amsterdam this spring, the Conservatorium Hotel, just round the corner from the Museumplein, has two new Van Gogh suites. Guests can choose which of the artist’s famous works (reproductions) adorn the walls, indulge in a Van Gogh-themed afternoon tea, and make the most of complimentary tickets to the exhibition. • Available until June 24. Package from £805 per night (0031 20570 0000; conservatoriumhotel.com) To celebrate the new Van Gogh & Japan exhibition in Amsterdam, the Conservatorium Hotel has launched two themed packages inspired by the artist. Milanese aromas The Hotel Principe di Savoia in Milan has revived its Secret Scents of Milan tours: a series of aromatic expeditions to the city’s gardens and perfumeries where, under the guidance of perfumer Mariangela Rossi, guests can discover the secrets of choosing, using, and creating the perfect fragrance. • Classic room from £430 (0039 2 62301; dorchestercollection.com/hotel-principe-di-savoia) The Hotel Principe di Savoia is offering its guests the chance to join 'scented tours' of the city's gardens, markets and perfumeries. Lava luxe The Blue Lagoon, one of Iceland’s best-known attractions, has been made even more alluring by the launch of its first luxury hotel. The Retreat offers a subterranean spa carved into the 800-year-old lava flow, an Icelandic restaurant, and 62 suites, the best of which open out on to a private section of mineral-rich heated water. • Suites from £1,030 (00354 4208700; retreat.bluelagoon.com) The Residence at the Blue Lagoon offers 62 suites, the best of which open out on to a private section of mineral-rich heated water. Equine adventure Don Totu, a chic little hotel embedded in rural Puglia, has teamed up with a local stables to offer horse-riding designed to immerse guests in the Arcadian landscape of Italy’s “heel”. Each five-day course includes daily rides, six nights’ accommodation in the palazzo and an Italian breakfast each day. Available May 13 to 19. • £590pp (0039 0836 992374; dontotu.it) Don Totu has set itself up as a chic base for multi-day horse riding excursions into the pristine Puglian countryside. Artistic Norfolk In celebration of Damien Hirst’s new exhibition at Houghton Hall in Norfolk, which opens today, nearby Congham Hall Hotel is relaunching its popular art trail, which maps out some of the county’s best galleries, exhibitions and installations. Hirst’s works are included, as are the GroundWork Gallery in King’s Lynn and The Old Skating Rink Gallery in Norwich. The trail is available free on the hotel website and from the reception desk. • Rooms £135 (01485 600250; conghamhallhotel.co.uk) Congham Hall has reinstated its Norfolk art trail: a curated journey through some of the county's creative hotspots. Hot hotel The Costa del Sol is set for a boost to its party scene next week with the opening of Nobu Marbella, an 81-room social hub set midway between the old town and dynamic Puerto Banús. Aside from the signature restaurant from Nobuyuki “Nobu” Matsuhisa, it promises a secluded pool with bar, sunset DJ sessions and a mixology cart. • Rooms £260 (0034 952 77 85 85; nobuhotels.com/hotels/marbella) Nobu Marbella is promising plenty of party vibes when it opens this March. Credit: CHARLY SIMON PHOTOGRAPHY Venice by night In days gone by, wealthy merchants and noblemen hired the codegas (guides) of Venice to escort them through its labyrinthine streets, lighting the way ahead during perilous night-time journeys. The city’s Baglioni Hotel Luna is reviving the tradition with its new Codega Experience, a post-sunset tour of the city’s narrow alleyways and hidden squares, led by a lamp-wielding guide and rounded off with a Signature Aperitivo back at the hotel. • Tour £321pp; rooms from £223 (0039 041 9655930; baglionihotels.com/venice) Baglioni Hotel Luna's Codega Experiences take guests on a evening tour of Venice. Mexican luxe Mexican heritage style meets contemporary design at Hotel Amapa, a new boutique hotel in Puerto Vallarta. The laid-back beach design is inspired by national design figures such as Luis Barragán, whose purist approach to colour and form can be found throughout the 55 guest rooms, Mexican restaurant, and rooftop pool and bar. • Rooms from £97 (hotelamapa.com) Hotel Amapa's style has been inspired by Mexican designers such as Luis Barragán. Credit: Petr Myska Got a hot hotel tip? Email: thehotelegraph@telegraph.co.uk
After Cardiff City's penalty disaster on Friday, Fulham took full advantage to move within two points in the Championship's race for second.
Championship Review: Fulham close in on Cardiff, Bradshaw provides Barnsley boost
After Cardiff City's penalty disaster on Friday, Fulham took full advantage to move within two points in the Championship's race for second.
For Emmanuel Frimpong, the parting of the ways was – typically – swift and explosive. Having been left out of Arsenal’s squad for a League Cup game against Chelsea in October 2013, Frimpong tweeted: “Sometimes I wish I was white and English.” Arsene Wenger was infuriated at the insinuation of racism, and three months later Frimpong was sold to Barnsley. It brought to an end a 13-year association with Arsenal that yielded just 16 first-team appearances but spawned innumerable quotes, memes and GIFs. For one of the Premier League’s first ‘social-media footballers’, it was appropriate a tweet hastened the end. He describes it as “my only regret in football”. Four years on, the one-time Arsenal cult hero insists he has mellowed, and with his former team facing CSKA Moscow in the Europa League on Thursday, he offers a surprising reference point for advice on Russian football. Frimpong, now 26, spent three years in the Russian league after leaving Arsenal – first with Ufa and then at Arsenal Tula – and speaks fondly of his time there. Now back home in Ghana with his girlfriend Esther and baby daughter Emmanuella – out of work since January after suffering a hamstring injury while at Cypriot club Ermis Aradippou – Frimpong revealed all about his time at Arsenal in an entertaining interview with Telegraph Sport. Far from the most technically gifted player, Frimpong became the darling of the Emirates crowd when he broke into the first team seven years ago through his endearingly unfiltered personality and always amusing social media presence. Highlights include calling Piers Morgan a “wasteman” on Twitter and mocking up a picture of Nicklas Bendtner winning the Ballon d’Or. Frimpong even had his own catchphrase: “Stay Dench or get Frimponged”. Frimpong made just 16 first-team appearances during his time at Arsenal Credit: PA “Dench” – now included in the MacMillan English dictionary and defined as “extremely attractive, fashionable, impressive” – was the brainchild of Frimpong’s cousin, the rapper Lethal Bizzle. Frimpong helped popularise the term in a series of rap videos, and T-shirts bearing the slogan “Stay Dench” sold in their thousands at Arsenal club shops. Years later, a still on-brand Frimpong made his debut for Arsenal Tula with the Cyrillic for ‘Dench’ on the back of his shirt. But Frimpong was not just an entertainer. Having joined the Arsenal academy at the age of nine, soon after he moved from Ghana to London to be with his mother, he impressed Wenger when asked to train with the first team and was given his debut aged 19 at Newcastle in the first match of the 2011-12 season. “It was amazing,” Frimpong says. “I was so buzzing that I was about to go on the pitch without my shirt on. Then I took someone else’s shirt and Pat Rice said: ‘No! That’s the wrong shirt!’” Frimpong did enough to start Arsenal’s next league game against Liverpool, where for 70 minutes he enlivened the Emirates crowd with his tough-tackling approach, before he spoiled an impressive performance by getting sent off for two daft bookings with the game goalless. Arsenal eventually lost the game 2-0, which prompted stinging criticism from Frimpong’s only enemy in football: Samir Nasri. Emmanuel Frimpong | ... in his own words “When the game ended, we were in the dressing room and I expected [Arsene] Wenger to be really angry,” Frimpong says. “He was actually very calm, but for some reason Nasri came in and he was like: ‘We lost the game because of you’. I was a young guy, didn’t really know what I was doing, and was devastated. I felt like I’d let everybody down and he was really blaming me, so I really didn’t like him. “He always had a go at me if I gave the ball away in training and even said to me once: ‘I could buy you if I want’. To be honest, he probably could have done at the time, but still.” Three months later, Nasri returned to the Emirates as a Manchester City player after an acrimonious departure from Arsenal. Frimpong delighted the home supporters by putting in meaty challenges on his one-time team-mate, grabbing him by the throat in one of many tasty exchanges. “People never really understand why that [fight] happened but I don’t like the guy,” Frimpong says. “The reason I don’t like him is because he’s an idiot. Plain and simple. I would never, ever have respect for him.” Frimpong descibed his former team-mate Samir Nasri as an 'idiot' Credit: Action Images Frimpong looks back wistfully on his days at Arsenal, but there is sadness that serious injuries robbed him of the chance to establish himself. After Frimpong ruptured his cruciate ligament while on loan at Wolves in February 2012, he only made two more appearances for Arsenal. But despite his sudden exit from the club two years later, Frimpong is fulsome in his praise for everyone – bar Nasri – he worked with at Arsenal, including Wenger. “As a young guy he’s the best manager you could ever have,” Frimpong says. “I’ve never come across another manager who’s so calm and understanding. “He only shouted at me once, when I did something wrong in training after turning up late. I regret the accusation in that tweet because the man is obviously not racist.” Frimpong is similarly effusive about his former team-mates. “[Cesc] Fabregas was such a lovely guy,” he says. “When I got moved to the first team, he said ‘Frimpong, you’ve been promoted, well done!’ It was such a nice touch. He was a very, very lovely guy. “Then there was [Alex] Song, who used to go to KFC before every home game. On the bus to the team hotel the night before the game, he would be eating chicken nuggets. “Andrey Arshavin was the worst trainer, always laboured, very relaxed. He was terrible in training but very good on the day of the game.” Has every Arsenal player regressed under Arsene Wenger? Frimpong’s affection for the club explains why he is so exasperated by the state of Arsenal now. “I’m still a fan and I think it’s too easy just to blame the manager,” Frimpong says. “This group of players is just not good enough, simple as that. I don’t think [Granit] Xhaka, for instance, is good enough for Arsenal.” I point out that it’s a decade since Gilberto Silva left Arsenal, and with Xhaka struggling there is still a gaping hole in the defensive midfield area. So, could Arsenal do with a someone like Frimpong? “They do need players with a more aggressive mentality,” he says. “If Arsenal signed aggressive players, there would be a big difference because how many real fighters are there in the team? “They don’t need me, though. Trust me, Arsenal would be worse off with Frimpong.” Asked about what Arsenal can expect from CSKA’s supporters descending on north London on Thursday, Frimpong says he does not foresee any crowd trouble. Sound bites | Highlights of a social-media footballer In general, Frimpong is evangelical about his experience in Russia despite being sent off for swearing at Spartak Moscow supporters dishing out horrendous racist abuse. Of his two-year spell at Ufa – a club based close to the Kazakh border – Frimpong says: “It was beautiful, we were like a family. Fans still write to me telling me to come back and visit. That was my happiest time in football.” Another injury ended Frimpong’s time at Ufa, before he endured a less productive year at Arsenal Tula. After a brief spell in Sweden, Frimpong’s latest venture to Cyprus was cut short by the hamstring injury that still sidelines him. Frimpong is confident though that he will be back playing professionally by the summer. Away from football, Frimpong insists that he has grown up and that the life he now leads in a remote part of Accra is “boring”. But when I remind him of his past antics, he can’t resist one last soundbite. “That’s why I say follow Frimpong and you’ll never, ever get bored. There’s always something. It’s better to watch me than CNN.”
Inside the mind of an Arsenal cult hero: Emmanuel Frimpong on why he still loves Arsene Wenger - and detests an old team-mate
For Emmanuel Frimpong, the parting of the ways was – typically – swift and explosive. Having been left out of Arsenal’s squad for a League Cup game against Chelsea in October 2013, Frimpong tweeted: “Sometimes I wish I was white and English.” Arsene Wenger was infuriated at the insinuation of racism, and three months later Frimpong was sold to Barnsley. It brought to an end a 13-year association with Arsenal that yielded just 16 first-team appearances but spawned innumerable quotes, memes and GIFs. For one of the Premier League’s first ‘social-media footballers’, it was appropriate a tweet hastened the end. He describes it as “my only regret in football”. Four years on, the one-time Arsenal cult hero insists he has mellowed, and with his former team facing CSKA Moscow in the Europa League on Thursday, he offers a surprising reference point for advice on Russian football. Frimpong, now 26, spent three years in the Russian league after leaving Arsenal – first with Ufa and then at Arsenal Tula – and speaks fondly of his time there. Now back home in Ghana with his girlfriend Esther and baby daughter Emmanuella – out of work since January after suffering a hamstring injury while at Cypriot club Ermis Aradippou – Frimpong revealed all about his time at Arsenal in an entertaining interview with Telegraph Sport. Far from the most technically gifted player, Frimpong became the darling of the Emirates crowd when he broke into the first team seven years ago through his endearingly unfiltered personality and always amusing social media presence. Highlights include calling Piers Morgan a “wasteman” on Twitter and mocking up a picture of Nicklas Bendtner winning the Ballon d’Or. Frimpong even had his own catchphrase: “Stay Dench or get Frimponged”. Frimpong made just 16 first-team appearances during his time at Arsenal Credit: PA “Dench” – now included in the MacMillan English dictionary and defined as “extremely attractive, fashionable, impressive” – was the brainchild of Frimpong’s cousin, the rapper Lethal Bizzle. Frimpong helped popularise the term in a series of rap videos, and T-shirts bearing the slogan “Stay Dench” sold in their thousands at Arsenal club shops. Years later, a still on-brand Frimpong made his debut for Arsenal Tula with the Cyrillic for ‘Dench’ on the back of his shirt. But Frimpong was not just an entertainer. Having joined the Arsenal academy at the age of nine, soon after he moved from Ghana to London to be with his mother, he impressed Wenger when asked to train with the first team and was given his debut aged 19 at Newcastle in the first match of the 2011-12 season. “It was amazing,” Frimpong says. “I was so buzzing that I was about to go on the pitch without my shirt on. Then I took someone else’s shirt and Pat Rice said: ‘No! That’s the wrong shirt!’” Frimpong did enough to start Arsenal’s next league game against Liverpool, where for 70 minutes he enlivened the Emirates crowd with his tough-tackling approach, before he spoiled an impressive performance by getting sent off for two daft bookings with the game goalless. Arsenal eventually lost the game 2-0, which prompted stinging criticism from Frimpong’s only enemy in football: Samir Nasri. Emmanuel Frimpong | ... in his own words “When the game ended, we were in the dressing room and I expected [Arsene] Wenger to be really angry,” Frimpong says. “He was actually very calm, but for some reason Nasri came in and he was like: ‘We lost the game because of you’. I was a young guy, didn’t really know what I was doing, and was devastated. I felt like I’d let everybody down and he was really blaming me, so I really didn’t like him. “He always had a go at me if I gave the ball away in training and even said to me once: ‘I could buy you if I want’. To be honest, he probably could have done at the time, but still.” Three months later, Nasri returned to the Emirates as a Manchester City player after an acrimonious departure from Arsenal. Frimpong delighted the home supporters by putting in meaty challenges on his one-time team-mate, grabbing him by the throat in one of many tasty exchanges. “People never really understand why that [fight] happened but I don’t like the guy,” Frimpong says. “The reason I don’t like him is because he’s an idiot. Plain and simple. I would never, ever have respect for him.” Frimpong descibed his former team-mate Samir Nasri as an 'idiot' Credit: Action Images Frimpong looks back wistfully on his days at Arsenal, but there is sadness that serious injuries robbed him of the chance to establish himself. After Frimpong ruptured his cruciate ligament while on loan at Wolves in February 2012, he only made two more appearances for Arsenal. But despite his sudden exit from the club two years later, Frimpong is fulsome in his praise for everyone – bar Nasri – he worked with at Arsenal, including Wenger. “As a young guy he’s the best manager you could ever have,” Frimpong says. “I’ve never come across another manager who’s so calm and understanding. “He only shouted at me once, when I did something wrong in training after turning up late. I regret the accusation in that tweet because the man is obviously not racist.” Frimpong is similarly effusive about his former team-mates. “[Cesc] Fabregas was such a lovely guy,” he says. “When I got moved to the first team, he said ‘Frimpong, you’ve been promoted, well done!’ It was such a nice touch. He was a very, very lovely guy. “Then there was [Alex] Song, who used to go to KFC before every home game. On the bus to the team hotel the night before the game, he would be eating chicken nuggets. “Andrey Arshavin was the worst trainer, always laboured, very relaxed. He was terrible in training but very good on the day of the game.” Has every Arsenal player regressed under Arsene Wenger? Frimpong’s affection for the club explains why he is so exasperated by the state of Arsenal now. “I’m still a fan and I think it’s too easy just to blame the manager,” Frimpong says. “This group of players is just not good enough, simple as that. I don’t think [Granit] Xhaka, for instance, is good enough for Arsenal.” I point out that it’s a decade since Gilberto Silva left Arsenal, and with Xhaka struggling there is still a gaping hole in the defensive midfield area. So, could Arsenal do with a someone like Frimpong? “They do need players with a more aggressive mentality,” he says. “If Arsenal signed aggressive players, there would be a big difference because how many real fighters are there in the team? “They don’t need me, though. Trust me, Arsenal would be worse off with Frimpong.” Asked about what Arsenal can expect from CSKA’s supporters descending on north London on Thursday, Frimpong says he does not foresee any crowd trouble. Sound bites | Highlights of a social-media footballer In general, Frimpong is evangelical about his experience in Russia despite being sent off for swearing at Spartak Moscow supporters dishing out horrendous racist abuse. Of his two-year spell at Ufa – a club based close to the Kazakh border – Frimpong says: “It was beautiful, we were like a family. Fans still write to me telling me to come back and visit. That was my happiest time in football.” Another injury ended Frimpong’s time at Ufa, before he endured a less productive year at Arsenal Tula. After a brief spell in Sweden, Frimpong’s latest venture to Cyprus was cut short by the hamstring injury that still sidelines him. Frimpong is confident though that he will be back playing professionally by the summer. Away from football, Frimpong insists that he has grown up and that the life he now leads in a remote part of Accra is “boring”. But when I remind him of his past antics, he can’t resist one last soundbite. “That’s why I say follow Frimpong and you’ll never, ever get bored. There’s always something. It’s better to watch me than CNN.”
For Emmanuel Frimpong, the parting of the ways was – typically – swift and explosive. Having been left out of Arsenal’s squad for a League Cup game against Chelsea in October 2013, Frimpong tweeted: “Sometimes I wish I was white and English.” Arsene Wenger was infuriated at the insinuation of racism, and three months later Frimpong was sold to Barnsley. It brought to an end a 13-year association with Arsenal that yielded just 16 first-team appearances but spawned innumerable quotes, memes and GIFs. For one of the Premier League’s first ‘social-media footballers’, it was appropriate a tweet hastened the end. He describes it as “my only regret in football”. Four years on, the one-time Arsenal cult hero insists he has mellowed, and with his former team facing CSKA Moscow in the Europa League on Thursday, he offers a surprising reference point for advice on Russian football. Frimpong, now 26, spent three years in the Russian league after leaving Arsenal – first with Ufa and then at Arsenal Tula – and speaks fondly of his time there. Now back home in Ghana with his girlfriend Esther and baby daughter Emmanuella – out of work since January after suffering a hamstring injury while at Cypriot club Ermis Aradippou – Frimpong revealed all about his time at Arsenal in an entertaining interview with Telegraph Sport. Far from the most technically gifted player, Frimpong became the darling of the Emirates crowd when he broke into the first team seven years ago through his endearingly unfiltered personality and always amusing social media presence. Highlights include calling Piers Morgan a “wasteman” on Twitter and mocking up a picture of Nicklas Bendtner winning the Ballon d’Or. Frimpong even had his own catchphrase: “Stay Dench or get Frimponged”. Frimpong made just 16 first-team appearances during his time at Arsenal Credit: PA “Dench” – now included in the MacMillan English dictionary and defined as “extremely attractive, fashionable, impressive” – was the brainchild of Frimpong’s cousin, the rapper Lethal Bizzle. Frimpong helped popularise the term in a series of rap videos, and T-shirts bearing the slogan “Stay Dench” sold in their thousands at Arsenal club shops. Years later, a still on-brand Frimpong made his debut for Arsenal Tula with the Cyrillic for ‘Dench’ on the back of his shirt. But Frimpong was not just an entertainer. Having joined the Arsenal academy at the age of nine, soon after he moved from Ghana to London to be with his mother, he impressed Wenger when asked to train with the first team and was given his debut aged 19 at Newcastle in the first match of the 2011-12 season. “It was amazing,” Frimpong says. “I was so buzzing that I was about to go on the pitch without my shirt on. Then I took someone else’s shirt and Pat Rice said: ‘No! That’s the wrong shirt!’” Frimpong did enough to start Arsenal’s next league game against Liverpool, where for 70 minutes he enlivened the Emirates crowd with his tough-tackling approach, before he spoiled an impressive performance by getting sent off for two daft bookings with the game goalless. Arsenal eventually lost the game 2-0, which prompted stinging criticism from Frimpong’s only enemy in football: Samir Nasri. Emmanuel Frimpong | ... in his own words “When the game ended, we were in the dressing room and I expected [Arsene] Wenger to be really angry,” Frimpong says. “He was actually very calm, but for some reason Nasri came in and he was like: ‘We lost the game because of you’. I was a young guy, didn’t really know what I was doing, and was devastated. I felt like I’d let everybody down and he was really blaming me, so I really didn’t like him. “He always had a go at me if I gave the ball away in training and even said to me once: ‘I could buy you if I want’. To be honest, he probably could have done at the time, but still.” Three months later, Nasri returned to the Emirates as a Manchester City player after an acrimonious departure from Arsenal. Frimpong delighted the home supporters by putting in meaty challenges on his one-time team-mate, grabbing him by the throat in one of many tasty exchanges. “People never really understand why that [fight] happened but I don’t like the guy,” Frimpong says. “The reason I don’t like him is because he’s an idiot. Plain and simple. I would never, ever have respect for him.” Frimpong descibed his former team-mate Samir Nasri as an 'idiot' Credit: Action Images Frimpong looks back wistfully on his days at Arsenal, but there is sadness that serious injuries robbed him of the chance to establish himself. After Frimpong ruptured his cruciate ligament while on loan at Wolves in February 2012, he only made two more appearances for Arsenal. But despite his sudden exit from the club two years later, Frimpong is fulsome in his praise for everyone – bar Nasri – he worked with at Arsenal, including Wenger. “As a young guy he’s the best manager you could ever have,” Frimpong says. “I’ve never come across another manager who’s so calm and understanding. “He only shouted at me once, when I did something wrong in training after turning up late. I regret the accusation in that tweet because the man is obviously not racist.” Frimpong is similarly effusive about his former team-mates. “[Cesc] Fabregas was such a lovely guy,” he says. “When I got moved to the first team, he said ‘Frimpong, you’ve been promoted, well done!’ It was such a nice touch. He was a very, very lovely guy. “Then there was [Alex] Song, who used to go to KFC before every home game. On the bus to the team hotel the night before the game, he would be eating chicken nuggets. “Andrey Arshavin was the worst trainer, always laboured, very relaxed. He was terrible in training but very good on the day of the game.” Has every Arsenal player regressed under Arsene Wenger? Frimpong’s affection for the club explains why he is so exasperated by the state of Arsenal now. “I’m still a fan and I think it’s too easy just to blame the manager,” Frimpong says. “This group of players is just not good enough, simple as that. I don’t think [Granit] Xhaka, for instance, is good enough for Arsenal.” I point out that it’s a decade since Gilberto Silva left Arsenal, and with Xhaka struggling there is still a gaping hole in the defensive midfield area. So, could Arsenal do with a someone like Frimpong? “They do need players with a more aggressive mentality,” he says. “If Arsenal signed aggressive players, there would be a big difference because how many real fighters are there in the team? “They don’t need me, though. Trust me, Arsenal would be worse off with Frimpong.” Asked about what Arsenal can expect from CSKA’s supporters descending on north London on Thursday, Frimpong says he does not foresee any crowd trouble. Sound bites | Highlights of a social-media footballer In general, Frimpong is evangelical about his experience in Russia despite being sent off for swearing at Spartak Moscow supporters dishing out horrendous racist abuse. Of his two-year spell at Ufa – a club based close to the Kazakh border – Frimpong says: “It was beautiful, we were like a family. Fans still write to me telling me to come back and visit. That was my happiest time in football.” Another injury ended Frimpong’s time at Ufa, before he endured a less productive year at Arsenal Tula. After a brief spell in Sweden, Frimpong’s latest venture to Cyprus was cut short by the hamstring injury that still sidelines him. Frimpong is confident though that he will be back playing professionally by the summer. Away from football, Frimpong insists that he has grown up and that the life he now leads in a remote part of Accra is “boring”. But when I remind him of his past antics, he can’t resist one last soundbite. “That’s why I say follow Frimpong and you’ll never, ever get bored. There’s always something. It’s better to watch me than CNN.”
