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Why Craig Shakespeare proves the folly of promoting an assistant to become manager

Another one bites the dust. To the list of assistant managers who have failed to make the cut in the main managerial hotseat we can now add Craig Shakespeare. Just eight games into the new season, Shakespeare has been shown the door at Leicester City with the club languishing in the Premier League relegation zone. The Leicester job was Shakespeare's first taste of management (aside from a one-game caretaker role more than a decade ago) and he had grown accustomed to life as a number two behind Claudio Ranieri. But when the Italian was controversially sacked in February he first took the role on a caretaker basis before he was appointed permanently this summer. Despite the initial upturn in fortunes that his appointment brought (and the subsequent awarding of a three-year contract), it was difficult to deny the the temporary feel to his stewardship. So it proved. Is it possible for an assistant to be promoted with success? A glance at the history of assistants taking the step up shows something of a common theme. Promoting from within after a manager has been sacked rarely yields positive results unless the the former assistant was sufficiently removed from the previous regime. Conversely - and unsurprisingly - those that have the benefit of following in the footsteps of greatness tend to succeed. Is it the case that their faces are just too familiar to ditch the association with past unsuccessful regimes or are they tactically incapable of breaking clear from a previous era? Here are some examples of when promoting from within worked - and times when it didn't. John Carver - Newcastle United The most caring of caretaker managers, Carver has taken temporary charge of clubs on numerous occasions in his coaching career. Brief stints at Newcastle, Leeds, Sheffield United and then Newcastle again paved the way for him to finally be given a (slightly) longer crack at the big time - without great success. John Carver did not last long at Newcastle Credit: afp Alan Pardew's departure in early 2015 saw Carver first promoted to a caretaker role before he was given the managerial job on a temporary basis until the end of the season. There were no guarantees over whether he would stand a chance of gaining the job permanently, but he was given the task of finishing in the top half of the table. Instead he oversaw a run of eight successive league defeats, only narrowly kept the club in the Premier League and was promptly sacked when Steve McClaren was appointed in June. Manager material or better in the backroom? Backroom Roberto Di Matteo - Chelsea The case of Shakespeare bears an uncanny resemblance to that of Di Matteo at Chelsea in 2012. The Italian had worked under Andre Villas-Boas as assistant manager from June 2011, prior to stepping up to the main role on a caretaker basis when Villas-Boas was sacked in March the following year. Di Matteo guided Chelsea to their first Champions League triumph, an FA Cup final victory and was rewarded with a two-year deal to remain as manager on a permanent basis. Yet, just like Shakespeare, his spell in charge was short-lived and he was ditched by November following a poor start to the 2012/13 season. Manager material or better in the backroom? Backroom (despite his success when caretaker) Ray Harford - Fulham, Luton Town, Wimbledon and Blackburn Rovers Surely no one can challenge Harford for number of promotions from assistant to permanent manager. He made his first step up at Fulham in 1984, where he began his reign by keeping the club in the First Division, but resigned after they were beset by financial problems and relegated the year after. He then climbed the same ladder at Luton Town, where he had great success, guiding them to victory in the League Cup final before a relegation battle saw him sacked in 1990. Ray Harford made the step up to manager on four separate occasions Credit:  Getty Images The third move from assistant to manager came later that year when Bobby Gould was sacked as Wimbledon manager, but he resigned in October 1991 to take up a role as Kenny Dalglish's assistant at Blackburn Rovers. Despite vowing that he would never again step up from No 2 to the manager's chair, he did just that when Dalglish quit in the wake of the club's Premier League title triumph. They finished seventh in Harford's first season in charge and he then quit in October 1996 after the club failed to win any of their first 10 games. Manager material or better in the backroom? On the balance of his four tenures: Manager Sammy Lee - Bolton Wanderers 'Little Sam' has made a decent career out of being an assistant manager, but his time as the man in charge did not go so swimmingly. The former Liverpool midfielder gained his nickname during his time as No 2 to Sam Allardyce at Bolton in 2005. When 'Big Sam' departed the club in April 2007, Lee was asked to step into the manager's role but managed to win just one league game from 11 matches and was sacked in October. He has since returned to the coaching ranks, thriving in his various behind-the-scenes roles. One who perhaps did not flourish in the limelight. Manager material or better in the backroom? Backroom Martin Jol - Spurs The Dutchman had never plied his managerial trade outside of his native country when he was recruited to be Jacques Santini's assistant manager at Spurs in the summer of 2004. Alas, Santini lasted just 13 games before his tenure ended and Jol was confirmed as his replacement. Martin Jol secured European football for Spurs Credit: action images He was a quick hit as manager, turning around the club's fortunes and narrowly missing out on a Uefa Cup spot in his first season in charge. The club came within a whisker (or a dodgy meal) of making the Champions League the following campaign and Jol guided them to another fifth-place finish the next year. He lost his job early in the following season. Manager material or better in the backroom? Manager Tito Vilanova - Barcelona Vilanova climbed the Barcelona ranks with Pep Guardiola, serving as assistant for Barcelona B and then the main Barcelona team until 2012. When Guardiola announced his departure that April - a year after guiding the club to a Champions League and La Liga double - Vilanova was immediately confirmed as his successor at the helm. It was the first time he had taken a main managerial position since an unsuccessful spell in charge of Spanish lower-league side Palafrugell almost a decade earlier, but he nonetheless led Barcelona to another La Liga title. He underwent surgery for cancer in December of that year, but remained as manager until he was forced to resign for health reasons in July 2013. He died in April 2014. Manager material or better in the backroom? Manager Bob Paisley - Liverpool A Liverpool stalwart throughout his playing career, Paisley returned to the club first as physio and then assistant manager to Bill Shankly. When Shankly retired in 1974, Paisley was promoted to the top job despite some reluctance as a successor - Paisley had once said: "Bill loves it. He likes the razzmatazz. I'm a backroom boy. Always will be." His managerial career at Anfield proved a huge success and he won six league titles and three European Cups during his nine years in charge. Manager material or better in the backroom? Manager

Why Craig Shakespeare proves the folly of promoting an assistant to become manager

Another one bites the dust. To the list of assistant managers who have failed to make the cut in the main managerial hotseat we can now add Craig Shakespeare. Just eight games into the new season, Shakespeare has been shown the door at Leicester City with the club languishing in the Premier League relegation zone. The Leicester job was Shakespeare's first taste of management (aside from a one-game caretaker role more than a decade ago) and he had grown accustomed to life as a number two behind Claudio Ranieri. But when the Italian was controversially sacked in February he first took the role on a caretaker basis before he was appointed permanently this summer. Despite the initial upturn in fortunes that his appointment brought (and the subsequent awarding of a three-year contract), it was difficult to deny the the temporary feel to his stewardship. So it proved. Is it possible for an assistant to be promoted with success? A glance at the history of assistants taking the step up shows something of a common theme. Promoting from within after a manager has been sacked rarely yields positive results unless the the former assistant was sufficiently removed from the previous regime. Conversely - and unsurprisingly - those that have the benefit of following in the footsteps of greatness tend to succeed. Is it the case that their faces are just too familiar to ditch the association with past unsuccessful regimes or are they tactically incapable of breaking clear from a previous era? Here are some examples of when promoting from within worked - and times when it didn't. John Carver - Newcastle United The most caring of caretaker managers, Carver has taken temporary charge of clubs on numerous occasions in his coaching career. Brief stints at Newcastle, Leeds, Sheffield United and then Newcastle again paved the way for him to finally be given a (slightly) longer crack at the big time - without great success. John Carver did not last long at Newcastle Credit: afp Alan Pardew's departure in early 2015 saw Carver first promoted to a caretaker role before he was given the managerial job on a temporary basis until the end of the season. There were no guarantees over whether he would stand a chance of gaining the job permanently, but he was given the task of finishing in the top half of the table. Instead he oversaw a run of eight successive league defeats, only narrowly kept the club in the Premier League and was promptly sacked when Steve McClaren was appointed in June. Manager material or better in the backroom? Backroom Roberto Di Matteo - Chelsea The case of Shakespeare bears an uncanny resemblance to that of Di Matteo at Chelsea in 2012. The Italian had worked under Andre Villas-Boas as assistant manager from June 2011, prior to stepping up to the main role on a caretaker basis when Villas-Boas was sacked in March the following year. Di Matteo guided Chelsea to their first Champions League triumph, an FA Cup final victory and was rewarded with a two-year deal to remain as manager on a permanent basis. Yet, just like Shakespeare, his spell in charge was short-lived and he was ditched by November following a poor start to the 2012/13 season. Manager material or better in the backroom? Backroom (despite his success when caretaker) Ray Harford - Fulham, Luton Town, Wimbledon and Blackburn Rovers Surely no one can challenge Harford for number of promotions from assistant to permanent manager. He made his first step up at Fulham in 1984, where he began his reign by keeping the club in the First Division, but resigned after they were beset by financial problems and relegated the year after. He then climbed the same ladder at Luton Town, where he had great success, guiding them to victory in the League Cup final before a relegation battle saw him sacked in 1990. Ray Harford made the step up to manager on four separate occasions Credit:  Getty Images The third move from assistant to manager came later that year when Bobby Gould was sacked as Wimbledon manager, but he resigned in October 1991 to take up a role as Kenny Dalglish's assistant at Blackburn Rovers. Despite vowing that he would never again step up from No 2 to the manager's chair, he did just that when Dalglish quit in the wake of the club's Premier League title triumph. They finished seventh in Harford's first season in charge and he then quit in October 1996 after the club failed to win any of their first 10 games. Manager material or better in the backroom? On the balance of his four tenures: Manager Sammy Lee - Bolton Wanderers 'Little Sam' has made a decent career out of being an assistant manager, but his time as the man in charge did not go so swimmingly. The former Liverpool midfielder gained his nickname during his time as No 2 to Sam Allardyce at Bolton in 2005. When 'Big Sam' departed the club in April 2007, Lee was asked to step into the manager's role but managed to win just one league game from 11 matches and was sacked in October. He has since returned to the coaching ranks, thriving in his various behind-the-scenes roles. One who perhaps did not flourish in the limelight. Manager material or better in the backroom? Backroom Martin Jol - Spurs The Dutchman had never plied his managerial trade outside of his native country when he was recruited to be Jacques Santini's assistant manager at Spurs in the summer of 2004. Alas, Santini lasted just 13 games before his tenure ended and Jol was confirmed as his replacement. Martin Jol secured European football for Spurs Credit: action images He was a quick hit as manager, turning around the club's fortunes and narrowly missing out on a Uefa Cup spot in his first season in charge. The club came within a whisker (or a dodgy meal) of making the Champions League the following campaign and Jol guided them to another fifth-place finish the next year. He lost his job early in the following season. Manager material or better in the backroom? Manager Tito Vilanova - Barcelona Vilanova climbed the Barcelona ranks with Pep Guardiola, serving as assistant for Barcelona B and then the main Barcelona team until 2012. When Guardiola announced his departure that April - a year after guiding the club to a Champions League and La Liga double - Vilanova was immediately confirmed as his successor at the helm. It was the first time he had taken a main managerial position since an unsuccessful spell in charge of Spanish lower-league side Palafrugell almost a decade earlier, but he nonetheless led Barcelona to another La Liga title. He underwent surgery for cancer in December of that year, but remained as manager until he was forced to resign for health reasons in July 2013. He died in April 2014. Manager material or better in the backroom? Manager Bob Paisley - Liverpool A Liverpool stalwart throughout his playing career, Paisley returned to the club first as physio and then assistant manager to Bill Shankly. When Shankly retired in 1974, Paisley was promoted to the top job despite some reluctance as a successor - Paisley had once said: "Bill loves it. He likes the razzmatazz. I'm a backroom boy. Always will be." His managerial career at Anfield proved a huge success and he won six league titles and three European Cups during his nine years in charge. Manager material or better in the backroom? Manager

Why Craig Shakespeare proves the folly of promoting an assistant to become manager

Another one bites the dust. To the list of assistant managers who have failed to make the cut in the main managerial hotseat we can now add Craig Shakespeare. Just eight games into the new season, Shakespeare has been shown the door at Leicester City with the club languishing in the Premier League relegation zone. The Leicester job was Shakespeare's first taste of management (aside from a one-game caretaker role more than a decade ago) and he had grown accustomed to life as a number two behind Claudio Ranieri. But when the Italian was controversially sacked in February he first took the role on a caretaker basis before he was appointed permanently this summer. Despite the initial upturn in fortunes that his appointment brought (and the subsequent awarding of a three-year contract), it was difficult to deny the the temporary feel to his stewardship. So it proved. Is it possible for an assistant to be promoted with success? A glance at the history of assistants taking the step up shows something of a common theme. Promoting from within after a manager has been sacked rarely yields positive results unless the the former assistant was sufficiently removed from the previous regime. Conversely - and unsurprisingly - those that have the benefit of following in the footsteps of greatness tend to succeed. Is it the case that their faces are just too familiar to ditch the association with past unsuccessful regimes or are they tactically incapable of breaking clear from a previous era? Here are some examples of when promoting from within worked - and times when it didn't. John Carver - Newcastle United The most caring of caretaker managers, Carver has taken temporary charge of clubs on numerous occasions in his coaching career. Brief stints at Newcastle, Leeds, Sheffield United and then Newcastle again paved the way for him to finally be given a (slightly) longer crack at the big time - without great success. John Carver did not last long at Newcastle Credit: afp Alan Pardew's departure in early 2015 saw Carver first promoted to a caretaker role before he was given the managerial job on a temporary basis until the end of the season. There were no guarantees over whether he would stand a chance of gaining the job permanently, but he was given the task of finishing in the top half of the table. Instead he oversaw a run of eight successive league defeats, only narrowly kept the club in the Premier League and was promptly sacked when Steve McClaren was appointed in June. Manager material or better in the backroom? Backroom Roberto Di Matteo - Chelsea The case of Shakespeare bears an uncanny resemblance to that of Di Matteo at Chelsea in 2012. The Italian had worked under Andre Villas-Boas as assistant manager from June 2011, prior to stepping up to the main role on a caretaker basis when Villas-Boas was sacked in March the following year. Di Matteo guided Chelsea to their first Champions League triumph, an FA Cup final victory and was rewarded with a two-year deal to remain as manager on a permanent basis. Yet, just like Shakespeare, his spell in charge was short-lived and he was ditched by November following a poor start to the 2012/13 season. Manager material or better in the backroom? Backroom (despite his success when caretaker) Ray Harford - Fulham, Luton Town, Wimbledon and Blackburn Rovers Surely no one can challenge Harford for number of promotions from assistant to permanent manager. He made his first step up at Fulham in 1984, where he began his reign by keeping the club in the First Division, but resigned after they were beset by financial problems and relegated the year after. He then climbed the same ladder at Luton Town, where he had great success, guiding them to victory in the League Cup final before a relegation battle saw him sacked in 1990. Ray Harford made the step up to manager on four separate occasions Credit:  Getty Images The third move from assistant to manager came later that year when Bobby Gould was sacked as Wimbledon manager, but he resigned in October 1991 to take up a role as Kenny Dalglish's assistant at Blackburn Rovers. Despite vowing that he would never again step up from No 2 to the manager's chair, he did just that when Dalglish quit in the wake of the club's Premier League title triumph. They finished seventh in Harford's first season in charge and he then quit in October 1996 after the club failed to win any of their first 10 games. Manager material or better in the backroom? On the balance of his four tenures: Manager Sammy Lee - Bolton Wanderers 'Little Sam' has made a decent career out of being an assistant manager, but his time as the man in charge did not go so swimmingly. The former Liverpool midfielder gained his nickname during his time as No 2 to Sam Allardyce at Bolton in 2005. When 'Big Sam' departed the club in April 2007, Lee was asked to step into the manager's role but managed to win just one league game from 11 matches and was sacked in October. He has since returned to the coaching ranks, thriving in his various behind-the-scenes roles. One who perhaps did not flourish in the limelight. Manager material or better in the backroom? Backroom Martin Jol - Spurs The Dutchman had never plied his managerial trade outside of his native country when he was recruited to be Jacques Santini's assistant manager at Spurs in the summer of 2004. Alas, Santini lasted just 13 games before his tenure ended and Jol was confirmed as his replacement. Martin Jol secured European football for Spurs Credit: action images He was a quick hit as manager, turning around the club's fortunes and narrowly missing out on a Uefa Cup spot in his first season in charge. The club came within a whisker (or a dodgy meal) of making the Champions League the following campaign and Jol guided them to another fifth-place finish the next year. He lost his job early in the following season. Manager material or better in the backroom? Manager Tito Vilanova - Barcelona Vilanova climbed the Barcelona ranks with Pep Guardiola, serving as assistant for Barcelona B and then the main Barcelona team until 2012. When Guardiola announced his departure that April - a year after guiding the club to a Champions League and La Liga double - Vilanova was immediately confirmed as his successor at the helm. It was the first time he had taken a main managerial position since an unsuccessful spell in charge of Spanish lower-league side Palafrugell almost a decade earlier, but he nonetheless led Barcelona to another La Liga title. He underwent surgery for cancer in December of that year, but remained as manager until he was forced to resign for health reasons in July 2013. He died in April 2014. Manager material or better in the backroom? Manager Bob Paisley - Liverpool A Liverpool stalwart throughout his playing career, Paisley returned to the club first as physio and then assistant manager to Bill Shankly. When Shankly retired in 1974, Paisley was promoted to the top job despite some reluctance as a successor - Paisley had once said: "Bill loves it. He likes the razzmatazz. I'm a backroom boy. Always will be." His managerial career at Anfield proved a huge success and he won six league titles and three European Cups during his nine years in charge. Manager material or better in the backroom? Manager

