Bayern Munich

Bayern Munich slideshow

Leicester City earned more money from last season's Champions League than Real Madrid

Leicester City earned more money for their Champions League run last season than Real Madrid did for winning it, it was revealed on Friday. Shock 2016 Premier League champions Leicester received €81.7m (£73.2m) for reaching the quarter-finals during their debut campaign in the world’s biggest club competition. Real Madrid were paid €81m (£72.6m) after becoming the first team to defend the Champions League. Runners-up Juventus were the only club to earn more than Leicester after being awarded €110.4m euros (£98.6m). In total, teams taking part in the Champions League shared €1.396bn (£1.25bn) in payments from Uefa. Real Madrid became the first club to defend the Champions League Credit: AFP Manchester United’s Europa League triumph, meanwhile, saw them paid €44.5m (£40m) - more than double any other club in last season’s second-tier competition. Of the other Premier League teams in Europe in 2016-17, Arsenal, who were humiliated 10-2 by Bayern Munich in the last 16 of the Champions League, were paid €64.6m (£58m). Manchester City, who also lost in the first knockout round after coming through the play-offs, earned €50.2m (£45m). Tottenham took home €43.2m euros (£39m) after failing to get out of the group stages. Celtic, who also failed to progress from their group, were paid €31.7m (£28m). Manchester United earned €44.5m (£40m) for their Europa League win Credit: AP Each club was guaranteed a minimum payment of €12.7m for participating in the Champions League proper and earned €1.5m per win and €500,000 per draw. Further bonuses were paid for each knockout round reached: €6m for the last 16, €6.5m for the quarter-finals, €7.5m for the semi-finals, €11m for the runners-up in the final and €15.5m for the winners. Most of the remaining cash was distributed according to the value of the television deal in each country and other factors.

Leicester City earned more money from last season's Champions League than Real Madrid

Leicester City earned more money for their Champions League run last season than Real Madrid did for winning it, it was revealed on Friday. Shock 2016 Premier League champions Leicester received €81.7m (£73.2m) for reaching the quarter-finals during their debut campaign in the world’s biggest club competition. Real Madrid were paid €81m (£72.6m) after becoming the first team to defend the Champions League. Runners-up Juventus were the only club to earn more than Leicester after being awarded €110.4m euros (£98.6m). In total, teams taking part in the Champions League shared €1.396bn (£1.25bn) in payments from Uefa. Real Madrid became the first club to defend the Champions League Credit: AFP Manchester United’s Europa League triumph, meanwhile, saw them paid €44.5m (£40m) - more than double any other club in last season’s second-tier competition. Of the other Premier League teams in Europe in 2016-17, Arsenal, who were humiliated 10-2 by Bayern Munich in the last 16 of the Champions League, were paid €64.6m (£58m). Manchester City, who also lost in the first knockout round after coming through the play-offs, earned €50.2m (£45m). Tottenham took home €43.2m euros (£39m) after failing to get out of the group stages. Celtic, who also failed to progress from their group, were paid €31.7m (£28m). Manchester United earned €44.5m (£40m) for their Europa League win Credit: AP Each club was guaranteed a minimum payment of €12.7m for participating in the Champions League proper and earned €1.5m per win and €500,000 per draw. Further bonuses were paid for each knockout round reached: €6m for the last 16, €6.5m for the quarter-finals, €7.5m for the semi-finals, €11m for the runners-up in the final and €15.5m for the winners. Most of the remaining cash was distributed according to the value of the television deal in each country and other factors.

Leicester City earned more money from last season's Champions League than Real Madrid

Leicester City earned more money for their Champions League run last season than Real Madrid did for winning it, it was revealed on Friday. Shock 2016 Premier League champions Leicester received €81.7m (£73.2m) for reaching the quarter-finals during their debut campaign in the world’s biggest club competition. Real Madrid were paid €81m (£72.6m) after becoming the first team to defend the Champions League. Runners-up Juventus were the only club to earn more than Leicester after being awarded €110.4m euros (£98.6m). In total, teams taking part in the Champions League shared €1.396bn (£1.25bn) in payments from Uefa. Real Madrid became the first club to defend the Champions League Credit: AFP Manchester United’s Europa League triumph, meanwhile, saw them paid €44.5m (£40m) - more than double any other club in last season’s second-tier competition. Of the other Premier League teams in Europe in 2016-17, Arsenal, who were humiliated 10-2 by Bayern Munich in the last 16 of the Champions League, were paid €64.6m (£58m). Manchester City, who also lost in the first knockout round after coming through the play-offs, earned €50.2m (£45m). Tottenham took home €43.2m euros (£39m) after failing to get out of the group stages. Celtic, who also failed to progress from their group, were paid €31.7m (£28m). Manchester United earned €44.5m (£40m) for their Europa League win Credit: AP Each club was guaranteed a minimum payment of €12.7m for participating in the Champions League proper and earned €1.5m per win and €500,000 per draw. Further bonuses were paid for each knockout round reached: €6m for the last 16, €6.5m for the quarter-finals, €7.5m for the semi-finals, €11m for the runners-up in the final and €15.5m for the winners. Most of the remaining cash was distributed according to the value of the television deal in each country and other factors.