Inside the mind of an Arsenal cult hero: Emmanuel Frimpong on why he still loves Arsene Wenger - and detests an old team-mate
For Emmanuel Frimpong, the parting of the ways was – typically – swift and explosive. Having been left out of Arsenal’s squad for a League Cup game against Chelsea in October 2013, Frimpong tweeted: “Sometimes I wish I was white and English.” Arsene Wenger was infuriated at the insinuation of racism, and three months later Frimpong was sold to Barnsley. It brought to an end a 13-year association with Arsenal that yielded just 16 first-team appearances but spawned innumerable quotes, memes and GIFs. For one of the Premier League’s first ‘social-media footballers’, it was appropriate a tweet hastened the end. He describes it as “my only regret in football”. Four years on, the one-time Arsenal cult hero insists he has mellowed, and with his former team facing CSKA Moscow in the Europa League on Thursday, he offers a surprising reference point for advice on Russian football. Frimpong, now 26, spent three years in the Russian league after leaving Arsenal – first with Ufa and then at Arsenal Tula – and speaks fondly of his time there. Now back home in Ghana with his girlfriend Esther and baby daughter Emmanuella – out of work since January after suffering a hamstring injury while at Cypriot club Ermis Aradippou – Frimpong revealed all about his time at Arsenal in an entertaining interview with Telegraph Sport. Far from the most technically gifted player, Frimpong became the darling of the Emirates crowd when he broke into the first team seven years ago through his endearingly unfiltered personality and always amusing social media presence. Highlights include calling Piers Morgan a “wasteman” on Twitter and mocking up a picture of Nicklas Bendtner winning the Ballon d’Or. Frimpong even had his own catchphrase: “Stay Dench or get Frimponged”. Frimpong made just 16 first-team appearances during his time at Arsenal Credit: PA “Dench” – now included in the MacMillan English dictionary and defined as “extremely attractive, fashionable, impressive” – was the brainchild of Frimpong’s cousin, the rapper Lethal Bizzle. Frimpong helped popularise the term in a series of rap videos, and T-shirts bearing the slogan “Stay Dench” sold in their thousands at Arsenal club shops. Years later, a still on-brand Frimpong made his debut for Arsenal Tula with the Cyrillic for ‘Dench’ on the back of his shirt. But Frimpong was not just an entertainer. Having joined the Arsenal academy at the age of nine, soon after he moved from Ghana to London to be with his mother, he impressed Wenger when asked to train with the first team and was given his debut aged 19 at Newcastle in the first match of the 2011-12 season. “It was amazing,” Frimpong says. “I was so buzzing that I was about to go on the pitch without my shirt on. Then I took someone else’s shirt and Pat Rice said: ‘No! That’s the wrong shirt!’” Frimpong did enough to start Arsenal’s next league game against Liverpool, where for 70 minutes he enlivened the Emirates crowd with his tough-tackling approach, before he spoiled an impressive performance by getting sent off for two daft bookings with the game goalless. Arsenal eventually lost the game 2-0, which prompted stinging criticism from Frimpong’s only enemy in football: Samir Nasri. Emmanuel Frimpong | ... in his own words “When the game ended, we were in the dressing room and I expected [Arsene] Wenger to be really angry,” Frimpong says. “He was actually very calm, but for some reason Nasri came in and he was like: ‘We lost the game because of you’. I was a young guy, didn’t really know what I was doing, and was devastated. I felt like I’d let everybody down and he was really blaming me, so I really didn’t like him. “He always had a go at me if I gave the ball away in training and even said to me once: ‘I could buy you if I want’. To be honest, he probably could have done at the time, but still.” Three months later, Nasri returned to the Emirates as a Manchester City player after an acrimonious departure from Arsenal. Frimpong delighted the home supporters by putting in meaty challenges on his one-time team-mate, grabbing him by the throat in one of many tasty exchanges. “People never really understand why that [fight] happened but I don’t like the guy,” Frimpong says. “The reason I don’t like him is because he’s an idiot. Plain and simple. I would never, ever have respect for him.” Frimpong descibed his former team-mate Samir Nasri as an 'idiot' Credit: Action Images Frimpong looks back wistfully on his days at Arsenal, but there is sadness that serious injuries robbed him of the chance to establish himself. After Frimpong ruptured his cruciate ligament while on loan at Wolves in February 2012, he only made two more appearances for Arsenal. But despite his sudden exit from the club two years later, Frimpong is fulsome in his praise for everyone – bar Nasri – he worked with at Arsenal, including Wenger. “As a young guy he’s the best manager you could ever have,” Frimpong says. “I’ve never come across another manager who’s so calm and understanding. “He only shouted at me once, when I did something wrong in training after turning up late. I regret the accusation in that tweet because the man is obviously not racist.” Frimpong is similarly effusive about his former team-mates. “[Cesc] Fabregas was such a lovely guy,” he says. “When I got moved to the first team, he said ‘Frimpong, you’ve been promoted, well done!’ It was such a nice touch. He was a very, very lovely guy. “Then there was [Alex] Song, who used to go to KFC before every home game. On the bus to the team hotel the night before the game, he would be eating chicken nuggets. “Andrey Arshavin was the worst trainer, always laboured, very relaxed. He was terrible in training but very good on the day of the game.” Has every Arsenal player regressed under Arsene Wenger? Frimpong’s affection for the club explains why he is so exasperated by the state of Arsenal now. “I’m still a fan and I think it’s too easy just to blame the manager,” Frimpong says. “This group of players is just not good enough, simple as that. I don’t think [Granit] Xhaka, for instance, is good enough for Arsenal.” I point out that it’s a decade since Gilberto Silva left Arsenal, and with Xhaka struggling there is still a gaping hole in the defensive midfield area. So, could Arsenal do with a someone like Frimpong? “They do need players with a more aggressive mentality,” he says. “If Arsenal signed aggressive players, there would be a big difference because how many real fighters are there in the team? “They don’t need me, though. Trust me, Arsenal would be worse off with Frimpong.” Asked about what Arsenal can expect from CSKA’s supporters descending on north London on Thursday, Frimpong says he does not foresee any crowd trouble. Sound bites | Highlights of a social-media footballer In general, Frimpong is evangelical about his experience in Russia despite being sent off for swearing at Spartak Moscow supporters dishing out horrendous racist abuse. Of his two-year spell at Ufa – a club based close to the Kazakh border – Frimpong says: “It was beautiful, we were like a family. Fans still write to me telling me to come back and visit. That was my happiest time in football.” Another injury ended Frimpong’s time at Ufa, before he endured a less productive year at Arsenal Tula. After a brief spell in Sweden, Frimpong’s latest venture to Cyprus was cut short by the hamstring injury that still sidelines him. Frimpong is confident though that he will be back playing professionally by the summer. Away from football, Frimpong insists that he has grown up and that the life he now leads in a remote part of Accra is “boring”. But when I remind him of his past antics, he can’t resist one last soundbite. “That’s why I say follow Frimpong and you’ll never, ever get bored. There’s always something. It’s better to watch me than CNN.”
For Emmanuel Frimpong, the parting of the ways was – typically – swift and explosive. Having been left out of Arsenal’s squad for a League Cup game against Chelsea in October 2013, Frimpong tweeted: “Sometimes I wish I was white and English.” Arsene Wenger was infuriated at the insinuation of racism, and three months later Frimpong was sold to Barnsley. It brought to an end a 13-year association with Arsenal that yielded just 16 first-team appearances but spawned innumerable quotes, memes and GIFs. For one of the Premier League’s first ‘social-media footballers’, it was appropriate a tweet hastened the end. He describes it as “my only regret in football”. Four years on, the one-time Arsenal cult hero insists he has mellowed, and with his former team facing CSKA Moscow in the Europa League on Thursday, he offers a surprising reference point for advice on Russian football. Frimpong, now 26, spent three years in the Russian league after leaving Arsenal – first with Ufa and then at Arsenal Tula – and speaks fondly of his time there. Now back home in Ghana with his girlfriend Esther and baby daughter Emmanuella – out of work since January after suffering a hamstring injury while at Cypriot club Ermis Aradippou – Frimpong revealed all about his time at Arsenal in an entertaining interview with Telegraph Sport. Far from the most technically gifted player, Frimpong became the darling of the Emirates crowd when he broke into the first team seven years ago through his endearingly unfiltered personality and always amusing social media presence. Highlights include calling Piers Morgan a “wasteman” on Twitter and mocking up a picture of Nicklas Bendtner winning the Ballon d’Or. Frimpong even had his own catchphrase: “Stay Dench or get Frimponged”. Frimpong made just 16 first-team appearances during his time at Arsenal Credit: PA “Dench” – now included in the MacMillan English dictionary and defined as “extremely attractive, fashionable, impressive” – was the brainchild of Frimpong’s cousin, the rapper Lethal Bizzle. Frimpong helped popularise the term in a series of rap videos, and T-shirts bearing the slogan “Stay Dench” sold in their thousands at Arsenal club shops. Years later, a still on-brand Frimpong made his debut for Arsenal Tula with the Cyrillic for ‘Dench’ on the back of his shirt. But Frimpong was not just an entertainer. Having joined the Arsenal academy at the age of nine, soon after he moved from Ghana to London to be with his mother, he impressed Wenger when asked to train with the first team and was given his debut aged 19 at Newcastle in the first match of the 2011-12 season. “It was amazing,” Frimpong says. “I was so buzzing that I was about to go on the pitch without my shirt on. Then I took someone else’s shirt and Pat Rice said: ‘No! That’s the wrong shirt!’” Frimpong did enough to start Arsenal’s next league game against Liverpool, where for 70 minutes he enlivened the Emirates crowd with his tough-tackling approach, before he spoiled an impressive performance by getting sent off for two daft bookings with the game goalless. Arsenal eventually lost the game 2-0, which prompted stinging criticism from Frimpong’s only enemy in football: Samir Nasri. Emmanuel Frimpong | ... in his own words “When the game ended, we were in the dressing room and I expected [Arsene] Wenger to be really angry,” Frimpong says. “He was actually very calm, but for some reason Nasri came in and he was like: ‘We lost the game because of you’. I was a young guy, didn’t really know what I was doing, and was devastated. I felt like I’d let everybody down and he was really blaming me, so I really didn’t like him. “He always had a go at me if I gave the ball away in training and even said to me once: ‘I could buy you if I want’. To be honest, he probably could have done at the time, but still.” Three months later, Nasri returned to the Emirates as a Manchester City player after an acrimonious departure from Arsenal. Frimpong delighted the home supporters by putting in meaty challenges on his one-time team-mate, grabbing him by the throat in one of many tasty exchanges. “People never really understand why that [fight] happened but I don’t like the guy,” Frimpong says. “The reason I don’t like him is because he’s an idiot. Plain and simple. I would never, ever have respect for him.” Frimpong descibed his former team-mate Samir Nasri as an 'idiot' Credit: Action Images Frimpong looks back wistfully on his days at Arsenal, but there is sadness that serious injuries robbed him of the chance to establish himself. After Frimpong ruptured his cruciate ligament while on loan at Wolves in February 2012, he only made two more appearances for Arsenal. But despite his sudden exit from the club two years later, Frimpong is fulsome in his praise for everyone – bar Nasri – he worked with at Arsenal, including Wenger. “As a young guy he’s the best manager you could ever have,” Frimpong says. “I’ve never come across another manager who’s so calm and understanding. “He only shouted at me once, when I did something wrong in training after turning up late. I regret the accusation in that tweet because the man is obviously not racist.” Frimpong is similarly effusive about his former team-mates. “[Cesc] Fabregas was such a lovely guy,” he says. “When I got moved to the first team, he said ‘Frimpong, you’ve been promoted, well done!’ It was such a nice touch. He was a very, very lovely guy. “Then there was [Alex] Song, who used to go to KFC before every home game. On the bus to the team hotel the night before the game, he would be eating chicken nuggets. “Andrey Arshavin was the worst trainer, always laboured, very relaxed. He was terrible in training but very good on the day of the game.” Has every Arsenal player regressed under Arsene Wenger? Frimpong’s affection for the club explains why he is so exasperated by the state of Arsenal now. “I’m still a fan and I think it’s too easy just to blame the manager,” Frimpong says. “This group of players is just not good enough, simple as that. I don’t think [Granit] Xhaka, for instance, is good enough for Arsenal.” I point out that it’s a decade since Gilberto Silva left Arsenal, and with Xhaka struggling there is still a gaping hole in the defensive midfield area. So, could Arsenal do with a someone like Frimpong? “They do need players with a more aggressive mentality,” he says. “If Arsenal signed aggressive players, there would be a big difference because how many real fighters are there in the team? “They don’t need me, though. Trust me, Arsenal would be worse off with Frimpong.” Asked about what Arsenal can expect from CSKA’s supporters descending on north London on Thursday, Frimpong says he does not foresee any crowd trouble. Sound bites | Highlights of a social-media footballer In general, Frimpong is evangelical about his experience in Russia despite being sent off for swearing at Spartak Moscow supporters dishing out horrendous racist abuse. Of his two-year spell at Ufa – a club based close to the Kazakh border – Frimpong says: “It was beautiful, we were like a family. Fans still write to me telling me to come back and visit. That was my happiest time in football.” Another injury ended Frimpong’s time at Ufa, before he endured a less productive year at Arsenal Tula. After a brief spell in Sweden, Frimpong’s latest venture to Cyprus was cut short by the hamstring injury that still sidelines him. Frimpong is confident though that he will be back playing professionally by the summer. Away from football, Frimpong insists that he has grown up and that the life he now leads in a remote part of Accra is “boring”. But when I remind him of his past antics, he can’t resist one last soundbite. “That’s why I say follow Frimpong and you’ll never, ever get bored. There’s always something. It’s better to watch me than CNN.”
Inside the mind of an Arsenal cult hero: Emmanuel Frimpong on why he still loves Arsene Wenger - and detests an old team-mate
For Emmanuel Frimpong, the parting of the ways was – typically – swift and explosive. Having been left out of Arsenal’s squad for a League Cup game against Chelsea in October 2013, Frimpong tweeted: “Sometimes I wish I was white and English.” Arsene Wenger was infuriated at the insinuation of racism, and three months later Frimpong was sold to Barnsley. It brought to an end a 13-year association with Arsenal that yielded just 16 first-team appearances but spawned innumerable quotes, memes and GIFs. For one of the Premier League’s first ‘social-media footballers’, it was appropriate a tweet hastened the end. He describes it as “my only regret in football”. Four years on, the one-time Arsenal cult hero insists he has mellowed, and with his former team facing CSKA Moscow in the Europa League on Thursday, he offers a surprising reference point for advice on Russian football. Frimpong, now 26, spent three years in the Russian league after leaving Arsenal – first with Ufa and then at Arsenal Tula – and speaks fondly of his time there. Now back home in Ghana with his girlfriend Esther and baby daughter Emmanuella – out of work since January after suffering a hamstring injury while at Cypriot club Ermis Aradippou – Frimpong revealed all about his time at Arsenal in an entertaining interview with Telegraph Sport. Far from the most technically gifted player, Frimpong became the darling of the Emirates crowd when he broke into the first team seven years ago through his endearingly unfiltered personality and always amusing social media presence. Highlights include calling Piers Morgan a “wasteman” on Twitter and mocking up a picture of Nicklas Bendtner winning the Ballon d’Or. Frimpong even had his own catchphrase: “Stay Dench or get Frimponged”. Frimpong made just 16 first-team appearances during his time at Arsenal Credit: PA “Dench” – now included in the MacMillan English dictionary and defined as “extremely attractive, fashionable, impressive” – was the brainchild of Frimpong’s cousin, the rapper Lethal Bizzle. Frimpong helped popularise the term in a series of rap videos, and T-shirts bearing the slogan “Stay Dench” sold in their thousands at Arsenal club shops. Years later, a still on-brand Frimpong made his debut for Arsenal Tula with the Cyrillic for ‘Dench’ on the back of his shirt. But Frimpong was not just an entertainer. Having joined the Arsenal academy at the age of nine, soon after he moved from Ghana to London to be with his mother, he impressed Wenger when asked to train with the first team and was given his debut aged 19 at Newcastle in the first match of the 2011-12 season. “It was amazing,” Frimpong says. “I was so buzzing that I was about to go on the pitch without my shirt on. Then I took someone else’s shirt and Pat Rice said: ‘No! That’s the wrong shirt!’” Frimpong did enough to start Arsenal’s next league game against Liverpool, where for 70 minutes he enlivened the Emirates crowd with his tough-tackling approach, before he spoiled an impressive performance by getting sent off for two daft bookings with the game goalless. Arsenal eventually lost the game 2-0, which prompted stinging criticism from Frimpong’s only enemy in football: Samir Nasri. Emmanuel Frimpong | ... in his own words “When the game ended, we were in the dressing room and I expected [Arsene] Wenger to be really angry,” Frimpong says. “He was actually very calm, but for some reason Nasri came in and he was like: ‘We lost the game because of you’. I was a young guy, didn’t really know what I was doing, and was devastated. I felt like I’d let everybody down and he was really blaming me, so I really didn’t like him. “He always had a go at me if I gave the ball away in training and even said to me once: ‘I could buy you if I want’. To be honest, he probably could have done at the time, but still.” Three months later, Nasri returned to the Emirates as a Manchester City player after an acrimonious departure from Arsenal. Frimpong delighted the home supporters by putting in meaty challenges on his one-time team-mate, grabbing him by the throat in one of many tasty exchanges. “People never really understand why that [fight] happened but I don’t like the guy,” Frimpong says. “The reason I don’t like him is because he’s an idiot. Plain and simple. I would never, ever have respect for him.” Frimpong descibed his former team-mate Samir Nasri as an 'idiot' Credit: Action Images Frimpong looks back wistfully on his days at Arsenal, but there is sadness that serious injuries robbed him of the chance to establish himself. After Frimpong ruptured his cruciate ligament while on loan at Wolves in February 2012, he only made two more appearances for Arsenal. But despite his sudden exit from the club two years later, Frimpong is fulsome in his praise for everyone – bar Nasri – he worked with at Arsenal, including Wenger. “As a young guy he’s the best manager you could ever have,” Frimpong says. “I’ve never come across another manager who’s so calm and understanding. “He only shouted at me once, when I did something wrong in training after turning up late. I regret the accusation in that tweet because the man is obviously not racist.” Frimpong is similarly effusive about his former team-mates. “[Cesc] Fabregas was such a lovely guy,” he says. “When I got moved to the first team, he said ‘Frimpong, you’ve been promoted, well done!’ It was such a nice touch. He was a very, very lovely guy. “Then there was [Alex] Song, who used to go to KFC before every home game. On the bus to the team hotel the night before the game, he would be eating chicken nuggets. “Andrey Arshavin was the worst trainer, always laboured, very relaxed. He was terrible in training but very good on the day of the game.” Has every Arsenal player regressed under Arsene Wenger? Frimpong’s affection for the club explains why he is so exasperated by the state of Arsenal now. “I’m still a fan and I think it’s too easy just to blame the manager,” Frimpong says. “This group of players is just not good enough, simple as that. I don’t think [Granit] Xhaka, for instance, is good enough for Arsenal.” I point out that it’s a decade since Gilberto Silva left Arsenal, and with Xhaka struggling there is still a gaping hole in the defensive midfield area. So, could Arsenal do with a someone like Frimpong? “They do need players with a more aggressive mentality,” he says. “If Arsenal signed aggressive players, there would be a big difference because how many real fighters are there in the team? “They don’t need me, though. Trust me, Arsenal would be worse off with Frimpong.” Asked about what Arsenal can expect from CSKA’s supporters descending on north London on Thursday, Frimpong says he does not foresee any crowd trouble. Sound bites | Highlights of a social-media footballer In general, Frimpong is evangelical about his experience in Russia despite being sent off for swearing at Spartak Moscow supporters dishing out horrendous racist abuse. Of his two-year spell at Ufa – a club based close to the Kazakh border – Frimpong says: “It was beautiful, we were like a family. Fans still write to me telling me to come back and visit. That was my happiest time in football.” Another injury ended Frimpong’s time at Ufa, before he endured a less productive year at Arsenal Tula. After a brief spell in Sweden, Frimpong’s latest venture to Cyprus was cut short by the hamstring injury that still sidelines him. Frimpong is confident though that he will be back playing professionally by the summer. Away from football, Frimpong insists that he has grown up and that the life he now leads in a remote part of Accra is “boring”. But when I remind him of his past antics, he can’t resist one last soundbite. “That’s why I say follow Frimpong and you’ll never, ever get bored. There’s always something. It’s better to watch me than CNN.”
Clockwise from top left: Adama Traoré of Middlesbrough; Fulham’s Ryan Sessegnon; Birmingham City’s Jota; and the Barnsley manager José Morais.
Can Boro stun Wolves? Will Derby wake? Key Championship questions
Clockwise from top left: Adama Traoré of Middlesbrough; Fulham’s Ryan Sessegnon; Birmingham City’s Jota; and the Barnsley manager José Morais.
<p>Renters looking for value may want to consider Barnsley, Burnley, Swansea or Kilmarnock, Rightmove&#8217;s findings suggest.</p>
Hackney sees fastest growth in home rents over past decade