Why Craig Shakespeare proves the folly of promoting an assistant to become manager

Another one bites the dust. To the list of assistant managers who have failed to make the cut in the main managerial hotseat we can now add Craig Shakespeare. Just eight games into the new season, Shakespeare has been shown the door at Leicester City with the club languishing in the Premier League relegation zone. The Leicester job was Shakespeare's first taste of management (aside from a one-game caretaker role more than a decade ago) and he had grown accustomed to life as a number two behind Claudio Ranieri. But when the Italian was controversially sacked in February he first took the role on a caretaker basis before he was appointed permanently this summer. Despite the initial upturn in fortunes that his appointment brought (and the subsequent awarding of a three-year contract), it was difficult to deny the the temporary feel to his stewardship. So it proved. Is it possible for an assistant to be promoted with success? A glance at the history of assistants taking the step up shows something of a common theme. Promoting from within after a manager has been sacked rarely yields positive results unless the the former assistant was sufficiently removed from the previous regime. Conversely - and unsurprisingly - those that have the benefit of following in the footsteps of greatness tend to succeed. Is it the case that their faces are just too familiar to ditch the association with past unsuccessful regimes or are they tactically incapable of breaking clear from a previous era? Here are some examples of when promoting from within worked - and times when it didn't. John Carver - Newcastle United The most caring of caretaker managers, Carver has taken temporary charge of clubs on numerous occasions in his coaching career. Brief stints at Newcastle, Leeds, Sheffield United and then Newcastle again paved the way for him to finally be given a (slightly) longer crack at the big time - without great success. John Carver did not last long at Newcastle Credit: afp Alan Pardew's departure in early 2015 saw Carver first promoted to a caretaker role before he was given the managerial job on a temporary basis until the end of the season. There were no guarantees over whether he would stand a chance of gaining the job permanently, but he was given the task of finishing in the top half of the table. Instead he oversaw a run of eight successive league defeats, only narrowly kept the club in the Premier League and was promptly sacked when Steve McClaren was appointed in June. Manager material or better in the backroom? Backroom Roberto Di Matteo - Chelsea The case of Shakespeare bears an uncanny resemblance to that of Di Matteo at Chelsea in 2012. The Italian had worked under Andre Villas-Boas as assistant manager from June 2011, prior to stepping up to the main role on a caretaker basis when Villas-Boas was sacked in March the following year. Di Matteo guided Chelsea to their first Champions League triumph, an FA Cup final victory and was rewarded with a two-year deal to remain as manager on a permanent basis. Yet, just like Shakespeare, his spell in charge was short-lived and he was ditched by November following a poor start to the 2012/13 season. Manager material or better in the backroom? Backroom (despite his success when caretaker) Ray Harford - Fulham, Luton Town, Wimbledon and Blackburn Rovers Surely no one can challenge Harford for number of promotions from assistant to permanent manager. He made his first step up at Fulham in 1984, where he began his reign by keeping the club in the First Division, but resigned after they were beset by financial problems and relegated the year after. He then climbed the same ladder at Luton Town, where he had great success, guiding them to victory in the League Cup final before a relegation battle saw him sacked in 1990. Ray Harford made the step up to manager on four separate occasions Credit:  Getty Images The third move from assistant to manager came later that year when Bobby Gould was sacked as Wimbledon manager, but he resigned in October 1991 to take up a role as Kenny Dalglish's assistant at Blackburn Rovers. Despite vowing that he would never again step up from No 2 to the manager's chair, he did just that when Dalglish quit in the wake of the club's Premier League title triumph. They finished seventh in Harford's first season in charge and he then quit in October 1996 after the club failed to win any of their first 10 games. Manager material or better in the backroom? On the balance of his four tenures: Manager Sammy Lee - Bolton Wanderers 'Little Sam' has made a decent career out of being an assistant manager, but his time as the man in charge did not go so swimmingly. The former Liverpool midfielder gained his nickname during his time as No 2 to Sam Allardyce at Bolton in 2005. When 'Big Sam' departed the club in April 2007, Lee was asked to step into the manager's role but managed to win just one league game from 11 matches and was sacked in October. He has since returned to the coaching ranks, thriving in his various behind-the-scenes roles. One who perhaps did not flourish in the limelight. Manager material or better in the backroom? Backroom Martin Jol - Spurs The Dutchman had never plied his managerial trade outside of his native country when he was recruited to be Jacques Santini's assistant manager at Spurs in the summer of 2004. Alas, Santini lasted just 13 games before his tenure ended and Jol was confirmed as his replacement. Martin Jol secured European football for Spurs Credit: action images He was a quick hit as manager, turning around the club's fortunes and narrowly missing out on a Uefa Cup spot in his first season in charge. The club came within a whisker (or a dodgy meal) of making the Champions League the following campaign and Jol guided them to another fifth-place finish the next year. He lost his job early in the following season. Manager material or better in the backroom? Manager Tito Vilanova - Barcelona Vilanova climbed the Barcelona ranks with Pep Guardiola, serving as assistant for Barcelona B and then the main Barcelona team until 2012. When Guardiola announced his departure that April - a year after guiding the club to a Champions League and La Liga double - Vilanova was immediately confirmed as his successor at the helm. It was the first time he had taken a main managerial position since an unsuccessful spell in charge of Spanish lower-league side Palafrugell almost a decade earlier, but he nonetheless led Barcelona to another La Liga title. He underwent surgery for cancer in December of that year, but remained as manager until he was forced to resign for health reasons in July 2013. He died in April 2014. Manager material or better in the backroom? Manager Bob Paisley - Liverpool A Liverpool stalwart throughout his playing career, Paisley returned to the club first as physio and then assistant manager to Bill Shankly. When Shankly retired in 1974, Paisley was promoted to the top job despite some reluctance as a successor - Paisley had once said: "Bill loves it. He likes the razzmatazz. I'm a backroom boy. Always will be." His managerial career at Anfield proved a huge success and he won six league titles and three European Cups during his nine years in charge. Manager material or better in the backroom? Manager

FA Cup first round draw: Hyde United (eighth tier) host MK Dons

  7:28PM And that's the draw The excitement is over! No more balls will be drawn! Morecambe vs Hartlepool is pretty good, Doncaster will visit either East Thurrock or Ebsfleet. Hyde vs MK Dons is a brilliant tie for the minnows. I was really hoping for a Slough vs Swindon draw, purely for Office quotes.  7:25PM Eighth tier Hyde will play MK Dons! The crowd goes wild in the BBC studio as the draw is announced. That's the big club the players wanted. 7:24PM Lads, can we please have some music Or something. This draw is not one of the most exciting things I've ever seen on television. That Liverpool vs Man Utd game on Saturday was more entertaining. 7:21PM AFC Wimbledon vs Lincoln City AFC Wimbledon are one of the clubs to have benefited immensely from TV money brought by the FA Cup and they are drawn against Lincoln City.  7:19PM Some more fixtures for you Peterborough Utd v Tranmere Cambridge Utd v Sutton Utd Forest Green Rovers v Macclesfield Town AFC Fylde v Kidderminster Harriers Luton v Portsmouth Shrewsbury v Aldershot Hereford v AFC Telford Utd Guiseley v Accrington Stanley Blackburn Rovers v Barnet 7:16PM No huge match ups so far Bradford City v Chesterfield Port Vale v Oxford Utd Newport County v Walsall Morecambe v Hartlepool Utd 7:14PM And it's set of balls number eight And Lancelot is the FA Cup draw machine for tonight. What a hilarious National Lottery joke. And the first fixture is Stevenage vs Nantwich or Kettering. IT'S ALL KICKING OFF NOW, CLIVE. 7:12PM Your Davids, your Goliaths Hyde, Heybridge Swifts and Ossett Town are the lowest ranked teams in the competition, with all three occupying the eighth tier of English football.  7:10PM David Sharpe The Wigan chairman, grandson of Dave Whelan, fancies Wigan's chances this season. And now it's time for the draw!   7:05PM Who do the small teams want to get in the draw? According to a couple of Hyde football staff (manager and player), the management want to play against a team they can probably beat whereas the players want to draw Blackburn or Charlton - one of the 'big' clubs. Hyde actually own the record for biggest defeat in the FA Cup. A 26-0 hiding (see what I did) by Preston North End. 7:00PM The live coverage begins! Here we go. The draw is being held at Hyde United's ground. Look how cool their sun was earlier: Red sun today. FA Cup draw at Hyde United. Is that an omen. #EmiratesFACuppic.twitter.com/LoZ27mZjKW— Hyde United FC (@hydeunited) October 16, 2017   6:47PM The difference the FA Cup actually makes I wrote this in January about just how much an FA Cup run is worth to a small club. It turns out the answer is everything. The FA awards a prize of £1.8million to the winners of the competition, the kind of short-change a Champions League club might use as a sweetener for a promising youth prospect’s signing-on fee. For non-league side Curzon Ashton just qualifying for the second round of the competition will, and has, had an enormous impact.   Image     Landscape Portrait Square Original/Custom   Edit Selected Crop... Caption:   Description: curzon ashton Agency: GETTY IMAGES Artist:       Edit...   Delete     “It means so much to us a club,” says their CEO Natalie Atkinson. “The FA Cup is enabling us, through prize money, funds gained and TV money to work with the FA and football foundations to replace our 3G pitch next to the stadium.” Curzon Ashton, currently 15th in the National League North, lost 4-3 to AFC Wimbledon in December, conceding four goals in the final 10 minutes of the game. The prize for qualifying for the second round was £27,000, in addition to £18,000 earned from the first round. Those sucker-punch goals prevented a windfall of £67,500 for making it to third round. However, thanks to the wonder of television money, the club received more for their defeat to Wimbledon than they would have if they’d won a non-televised second round match. There's more on the article, if you fancy clicking on it. 6:30PM The magic of the cup This most holy of trophies always produces magical moments and even if a guilty few/most don't pay attention to the competition until their team is involved, those matches between minnows of the lower leagues and giants of... in this case, League One, are always thoroughly enjoyable.  Sutton are looking to make a lot more money from another (pie free) run at the cup this year, Accrington Stanley's involvement will be upping the YouTube view count on this milk advert, and today is the first time I have ever heard of Gainsborough Trinity. Perhaps they will become my new favourite non-league - maybe they'll be yours! It all depends who has to play who - and which of those games the people in charge at BBC decide to broadcast... 6:15PM Good evening! Hello there sports fans. Welcome to our live coverage of what is sure to be a riveting FA Cup first round draw. The action will kick-off at 7:10pm and we'll keep you up to date with the draw as it happens. For right now, that wait should give you time to look at all the nice photographs of that weird looking sun from earlier today. It was like being in Blade Runner. 6:09PM Preview What is it? It's the draw for the first round proper of the FA Cup: the oldest competition in world football.  The first round sees the 48 teams from League One and League Two joined by 32 non-league sides. When is it? Monday October 16. What time is it? The draw itself will begin at 7:10pm on Monday evening. The first round of the FA Cup will take place on Saturday November 4  Credit: AP  What TV channel is it on? The draw will be broadcast live on both BBC Two and BT Sport. Mark Chapman will present the BBC's coverage of the draw in half-hour long episode from 7pm, while BT Sport 3's show will also begin at 7pm.  When will the matches take place?  The first round will take place over the weekend of Friday November 3 to Monday 6 November 2017 Who's in the hat? Sutton United made it to the fifth round of the FA Cup last season  Credit: Getty Images  Three teams from the eighth tier of English football are among the non-league teams in the hat for the first round. Hyde United, who play in the Northern Premier League, beat Scarborough Athletic on Sunday afternoon to book their place in the competition.  Hampton and Richmond, who are coached by Sky Sports commentator Martin Tyler, failed in their bid to reach the FA Cup proper after losing to  National League South rivals Truro City. Truro's 2-0 victory over their league rivals means they become the first Cornwal team to reach the FA Cup first round since 1969.  Billericay Town, whose current players include Jamie O'Hara, Paul Konchesky and Jermaine Pennant, will also take their place in the draw.  FA Cup first round numbers 1 ACCRINGTON STANLEY 2 AFC WIMBLEDON 3 BARNET 4 BLACKBURN ROVERS 5 BLACKPOOL 6 BRADFORD CITY 7 BRISTOL ROVERS 8 BURY 9 CAMBRIDGE UNITED 10 CARLISLE UNITED 11 CHARLTON ATHLETIC 12 CHELTENHAM TOWN 13 CHESTERFIELD 14 COLCHESTER UNITED 15 COVENTRY CITY 16 CRAWLEY TOWN 17 CREWE ALEXANDRA 18 DONCASTER ROVERS 19 EXETER CITY 20 FLEETWOOD TOWN 21 FOREST GREEN ROVERS 22 GILLINGHAM 23 GRIMSBY TOWN 24 LINCOLN CITY 25 LUTON TOWN 26 MANSFIELD TOWN 27 MILTON KEYNES DONS 28 MORECAMBE 29 NEWPORT COUNTY 30 NORTHAMPTON TOWN 31 NOTTS COUNTY 32 OLDHAM ATHLETIC 33 OXFORD UNITED 34 PETERBOROUGH UNITED 35 PLYMOUTH ARGYLE 36 PORT VALE 37 PORTSMOUTH 38 ROCHDALE 39 ROTHERHAM UNITED 40 SCUNTHORPE UNITED 41 SHREWSBURY TOWN 42 SOUTHEND UNITED 43 STEVENAGE 44 SWINDON TOWN 45 WALSALL 46 WIGAN ATHLETIC 47 WYCOMBE WANDERERS 48 YEOVIL TOWN 49 TRANMERE ROVERS 50 SOLIHULL MOORS OR OSSETT TOWN 51 HARTLEPOOL UNITED 52 SHAW LANE ASSOCIATION 53 CHORLEY OR BOSTON UNITED 54 AFC TELFORD UNITED 55 GAINSBOROUGH TRINITY 56 NANTWICH TOWN OR KETTERING TOWN 57 GATESHEAD 58 GUISELEY 59 AFC FYLDE 60 KIDDERMINSTER HARRIERS 61 HYDE UNITED 62 MACCLESFIELD TOWN 63 BRACKLEY TOWN OR BILLERICAY TOWN 64 DAGENHAM & REDBRIDGE OR LEYTON ORIENT 65 HEREFORD 66 ALDERSHOT TOWN  67 BATH CITY OR CHELMSFORD CITY 68 OXFORD CITY 69 MAIDENHEAD UNITED 70 HEYBRIDGE SWIFTS 71 WOKING OR CONCORD RANGERS 72 TRURO CITY 73 DOVER ATHLETIC OR BROMLEY 74 SLOUGH TOWN 75 DARTFORD 76 BOREHAM WOOD 77 MAIDSTONE UNITED OR ENFIELD TOWN 78 LEATHERHEAD 79 SUTTON UNITED 80 EAST THURROCK UNITED OR EBBSFLEET UNITED