Bernat steps up recovery for Bayern comeback

After almost three months out of action due to an ankle injury, Bayern Munich defender Juan Bernat has made a key step in his recovery.

Arsenal earn more Champions League money than Bayern Munich despite 10-2 exit

Arsenal earn more Champions League money than Bayern Munich despite 10-2 exit

I won't stay at Bayern beyond this season - Heynckes

Jupp Heynckes says he has no intention of extending his stay at Bayern Munich beyond the summer of 2018.

I won't stay at Bayern beyond this season - Heynckes

Jupp Heynckes says he has no intention of extending his stay at Bayern Munich beyond the summer of 2018.

I won't stay at Bayern beyond this season - Heynckes

Jupp Heynckes says he has no intention of extending his stay at Bayern Munich beyond the summer of 2018.

Harry Kane is England's most talented footballer, but is not world class yet

It is often said in football the word ‘legend’ is applied too loosely. The same must be said of the phrase ‘world class’.  Too many players are given this tag, but we should pause before handing out such lavish compliments. That is why I do not agree with those arguing Harry Kane is a world-class footballer. He isn’t. Not yet. My criteria for world class status are stricter than excelling in the Premier League, no matter how long Kane terrorises defences domestically. World class players are those who deliver in the post-Christmas stage of the Champions League, shining in the quarter-finals and beyond. World class players are those who deliver at major international tournaments. By the end of this season Kane might tick both boxes. He has the credentials, but until such time becoming English football’s most talented footballer is not enough. There was a comment by Pep Guardiola when asked about Kevin De Bruyne’s superb start to the season. I loved it. “If you want Kevin to be considered one of the best he has to win titles,” said Guardiola. In that sentence Pep encapsulated my argument. De Bruyne is the best player in the Premier League at this moment. But one of the greatest managers of all time is telling him how much farther he has to go. The same applies to Kane. I agree he is one of the finest strikers in the world, but it's not solely about being one of the best of your generation. The stage on which you consistently apply that talent also matters.  If selecting a world XI, would Kane join Lionel Messi, Neymar and Cristiano Ronaldo in the line-up? No. Not at this moment. Kane’s form compares favourably with his goalscoring peers, but his task is to go beyond them. Harry Kane goals in Champs League 02/10 The record of the most prolific in this calendar year is similar. In 2017, Kane and Bayern Munich’s Robert Lewandowski have 36 goals apiece in all competitions. Dortmund’s Pierre-Emerick Aubamayang has 35. Edinson Cavani has 37 for PSG. Domestically, Kane and Lewandowski have 27 league goals over this period, so statistically the Spurs man is already on a par with the most productive around. He is outscoring Real Madrid’s Karim Benzema and Juventus’ Gonzalo Higuain. I believe he is better than them. This is why there is understandable enthusiasm to promote Kane’s current standing. You see the reports suggesting Real Madrid are prepared to pay £200 million, and I am sure had he scored the winning goal in the Bernabeu in the Champions League in midweek it would have been presented as evidence Kane has reached the highest tier.  But, with the exception of Lewandowski who helped Borussia Dortmund to the Champions League final, I would contend these strikers have more to do to be truly world class. Forwards like Cavani, Benzema, Higuain and Aubamayang are greatly admired and some might argue to be part of this group proves Kane is world class. Not for me. Arsene Wenger made a good point a couple of years ago regarding the number of top class strikers out there. “The strikers are South American today. Europe doesn’t produce strikers any more,” Wenger said.  