Renters looking for value may want to consider Barnsley, Burnley, Swansea or Kilmarnock, Rightmove’s findings suggest.

<p>Renters looking for value may want to consider Barnsley, Burnley, Swansea or Kilmarnock, Rightmove&#8217;s findings suggest.</p>
Hackney sees fastest growth in home rents over past decade

Renters looking for value may want to consider Barnsley, Burnley, Swansea or Kilmarnock, Rightmove’s findings suggest.

<p>Renters looking for value may want to consider Barnsley, Burnley, Swansea or Kilmarnock, Rightmove&#8217;s findings suggest.</p>
Hackney sees fastest growth in home rents over past decade

Renters looking for value may want to consider Barnsley, Burnley, Swansea or Kilmarnock, Rightmove’s findings suggest.

The dawn of Alex McLeish’s second spell in charge of Scotland was a grey affair as Costa Rica reprised the scoreline that shocked the Tartan Army at the World Cup finals in Italy in 1990. This time the blow was struck by Marcos Urena when the Los Angeles striker was allowed a free chance early in the match and, despite some encouraging football by the Scots, there was no joy for the home fans in a crowd of 20,488. McLeish signalled a changing of the guard with his squad selection and confirmed his desire to assess new recruits with the opening line-up of his second spell in charge. Scott McTominay was an expected starter, having turned declined an invitation from Gareth Southgate to sign up for England and, apart from the Manchester United midfielder, debuts were afforded to Aberdeen’s Scott McKenna, Fulham’s Kevin McDonald and Oliver McBurnie of Barnsley. McLeish had indicated beforehand that he favoured a back three and would have played Kieran Tierney on the left. The Celtic’s player’s withdrawal through injury create the opportunity for McKenna, with Liverpool’s Andrew Robertson in the left wing-back position and Callum Paterson of Cardiff City on the other flank. Allan McGregor was powerless to keep out Urena&#39;s strike Credit: getty images McLeish and his Costa Rican counterpart, Oscar Ramirez, played against each other in the only other meeting of these sides and Ramirez emphasised the significance of that occasion when he said, in the build-up to this encounter, that &quot;winning that game was a surprise and an important kick-off point for our nation.&quot; Such has been the teams’ comparative fortunes since then that it was McLeish who hoped that this fixture would kick off a resurgence in Scotland’s reputation. It took all of quarter of an hour for the ghost of 1990 to haunt Hampden. Bryan Oviedo left Tom Cairney behind to outflank the Scottish rear guard on the Costa Rican left and his angled cutback found Urena on an unchecked tracking run into the penalty area to finish with a precise low drive beyond Allan McGregor. Jose Mourinho, sitting between former Scotland manager, Craig Brown, and the SFA’s director of development, Malky Mackay, looked unimpressed and his disapproval might have extended to McTominay, who could have been more alert to Urena’s movement ahead of the goal. The Scots, though, almost equalised within a minute of falling behind, when Matt Ritchie’s corner kick was met by Grant Hanley with a downward header which bounced just wide of the post. Scotland stabilised and began to quarry a greater share of possession, much of which was channelled through Robertson, whose forays down the left flank produced tempting deliveries, one of which prompted McBurnie into a shot which Keylor Navas blocked but could not hold. The Real Madrid goalkeeper was duly relieved to see the ball booted clear of the danger area. Scott McTominay made his Scotland debut at Hampden Credit: pa David Guzman, meanwhile, had been booked for tripping McBurnie when McTominay set his colleague off towards Navas but, by the interval, Costa Rica had not had to exert themselves unduly to maintain their advantage. The Scots came within a fraction of falling further behind just after the restart when Robertson unaccountably allowed Bryan Ruiz to get goal side of him for a tightly angled rising drive which clipped McGregor’s crossbar on its way over. McTominay’s appearance came to an end shortly before the hour mark when he and Cairney made way for the Celtic midfield pair of Stuart Armstrong and Callum McGregor. Armstrong had scarcely drawn breath when Matt Ritchie put him through one-on-one with Navas for an effort which was pushed over the crossbar by the keeper. Scotland came even closer to hauling themselves level when Robertson’s energy once more resulted in a beckoning pass across the goalmouth which would have brought the equaliser had the straining McBurnie made any form of contact. The striker departed soon afterwards to be replaced by Matt Phillips. Robertson, meanwhile, continued to work the left wing promisingly but, although his next cutback was met by Matt Ritchie, the ball spun tamely into Navas’s grasp. Ritchie had no more opportunity to change the destiny of the contest because he was the last player to head for the showers in order to give Jamie Murphy a brief run out as the clock ran down on a modestly encouraging win for Los Ticos.
Scotland 0 Costa Rica 1: Alex McLeish begins second reign with drab defeat
The dawn of Alex McLeish’s second spell in charge of Scotland was a grey affair as Costa Rica reprised the scoreline that shocked the Tartan Army at the World Cup finals in Italy in 1990. This time the blow was struck by Marcos Urena when the Los Angeles striker was allowed a free chance early in the match and, despite some encouraging football by the Scots, there was no joy for the home fans in a crowd of 20,488. McLeish signalled a changing of the guard with his squad selection and confirmed his desire to assess new recruits with the opening line-up of his second spell in charge. Scott McTominay was an expected starter, having turned declined an invitation from Gareth Southgate to sign up for England and, apart from the Manchester United midfielder, debuts were afforded to Aberdeen’s Scott McKenna, Fulham’s Kevin McDonald and Oliver McBurnie of Barnsley. McLeish had indicated beforehand that he favoured a back three and would have played Kieran Tierney on the left. The Celtic’s player’s withdrawal through injury create the opportunity for McKenna, with Liverpool’s Andrew Robertson in the left wing-back position and Callum Paterson of Cardiff City on the other flank. Allan McGregor was powerless to keep out Urena's strike Credit: getty images McLeish and his Costa Rican counterpart, Oscar Ramirez, played against each other in the only other meeting of these sides and Ramirez emphasised the significance of that occasion when he said, in the build-up to this encounter, that "winning that game was a surprise and an important kick-off point for our nation." Such has been the teams’ comparative fortunes since then that it was McLeish who hoped that this fixture would kick off a resurgence in Scotland’s reputation. It took all of quarter of an hour for the ghost of 1990 to haunt Hampden. Bryan Oviedo left Tom Cairney behind to outflank the Scottish rear guard on the Costa Rican left and his angled cutback found Urena on an unchecked tracking run into the penalty area to finish with a precise low drive beyond Allan McGregor. Jose Mourinho, sitting between former Scotland manager, Craig Brown, and the SFA’s director of development, Malky Mackay, looked unimpressed and his disapproval might have extended to McTominay, who could have been more alert to Urena’s movement ahead of the goal. The Scots, though, almost equalised within a minute of falling behind, when Matt Ritchie’s corner kick was met by Grant Hanley with a downward header which bounced just wide of the post. Scotland stabilised and began to quarry a greater share of possession, much of which was channelled through Robertson, whose forays down the left flank produced tempting deliveries, one of which prompted McBurnie into a shot which Keylor Navas blocked but could not hold. The Real Madrid goalkeeper was duly relieved to see the ball booted clear of the danger area. Scott McTominay made his Scotland debut at Hampden Credit: pa David Guzman, meanwhile, had been booked for tripping McBurnie when McTominay set his colleague off towards Navas but, by the interval, Costa Rica had not had to exert themselves unduly to maintain their advantage. The Scots came within a fraction of falling further behind just after the restart when Robertson unaccountably allowed Bryan Ruiz to get goal side of him for a tightly angled rising drive which clipped McGregor’s crossbar on its way over. McTominay’s appearance came to an end shortly before the hour mark when he and Cairney made way for the Celtic midfield pair of Stuart Armstrong and Callum McGregor. Armstrong had scarcely drawn breath when Matt Ritchie put him through one-on-one with Navas for an effort which was pushed over the crossbar by the keeper. Scotland came even closer to hauling themselves level when Robertson’s energy once more resulted in a beckoning pass across the goalmouth which would have brought the equaliser had the straining McBurnie made any form of contact. The striker departed soon afterwards to be replaced by Matt Phillips. Robertson, meanwhile, continued to work the left wing promisingly but, although his next cutback was met by Matt Ritchie, the ball spun tamely into Navas’s grasp. Ritchie had no more opportunity to change the destiny of the contest because he was the last player to head for the showers in order to give Jamie Murphy a brief run out as the clock ran down on a modestly encouraging win for Los Ticos.
The dawn of Alex McLeish’s second spell in charge of Scotland was a grey affair as Costa Rica reprised the scoreline that shocked the Tartan Army at the World Cup finals in Italy in 1990. This time the blow was struck by Marcos Urena when the Los Angeles striker was allowed a free chance early in the match and, despite some encouraging football by the Scots, there was no joy for the home fans in a crowd of 20,488. McLeish signalled a changing of the guard with his squad selection and confirmed his desire to assess new recruits with the opening line-up of his second spell in charge. Scott McTominay was an expected starter, having turned declined an invitation from Gareth Southgate to sign up for England and, apart from the Manchester United midfielder, debuts were afforded to Aberdeen’s Scott McKenna, Fulham’s Kevin McDonald and Oliver McBurnie of Barnsley. McLeish had indicated beforehand that he favoured a back three and would have played Kieran Tierney on the left. The Celtic’s player’s withdrawal through injury create the opportunity for McKenna, with Liverpool’s Andrew Robertson in the left wing-back position and Callum Paterson of Cardiff City on the other flank. Allan McGregor was powerless to keep out Urena&#39;s strike Credit: getty images McLeish and his Costa Rican counterpart, Oscar Ramirez, played against each other in the only other meeting of these sides and Ramirez emphasised the significance of that occasion when he said, in the build-up to this encounter, that &quot;winning that game was a surprise and an important kick-off point for our nation.&quot; Such has been the teams’ comparative fortunes since then that it was McLeish who hoped that this fixture would kick off a resurgence in Scotland’s reputation. It took all of quarter of an hour for the ghost of 1990 to haunt Hampden. Bryan Oviedo left Tom Cairney behind to outflank the Scottish rear guard on the Costa Rican left and his angled cutback found Urena on an unchecked tracking run into the penalty area to finish with a precise low drive beyond Allan McGregor. Jose Mourinho, sitting between former Scotland manager, Craig Brown, and the SFA’s director of development, Malky Mackay, looked unimpressed and his disapproval might have extended to McTominay, who could have been more alert to Urena’s movement ahead of the goal. The Scots, though, almost equalised within a minute of falling behind, when Matt Ritchie’s corner kick was met by Grant Hanley with a downward header which bounced just wide of the post. Scotland stabilised and began to quarry a greater share of possession, much of which was channelled through Robertson, whose forays down the left flank produced tempting deliveries, one of which prompted McBurnie into a shot which Keylor Navas blocked but could not hold. The Real Madrid goalkeeper was duly relieved to see the ball booted clear of the danger area. Scott McTominay made his Scotland debut at Hampden Credit: pa David Guzman, meanwhile, had been booked for tripping McBurnie when McTominay set his colleague off towards Navas but, by the interval, Costa Rica had not had to exert themselves unduly to maintain their advantage. The Scots came within a fraction of falling further behind just after the restart when Robertson unaccountably allowed Bryan Ruiz to get goal side of him for a tightly angled rising drive which clipped McGregor’s crossbar on its way over. McTominay’s appearance came to an end shortly before the hour mark when he and Cairney made way for the Celtic midfield pair of Stuart Armstrong and Callum McGregor. Armstrong had scarcely drawn breath when Matt Ritchie put him through one-on-one with Navas for an effort which was pushed over the crossbar by the keeper. Scotland came even closer to hauling themselves level when Robertson’s energy once more resulted in a beckoning pass across the goalmouth which would have brought the equaliser had the straining McBurnie made any form of contact. The striker departed soon afterwards to be replaced by Matt Phillips. Robertson, meanwhile, continued to work the left wing promisingly but, although his next cutback was met by Matt Ritchie, the ball spun tamely into Navas’s grasp. Ritchie had no more opportunity to change the destiny of the contest because he was the last player to head for the showers in order to give Jamie Murphy a brief run out as the clock ran down on a modestly encouraging win for Los Ticos.
Scotland 0 Costa Rica 1: Alex McLeish begins second reign with drab defeat
The dawn of Alex McLeish’s second spell in charge of Scotland was a grey affair as Costa Rica reprised the scoreline that shocked the Tartan Army at the World Cup finals in Italy in 1990. This time the blow was struck by Marcos Urena when the Los Angeles striker was allowed a free chance early in the match and, despite some encouraging football by the Scots, there was no joy for the home fans in a crowd of 20,488. McLeish signalled a changing of the guard with his squad selection and confirmed his desire to assess new recruits with the opening line-up of his second spell in charge. Scott McTominay was an expected starter, having turned declined an invitation from Gareth Southgate to sign up for England and, apart from the Manchester United midfielder, debuts were afforded to Aberdeen’s Scott McKenna, Fulham’s Kevin McDonald and Oliver McBurnie of Barnsley. McLeish had indicated beforehand that he favoured a back three and would have played Kieran Tierney on the left. The Celtic’s player’s withdrawal through injury create the opportunity for McKenna, with Liverpool’s Andrew Robertson in the left wing-back position and Callum Paterson of Cardiff City on the other flank. Allan McGregor was powerless to keep out Urena's strike Credit: getty images McLeish and his Costa Rican counterpart, Oscar Ramirez, played against each other in the only other meeting of these sides and Ramirez emphasised the significance of that occasion when he said, in the build-up to this encounter, that "winning that game was a surprise and an important kick-off point for our nation." Such has been the teams’ comparative fortunes since then that it was McLeish who hoped that this fixture would kick off a resurgence in Scotland’s reputation. It took all of quarter of an hour for the ghost of 1990 to haunt Hampden. Bryan Oviedo left Tom Cairney behind to outflank the Scottish rear guard on the Costa Rican left and his angled cutback found Urena on an unchecked tracking run into the penalty area to finish with a precise low drive beyond Allan McGregor. Jose Mourinho, sitting between former Scotland manager, Craig Brown, and the SFA’s director of development, Malky Mackay, looked unimpressed and his disapproval might have extended to McTominay, who could have been more alert to Urena’s movement ahead of the goal. The Scots, though, almost equalised within a minute of falling behind, when Matt Ritchie’s corner kick was met by Grant Hanley with a downward header which bounced just wide of the post. Scotland stabilised and began to quarry a greater share of possession, much of which was channelled through Robertson, whose forays down the left flank produced tempting deliveries, one of which prompted McBurnie into a shot which Keylor Navas blocked but could not hold. The Real Madrid goalkeeper was duly relieved to see the ball booted clear of the danger area. Scott McTominay made his Scotland debut at Hampden Credit: pa David Guzman, meanwhile, had been booked for tripping McBurnie when McTominay set his colleague off towards Navas but, by the interval, Costa Rica had not had to exert themselves unduly to maintain their advantage. The Scots came within a fraction of falling further behind just after the restart when Robertson unaccountably allowed Bryan Ruiz to get goal side of him for a tightly angled rising drive which clipped McGregor’s crossbar on its way over. McTominay’s appearance came to an end shortly before the hour mark when he and Cairney made way for the Celtic midfield pair of Stuart Armstrong and Callum McGregor. Armstrong had scarcely drawn breath when Matt Ritchie put him through one-on-one with Navas for an effort which was pushed over the crossbar by the keeper. Scotland came even closer to hauling themselves level when Robertson’s energy once more resulted in a beckoning pass across the goalmouth which would have brought the equaliser had the straining McBurnie made any form of contact. The striker departed soon afterwards to be replaced by Matt Phillips. Robertson, meanwhile, continued to work the left wing promisingly but, although his next cutback was met by Matt Ritchie, the ball spun tamely into Navas’s grasp. Ritchie had no more opportunity to change the destiny of the contest because he was the last player to head for the showers in order to give Jamie Murphy a brief run out as the clock ran down on a modestly encouraging win for Los Ticos.
The dawn of Alex McLeish’s second spell in charge of Scotland was a grey affair as Costa Rica reprised the scoreline that shocked the Tartan Army at the World Cup finals in Italy in 1990. This time the blow was struck by Marcos Urena when the Los Angeles striker was allowed a free chance early in the match and, despite some encouraging football by the Scots, there was no joy for the home fans in a crowd of 20,488. McLeish signalled a changing of the guard with his squad selection and confirmed his desire to assess new recruits with the opening line-up of his second spell in charge. Scott McTominay was an expected starter, having turned declined an invitation from Gareth Southgate to sign up for England and, apart from the Manchester United midfielder, debuts were afforded to Aberdeen’s Scott McKenna, Fulham’s Kevin McDonald and Oliver McBurnie of Barnsley. McLeish had indicated beforehand that he favoured a back three and would have played Kieran Tierney on the left. The Celtic’s player’s withdrawal through injury create the opportunity for McKenna, with Liverpool’s Andrew Robertson in the left wing-back position and Callum Paterson of Cardiff City on the other flank. Allan McGregor was powerless to keep out Urena&#39;s strike Credit: getty images McLeish and his Costa Rican counterpart, Oscar Ramirez, played against each other in the only other meeting of these sides and Ramirez emphasised the significance of that occasion when he said, in the build-up to this encounter, that &quot;winning that game was a surprise and an important kick-off point for our nation.&quot; Such has been the teams’ comparative fortunes since then that it was McLeish who hoped that this fixture would kick off a resurgence in Scotland’s reputation. It took all of quarter of an hour for the ghost of 1990 to haunt Hampden. Bryan Oviedo left Tom Cairney behind to outflank the Scottish rear guard on the Costa Rican left and his angled cutback found Urena on an unchecked tracking run into the penalty area to finish with a precise low drive beyond Allan McGregor. Jose Mourinho, sitting between former Scotland manager, Craig Brown, and the SFA’s director of development, Malky Mackay, looked unimpressed and his disapproval might have extended to McTominay, who could have been more alert to Urena’s movement ahead of the goal. The Scots, though, almost equalised within a minute of falling behind, when Matt Ritchie’s corner kick was met by Grant Hanley with a downward header which bounced just wide of the post. Scotland stabilised and began to quarry a greater share of possession, much of which was channelled through Robertson, whose forays down the left flank produced tempting deliveries, one of which prompted McBurnie into a shot which Keylor Navas blocked but could not hold. The Real Madrid goalkeeper was duly relieved to see the ball booted clear of the danger area. Scott McTominay made his Scotland debut at Hampden Credit: pa David Guzman, meanwhile, had been booked for tripping McBurnie when McTominay set his colleague off towards Navas but, by the interval, Costa Rica had not had to exert themselves unduly to maintain their advantage. The Scots came within a fraction of falling further behind just after the restart when Robertson unaccountably allowed Bryan Ruiz to get goal side of him for a tightly angled rising drive which clipped McGregor’s crossbar on its way over. McTominay’s appearance came to an end shortly before the hour mark when he and Cairney made way for the Celtic midfield pair of Stuart Armstrong and Callum McGregor. Armstrong had scarcely drawn breath when Matt Ritchie put him through one-on-one with Navas for an effort which was pushed over the crossbar by the keeper. Scotland came even closer to hauling themselves level when Robertson’s energy once more resulted in a beckoning pass across the goalmouth which would have brought the equaliser had the straining McBurnie made any form of contact. The striker departed soon afterwards to be replaced by Matt Phillips. Robertson, meanwhile, continued to work the left wing promisingly but, although his next cutback was met by Matt Ritchie, the ball spun tamely into Navas’s grasp. Ritchie had no more opportunity to change the destiny of the contest because he was the last player to head for the showers in order to give Jamie Murphy a brief run out as the clock ran down on a modestly encouraging win for Los Ticos.
Scotland 0 Costa Rica 1: Alex McLeish begins second reign with drab defeat
The dawn of Alex McLeish’s second spell in charge of Scotland was a grey affair as Costa Rica reprised the scoreline that shocked the Tartan Army at the World Cup finals in Italy in 1990. This time the blow was struck by Marcos Urena when the Los Angeles striker was allowed a free chance early in the match and, despite some encouraging football by the Scots, there was no joy for the home fans in a crowd of 20,488. McLeish signalled a changing of the guard with his squad selection and confirmed his desire to assess new recruits with the opening line-up of his second spell in charge. Scott McTominay was an expected starter, having turned declined an invitation from Gareth Southgate to sign up for England and, apart from the Manchester United midfielder, debuts were afforded to Aberdeen’s Scott McKenna, Fulham’s Kevin McDonald and Oliver McBurnie of Barnsley. McLeish had indicated beforehand that he favoured a back three and would have played Kieran Tierney on the left. The Celtic’s player’s withdrawal through injury create the opportunity for McKenna, with Liverpool’s Andrew Robertson in the left wing-back position and Callum Paterson of Cardiff City on the other flank. Allan McGregor was powerless to keep out Urena's strike Credit: getty images McLeish and his Costa Rican counterpart, Oscar Ramirez, played against each other in the only other meeting of these sides and Ramirez emphasised the significance of that occasion when he said, in the build-up to this encounter, that "winning that game was a surprise and an important kick-off point for our nation." Such has been the teams’ comparative fortunes since then that it was McLeish who hoped that this fixture would kick off a resurgence in Scotland’s reputation. It took all of quarter of an hour for the ghost of 1990 to haunt Hampden. Bryan Oviedo left Tom Cairney behind to outflank the Scottish rear guard on the Costa Rican left and his angled cutback found Urena on an unchecked tracking run into the penalty area to finish with a precise low drive beyond Allan McGregor. Jose Mourinho, sitting between former Scotland manager, Craig Brown, and the SFA’s director of development, Malky Mackay, looked unimpressed and his disapproval might have extended to McTominay, who could have been more alert to Urena’s movement ahead of the goal. The Scots, though, almost equalised within a minute of falling behind, when Matt Ritchie’s corner kick was met by Grant Hanley with a downward header which bounced just wide of the post. Scotland stabilised and began to quarry a greater share of possession, much of which was channelled through Robertson, whose forays down the left flank produced tempting deliveries, one of which prompted McBurnie into a shot which Keylor Navas blocked but could not hold. The Real Madrid goalkeeper was duly relieved to see the ball booted clear of the danger area. Scott McTominay made his Scotland debut at Hampden Credit: pa David Guzman, meanwhile, had been booked for tripping McBurnie when McTominay set his colleague off towards Navas but, by the interval, Costa Rica had not had to exert themselves unduly to maintain their advantage. The Scots came within a fraction of falling further behind just after the restart when Robertson unaccountably allowed Bryan Ruiz to get goal side of him for a tightly angled rising drive which clipped McGregor’s crossbar on its way over. McTominay’s appearance came to an end shortly before the hour mark when he and Cairney made way for the Celtic midfield pair of Stuart Armstrong and Callum McGregor. Armstrong had scarcely drawn breath when Matt Ritchie put him through one-on-one with Navas for an effort which was pushed over the crossbar by the keeper. Scotland came even closer to hauling themselves level when Robertson’s energy once more resulted in a beckoning pass across the goalmouth which would have brought the equaliser had the straining McBurnie made any form of contact. The striker departed soon afterwards to be replaced by Matt Phillips. Robertson, meanwhile, continued to work the left wing promisingly but, although his next cutback was met by Matt Ritchie, the ball spun tamely into Navas’s grasp. Ritchie had no more opportunity to change the destiny of the contest because he was the last player to head for the showers in order to give Jamie Murphy a brief run out as the clock ran down on a modestly encouraging win for Los Ticos.
Labour select Dan Jarvis MP as Sheffield mayoral candidate raising prospect of Barnsley by-election
Labour select Dan Jarvis MP as Sheffield mayoral candidate raising prospect of Barnsley by-election
Labour select Dan Jarvis MP as Sheffield mayoral candidate raising prospect of Barnsley by-election
Labour select Dan Jarvis MP as Sheffield mayoral candidate raising prospect of Barnsley by-election
Labour select Dan Jarvis MP as Sheffield mayoral candidate raising prospect of Barnsley by-election
Labour select Dan Jarvis MP as Sheffield mayoral candidate raising prospect of Barnsley by-election
Scotland’s single encounter with Costa Rica – who visit Hampden Park tomorrow night as part of their World Cup warm-up schedule – left scar tissue on those Scots who were part of the occasion, as players, fans or media observers. When the countries met in Genoa at the group stage of Italia ’90 a perilous consensus had formed within the Scottish camp that Los Ticos would be the group makeweights and could therefore be marked down as a banker win for Andy Roxburgh and his players. A full peal of alarm bells should have rung when it was put about that Luis Gabelo Canejo had been identified as that folkloric figure, the dodgy foreign keeper. Alex McLeish, who begins his second spell as Scotland manager tomorrow night – and who played in what turned out to be an ignominious 1-0 defeat in Genoa - still winces at the recollection of native folly. “At the time I didn’t think it was funny but I can see the humour in it now,” he said. “We were a bit anxious, uptight. It’s that old one, when Scotland are expected to win the game. “The psyche with the players was, ‘we’re meant to win here, we should be giving a big display and the goalie is hopeless, bombard him with crosses…’ I think he took 17 out of 20. “It was a typical day. The Costa Rica coach at the time used our press coverage - that we were hot favourites - against us. And we were usurped, unfortunately.&quot; Now it is Scotland who would be seen as usurpers by a country that qualified for the World Cup finals four times since 1998 – and reached the quarter finals in Brazil four years ago – while the Tartan Army was compelled to watch from afar. The 20-year-long exile from major tournament finals has had an inevitably corrosive effect on Scottish enthusiasm. This match, played on an evening with many alternative entertainments at hand and against unfamiliar opponents, will likely attract an attendance of between 20,000 and 25,000, even though it will inaugurate McLeish’s second tenure, with hope of fresh momentum after the disappointment of the Scots’ narrow failure to reach the World Cup play-offs under Gordon Strachan. In such circumstances, the ambience of Hampden can be sapping. “We want to give the fans who come to the game something back,” McLeish said. “We thank them for coming. We know that it’s Friday night and Costa Rica are not the number one team in the world, but it’s a team that has qualified for the World Cup Finals. They are ahead of us in the Fifa rankings. “If we beat them then we start to get up the rankings a wee bit. That’s important - it’s important to win. It’s also very important that I see these players can handle this well. “A lot of them have already been at this level, but there will be an introduction of younger players and my message to them is ‘go for it.’ The gauntlet is down.” As ever, though, Scotland are short of firepower. Of the three forwards who have made international appearances – Ryan Christie, Jason Cummings and Matt Phillips – none has scored. The other, Oliver McBurnie of Swansea, on loan to Barnsley – is on his first call-up, although he notched three goals in 14 appearances at under-19 and under-21 levels. “We have Oli McBurnie, who is a big unit,” McLeish said. “He’s good at taking the ball in and Jason has his different skills. If we can create the right environment for these guys they can score for Scotland. “McBurnie is wiry enough to help the team. Jason can be a bit of a maverick. He’s young and he has that wee bit of gallusness you would want to have in every single player. “I’d have no fear over starting either. Maybe we will do something else, because we have looked at one or two other situations in training with players who are versatile. We can’t rule that out.” McLeish has not observed the convention, employed to hike up the attendance at such low-key friendly fixtures, of hinting or specifying his line-up, other than confirming that Charlie Mulgrew will be captain. It can be assumed, given the efforts made to secure his services for Scotland rather than England, that Scott McTominay of Manchester United, will start. McLeish did, though, indicate that, over the course of this match and Tuesday’s meeting with Hungary in Budapest, all of the uncapped players in this squad could play at some stage. “There could be ten new caps in the two games,” he said. “There could be three or four playing in this one but we will try to pick a team to beat Costa Rica. “They scored a lot of late goals in their qualifying campaign and they have good players and strength. They are a tall team and we have to stifle that, but they also have that ability, like all teams from that part of the world, to control a ball and use it well. “That&#39;s why they have dumped the USA out and held their own against Mexico, and deservedly qualified for the World Cup.” It might be asking too much of a transitional squad to beat Los Ticos, but an extension of last year’s unbeaten run under Strachan would keep Scottish hopes of a new dawn ticking over.
Scotland still feel scars of underestimating Costa Rica at Italia 90 as Alex McLeish prepares for second tenure
Scotland’s single encounter with Costa Rica – who visit Hampden Park tomorrow night as part of their World Cup warm-up schedule – left scar tissue on those Scots who were part of the occasion, as players, fans or media observers. When the countries met in Genoa at the group stage of Italia ’90 a perilous consensus had formed within the Scottish camp that Los Ticos would be the group makeweights and could therefore be marked down as a banker win for Andy Roxburgh and his players. A full peal of alarm bells should have rung when it was put about that Luis Gabelo Canejo had been identified as that folkloric figure, the dodgy foreign keeper. Alex McLeish, who begins his second spell as Scotland manager tomorrow night – and who played in what turned out to be an ignominious 1-0 defeat in Genoa - still winces at the recollection of native folly. “At the time I didn’t think it was funny but I can see the humour in it now,” he said. “We were a bit anxious, uptight. It’s that old one, when Scotland are expected to win the game. “The psyche with the players was, ‘we’re meant to win here, we should be giving a big display and the goalie is hopeless, bombard him with crosses…’ I think he took 17 out of 20. “It was a typical day. The Costa Rica coach at the time used our press coverage - that we were hot favourites - against us. And we were usurped, unfortunately." Now it is Scotland who would be seen as usurpers by a country that qualified for the World Cup finals four times since 1998 – and reached the quarter finals in Brazil four years ago – while the Tartan Army was compelled to watch from afar. The 20-year-long exile from major tournament finals has had an inevitably corrosive effect on Scottish enthusiasm. This match, played on an evening with many alternative entertainments at hand and against unfamiliar opponents, will likely attract an attendance of between 20,000 and 25,000, even though it will inaugurate McLeish’s second tenure, with hope of fresh momentum after the disappointment of the Scots’ narrow failure to reach the World Cup play-offs under Gordon Strachan. In such circumstances, the ambience of Hampden can be sapping. “We want to give the fans who come to the game something back,” McLeish said. “We thank them for coming. We know that it’s Friday night and Costa Rica are not the number one team in the world, but it’s a team that has qualified for the World Cup Finals. They are ahead of us in the Fifa rankings. “If we beat them then we start to get up the rankings a wee bit. That’s important - it’s important to win. It’s also very important that I see these players can handle this well. “A lot of them have already been at this level, but there will be an introduction of younger players and my message to them is ‘go for it.’ The gauntlet is down.” As ever, though, Scotland are short of firepower. Of the three forwards who have made international appearances – Ryan Christie, Jason Cummings and Matt Phillips – none has scored. The other, Oliver McBurnie of Swansea, on loan to Barnsley – is on his first call-up, although he notched three goals in 14 appearances at under-19 and under-21 levels. “We have Oli McBurnie, who is a big unit,” McLeish said. “He’s good at taking the ball in and Jason has his different skills. If we can create the right environment for these guys they can score for Scotland. “McBurnie is wiry enough to help the team. Jason can be a bit of a maverick. He’s young and he has that wee bit of gallusness you would want to have in every single player. “I’d have no fear over starting either. Maybe we will do something else, because we have looked at one or two other situations in training with players who are versatile. We can’t rule that out.” McLeish has not observed the convention, employed to hike up the attendance at such low-key friendly fixtures, of hinting or specifying his line-up, other than confirming that Charlie Mulgrew will be captain. It can be assumed, given the efforts made to secure his services for Scotland rather than England, that Scott McTominay of Manchester United, will start. McLeish did, though, indicate that, over the course of this match and Tuesday’s meeting with Hungary in Budapest, all of the uncapped players in this squad could play at some stage. “There could be ten new caps in the two games,” he said. “There could be three or four playing in this one but we will try to pick a team to beat Costa Rica. “They scored a lot of late goals in their qualifying campaign and they have good players and strength. They are a tall team and we have to stifle that, but they also have that ability, like all teams from that part of the world, to control a ball and use it well. “That's why they have dumped the USA out and held their own against Mexico, and deservedly qualified for the World Cup.” It might be asking too much of a transitional squad to beat Los Ticos, but an extension of last year’s unbeaten run under Strachan would keep Scottish hopes of a new dawn ticking over.
The Ghana full-back speaks on their target for the remainder of the campaign
Yiadom talks up Barnsley season ambitions
The Ghana full-back speaks on their target for the remainder of the campaign
The Ghana full-back speaks on their target for the remainder of the campaign
Yiadom talks up Barnsley season ambitions