FA Cup first round draw: Hyde United (eighth tier) host MK Dons

  7:28PM And that's the draw The excitement is over! No more balls will be drawn! Morecambe vs Hartlepool is pretty good, Doncaster will visit either East Thurrock or Ebsfleet. Hyde vs MK Dons is a brilliant tie for the minnows. I was really hoping for a Slough vs Swindon draw, purely for Office quotes.  7:25PM Eighth tier Hyde will play MK Dons! The crowd goes wild in the BBC studio as the draw is announced. That's the big club the players wanted. 7:24PM Lads, can we please have some music Or something. This draw is not one of the most exciting things I've ever seen on television. That Liverpool vs Man Utd game on Saturday was more entertaining. 7:21PM AFC Wimbledon vs Lincoln City AFC Wimbledon are one of the clubs to have benefited immensely from TV money brought by the FA Cup and they are drawn against Lincoln City.  7:19PM Some more fixtures for you Peterborough Utd v Tranmere Cambridge Utd v Sutton Utd Forest Green Rovers v Macclesfield Town AFC Fylde v Kidderminster Harriers Luton v Portsmouth Shrewsbury v Aldershot Hereford v AFC Telford Utd Guiseley v Accrington Stanley Blackburn Rovers v Barnet 7:16PM No huge match ups so far Bradford City v Chesterfield Port Vale v Oxford Utd Newport County v Walsall Morecambe v Hartlepool Utd 7:14PM And it's set of balls number eight And Lancelot is the FA Cup draw machine for tonight. What a hilarious National Lottery joke. And the first fixture is Stevenage vs Nantwich or Kettering. IT'S ALL KICKING OFF NOW, CLIVE. 7:12PM Your Davids, your Goliaths Hyde, Heybridge Swifts and Ossett Town are the lowest ranked teams in the competition, with all three occupying the eighth tier of English football.  7:10PM David Sharpe The Wigan chairman, grandson of Dave Whelan, fancies Wigan's chances this season. And now it's time for the draw!   7:05PM Who do the small teams want to get in the draw? According to a couple of Hyde football staff (manager and player), the management want to play against a team they can probably beat whereas the players want to draw Blackburn or Charlton - one of the 'big' clubs. Hyde actually own the record for biggest defeat in the FA Cup. A 26-0 hiding (see what I did) by Preston North End. 7:00PM The live coverage begins! Here we go. The draw is being held at Hyde United's ground. Look how cool their sun was earlier: Red sun today. FA Cup draw at Hyde United. Is that an omen. #EmiratesFACuppic.twitter.com/LoZ27mZjKW— Hyde United FC (@hydeunited) October 16, 2017   6:47PM The difference the FA Cup actually makes I wrote this in January about just how much an FA Cup run is worth to a small club. It turns out the answer is everything. The FA awards a prize of £1.8million to the winners of the competition, the kind of short-change a Champions League club might use as a sweetener for a promising youth prospect’s signing-on fee. For non-league side Curzon Ashton just qualifying for the second round of the competition will, and has, had an enormous impact.   Image     Landscape Portrait Square Original/Custom   Edit Selected Crop... Caption:   Description: curzon ashton Agency: GETTY IMAGES Artist:       Edit...   Delete     “It means so much to us a club,” says their CEO Natalie Atkinson. “The FA Cup is enabling us, through prize money, funds gained and TV money to work with the FA and football foundations to replace our 3G pitch next to the stadium.” Curzon Ashton, currently 15th in the National League North, lost 4-3 to AFC Wimbledon in December, conceding four goals in the final 10 minutes of the game. The prize for qualifying for the second round was £27,000, in addition to £18,000 earned from the first round. Those sucker-punch goals prevented a windfall of £67,500 for making it to third round. However, thanks to the wonder of television money, the club received more for their defeat to Wimbledon than they would have if they’d won a non-televised second round match. There's more on the article, if you fancy clicking on it. 6:30PM The magic of the cup This most holy of trophies always produces magical moments and even if a guilty few/most don't pay attention to the competition until their team is involved, those matches between minnows of the lower leagues and giants of... in this case, League One, are always thoroughly enjoyable.  Sutton are looking to make a lot more money from another (pie free) run at the cup this year, Accrington Stanley's involvement will be upping the YouTube view count on this milk advert, and today is the first time I have ever heard of Gainsborough Trinity. Perhaps they will become my new favourite non-league - maybe they'll be yours! It all depends who has to play who - and which of those games the people in charge at BBC decide to broadcast... 6:15PM Good evening! Hello there sports fans. Welcome to our live coverage of what is sure to be a riveting FA Cup first round draw. The action will kick-off at 7:10pm and we'll keep you up to date with the draw as it happens. For right now, that wait should give you time to look at all the nice photographs of that weird looking sun from earlier today. It was like being in Blade Runner. 6:09PM Preview What is it? It's the draw for the first round proper of the FA Cup: the oldest competition in world football.  The first round sees the 48 teams from League One and League Two joined by 32 non-league sides. When is it? Monday October 16. What time is it? The draw itself will begin at 7:10pm on Monday evening. The first round of the FA Cup will take place on Saturday November 4  Credit: AP  What TV channel is it on? The draw will be broadcast live on both BBC Two and BT Sport. Mark Chapman will present the BBC's coverage of the draw in half-hour long episode from 7pm, while BT Sport 3's show will also begin at 7pm.  When will the matches take place?  The first round will take place over the weekend of Friday November 3 to Monday 6 November 2017 Who's in the hat? Sutton United made it to the fifth round of the FA Cup last season  Credit: Getty Images  Three teams from the eighth tier of English football are among the non-league teams in the hat for the first round. Hyde United, who play in the Northern Premier League, beat Scarborough Athletic on Sunday afternoon to book their place in the competition.  Hampton and Richmond, who are coached by Sky Sports commentator Martin Tyler, failed in their bid to reach the FA Cup proper after losing to  National League South rivals Truro City. Truro's 2-0 victory over their league rivals means they become the first Cornwal team to reach the FA Cup first round since 1969.  Billericay Town, whose current players include Jamie O'Hara, Paul Konchesky and Jermaine Pennant, will also take their place in the draw.  FA Cup first round numbers 1 ACCRINGTON STANLEY 2 AFC WIMBLEDON 3 BARNET 4 BLACKBURN ROVERS 5 BLACKPOOL 6 BRADFORD CITY 7 BRISTOL ROVERS 8 BURY 9 CAMBRIDGE UNITED 10 CARLISLE UNITED 11 CHARLTON ATHLETIC 12 CHELTENHAM TOWN 13 CHESTERFIELD 14 COLCHESTER UNITED 15 COVENTRY CITY 16 CRAWLEY TOWN 17 CREWE ALEXANDRA 18 DONCASTER ROVERS 19 EXETER CITY 20 FLEETWOOD TOWN 21 FOREST GREEN ROVERS 22 GILLINGHAM 23 GRIMSBY TOWN 24 LINCOLN CITY 25 LUTON TOWN 26 MANSFIELD TOWN 27 MILTON KEYNES DONS 28 MORECAMBE 29 NEWPORT COUNTY 30 NORTHAMPTON TOWN 31 NOTTS COUNTY 32 OLDHAM ATHLETIC 33 OXFORD UNITED 34 PETERBOROUGH UNITED 35 PLYMOUTH ARGYLE 36 PORT VALE 37 PORTSMOUTH 38 ROCHDALE 39 ROTHERHAM UNITED 40 SCUNTHORPE UNITED 41 SHREWSBURY TOWN 42 SOUTHEND UNITED 43 STEVENAGE 44 SWINDON TOWN 45 WALSALL 46 WIGAN ATHLETIC 47 WYCOMBE WANDERERS 48 YEOVIL TOWN 49 TRANMERE ROVERS 50 SOLIHULL MOORS OR OSSETT TOWN 51 HARTLEPOOL UNITED 52 SHAW LANE ASSOCIATION 53 CHORLEY OR BOSTON UNITED 54 AFC TELFORD UNITED 55 GAINSBOROUGH TRINITY 56 NANTWICH TOWN OR KETTERING TOWN 57 GATESHEAD 58 GUISELEY 59 AFC FYLDE 60 KIDDERMINSTER HARRIERS 61 HYDE UNITED 62 MACCLESFIELD TOWN 63 BRACKLEY TOWN OR BILLERICAY TOWN 64 DAGENHAM & REDBRIDGE OR LEYTON ORIENT 65 HEREFORD 66 ALDERSHOT TOWN  67 BATH CITY OR CHELMSFORD CITY 68 OXFORD CITY 69 MAIDENHEAD UNITED 70 HEYBRIDGE SWIFTS 71 WOKING OR CONCORD RANGERS 72 TRURO CITY 73 DOVER ATHLETIC OR BROMLEY 74 SLOUGH TOWN 75 DARTFORD 76 BOREHAM WOOD 77 MAIDSTONE UNITED OR ENFIELD TOWN 78 LEATHERHEAD 79 SUTTON UNITED 80 EAST THURROCK UNITED OR EBBSFLEET UNITED