I am sure the progress of Kane and Kylian Mbappe since he made this comment would make him revise that view slightly, but broadly I agree. Kylian Mbappe is the world's second most expensive player and a rare commodity: a high quality European striker Credit: GETTY IMAGES There was a time when the world’s greatest players were number nines. Think of Marco Van Basten from Europe, or the Brazilians Romario and Ronaldo. Now there is a dearth of world class centre-forwards and that is putting Kane top of most wanted lists. I do not write this to belittle or criticise the Tottenham striker. He is my favourite Premier League footballer and if I was a manager he is the one player I would be begging my chairman to sign. There are few certainties in the transfer market, but – injury permitting – Kane is as close to the ideal signing you can get. He guarantees goals. He is the right age, at a point in his career where he will get better. Most important, he is striving for greatness. He has the application you need to attain his targets. I do not believe it will matter to him who is saying how good he is, or whether he is world class or not, he will want more.  I can see it in Kane’s eyes when he gives interviews, that focus and single-mindedness to achieve as much as he can from the game. He is obsessed with goals. When he turns up for pre-season every summer, I can tell he has that determination to finish the year as the top goalscorer. He will be studying his numbers. When I read the extract from the Spanish journalist Guillem Balague’s book on Mauricio Pochettino describing Kane as the ‘best player in the world in terms of mental strength, willpower and endeavour’ it did not surprise me. As a 14-year-old at Spurs, Kane was not the tallest or most physically developed in his group. I believe the coaches at the time thought his progress could go either way, but when they saw his dad at the training ground – and how tall he was – they took a long-term view with the player. He has repaid that faith.  If he stays fit and is not tempted to move abroad, I believe Kane will break Alan Shearer’s Premier League goalscoring record of 260. Where he needs to distance himself from Shearer is the number of medals won. It is a travesty a player of Shearer’s ability has only one Premier League winners’ medal. His haul should be up their with the greatest players. Kane cannot let his career progress without reward. No matter how strong Kane’s affinity to Spurs, the club must starting winning trophies. Shearer underlined his world-class talent because he also performed at the highest standard for England at a major tournament, in his case Euro 96. Kane must prove his quality on the international stage with England to truly be considered world class Credit: GETTY IMAGES England has had other recent players such as Rio Ferdinand, Steven Gerrard, Frank Lampard, John Terry, Ashley Cole and Wayne Rooney who used the Champions League to confirm their world class status, regardless of how their international careers are judged. Fernando Torres was world class, not because of his Anfield career, but his contribution to Spain’s European Championship win in 2012. Suarez, one of the few strikers around who I feel still has the edge on Kane, is world class because of his performances for Uruguay at the World Cup and Barcelona in Europe. These performances added to what they were producing domestically. They were consistently brilliant at all levels and collected trophies. Total Football Special: Graeme Souness 37:26 I apply the same logic to managers. The greatest are defined by their success in the European Cup or Champions League. Think of it as those great golfers who spend their careers chasing a major trophy. We all know who has the talent, but there is clear way of separating the very best from the rest – those who win green jackets and Open Championships. Kane already stands apart from every other English player. There was a time when the national team was packed with those who were the main men for their clubs – Gerrard, Terry, Lampard, Rooney and Michael Owen. Now only Kane is the main man for his club. Pochettino may be upset about Spurs being referred to as this, but England is certainly the ‘Harry Kane Team’ Like it or not, that is a phrase that will stick because when Kane eventually achieves world class status his contribution will resonate most when we recall this era for Spurs and England.