The Ghana full-back speaks on their target for the remainder of the campaign
Ok so the great Stephen Hawking has died; a man who told us the history of time, who showed us a glimpse into black holes, who cast our minds and imaginations into the vast universe. But another great man also died this week. He was closer to home and significantly more down to earth. Hawking may have once said that: ‘The scientific account is complete. Theology is unnecessary.’ But it was Jim Bowen who uttered the line: ‘Keep out of the black and in the red, nothing in this game for two in a bed.’ Jim Bowen was a hit in the 80&#39;s with Bullseye Credit: ITV/REX/Shutterstock And if you missed it one week, he repeated the next week and then next for 14 years throughout the 1980s and early 90s. Bowen was the host of Bullseye, a particularly British institution - a darts-based game show hosted by a man who had none of the slick professionalism of someone like Bob Monkhouse. While Monkhouse had glamorous girls as his sidekicks, Jim Bowen had Tony Green; a chubby ex-darts player, turned commentator and scorekeeper. The contestants were largely Northern working class tradesman. The audience was the same, but not entirely. For there was also me and plenty of my school friends at Eton who were Bullseye addicts. And not just in some ironic way. I LOVED Bullseye. As did my school pal (the actor) Dominic West. We once wrote to Central Television asking if we could be contestants. They wrote back declining but offering us places in the studio audience. We didn&#39;t take up the offer, but I still sometimes imagine what that show might have been like if we&#39;d managed to appear on it. I can&#39;t recall whether it was I or Dom answering the questions or throwing the darts (the knower or the thrower as it was called). Jim Bowen TV Presenter at home Credit: Trinity Mirror/Alamy Stock Photo At school on a Sunday evening at 5pm I’d rush back to my room to watch the show on the secret little black and white TV I had hidden in my &#39;boot box&#39; beside my bed. At home I watched it - often with my sister Henrietta - religiously. An old friend of mine – James Tomkinson and I still talk about it over lunch. Joyously you can still catch it on Challenge. The shows have weathered well. The show&#39;s format was tweaked over the years but the mainstays were always there. There were the terrible jokes relating to people&#39;s jobs, always (with no subtlety) referenced on Jim&#39;s cue cards. &#39;So Mike I hear you&#39;re a drayman?&#39; ‘That&#39;s right Jim&#39;. &#39;So it would be fair to say your drink problem is behind you...&#39; Actually on that occasion he had to explain that a drayman drove booze to pubs. Often he had no response planned at all so just said, &quot;That&#39;s fine…Smashing…We move on…&#39; &#39;So Wendy, I hear you&#39;re a nurse.&#39; &#39;That&#39;s right Jim.&#39; &#39;Fine, we move on.&#39; &#39;So Phil, what do you do for a living.&quot; ‘I&#39;ve been unemployed for two years Jim.’ &#39;Smashing.’ ‘Happily married man Mike?’ ‘I’m divorced Jim.’ ‘So Trevor you’re a fork lift truck engineer?’ ‘That’s right Jim’. ’You must have had some ups and downs…’ ‘Where are you from?’ ‘Barnsley.’ ‘Oh, so this will be new for you, a bit of carpet and electricity.’ Bowen with a prize car on &#39;Bullseye&#39; Credit: ITV / Rex Features/ITV / Rex Features Then there were the questions. &#39;What was TE Lawrence&#39;s first name?&#39; he once asked. &#39;Tommy?&quot; asked a bemused contestant, who wasn&#39;t far wrong in fact. My favourite question incident was the time Jim inadvertently read out the answer. &#39;What country produces the most coffee Brazil,&#39; he called out. And there was Bully&#39;s prize board. How well I recall not just the terrible prizes, recycled the following week if no one won them, but the poetry that announced them: ‘In one: No more shirking you&#39;ll love working with this fabulous power toolkit. In two: Stay cool and upright with this fabulous refrigerator. In three. What goes up, must come down. It&#39;s a stylish umbrella.’ The &#39;Bullseye&#39; Christmas Show 1988 Credit: ITV/REX/Shutterstock/ITV/REX/Shutterstock Of course the denouement was the final 101 or more required with just with six darts for the star prize, hiding behind Bully. There was all the bonkers chat by the oche. &#39;Take your time and listen to Tony,&#39; Jim would say. And Tony would say, &#39;Settle in, take your time, best ‘o luck.&#39; It was the only game show where losing contestants were told: &#39;Come and look at what you could have won.&#39; Actually winning was sometimes worse. I won’t ever forget the couple who lived in a tower block in Leeds who won the speedboat. My brother George once gave me Jim&#39;s autobiography, &#39;From a Bundle of Rags&#39;, for Christmas. I learnt of his humble origins, his previous life as a deputy headmaster, the old train station he lived in in Cumbria. Having just finished a new biography of Charles I, I think I&#39;ll get out Jim’s and have another read. Jim Bowen seemed a kind and self-effacing man who once said of his hosting of Bullseye: ‘I think the early shows set the TV industry back 20 years.’ I was once managed to get my hands on a real Bendy Bully (given to all contestants along with a tankard for the boys or goblet for the ladies)...I feel a quadruple bill on Challenge coming on...sorry Emily: ‘Let me count out the money, it’ll take me two minutes…’ William Sitwell is the host of Biting Talk on Soho Radio
Bullseye was the must watch show when I was a boarder at Eton
Ok so the great Stephen Hawking has died; a man who told us the history of time, who showed us a glimpse into black holes, who cast our minds and imaginations into the vast universe. But another great man also died this week. He was closer to home and significantly more down to earth. Hawking may have once said that: ‘The scientific account is complete. Theology is unnecessary.’ But it was Jim Bowen who uttered the line: ‘Keep out of the black and in the red, nothing in this game for two in a bed.’ Jim Bowen was a hit in the 80's with Bullseye Credit: ITV/REX/Shutterstock And if you missed it one week, he repeated the next week and then next for 14 years throughout the 1980s and early 90s. Bowen was the host of Bullseye, a particularly British institution - a darts-based game show hosted by a man who had none of the slick professionalism of someone like Bob Monkhouse. While Monkhouse had glamorous girls as his sidekicks, Jim Bowen had Tony Green; a chubby ex-darts player, turned commentator and scorekeeper. The contestants were largely Northern working class tradesman. The audience was the same, but not entirely. For there was also me and plenty of my school friends at Eton who were Bullseye addicts. And not just in some ironic way. I LOVED Bullseye. As did my school pal (the actor) Dominic West. We once wrote to Central Television asking if we could be contestants. They wrote back declining but offering us places in the studio audience. We didn't take up the offer, but I still sometimes imagine what that show might have been like if we'd managed to appear on it. I can't recall whether it was I or Dom answering the questions or throwing the darts (the knower or the thrower as it was called). Jim Bowen TV Presenter at home Credit: Trinity Mirror/Alamy Stock Photo At school on a Sunday evening at 5pm I’d rush back to my room to watch the show on the secret little black and white TV I had hidden in my 'boot box' beside my bed. At home I watched it - often with my sister Henrietta - religiously. An old friend of mine – James Tomkinson and I still talk about it over lunch. Joyously you can still catch it on Challenge. The shows have weathered well. The show's format was tweaked over the years but the mainstays were always there. There were the terrible jokes relating to people's jobs, always (with no subtlety) referenced on Jim's cue cards. 'So Mike I hear you're a drayman?' ‘That's right Jim'. 'So it would be fair to say your drink problem is behind you...' Actually on that occasion he had to explain that a drayman drove booze to pubs. Often he had no response planned at all so just said, "That's fine…Smashing…We move on…' 'So Wendy, I hear you're a nurse.' 'That's right Jim.' 'Fine, we move on.' 'So Phil, what do you do for a living." ‘I've been unemployed for two years Jim.’ 'Smashing.’ ‘Happily married man Mike?’ ‘I’m divorced Jim.’ ‘So Trevor you’re a fork lift truck engineer?’ ‘That’s right Jim’. ’You must have had some ups and downs…’ ‘Where are you from?’ ‘Barnsley.’ ‘Oh, so this will be new for you, a bit of carpet and electricity.’ Bowen with a prize car on 'Bullseye' Credit: ITV / Rex Features/ITV / Rex Features Then there were the questions. 'What was TE Lawrence's first name?' he once asked. 'Tommy?" asked a bemused contestant, who wasn't far wrong in fact. My favourite question incident was the time Jim inadvertently read out the answer. 'What country produces the most coffee Brazil,' he called out. And there was Bully's prize board. How well I recall not just the terrible prizes, recycled the following week if no one won them, but the poetry that announced them: ‘In one: No more shirking you'll love working with this fabulous power toolkit. In two: Stay cool and upright with this fabulous refrigerator. In three. What goes up, must come down. It's a stylish umbrella.’ The 'Bullseye' Christmas Show 1988 Credit: ITV/REX/Shutterstock/ITV/REX/Shutterstock Of course the denouement was the final 101 or more required with just with six darts for the star prize, hiding behind Bully. There was all the bonkers chat by the oche. 'Take your time and listen to Tony,' Jim would say. And Tony would say, 'Settle in, take your time, best ‘o luck.' It was the only game show where losing contestants were told: 'Come and look at what you could have won.' Actually winning was sometimes worse. I won’t ever forget the couple who lived in a tower block in Leeds who won the speedboat. My brother George once gave me Jim's autobiography, 'From a Bundle of Rags', for Christmas. I learnt of his humble origins, his previous life as a deputy headmaster, the old train station he lived in in Cumbria. Having just finished a new biography of Charles I, I think I'll get out Jim’s and have another read. Jim Bowen seemed a kind and self-effacing man who once said of his hosting of Bullseye: ‘I think the early shows set the TV industry back 20 years.’ I was once managed to get my hands on a real Bendy Bully (given to all contestants along with a tankard for the boys or goblet for the ladies)...I feel a quadruple bill on Challenge coming on...sorry Emily: ‘Let me count out the money, it’ll take me two minutes…’ William Sitwell is the host of Biting Talk on Soho Radio
Ok so the great Stephen Hawking has died; a man who told us the history of time, who showed us a glimpse into black holes, who cast our minds and imaginations into the vast universe. But another great man also died this week. He was closer to home and significantly more down to earth. Hawking may have once said that: ‘The scientific account is complete. Theology is unnecessary.’ But it was Jim Bowen who uttered the line: ‘Keep out of the black and in the red, nothing in this game for two in a bed.’ Jim Bowen was a hit in the 80&#39;s with Bullseye Credit: ITV/REX/Shutterstock And if you missed it one week, he repeated the next week and then next for 14 years throughout the 1980s and early 90s. Bowen was the host of Bullseye, a particularly British institution - a darts-based game show hosted by a man who had none of the slick professionalism of someone like Bob Monkhouse. While Monkhouse had glamorous girls as his sidekicks, Jim Bowen had Tony Green; a chubby ex-darts player, turned commentator and scorekeeper. The contestants were largely Northern working class tradesman. The audience was the same, but not entirely. For there was also me and plenty of my school friends at Eton who were Bullseye addicts. And not just in some ironic way. I LOVED Bullseye. As did my school pal (the actor) Dominic West. We once wrote to Central Television asking if we could be contestants. They wrote back declining but offering us places in the studio audience. We didn&#39;t take up the offer, but I still sometimes imagine what that show might have been like if we&#39;d managed to appear on it. I can&#39;t recall whether it was I or Dom answering the questions or throwing the darts (the knower or the thrower as it was called). Jim Bowen TV Presenter at home Credit: Trinity Mirror/Alamy Stock Photo At school on a Sunday evening at 5pm I’d rush back to my room to watch the show on the secret little black and white TV I had hidden in my &#39;boot box&#39; beside my bed. At home I watched it - often with my sister Henrietta - religiously. An old friend of mine – James Tomkinson and I still talk about it over lunch. Joyously you can still catch it on Challenge. The shows have weathered well. The show&#39;s format was tweaked over the years but the mainstays were always there. There were the terrible jokes relating to people&#39;s jobs, always (with no subtlety) referenced on Jim&#39;s cue cards. &#39;So Mike I hear you&#39;re a drayman?&#39; ‘That&#39;s right Jim&#39;. &#39;So it would be fair to say your drink problem is behind you...&#39; Actually on that occasion he had to explain that a drayman drove booze to pubs. Often he had no response planned at all so just said, &quot;That&#39;s fine…Smashing…We move on…&#39; &#39;So Wendy, I hear you&#39;re a nurse.&#39; &#39;That&#39;s right Jim.&#39; &#39;Fine, we move on.&#39; &#39;So Phil, what do you do for a living.&quot; ‘I&#39;ve been unemployed for two years Jim.’ &#39;Smashing.’ ‘Happily married man Mike?’ ‘I’m divorced Jim.’ ‘So Trevor you’re a fork lift truck engineer?’ ‘That’s right Jim’. ’You must have had some ups and downs…’ ‘Where are you from?’ ‘Barnsley.’ ‘Oh, so this will be new for you, a bit of carpet and electricity.’ Bowen with a prize car on &#39;Bullseye&#39; Credit: ITV / Rex Features/ITV / Rex Features Then there were the questions. &#39;What was TE Lawrence&#39;s first name?&#39; he once asked. &#39;Tommy?&quot; asked a bemused contestant, who wasn&#39;t far wrong in fact. My favourite question incident was the time Jim inadvertently read out the answer. &#39;What country produces the most coffee Brazil,&#39; he called out. And there was Bully&#39;s prize board. How well I recall not just the terrible prizes, recycled the following week if no one won them, but the poetry that announced them: ‘In one: No more shirking you&#39;ll love working with this fabulous power toolkit. In two: Stay cool and upright with this fabulous refrigerator. In three. What goes up, must come down. It&#39;s a stylish umbrella.’ The &#39;Bullseye&#39; Christmas Show 1988 Credit: ITV/REX/Shutterstock/ITV/REX/Shutterstock Of course the denouement was the final 101 or more required with just with six darts for the star prize, hiding behind Bully. There was all the bonkers chat by the oche. &#39;Take your time and listen to Tony,&#39; Jim would say. And Tony would say, &#39;Settle in, take your time, best ‘o luck.&#39; It was the only game show where losing contestants were told: &#39;Come and look at what you could have won.&#39; Actually winning was sometimes worse. I won’t ever forget the couple who lived in a tower block in Leeds who won the speedboat. My brother George once gave me Jim&#39;s autobiography, &#39;From a Bundle of Rags&#39;, for Christmas. I learnt of his humble origins, his previous life as a deputy headmaster, the old train station he lived in in Cumbria. Having just finished a new biography of Charles I, I think I&#39;ll get out Jim’s and have another read. Jim Bowen seemed a kind and self-effacing man who once said of his hosting of Bullseye: ‘I think the early shows set the TV industry back 20 years.’ I was once managed to get my hands on a real Bendy Bully (given to all contestants along with a tankard for the boys or goblet for the ladies)...I feel a quadruple bill on Challenge coming on...sorry Emily: ‘Let me count out the money, it’ll take me two minutes…’ William Sitwell is the host of Biting Talk on Soho Radio
Bullseye was the must watch show when I was a boarder at Eton
Ok so the great Stephen Hawking has died; a man who told us the history of time, who showed us a glimpse into black holes, who cast our minds and imaginations into the vast universe. But another great man also died this week. He was closer to home and significantly more down to earth. Hawking may have once said that: ‘The scientific account is complete. Theology is unnecessary.’ But it was Jim Bowen who uttered the line: ‘Keep out of the black and in the red, nothing in this game for two in a bed.’ Jim Bowen was a hit in the 80's with Bullseye Credit: ITV/REX/Shutterstock And if you missed it one week, he repeated the next week and then next for 14 years throughout the 1980s and early 90s. Bowen was the host of Bullseye, a particularly British institution - a darts-based game show hosted by a man who had none of the slick professionalism of someone like Bob Monkhouse. While Monkhouse had glamorous girls as his sidekicks, Jim Bowen had Tony Green; a chubby ex-darts player, turned commentator and scorekeeper. The contestants were largely Northern working class tradesman. The audience was the same, but not entirely. For there was also me and plenty of my school friends at Eton who were Bullseye addicts. And not just in some ironic way. I LOVED Bullseye. As did my school pal (the actor) Dominic West. We once wrote to Central Television asking if we could be contestants. They wrote back declining but offering us places in the studio audience. We didn't take up the offer, but I still sometimes imagine what that show might have been like if we'd managed to appear on it. I can't recall whether it was I or Dom answering the questions or throwing the darts (the knower or the thrower as it was called). Jim Bowen TV Presenter at home Credit: Trinity Mirror/Alamy Stock Photo At school on a Sunday evening at 5pm I’d rush back to my room to watch the show on the secret little black and white TV I had hidden in my 'boot box' beside my bed. At home I watched it - often with my sister Henrietta - religiously. An old friend of mine – James Tomkinson and I still talk about it over lunch. Joyously you can still catch it on Challenge. The shows have weathered well. The show's format was tweaked over the years but the mainstays were always there. There were the terrible jokes relating to people's jobs, always (with no subtlety) referenced on Jim's cue cards. 'So Mike I hear you're a drayman?' ‘That's right Jim'. 'So it would be fair to say your drink problem is behind you...' Actually on that occasion he had to explain that a drayman drove booze to pubs. Often he had no response planned at all so just said, "That's fine…Smashing…We move on…' 'So Wendy, I hear you're a nurse.' 'That's right Jim.' 'Fine, we move on.' 'So Phil, what do you do for a living." ‘I've been unemployed for two years Jim.’ 'Smashing.’ ‘Happily married man Mike?’ ‘I’m divorced Jim.’ ‘So Trevor you’re a fork lift truck engineer?’ ‘That’s right Jim’. ’You must have had some ups and downs…’ ‘Where are you from?’ ‘Barnsley.’ ‘Oh, so this will be new for you, a bit of carpet and electricity.’ Bowen with a prize car on 'Bullseye' Credit: ITV / Rex Features/ITV / Rex Features Then there were the questions. 'What was TE Lawrence's first name?' he once asked. 'Tommy?" asked a bemused contestant, who wasn't far wrong in fact. My favourite question incident was the time Jim inadvertently read out the answer. 'What country produces the most coffee Brazil,' he called out. And there was Bully's prize board. How well I recall not just the terrible prizes, recycled the following week if no one won them, but the poetry that announced them: ‘In one: No more shirking you'll love working with this fabulous power toolkit. In two: Stay cool and upright with this fabulous refrigerator. In three. What goes up, must come down. It's a stylish umbrella.’ The 'Bullseye' Christmas Show 1988 Credit: ITV/REX/Shutterstock/ITV/REX/Shutterstock Of course the denouement was the final 101 or more required with just with six darts for the star prize, hiding behind Bully. There was all the bonkers chat by the oche. 'Take your time and listen to Tony,' Jim would say. And Tony would say, 'Settle in, take your time, best ‘o luck.' It was the only game show where losing contestants were told: 'Come and look at what you could have won.' Actually winning was sometimes worse. I won’t ever forget the couple who lived in a tower block in Leeds who won the speedboat. My brother George once gave me Jim's autobiography, 'From a Bundle of Rags', for Christmas. I learnt of his humble origins, his previous life as a deputy headmaster, the old train station he lived in in Cumbria. Having just finished a new biography of Charles I, I think I'll get out Jim’s and have another read. Jim Bowen seemed a kind and self-effacing man who once said of his hosting of Bullseye: ‘I think the early shows set the TV industry back 20 years.’ I was once managed to get my hands on a real Bendy Bully (given to all contestants along with a tankard for the boys or goblet for the ladies)...I feel a quadruple bill on Challenge coming on...sorry Emily: ‘Let me count out the money, it’ll take me two minutes…’ William Sitwell is the host of Biting Talk on Soho Radio
Ok so the great Stephen Hawking has died; a man who told us the history of time, who showed us a glimpse into black holes, who cast our minds and imaginations into the vast universe. But another great man also died this week. He was closer to home and significantly more down to earth. Hawking may have once said that: ‘The scientific account is complete. Theology is unnecessary.’ But it was Jim Bowen who uttered the line: ‘Keep out of the black and in the red, nothing in this game for two in a bed.’ Jim Bowen was a hit in the 80&#39;s with Bullseye Credit: ITV/REX/Shutterstock And if you missed it one week, he repeated the next week and then next for 14 years throughout the 1980s and early 90s. Bowen was the host of Bullseye, a particularly British institution - a darts-based game show hosted by a man who had none of the slick professionalism of someone like Bob Monkhouse. While Monkhouse had glamorous girls as his sidekicks, Jim Bowen had Tony Green; a chubby ex-darts player, turned commentator and scorekeeper. The contestants were largely Northern working class tradesman. The audience was the same, but not entirely. For there was also me and plenty of my school friends at Eton who were Bullseye addicts. And not just in some ironic way. I LOVED Bullseye. As did my school pal (the actor) Dominic West. We once wrote to Central Television asking if we could be contestants. They wrote back declining but offering us places in the studio audience. We didn&#39;t take up the offer, but I still sometimes imagine what that show might have been like if we&#39;d managed to appear on it. I can&#39;t recall whether it was I or Dom answering the questions or throwing the darts (the knower or the thrower as it was called). Jim Bowen TV Presenter at home Credit: Trinity Mirror/Alamy Stock Photo At school on a Sunday evening at 5pm I’d rush back to my room to watch the show on the secret little black and white TV I had hidden in my &#39;boot box&#39; beside my bed. At home I watched it - often with my sister Henrietta - religiously. An old friend of mine – James Tomkinson and I still talk about it over lunch. Joyously you can still catch it on Challenge. The shows have weathered well. The show&#39;s format was tweaked over the years but the mainstays were always there. There were the terrible jokes relating to people&#39;s jobs, always (with no subtlety) referenced on Jim&#39;s cue cards. &#39;So Mike I hear you&#39;re a drayman?&#39; ‘That&#39;s right Jim&#39;. &#39;So it would be fair to say your drink problem is behind you...&#39; Actually on that occasion he had to explain that a drayman drove booze to pubs. Often he had no response planned at all so just said, &quot;That&#39;s fine…Smashing…We move on…&#39; &#39;So Wendy, I hear you&#39;re a nurse.&#39; &#39;That&#39;s right Jim.&#39; &#39;Fine, we move on.&#39; &#39;So Phil, what do you do for a living.&quot; ‘I&#39;ve been unemployed for two years Jim.’ &#39;Smashing.’ ‘Happily married man Mike?’ ‘I’m divorced Jim.’ ‘So Trevor you’re a fork lift truck engineer?’ ‘That’s right Jim’. ’You must have had some ups and downs…’ ‘Where are you from?’ ‘Barnsley.’ ‘Oh, so this will be new for you, a bit of carpet and electricity.’ Bowen with a prize car on &#39;Bullseye&#39; Credit: ITV / Rex Features/ITV / Rex Features Then there were the questions. &#39;What was TE Lawrence&#39;s first name?&#39; he once asked. &#39;Tommy?&quot; asked a bemused contestant, who wasn&#39;t far wrong in fact. My favourite question incident was the time Jim inadvertently read out the answer. &#39;What country produces the most coffee Brazil,&#39; he called out. And there was Bully&#39;s prize board. How well I recall not just the terrible prizes, recycled the following week if no one won them, but the poetry that announced them: ‘In one: No more shirking you&#39;ll love working with this fabulous power toolkit. In two: Stay cool and upright with this fabulous refrigerator. In three. What goes up, must come down. It&#39;s a stylish umbrella.’ The &#39;Bullseye&#39; Christmas Show 1988 Credit: ITV/REX/Shutterstock/ITV/REX/Shutterstock Of course the denouement was the final 101 or more required with just with six darts for the star prize, hiding behind Bully. There was all the bonkers chat by the oche. &#39;Take your time and listen to Tony,&#39; Jim would say. And Tony would say, &#39;Settle in, take your time, best ‘o luck.&#39; It was the only game show where losing contestants were told: &#39;Come and look at what you could have won.&#39; Actually winning was sometimes worse. I won’t ever forget the couple who lived in a tower block in Leeds who won the speedboat. My brother George once gave me Jim&#39;s autobiography, &#39;From a Bundle of Rags&#39;, for Christmas. I learnt of his humble origins, his previous life as a deputy headmaster, the old train station he lived in in Cumbria. Having just finished a new biography of Charles I, I think I&#39;ll get out Jim’s and have another read. Jim Bowen seemed a kind and self-effacing man who once said of his hosting of Bullseye: ‘I think the early shows set the TV industry back 20 years.’ I was once managed to get my hands on a real Bendy Bully (given to all contestants along with a tankard for the boys or goblet for the ladies)...I feel a quadruple bill on Challenge coming on...sorry Emily: ‘Let me count out the money, it’ll take me two minutes…’ William Sitwell is the host of Biting Talk on Soho Radio
Bullseye was the must watch show when I was a boarder at Eton
Ok so the great Stephen Hawking has died; a man who told us the history of time, who showed us a glimpse into black holes, who cast our minds and imaginations into the vast universe. But another great man also died this week. He was closer to home and significantly more down to earth. Hawking may have once said that: ‘The scientific account is complete. Theology is unnecessary.’ But it was Jim Bowen who uttered the line: ‘Keep out of the black and in the red, nothing in this game for two in a bed.’ Jim Bowen was a hit in the 80's with Bullseye Credit: ITV/REX/Shutterstock And if you missed it one week, he repeated the next week and then next for 14 years throughout the 1980s and early 90s. Bowen was the host of Bullseye, a particularly British institution - a darts-based game show hosted by a man who had none of the slick professionalism of someone like Bob Monkhouse. While Monkhouse had glamorous girls as his sidekicks, Jim Bowen had Tony Green; a chubby ex-darts player, turned commentator and scorekeeper. The contestants were largely Northern working class tradesman. The audience was the same, but not entirely. For there was also me and plenty of my school friends at Eton who were Bullseye addicts. And not just in some ironic way. I LOVED Bullseye. As did my school pal (the actor) Dominic West. We once wrote to Central Television asking if we could be contestants. They wrote back declining but offering us places in the studio audience. We didn't take up the offer, but I still sometimes imagine what that show might have been like if we'd managed to appear on it. I can't recall whether it was I or Dom answering the questions or throwing the darts (the knower or the thrower as it was called). Jim Bowen TV Presenter at home Credit: Trinity Mirror/Alamy Stock Photo At school on a Sunday evening at 5pm I’d rush back to my room to watch the show on the secret little black and white TV I had hidden in my 'boot box' beside my bed. At home I watched it - often with my sister Henrietta - religiously. An old friend of mine – James Tomkinson and I still talk about it over lunch. Joyously you can still catch it on Challenge. The shows have weathered well. The show's format was tweaked over the years but the mainstays were always there. There were the terrible jokes relating to people's jobs, always (with no subtlety) referenced on Jim's cue cards. 'So Mike I hear you're a drayman?' ‘That's right Jim'. 'So it would be fair to say your drink problem is behind you...' Actually on that occasion he had to explain that a drayman drove booze to pubs. Often he had no response planned at all so just said, "That's fine…Smashing…We move on…' 'So Wendy, I hear you're a nurse.' 'That's right Jim.' 'Fine, we move on.' 'So Phil, what do you do for a living." ‘I've been unemployed for two years Jim.’ 'Smashing.’ ‘Happily married man Mike?’ ‘I’m divorced Jim.’ ‘So Trevor you’re a fork lift truck engineer?’ ‘That’s right Jim’. ’You must have had some ups and downs…’ ‘Where are you from?’ ‘Barnsley.’ ‘Oh, so this will be new for you, a bit of carpet and electricity.’ Bowen with a prize car on 'Bullseye' Credit: ITV / Rex Features/ITV / Rex Features Then there were the questions. 'What was TE Lawrence's first name?' he once asked. 'Tommy?" asked a bemused contestant, who wasn't far wrong in fact. My favourite question incident was the time Jim inadvertently read out the answer. 'What country produces the most coffee Brazil,' he called out. And there was Bully's prize board. How well I recall not just the terrible prizes, recycled the following week if no one won them, but the poetry that announced them: ‘In one: No more shirking you'll love working with this fabulous power toolkit. In two: Stay cool and upright with this fabulous refrigerator. In three. What goes up, must come down. It's a stylish umbrella.’ The 'Bullseye' Christmas Show 1988 Credit: ITV/REX/Shutterstock/ITV/REX/Shutterstock Of course the denouement was the final 101 or more required with just with six darts for the star prize, hiding behind Bully. There was all the bonkers chat by the oche. 'Take your time and listen to Tony,' Jim would say. And Tony would say, 'Settle in, take your time, best ‘o luck.' It was the only game show where losing contestants were told: 'Come and look at what you could have won.' Actually winning was sometimes worse. I won’t ever forget the couple who lived in a tower block in Leeds who won the speedboat. My brother George once gave me Jim's autobiography, 'From a Bundle of Rags', for Christmas. I learnt of his humble origins, his previous life as a deputy headmaster, the old train station he lived in in Cumbria. Having just finished a new biography of Charles I, I think I'll get out Jim’s and have another read. Jim Bowen seemed a kind and self-effacing man who once said of his hosting of Bullseye: ‘I think the early shows set the TV industry back 20 years.’ I was once managed to get my hands on a real Bendy Bully (given to all contestants along with a tankard for the boys or goblet for the ladies)...I feel a quadruple bill on Challenge coming on...sorry Emily: ‘Let me count out the money, it’ll take me two minutes…’ William Sitwell is the host of Biting Talk on Soho Radio
Ok so the great Stephen Hawking has died; a man who told us the history of time, who showed us a glimpse into black holes, who cast our minds and imaginations into the vast universe. But another great man also died this week. He was closer to home and significantly more down to earth. Hawking may have once said that: ‘The scientific account is complete. Theology is unnecessary.’ But it was Jim Bowen who uttered the line: ‘Keep out of the black and in the red, nothing in this game for two in a bed.’ Jim Bowen was a hit in the 80&#39;s with Bullseye Credit: ITV/REX/Shutterstock And if you missed it one week, he repeated the next week and then next for 14 years throughout the 1980s and early 90s. Bowen was the host of Bullseye, a particularly British institution - a darts-based game show hosted by a man who had none of the slick professionalism of someone like Bob Monkhouse. While Monkhouse had glamorous girls as his sidekicks, Jim Bowen had Tony Green; a chubby ex-darts player, turned commentator and scorekeeper. The contestants were largely Northern working class tradesman. The audience was the same, but not entirely. For there was also me and plenty of my school friends at Eton who were Bullseye addicts. And not just in some ironic way. I LOVED Bullseye. As did my school pal (the actor) Dominic West. We once wrote to Central Television asking if we could be contestants. They wrote back declining but offering us places in the studio audience. We didn&#39;t take up the offer, but I still sometimes imagine what that show might have been like if we&#39;d managed to appear on it. I can&#39;t recall whether it was I or Dom answering the questions or throwing the darts (the knower or the thrower as it was called). Jim Bowen TV Presenter at home Credit: Trinity Mirror/Alamy Stock Photo At school on a Sunday evening at 5pm I’d rush back to my room to watch the show on the secret little black and white TV I had hidden in my &#39;boot box&#39; beside my bed. At home I watched it - often with my sister Henrietta - religiously. An old friend of mine – James Tomkinson and I still talk about it over lunch. Joyously you can still catch it on Challenge. The shows have weathered well. The show&#39;s format was tweaked over the years but the mainstays were always there. There were the terrible jokes relating to people&#39;s jobs, always (with no subtlety) referenced on Jim&#39;s cue cards. &#39;So Mike I hear you&#39;re a drayman?&#39; ‘That&#39;s right Jim&#39;. &#39;So it would be fair to say your drink problem is behind you...&#39; Actually on that occasion he had to explain that a drayman drove booze to pubs. Often he had no response planned at all so just said, &quot;That&#39;s fine…Smashing…We move on…&#39; &#39;So Wendy, I hear you&#39;re a nurse.&#39; &#39;That&#39;s right Jim.&#39; &#39;Fine, we move on.&#39; &#39;So Phil, what do you do for a living.&quot; ‘I&#39;ve been unemployed for two years Jim.’ &#39;Smashing.’ ‘Happily married man Mike?’ ‘I’m divorced Jim.’ ‘So Trevor you’re a fork lift truck engineer?’ ‘That’s right Jim’. ’You must have had some ups and downs…’ ‘Where are you from?’ ‘Barnsley.’ ‘Oh, so this will be new for you, a bit of carpet and electricity.’ Bowen with a prize car on &#39;Bullseye&#39; Credit: ITV / Rex Features/ITV / Rex Features Then there were the questions. &#39;What was TE Lawrence&#39;s first name?&#39; he once asked. &#39;Tommy?&quot; asked a bemused contestant, who wasn&#39;t far wrong in fact. My favourite question incident was the time Jim inadvertently read out the answer. &#39;What country produces the most coffee Brazil,&#39; he called out. And there was Bully&#39;s prize board. How well I recall not just the terrible prizes, recycled the following week if no one won them, but the poetry that announced them: ‘In one: No more shirking you&#39;ll love working with this fabulous power toolkit. In two: Stay cool and upright with this fabulous refrigerator. In three. What goes up, must come down. It&#39;s a stylish umbrella.’ The &#39;Bullseye&#39; Christmas Show 1988 Credit: ITV/REX/Shutterstock/ITV/REX/Shutterstock Of course the denouement was the final 101 or more required with just with six darts for the star prize, hiding behind Bully. There was all the bonkers chat by the oche. &#39;Take your time and listen to Tony,&#39; Jim would say. And Tony would say, &#39;Settle in, take your time, best ‘o luck.&#39; It was the only game show where losing contestants were told: &#39;Come and look at what you could have won.&#39; Actually winning was sometimes worse. I won’t ever forget the couple who lived in a tower block in Leeds who won the speedboat. My brother George once gave me Jim&#39;s autobiography, &#39;From a Bundle of Rags&#39;, for Christmas. I learnt of his humble origins, his previous life as a deputy headmaster, the old train station he lived in in Cumbria. Having just finished a new biography of Charles I, I think I&#39;ll get out Jim’s and have another read. Jim Bowen seemed a kind and self-effacing man who once said of his hosting of Bullseye: ‘I think the early shows set the TV industry back 20 years.’ I was once managed to get my hands on a real Bendy Bully (given to all contestants along with a tankard for the boys or goblet for the ladies)...I feel a quadruple bill on Challenge coming on...sorry Emily: ‘Let me count out the money, it’ll take me two minutes…’ William Sitwell is the host of Biting Talk on Soho Radio
Bullseye was the must watch show when I was a boarder at Eton