FA Cup first round draw: Hyde United (eighth tier) host MK Dons

  7:28PM And that's the draw The excitement is over! No more balls will be drawn! Morecambe vs Hartlepool is pretty good, Doncaster will visit either East Thurrock or Ebsfleet. Hyde vs MK Dons is a brilliant tie for the minnows. I was really hoping for a Slough vs Swindon draw, purely for Office quotes.  7:25PM Eighth tier Hyde will play MK Dons! The crowd goes wild in the BBC studio as the draw is announced. That's the big club the players wanted. 7:24PM Lads, can we please have some music Or something. This draw is not one of the most exciting things I've ever seen on television. That Liverpool vs Man Utd game on Saturday was more entertaining. 7:21PM AFC Wimbledon vs Lincoln City AFC Wimbledon are one of the clubs to have benefited immensely from TV money brought by the FA Cup and they are drawn against Lincoln City.  7:19PM Some more fixtures for you Peterborough Utd v Tranmere Cambridge Utd v Sutton Utd Forest Green Rovers v Macclesfield Town AFC Fylde v Kidderminster Harriers Luton v Portsmouth Shrewsbury v Aldershot Hereford v AFC Telford Utd Guiseley v Accrington Stanley Blackburn Rovers v Barnet 7:16PM No huge match ups so far Bradford City v Chesterfield Port Vale v Oxford Utd Newport County v Walsall Morecambe v Hartlepool Utd 7:14PM And it's set of balls number eight And Lancelot is the FA Cup draw machine for tonight. What a hilarious National Lottery joke. And the first fixture is Stevenage vs Nantwich or Kettering. IT'S ALL KICKING OFF NOW, CLIVE. 7:12PM Your Davids, your Goliaths Hyde, Heybridge Swifts and Ossett Town are the lowest ranked teams in the competition, with all three occupying the eighth tier of English football.  7:10PM David Sharpe The Wigan chairman, grandson of Dave Whelan, fancies Wigan's chances this season. And now it's time for the draw!   7:05PM Who do the small teams want to get in the draw? According to a couple of Hyde football staff (manager and player), the management want to play against a team they can probably beat whereas the players want to draw Blackburn or Charlton - one of the 'big' clubs. Hyde actually own the record for biggest defeat in the FA Cup. A 26-0 hiding (see what I did) by Preston North End. 7:00PM The live coverage begins! Here we go. The draw is being held at Hyde United's ground. Look how cool their sun was earlier: Red sun today. FA Cup draw at Hyde United. Is that an omen. #EmiratesFACuppic.twitter.com/LoZ27mZjKW— Hyde United FC (@hydeunited) October 16, 2017   6:47PM The difference the FA Cup actually makes I wrote this in January about just how much an FA Cup run is worth to a small club. It turns out the answer is everything. The FA awards a prize of £1.8million to the winners of the competition, the kind of short-change a Champions League club might use as a sweetener for a promising youth prospect’s signing-on fee. For non-league side Curzon Ashton just qualifying for the second round of the competition will, and has, had an enormous impact.   Image     Landscape Portrait Square Original/Custom   Edit Selected Crop... Caption:   Description: curzon ashton Agency: GETTY IMAGES Artist:       Edit...   Delete     “It means so much to us a club,” says their CEO Natalie Atkinson. “The FA Cup is enabling us, through prize money, funds gained and TV money to work with the FA and football foundations to replace our 3G pitch next to the stadium.” Curzon Ashton, currently 15th in the National League North, lost 4-3 to AFC Wimbledon in December, conceding four goals in the final 10 minutes of the game. The prize for qualifying for the second round was £27,000, in addition to £18,000 earned from the first round. Those sucker-punch goals prevented a windfall of £67,500 for making it to third round. However, thanks to the wonder of television money, the club received more for their defeat to Wimbledon than they would have if they’d won a non-televised second round match. There's more on the article, if you fancy clicking on it. 6:30PM The magic of the cup This most holy of trophies always produces magical moments and even if a guilty few/most don't pay attention to the competition until their team is involved, those matches between minnows of the lower leagues and giants of... in this case, League One, are always thoroughly enjoyable.  Sutton are looking to make a lot more money from another (pie free) run at the cup this year, Accrington Stanley's involvement will be upping the YouTube view count on this milk advert, and today is the first time I have ever heard of Gainsborough Trinity. Perhaps they will become my new favourite non-league - maybe they'll be yours! It all depends who has to play who - and which of those games the people in charge at BBC decide to broadcast... 6:15PM Good evening! Hello there sports fans. Welcome to our live coverage of what is sure to be a riveting FA Cup first round draw. The action will kick-off at 7:10pm and we'll keep you up to date with the draw as it happens. For right now, that wait should give you time to look at all the nice photographs of that weird looking sun from earlier today. It was like being in Blade Runner. 6:09PM Preview What is it? It's the draw for the first round proper of the FA Cup: the oldest competition in world football.  The first round sees the 48 teams from League One and League Two joined by 32 non-league sides. When is it? Monday October 16. What time is it? The draw itself will begin at 7:10pm on Monday evening. The first round of the FA Cup will take place on Saturday November 4  Credit: AP  What TV channel is it on? The draw will be broadcast live on both BBC Two and BT Sport. Mark Chapman will present the BBC's coverage of the draw in half-hour long episode from 7pm, while BT Sport 3's show will also begin at 7pm.  When will the matches take place?  The first round will take place over the weekend of Friday November 3 to Monday 6 November 2017 Who's in the hat? Sutton United made it to the fifth round of the FA Cup last season  Credit: Getty Images  Three teams from the eighth tier of English football are among the non-league teams in the hat for the first round. Hyde United, who play in the Northern Premier League, beat Scarborough Athletic on Sunday afternoon to book their place in the competition.  Hampton and Richmond, who are coached by Sky Sports commentator Martin Tyler, failed in their bid to reach the FA Cup proper after losing to  National League South rivals Truro City. Truro's 2-0 victory over their league rivals means they become the first Cornwal team to reach the FA Cup first round since 1969.  Billericay Town, whose current players include Jamie O'Hara, Paul Konchesky and Jermaine Pennant, will also take their place in the draw.  FA Cup first round numbers 1 ACCRINGTON STANLEY 2 AFC WIMBLEDON 3 BARNET 4 BLACKBURN ROVERS 5 BLACKPOOL 6 BRADFORD CITY 7 BRISTOL ROVERS 8 BURY 9 CAMBRIDGE UNITED 10 CARLISLE UNITED 11 CHARLTON ATHLETIC 12 CHELTENHAM TOWN 13 CHESTERFIELD 14 COLCHESTER UNITED 15 COVENTRY CITY 16 CRAWLEY TOWN 17 CREWE ALEXANDRA 18 DONCASTER ROVERS 19 EXETER CITY 20 FLEETWOOD TOWN 21 FOREST GREEN ROVERS 22 GILLINGHAM 23 GRIMSBY TOWN 24 LINCOLN CITY 25 LUTON TOWN 26 MANSFIELD TOWN 27 MILTON KEYNES DONS 28 MORECAMBE 29 NEWPORT COUNTY 30 NORTHAMPTON TOWN 31 NOTTS COUNTY 32 OLDHAM ATHLETIC 33 OXFORD UNITED 34 PETERBOROUGH UNITED 35 PLYMOUTH ARGYLE 36 PORT VALE 37 PORTSMOUTH 38 ROCHDALE 39 ROTHERHAM UNITED 40 SCUNTHORPE UNITED 41 SHREWSBURY TOWN 42 SOUTHEND UNITED 43 STEVENAGE 44 SWINDON TOWN 45 WALSALL 46 WIGAN ATHLETIC 47 WYCOMBE WANDERERS 48 YEOVIL TOWN 49 TRANMERE ROVERS 50 SOLIHULL MOORS OR OSSETT TOWN 51 HARTLEPOOL UNITED 52 SHAW LANE ASSOCIATION 53 CHORLEY OR BOSTON UNITED 54 AFC TELFORD UNITED 55 GAINSBOROUGH TRINITY 56 NANTWICH TOWN OR KETTERING TOWN 57 GATESHEAD 58 GUISELEY 59 AFC FYLDE 60 KIDDERMINSTER HARRIERS 61 HYDE UNITED 62 MACCLESFIELD TOWN 63 BRACKLEY TOWN OR BILLERICAY TOWN 64 DAGENHAM & REDBRIDGE OR LEYTON ORIENT 65 HEREFORD 66 ALDERSHOT TOWN  67 BATH CITY OR CHELMSFORD CITY 68 OXFORD CITY 69 MAIDENHEAD UNITED 70 HEYBRIDGE SWIFTS 71 WOKING OR CONCORD RANGERS 72 TRURO CITY 73 DOVER ATHLETIC OR BROMLEY 74 SLOUGH TOWN 75 DARTFORD 76 BOREHAM WOOD 77 MAIDSTONE UNITED OR ENFIELD TOWN 78 LEATHERHEAD 79 SUTTON UNITED 80 EAST THURROCK UNITED OR EBBSFLEET UNITED

Blackburn Rovers v Nottingham Forest - Sky Bet Football League Championship

Football Soccer- Blackburn Rovers v Nottingham Forest - Sky Bet Football League Championship - Ewood Park - 14/12/15 Former Blackburn Rovers player Alan Shearer introduced to the crowd ahead of the game Mandatory Credit: Action Images / Craig Brough Livepic

Security bolstered at Christmas markets amid fears of Berlin-style terror attack

Christmas markets will be protected by "rings of steel" this year as security is bolstered at events across Britain to prevent  Berlin-style copycat terror attacks. The Telegraph understands the Local Government Association has warned councils to be vigilant and has encouraged them to follow government guidance in protecting areas susceptible to mass casualty atrocities. This includes installing obstructions such as concrete bollards in pedestrianised areas to prevent heavy vehicles driving into crowds of people - similar to the attack carried out in Germany’s capital last year, where 12 people died and a further 56 were injured. Similar barriers were put in place on three of London’s bridges in the aftermath of June’s terror attack at London Bridge and Borough Market, where a van also left the road and drove into pedestrians. In both instances, attackers were motivated by Islamic extremism and the revelation that councils in the UK are taking action raises fears that further terror attacks might be attempted. Work to bolster barrier security is due to begin in some cities, including in Southampton, Hampshire, where a city council spokesman confirmed concrete bollards are to be installed ahead of the Christmas market opening on November 11. Barriers put up on bridges in London following this summer's terror attacks may soon be seen on the perimeter of Christmas markets Credit: Paul Grover for the Telegraph  Meanwhile, organisers of other markets are putting their staff through anti-terror training with police as part of Project Griffin - a counter terrorism initiative where business personnel attend briefings organised by the National Counter Terrorism Security Office. Police forces have also suggested armed officers could be stationed around the perimeter of markets during festivities, depending on the terror threat level. Security may also carry out random bag searches. In London, the Metropolitan Police Service - the country’s largest police force - warned the public may notice additional safety measures around Christmas markets, such as Hyde Park’s Winter Wonderland. A force spokesman said: “The public may see additional protective security measures and barriers at events this year, in response to a number of vehicle-based terrorist attacks we have sadly seen both here in the UK and abroad. “There could also be increased security checks at some events and venues so we advise the public to arrive in plenty of time to allow for this.” Other forces around the UK confirmed they were working with local authorities and market organisers to assess the security of the events. In Berlin a speeding lorry drove into crowds at the city's Christmas market last year, killing 12 Credit: TOBIAS SCHWARZ/AFP MI5 says the current terror threat level in the UK is severe, meaning an attack is highly likely. Earlier this month, the Department for Transport issued guidance to local authorities about “mitigating security vulnerabilities” around major public transport hubs, including “hostile vehicle mitigation” to deter attackers using “vehicles as a weapon”. Such tactics include putting up appropriately spaced concrete bollards to protect pedestrians from vehicles, and now the same is set to be seen around the traditional festive German markets in UK cities after the Local Government Association urged councils to take note. Cllr Simon Blackburn, Chair of the LGA’s Safer and Stronger Communities Board, said: “Councils take their responsibilities to protect their residents incredibly seriously, and this includes making sure that transport hubs are safe and that any security risks are mitigated.” Despite the increase in security, councils are still urging visitors that their markets are safe, and that an armed police presence did not necessarily mean an attack was imminent. In Manchester, which was at the centre of a terrorist attack in May, city councillor Pat Karney said: “Public safety is absolutely paramount at any event, and it is important for us that we can reassure people visiting our Christmas Markets that they know that we have done everything we can to make their visit is enjoyable and safe.”

Security bolstered at Christmas markets amid fears of Berlin-style terror attack

Christmas markets will be protected by "rings of steel" this year as security is bolstered at events across Britain to prevent  Berlin-style copycat terror attacks. The Telegraph understands the Local Government Association has warned councils to be vigilant and has encouraged them to follow government guidance in protecting areas susceptible to mass casualty atrocities. This includes installing obstructions such as concrete bollards in pedestrianised areas to prevent heavy vehicles driving into crowds of people - similar to the attack carried out in Germany’s capital last year, where 12 people died and a further 56 were injured. Similar barriers were put in place on three of London’s bridges in the aftermath of June’s terror attack at London Bridge and Borough Market, where a van also left the road and drove into pedestrians. In both instances, attackers were motivated by Islamic extremism and the revelation that councils in the UK are taking action raises fears that further terror attacks might be attempted. Work to bolster barrier security is due to begin in some cities, including in Southampton, Hampshire, where a city council spokesman confirmed concrete bollards are to be installed ahead of the Christmas market opening on November 11. Barriers put up on bridges in London following this summer's terror attacks may soon be seen on the perimeter of Christmas markets Credit: Paul Grover for the Telegraph  Meanwhile, organisers of other markets are putting their staff through anti-terror training with police as part of Project Griffin - a counter terrorism initiative where business personnel attend briefings organised by the National Counter Terrorism Security Office. Police forces have also suggested armed officers could be stationed around the perimeter of markets during festivities, depending on the terror threat level. Security may also carry out random bag searches. In London, the Metropolitan Police Service - the country’s largest police force - warned the public may notice additional safety measures around Christmas markets, such as Hyde Park’s Winter Wonderland. A force spokesman said: “The public may see additional protective security measures and barriers at events this year, in response to a number of vehicle-based terrorist attacks we have sadly seen both here in the UK and abroad. “There could also be increased security checks at some events and venues so we advise the public to arrive in plenty of time to allow for this.” Other forces around the UK confirmed they were working with local authorities and market organisers to assess the security of the events. In Berlin a speeding lorry drove into crowds at the city's Christmas market last year, killing 12 Credit: TOBIAS SCHWARZ/AFP MI5 says the current terror threat level in the UK is severe, meaning an attack is highly likely. Earlier this month, the Department for Transport issued guidance to local authorities about “mitigating security vulnerabilities” around major public transport hubs, including “hostile vehicle mitigation” to deter attackers using “vehicles as a weapon”. Such tactics include putting up appropriately spaced concrete bollards to protect pedestrians from vehicles, and now the same is set to be seen around the traditional festive German markets in UK cities after the Local Government Association urged councils to take note. Cllr Simon Blackburn, Chair of the LGA’s Safer and Stronger Communities Board, said: “Councils take their responsibilities to protect their residents incredibly seriously, and this includes making sure that transport hubs are safe and that any security risks are mitigated.” Despite the increase in security, councils are still urging visitors that their markets are safe, and that an armed police presence did not necessarily mean an attack was imminent. In Manchester, which was at the centre of a terrorist attack in May, city councillor Pat Karney said: “Public safety is absolutely paramount at any event, and it is important for us that we can reassure people visiting our Christmas Markets that they know that we have done everything we can to make their visit is enjoyable and safe.”

Security bolstered at Christmas markets amid fears of Berlin-style terror attack

Christmas markets will be protected by "rings of steel" this year as security is bolstered at events across Britain to prevent  Berlin-style copycat terror attacks. The Telegraph understands the Local Government Association has warned councils to be vigilant and has encouraged them to follow government guidance in protecting areas susceptible to mass casualty atrocities. This includes installing obstructions such as concrete bollards in pedestrianised areas to prevent heavy vehicles driving into crowds of people - similar to the attack carried out in Germany’s capital last year, where 12 people died and a further 56 were injured. Similar barriers were put in place on three of London’s bridges in the aftermath of June’s terror attack at London Bridge and Borough Market, where a van also left the road and drove into pedestrians. In both instances, attackers were motivated by Islamic extremism and the revelation that councils in the UK are taking action raises fears that further terror attacks might be attempted. Work to bolster barrier security is due to begin in some cities, including in Southampton, Hampshire, where a city council spokesman confirmed concrete bollards are to be installed ahead of the Christmas market opening on November 11. Barriers put up on bridges in London following this summer's terror attacks may soon be seen on the perimeter of Christmas markets Credit: Paul Grover for the Telegraph  Meanwhile, organisers of other markets are putting their staff through anti-terror training with police as part of Project Griffin - a counter terrorism initiative where business personnel attend briefings organised by the National Counter Terrorism Security Office. Police forces have also suggested armed officers could be stationed around the perimeter of markets during festivities, depending on the terror threat level. Security may also carry out random bag searches. In London, the Metropolitan Police Service - the country’s largest police force - warned the public may notice additional safety measures around Christmas markets, such as Hyde Park’s Winter Wonderland. A force spokesman said: “The public may see additional protective security measures and barriers at events this year, in response to a number of vehicle-based terrorist attacks we have sadly seen both here in the UK and abroad. “There could also be increased security checks at some events and venues so we advise the public to arrive in plenty of time to allow for this.” Other forces around the UK confirmed they were working with local authorities and market organisers to assess the security of the events. In Berlin a speeding lorry drove into crowds at the city's Christmas market last year, killing 12 Credit: TOBIAS SCHWARZ/AFP MI5 says the current terror threat level in the UK is severe, meaning an attack is highly likely. Earlier this month, the Department for Transport issued guidance to local authorities about “mitigating security vulnerabilities” around major public transport hubs, including “hostile vehicle mitigation” to deter attackers using “vehicles as a weapon”. Such tactics include putting up appropriately spaced concrete bollards to protect pedestrians from vehicles, and now the same is set to be seen around the traditional festive German markets in UK cities after the Local Government Association urged councils to take note. Cllr Simon Blackburn, Chair of the LGA’s Safer and Stronger Communities Board, said: “Councils take their responsibilities to protect their residents incredibly seriously, and this includes making sure that transport hubs are safe and that any security risks are mitigated.” Despite the increase in security, councils are still urging visitors that their markets are safe, and that an armed police presence did not necessarily mean an attack was imminent. In Manchester, which was at the centre of a terrorist attack in May, city councillor Pat Karney said: “Public safety is absolutely paramount at any event, and it is important for us that we can reassure people visiting our Christmas Markets that they know that we have done everything we can to make their visit is enjoyable and safe.”