Harry Kane is England's most talented footballer, but is not world class yet

It is often said in football the word ‘legend’ is applied too loosely. The same must be said of the phrase ‘world class’.  Too many players are given this tag, but we should pause before handing out such lavish compliments. That is why I do not agree with those arguing Harry Kane is a world-class footballer. He isn’t. Not yet. My criteria for world class status are stricter than excelling in the Premier League, no matter how long Kane terrorises defences domestically. World class players are those who deliver in the post-Christmas stage of the Champions League, shining in the quarter-finals and beyond. World class players are those who deliver at major international tournaments. By the end of this season Kane might tick both boxes. He has the credentials, but until such time becoming English football’s most talented footballer is not enough. There was a comment by Pep Guardiola when asked about Kevin De Bruyne’s superb start to the season. I loved it. “If you want Kevin to be considered one of the best he has to win titles,” said Guardiola. In that sentence Pep encapsulated my argument. De Bruyne is the best player in the Premier League at this moment. But one of the greatest managers of all time is telling him how much farther he has to go. The same applies to Kane. I agree he is one of the finest strikers in the world, but it's not solely about being one of the best of your generation. The stage on which you consistently apply that talent also matters.  If selecting a world XI, would Kane join Lionel Messi, Neymar and Cristiano Ronaldo in the line-up? No. Not at this moment. Kane’s form compares favourably with his goalscoring peers, but his task is to go beyond them. Harry Kane goals in Champs League 02/10 The record of the most prolific in this calendar year is similar. In 2017, Kane and Bayern Munich’s Robert Lewandowski have 36 goals apiece in all competitions. Dortmund’s Pierre-Emerick Aubamayang has 35. Edinson Cavani has 37 for PSG. Domestically, Kane and Lewandowski have 27 league goals over this period, so statistically the Spurs man is already on a par with the most productive around. He is outscoring Real Madrid’s Karim Benzema and Juventus’ Gonzalo Higuain. I believe he is better than them. This is why there is understandable enthusiasm to promote Kane’s current standing. You see the reports suggesting Real Madrid are prepared to pay £200 million, and I am sure had he scored the winning goal in the Bernabeu in the Champions League in midweek it would have been presented as evidence Kane has reached the highest tier.  But, with the exception of Lewandowski who helped Borussia Dortmund to the Champions League final, I would contend these strikers have more to do to be truly world class. Forwards like Cavani, Benzema, Higuain and Aubamayang are greatly admired and some might argue to be part of this group proves Kane is world class. Not for me. Arsene Wenger made a good point a couple of years ago regarding the number of top class strikers out there. “The strikers are South American today. Europe doesn’t produce strikers any more,” Wenger said.  I am sure the progress of Kane and Kylian Mbappe since he made this comment would make him revise that view slightly, but broadly I agree. Kylian Mbappe is the world's second most expensive player and a rare commodity: a high quality European striker Credit: GETTY IMAGES There was a time when the world’s greatest players were number nines. Think of Marco Van Basten from Europe, or the Brazilians Romario and Ronaldo. Now there is a dearth of world class centre-forwards and that is putting Kane top of most wanted lists. I do not write this to belittle or criticise the Tottenham striker. He is my favourite Premier League footballer and if I was a manager he is the one player I would be begging my chairman to sign. There are few certainties in the transfer market, but – injury permitting – Kane is as close to the ideal signing you can get. He guarantees goals. He is the right age, at a point in his career where he will get better. Most important, he is striving for greatness. He has the application you need to attain his targets. I do not believe it will matter to him who is saying how good he is, or whether he is world class or not, he will want more.  I can see it in Kane’s eyes when he gives interviews, that focus and single-mindedness to achieve as much as he can from the game. He is obsessed with goals. When he turns up for pre-season every summer, I can tell he has that determination to finish the year as the top goalscorer. He will be studying his numbers. When I read the extract from the Spanish journalist Guillem Balague’s book on Mauricio Pochettino describing Kane as the ‘best player in the world in terms of mental strength, willpower and endeavour’ it did not surprise me. As a 14-year-old at Spurs, Kane was not the tallest or most physically developed in his group. I believe the coaches at the time thought his progress could go either way, but when they saw his dad at the training ground – and how tall he was – they took a long-term view with the player. He has repaid that faith.  If he stays fit and is not tempted to move abroad, I believe Kane will break Alan Shearer’s Premier League goalscoring record of 260. Where he needs to distance himself from Shearer is the number of medals won. It is a travesty a player of Shearer’s ability has only one Premier League winners’ medal. His haul should be up their with the greatest players. Kane cannot let his career progress without reward. No matter how strong Kane’s affinity to Spurs, the club must starting winning trophies. Shearer underlined his world-class talent because he also performed at the highest standard for England at a major tournament, in his case Euro 96. Kane must prove his quality on the international stage with England to truly be considered world class Credit: GETTY IMAGES England has had other recent players such as Rio Ferdinand, Steven Gerrard, Frank Lampard, John Terry, Ashley Cole and Wayne Rooney who used the Champions League to confirm their world class status, regardless of how their international careers are judged. Fernando Torres was world class, not because of his Anfield career, but his contribution to Spain’s European Championship win in 2012. Suarez, one of the few strikers around who I feel still has the edge on Kane, is world class because of his performances for Uruguay at the World Cup and Barcelona in Europe. These performances added to what they were producing domestically. They were consistently brilliant at all levels and collected trophies. Total Football Special: Graeme Souness 37:26 I apply the same logic to managers. The greatest are defined by their success in the European Cup or Champions League. Think of it as those great golfers who spend their careers chasing a major trophy. We all know who has the talent, but there is clear way of separating the very best from the rest – those who win green jackets and Open Championships. Kane already stands apart from every other English player. There was a time when the national team was packed with those who were the main men for their clubs – Gerrard, Terry, Lampard, Rooney and Michael Owen. Now only Kane is the main man for his club. Pochettino may be upset about Spurs being referred to as this, but England is certainly the ‘Harry Kane Team’ Like it or not, that is a phrase that will stick because when Kane eventually achieves world class status his contribution will resonate most when we recall this era for Spurs and England.