Ok so the great Stephen Hawking has died; a man who told us the history of time, who showed us a glimpse into black holes, who cast our minds and imaginations into the vast universe. But another great man also died this week. He was closer to home and significantly more down to earth. Hawking may have once said that: ‘The scientific account is complete. Theology is unnecessary.’ But it was Jim Bowen who uttered the line: ‘Keep out of the black and in the red, nothing in this game for two in a bed.’ Jim Bowen was a hit in the 80's with Bullseye Credit: ITV/REX/Shutterstock And if you missed it one week, he repeated the next week and then next for 14 years throughout the 1980s and early 90s. Bowen was the host of Bullseye, a particularly British institution - a darts-based game show hosted by a man who had none of the slick professionalism of someone like Bob Monkhouse. While Monkhouse had glamorous girls as his sidekicks, Jim Bowen had Tony Green; a chubby ex-darts player, turned commentator and scorekeeper. The contestants were largely Northern working class tradesman. The audience was the same, but not entirely. For there was also me and plenty of my school friends at Eton who were Bullseye addicts. And not just in some ironic way. I LOVED Bullseye. As did my school pal (the actor) Dominic West. We once wrote to Central Television asking if we could be contestants. They wrote back declining but offering us places in the studio audience. We didn't take up the offer, but I still sometimes imagine what that show might have been like if we'd managed to appear on it. I can't recall whether it was I or Dom answering the questions or throwing the darts (the knower or the thrower as it was called). Jim Bowen TV Presenter at home Credit: Trinity Mirror/Alamy Stock Photo At school on a Sunday evening at 5pm I’d rush back to my room to watch the show on the secret little black and white TV I had hidden in my 'boot box' beside my bed. At home I watched it - often with my sister Henrietta - religiously. An old friend of mine – James Tomkinson and I still talk about it over lunch. Joyously you can still catch it on Challenge. The shows have weathered well. The show's format was tweaked over the years but the mainstays were always there. There were the terrible jokes relating to people's jobs, always (with no subtlety) referenced on Jim's cue cards. 'So Mike I hear you're a drayman?' ‘That's right Jim'. 'So it would be fair to say your drink problem is behind you...' Actually on that occasion he had to explain that a drayman drove booze to pubs. Often he had no response planned at all so just said, "That's fine…Smashing…We move on…' 'So Wendy, I hear you're a nurse.' 'That's right Jim.' 'Fine, we move on.' 'So Phil, what do you do for a living." ‘I've been unemployed for two years Jim.’ 'Smashing.’ ‘Happily married man Mike?’ ‘I’m divorced Jim.’ ‘So Trevor you’re a fork lift truck engineer?’ ‘That’s right Jim’. ’You must have had some ups and downs…’ ‘Where are you from?’ ‘Barnsley.’ ‘Oh, so this will be new for you, a bit of carpet and electricity.’ Bowen with a prize car on 'Bullseye' Credit: ITV / Rex Features/ITV / Rex Features Then there were the questions. 'What was TE Lawrence's first name?' he once asked. 'Tommy?" asked a bemused contestant, who wasn't far wrong in fact. My favourite question incident was the time Jim inadvertently read out the answer. 'What country produces the most coffee Brazil,' he called out. And there was Bully's prize board. How well I recall not just the terrible prizes, recycled the following week if no one won them, but the poetry that announced them: ‘In one: No more shirking you'll love working with this fabulous power toolkit. In two: Stay cool and upright with this fabulous refrigerator. In three. What goes up, must come down. It's a stylish umbrella.’ The 'Bullseye' Christmas Show 1988 Credit: ITV/REX/Shutterstock/ITV/REX/Shutterstock Of course the denouement was the final 101 or more required with just with six darts for the star prize, hiding behind Bully. There was all the bonkers chat by the oche. 'Take your time and listen to Tony,' Jim would say. And Tony would say, 'Settle in, take your time, best ‘o luck.' It was the only game show where losing contestants were told: 'Come and look at what you could have won.' Actually winning was sometimes worse. I won’t ever forget the couple who lived in a tower block in Leeds who won the speedboat. My brother George once gave me Jim's autobiography, 'From a Bundle of Rags', for Christmas. I learnt of his humble origins, his previous life as a deputy headmaster, the old train station he lived in in Cumbria. Having just finished a new biography of Charles I, I think I'll get out Jim’s and have another read. Jim Bowen seemed a kind and self-effacing man who once said of his hosting of Bullseye: ‘I think the early shows set the TV industry back 20 years.’ I was once managed to get my hands on a real Bendy Bully (given to all contestants along with a tankard for the boys or goblet for the ladies)...I feel a quadruple bill on Challenge coming on...sorry Emily: ‘Let me count out the money, it’ll take me two minutes…’ William Sitwell is the host of Biting Talk on Soho Radio
Ok so the great Stephen Hawking has died; a man who told us the history of time, who showed us a glimpse into black holes, who cast our minds and imaginations into the vast universe. But another great man also died this week. He was closer to home and significantly more down to earth. Hawking may have once said that: ‘The scientific account is complete. Theology is unnecessary.’ But it was Jim Bowen who uttered the line: ‘Keep out of the black and in the red, nothing in this game for two in a bed.’ Jim Bowen was a hit in the 80&#39;s with Bullseye Credit: ITV/REX/Shutterstock And if you missed it one week, he repeated the next week and then next for 14 years throughout the 1980s and early 90s. Bowen was the host of Bullseye, a particularly British institution - a darts-based game show hosted by a man who had none of the slick professionalism of someone like Bob Monkhouse. While Monkhouse had glamorous girls as his sidekicks, Jim Bowen had Tony Green; a chubby ex-darts player, turned commentator and scorekeeper. The contestants were largely Northern working class tradesman. The audience was the same, but not entirely. For there was also me and plenty of my school friends at Eton who were Bullseye addicts. And not just in some ironic way. I LOVED Bullseye. As did my school pal (the actor) Dominic West. We once wrote to Central Television asking if we could be contestants. They wrote back declining but offering us places in the studio audience. We didn&#39;t take up the offer, but I still sometimes imagine what that show might have been like if we&#39;d managed to appear on it. I can&#39;t recall whether it was I or Dom answering the questions or throwing the darts (the knower or the thrower as it was called). Jim Bowen TV Presenter at home Credit: Trinity Mirror/Alamy Stock Photo At school on a Sunday evening at 5pm I’d rush back to my room to watch the show on the secret little black and white TV I had hidden in my &#39;boot box&#39; beside my bed. At home I watched it - often with my sister Henrietta - religiously. An old friend of mine – James Tomkinson and I still talk about it over lunch. Joyously you can still catch it on Challenge. The shows have weathered well. The show&#39;s format was tweaked over the years but the mainstays were always there. There were the terrible jokes relating to people&#39;s jobs, always (with no subtlety) referenced on Jim&#39;s cue cards. &#39;So Mike I hear you&#39;re a drayman?&#39; ‘That&#39;s right Jim&#39;. &#39;So it would be fair to say your drink problem is behind you...&#39; Actually on that occasion he had to explain that a drayman drove booze to pubs. Often he had no response planned at all so just said, &quot;That&#39;s fine…Smashing…We move on…&#39; &#39;So Wendy, I hear you&#39;re a nurse.&#39; &#39;That&#39;s right Jim.&#39; &#39;Fine, we move on.&#39; &#39;So Phil, what do you do for a living.&quot; ‘I&#39;ve been unemployed for two years Jim.’ &#39;Smashing.’ ‘Happily married man Mike?’ ‘I’m divorced Jim.’ ‘So Trevor you’re a fork lift truck engineer?’ ‘That’s right Jim’. ’You must have had some ups and downs…’ ‘Where are you from?’ ‘Barnsley.’ ‘Oh, so this will be new for you, a bit of carpet and electricity.’ Bowen with a prize car on &#39;Bullseye&#39; Credit: ITV / Rex Features/ITV / Rex Features Then there were the questions. &#39;What was TE Lawrence&#39;s first name?&#39; he once asked. &#39;Tommy?&quot; asked a bemused contestant, who wasn&#39;t far wrong in fact. My favourite question incident was the time Jim inadvertently read out the answer. &#39;What country produces the most coffee Brazil,&#39; he called out. And there was Bully&#39;s prize board. How well I recall not just the terrible prizes, recycled the following week if no one won them, but the poetry that announced them: ‘In one: No more shirking you&#39;ll love working with this fabulous power toolkit. In two: Stay cool and upright with this fabulous refrigerator. In three. What goes up, must come down. It&#39;s a stylish umbrella.’ The &#39;Bullseye&#39; Christmas Show 1988 Credit: ITV/REX/Shutterstock/ITV/REX/Shutterstock Of course the denouement was the final 101 or more required with just with six darts for the star prize, hiding behind Bully. There was all the bonkers chat by the oche. &#39;Take your time and listen to Tony,&#39; Jim would say. And Tony would say, &#39;Settle in, take your time, best ‘o luck.&#39; It was the only game show where losing contestants were told: &#39;Come and look at what you could have won.&#39; Actually winning was sometimes worse. I won’t ever forget the couple who lived in a tower block in Leeds who won the speedboat. My brother George once gave me Jim&#39;s autobiography, &#39;From a Bundle of Rags&#39;, for Christmas. I learnt of his humble origins, his previous life as a deputy headmaster, the old train station he lived in in Cumbria. Having just finished a new biography of Charles I, I think I&#39;ll get out Jim’s and have another read. Jim Bowen seemed a kind and self-effacing man who once said of his hosting of Bullseye: ‘I think the early shows set the TV industry back 20 years.’ I was once managed to get my hands on a real Bendy Bully (given to all contestants along with a tankard for the boys or goblet for the ladies)...I feel a quadruple bill on Challenge coming on...sorry Emily: ‘Let me count out the money, it’ll take me two minutes…’ William Sitwell is the host of Biting Talk on Soho Radio
Bullseye was the must watch show when I was a boarder at Eton
Ok so the great Stephen Hawking has died; a man who told us the history of time, who showed us a glimpse into black holes, who cast our minds and imaginations into the vast universe. But another great man also died this week. He was closer to home and significantly more down to earth. Hawking may have once said that: ‘The scientific account is complete. Theology is unnecessary.’ But it was Jim Bowen who uttered the line: ‘Keep out of the black and in the red, nothing in this game for two in a bed.’ Jim Bowen was a hit in the 80's with Bullseye Credit: ITV/REX/Shutterstock And if you missed it one week, he repeated the next week and then next for 14 years throughout the 1980s and early 90s. Bowen was the host of Bullseye, a particularly British institution - a darts-based game show hosted by a man who had none of the slick professionalism of someone like Bob Monkhouse. While Monkhouse had glamorous girls as his sidekicks, Jim Bowen had Tony Green; a chubby ex-darts player, turned commentator and scorekeeper. The contestants were largely Northern working class tradesman. The audience was the same, but not entirely. For there was also me and plenty of my school friends at Eton who were Bullseye addicts. And not just in some ironic way. I LOVED Bullseye. As did my school pal (the actor) Dominic West. We once wrote to Central Television asking if we could be contestants. They wrote back declining but offering us places in the studio audience. We didn't take up the offer, but I still sometimes imagine what that show might have been like if we'd managed to appear on it. I can't recall whether it was I or Dom answering the questions or throwing the darts (the knower or the thrower as it was called). Jim Bowen TV Presenter at home Credit: Trinity Mirror/Alamy Stock Photo At school on a Sunday evening at 5pm I’d rush back to my room to watch the show on the secret little black and white TV I had hidden in my 'boot box' beside my bed. At home I watched it - often with my sister Henrietta - religiously. An old friend of mine – James Tomkinson and I still talk about it over lunch. Joyously you can still catch it on Challenge. The shows have weathered well. The show's format was tweaked over the years but the mainstays were always there. There were the terrible jokes relating to people's jobs, always (with no subtlety) referenced on Jim's cue cards. 'So Mike I hear you're a drayman?' ‘That's right Jim'. 'So it would be fair to say your drink problem is behind you...' Actually on that occasion he had to explain that a drayman drove booze to pubs. Often he had no response planned at all so just said, "That's fine…Smashing…We move on…' 'So Wendy, I hear you're a nurse.' 'That's right Jim.' 'Fine, we move on.' 'So Phil, what do you do for a living." ‘I've been unemployed for two years Jim.’ 'Smashing.’ ‘Happily married man Mike?’ ‘I’m divorced Jim.’ ‘So Trevor you’re a fork lift truck engineer?’ ‘That’s right Jim’. ’You must have had some ups and downs…’ ‘Where are you from?’ ‘Barnsley.’ ‘Oh, so this will be new for you, a bit of carpet and electricity.’ Bowen with a prize car on 'Bullseye' Credit: ITV / Rex Features/ITV / Rex Features Then there were the questions. 'What was TE Lawrence's first name?' he once asked. 'Tommy?" asked a bemused contestant, who wasn't far wrong in fact. My favourite question incident was the time Jim inadvertently read out the answer. 'What country produces the most coffee Brazil,' he called out. And there was Bully's prize board. How well I recall not just the terrible prizes, recycled the following week if no one won them, but the poetry that announced them: ‘In one: No more shirking you'll love working with this fabulous power toolkit. In two: Stay cool and upright with this fabulous refrigerator. In three. What goes up, must come down. It's a stylish umbrella.’ The 'Bullseye' Christmas Show 1988 Credit: ITV/REX/Shutterstock/ITV/REX/Shutterstock Of course the denouement was the final 101 or more required with just with six darts for the star prize, hiding behind Bully. There was all the bonkers chat by the oche. 'Take your time and listen to Tony,' Jim would say. And Tony would say, 'Settle in, take your time, best ‘o luck.' It was the only game show where losing contestants were told: 'Come and look at what you could have won.' Actually winning was sometimes worse. I won’t ever forget the couple who lived in a tower block in Leeds who won the speedboat. My brother George once gave me Jim's autobiography, 'From a Bundle of Rags', for Christmas. I learnt of his humble origins, his previous life as a deputy headmaster, the old train station he lived in in Cumbria. Having just finished a new biography of Charles I, I think I'll get out Jim’s and have another read. Jim Bowen seemed a kind and self-effacing man who once said of his hosting of Bullseye: ‘I think the early shows set the TV industry back 20 years.’ I was once managed to get my hands on a real Bendy Bully (given to all contestants along with a tankard for the boys or goblet for the ladies)...I feel a quadruple bill on Challenge coming on...sorry Emily: ‘Let me count out the money, it’ll take me two minutes…’ William Sitwell is the host of Biting Talk on Soho Radio
It would stretch acceptable hyperbole to say that Alex McLeish looked into Scott McTominay’s eyes, saw Saltire blue and decided to build a Scotland team around him. What is true, however, is that McLeish drove through the recent Siberian weather so that he could judge for himself whether or not the highly regarded Manchester United midfielder genuinely wanted to pledge fealty to the land of his father’s birth. McLeish was sufficiently persuaded to include the 21-year-old – who turned down a request from Gareth Southgate to declare for England - in the squad for the Scots’ forthcoming friendlies, at home to Costa Rica and away to Hungary in Budapest. The 27-strong pool includes five other players new to this level – Oli McBurnie (Swansea), Dylan McGeouch (Hibernian), Barry Douglas (Wolves), Scott McKenna (Aberdeen) and the Heart of Midlothian goalkeeper, Jon McLaughlin. Asked if, at the start of his second stint as Scotland manager, he regarded McTominay as his first success, McLeish said: “Yeah I felt very chuffed with myself with that one. I did a lot of travelling that night to get to Manchester - it was a wicked night, with all the snow. I was actually very surprised by my first exchange with him because he said ‘I want to play for Scotland’. “I said, ‘Listen I’m not forcing it down your throat’ and he said that Jose Mourinho wanted to release it at a certain time after the Crystal Palace game. Scott intimated that he definitely wanted to play for Scotland. I said I’d phone him again next week when he could give me a definitive answer. “The fans have been giving him some banter saying he chose us because he wants to have his holidays every summer, but he played a great game at the weekend. I was at the Palace game and, unfortunately, he came off at half time because United’s midfield was a wee bit indisciplined. McTominay is a man on a mission Credit: PA “I must stress that he wasn’t. He had to make way for a couple of other players, but he came back with a giant bounce against Liverpool. “I think he’s ready and I think he’s got the temperament and mentality. I believe he has the confidence and there is so much Jose can impart to Scott McTominay. Now I believe we can help him to progress also by giving him additional advice. “He’s not got all the answers. He’s 21. He’s a young guy learning the game and we have to be patient with young guys, but my first game for Scotland was at 21 and I realised right away that I had to retain possession. I knew if you lose the ball in international football you might not get another game. “One mistake and you retire with one cap saying, “I’m happy, I got a cap!’, so it’s up to these guys to bring their club level but also to improve when they get here both mentally and technically.” Along with the six players who have not previously been named in Scotland squads, McLeish included three who have been with previous groups but who have not been capped - Fulham’s Kevin McDonald, Jamie Murphy, on loan to Rangers from Brighton, and the Millwall goalkeeper Jordan Archer. Several names familiar from recent campaigns were absent from the squad, some through injury but others were omitted because McLeish wanted to make a significant start on blooding the next generation of Scotland players. The manager, though, took pains to speak to previous regulars, like Robert Snodgrass and James McArthur. “I paid respect to the older fellows,” he said. “They’re not old guys – they’re experienced players and we’re going to need experience. I spoke to all the fellows who have been involved recently and said, ‘I know what you can do - you’re very much in my thoughts but I’m going to look at some other players at this particular international period’. “You need the nous and the experience of what those guys can do.” Aside from adding McTominay’s potential to Scotland’s strength, McLeish has inherited two highly rated defenders in Andrew Robertson of Liverpool and Celtic’s Kieran Tierney. The twist is that both play at left back but, although Tierney has featured on the other flank, he has also proved adept as a central defender for Celtic and also for the Scots when they played an autumn friendly against the Dutch in Aberdeen. “It is not in my plans to go forward with Tierney as the right back for Scotland,” McLeish said. “I don’t want to talk about systems, but you could see the way Tierney and Robertson fitted in at Pittodrie. “That is a good option for us. You want to get your best players in the team and those are two of the best players that the country has produced.” The Tartan Army are also likely to be introduced to McBurnie, although McLeish has yet to watch him play in person. “We have not seen much of Oli McBurnie. He has come late in the day,” McLeish said. “I have seen the last three or four Barnsley videos and he looks as if he has got a character about him. He is a guy who wants to play for Scotland and who has the mentality to play for us. He is unfazed by any opponent he comes across.” Meanwhile, it has been confirmed that, following this month’s fixtures and the June visit to Peru and Mexico, Scotland will meet Belgium in a friendly at Hampden Park on Friday, September 7. McLeish said: “As a side currently ranked in the top five in the world, Belgium are the standard to which our players should be aspiring.”
Scott McTominay praised by Alex McLeish after being named in Scotland squad
It would stretch acceptable hyperbole to say that Alex McLeish looked into Scott McTominay’s eyes, saw Saltire blue and decided to build a Scotland team around him. What is true, however, is that McLeish drove through the recent Siberian weather so that he could judge for himself whether or not the highly regarded Manchester United midfielder genuinely wanted to pledge fealty to the land of his father’s birth. McLeish was sufficiently persuaded to include the 21-year-old – who turned down a request from Gareth Southgate to declare for England - in the squad for the Scots’ forthcoming friendlies, at home to Costa Rica and away to Hungary in Budapest. The 27-strong pool includes five other players new to this level – Oli McBurnie (Swansea), Dylan McGeouch (Hibernian), Barry Douglas (Wolves), Scott McKenna (Aberdeen) and the Heart of Midlothian goalkeeper, Jon McLaughlin. Asked if, at the start of his second stint as Scotland manager, he regarded McTominay as his first success, McLeish said: “Yeah I felt very chuffed with myself with that one. I did a lot of travelling that night to get to Manchester - it was a wicked night, with all the snow. I was actually very surprised by my first exchange with him because he said ‘I want to play for Scotland’. “I said, ‘Listen I’m not forcing it down your throat’ and he said that Jose Mourinho wanted to release it at a certain time after the Crystal Palace game. Scott intimated that he definitely wanted to play for Scotland. I said I’d phone him again next week when he could give me a definitive answer. “The fans have been giving him some banter saying he chose us because he wants to have his holidays every summer, but he played a great game at the weekend. I was at the Palace game and, unfortunately, he came off at half time because United’s midfield was a wee bit indisciplined. McTominay is a man on a mission Credit: PA “I must stress that he wasn’t. He had to make way for a couple of other players, but he came back with a giant bounce against Liverpool. “I think he’s ready and I think he’s got the temperament and mentality. I believe he has the confidence and there is so much Jose can impart to Scott McTominay. Now I believe we can help him to progress also by giving him additional advice. “He’s not got all the answers. He’s 21. He’s a young guy learning the game and we have to be patient with young guys, but my first game for Scotland was at 21 and I realised right away that I had to retain possession. I knew if you lose the ball in international football you might not get another game. “One mistake and you retire with one cap saying, “I’m happy, I got a cap!’, so it’s up to these guys to bring their club level but also to improve when they get here both mentally and technically.” Along with the six players who have not previously been named in Scotland squads, McLeish included three who have been with previous groups but who have not been capped - Fulham’s Kevin McDonald, Jamie Murphy, on loan to Rangers from Brighton, and the Millwall goalkeeper Jordan Archer. Several names familiar from recent campaigns were absent from the squad, some through injury but others were omitted because McLeish wanted to make a significant start on blooding the next generation of Scotland players. The manager, though, took pains to speak to previous regulars, like Robert Snodgrass and James McArthur. “I paid respect to the older fellows,” he said. “They’re not old guys – they’re experienced players and we’re going to need experience. I spoke to all the fellows who have been involved recently and said, ‘I know what you can do - you’re very much in my thoughts but I’m going to look at some other players at this particular international period’. “You need the nous and the experience of what those guys can do.” Aside from adding McTominay’s potential to Scotland’s strength, McLeish has inherited two highly rated defenders in Andrew Robertson of Liverpool and Celtic’s Kieran Tierney. The twist is that both play at left back but, although Tierney has featured on the other flank, he has also proved adept as a central defender for Celtic and also for the Scots when they played an autumn friendly against the Dutch in Aberdeen. “It is not in my plans to go forward with Tierney as the right back for Scotland,” McLeish said. “I don’t want to talk about systems, but you could see the way Tierney and Robertson fitted in at Pittodrie. “That is a good option for us. You want to get your best players in the team and those are two of the best players that the country has produced.” The Tartan Army are also likely to be introduced to McBurnie, although McLeish has yet to watch him play in person. “We have not seen much of Oli McBurnie. He has come late in the day,” McLeish said. “I have seen the last three or four Barnsley videos and he looks as if he has got a character about him. He is a guy who wants to play for Scotland and who has the mentality to play for us. He is unfazed by any opponent he comes across.” Meanwhile, it has been confirmed that, following this month’s fixtures and the June visit to Peru and Mexico, Scotland will meet Belgium in a friendly at Hampden Park on Friday, September 7. McLeish said: “As a side currently ranked in the top five in the world, Belgium are the standard to which our players should be aspiring.”
It would stretch acceptable hyperbole to say that Alex McLeish looked into Scott McTominay’s eyes, saw Saltire blue and decided to build a Scotland team around him. What is true, however, is that McLeish drove through the recent Siberian weather so that he could judge for himself whether or not the highly regarded Manchester United midfielder genuinely wanted to pledge fealty to the land of his father’s birth. McLeish was sufficiently persuaded to include the 21-year-old – who turned down a request from Gareth Southgate to declare for England - in the squad for the Scots’ forthcoming friendlies, at home to Costa Rica and away to Hungary in Budapest. The 27-strong pool includes five other players new to this level – Oli McBurnie (Swansea), Dylan McGeouch (Hibernian), Barry Douglas (Wolves), Scott McKenna (Aberdeen) and the Heart of Midlothian goalkeeper, Jon McLaughlin. Asked if, at the start of his second stint as Scotland manager, he regarded McTominay as his first success, McLeish said: “Yeah I felt very chuffed with myself with that one. I did a lot of travelling that night to get to Manchester - it was a wicked night, with all the snow. I was actually very surprised by my first exchange with him because he said ‘I want to play for Scotland’. “I said, ‘Listen I’m not forcing it down your throat’ and he said that Jose Mourinho wanted to release it at a certain time after the Crystal Palace game. Scott intimated that he definitely wanted to play for Scotland. I said I’d phone him again next week when he could give me a definitive answer. “The fans have been giving him some banter saying he chose us because he wants to have his holidays every summer, but he played a great game at the weekend. I was at the Palace game and, unfortunately, he came off at half time because United’s midfield was a wee bit indisciplined. McTominay is a man on a mission Credit: PA “I must stress that he wasn’t. He had to make way for a couple of other players, but he came back with a giant bounce against Liverpool. “I think he’s ready and I think he’s got the temperament and mentality. I believe he has the confidence and there is so much Jose can impart to Scott McTominay. Now I believe we can help him to progress also by giving him additional advice. “He’s not got all the answers. He’s 21. He’s a young guy learning the game and we have to be patient with young guys, but my first game for Scotland was at 21 and I realised right away that I had to retain possession. I knew if you lose the ball in international football you might not get another game. “One mistake and you retire with one cap saying, “I’m happy, I got a cap!’, so it’s up to these guys to bring their club level but also to improve when they get here both mentally and technically.” Along with the six players who have not previously been named in Scotland squads, McLeish included three who have been with previous groups but who have not been capped - Fulham’s Kevin McDonald, Jamie Murphy, on loan to Rangers from Brighton, and the Millwall goalkeeper Jordan Archer. Several names familiar from recent campaigns were absent from the squad, some through injury but others were omitted because McLeish wanted to make a significant start on blooding the next generation of Scotland players. The manager, though, took pains to speak to previous regulars, like Robert Snodgrass and James McArthur. “I paid respect to the older fellows,” he said. “They’re not old guys – they’re experienced players and we’re going to need experience. I spoke to all the fellows who have been involved recently and said, ‘I know what you can do - you’re very much in my thoughts but I’m going to look at some other players at this particular international period’. “You need the nous and the experience of what those guys can do.” Aside from adding McTominay’s potential to Scotland’s strength, McLeish has inherited two highly rated defenders in Andrew Robertson of Liverpool and Celtic’s Kieran Tierney. The twist is that both play at left back but, although Tierney has featured on the other flank, he has also proved adept as a central defender for Celtic and also for the Scots when they played an autumn friendly against the Dutch in Aberdeen. “It is not in my plans to go forward with Tierney as the right back for Scotland,” McLeish said. “I don’t want to talk about systems, but you could see the way Tierney and Robertson fitted in at Pittodrie. “That is a good option for us. You want to get your best players in the team and those are two of the best players that the country has produced.” The Tartan Army are also likely to be introduced to McBurnie, although McLeish has yet to watch him play in person. “We have not seen much of Oli McBurnie. He has come late in the day,” McLeish said. “I have seen the last three or four Barnsley videos and he looks as if he has got a character about him. He is a guy who wants to play for Scotland and who has the mentality to play for us. He is unfazed by any opponent he comes across.” Meanwhile, it has been confirmed that, following this month’s fixtures and the June visit to Peru and Mexico, Scotland will meet Belgium in a friendly at Hampden Park on Friday, September 7. McLeish said: “As a side currently ranked in the top five in the world, Belgium are the standard to which our players should be aspiring.”
Scott McTominay praised by Alex McLeish after being named in Scotland squad
It would stretch acceptable hyperbole to say that Alex McLeish looked into Scott McTominay’s eyes, saw Saltire blue and decided to build a Scotland team around him. What is true, however, is that McLeish drove through the recent Siberian weather so that he could judge for himself whether or not the highly regarded Manchester United midfielder genuinely wanted to pledge fealty to the land of his father’s birth. McLeish was sufficiently persuaded to include the 21-year-old – who turned down a request from Gareth Southgate to declare for England - in the squad for the Scots’ forthcoming friendlies, at home to Costa Rica and away to Hungary in Budapest. The 27-strong pool includes five other players new to this level – Oli McBurnie (Swansea), Dylan McGeouch (Hibernian), Barry Douglas (Wolves), Scott McKenna (Aberdeen) and the Heart of Midlothian goalkeeper, Jon McLaughlin. Asked if, at the start of his second stint as Scotland manager, he regarded McTominay as his first success, McLeish said: “Yeah I felt very chuffed with myself with that one. I did a lot of travelling that night to get to Manchester - it was a wicked night, with all the snow. I was actually very surprised by my first exchange with him because he said ‘I want to play for Scotland’. “I said, ‘Listen I’m not forcing it down your throat’ and he said that Jose Mourinho wanted to release it at a certain time after the Crystal Palace game. Scott intimated that he definitely wanted to play for Scotland. I said I’d phone him again next week when he could give me a definitive answer. “The fans have been giving him some banter saying he chose us because he wants to have his holidays every summer, but he played a great game at the weekend. I was at the Palace game and, unfortunately, he came off at half time because United’s midfield was a wee bit indisciplined. McTominay is a man on a mission Credit: PA “I must stress that he wasn’t. He had to make way for a couple of other players, but he came back with a giant bounce against Liverpool. “I think he’s ready and I think he’s got the temperament and mentality. I believe he has the confidence and there is so much Jose can impart to Scott McTominay. Now I believe we can help him to progress also by giving him additional advice. “He’s not got all the answers. He’s 21. He’s a young guy learning the game and we have to be patient with young guys, but my first game for Scotland was at 21 and I realised right away that I had to retain possession. I knew if you lose the ball in international football you might not get another game. “One mistake and you retire with one cap saying, “I’m happy, I got a cap!’, so it’s up to these guys to bring their club level but also to improve when they get here both mentally and technically.” Along with the six players who have not previously been named in Scotland squads, McLeish included three who have been with previous groups but who have not been capped - Fulham’s Kevin McDonald, Jamie Murphy, on loan to Rangers from Brighton, and the Millwall goalkeeper Jordan Archer. Several names familiar from recent campaigns were absent from the squad, some through injury but others were omitted because McLeish wanted to make a significant start on blooding the next generation of Scotland players. The manager, though, took pains to speak to previous regulars, like Robert Snodgrass and James McArthur. “I paid respect to the older fellows,” he said. “They’re not old guys – they’re experienced players and we’re going to need experience. I spoke to all the fellows who have been involved recently and said, ‘I know what you can do - you’re very much in my thoughts but I’m going to look at some other players at this particular international period’. “You need the nous and the experience of what those guys can do.” Aside from adding McTominay’s potential to Scotland’s strength, McLeish has inherited two highly rated defenders in Andrew Robertson of Liverpool and Celtic’s Kieran Tierney. The twist is that both play at left back but, although Tierney has featured on the other flank, he has also proved adept as a central defender for Celtic and also for the Scots when they played an autumn friendly against the Dutch in Aberdeen. “It is not in my plans to go forward with Tierney as the right back for Scotland,” McLeish said. “I don’t want to talk about systems, but you could see the way Tierney and Robertson fitted in at Pittodrie. “That is a good option for us. You want to get your best players in the team and those are two of the best players that the country has produced.” The Tartan Army are also likely to be introduced to McBurnie, although McLeish has yet to watch him play in person. “We have not seen much of Oli McBurnie. He has come late in the day,” McLeish said. “I have seen the last three or four Barnsley videos and he looks as if he has got a character about him. He is a guy who wants to play for Scotland and who has the mentality to play for us. He is unfazed by any opponent he comes across.” Meanwhile, it has been confirmed that, following this month’s fixtures and the June visit to Peru and Mexico, Scotland will meet Belgium in a friendly at Hampden Park on Friday, September 7. McLeish said: “As a side currently ranked in the top five in the world, Belgium are the standard to which our players should be aspiring.”
Soccer Football - Championship - Cardiff City vs Barnsley - Cardiff City Stadium, Cardiff, Britain - March 6, 2018 Cardiff City&#39;s Marko Grujic celebrates scoring their second goal with team mates Action Images/Peter Cziborra
Championship - Cardiff City vs Barnsley
Soccer Football - Championship - Cardiff City vs Barnsley - Cardiff City Stadium, Cardiff, Britain - March 6, 2018 Cardiff City's Marko Grujic celebrates scoring their second goal with team mates Action Images/Peter Cziborra
Soccer Football - Championship - Cardiff City vs Barnsley - Cardiff City Stadium, Cardiff, Britain - March 6, 2018 Cardiff City manager Neil Warnock celebrates at full time Action Images/Peter Cziborra
Championship - Cardiff City vs Barnsley
Soccer Football - Championship - Cardiff City vs Barnsley - Cardiff City Stadium, Cardiff, Britain - March 6, 2018 Cardiff City manager Neil Warnock celebrates at full time Action Images/Peter Cziborra
<p>It takes more than a snow storm to distract the Highland Cattle of Wigfield Farm, Barnsley, South Yorkshire, from their breakfasts.</p><p>“The Beast from the East” <a href="http://metro.co.uk/2018/02/27/school-closures-across-uk-snow-beast-east-hits-britain-7344650/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:hit early on Wednesday" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">hit early on Wednesday</a>, causing school delays and several road closures.</p><p>This video shows the cold weather didn’t phase the farm’s resident Highland Cattle. Credit: Wigfield Farm and Barnsley College via Storyful</p>
Highland Cattle Continue Munching Despite the Snow in Barnsley