Ince: Mane a 'bigger loss than Coutinho would be' for Liverpool

The former Blackburn and MK Dons gaffer believes that the 25-year-old’s injury is a huge blow for the Reds as he's set for the sidelines for six week

Ince: Mane a 'bigger loss than Coutinho would be' for Liverpool

The former Blackburn and MK Dons gaffer believes that the 25-year-old’s injury is a huge blow for the Reds as he's set for the sidelines for six week

Kenny Dalglish humbled by Sir Alex Ferguson attending Anfield stand renaming ceremony

At the peak of their powers they were feuding foes symbolising the bitter rivalry between Liverpool and Manchester United. On Friday, Kenny Dalglish and Sir Alex Ferguson will stand side-by-side in tribute to the Kop legend. Anfield’s Centenary Stand will become the Kenny Dalglish Stand, and ahead of this weekend’s meeting between Liverpool and United Ferguson will accompany Sir Bobby Charlton as a VIP guests at Friday’s renaming ceremony. Beneath their sporting enmity, Dalglish says there has always been respect between the two Titans of the game. “His actions speak louder than 1000 words with him and Sir Bobby coming over,” said Dalglish of his former nemesis. “They did exactly the same after Hillsborough. They were over here early. There is rivalry on and off the pitch but when it comes to something like that there is not even a doubt about it – they will be over here supporting us and hopefully we would do the same for them. Anfield will honour Kenny Dalglish on Friday “Away from working, there has never been a problem with him. Never, ever been a problem. “We defended our football clubs and our fans as best we could. How can you criticise someone who is totally supportive of his club? That is what you want as a supporter - someone who is defensive of your club and wants to make a contribution. He made a massive contribution to Manchester United. “If someone came to manage Liverpool and never stood their corner, I don’t think the punters would be happy with that. He was exactly the same for Manchester United.  “He represents his club fantastically well and I have tried my best to represent the club I was at. I don’t see anything wrong with that. “After the end of the game, there was never any animosity or dissent from either of us. There would always be a drink. “When I came back (for second spell as manager) and we had that first game at Old Trafford he shouted to me when I was walking on to the pitch ‘are you coming in for a drink after?’ “I said to him: ‘What do you mean? I’ve always been in for a drink!’ Dalglish is a Liverpool legend  “He said: ‘Aye, I know. But it’s changed a wee bit now.’ “I said: ‘Not for me it hasn’t.’ “You never spoke about football. You never spoke about what happened out there. If you did, you end up arguing, don’t you?”  Any painful memories from scrapes on the touchline have evidently soothed with age. Dalglish ruled English football when Ferguson arrived at Old Trafford in 1986, and Ferguson’s fabled quip about ‘knocking Liverpool off their perch’ was long after Dalglish’s first spell at Anfield, although the duo enjoyed more title rivalry when Dalglish moved to Blackburn. “If he wanted to get to the top he had to target Liverpool and Everton, because when he came down here in the 80s Liverpool and Everton were winning at least one thing every year,” says Dalglish. “So if you want to get to the top then somebody has to be knocked aside. 20 best players in the Premier League: August 2017 “I don't think anybody will go back to that time of having such success like we did in the 80s. I don't think any club will ever be that dominant. There are so many of them now that have access to finance that can help them out. If you buy well enough and spend well enough then you can compete. You don't have to do it in one transfer window, it may take four or five, but no matter. It took Fergie a long time to do it at Man United so I don't see what the impatience is about at other places.”   Alongside the former rivals, Liverpool glitterati will be attending the unveiling of the new stand. Dalglish says he was initially concerned when summoned to a meeting with the club’s owners to be informed of their plans. “I thought I was getting the sack again, but it was a happy story this time,” he joked. “I don’t know if I will sit in it. I’ve not even got a car park space. “Obviously for everybody, for all the family, it is an immensely proud that your name is on the stand. We only came here for football and to end up at that level is beyond everybody’s expectations and possibilities. For me to manage and play for the club was a great enough achievement and to get your name up on the stand it just goes beyond the realms of expectations for me.”   

Kenny Dalglish humbled by Sir Alex Ferguson attending Anfield stand renaming ceremony

At the peak of their powers they were feuding foes symbolising the bitter rivalry between Liverpool and Manchester United. On Friday, Kenny Dalglish and Sir Alex Ferguson will stand side-by-side in tribute to the Kop legend. Anfield’s Centenary Stand will become the Kenny Dalglish Stand, and ahead of this weekend’s meeting between Liverpool and United Ferguson will accompany Sir Bobby Charlton as a VIP guests at Friday’s renaming ceremony. Beneath their sporting enmity, Dalglish says there has always been respect between the two Titans of the game. “His actions speak louder than 1000 words with him and Sir Bobby coming over,” said Dalglish of his former nemesis. “They did exactly the same after Hillsborough. They were over here early. There is rivalry on and off the pitch but when it comes to something like that there is not even a doubt about it – they will be over here supporting us and hopefully we would do the same for them. Anfield will honour Kenny Dalglish on Friday “Away from working, there has never been a problem with him. Never, ever been a problem. “We defended our football clubs and our fans as best we could. How can you criticise someone who is totally supportive of his club? That is what you want as a supporter - someone who is defensive of your club and wants to make a contribution. He made a massive contribution to Manchester United. “If someone came to manage Liverpool and never stood their corner, I don’t think the punters would be happy with that. He was exactly the same for Manchester United.  “He represents his club fantastically well and I have tried my best to represent the club I was at. I don’t see anything wrong with that. “After the end of the game, there was never any animosity or dissent from either of us. There would always be a drink. “When I came back (for second spell as manager) and we had that first game at Old Trafford he shouted to me when I was walking on to the pitch ‘are you coming in for a drink after?’ “I said to him: ‘What do you mean? I’ve always been in for a drink!’ Dalglish is a Liverpool legend  “He said: ‘Aye, I know. But it’s changed a wee bit now.’ “I said: ‘Not for me it hasn’t.’ “You never spoke about football. You never spoke about what happened out there. If you did, you end up arguing, don’t you?”  Any painful memories from scrapes on the touchline have evidently soothed with age. Dalglish ruled English football when Ferguson arrived at Old Trafford in 1986, and Ferguson’s fabled quip about ‘knocking Liverpool off their perch’ was long after Dalglish’s first spell at Anfield, although the duo enjoyed more title rivalry when Dalglish moved to Blackburn. “If he wanted to get to the top he had to target Liverpool and Everton, because when he came down here in the 80s Liverpool and Everton were winning at least one thing every year,” says Dalglish. “So if you want to get to the top then somebody has to be knocked aside. 20 best players in the Premier League: August 2017 “I don't think anybody will go back to that time of having such success like we did in the 80s. I don't think any club will ever be that dominant. There are so many of them now that have access to finance that can help them out. If you buy well enough and spend well enough then you can compete. You don't have to do it in one transfer window, it may take four or five, but no matter. It took Fergie a long time to do it at Man United so I don't see what the impatience is about at other places.”   Alongside the former rivals, Liverpool glitterati will be attending the unveiling of the new stand. Dalglish says he was initially concerned when summoned to a meeting with the club’s owners to be informed of their plans. “I thought I was getting the sack again, but it was a happy story this time,” he joked. “I don’t know if I will sit in it. I’ve not even got a car park space. “Obviously for everybody, for all the family, it is an immensely proud that your name is on the stand. We only came here for football and to end up at that level is beyond everybody’s expectations and possibilities. For me to manage and play for the club was a great enough achievement and to get your name up on the stand it just goes beyond the realms of expectations for me.”   

Kenny Dalglish humbled by Sir Alex Ferguson attending Anfield stand renaming ceremony

At the peak of their powers they were feuding foes symbolising the bitter rivalry between Liverpool and Manchester United. On Friday, Kenny Dalglish and Sir Alex Ferguson will stand side-by-side in tribute to the Kop legend. Anfield’s Centenary Stand will become the Kenny Dalglish Stand, and ahead of this weekend’s meeting between Liverpool and United Ferguson will accompany Sir Bobby Charlton as a VIP guests at Friday’s renaming ceremony. Beneath their sporting enmity, Dalglish says there has always been respect between the two Titans of the game. “His actions speak louder than 1000 words with him and Sir Bobby coming over,” said Dalglish of his former nemesis. “They did exactly the same after Hillsborough. They were over here early. There is rivalry on and off the pitch but when it comes to something like that there is not even a doubt about it – they will be over here supporting us and hopefully we would do the same for them. Anfield will honour Kenny Dalglish on Friday “Away from working, there has never been a problem with him. Never, ever been a problem. “We defended our football clubs and our fans as best we could. How can you criticise someone who is totally supportive of his club? That is what you want as a supporter - someone who is defensive of your club and wants to make a contribution. He made a massive contribution to Manchester United. “If someone came to manage Liverpool and never stood their corner, I don’t think the punters would be happy with that. He was exactly the same for Manchester United.  “He represents his club fantastically well and I have tried my best to represent the club I was at. I don’t see anything wrong with that. “After the end of the game, there was never any animosity or dissent from either of us. There would always be a drink. “When I came back (for second spell as manager) and we had that first game at Old Trafford he shouted to me when I was walking on to the pitch ‘are you coming in for a drink after?’ “I said to him: ‘What do you mean? I’ve always been in for a drink!’ Dalglish is a Liverpool legend  “He said: ‘Aye, I know. But it’s changed a wee bit now.’ “I said: ‘Not for me it hasn’t.’ “You never spoke about football. You never spoke about what happened out there. If you did, you end up arguing, don’t you?”  Any painful memories from scrapes on the touchline have evidently soothed with age. Dalglish ruled English football when Ferguson arrived at Old Trafford in 1986, and Ferguson’s fabled quip about ‘knocking Liverpool off their perch’ was long after Dalglish’s first spell at Anfield, although the duo enjoyed more title rivalry when Dalglish moved to Blackburn. “If he wanted to get to the top he had to target Liverpool and Everton, because when he came down here in the 80s Liverpool and Everton were winning at least one thing every year,” says Dalglish. “So if you want to get to the top then somebody has to be knocked aside. 20 best players in the Premier League: August 2017 “I don't think anybody will go back to that time of having such success like we did in the 80s. I don't think any club will ever be that dominant. There are so many of them now that have access to finance that can help them out. If you buy well enough and spend well enough then you can compete. You don't have to do it in one transfer window, it may take four or five, but no matter. It took Fergie a long time to do it at Man United so I don't see what the impatience is about at other places.”   Alongside the former rivals, Liverpool glitterati will be attending the unveiling of the new stand. Dalglish says he was initially concerned when summoned to a meeting with the club’s owners to be informed of their plans. “I thought I was getting the sack again, but it was a happy story this time,” he joked. “I don’t know if I will sit in it. I’ve not even got a car park space. “Obviously for everybody, for all the family, it is an immensely proud that your name is on the stand. We only came here for football and to end up at that level is beyond everybody’s expectations and possibilities. For me to manage and play for the club was a great enough achievement and to get your name up on the stand it just goes beyond the realms of expectations for me.”   

Romelu Lukaku has Man Utd record in sight - but needs four against Liverpool to trump a mighty No 1

Romelu Lukaku could become the first Manchester United player to score eight goals in his first eight Premier League matches at Anfield on Saturday. Despite doubts over an ankle injury, the £75m summer signing played the last half an hour of Belgium's dead rubber against Cyprus in a World Cup qualifier in midweek, even though Roberto Martinez's side had already booked their spot in Russia.  Lukaku was even on the scoresheet in the 4-0 win, taking his tally to 16 goals in 13 appearances in all competitions.  Now the 24-year-old is on the brink of moving clear of Andrew Cole's seven-goal run as United travel to Liverpool in the early kick-off on Saturday. A single strike against Liverpool would see Lukaku join a small band of legendary strikers in scoring eight goals in their first eight league games. 7 - No player has scored more goals in their first 7 @premierleague apps for @ManUtd than Romelu Lukaku (7, level with Andrew Cole). Heaven. pic.twitter.com/fcsfhDfbdw— OptaJoe (@OptaJoe) September 30, 2017 A brace versus Jurgen Klopp's men would draw him alongside seven past and present forwards. And if Lukaku becomes the first United player to score a hat-trick against the Reds since Dimitar Berbatov in 2010, he would move level on 10 goals with a blast from the past. But can you guess who (before scrolling below).  We take a look at the hotshots Lukaku is primed to emulate after eight league matches and look what happened next after their goalscoring exploits. The eight goals in eight games group... Alan Shearer, Blackburn 1992/93 Turning down the lure of Man Utd, the former England captain struck twice on his debut at Crystal Palace. The now MOTD pundit's spree didn't stop at eight goals in eight games. Further efforts at Wimbledon, against Oldham and a double in Blackburn's 7-1 thrashing of Norwich at Ewood Park saw Shearer eventually end his purple patch with 12 goals in 11 games. His first season was cruelly ended by a cruciate ligament injury suffered in December. Kevin Phillips, Sunderland, 1999/2000 The 5ft 7in forward had already acclimatised to his north east surroundings by the time he got his boots firing in the Premier League. Phillips spent two seasons in the Championship banging in the goals that lifted the Black Cats into the top flight and his exploits didn't stop there.  A hat-trick at Derby on September 18, 1999 took Phillips to the eight-in-eight mark. Despite a relatively lean spell by his standards towards the end of the season where he scored just one in four games, he ended the season with 30 goals and the Golden Boot.  Kevin Phillips won the Golden Boot in 1999/2000 Credit: Getty Images Jermain Defoe, Portsmouth, Feb 2008 to March 2008 The 35-year-old ended a six-match barren run by swapping Tottenham for the south coast in the transfer window nine years ago. However, after his goal splurge he failed to score in his next five top-flight matches which also resulted in Pompey collecting just one point. In fairness, Portsmouth had bigger fish to fry with their run and capture of the FA Cup, a competition Defoe was unfortunately ineligible for. Jermain Defoe ended a six-match barren spell when he joined Pompey Credit: Getty Images Francesco Baiano, Derby, 1997/98 The Italian needed two games to adjust to the hustle and bustle of the English game before getting up and running with a strike at Aston Villa. The now 49-year-old, who was voted one of the club's best ever imports, ended the season with 12 league goals but his purple patch was about as good as it got for the diminutive forward. Baiano ended up scoring 16 goals in 64 appearances in the East Midlands. Francesco Baiano was a fans' favourite at Derby Credit: PA The nine goals in eight games party... Mark Viduka, Leeds, 2000/2001 'Big Dukes' established a formidable partnership with Alan Smith but he will always be remembered for scoring all four goals in the thrilling 4-3 win over Liverpool in November 2000. The Australian added another eight goals to his league campaign in his debut season in the English top flight. Les Ferdinand, Newcastle, 1995/96 Part of Kevin Keegan's 'Entertainers', Ferdinand scored three goals in his first two games for Newcastle following a £6m move from QPR. Ferdinand's exploits didn't stop at nine goals in eight. A hat-trick in a 6-1 win over Wimbledon took him to 12 in nine before Spurs, the club he would later join two seasons later, stopped him in his tracks. After just one goal in six games at the end of the season, Ferdinand's effort in a 1-1 draw against Tottenham on the final day took his overall tally to 25. Dion Dublin, Aston Villa, 1998/99 The now Homes Under the Hammer presenter scored five goals in his first two games for Villa including a hat-trick against Southampton following an autumn switch from Coventry. After two against Arsenal in his first eight games in Claret and Blue, Dublin went on an eight-goal drought that ironically came to a halt against his former club. It was only a consolation as the Sky Blues had the last laugh in a 4-1 win. Dublin only scored once more between February and the end of the season, taking his tally for Villa to 11.  Diego Costa, Chelsea, 2014/15 It hasn't been all tantrums and tempestuous behaviour from Costa at the Bridge. The Brazilian-born forward enjoyed a lengthy honeymoon which included a hat-trick against Swansea which saw him score seven goals in four games. Costa only scored more than one goal in a game on one other occasion that season - against Swansea no less - and the rest of his time in west London has been well documented. Costa highs, lows Papiss Cisse, Newcastle,  Feb to April 2012 The Senegalese made little impact when Newcastle slipped out of the top flight two seasons ago. It was in stark contrast to his explosive arrival where a triple of doubles kept Alan Pardew's side in the chase for a Champions League spot. Cisse scored 13 goals in 14 appearances as Newcastle finished fifth. The summer break didn't do Cisse any favours, though. He needed seven league games to get off the mark and only scored three more goals in the top flight that calendar year. Kevin Campbell, Everton, 1999 Evertonians weren't that enamoured with Campbell's arrival on loan from Trabsonspor in April 1999. But Campbell defied those critics who suggested his career was petering out with nine goals in eight appearances to safeguard Everton's top-flight status. Sergio Aguero, Manchester City, 2011/12 The Argentine declared upon signing with City that he'd be fine in the north west as he didn't like hot weather. Five goals later in his first two home games and Aguero was already at home at the Etihad. Aguero's goalscoring sequence ended in City's pummelling against rivals United with the popular forward scoring the third in their still incredible 6-1 win at Old Trafford. The 10 goals in eight games one-man band And so we come to the sole player who has amassed the most goals in their opening eight Premier League matches with their respective new club. Take a bow, Micky Quinn. Quinn, in fact, reached double figures after just six games and then drew blanks against Man Utd and Nottingham as Coventry's early season good form suffered a minor blip. Micky Quinn struck 10 goals after six games for Coventry Quinn had to wait until the final two games of the season to score in successive games to finish his debut top-flight season with 17 goals in 26 appearances.   So just the four required against Liverpool to break the Mighty Quinn's record. It's over to you Romelu...  