Harry Kane is England's most talented footballer, but is not world class yet

It is often said in football the word ‘legend’ is applied too loosely. The same must be said of the phrase ‘world class’.  Too many players are given this tag, but we should pause before handing out such lavish compliments. That is why I do not agree with those arguing Harry Kane is a world-class footballer. He isn’t. Not yet. My criteria for world class status are stricter than excelling in the Premier League, no matter how long Kane terrorises defences domestically. World class players are those who deliver in the post-Christmas stage of the Champions League, shining in the quarter-finals and beyond. World class players are those who deliver at major international tournaments. By the end of this season Kane might tick both boxes. He has the credentials, but until such time becoming English football’s most talented footballer is not enough. There was a comment by Pep Guardiola when asked about Kevin De Bruyne’s superb start to the season. I loved it. “If you want Kevin to be considered one of the best he has to win titles,” said Guardiola. In that sentence Pep encapsulated my argument. De Bruyne is the best player in the Premier League at this moment. But one of the greatest managers of all time is telling him how much farther he has to go. The same applies to Kane. I agree he is one of the finest strikers in the world, but it's not solely about being one of the best of your generation. The stage on which you consistently apply that talent also matters.  If selecting a world XI, would Kane join Lionel Messi, Neymar and Cristiano Ronaldo in the line-up? No. Not at this moment. Kane’s form compares favourably with his goalscoring peers, but his task is to go beyond them. Harry Kane goals in Champs League 02/10 The record of the most prolific in this calendar year is similar. In 2017, Kane and Bayern Munich’s Robert Lewandowski have 36 goals apiece in all competitions. Dortmund’s Pierre-Emerick Aubamayang has 35. Edinson Cavani has 37 for PSG. Domestically, Kane and Lewandowski have 27 league goals over this period, so statistically the Spurs man is already on a par with the most productive around. He is outscoring Real Madrid’s Karim Benzema and Juventus’ Gonzalo Higuain. I believe he is better than them. This is why there is understandable enthusiasm to promote Kane’s current standing. You see the reports suggesting Real Madrid are prepared to pay £200 million, and I am sure had he scored the winning goal in the Bernabeu in the Champions League in midweek it would have been presented as evidence Kane has reached the highest tier.  But, with the exception of Lewandowski who helped Borussia Dortmund to the Champions League final, I would contend these strikers have more to do to be truly world class. Forwards like Cavani, Benzema, Higuain and Aubamayang are greatly admired and some might argue to be part of this group proves Kane is world class. Not for me. Arsene Wenger made a good point a couple of years ago regarding the number of top class strikers out there. “The strikers are South American today. Europe doesn’t produce strikers any more,” Wenger said.  I am sure the progress of Kane and Kylian Mbappe since he made this comment would make him revise that view slightly, but broadly I agree. Kylian Mbappe is the world's second most expensive player and a rare commodity: a high quality European striker Credit: GETTY IMAGES There was a time when the world’s greatest players were number nines. Think of Marco Van Basten from Europe, or the Brazilians Romario and Ronaldo. Now there is a dearth of world class centre-forwards and that is putting Kane top of most wanted lists. I do not write this to belittle or criticise the Tottenham striker. He is my favourite Premier League footballer and if I was a manager he is the one player I would be begging my chairman to sign. There are few certainties in the transfer market, but – injury permitting – Kane is as close to the ideal signing you can get. He guarantees goals. He is the right age, at a point in his career where he will get better. Most important, he is striving for greatness. He has the application you need to attain his targets. I do not believe it will matter to him who is saying how good he is, or whether he is world class or not, he will want more.  I can see it in Kane’s eyes when he gives interviews, that focus and single-mindedness to achieve as much as he can from the game. He is obsessed with goals. When he turns up for pre-season every summer, I can tell he has that determination to finish the year as the top goalscorer. He will be studying his numbers. When I read the extract from the Spanish journalist Guillem Balague’s book on Mauricio Pochettino describing Kane as the ‘best player in the world in terms of mental strength, willpower and endeavour’ it did not surprise me. As a 14-year-old at Spurs, Kane was not the tallest or most physically developed in his group. I believe the coaches at the time thought his progress could go either way, but when they saw his dad at the training ground – and how tall he was – they took a long-term view with the player. He has repaid that faith.  If he stays fit and is not tempted to move abroad, I believe Kane will break Alan Shearer’s Premier League goalscoring record of 260. Where he needs to distance himself from Shearer is the number of medals won. It is a travesty a player of Shearer’s ability has only one Premier League winners’ medal. His haul should be up their with the greatest players. Kane cannot let his career progress without reward. No matter how strong Kane’s affinity to Spurs, the club must starting winning trophies. Shearer underlined his world-class talent because he also performed at the highest standard for England at a major tournament, in his case Euro 96. Kane must prove his quality on the international stage with England to truly be considered world class Credit: GETTY IMAGES England has had other recent players such as Rio Ferdinand, Steven Gerrard, Frank Lampard, John Terry, Ashley Cole and Wayne Rooney who used the Champions League to confirm their world class status, regardless of how their international careers are judged. Fernando Torres was world class, not because of his Anfield career, but his contribution to Spain’s European Championship win in 2012. Suarez, one of the few strikers around who I feel still has the edge on Kane, is world class because of his performances for Uruguay at the World Cup and Barcelona in Europe. These performances added to what they were producing domestically. They were consistently brilliant at all levels and collected trophies. Total Football Special: Graeme Souness 37:26 I apply the same logic to managers. The greatest are defined by their success in the European Cup or Champions League. Think of it as those great golfers who spend their careers chasing a major trophy. We all know who has the talent, but there is clear way of separating the very best from the rest – those who win green jackets and Open Championships. Kane already stands apart from every other English player. There was a time when the national team was packed with those who were the main men for their clubs – Gerrard, Terry, Lampard, Rooney and Michael Owen. Now only Kane is the main man for his club. Pochettino may be upset about Spurs being referred to as this, but England is certainly the ‘Harry Kane Team’ Like it or not, that is a phrase that will stick because when Kane eventually achieves world class status his contribution will resonate most when we recall this era for Spurs and England.

Muller close to his old self again - Heynckes

The Bayern Munich forward struggled during the latter months of Carlo Ancelotti's reign, but is starting to display his former sparkle

Muller close to his old self again - Heynckes

The Bayern Munich forward struggled during the latter months of Carlo Ancelotti's reign, but is starting to display his former sparkle

Muller close to his old self again, says Heynckes

Jupp Heynckes believes Thomas Muller's journey back towards top form at Bayern Munich is going well, after a difficult 18 months.