It takes more than a snow storm to distract the Highland Cattle of Wigfield Farm, Barnsley, South Yorkshire, from their breakfasts.

“The Beast from the East” hit early on Wednesday, causing school delays and several road closures.

This video shows the cold weather didn’t phase the farm’s resident Highland Cattle. Credit: Wigfield Farm and Barnsley College via Storyful

<p>It takes more than a snow storm to distract the Highland Cattle of Wigfield Farm, Barnsley, South Yorkshire, from their breakfasts.</p><p>“The Beast from the East” <a href="http://metro.co.uk/2018/02/27/school-closures-across-uk-snow-beast-east-hits-britain-7344650/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:hit early on Wednesday" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">hit early on Wednesday</a>, causing school delays and several road closures.</p><p>This video shows the cold weather didn’t phase the farm’s resident Highland Cattle. Credit: Wigfield Farm and Barnsley College via Storyful</p>
Highland Cattle Continue Munching Despite the Snow in Barnsley

It takes more than a snow storm to distract the Highland Cattle of Wigfield Farm, Barnsley, South Yorkshire, from their breakfasts.

“The Beast from the East” hit early on Wednesday, causing school delays and several road closures.

This video shows the cold weather didn’t phase the farm’s resident Highland Cattle. Credit: Wigfield Farm and Barnsley College via Storyful

<p>It takes more than a snow storm to distract the Highland Cattle of Wigfield Farm, Barnsley, South Yorkshire, from their breakfasts.</p><p>“The Beast from the East” <a href="http://metro.co.uk/2018/02/27/school-closures-across-uk-snow-beast-east-hits-britain-7344650/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:hit early on Wednesday" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">hit early on Wednesday</a>, causing school delays and several road closures.</p><p>This video shows the cold weather didn’t phase the farm’s resident Highland Cattle. Credit: Wigfield Farm and Barnsley College via Storyful</p>
Highland Cattle Continue Munching Despite the Snow in Barnsley

It takes more than a snow storm to distract the Highland Cattle of Wigfield Farm, Barnsley, South Yorkshire, from their breakfasts.

“The Beast from the East” hit early on Wednesday, causing school delays and several road closures.

This video shows the cold weather didn’t phase the farm’s resident Highland Cattle. Credit: Wigfield Farm and Barnsley College via Storyful