Romelu Lukaku has Man Utd record in sight - but needs four against Liverpool to trump a mighty No 1

Romelu Lukaku could become the first Manchester United player to score eight goals in his first eight Premier League matches at Anfield on Saturday. Despite doubts over an ankle injury, the £75m summer signing played the last half an hour of Belgium's dead rubber against Cyprus in a World Cup qualifier in midweek, even though Roberto Martinez's side had already booked their spot in Russia.  Lukaku was even on the scoresheet in the 4-0 win, taking his tally to 16 goals in 13 appearances in all competitions.  Now the 24-year-old is on the brink of moving clear of Andrew Cole's seven-goal run as United travel to Liverpool in the early kick-off on Saturday. A single strike against Liverpool would see Lukaku join a small band of legendary strikers in scoring eight goals in their first eight league games. 7 - No player has scored more goals in their first 7 @premierleague apps for @ManUtd than Romelu Lukaku (7, level with Andrew Cole). Heaven. pic.twitter.com/fcsfhDfbdw— OptaJoe (@OptaJoe) September 30, 2017 A brace versus Jurgen Klopp's men would draw him alongside seven past and present forwards. And if Lukaku becomes the first United player to score a hat-trick against the Reds since Dimitar Berbatov in 2010, he would move level on 10 goals with a blast from the past. But can you guess who (before scrolling below).  We take a look at the hotshots Lukaku is primed to emulate after eight league matches and look what happened next after their goalscoring exploits. The eight goals in eight games group... Alan Shearer, Blackburn 1992/93 Turning down the lure of Man Utd, the former England captain struck twice on his debut at Crystal Palace. The now MOTD pundit's spree didn't stop at eight goals in eight games. Further efforts at Wimbledon, against Oldham and a double in Blackburn's 7-1 thrashing of Norwich at Ewood Park saw Shearer eventually end his purple patch with 12 goals in 11 games. His first season was cruelly ended by a cruciate ligament injury suffered in December. Kevin Phillips, Sunderland, 1999/2000 The 5ft 7in forward had already acclimatised to his north east surroundings by the time he got his boots firing in the Premier League. Phillips spent two seasons in the Championship banging in the goals that lifted the Black Cats into the top flight and his exploits didn't stop there.  A hat-trick at Derby on September 18, 1999 took Phillips to the eight-in-eight mark. Despite a relatively lean spell by his standards towards the end of the season where he scored just one in four games, he ended the season with 30 goals and the Golden Boot.  Kevin Phillips won the Golden Boot in 1999/2000 Credit: Getty Images Jermain Defoe, Portsmouth, Feb 2008 to March 2008 The 35-year-old ended a six-match barren run by swapping Tottenham for the south coast in the transfer window nine years ago. However, after his goal splurge he failed to score in his next five top-flight matches which also resulted in Pompey collecting just one point. In fairness, Portsmouth had bigger fish to fry with their run and capture of the FA Cup, a competition Defoe was unfortunately ineligible for. Jermain Defoe ended a six-match barren spell when he joined Pompey Credit: Getty Images Francesco Baiano, Derby, 1997/98 The Italian needed two games to adjust to the hustle and bustle of the English game before getting up and running with a strike at Aston Villa. The now 49-year-old, who was voted one of the club's best ever imports, ended the season with 12 league goals but his purple patch was about as good as it got for the diminutive forward. Baiano ended up scoring 16 goals in 64 appearances in the East Midlands. Francesco Baiano was a fans' favourite at Derby Credit: PA The nine goals in eight games party... Mark Viduka, Leeds, 2000/2001 'Big Dukes' established a formidable partnership with Alan Smith but he will always be remembered for scoring all four goals in the thrilling 4-3 win over Liverpool in November 2000. The Australian added another eight goals to his league campaign in his debut season in the English top flight. Les Ferdinand, Newcastle, 1995/96 Part of Kevin Keegan's 'Entertainers', Ferdinand scored three goals in his first two games for Newcastle following a £6m move from QPR. Ferdinand's exploits didn't stop at nine goals in eight. A hat-trick in a 6-1 win over Wimbledon took him to 12 in nine before Spurs, the club he would later join two seasons later, stopped him in his tracks. After just one goal in six games at the end of the season, Ferdinand's effort in a 1-1 draw against Tottenham on the final day took his overall tally to 25. Dion Dublin, Aston Villa, 1998/99 The now Homes Under the Hammer presenter scored five goals in his first two games for Villa including a hat-trick against Southampton following an autumn switch from Coventry. After two against Arsenal in his first eight games in Claret and Blue, Dublin went on an eight-goal drought that ironically came to a halt against his former club. It was only a consolation as the Sky Blues had the last laugh in a 4-1 win. Dublin only scored once more between February and the end of the season, taking his tally for Villa to 11.  Diego Costa, Chelsea, 2014/15 It hasn't been all tantrums and tempestuous behaviour from Costa at the Bridge. The Brazilian-born forward enjoyed a lengthy honeymoon which included a hat-trick against Swansea which saw him score seven goals in four games. Costa only scored more than one goal in a game on one other occasion that season - against Swansea no less - and the rest of his time in west London has been well documented. Costa highs, lows Papiss Cisse, Newcastle,  Feb to April 2012 The Senegalese made little impact when Newcastle slipped out of the top flight two seasons ago. It was in stark contrast to his explosive arrival where a triple of doubles kept Alan Pardew's side in the chase for a Champions League spot. Cisse scored 13 goals in 14 appearances as Newcastle finished fifth. The summer break didn't do Cisse any favours, though. He needed seven league games to get off the mark and only scored three more goals in the top flight that calendar year. Kevin Campbell, Everton, 1999 Evertonians weren't that enamoured with Campbell's arrival on loan from Trabsonspor in April 1999. But Campbell defied those critics who suggested his career was petering out with nine goals in eight appearances to safeguard Everton's top-flight status. Sergio Aguero, Manchester City, 2011/12 The Argentine declared upon signing with City that he'd be fine in the north west as he didn't like hot weather. Five goals later in his first two home games and Aguero was already at home at the Etihad. Aguero's goalscoring sequence ended in City's pummelling against rivals United with the popular forward scoring the third in their still incredible 6-1 win at Old Trafford. The 10 goals in eight games one-man band And so we come to the sole player who has amassed the most goals in their opening eight Premier League matches with their respective new club. Take a bow, Micky Quinn. Quinn, in fact, reached double figures after just six games and then drew blanks against Man Utd and Nottingham as Coventry's early season good form suffered a minor blip. Micky Quinn struck 10 goals after six games for Coventry Quinn had to wait until the final two games of the season to score in successive games to finish his debut top-flight season with 17 goals in 26 appearances.   So just the four required against Liverpool to break the Mighty Quinn's record. It's over to you Romelu...  

Romelu Lukaku has Man Utd record in sight - but needs four against Liverpool to trump a mighty No 1

Romelu Lukaku could become the first Manchester United player to score eight goals in his first eight Premier League matches at Anfield on Saturday. Despite doubts over an ankle injury, the £75m summer signing played the last half an hour of Belgium's dead rubber against Cyprus in a World Cup qualifier in midweek, even though Roberto Martinez's side had already booked their spot in Russia.  Lukaku was even on the scoresheet in the 4-0 win, taking his tally to 16 goals in 13 appearances in all competitions.  Now the 24-year-old is on the brink of moving clear of Andrew Cole's seven-goal run as United travel to Liverpool in the early kick-off on Saturday. A single strike against Liverpool would see Lukaku join a small band of legendary strikers in scoring eight goals in their first eight league games. 7 - No player has scored more goals in their first 7 @premierleague apps for @ManUtd than Romelu Lukaku (7, level with Andrew Cole). Heaven. pic.twitter.com/fcsfhDfbdw— OptaJoe (@OptaJoe) September 30, 2017 A brace versus Jurgen Klopp's men would draw him alongside seven past and present forwards. And if Lukaku becomes the first United player to score a hat-trick against the Reds since Dimitar Berbatov in 2010, he would move level on 10 goals with a blast from the past. But can you guess who (before scrolling below).  We take a look at the hotshots Lukaku is primed to emulate after eight league matches and look what happened next after their goalscoring exploits. The eight goals in eight games group... Alan Shearer, Blackburn 1992/93 Turning down the lure of Man Utd, the former England captain struck twice on his debut at Crystal Palace. The now MOTD pundit's spree didn't stop at eight goals in eight games. Further efforts at Wimbledon, against Oldham and a double in Blackburn's 7-1 thrashing of Norwich at Ewood Park saw Shearer eventually end his purple patch with 12 goals in 11 games. His first season was cruelly ended by a cruciate ligament injury suffered in December. Kevin Phillips, Sunderland, 1999/2000 The 5ft 7in forward had already acclimatised to his north east surroundings by the time he got his boots firing in the Premier League. Phillips spent two seasons in the Championship banging in the goals that lifted the Black Cats into the top flight and his exploits didn't stop there.  A hat-trick at Derby on September 18, 1999 took Phillips to the eight-in-eight mark. Despite a relatively lean spell by his standards towards the end of the season where he scored just one in four games, he ended the season with 30 goals and the Golden Boot.  Kevin Phillips won the Golden Boot in 1999/2000 Credit: Getty Images Jermain Defoe, Portsmouth, Feb 2008 to March 2008 The 35-year-old ended a six-match barren run by swapping Tottenham for the south coast in the transfer window nine years ago. However, after his goal splurge he failed to score in his next five top-flight matches which also resulted in Pompey collecting just one point. In fairness, Portsmouth had bigger fish to fry with their run and capture of the FA Cup, a competition Defoe was unfortunately ineligible for. Jermain Defoe ended a six-match barren spell when he joined Pompey Credit: Getty Images Francesco Baiano, Derby, 1997/98 The Italian needed two games to adjust to the hustle and bustle of the English game before getting up and running with a strike at Aston Villa. The now 49-year-old, who was voted one of the club's best ever imports, ended the season with 12 league goals but his purple patch was about as good as it got for the diminutive forward. Baiano ended up scoring 16 goals in 64 appearances in the East Midlands. Francesco Baiano was a fans' favourite at Derby Credit: PA The nine goals in eight games party... Mark Viduka, Leeds, 2000/2001 'Big Dukes' established a formidable partnership with Alan Smith but he will always be remembered for scoring all four goals in the thrilling 4-3 win over Liverpool in November 2000. The Australian added another eight goals to his league campaign in his debut season in the English top flight. Les Ferdinand, Newcastle, 1995/96 Part of Kevin Keegan's 'Entertainers', Ferdinand scored three goals in his first two games for Newcastle following a £6m move from QPR. Ferdinand's exploits didn't stop at nine goals in eight. A hat-trick in a 6-1 win over Wimbledon took him to 12 in nine before Spurs, the club he would later join two seasons later, stopped him in his tracks. After just one goal in six games at the end of the season, Ferdinand's effort in a 1-1 draw against Tottenham on the final day took his overall tally to 25. Dion Dublin, Aston Villa, 1998/99 The now Homes Under the Hammer presenter scored five goals in his first two games for Villa including a hat-trick against Southampton following an autumn switch from Coventry. After two against Arsenal in his first eight games in Claret and Blue, Dublin went on an eight-goal drought that ironically came to a halt against his former club. It was only a consolation as the Sky Blues had the last laugh in a 4-1 win. Dublin only scored once more between February and the end of the season, taking his tally for Villa to 11.  Diego Costa, Chelsea, 2014/15 It hasn't been all tantrums and tempestuous behaviour from Costa at the Bridge. The Brazilian-born forward enjoyed a lengthy honeymoon which included a hat-trick against Swansea which saw him score seven goals in four games. Costa only scored more than one goal in a game on one other occasion that season - against Swansea no less - and the rest of his time in west London has been well documented. Costa highs, lows Papiss Cisse, Newcastle,  Feb to April 2012 The Senegalese made little impact when Newcastle slipped out of the top flight two seasons ago. It was in stark contrast to his explosive arrival where a triple of doubles kept Alan Pardew's side in the chase for a Champions League spot. Cisse scored 13 goals in 14 appearances as Newcastle finished fifth. The summer break didn't do Cisse any favours, though. He needed seven league games to get off the mark and only scored three more goals in the top flight that calendar year. Kevin Campbell, Everton, 1999 Evertonians weren't that enamoured with Campbell's arrival on loan from Trabsonspor in April 1999. But Campbell defied those critics who suggested his career was petering out with nine goals in eight appearances to safeguard Everton's top-flight status. Sergio Aguero, Manchester City, 2011/12 The Argentine declared upon signing with City that he'd be fine in the north west as he didn't like hot weather. Five goals later in his first two home games and Aguero was already at home at the Etihad. Aguero's goalscoring sequence ended in City's pummelling against rivals United with the popular forward scoring the third in their still incredible 6-1 win at Old Trafford. The 10 goals in eight games one-man band And so we come to the sole player who has amassed the most goals in their opening eight Premier League matches with their respective new club. Take a bow, Micky Quinn. Quinn, in fact, reached double figures after just six games and then drew blanks against Man Utd and Nottingham as Coventry's early season good form suffered a minor blip. Micky Quinn struck 10 goals after six games for Coventry Quinn had to wait until the final two games of the season to score in successive games to finish his debut top-flight season with 17 goals in 26 appearances.   So just the four required against Liverpool to break the Mighty Quinn's record. It's over to you Romelu...  