Brendan Rodgers says Celtic committed to Champions League plan of attack

Kingsley Coman, right, vies with Celtic’s Cristian Gamboa in their 3-0 Champions League defeat against Bayern Munich.

Robben yet to hold talks over new Bayern Munich contract

Robben yet to hold talks over new Bayern Munich contract

The Dutch winger is in no rush to discuss an extension with the German champions despite his deal coming to an end next year

Robben yet to hold talks over new Bayern Munich contract

The Dutch winger is in no rush to discuss an extension with the German champions despite his deal coming to an end next year

Robben yet to hold talks over new Bayern Munich contract

Robben yet to hold talks over new Bayern Munich contract

Bayern Munich winger Arjen Robben is in no rush to discuss a new contract despite his deal coming to an end next year.

Bayern's Robert Lewandowski reacts during a Group B Champions League soccer match between Bayern Munich and Celtic F.C. at the Allianz Arena in Munich, Germany, Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader)

Bayern Munich's head coach Jupp Heynckes reacts during the Champions League group B match against Celtic Glasgow October 18, 2017

Bayern Munich's head coach Jupp Heynckes reacts during the Champions League group B match against Celtic Glasgow October 18, 2017 (AFP Photo/Christof STACHE)

Bayern Munich's head coach Jupp Heynckes reacts during the Champions League group B match against Celtic Glasgow October 18, 2017

Brendan Rodgers: 'I'd rather lose playing the Celtic way than sit and defend for 90 minutes and still lose'

In other circumstances, it would be no revelation if Celtic exhibited the symptoms of shell shock as a consequence of their European expeditions. In the space of 15 months they have endured defeat by the most minuscule opponents they have faced at this level – Lincoln Red Imps – along with their worst European loss, a 7-0 drubbing by Barcelona in the Nou Camp, and their heaviest home reverse, a 5-0 beating by Paris St-Germain. Their latest pounding was administered by Bayern Munich in the Allianz Arena on Wednesday, when the 3-0 score belied a contest that easily could have finished with the Bundesliga side ahead by double that margin. Brendan Rodgers and his players, however, are able to sustain such wounds without the legacy of disfiguring scar tissue because of their bipolar existence. If they prevail against Hibernian in the Betfred Scottish League Cup semi-final at Hampden Park on Saturday, the Hoops will record their 60th successive unbeaten domestic fixture, a sequence that has included half-a-dozen wins over Rangers, including two 5-1 drubbings, the second of which set a record for a Celtic victory at Ibrox. The accumulation of home comforts includes the three Scottish honours but, despite total command of their native domain, Celtic are cast in the role of impoverished neighbours compared to Champions League powers such as Paris St-Germain and Bayern Munich. It is not impossible for them to get beyond the group stage, as Gordon Strachan and Neil Lennon proved during their time in charge in the east end of Glasgow, but the chances of a repeat grow slimmer with every transfer deal priced in hundreds of millions of euros amongst the bloated ‘big five’ nations. Celtic suffered a beating in Bavaria Credit: REUTERS So it was that, while their heroes were chasing shadows against Bayern, the Celtic support kept up a constant stream of choruses in their lofty perch at the Allianz Arena. They were celebrating the simple fact of being present, events on the field notwithstanding. Rodgers, meanwhile, has a refrain of his own, to the effect that his squad are in a constant process of development. The evidence in his favour is that, after the competitive hiatus under his predecessor, Ronny Deila, the Northern Irishman has twice successfully steered his men through half-a-dozen hazardous qualifiers and, thanks to a merited 3-0 victory over Anderlecht in Brussels, Celtic are favourites to secure third spot in Group B and a place in the Europa League, where the demands are likely to be more congenial. It was this context which allowed Rodgers to be bullish in the aftermath of Wednesday’s defeat, despite the decision not to alter his favoured 4-2-3-1 formation, even when it meant a match-up with a Bayern side who were better equipped in every position – and who had been incited to demonstrate the mismatch by Jupp Heyncke’s return for a third spell in charge. The concession of three cheap goals and the narrow avoidance of greater damage prompted charges of naivety or presumption directed towards Rodgers but his retort was that his defenders were below par and that, if defeat was always the probable outcome, he would rather supervise an expansive game than a protective huddle. Bendan Rodgers watches his team take a beating Credit: REUTERS “I’d rather lose playing how we want to play and how we want to work, as opposed to sit in and defending for 90 minutes and still lose if that’s the case,” he said. Of course, the proposition can be advanced that if Celtic had concentrated on closing available space in their own half, thus narrowing the percentages in Bayern’s favour, they would have created the circumstances which can produce menacing counterattacks. Rodgers bridled somewhat when it was suggested that he could have been more pragmatic. “There was nothing about being pragmatic for the goals we conceded. We didn’t defend our box well enough from crosses coming in – we can do better with those,” he said. Celtic’s destiny in the group is unlikely to be affected by Bayern’s Halloween visit to Glasgow, but they will be expected to make a better fist of it on their own turf. Asked if he believed that he and his team-mates had the capacity to hurt Heynckes’s players at home, goalkeeper Craig Gordon said: “We are going to try but it is a big task. “They have got some world-class players and they will be looking to go quite far into this competition and try to win it. It was always going to be difficult. There are better teams than us who will be beaten 3-0 in Munich.” That may be true, but another drubbing at home, such as was inflicted by PSG, would be markedly less palatable. Pragmatism is not usually romantic but, against manifestly superior opponents, it need not be shorn of virtue.