Hull and Barnsley shared a 1-1 draw, while similarly relegation-threatened Reading lost 3-1 as Sheffield United went back into the top six.
Championship Review: Dawson spares Hull, Sharp and Blades blunt Reading
Hull and Barnsley shared a 1-1 draw, while similarly relegation-threatened Reading lost 3-1 as Sheffield United went back into the top six.
The British country house hotel was born in 1949, brought to us in the pink and frilly shape of Sharrow Bay, overlooking Ullswater in the Lake District. Presided over by a splendid couple, Francis Coulson and his partner Brian Sack, it came complete with a gargantuan afternoon tea, and Sack’s famous Icky Sticky Toffee Pudding and Coulson’s bedtime poems on the pillow. People adored it. There had been leisure hotels in Britain before, of course, but this was the first where you could be assured of being personally pampered in beautiful rural surroundings, with a committed owner at the helm offering a warm welcome, decent food, peace and quiet. Hundreds of characterful country house hotels have followed, and today there’s a bewildering amount from which to choose. Here we present the cream of the crop. While some continue to offer no more than the pleasures of a beautiful old house, a roaring fire and a cup of tea, others cater to our increased demands: for spas, cookery courses and activities such as foraging. All these hotels share in common comfort, excellent food and the joys of the English countryside. England Lime WoodNew Forest, Hampshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating It’s the attention to detail throughout Lime Wood that makes it special. The oak doors are thick and stylised sitting rooms melt one into the other, pale lemon into lilac into mint green, each with an open fire. As for the food, that most grounded of all celebrity chefs, Angela Hartnett, has joined forces with existing Lime Wood chef Luke Holder and to produce Italian inspired dishes that are as informal, yet polished as their surroundings. Read expert review From £245per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Hampshire • Find exclusive UK hotel and restaurant offers from Telegraph Travel Belmond Le Manoir aux Quat&#39;SaisonsOxfordshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating The style is a happy marriage between stately Oxfordshire and eccentric French fancy. The honey-coloured Manor house creates an attractive focus around which an eclectic mix of 15th-century ponds, Provençal lavender rows, a Japanese garden, kitsch sculptures and a wild mushroom patch can all co-exist. Seasonality is king in its two-Michelin starred restaurant. A 1930s-style bar serves comforting cocktails and the wine cellar stocks a French dominated list of more than 1,000 different wines. Read expert review From £756per night • The best country house hotels in Britain Lympstone ManorExmouth, Devon, England 9Telegraph expert rating Britain&#39;s most exciting new country house hotel in decades, with double-Michelin-starred BBC Great British Menu icon Michael Caines MBE at the helm. The man himself takes the time to greet guests and can often be spied striding through the halls in his white chef overalls. Don&#39;t miss the eight-course tasting menu dinner. Many chefs get bogged down in zany experiments with foams and moleculars. Michael prefers to bravely poke at the booby-trapped boundary between sumptuous and sickly. Book a room with an outdoor bath overlooking the golden syrup sunsets of the Exe estuary. Read expert review From £290per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The best hotels in Oxfordshire Save up to 70% on hotel deals via our partner Secret Escapes ClivedenTaplow, Berkshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating This has to be one of the loveliest spots for a hotel, overlooking a spectacular 19th-century parterre and surrounded by acres of ancient woodland running down to the Thames. Contrary to its appearance, Cliveden is not in the least bit stuck up and doesn’t mind whether you turn up in a Ferrari or a Fiat. The house has witnessed much intrigue over the years – it was the setting for the infamous Profumo affair – and a hint of naughtiness remains. Read expert review From £340per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Berkshire Chewton Glen HotelNew Forest, Hampshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating The hotel has lovely grounds and guests can follow the stream through the woods to emerge at Naish Beach, with a view of the Needles rising from the sea. Facilities are legion: a lavish spa, indoor and outdoor pools, tennis centre, nine-hole golf course and many activities, from archery and buggy riding to duck herding. Bedrooms and suites, in many different styles, display astonishing attention to detail, down to the stamped postcards on each desk. Read expert review From £315per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Hampshire Hambleton HallRutland, East Midlands, England 9Telegraph expert rating Beautifully decorated by Stefa Hart, who with her husband Tim has owned and run Hambleton Hall since 1979, the house exudes a feeling of controlled and carefully orchestrated wellbeing without ever feeling unnatural or overly theatrical. The flowing country house good looks are matched by the surrounding gardens and the beautiful view of Rutland Water from the lovely flower filled terrace. The cooking of Aaron Patterson, who began here as a 16-year-old sous chef, easily deserves its long held Michelin star and is rooted in local and seasonal produce, charmingly presented and always delicious. Read expert review From £265per night • The best hotels in Rutland Gidleigh ParkChagford, Devon, England 9Telegraph expert rating Perched atop a bank overlooking private woodlands traced by a boulder-strewn river, Gidleigh’s location is wild and dramatic. The décor is stylish if a little straight-laced, with everything you’d expect in an English country house hotel: antique furniture, wood panelling, stone fireplaces and elegant bouquets of flowers. The 24 bedrooms are decorated individually in a classic English country style, with supersized beds, roll-top baths, televisions, L’Occitane toiletries, spring water from the Gidleigh Estate, bowls of fresh fruit and complimentary decanters of Madeira. Read expert review From £248per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Devon Askham HallPenrith, Cumbria, England 9Telegraph expert rating A mixture of family furniture and paintings have been combined with more modern, or quirky pieces to create something both charming and unusual. The whole place feels part stately home, part private club, but mostly unique. Richard Swale is a gifted chef who draws his influences from, amongst others, Magnus Nilsson of Faviken restaurant in Sweden and Shaun Hill of the Walnut Tree, in Wales. Richard’s food is locally grown, or personally preserved and tastes correspondingly fresh and interesting. Read expert review From £150per night • The best hotels in Cumbria Calcot ManorTetbury, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating A weathered stone manor house and farm building that’s grown to house 35 guest rooms, a gorgeous spa, a function centre in a converted barn, an Ofsted-registered crèche in the kids’ Playzone and two restaurants. Double rooms are in the manor; family rooms overlook the outdoor pool. There’s something incredibly relaxing about this hotel, with &#39;country modern’ bedrooms that manage to be both cosy and elegant, soothing and spoiling, natural and sophisticated. When it was time to go home, we refused to leave, cancelled everything and booked for another night. It’s honestly that good. Read expert review From £204per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Cotswolds Augill CastleKirkby Stephen, Cumbria, England 9Telegraph expert rating Augill Castle stands in 20 acres of grounds in the beautiful upper Eden Valley, within striking distance of both the Yorkshire Dales and the Lake District. The owners have created a highly individual hotel with minimal rules, a great sense of relaxation and welcome to all – unusual and imaginative with a &#39;family friends’ feel. The 15 bedrooms are eclectic and slightly eccentric with a mix of antique and contemporary pieces and an array of unusual and pretty bedsteads. Dining is a social occasion. Read expert review From £170per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Cumbria Summer Lodge Country House Hotel & SpaEvershot, Dorset, England 9Telegraph expert rating Decoration and style tends towards the feminine and the flouncy with fabric covered ceilings and padded fabric walls, pictures of dogs, plenty of cushions and so on but they add up, in general, to a feeling of spoiling indulgence and do not, mercifully, overwhelm. The drawing room, designed by the poet and author Thomas Hardy, is admirably classic in style, now painted a pretty blue, and the bedrooms are divinely pretty and comfortable. Read expert review From £215per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Dorset Cowley ManorCheltenham, Gloucestershire, England 8Telegraph expert rating One of the first of the new breed of contemporary country house hotels to put their spa, C-side, at the heart of their offering. The glass-fronted building is a beautiful piece of modern design, sunk into a hill to one side. The treatments in the four rooms use the hotel’s own Green & Spring products, employing local natural products. There are indoor and outdoor pools and a dedicated manicure and pedicure area, gym, steam room and sauna. Read expert review From £195per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Gloucestershire Gilpin Hotel & Lake HouseLake Windermere, Lake District, England 8Telegraph expert rating The hotel is a characterful Georgian house, built in 1901 and owned by three generations of the Cunliffe family. That’s not to say it’s a creaking relic — the décor is glamorous boutique meets country pile. Life at the Gilpin is all about kicking back — and that’s helped by the service, about which it’s hard to say anything negative. Everyone smiles, everyone says hello — yet it’s not overbearing. Fishing, shooting, horse riding, mountain biking, paintballing and treasure hunts can also be organised on-site. Read expert review From £215per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Lake District Four Seasons Hotel HampshireWinchfield, Hampshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating Built in the 18th century as a manor house, the hotel is set amid 500 acres of green fields and paddocks full of grazing horses. Inside, it’s all slick and stylish, a blend of traditional and contemporary, as befits a metropolitan, cosmopolitan Four Seasons hotel set in English countryside. Bedrooms are sophisticated and elegant, traditional in style but with high-tech amenities and large marble bathrooms, and flexible sleeping options for families. The fine dining restaurant, Seasons, is very elegant, and there is a more casual bistro, a bar with open fire and library for afternoon tea. Read expert review From £295per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Hampshire The Pig at CombeGittisham, Devon, England 9Telegraph expert rating Sexy and fun as well as romantic. The 27 rooms are some of the most charming, traditional yet stylish (larders and minibars cleverly hidden inside antique cupboards; some televisions disguised as antique mirrors), comfortable, practical, quirky and soothing of any hotel bedrooms in the land. Head chef Dan Gavriilidis is responsible for the Devon version of the Pigs’ informal &#39;25 Mile’ menu, featuring the produce of the kitchen gardens and poly tunnels and the best locally-sourced ingredients. Read expert review From £170per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith • The best hotels in Devon Barnsley HouseCirencester, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating What a beauty. With its golden stone, gables and mullion windows this is a dreamily romantic house. But for all that, the building is magnificently upstaged by its garden. There are four acres of formal gardens including a knot garden and a potager. Cream furnishings in the rooms enhance engaging artworks, all based on the theme of nature – a row of bird houses; a chandelier cleverly created out of flower pots. Everything about the restaurant has been calibrated to convey a sense of pleasing simplicity – although of course that requires much painstaking effort. Read expert review From £181per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Cotswolds Ellenborough ParkCheltenham, Gloucestershire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A group of honeystone buildings is set around a historic Cotswold manor house that was embellished with castle-like towers in the mid-19th century. The 61 generously sized bedrooms are a world away from the shabby-chic looks or the pared back minimalism that are now the norm in other rural retreats. With stripy wallpaper and sprucely comfy armchairs, and with swathes of linen chintz in some rooms, panelling in others, the interiors are a contemporary take on traditional British country style. Read expert review From £126per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Lake District Lucknam ParkWiltshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating The hotel sits within a 500-acre estate that encompasses meadows, paddocks and woodland. The main building is a beautiful, symmetrical, creeper-covered Palladian mansion dating from 1720. Its public rooms are opulent and elegant, with a traditional country house feel. They include a panelled library, a drawing room with a corniced ceiling, an ornate fireplace as well as tassled curtains and sofas, and The Park Restaurant, laid out with white-clothed tables under a sky-painted ceiling. Read expert review From £230per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Wiltshire Lords Of The ManorUpper Slaughter, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The oldest parts of this mellow-stone manor house date from around 1649, with gables, wings and bay windows added in later centuries. Traditional rather than style-conscious, the public rooms are furnished with antiques. The 26 rooms in total split into five categories, comfortably furnished with embroidered silk throws on beds and soft lighting. The Michelin-starred restaurant is a key reason for staying at this hotel. The £69 three-course dinner menu may include starters of squab pigeon or foie gras with smoked eel and mains of Gloucestershire Old Spot suckling pig with rhubarb or local venison. Read expert review From £150per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Cotswolds Hotel EndsleighTavistock, Devon, England 9Telegraph expert rating Built in 1812 as the holiday home for the Duchess of Bedford, Georgiana Russell, this wildly romantic, chintz-free country estate, run by Channel 5’s Hotel Inspector, Alex Polizzi, is steeped in royal history. It’s a verdantly gardened, Grade 1-listed Eden between Dartmoor and Exmoor, with shell houses and hidden glades for romantic tête-à-têtes. The cream teas are worth the journey alone: a help-yourself affair of just-baked scones accompanied by massive urns of clotted cream and fruit-laden strawberry jam. Breakfasts, too, are a cut above the rivals. Read expert review From £198per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Devon The House at BeaverbrookSurrey, England 9Telegraph expert rating Step into a bygone era of English high society, original artworks and antiques at this luxurious country house hotel, where press baron Lord Beaverbrook entertained world leaders and literary greats. Grandeur and opulence ooze from every room, beautifully designed by Susie Atkinson: A cosy morning room with log fire and plump, squishy sofas offers stunning views of the North Downs and Italianate garden. The library&#39;s shelves heave with weighty tomes, and the UK&#39;s first home cinema, where Beaverbrook and Sir Winston Churchill discussed the war&#39;s progress, still has the original wood-panelling and lighting. Read expert review From £225per night • The best hotels in Surrey Bovey CastleMoretonhampstead, Dartmoor, England 9Telegraph expert rating This grand stately pile on a sporting estate in Dartmoor National Park caters for every whim, whether rugged outdoor pursuits or fine dining and pampering. Inside, there’s a heated swimming pool and whirlpool with deckchairs overlooking the grounds, plus steam room, sauna and gym, while the ESPA Spa offers an extensive range of treatments. Outside, in the 275-acre grounds, there’s an 18-hole championship golf course, tennis courts, a croquet pitch, archery and rifle range, putting green, helipad and beautiful lakeside walks to be had. Read expert review From £112per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels on Dartmoor Great FostersEgham, Surrey, England 9Telegraph expert rating Italian gilt furniture, exquisite Flemish tapestries, elaborate Jacobean fireplaces and a one-Michelin-starred restaurant are the crowning glories of this luxury country-house hotel – once a 16th-century royal hunting lodge used by both Henry VIII and Elizabeth I. Oak paneling, beautifully-carved Jacobean fire-pieces plus a secret staircase – even 17th-century graffiti – await guests who enter the Grade I-listed building via a low wicket door. Traces of royal ancestry are everywhere, in Elizabeth’s coat of arms above the porch, and on the ceiling, dating from the 1500s and decorated with Queen Anne Boleyn’s personal crests. Read expert review From £122per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Surrey Wales Palé HallLlandderfel, Gwynedd, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Complete with spire, porte-cochère and a grand entrance hall, hand stencilled by the owners, this mansion feels regal and is astonishingly well preserved. The wealth of period features: stained-glass, tiles, wood panelling, chandeliers, fireplaces and so on, are complemented by Angela Harper’s decoration, making liberal use of antiques, Zoffany and Sanderson wallpapers, paintings (including Snowdonia artist Rob Reen’s striking canvases of sheep) and collections of glass. Read expert review From £199per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Gwynedd Gliffaes Country House HotelBrecon Beacons, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating What’s not to love? Down a rural track, Gliffaes reclines peacefully in 33-acre grounds in the shadow of the Black Mountains and on the edge of the River Usk. With antique dressers, floral drapes, retro Roberts radios, and carpets you can sink your toes into, the look is traditionally elegant, never twee. Excellent restaurant. Read expert review From £110per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Wales Bodysgallen Hall and SpaLlandudno, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating The medieval core of a fine 16th-century mansion, the tower was built as a lookout for Conwy Castle. The higher you climb, the older its spiralling staircase becomes: Victorian at the bottom, 13th-century at the top. The encircling view is enthralling. As you turn, first Conwy Castle, then Snowdonia, then the sea and Anglesey, then Great Orme, catching the golden light, and lastly Llandudno, with the promise of its marvellous 19th-century promenade, come into view. Read expert review From £185per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The most romantic hotels in Wales Llangoed HallPowys, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating The house itself, redesigned by Clough Williams-Ellis in 1912, has great presence. Later bought and restored by Sir Bernard Ashley, widower of Laura, family photographs, as well as his fine collection of early 20th-century British paintings, including a collection of prints by James McNeil Whistler abound. Guests are encouraged to relax, curl up on sofas and play the piano. Read expert review From £99per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Wales The GroveNarberth, Pembrokeshire, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating The hotel is set in 26 acres of grounds amid deep countryside, with distant views of the Preseli Hills. The main building is a handsome three-storey residence with Georgian proportions and distinctive Arts and Crafts panelling and fireplaces. The lounges – cosy yet elegant, with real fires, window seats, plush sofas and modern prints and paintings of coastal Pembrokeshire – set the tone of the whole property. There are 26 rooms in total. Expect treats such as the softest of sheets, posh toiletries, thick towels and house-made biscotti. Read expert review From £145per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Wales Scotland The Gleneagles HotelAuchterarder, Perthshire, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating Built in the 1920s as a railway resort hotel, the design is Scottish Baronial meets French chateau, with all the opulent comfort of a grand country house on steroids. (A dull-looking modern addition to one side is easily ignored). It’s so big you need the map provided when you arrive, but this five-star formality comes with a splendid sense of ease: time seems to slow from the moment the kilted doorman welcomes you to the hotel. Read expert review From £265per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Scotland Inverlochy Castle HotelFort William, Highlands, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating No bows to passing fashions here. Moving with the times means waterfall showers, Bang & Olufsen stereos and televisions, while the unashamedly country house style - all swags, gilt, silk and brocade, sparkling crystal, polished wood and an all-pervading sense of time suspended, remains. Nowhere else makes grandeur so cosy, combining Jacobite rose wallpaper, Venetian chandeliers and French Empire-style ceiling frescos with perfectly judged élan. Dinner begins with a drink by the fire in the Great Hall, followed by a delightfully light-handed five-course menu with a distinctly Highland accent. Read expert review From £295per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • Top 10: the best Scottish castle hotels Isle of Eriska HotelArgyll & Bute, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating Calm and solitude are assured in a haven of herons and badgers, where the loudest sound is likely to be a fishing boat puttering over tranquil water. The trappings of Victorian wealth and privilege pervade drawing rooms filled with deep sofas, fireplaces and books in the imposing granite and red sandstone Big House. Elegant and comfortable without being stuffy, the ambiance is warm and welcoming, with soft, bright furnishings and piles of wellingtons by the front door of the oak-panelled hall. Carry on, Jeeves. Read expert review From £330per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels for spa breaks in Scotland Killiecrankie HotelPerth and Kinross, Perthshire, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating With direct access to the beautiful Pass of Killiecrankie, the deep river gorge formed by the River Garry, the whitewashed 1840s house has been a hotel since 1939. There are 10 pretty and homely rooms, with antique pieces, thick curtains and very comfortable beds. No two are the same: they are all shapes and sizes and some of the bathrooms are very small. You’ll find a vase of fresh flowers and the Egyptian cotton sheets will be turned down while you are at dinner. Read expert review From £220per night • Scotland hotels: the best places to stay on Scottish lochs The Roxburghe Hotel And Golf CourseKelso, Scottish Borders, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating The drawing room at The Roxburghe feels like a private house, with its family portraits and photographs, books and ornaments, and its welcoming groups of sofas and armchairs. Elsewhere there are tartan carpets, collections of whiskey and gin, plentiful open fires and the homely smell of woodsmoke. Bedrooms, some of which were designed by the Duchess of Roxburghe, are all different and decorated in traditional country house style. Three rooms have open fires, with coal and logs provided - the greatest luxury in a country hotel bedroom. Read expert review From £171per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com
The best country house hotels in Britain
The British country house hotel was born in 1949, brought to us in the pink and frilly shape of Sharrow Bay, overlooking Ullswater in the Lake District. Presided over by a splendid couple, Francis Coulson and his partner Brian Sack, it came complete with a gargantuan afternoon tea, and Sack’s famous Icky Sticky Toffee Pudding and Coulson’s bedtime poems on the pillow. People adored it. There had been leisure hotels in Britain before, of course, but this was the first where you could be assured of being personally pampered in beautiful rural surroundings, with a committed owner at the helm offering a warm welcome, decent food, peace and quiet. Hundreds of characterful country house hotels have followed, and today there’s a bewildering amount from which to choose. Here we present the cream of the crop. While some continue to offer no more than the pleasures of a beautiful old house, a roaring fire and a cup of tea, others cater to our increased demands: for spas, cookery courses and activities such as foraging. All these hotels share in common comfort, excellent food and the joys of the English countryside. England Lime WoodNew Forest, Hampshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating It’s the attention to detail throughout Lime Wood that makes it special. The oak doors are thick and stylised sitting rooms melt one into the other, pale lemon into lilac into mint green, each with an open fire. As for the food, that most grounded of all celebrity chefs, Angela Hartnett, has joined forces with existing Lime Wood chef Luke Holder and to produce Italian inspired dishes that are as informal, yet polished as their surroundings. Read expert review From £245per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Hampshire • Find exclusive UK hotel and restaurant offers from Telegraph Travel Belmond Le Manoir aux Quat'SaisonsOxfordshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating The style is a happy marriage between stately Oxfordshire and eccentric French fancy. The honey-coloured Manor house creates an attractive focus around which an eclectic mix of 15th-century ponds, Provençal lavender rows, a Japanese garden, kitsch sculptures and a wild mushroom patch can all co-exist. Seasonality is king in its two-Michelin starred restaurant. A 1930s-style bar serves comforting cocktails and the wine cellar stocks a French dominated list of more than 1,000 different wines. Read expert review From £756per night • The best country house hotels in Britain Lympstone ManorExmouth, Devon, England 9Telegraph expert rating Britain's most exciting new country house hotel in decades, with double-Michelin-starred BBC Great British Menu icon Michael Caines MBE at the helm. The man himself takes the time to greet guests and can often be spied striding through the halls in his white chef overalls. Don't miss the eight-course tasting menu dinner. Many chefs get bogged down in zany experiments with foams and moleculars. Michael prefers to bravely poke at the booby-trapped boundary between sumptuous and sickly. Book a room with an outdoor bath overlooking the golden syrup sunsets of the Exe estuary. Read expert review From £290per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The best hotels in Oxfordshire Save up to 70% on hotel deals via our partner Secret Escapes ClivedenTaplow, Berkshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating This has to be one of the loveliest spots for a hotel, overlooking a spectacular 19th-century parterre and surrounded by acres of ancient woodland running down to the Thames. Contrary to its appearance, Cliveden is not in the least bit stuck up and doesn’t mind whether you turn up in a Ferrari or a Fiat. The house has witnessed much intrigue over the years – it was the setting for the infamous Profumo affair – and a hint of naughtiness remains. Read expert review From £340per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Berkshire Chewton Glen HotelNew Forest, Hampshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating The hotel has lovely grounds and guests can follow the stream through the woods to emerge at Naish Beach, with a view of the Needles rising from the sea. Facilities are legion: a lavish spa, indoor and outdoor pools, tennis centre, nine-hole golf course and many activities, from archery and buggy riding to duck herding. Bedrooms and suites, in many different styles, display astonishing attention to detail, down to the stamped postcards on each desk. Read expert review From £315per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Hampshire Hambleton HallRutland, East Midlands, England 9Telegraph expert rating Beautifully decorated by Stefa Hart, who with her husband Tim has owned and run Hambleton Hall since 1979, the house exudes a feeling of controlled and carefully orchestrated wellbeing without ever feeling unnatural or overly theatrical. The flowing country house good looks are matched by the surrounding gardens and the beautiful view of Rutland Water from the lovely flower filled terrace. The cooking of Aaron Patterson, who began here as a 16-year-old sous chef, easily deserves its long held Michelin star and is rooted in local and seasonal produce, charmingly presented and always delicious. Read expert review From £265per night • The best hotels in Rutland Gidleigh ParkChagford, Devon, England 9Telegraph expert rating Perched atop a bank overlooking private woodlands traced by a boulder-strewn river, Gidleigh’s location is wild and dramatic. The décor is stylish if a little straight-laced, with everything you’d expect in an English country house hotel: antique furniture, wood panelling, stone fireplaces and elegant bouquets of flowers. The 24 bedrooms are decorated individually in a classic English country style, with supersized beds, roll-top baths, televisions, L’Occitane toiletries, spring water from the Gidleigh Estate, bowls of fresh fruit and complimentary decanters of Madeira. Read expert review From £248per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Devon Askham HallPenrith, Cumbria, England 9Telegraph expert rating A mixture of family furniture and paintings have been combined with more modern, or quirky pieces to create something both charming and unusual. The whole place feels part stately home, part private club, but mostly unique. Richard Swale is a gifted chef who draws his influences from, amongst others, Magnus Nilsson of Faviken restaurant in Sweden and Shaun Hill of the Walnut Tree, in Wales. Richard’s food is locally grown, or personally preserved and tastes correspondingly fresh and interesting. Read expert review From £150per night • The best hotels in Cumbria Calcot ManorTetbury, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating A weathered stone manor house and farm building that’s grown to house 35 guest rooms, a gorgeous spa, a function centre in a converted barn, an Ofsted-registered crèche in the kids’ Playzone and two restaurants. Double rooms are in the manor; family rooms overlook the outdoor pool. There’s something incredibly relaxing about this hotel, with 'country modern’ bedrooms that manage to be both cosy and elegant, soothing and spoiling, natural and sophisticated. When it was time to go home, we refused to leave, cancelled everything and booked for another night. It’s honestly that good. Read expert review From £204per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Cotswolds Augill CastleKirkby Stephen, Cumbria, England 9Telegraph expert rating Augill Castle stands in 20 acres of grounds in the beautiful upper Eden Valley, within striking distance of both the Yorkshire Dales and the Lake District. The owners have created a highly individual hotel with minimal rules, a great sense of relaxation and welcome to all – unusual and imaginative with a 'family friends’ feel. The 15 bedrooms are eclectic and slightly eccentric with a mix of antique and contemporary pieces and an array of unusual and pretty bedsteads. Dining is a social occasion. Read expert review From £170per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Cumbria Summer Lodge Country House Hotel & SpaEvershot, Dorset, England 9Telegraph expert rating Decoration and style tends towards the feminine and the flouncy with fabric covered ceilings and padded fabric walls, pictures of dogs, plenty of cushions and so on but they add up, in general, to a feeling of spoiling indulgence and do not, mercifully, overwhelm. The drawing room, designed by the poet and author Thomas Hardy, is admirably classic in style, now painted a pretty blue, and the bedrooms are divinely pretty and comfortable. Read expert review From £215per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Dorset Cowley ManorCheltenham, Gloucestershire, England 8Telegraph expert rating One of the first of the new breed of contemporary country house hotels to put their spa, C-side, at the heart of their offering. The glass-fronted building is a beautiful piece of modern design, sunk into a hill to one side. The treatments in the four rooms use the hotel’s own Green & Spring products, employing local natural products. There are indoor and outdoor pools and a dedicated manicure and pedicure area, gym, steam room and sauna. Read expert review From £195per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Gloucestershire Gilpin Hotel & Lake HouseLake Windermere, Lake District, England 8Telegraph expert rating The hotel is a characterful Georgian house, built in 1901 and owned by three generations of the Cunliffe family. That’s not to say it’s a creaking relic — the décor is glamorous boutique meets country pile. Life at the Gilpin is all about kicking back — and that’s helped by the service, about which it’s hard to say anything negative. Everyone smiles, everyone says hello — yet it’s not overbearing. Fishing, shooting, horse riding, mountain biking, paintballing and treasure hunts can also be organised on-site. Read expert review From £215per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Lake District Four Seasons Hotel HampshireWinchfield, Hampshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating Built in the 18th century as a manor house, the hotel is set amid 500 acres of green fields and paddocks full of grazing horses. Inside, it’s all slick and stylish, a blend of traditional and contemporary, as befits a metropolitan, cosmopolitan Four Seasons hotel set in English countryside. Bedrooms are sophisticated and elegant, traditional in style but with high-tech amenities and large marble bathrooms, and flexible sleeping options for families. The fine dining restaurant, Seasons, is very elegant, and there is a more casual bistro, a bar with open fire and library for afternoon tea. Read expert review From £295per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Hampshire The Pig at CombeGittisham, Devon, England 9Telegraph expert rating Sexy and fun as well as romantic. The 27 rooms are some of the most charming, traditional yet stylish (larders and minibars cleverly hidden inside antique cupboards; some televisions disguised as antique mirrors), comfortable, practical, quirky and soothing of any hotel bedrooms in the land. Head chef Dan Gavriilidis is responsible for the Devon version of the Pigs’ informal '25 Mile’ menu, featuring the produce of the kitchen gardens and poly tunnels and the best locally-sourced ingredients. Read expert review From £170per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith • The best hotels in Devon Barnsley HouseCirencester, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating What a beauty. With its golden stone, gables and mullion windows this is a dreamily romantic house. But for all that, the building is magnificently upstaged by its garden. There are four acres of formal gardens including a knot garden and a potager. Cream furnishings in the rooms enhance engaging artworks, all based on the theme of nature – a row of bird houses; a chandelier cleverly created out of flower pots. Everything about the restaurant has been calibrated to convey a sense of pleasing simplicity – although of course that requires much painstaking effort. Read expert review From £181per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Cotswolds Ellenborough ParkCheltenham, Gloucestershire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A group of honeystone buildings is set around a historic Cotswold manor house that was embellished with castle-like towers in the mid-19th century. The 61 generously sized bedrooms are a world away from the shabby-chic looks or the pared back minimalism that are now the norm in other rural retreats. With stripy wallpaper and sprucely comfy armchairs, and with swathes of linen chintz in some rooms, panelling in others, the interiors are a contemporary take on traditional British country style. Read expert review From £126per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Lake District Lucknam ParkWiltshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating The hotel sits within a 500-acre estate that encompasses meadows, paddocks and woodland. The main building is a beautiful, symmetrical, creeper-covered Palladian mansion dating from 1720. Its public rooms are opulent and elegant, with a traditional country house feel. They include a panelled library, a drawing room with a corniced ceiling, an ornate fireplace as well as tassled curtains and sofas, and The Park Restaurant, laid out with white-clothed tables under a sky-painted ceiling. Read expert review From £230per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Wiltshire Lords Of The ManorUpper Slaughter, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The oldest parts of this mellow-stone manor house date from around 1649, with gables, wings and bay windows added in later centuries. Traditional rather than style-conscious, the public rooms are furnished with antiques. The 26 rooms in total split into five categories, comfortably furnished with embroidered silk throws on beds and soft lighting. The Michelin-starred restaurant is a key reason for staying at this hotel. The £69 three-course dinner menu may include starters of squab pigeon or foie gras with smoked eel and mains of Gloucestershire Old Spot suckling pig with rhubarb or local venison. Read expert review From £150per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Cotswolds Hotel EndsleighTavistock, Devon, England 9Telegraph expert rating Built in 1812 as the holiday home for the Duchess of Bedford, Georgiana Russell, this wildly romantic, chintz-free country estate, run by Channel 5’s Hotel Inspector, Alex Polizzi, is steeped in royal history. It’s a verdantly gardened, Grade 1-listed Eden between Dartmoor and Exmoor, with shell houses and hidden glades for romantic tête-à-têtes. The cream teas are worth the journey alone: a help-yourself affair of just-baked scones accompanied by massive urns of clotted cream and fruit-laden strawberry jam. Breakfasts, too, are a cut above the rivals. Read expert review From £198per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Devon The House at BeaverbrookSurrey, England 9Telegraph expert rating Step into a bygone era of English high society, original artworks and antiques at this luxurious country house hotel, where press baron Lord Beaverbrook entertained world leaders and literary greats. Grandeur and opulence ooze from every room, beautifully designed by Susie Atkinson: A cosy morning room with log fire and plump, squishy sofas offers stunning views of the North Downs and Italianate garden. The library's shelves heave with weighty tomes, and the UK's first home cinema, where Beaverbrook and Sir Winston Churchill discussed the war's progress, still has the original wood-panelling and lighting. Read expert review From £225per night • The best hotels in Surrey Bovey CastleMoretonhampstead, Dartmoor, England 9Telegraph expert rating This grand stately pile on a sporting estate in Dartmoor National Park caters for every whim, whether rugged outdoor pursuits or fine dining and pampering. Inside, there’s a heated swimming pool and whirlpool with deckchairs overlooking the grounds, plus steam room, sauna and gym, while the ESPA Spa offers an extensive range of treatments. Outside, in the 275-acre grounds, there’s an 18-hole championship golf course, tennis courts, a croquet pitch, archery and rifle range, putting green, helipad and beautiful lakeside walks to be had. Read expert review From £112per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels on Dartmoor Great FostersEgham, Surrey, England 9Telegraph expert rating Italian gilt furniture, exquisite Flemish tapestries, elaborate Jacobean fireplaces and a one-Michelin-starred restaurant are the crowning glories of this luxury country-house hotel – once a 16th-century royal hunting lodge used by both Henry VIII and Elizabeth I. Oak paneling, beautifully-carved Jacobean fire-pieces plus a secret staircase – even 17th-century graffiti – await guests who enter the Grade I-listed building via a low wicket door. Traces of royal ancestry are everywhere, in Elizabeth’s coat of arms above the porch, and on the ceiling, dating from the 1500s and decorated with Queen Anne Boleyn’s personal crests. Read expert review From £122per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Surrey Wales Palé HallLlandderfel, Gwynedd, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Complete with spire, porte-cochère and a grand entrance hall, hand stencilled by the owners, this mansion feels regal and is astonishingly well preserved. The wealth of period features: stained-glass, tiles, wood panelling, chandeliers, fireplaces and so on, are complemented by Angela Harper’s decoration, making liberal use of antiques, Zoffany and Sanderson wallpapers, paintings (including Snowdonia artist Rob Reen’s striking canvases of sheep) and collections of glass. Read expert review From £199per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Gwynedd Gliffaes Country House HotelBrecon Beacons, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating What’s not to love? Down a rural track, Gliffaes reclines peacefully in 33-acre grounds in the shadow of the Black Mountains and on the edge of the River Usk. With antique dressers, floral drapes, retro Roberts radios, and carpets you can sink your toes into, the look is traditionally elegant, never twee. Excellent restaurant. Read expert review From £110per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Wales Bodysgallen Hall and SpaLlandudno, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating The medieval core of a fine 16th-century mansion, the tower was built as a lookout for Conwy Castle. The higher you climb, the older its spiralling staircase becomes: Victorian at the bottom, 13th-century at the top. The encircling view is enthralling. As you turn, first Conwy Castle, then Snowdonia, then the sea and Anglesey, then Great Orme, catching the golden light, and lastly Llandudno, with the promise of its marvellous 19th-century promenade, come into view. Read expert review From £185per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The most romantic hotels in Wales Llangoed HallPowys, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating The house itself, redesigned by Clough Williams-Ellis in 1912, has great presence. Later bought and restored by Sir Bernard Ashley, widower of Laura, family photographs, as well as his fine collection of early 20th-century British paintings, including a collection of prints by James McNeil Whistler abound. Guests are encouraged to relax, curl up on sofas and play the piano. Read expert review From £99per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Wales The GroveNarberth, Pembrokeshire, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating The hotel is set in 26 acres of grounds amid deep countryside, with distant views of the Preseli Hills. The main building is a handsome three-storey residence with Georgian proportions and distinctive Arts and Crafts panelling and fireplaces. The lounges – cosy yet elegant, with real fires, window seats, plush sofas and modern prints and paintings of coastal Pembrokeshire – set the tone of the whole property. There are 26 rooms in total. Expect treats such as the softest of sheets, posh toiletries, thick towels and house-made biscotti. Read expert review From £145per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Wales Scotland The Gleneagles HotelAuchterarder, Perthshire, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating Built in the 1920s as a railway resort hotel, the design is Scottish Baronial meets French chateau, with all the opulent comfort of a grand country house on steroids. (A dull-looking modern addition to one side is easily ignored). It’s so big you need the map provided when you arrive, but this five-star formality comes with a splendid sense of ease: time seems to slow from the moment the kilted doorman welcomes you to the hotel. Read expert review From £265per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Scotland Inverlochy Castle HotelFort William, Highlands, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating No bows to passing fashions here. Moving with the times means waterfall showers, Bang & Olufsen stereos and televisions, while the unashamedly country house style - all swags, gilt, silk and brocade, sparkling crystal, polished wood and an all-pervading sense of time suspended, remains. Nowhere else makes grandeur so cosy, combining Jacobite rose wallpaper, Venetian chandeliers and French Empire-style ceiling frescos with perfectly judged élan. Dinner begins with a drink by the fire in the Great Hall, followed by a delightfully light-handed five-course menu with a distinctly Highland accent. Read expert review From £295per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • Top 10: the best Scottish castle hotels Isle of Eriska HotelArgyll & Bute, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating Calm and solitude are assured in a haven of herons and badgers, where the loudest sound is likely to be a fishing boat puttering over tranquil water. The trappings of Victorian wealth and privilege pervade drawing rooms filled with deep sofas, fireplaces and books in the imposing granite and red sandstone Big House. Elegant and comfortable without being stuffy, the ambiance is warm and welcoming, with soft, bright furnishings and piles of wellingtons by the front door of the oak-panelled hall. Carry on, Jeeves. Read expert review From £330per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels for spa breaks in Scotland Killiecrankie HotelPerth and Kinross, Perthshire, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating With direct access to the beautiful Pass of Killiecrankie, the deep river gorge formed by the River Garry, the whitewashed 1840s house has been a hotel since 1939. There are 10 pretty and homely rooms, with antique pieces, thick curtains and very comfortable beds. No two are the same: they are all shapes and sizes and some of the bathrooms are very small. You’ll find a vase of fresh flowers and the Egyptian cotton sheets will be turned down while you are at dinner. Read expert review From £220per night • Scotland hotels: the best places to stay on Scottish lochs The Roxburghe Hotel And Golf CourseKelso, Scottish Borders, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating The drawing room at The Roxburghe feels like a private house, with its family portraits and photographs, books and ornaments, and its welcoming groups of sofas and armchairs. Elsewhere there are tartan carpets, collections of whiskey and gin, plentiful open fires and the homely smell of woodsmoke. Bedrooms, some of which were designed by the Duchess of Roxburghe, are all different and decorated in traditional country house style. Three rooms have open fires, with coal and logs provided - the greatest luxury in a country hotel bedroom. Read expert review From £171per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com