Romelu Lukaku has Man Utd record in sight - but needs four against Liverpool to trump a mighty No 1

Romelu Lukaku could become the first Manchester United player to score eight goals in his first eight Premier League matches at Anfield on Saturday. Despite doubts over an ankle injury, the £75m summer signing played the last half an hour of Belgium's dead rubber against Cyprus in a World Cup qualifier in midweek, even though Roberto Martinez's side had already booked their spot in Russia.  Lukaku was even on the scoresheet in the 4-0 win, taking his tally to 16 goals in 13 appearances in all competitions.  Now the 24-year-old is on the brink of moving clear of Andrew Cole's seven-goal run as United travel to Liverpool in the early kick-off on Saturday. A single strike against Liverpool would see Lukaku join a small band of legendary strikers in scoring eight goals in their first eight league games. 7 - No player has scored more goals in their first 7 @premierleague apps for @ManUtd than Romelu Lukaku (7, level with Andrew Cole). Heaven. pic.twitter.com/fcsfhDfbdw— OptaJoe (@OptaJoe) September 30, 2017 A brace versus Jurgen Klopp's men would draw him alongside seven past and present forwards. And if Lukaku becomes the first United player to score a hat-trick against the Reds since Dimitar Berbatov in 2010, he would move level on 10 goals with a blast from the past. But can you guess who (before scrolling below).  We take a look at the hotshots Lukaku is primed to emulate after eight league matches and look what happened next after their goalscoring exploits. The eight goals in eight games group... Alan Shearer, Blackburn 1992/93 Turning down the lure of Man Utd, the former England captain struck twice on his debut at Crystal Palace. The now MOTD pundit's spree didn't stop at eight goals in eight games. Further efforts at Wimbledon, against Oldham and a double in Blackburn's 7-1 thrashing of Norwich at Ewood Park saw Shearer eventually end his purple patch with 12 goals in 11 games. His first season was cruelly ended by a cruciate ligament injury suffered in December. Kevin Phillips, Sunderland, 1999/2000 The 5ft 7in forward had already acclimatised to his north east surroundings by the time he got his boots firing in the Premier League. Phillips spent two seasons in the Championship banging in the goals that lifted the Black Cats into the top flight and his exploits didn't stop there.  A hat-trick at Derby on September 18, 1999 took Phillips to the eight-in-eight mark. Despite a relatively lean spell by his standards towards the end of the season where he scored just one in four games, he ended the season with 30 goals and the Golden Boot.  Kevin Phillips won the Golden Boot in 1999/2000 Credit: Getty Images Jermain Defoe, Portsmouth, Feb 2008 to March 2008 The 35-year-old ended a six-match barren run by swapping Tottenham for the south coast in the transfer window nine years ago. However, after his goal splurge he failed to score in his next five top-flight matches which also resulted in Pompey collecting just one point. In fairness, Portsmouth had bigger fish to fry with their run and capture of the FA Cup, a competition Defoe was unfortunately ineligible for. Jermain Defoe ended a six-match barren spell when he joined Pompey Credit: Getty Images Francesco Baiano, Derby, 1997/98 The Italian needed two games to adjust to the hustle and bustle of the English game before getting up and running with a strike at Aston Villa. The now 49-year-old, who was voted one of the club's best ever imports, ended the season with 12 league goals but his purple patch was about as good as it got for the diminutive forward. Baiano ended up scoring 16 goals in 64 appearances in the East Midlands. Francesco Baiano was a fans' favourite at Derby Credit: PA The nine goals in eight games party... Mark Viduka, Leeds, 2000/2001 'Big Dukes' established a formidable partnership with Alan Smith but he will always be remembered for scoring all four goals in the thrilling 4-3 win over Liverpool in November 2000. The Australian added another eight goals to his league campaign in his debut season in the English top flight. Les Ferdinand, Newcastle, 1995/96 Part of Kevin Keegan's 'Entertainers', Ferdinand scored three goals in his first two games for Newcastle following a £6m move from QPR. Ferdinand's exploits didn't stop at nine goals in eight. A hat-trick in a 6-1 win over Wimbledon took him to 12 in nine before Spurs, the club he would later join two seasons later, stopped him in his tracks. After just one goal in six games at the end of the season, Ferdinand's effort in a 1-1 draw against Tottenham on the final day took his overall tally to 25. Dion Dublin, Aston Villa, 1998/99 The now Homes Under the Hammer presenter scored five goals in his first two games for Villa including a hat-trick against Southampton following an autumn switch from Coventry. After two against Arsenal in his first eight games in Claret and Blue, Dublin went on an eight-goal drought that ironically came to a halt against his former club. It was only a consolation as the Sky Blues had the last laugh in a 4-1 win. Dublin only scored once more between February and the end of the season, taking his tally for Villa to 11.  Diego Costa, Chelsea, 2014/15 It hasn't been all tantrums and tempestuous behaviour from Costa at the Bridge. The Brazilian-born forward enjoyed a lengthy honeymoon which included a hat-trick against Swansea which saw him score seven goals in four games. Costa only scored more than one goal in a game on one other occasion that season - against Swansea no less - and the rest of his time in west London has been well documented. Costa highs, lows Papiss Cisse, Newcastle,  Feb to April 2012 The Senegalese made little impact when Newcastle slipped out of the top flight two seasons ago. It was in stark contrast to his explosive arrival where a triple of doubles kept Alan Pardew's side in the chase for a Champions League spot. Cisse scored 13 goals in 14 appearances as Newcastle finished fifth. The summer break didn't do Cisse any favours, though. He needed seven league games to get off the mark and only scored three more goals in the top flight that calendar year. Kevin Campbell, Everton, 1999 Evertonians weren't that enamoured with Campbell's arrival on loan from Trabsonspor in April 1999. But Campbell defied those critics who suggested his career was petering out with nine goals in eight appearances to safeguard Everton's top-flight status. Sergio Aguero, Manchester City, 2011/12 The Argentine declared upon signing with City that he'd be fine in the north west as he didn't like hot weather. Five goals later in his first two home games and Aguero was already at home at the Etihad. Aguero's goalscoring sequence ended in City's pummelling against rivals United with the popular forward scoring the third in their still incredible 6-1 win at Old Trafford. The 10 goals in eight games one-man band And so we come to the sole player who has amassed the most goals in their opening eight Premier League matches with their respective new club. Take a bow, Micky Quinn. Quinn, in fact, reached double figures after just six games and then drew blanks against Man Utd and Nottingham as Coventry's early season good form suffered a minor blip. Micky Quinn struck 10 goals after six games for Coventry Quinn had to wait until the final two games of the season to score in successive games to finish his debut top-flight season with 17 goals in 26 appearances.   So just the four required against Liverpool to break the Mighty Quinn's record. It's over to you Romelu...  

Sergio Aguero could feature for Man City against Stoke, just two weeks after breaking rib in car crash

Sergio Aguero is pushing for inclusion in Manchester City’s squad to face Stoke City on Saturday amid the prospect of a swift recovery from the broken rib he suffered in a car crash a fortnight ago. The Argentina striker resumed light training with City on Tuesday and showed no ill-effects during Wednesday's session, although the club’s medical staff will not take a decision on his fitness and availability against Stoke until Friday. City are unprepared to take any unnecessary risks with Aguero’s fitness and are conscious that a blow to the ribs could set him back if he returns too soon, before the injury has adequately healed. It was initially forecast by City that Aguero would be out for between two and four weeks but that was challenged by Argentina’s national team doctor, Donato Villaini, who had claimed the 29-year-old would be out for minimum of six weeks. If Aguero does not make the Stoke game, he could come into contention for the Champions League tie at home to Napoli three days later, when City will look to get a firm grip on Group F with a third consecutive win. Aguero was involved in a car crash in Amsterdam only a couple of weeks ago Aguero had fractured a rib after the taxi taking him from a concert to the airport in Amsterdam late last month crashed into a pole. The striker was forced to stay overnight in hospital and admitted later that he was fortunate the accident had not been more serious. Aguero, who is one goal short of matching Eric Brook’s all time City scoring record of 177 goals, has been in outstanding form for City this season although Pep Guardiola’s side coped fine without him in the impressive 1-0 win at Chelsea before the international break. Meanwhile, City remain confident that David Silva will sign a one-year extension to his existing contract, which runs until June 2019, in the weeks ahead, despite interest from Italy. And Jason Wilcox, the former Blackburn Rovers and England winger, has been appointed City's academy director on a permanent basis. Wilcox, formerly head of City's Under-18s, had been in interim charge of the academy since June following the departure of Mark Allen.

Sergio Aguero could feature for Man City against Stoke, just two weeks after breaking rib in car crash

Sergio Aguero is pushing for inclusion in Manchester City’s squad to face Stoke City on Saturday amid the prospect of a swift recovery from the broken rib he suffered in a car crash a fortnight ago. The Argentina striker resumed light training with City on Tuesday and showed no ill-effects during Wednesday's session, although the club’s medical staff will not take a decision on his fitness and availability against Stoke until Friday. City are unprepared to take any unnecessary risks with Aguero’s fitness and are conscious that a blow to the ribs could set him back if he returns too soon, before the injury has adequately healed. It was initially forecast by City that Aguero would be out for between two and four weeks but that was challenged by Argentina’s national team doctor, Donato Villaini, who had claimed the 29-year-old would be out for minimum of six weeks. If Aguero does not make the Stoke game, he could come into contention for the Champions League tie at home to Napoli three days later, when City will look to get a firm grip on Group F with a third consecutive win. Aguero was involved in a car crash in Amsterdam only a couple of weeks ago Aguero had fractured a rib after the taxi taking him from a concert to the airport in Amsterdam late last month crashed into a pole. The striker was forced to stay overnight in hospital and admitted later that he was fortunate the accident had not been more serious. Aguero, who is one goal short of matching Eric Brook’s all time City scoring record of 177 goals, has been in outstanding form for City this season although Pep Guardiola’s side coped fine without him in the impressive 1-0 win at Chelsea before the international break. Meanwhile, City remain confident that David Silva will sign a one-year extension to his existing contract, which runs until June 2019, in the weeks ahead, despite interest from Italy. And Jason Wilcox, the former Blackburn Rovers and England winger, has been appointed City's academy director on a permanent basis. Wilcox, formerly head of City's Under-18s, had been in interim charge of the academy since June following the departure of Mark Allen.

The England dream team by eras: which decade comes out on top?