Brendan Rodgers: 'I'd rather lose playing the Celtic way than sit and defend for 90 minutes and still lose'

In other circumstances, it would be no revelation if Celtic exhibited the symptoms of shell shock as a consequence of their European expeditions. In the space of 15 months they have endured defeat by the most minuscule opponents they have faced at this level – Lincoln Red Imps – along with their worst European loss, a 7-0 drubbing by Barcelona in the Nou Camp, and their heaviest home reverse, a 5-0 beating by Paris St-Germain. Their latest pounding was administered by Bayern Munich in the Allianz Arena on Wednesday, when the 3-0 score belied a contest that easily could have finished with the Bundesliga side ahead by double that margin. Brendan Rodgers and his players, however, are able to sustain such wounds without the legacy of disfiguring scar tissue because of their bipolar existence. If they prevail against Hibernian in the Betfred Scottish League Cup semi-final at Hampden Park on Saturday, the Hoops will record their 60th successive unbeaten domestic fixture, a sequence that has included half-a-dozen wins over Rangers, including two 5-1 drubbings, the second of which set a record for a Celtic victory at Ibrox. The accumulation of home comforts includes the three Scottish honours but, despite total command of their native domain, Celtic are cast in the role of impoverished neighbours compared to Champions League powers such as Paris St-Germain and Bayern Munich. It is not impossible for them to get beyond the group stage, as Gordon Strachan and Neil Lennon proved during their time in charge in the east end of Glasgow, but the chances of a repeat grow slimmer with every transfer deal priced in hundreds of millions of euros amongst the bloated ‘big five’ nations. Celtic suffered a beating in Bavaria Credit: REUTERS So it was that, while their heroes were chasing shadows against Bayern, the Celtic support kept up a constant stream of choruses in their lofty perch at the Allianz Arena. They were celebrating the simple fact of being present, events on the field notwithstanding. Rodgers, meanwhile, has a refrain of his own, to the effect that his squad are in a constant process of development. The evidence in his favour is that, after the competitive hiatus under his predecessor, Ronny Deila, the Northern Irishman has twice successfully steered his men through half-a-dozen hazardous qualifiers and, thanks to a merited 3-0 victory over Anderlecht in Brussels, Celtic are favourites to secure third spot in Group B and a place in the Europa League, where the demands are likely to be more congenial. It was this context which allowed Rodgers to be bullish in the aftermath of Wednesday’s defeat, despite the decision not to alter his favoured 4-2-3-1 formation, even when it meant a match-up with a Bayern side who were better equipped in every position – and who had been incited to demonstrate the mismatch by Jupp Heyncke’s return for a third spell in charge. The concession of three cheap goals and the narrow avoidance of greater damage prompted charges of naivety or presumption directed towards Rodgers but his retort was that his defenders were below par and that, if defeat was always the probable outcome, he would rather supervise an expansive game than a protective huddle. Bendan Rodgers watches his team take a beating Credit: REUTERS “I’d rather lose playing how we want to play and how we want to work, as opposed to sit in and defending for 90 minutes and still lose if that’s the case,” he said. Of course, the proposition can be advanced that if Celtic had concentrated on closing available space in their own half, thus narrowing the percentages in Bayern’s favour, they would have created the circumstances which can produce menacing counterattacks. Rodgers bridled somewhat when it was suggested that he could have been more pragmatic. “There was nothing about being pragmatic for the goals we conceded. We didn’t defend our box well enough from crosses coming in – we can do better with those,” he said. Celtic’s destiny in the group is unlikely to be affected by Bayern’s Halloween visit to Glasgow, but they will be expected to make a better fist of it on their own turf. Asked if he believed that he and his team-mates had the capacity to hurt Heynckes’s players at home, goalkeeper Craig Gordon said: “We are going to try but it is a big task. “They have got some world-class players and they will be looking to go quite far into this competition and try to win it. It was always going to be difficult. There are better teams than us who will be beaten 3-0 in Munich.” That may be true, but another drubbing at home, such as was inflicted by PSG, would be markedly less palatable. Pragmatism is not usually romantic but, against manifestly superior opponents, it need not be shorn of virtue.