The British country house hotel was born in 1949, brought to us in the pink and frilly shape of Sharrow Bay, overlooking Ullswater in the Lake District. Presided over by a splendid couple, Francis Coulson and his partner Brian Sack, it came complete with a gargantuan afternoon tea, and Sack’s famous Icky Sticky Toffee Pudding and Coulson’s bedtime poems on the pillow. People adored it. There had been leisure hotels in Britain before, of course, but this was the first where you could be assured of being personally pampered in beautiful rural surroundings, with a committed owner at the helm offering a warm welcome, decent food, peace and quiet. Hundreds of characterful country house hotels have followed, and today there’s a bewildering amount from which to choose. Here we present the cream of the crop. While some continue to offer no more than the pleasures of a beautiful old house, a roaring fire and a cup of tea, others cater to our increased demands: for spas, cookery courses and activities such as foraging. All these hotels share in common comfort, excellent food and the joys of the English countryside. England Lime WoodNew Forest, Hampshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating It’s the attention to detail throughout Lime Wood that makes it special. The oak doors are thick and stylised sitting rooms melt one into the other, pale lemon into lilac into mint green, each with an open fire. As for the food, that most grounded of all celebrity chefs, Angela Hartnett, has joined forces with existing Lime Wood chef Luke Holder and to produce Italian inspired dishes that are as informal, yet polished as their surroundings. Read expert review From £245per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Hampshire • Find exclusive UK hotel and restaurant offers from Telegraph Travel Belmond Le Manoir aux Quat&#39;SaisonsOxfordshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating The style is a happy marriage between stately Oxfordshire and eccentric French fancy. The honey-coloured Manor house creates an attractive focus around which an eclectic mix of 15th-century ponds, Provençal lavender rows, a Japanese garden, kitsch sculptures and a wild mushroom patch can all co-exist. Seasonality is king in its two-Michelin starred restaurant. A 1930s-style bar serves comforting cocktails and the wine cellar stocks a French dominated list of more than 1,000 different wines. Read expert review From £756per night • The best country house hotels in Britain Lympstone ManorExmouth, Devon, England 9Telegraph expert rating Britain&#39;s most exciting new country house hotel in decades, with double-Michelin-starred BBC Great British Menu icon Michael Caines MBE at the helm. The man himself takes the time to greet guests and can often be spied striding through the halls in his white chef overalls. Don&#39;t miss the eight-course tasting menu dinner. Many chefs get bogged down in zany experiments with foams and moleculars. Michael prefers to bravely poke at the booby-trapped boundary between sumptuous and sickly. Book a room with an outdoor bath overlooking the golden syrup sunsets of the Exe estuary. Read expert review From £290per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The best hotels in Oxfordshire Save up to 70% on hotel deals via our partner Secret Escapes ClivedenTaplow, Berkshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating This has to be one of the loveliest spots for a hotel, overlooking a spectacular 19th-century parterre and surrounded by acres of ancient woodland running down to the Thames. Contrary to its appearance, Cliveden is not in the least bit stuck up and doesn’t mind whether you turn up in a Ferrari or a Fiat. The house has witnessed much intrigue over the years – it was the setting for the infamous Profumo affair – and a hint of naughtiness remains. Read expert review From £340per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Berkshire Chewton Glen HotelNew Forest, Hampshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating The hotel has lovely grounds and guests can follow the stream through the woods to emerge at Naish Beach, with a view of the Needles rising from the sea. Facilities are legion: a lavish spa, indoor and outdoor pools, tennis centre, nine-hole golf course and many activities, from archery and buggy riding to duck herding. Bedrooms and suites, in many different styles, display astonishing attention to detail, down to the stamped postcards on each desk. Read expert review From £315per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Hampshire Hambleton HallRutland, East Midlands, England 9Telegraph expert rating Beautifully decorated by Stefa Hart, who with her husband Tim has owned and run Hambleton Hall since 1979, the house exudes a feeling of controlled and carefully orchestrated wellbeing without ever feeling unnatural or overly theatrical. The flowing country house good looks are matched by the surrounding gardens and the beautiful view of Rutland Water from the lovely flower filled terrace. The cooking of Aaron Patterson, who began here as a 16-year-old sous chef, easily deserves its long held Michelin star and is rooted in local and seasonal produce, charmingly presented and always delicious. Read expert review From £265per night • The best hotels in Rutland Gidleigh ParkChagford, Devon, England 9Telegraph expert rating Perched atop a bank overlooking private woodlands traced by a boulder-strewn river, Gidleigh’s location is wild and dramatic. The décor is stylish if a little straight-laced, with everything you’d expect in an English country house hotel: antique furniture, wood panelling, stone fireplaces and elegant bouquets of flowers. The 24 bedrooms are decorated individually in a classic English country style, with supersized beds, roll-top baths, televisions, L’Occitane toiletries, spring water from the Gidleigh Estate, bowls of fresh fruit and complimentary decanters of Madeira. Read expert review From £248per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Devon Askham HallPenrith, Cumbria, England 9Telegraph expert rating A mixture of family furniture and paintings have been combined with more modern, or quirky pieces to create something both charming and unusual. The whole place feels part stately home, part private club, but mostly unique. Richard Swale is a gifted chef who draws his influences from, amongst others, Magnus Nilsson of Faviken restaurant in Sweden and Shaun Hill of the Walnut Tree, in Wales. Richard’s food is locally grown, or personally preserved and tastes correspondingly fresh and interesting. Read expert review From £150per night • The best hotels in Cumbria Calcot ManorTetbury, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating A weathered stone manor house and farm building that’s grown to house 35 guest rooms, a gorgeous spa, a function centre in a converted barn, an Ofsted-registered crèche in the kids’ Playzone and two restaurants. Double rooms are in the manor; family rooms overlook the outdoor pool. There’s something incredibly relaxing about this hotel, with &#39;country modern’ bedrooms that manage to be both cosy and elegant, soothing and spoiling, natural and sophisticated. When it was time to go home, we refused to leave, cancelled everything and booked for another night. It’s honestly that good. Read expert review From £204per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Cotswolds Augill CastleKirkby Stephen, Cumbria, England 9Telegraph expert rating Augill Castle stands in 20 acres of grounds in the beautiful upper Eden Valley, within striking distance of both the Yorkshire Dales and the Lake District. The owners have created a highly individual hotel with minimal rules, a great sense of relaxation and welcome to all – unusual and imaginative with a &#39;family friends’ feel. The 15 bedrooms are eclectic and slightly eccentric with a mix of antique and contemporary pieces and an array of unusual and pretty bedsteads. Dining is a social occasion. Read expert review From £170per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Cumbria Summer Lodge Country House Hotel & SpaEvershot, Dorset, England 9Telegraph expert rating Decoration and style tends towards the feminine and the flouncy with fabric covered ceilings and padded fabric walls, pictures of dogs, plenty of cushions and so on but they add up, in general, to a feeling of spoiling indulgence and do not, mercifully, overwhelm. The drawing room, designed by the poet and author Thomas Hardy, is admirably classic in style, now painted a pretty blue, and the bedrooms are divinely pretty and comfortable. Read expert review From £215per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Dorset Cowley ManorCheltenham, Gloucestershire, England 8Telegraph expert rating One of the first of the new breed of contemporary country house hotels to put their spa, C-side, at the heart of their offering. The glass-fronted building is a beautiful piece of modern design, sunk into a hill to one side. The treatments in the four rooms use the hotel’s own Green & Spring products, employing local natural products. There are indoor and outdoor pools and a dedicated manicure and pedicure area, gym, steam room and sauna. Read expert review From £195per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Gloucestershire Gilpin Hotel & Lake HouseLake Windermere, Lake District, England 8Telegraph expert rating The hotel is a characterful Georgian house, built in 1901 and owned by three generations of the Cunliffe family. That’s not to say it’s a creaking relic — the décor is glamorous boutique meets country pile. Life at the Gilpin is all about kicking back — and that’s helped by the service, about which it’s hard to say anything negative. Everyone smiles, everyone says hello — yet it’s not overbearing. Fishing, shooting, horse riding, mountain biking, paintballing and treasure hunts can also be organised on-site. Read expert review From £215per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Lake District Four Seasons Hotel HampshireWinchfield, Hampshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating Built in the 18th century as a manor house, the hotel is set amid 500 acres of green fields and paddocks full of grazing horses. Inside, it’s all slick and stylish, a blend of traditional and contemporary, as befits a metropolitan, cosmopolitan Four Seasons hotel set in English countryside. Bedrooms are sophisticated and elegant, traditional in style but with high-tech amenities and large marble bathrooms, and flexible sleeping options for families. The fine dining restaurant, Seasons, is very elegant, and there is a more casual bistro, a bar with open fire and library for afternoon tea. Read expert review From £295per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Hampshire The Pig at CombeGittisham, Devon, England 9Telegraph expert rating Sexy and fun as well as romantic. The 27 rooms are some of the most charming, traditional yet stylish (larders and minibars cleverly hidden inside antique cupboards; some televisions disguised as antique mirrors), comfortable, practical, quirky and soothing of any hotel bedrooms in the land. Head chef Dan Gavriilidis is responsible for the Devon version of the Pigs’ informal &#39;25 Mile’ menu, featuring the produce of the kitchen gardens and poly tunnels and the best locally-sourced ingredients. Read expert review From £170per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith • The best hotels in Devon Barnsley HouseCirencester, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating What a beauty. With its golden stone, gables and mullion windows this is a dreamily romantic house. But for all that, the building is magnificently upstaged by its garden. There are four acres of formal gardens including a knot garden and a potager. Cream furnishings in the rooms enhance engaging artworks, all based on the theme of nature – a row of bird houses; a chandelier cleverly created out of flower pots. Everything about the restaurant has been calibrated to convey a sense of pleasing simplicity – although of course that requires much painstaking effort. Read expert review From £181per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Cotswolds Ellenborough ParkCheltenham, Gloucestershire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A group of honeystone buildings is set around a historic Cotswold manor house that was embellished with castle-like towers in the mid-19th century. The 61 generously sized bedrooms are a world away from the shabby-chic looks or the pared back minimalism that are now the norm in other rural retreats. With stripy wallpaper and sprucely comfy armchairs, and with swathes of linen chintz in some rooms, panelling in others, the interiors are a contemporary take on traditional British country style. Read expert review From £126per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Lake District Lucknam ParkWiltshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating The hotel sits within a 500-acre estate that encompasses meadows, paddocks and woodland. The main building is a beautiful, symmetrical, creeper-covered Palladian mansion dating from 1720. Its public rooms are opulent and elegant, with a traditional country house feel. They include a panelled library, a drawing room with a corniced ceiling, an ornate fireplace as well as tassled curtains and sofas, and The Park Restaurant, laid out with white-clothed tables under a sky-painted ceiling. Read expert review From £230per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Wiltshire Lords Of The ManorUpper Slaughter, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The oldest parts of this mellow-stone manor house date from around 1649, with gables, wings and bay windows added in later centuries. Traditional rather than style-conscious, the public rooms are furnished with antiques. The 26 rooms in total split into five categories, comfortably furnished with embroidered silk throws on beds and soft lighting. The Michelin-starred restaurant is a key reason for staying at this hotel. The £69 three-course dinner menu may include starters of squab pigeon or foie gras with smoked eel and mains of Gloucestershire Old Spot suckling pig with rhubarb or local venison. Read expert review From £150per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Cotswolds Hotel EndsleighTavistock, Devon, England 9Telegraph expert rating Built in 1812 as the holiday home for the Duchess of Bedford, Georgiana Russell, this wildly romantic, chintz-free country estate, run by Channel 5’s Hotel Inspector, Alex Polizzi, is steeped in royal history. It’s a verdantly gardened, Grade 1-listed Eden between Dartmoor and Exmoor, with shell houses and hidden glades for romantic tête-à-têtes. The cream teas are worth the journey alone: a help-yourself affair of just-baked scones accompanied by massive urns of clotted cream and fruit-laden strawberry jam. Breakfasts, too, are a cut above the rivals. Read expert review From £198per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Devon The House at BeaverbrookSurrey, England 9Telegraph expert rating Step into a bygone era of English high society, original artworks and antiques at this luxurious country house hotel, where press baron Lord Beaverbrook entertained world leaders and literary greats. Grandeur and opulence ooze from every room, beautifully designed by Susie Atkinson: A cosy morning room with log fire and plump, squishy sofas offers stunning views of the North Downs and Italianate garden. The library&#39;s shelves heave with weighty tomes, and the UK&#39;s first home cinema, where Beaverbrook and Sir Winston Churchill discussed the war&#39;s progress, still has the original wood-panelling and lighting. Read expert review From £225per night • The best hotels in Surrey Bovey CastleMoretonhampstead, Dartmoor, England 9Telegraph expert rating This grand stately pile on a sporting estate in Dartmoor National Park caters for every whim, whether rugged outdoor pursuits or fine dining and pampering. Inside, there’s a heated swimming pool and whirlpool with deckchairs overlooking the grounds, plus steam room, sauna and gym, while the ESPA Spa offers an extensive range of treatments. Outside, in the 275-acre grounds, there’s an 18-hole championship golf course, tennis courts, a croquet pitch, archery and rifle range, putting green, helipad and beautiful lakeside walks to be had. Read expert review From £112per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels on Dartmoor Great FostersEgham, Surrey, England 9Telegraph expert rating Italian gilt furniture, exquisite Flemish tapestries, elaborate Jacobean fireplaces and a one-Michelin-starred restaurant are the crowning glories of this luxury country-house hotel – once a 16th-century royal hunting lodge used by both Henry VIII and Elizabeth I. Oak paneling, beautifully-carved Jacobean fire-pieces plus a secret staircase – even 17th-century graffiti – await guests who enter the Grade I-listed building via a low wicket door. Traces of royal ancestry are everywhere, in Elizabeth’s coat of arms above the porch, and on the ceiling, dating from the 1500s and decorated with Queen Anne Boleyn’s personal crests. Read expert review From £122per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Surrey Wales Palé HallLlandderfel, Gwynedd, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating Complete with spire, porte-cochère and a grand entrance hall, hand stencilled by the owners, this mansion feels regal and is astonishingly well preserved. The wealth of period features: stained-glass, tiles, wood panelling, chandeliers, fireplaces and so on, are complemented by Angela Harper’s decoration, making liberal use of antiques, Zoffany and Sanderson wallpapers, paintings (including Snowdonia artist Rob Reen’s striking canvases of sheep) and collections of glass. Read expert review From £199per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Gwynedd Gliffaes Country House HotelBrecon Beacons, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating What’s not to love? Down a rural track, Gliffaes reclines peacefully in 33-acre grounds in the shadow of the Black Mountains and on the edge of the River Usk. With antique dressers, floral drapes, retro Roberts radios, and carpets you can sink your toes into, the look is traditionally elegant, never twee. Excellent restaurant. Read expert review From £110per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Wales Bodysgallen Hall and SpaLlandudno, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating The medieval core of a fine 16th-century mansion, the tower was built as a lookout for Conwy Castle. The higher you climb, the older its spiralling staircase becomes: Victorian at the bottom, 13th-century at the top. The encircling view is enthralling. As you turn, first Conwy Castle, then Snowdonia, then the sea and Anglesey, then Great Orme, catching the golden light, and lastly Llandudno, with the promise of its marvellous 19th-century promenade, come into view. Read expert review From £185per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The most romantic hotels in Wales Llangoed HallPowys, Wales 9Telegraph expert rating The house itself, redesigned by Clough Williams-Ellis in 1912, has great presence. Later bought and restored by Sir Bernard Ashley, widower of Laura, family photographs, as well as his fine collection of early 20th-century British paintings, including a collection of prints by James McNeil Whistler abound. Guests are encouraged to relax, curl up on sofas and play the piano. Read expert review From £99per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Wales The GroveNarberth, Pembrokeshire, Wales 8Telegraph expert rating The hotel is set in 26 acres of grounds amid deep countryside, with distant views of the Preseli Hills. The main building is a handsome three-storey residence with Georgian proportions and distinctive Arts and Crafts panelling and fireplaces. The lounges – cosy yet elegant, with real fires, window seats, plush sofas and modern prints and paintings of coastal Pembrokeshire – set the tone of the whole property. There are 26 rooms in total. Expect treats such as the softest of sheets, posh toiletries, thick towels and house-made biscotti. Read expert review From £145per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Wales Scotland The Gleneagles HotelAuchterarder, Perthshire, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating Built in the 1920s as a railway resort hotel, the design is Scottish Baronial meets French chateau, with all the opulent comfort of a grand country house on steroids. (A dull-looking modern addition to one side is easily ignored). It’s so big you need the map provided when you arrive, but this five-star formality comes with a splendid sense of ease: time seems to slow from the moment the kilted doorman welcomes you to the hotel. Read expert review From £265per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Scotland Inverlochy Castle HotelFort William, Highlands, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating No bows to passing fashions here. Moving with the times means waterfall showers, Bang & Olufsen stereos and televisions, while the unashamedly country house style - all swags, gilt, silk and brocade, sparkling crystal, polished wood and an all-pervading sense of time suspended, remains. Nowhere else makes grandeur so cosy, combining Jacobite rose wallpaper, Venetian chandeliers and French Empire-style ceiling frescos with perfectly judged élan. Dinner begins with a drink by the fire in the Great Hall, followed by a delightfully light-handed five-course menu with a distinctly Highland accent. Read expert review From £295per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • Top 10: the best Scottish castle hotels Isle of Eriska HotelArgyll & Bute, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating Calm and solitude are assured in a haven of herons and badgers, where the loudest sound is likely to be a fishing boat puttering over tranquil water. The trappings of Victorian wealth and privilege pervade drawing rooms filled with deep sofas, fireplaces and books in the imposing granite and red sandstone Big House. Elegant and comfortable without being stuffy, the ambiance is warm and welcoming, with soft, bright furnishings and piles of wellingtons by the front door of the oak-panelled hall. Carry on, Jeeves. Read expert review From £330per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels for spa breaks in Scotland Killiecrankie HotelPerth and Kinross, Perthshire, Scotland 9Telegraph expert rating With direct access to the beautiful Pass of Killiecrankie, the deep river gorge formed by the River Garry, the whitewashed 1840s house has been a hotel since 1939. There are 10 pretty and homely rooms, with antique pieces, thick curtains and very comfortable beds. No two are the same: they are all shapes and sizes and some of the bathrooms are very small. You’ll find a vase of fresh flowers and the Egyptian cotton sheets will be turned down while you are at dinner. Read expert review From £220per night • Scotland hotels: the best places to stay on Scottish lochs The Roxburghe Hotel And Golf CourseKelso, Scottish Borders, Scotland 8Telegraph expert rating The drawing room at The Roxburghe feels like a private house, with its family portraits and photographs, books and ornaments, and its welcoming groups of sofas and armchairs. Elsewhere there are tartan carpets, collections of whiskey and gin, plentiful open fires and the homely smell of woodsmoke. Bedrooms, some of which were designed by the Duchess of Roxburghe, are all different and decorated in traditional country house style. Three rooms have open fires, with coal and logs provided - the greatest luxury in a country hotel bedroom. Read expert review From £171per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com
The best country house hotels in Britain
The British country house hotel was born in 1949, brought to us in the pink and frilly shape of Sharrow Bay, overlooking Ullswater in the Lake District. Presided over by a splendid couple, Francis Coulson and his partner Brian Sack, it came complete with a gargantuan afternoon tea, and Sack’s famous Icky Sticky Toffee Pudding and Coulson’s bedtime poems on the pillow. People adored it. There had been leisure hotels in Britain before, of course, but this was the first where you could be assured of being personally pampered in beautiful rural surroundings, with a committed owner at the helm offering a warm welcome, decent food, peace and quiet. Hundreds of characterful country house hotels have followed, and today there’s a bewildering amount from which to choose. Here we present the cream of the crop. While some continue to offer no more than the pleasures of a beautiful old house, a roaring fire and a cup of tea, others cater to our increased demands: for spas, cookery courses and activities such as foraging. All these hotels share in common comfort, excellent food and the joys of the English countryside. England Lime WoodNew Forest, Hampshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating It’s the attention to detail throughout Lime Wood that makes it special. The oak doors are thick and stylised sitting rooms melt one into the other, pale lemon into lilac into mint green, each with an open fire. As for the food, that most grounded of all celebrity chefs, Angela Hartnett, has joined forces with existing Lime Wood chef Luke Holder and to produce Italian inspired dishes that are as informal, yet polished as their surroundings. Read expert review From £245per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Hampshire • Find exclusive UK hotel and restaurant offers from Telegraph Travel Belmond Le Manoir aux Quat'SaisonsOxfordshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating The style is a happy marriage between stately Oxfordshire and eccentric French fancy. The honey-coloured Manor house creates an attractive focus around which an eclectic mix of 15th-century ponds, Provençal lavender rows, a Japanese garden, kitsch sculptures and a wild mushroom patch can all co-exist. Seasonality is king in its two-Michelin starred restaurant. A 1930s-style bar serves comforting cocktails and the wine cellar stocks a French dominated list of more than 1,000 different wines. Read expert review From £756per night • The best country house hotels in Britain Lympstone ManorExmouth, Devon, England 9Telegraph expert rating Britain's most exciting new country house hotel in decades, with double-Michelin-starred BBC Great British Menu icon Michael Caines MBE at the helm. The man himself takes the time to greet guests and can often be spied striding through the halls in his white chef overalls. Don't miss the eight-course tasting menu dinner. Many chefs get bogged down in zany experiments with foams and moleculars. Michael prefers to bravely poke at the booby-trapped boundary between sumptuous and sickly. Book a room with an outdoor bath overlooking the golden syrup sunsets of the Exe estuary. Read expert review From £290per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com The best hotels in Oxfordshire Save up to 70% on hotel deals via our partner Secret Escapes ClivedenTaplow, Berkshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating This has to be one of the loveliest spots for a hotel, overlooking a spectacular 19th-century parterre and surrounded by acres of ancient woodland running down to the Thames. Contrary to its appearance, Cliveden is not in the least bit stuck up and doesn’t mind whether you turn up in a Ferrari or a Fiat. The house has witnessed much intrigue over the years – it was the setting for the infamous Profumo affair – and a hint of naughtiness remains. Read expert review From £340per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Berkshire Chewton Glen HotelNew Forest, Hampshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating The hotel has lovely grounds and guests can follow the stream through the woods to emerge at Naish Beach, with a view of the Needles rising from the sea. Facilities are legion: a lavish spa, indoor and outdoor pools, tennis centre, nine-hole golf course and many activities, from archery and buggy riding to duck herding. Bedrooms and suites, in many different styles, display astonishing attention to detail, down to the stamped postcards on each desk. Read expert review From £315per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Hampshire Hambleton HallRutland, East Midlands, England 9Telegraph expert rating Beautifully decorated by Stefa Hart, who with her husband Tim has owned and run Hambleton Hall since 1979, the house exudes a feeling of controlled and carefully orchestrated wellbeing without ever feeling unnatural or overly theatrical. The flowing country house good looks are matched by the surrounding gardens and the beautiful view of Rutland Water from the lovely flower filled terrace. The cooking of Aaron Patterson, who began here as a 16-year-old sous chef, easily deserves its long held Michelin star and is rooted in local and seasonal produce, charmingly presented and always delicious. Read expert review From £265per night • The best hotels in Rutland Gidleigh ParkChagford, Devon, England 9Telegraph expert rating Perched atop a bank overlooking private woodlands traced by a boulder-strewn river, Gidleigh’s location is wild and dramatic. The décor is stylish if a little straight-laced, with everything you’d expect in an English country house hotel: antique furniture, wood panelling, stone fireplaces and elegant bouquets of flowers. The 24 bedrooms are decorated individually in a classic English country style, with supersized beds, roll-top baths, televisions, L’Occitane toiletries, spring water from the Gidleigh Estate, bowls of fresh fruit and complimentary decanters of Madeira. Read expert review From £248per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Devon Askham HallPenrith, Cumbria, England 9Telegraph expert rating A mixture of family furniture and paintings have been combined with more modern, or quirky pieces to create something both charming and unusual. The whole place feels part stately home, part private club, but mostly unique. Richard Swale is a gifted chef who draws his influences from, amongst others, Magnus Nilsson of Faviken restaurant in Sweden and Shaun Hill of the Walnut Tree, in Wales. Richard’s food is locally grown, or personally preserved and tastes correspondingly fresh and interesting. Read expert review From £150per night • The best hotels in Cumbria Calcot ManorTetbury, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating A weathered stone manor house and farm building that’s grown to house 35 guest rooms, a gorgeous spa, a function centre in a converted barn, an Ofsted-registered crèche in the kids’ Playzone and two restaurants. Double rooms are in the manor; family rooms overlook the outdoor pool. There’s something incredibly relaxing about this hotel, with 'country modern’ bedrooms that manage to be both cosy and elegant, soothing and spoiling, natural and sophisticated. When it was time to go home, we refused to leave, cancelled everything and booked for another night. It’s honestly that good. Read expert review From £204per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Cotswolds Augill CastleKirkby Stephen, Cumbria, England 9Telegraph expert rating Augill Castle stands in 20 acres of grounds in the beautiful upper Eden Valley, within striking distance of both the Yorkshire Dales and the Lake District. The owners have created a highly individual hotel with minimal rules, a great sense of relaxation and welcome to all – unusual and imaginative with a 'family friends’ feel. The 15 bedrooms are eclectic and slightly eccentric with a mix of antique and contemporary pieces and an array of unusual and pretty bedsteads. Dining is a social occasion. Read expert review From £170per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Cumbria Summer Lodge Country House Hotel & SpaEvershot, Dorset, England 9Telegraph expert rating Decoration and style tends towards the feminine and the flouncy with fabric covered ceilings and padded fabric walls, pictures of dogs, plenty of cushions and so on but they add up, in general, to a feeling of spoiling indulgence and do not, mercifully, overwhelm. The drawing room, designed by the poet and author Thomas Hardy, is admirably classic in style, now painted a pretty blue, and the bedrooms are divinely pretty and comfortable. Read expert review From £215per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Dorset Cowley ManorCheltenham, Gloucestershire, England 8Telegraph expert rating One of the first of the new breed of contemporary country house hotels to put their spa, C-side, at the heart of their offering. The glass-fronted building is a beautiful piece of modern design, sunk into a hill to one side. The treatments in the four rooms use the hotel’s own Green & Spring products, employing local natural products. There are indoor and outdoor pools and a dedicated manicure and pedicure area, gym, steam room and sauna. Read expert review From £195per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Gloucestershire Gilpin Hotel & Lake HouseLake Windermere, Lake District, England 8Telegraph expert rating The hotel is a characterful Georgian house, built in 1901 and owned by three generations of the Cunliffe family. That’s not to say it’s a creaking relic — the décor is glamorous boutique meets country pile. Life at the Gilpin is all about kicking back — and that’s helped by the service, about which it’s hard to say anything negative. Everyone smiles, everyone says hello — yet it’s not overbearing. Fishing, shooting, horse riding, mountain biking, paintballing and treasure hunts can also be organised on-site. Read expert review From £215per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Lake District Four Seasons Hotel HampshireWinchfield, Hampshire, England 8Telegraph expert rating Built in the 18th century as a manor house, the hotel is set amid 500 acres of green fields and paddocks full of grazing horses. Inside, it’s all slick and stylish, a blend of traditional and contemporary, as befits a metropolitan, cosmopolitan Four Seasons hotel set in English countryside. Bedrooms are sophisticated and elegant, traditional in style but with high-tech amenities and large marble bathrooms, and flexible sleeping options for families. The fine dining restaurant, Seasons, is very elegant, and there is a more casual bistro, a bar with open fire and library for afternoon tea. Read expert review From £295per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Hampshire The Pig at CombeGittisham, Devon, England 9Telegraph expert rating Sexy and fun as well as romantic. The 27 rooms are some of the most charming, traditional yet stylish (larders and minibars cleverly hidden inside antique cupboards; some televisions disguised as antique mirrors), comfortable, practical, quirky and soothing of any hotel bedrooms in the land. Head chef Dan Gavriilidis is responsible for the Devon version of the Pigs’ informal '25 Mile’ menu, featuring the produce of the kitchen gardens and poly tunnels and the best locally-sourced ingredients. Read expert review From £170per night Check availability Rates provided by Mr & Mrs Smith • The best hotels in Devon Barnsley HouseCirencester, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating What a beauty. With its golden stone, gables and mullion windows this is a dreamily romantic house. But for all that, the building is magnificently upstaged by its garden. There are four acres of formal gardens including a knot garden and a potager. Cream furnishings in the rooms enhance engaging artworks, all based on the theme of nature – a row of bird houses; a chandelier cleverly created out of flower pots. Everything about the restaurant has been calibrated to convey a sense of pleasing simplicity – although of course that requires much painstaking effort. Read expert review From £181per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Cotswolds Ellenborough ParkCheltenham, Gloucestershire, England 8Telegraph expert rating A group of honeystone buildings is set around a historic Cotswold manor house that was embellished with castle-like towers in the mid-19th century. The 61 generously sized bedrooms are a world away from the shabby-chic looks or the pared back minimalism that are now the norm in other rural retreats. With stripy wallpaper and sprucely comfy armchairs, and with swathes of linen chintz in some rooms, panelling in others, the interiors are a contemporary take on traditional British country style. Read expert review From £126per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Lake District Lucknam ParkWiltshire, England 9Telegraph expert rating The hotel sits within a 500-acre estate that encompasses meadows, paddocks and woodland. The main building is a beautiful, symmetrical, creeper-covered Palladian mansion dating from 1720. Its public rooms are opulent and elegant, with a traditional country house feel. They include a panelled library, a drawing room with a corniced ceiling, an ornate fireplace as well as tassled curtains and sofas, and The Park Restaurant, laid out with white-clothed tables under a sky-painted ceiling. Read expert review From £230per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Wiltshire Lords Of The ManorUpper Slaughter, Cotswolds, England 8Telegraph expert rating The oldest parts of this mellow-stone manor house date from around 1649, with gables, wings and bay windows added in later centuries. Traditional rather than style-conscious, the public rooms are furnished with antiques. The 26 rooms in total split into five categories, comfortably furnished with embroidered silk throws on beds and soft lighting. The Michelin-starred restaurant is a key reason for staying at this hotel. The £69 three-course dinner menu may include starters of squab pigeon or foie gras with smoked eel and mains of Gloucestershire Old Spot suckling pig with rhubarb or local venison. Read expert review From £150per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in the Cotswolds Hotel EndsleighTavistock, Devon, England 9Telegraph expert rating Built in 1812 as the holiday home for the Duchess of Bedford, Georgiana Russell, this wildly romantic, chintz-free country estate, run by Channel 5’s Hotel Inspector, Alex Polizzi, is steeped in royal history. It’s a verdantly gardened, Grade 1-listed Eden between Dartmoor and Exmoor, with shell houses and hidden glades for romantic tête-à-têtes. The cream teas are worth the journey alone: a help-yourself affair of just-baked scones accompanied by massive urns of clotted cream and fruit-laden strawberry jam. Breakfasts, too, are a cut above the rivals. Read expert review From £198per night Check availability Rates provided by Booking.com • The best hotels in Devon The House at BeaverbrookSurrey, England 9Telegraph expert rating Step into a bygone era of English high society, original artworks and antiques at this luxurious country house hotel, where press baron Lord Beaverbrook entertained world leaders and literary greats. Grandeur and opulence ooze from every room, beautifully designed by Susie Atkinson: A cosy morning room with log fire and plump, squishy sofas offers stunning views of the North Downs and Italianate garden. The library's shelves heave with weighty tomes, and the UK's first home cinema, where Beaverbrook and Sir Winston Churchill discussed the war's progress, still has the original wood-panelling and lighting. Read expert review From £225per night • The best hotels in Surrey Bovey CastleMoretonhampstead, Dartmoor, England 9Telegraph expert rating This grand stately pile on a sporting estate in Dartmoor National Park caters for every whim, whether rugged outdoor pursuits or fine dining and pampering. Inside, there’s a heated swimming pool and whirlpool with deckchairs overlooking the grounds, plus steam room, sauna and gym, while the ESPA Spa offers an extensive range of treatments. Outside, in the 275-acre grounds,