Brendan Rodgers: 'I'd rather lose playing the Celtic way than sit and defend for 90 minutes and still lose'

In other circumstances, it would be no revelation if Celtic exhibited the symptoms of shell shock as a consequence of their European expeditions. In the space of 15 months they have endured defeat by the most minuscule opponents they have faced at this level – Lincoln Red Imps – along with their worst European loss, a 7-0 drubbing by Barcelona in the Nou Camp, and their heaviest home reverse, a 5-0 beating by Paris St-Germain. Their latest pounding was administered by Bayern Munich in the Allianz Arena on Wednesday, when the 3-0 score belied a contest that easily could have finished with the Bundesliga side ahead by double that margin. Brendan Rodgers and his players, however, are able to sustain such wounds without the legacy of disfiguring scar tissue because of their bipolar existence. If they prevail against Hibernian in the Betfred Scottish League Cup semi-final at Hampden Park on Saturday, the Hoops will record their 60th successive unbeaten domestic fixture, a sequence that has included half-a-dozen wins over Rangers, including two 5-1 drubbings, the second of which set a record for a Celtic victory at Ibrox. The accumulation of home comforts includes the three Scottish honours but, despite total command of their native domain, Celtic are cast in the role of impoverished neighbours compared to Champions League powers such as Paris St-Germain and Bayern Munich. It is not impossible for them to get beyond the group stage, as Gordon Strachan and Neil Lennon proved during their time in charge in the east end of Glasgow, but the chances of a repeat grow slimmer with every transfer deal priced in hundreds of millions of euros amongst the bloated ‘big five’ nations. Celtic suffered a beating in Bavaria Credit: REUTERS So it was that, while their heroes were chasing shadows against Bayern, the Celtic support kept up a constant stream of choruses in their lofty perch at the Allianz Arena. They were celebrating the simple fact of being present, events on the field notwithstanding. Rodgers, meanwhile, has a refrain of his own, to the effect that his squad are in a constant process of development. The evidence in his favour is that, after the competitive hiatus under his predecessor, Ronny Deila, the Northern Irishman has twice successfully steered his men through half-a-dozen hazardous qualifiers and, thanks to a merited 3-0 victory over Anderlecht in Brussels, Celtic are favourites to secure third spot in Group B and a place in the Europa League, where the demands are likely to be more congenial. It was this context which allowed Rodgers to be bullish in the aftermath of Wednesday’s defeat, despite the decision not to alter his favoured 4-2-3-1 formation, even when it meant a match-up with a Bayern side who were better equipped in every position – and who had been incited to demonstrate the mismatch by Jupp Heyncke’s return for a third spell in charge. The concession of three cheap goals and the narrow avoidance of greater damage prompted charges of naivety or presumption directed towards Rodgers but his retort was that his defenders were below par and that, if defeat was always the probable outcome, he would rather supervise an expansive game than a protective huddle. Bendan Rodgers watches his team take a beating Credit: REUTERS “I’d rather lose playing how we want to play and how we want to work, as opposed to sit in and defending for 90 minutes and still lose if that’s the case,” he said. Of course, the proposition can be advanced that if Celtic had concentrated on closing available space in their own half, thus narrowing the percentages in Bayern’s favour, they would have created the circumstances which can produce menacing counterattacks. Rodgers bridled somewhat when it was suggested that he could have been more pragmatic. “There was nothing about being pragmatic for the goals we conceded. We didn’t defend our box well enough from crosses coming in – we can do better with those,” he said. Celtic’s destiny in the group is unlikely to be affected by Bayern’s Halloween visit to Glasgow, but they will be expected to make a better fist of it on their own turf. Asked if he believed that he and his team-mates had the capacity to hurt Heynckes’s players at home, goalkeeper Craig Gordon said: “We are going to try but it is a big task. “They have got some world-class players and they will be looking to go quite far into this competition and try to win it. It was always going to be difficult. There are better teams than us who will be beaten 3-0 in Munich.” That may be true, but another drubbing at home, such as was inflicted by PSG, would be markedly less palatable. Pragmatism is not usually romantic but, against manifestly superior opponents, it need not be shorn of virtue.

How to Watch Bayern Munich vs. Celtic: Watch Online, Live Stream, TV

Bayern Munich hosts Celtic on Wednesday at the Allianz Arena in a Champions League contest.

The matchup is pivotal to the earlygoing in Group B, with the two teams tied at three points each and trailing leader PSG after two matches. Three points would mean a direct leg up toward qualification, and Bayern should be favorites at home and with more talent on the field.

Find out how to watch the match below.

How to watch

When: 2:45 p.m. ET, Wednesday, Oct. 18

TV: Fox Soccer Plus

Live Stream: Watch online with fuboTV. Sign up for a free trial here.

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"Hey! Get back here!"

Bayern Munich's French defender Kingsley Coman (L) and Celtic's Scottish midfielder Scott Brown vie for the ball during the Champions League group B match between FC Bayern Munich and Celtic Glasgow in Munich, southern Germany (AFP Photo/Christof STACHE)

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