Scroll to the bottom of the article for Rob Bagchi's all-time 23-man England squad August is traditionally silly season for journalism but on the football beat the two-week autumn and spring international breaks are the cue for extreme resourcefulness. Watching England toil through yet another developmental stage, the slimness of their options and assets in central midfield and the heart of defence as blatant as the consoling promise of Harry Kane and Marcus Rashford, made us wonder in which eras each part of the team have been at their strongest? Was English goalkeeping, say, at its apex in the 1970s or have the wide players of the Forties never been surpassed? For once a decision to truncate the period for analysis is not motivated by either sloth or rampant neophilia. England rejoined Fifa only in 1946 and their first international tournament was the 1950 World Cup, having spurned the first three.  Therefore it makes sense to start in the immediate post-war years and to help the process we will look at each phase for every sector - goalkeeper, full-backs, central defenders, midfielders, wide players and strikers - look at the players picked and the breadth of quality alternatives. Some will represent generations or decades, others distinct stages in the team’s evolution. We’ll begin in goal and chart the progression, chronological at least, from Frank Swift and his primrose polo neck sweater to Joe Hart and his binman chic high-vis short-sleeves, concluding with our stab at an answer. Goalkeepers If you’ve been paying attention to anything involving England without being so bored you’ve felt compelled to make a paper plane, our first contender will be obvious. Frank Swift, the wok-handed, spring-heeled Manchester City goalkeeper who pioneered the throw-out, was the first keeper to captain England and as the man in goal when England travelled to Turin to defeat the double world champions Italy (a pre Superga full-strength Azzurri side) 4-0, is our candidate from the Forties. He won 19 caps despite the war depriving him of his career from the age of 25 to 32, let in 18 goals and played in other memorable victories over France, Sweden, Scotland and Portugal. Other standouts from the truncated decade include Tottenham’s title-winning Ted Ditchburn, who won six caps, and the brave, acrobatic, sure-handed Bert Williams of Wolves who succeeded Swift after his international retirement and earned 24 caps over the next six years. Our Fifties options begin with Williams and Gil Merrick of Birmingham City who earned the most caps (23) of the decade and kept five clean sheets. It was Merrick’s misfortune to be in goal for the mortifying, 3-6 defeat by Hungary at Wembley in 1953 and the 7-1 thrashing in the Nepstadion a year later. Admittedly he appeared rattled on both occasions but only because the Magnificent Magyars and his shaky defence left him horribly exposed. The sight of him picking the ball out of the net 13 times have haunted English football ever since but he was not responsible. Those defeats should have marked a paradigm shift but the England system - once again propped up by a crop of excellent players - did not significantly change until much later.  Other notable stalwarts of the decade were Bolton’s 5ft 8in Eddie Hopkinson, the master of one-on-ones who won 13 caps, and Colin McDonald of Burnley who kept goal at the 1958 World Cup and was a dominant, cross-catching doyen of the old school. The Sixties begin with Sheffield Wednesday’s, quick, agile Ron Springett who played 33 times including all four at the 1962 World Cup where he repeatedly saved Walter Winterbottom's side from a proper drubbing in the 3-1 quarter-final defeat by Brazil, and end with Banks of England, Springett’s understudy in Chile, justly recognised as the greatest goalie in the world. It wasn’t just his majesty during England’s 1966 campaign, it was his general safehandedness - helped, trivia fans, in a pre-gloves age, with a generous rub of Beechnut chewing gum-laced saliva on the palms - his rare ability to save gymnastically equally well whether his goal was attacked high or low and his courage. He was so supreme that he restricted other fine goalkeepers such as Peter Bonetti, Gordon West, Alex Stepney and Springett to a handful of caps after Alf Ramsey made him first choice in 1964. Gordon Banks remained Ramsey’s default selection until he lost an eye in a car crash at the age of 34 in Oct 1972, taking in the save against Pele in 1970, the world’s greatest keeper defying the game’s best player by diving downwards, like an hour hand pointing to seven o’clock, and twisting his wrist to ensure he flicked it over the bar to prevent the great striker pouncing on the rebound. But Leicester City did not rate the marginal differentials between an established world-class player and an emerging one as highly as Ramsey and sold Banks to Stoke in 1967 to clear the way for 17-year-old Peter Shilton who owned the Eighties but duelled with the agile, commanding and astute Ray Clemence throughout the preceding decade to be England’s No1. Shilton was a brilliant shot-stopper and all the hours of dedicated, unrelenting practice gave him uncommon agility and aerial mastery. From about 1978 onwards, the error against Poland in 1973 long overcome, Shilton has the right to be considered Banks’ equal and probably superior. The reign of the duopoly left those other excellent keepers, Joe Corrigan, Phil Parkes and Stepney feeding off scraps. When it game to goalkeepers Ron Greenwood had a touch of the Jimmy Armfields at Leeds (“the manager’s indecision is final) but at the start of 1982 after rotating them for five years, he eventually plumped for Shilton who stayed undisputed first choice for the whole of the Eighties. Clemence carried on as the first reserve until 1983 and from 1985 Chris Woods began to make the No13 shirt his second skin during international weeks. Woods made 14 starts in the decade but was mostly stuck on the bench occasionally conceding opportunities for the stand-by role to Gary Bailey, Nigel Spink, Dave Beasant and David Seaman. Poor Martin Hodge, Tony Coton and John Lukic never even got a sniff. Peter Shilton at the start of his international career Credit: Malcolm Croft/PA Bobby Robson stood by Peter Shilton for Italia 90 and kept the 40-year-old keeper between the sticks for the semi-final shootout against West Germany despite having not used all his substitute options and Shilton’s poor record at saving spot-kicks (one from 15). The veteran retired from international football at the end of the tournament but carried on playing for a variety of clubs until 1997. Woods, who once went 1196 minutes without conceding a goal for Rangers in successive matches, became Graham Taylor’s No1 and played at Euro 92 backed up by David Seaman and England’s first million-pound goalie, Nigel Martyn. Seaman came into his own under Terry Venables and proved himself a wonderfully athletic goalkeeper with great agility, positional awareness, sound judgment and, above all, consistency at Euro 96. He saved penalties, too. Glenn Hoddle logically opted for continuity but awarded caps to Ian Walker, David James, Tim Flowers and Martyn when injury or the need to see how the others shaped up demanded.   Seaman continued through the proto-Golden Generation era until his mistakes were compounded by his age, particularly, like Shilton in 1990, a leaden-footedness in reverse. Paul Robinson was anointed for the 2006 World Cup when David Beckham metamorphosed into Sally Bowles in Baden-Baden but Sven Goran-Eriksson also tried out Martyn, James (the Euro 2004) starter and Rob Green. If we consider the McClaren era a coda to the Golden Generation, The Together Again tour after Dean Martin had bailed on Frank Sinatra and Sammy Davis to be replaced by Liza Minelli, small wonder that it was largely a Robinson hangover with supporting roles for Scott Carson, Chris Kirkland, James and Ben Foster. Fabio Capello took a look at James and Green, didn’t like what he saw, blooded Joe Hart then went back to swapping between the other two, £4m a year not being enough to deliver decisiveness. Jack Butland, John Ruddy, Fraser Forster and Tom Heaton have made appearances under Roy Hodgson and Gareth Southgate. Foster, too, has returned from temporary retirement but the seven years since the 4-1 defeat by Germany in Bloemfontein have been the Hart hegemony, under whose dominion we linger. Poor old Whitney Houston did not live long enough for an answer to her question - where do broken Harts go? It’s West Ham, pet. Full backs Now we have established the decades we are going to compare, let us breeze through the options rather than dwelling in such detail to outline the parameters. First choices for full-backs of the Forties are Laurie Scott of Arsenal on the right and captain in all 13 appearances, George Hardwick of Middlesbrough on the left. Depth is added by Derby’s Bert Mozley as a back-up down the right and Manchester United’s Johnny Aston at left-back with 17 caps. George Hardwick, right, greets the Sweden captain Erik Nilsson in  1947 Credit: Reg Birkett/Keystone/Getty Images In the Fifties the selection panel had Spurs’ Alf Ramsey at the beginning of the decade to play on the right and Blackburn’s Bill Eckersley on the left. Birmingham’s Jeff Hall and West Brom’s Don Howe made the right-back slot the preserve of the West Midlands for the rest of the decade while Manchester United’s majestic and adventurous Roger Byrne played 33 successive matches at left-back until his death at Munich during a period when the selection committee made consistency virtually unknown. Tommy Banks, Bolton’s tank, did his best to replace the irreplaceable at the 1958 World Cup and Sheffield United’s Graham Shaw filled in the following year. Take your pick from the Sixties beginning with the two 1966 imperishables George Cohen and Ray Wilson, Jimmy Armfield, a former captain who played on the right at the 1962 World Cup, Keith Newton, who succeeded Cohen and Terry Cooper who took over from his fellow Yorkshireman Wilson at left-back. Add on all those reduced to a handful of caps because of Ramsey’s loyalty - Bob McNab, Paul Reaney, Chris Lawler, Gerry Byrne, Tommy Wright and Cyril Knowles - and you have the kind of riches that would make Gareth Southgate turn green with envy beneath his beard.   George Cohen, left, and Ray Wilson, holding the Jules Rimet Trophy, celebrate victory in 1966 Credit: PA Photos England’s least successful decade in terms of qualification is also, paradoxically, one remembered with a fondness for the quality of English teams – the best of which were bolstered by Scotsmen, Welshmen and Irishmen. England’s full-backs in the Seventies numbered the Liverpool pair Phil Neal and Emlyn Hughes (not that Hughes played there for his club as frequently as he did for the national side). Their versatility was a virtue, as it was for Ipswich’s Mick Mills and Leeds’ Paul Madeley and Trevor Cherry. More orthodox full-backs were plentiful, too: the magnificent Viv Anderson on the right and Don Revie’s choices, Leicester’s Steve Whitworth and QPR’s Dave Clement. On the left Frank Lampard, Alec Lindsay, David Nish, Mike Pejic and Ian Gillard won caps, as did Kevin Beattie playing out of position but in masterly fashion, particularly in the 5-1 thrashing of Scotland in 1975. Kenny Sansom began the Eighties in possession of the No 3 shirt and held it for eight years, playing consistently and with real skill to hold off the challenge of West Brom’s Derek Statham, until the claims of Stuart Pearce in 1988 could be resisted no more. The right side was more problematic once Mills, Neal and Anderson entered their mid thirties. Mick Duxbury had a run there, Danny Thomas could have been the long-term solution save for that rotten injury inflicted by Kevin Maguire while Gary Stevens won 45 caps after his debut during Everton’s title-winning campaign in 1984-85 including Mexico ’86, Euro ’88 and the beginning of Italia 90. Kenny Sansom made the left-back position his own in the Eighties Credit:  Duncan Raban/Allsport/Getty Images Pearce was key at the start of the next decade, becoming captain under Graham Taylor, taking a position in a back three for Euro 96 when Steve McManaman and Darren Anderton played wide, and was recalled at the age of 37 for a couple of starts under Kevin Keegan. Terry Venables initially preferred the Blackburn Rovers left-back Graeme Le Saux and but for injury he would have started Euro 96. Glenn Hoddle restored him as first-choice after a cameo from Andy Hinchcliffe but by the end of the Nineties the left side, in defence and midfield, had become something of a national neurosis. Phil Neville filled in there, playing alongside his brother, Gary, the undisputed No2 when fit. For club and country he succeeded Paul Parker and the challenges of Gary Charles and Rob Jones for the spot were sadly snuffed out by personal problems and injury respectively. Sven Goran-Eriksson promoted Ashley Cole as the man to solve the malaise on the left and over the 12 years of his international career from 2001 onwards he won 107 caps and held Wayne Bridge at bay. Gary Neville missed the 2002 World Cup where Danny Mills stood in but was back straight afterwards and carried on until 2007. Luke Young and Micah Richards stated their claims to be paired with Cole but ultimately Glen Johnson won the contest under Fabio Capello. Johnson stayed in situ under Roy Hodgson until the 2014 World Cup and was even recalled to the squad last year but Kyle Walker, Nathaniel Clyne and Kieran Trippier are now the default options after experiments with Chris Smalling and Phil Jones out wide. Leighton Baines played so well from 2012-14 that he essentially forced Cole into international retirement before the more athletic claims of Danny Rose and Ryan Bertrand did for him. Central defenders   Here we face a problem with the first two post-war decades before the four-back system really took off. A bodged solution for the Forties and Fifties, rather than trying to corral in a wing-half, would be to list the options at centre-half even though normally only one was picked. We don’t even have to do that for the Forties because Billy Wright, the centre-half for much of the Fifties, captain for 11 years and England’s first 100-cap player, played at wing-half for his country at the beginning of his international career, alongside the exemplary Neil Franklin at No 5. Franklin abandoned Stoke in 1950 to move to Colombia and circumvent the maximum wage but his wife did not settle there and he faced the opprobrium of his club and the FA on return, not adding to the 27 caps he earned before he left. Breadth of talent for the decade would be provided by Blackpool’s Harry Johnston, Allenby Chilton of Manchester United and Liverpool’s Bill Jones. Wright made the position his own after the 1954 World Cup where Bill McGarry and Syd Owen had taken the role. Johnston, too, continued to make appearances at the start of the Fifties and Liverpool’s Laurie Hughes stood in for Franklin at the 1950 World Cup. Jim Taylor of Fulham, Burnley’s Mal Barrass and Charlton’s Derek Ufton were also tried but no one could dislodge the 5ft 8in Wright, captain of Wolves and England, golden-haired paragon of the post-war game. The finest partnership of the Sixties, Jackie Charlton and Bobby Moore, came together only a year before they won the World Cup and had it not been for the disgrace of Peter Swan - who won 19 caps as a cultured but powerful stopper between 1960-62 - Charlton may never have joined his brother as a cornerstone of 1966 and all that. Maurice Norman, the Spurs Double-winning centre-half, joined forces with Moore for the 1962 World Cup because Swan was confined to quarters with dysentery in Chile and Brian Labone both preceded Charlton and succeeded him as first choice towards the end of the decade. Norman Hunter served as Moore’s understudy but the consistency of the captain restricted ‘Bites Yer Legs’ to 28 caps over nine seasons. Moore at his peak Credit: AP Photo/files Moore made the last of his 108 appearances in 1973 and by that point there were plenty of contenders for his position, notably Derby County’s Colin Todd, Hunter and Emlyn Hughes. Roy McFarland earned 28 caps in the centre-half slot from 1971-76 before injuries ruined his career and gave Dave Watson a long run as first choice until 1981. Watson won the last of his 65 caps at the age of 35 in June 1982 but was omitted from the final squad for the Spain World Cup, the first for which he had qualified after failures to reach West Germany and Argentina. Phil Thompson of Liverpool and Manchester United’s Brian Greenhoff were given their debuts by Don Revie but only the former flourished after he left for Abu Dhabi. Watson’s role as the tall, raw-bone aerial colossus was filled by Terry Butcher throughout the Eighties though we forget how good his left foot was, his skill overwhelmed by the ‘up and  at ‘em’ patriotism of his persona. Thompson led Liverpool to the 1981 European Cup and partnered the Ipswich defender at the Spain World Cup but Bobby Robson struggled to find a regular foil for Butcher thereafter and worked his way through Alvin Martin, Graham Roberts, Mark Wright, Terry Fenwick, Gary Pallister and a callow Tony Adams before settling on Des Walker for Italia 90 and a return for Wright in a back three. At the start of the Nineties Graham Taylor used Walker, Adams and Pallister but it was his successors, Terry Venables and Glenn Hoddle, who got the best out of Adams. Venables managed it at Euro 96 when Adams was white-knuckling his sobriety for the duration of the tournament and Hoddle benefited from Adams stopping drinking and finding a new poise. Both also used Gareth Southgate in a back three while Sol Campbell, given his debut by Venables, became a regular when Hoddle took charge. Taylor and Hoddle used Martin Keown but Venables never picked him and though Steve Howey, Neil Ruddock, Steve Bould, John Scales, Colin Cooper and David Unsworth were tried, none established himself. The so-called Golden Generation had three stalwarts in Rio Ferdinand, John Terry and Campbell while injuries prevented Jonathan Woodgate and Ledley King from the long international careers their talent deserved. Jamie Carragher won 31 caps over 11 years, Matthew Upson became a favourite of Fabio Capello’s and Steve McClaren gave Joleon Lescott his debut in 2007. Rio Ferdinand and John Terry before the latter racially abused the former's brother Credit: Action Images / Tony O'Brien Ferdinand failed to re-establish himself after missing the 2010 World Cup through injury and ended his England career with 81 caps in 2011, Terry retired from the international game in 2012 after an FA Commission went ahead with charging him over racially abusing Ferdinand’s brother, Anton. Since then we’ve had shaky alliances involving Gary Cahill, Phil Jagielka and Lescott, Chris Smalling, Phil Jones, John Stones and Michael Keane. Central midfielders Again we need to make an adjustment here for the Forties and Fifties and will restrict it to wing-halfs, elevating most inside-forwards to forwards for the sake of this exercise. The immediate post-war era used Billy Wright most often as the right-half and Manchester United’s Henry Cockburn as the left pivot. Portsmouth’s hard-tackling tyro Jimmy Dickinson succeeded Cockburn and played 48 times from 1949-56 while Phil Taylor of Liverpool and Villa’s Eddie Lowe shared six caps on the right. Before the emergence of the Busby Babes - and we must include Eddie Colman here as well as Duncan Edwards because he would have been an international but for his death at Munich at the age of 21 - Wright and Dickinson formed the regular partnership. The claims of Edwards  - simply the most complete player England has ever produced, skilful, forceful, bursting with stamina and natural authority - could no longer be ignored in 1955 and he won 18 caps before he was killed, also at the age of 21. Ron Flowers, who won three titles with Wolves in the Fifties, played once in tandem with Edwards and took over after the 1958 World Cup with Blackburn’s efficient Ronnie Clayton his usual foil after Clayton had seen off Wolves’ Eddie Clamp. Nobby Stiles played at centre-back for Manchester United but was magnificent as Ramsey’s midfield destroyer in the 1966 side, providing the platform from which Bobby Charlton could glide through the gears, the ball under his immaculate control, and ping passes, whip in crosses or fire thunderous shots at goal. Before the two of them joined up, Flowers and Bobby Robson had been the main men with Charlton out on the left wing and after injuries and age diminished Stiles, Tottenham’s Alan Mullery was given the job. Colin Bell, Man City’s Nijinsky, was blooded in 1968 and proved irreplaceable when Martin Buchan effectively ended his career in 1975 after 48 caps. For the first part of the Seventies Martin Peters tucked in from the left and Bell played the dynamic right-half role, sadly without as much freedom as he had to pelt forward for City. Trevor Brooking made his first start in Ramsey’s last match and became the co-key player with Kevin Keegan under Greenwood with his clever passing and penetrative movement. He was so good that he kept the magnificent Glenn Hoddle on the peripheries following his debut in 1978. Hoddle, as brilliant a playmaker as he is rotten as a pundit, would have a system tailored to his strengths for England’s last three games at the 1986 World Cup when crisis forced Robson’s hand. Gerry Francis, Revie’s second captain, would have given both stiff competition had he stayed fit after his 12th cap. Tony Currie and Alan Hudson join the list of inexpertly harnessed talents while Terry McDermott, so intrepid for Liverpool, was denied a consistent run in the side by Ray Wilkins who ended the decade a dynamic box-to-box midfielder with the skill, control and vision that would later make him so comfortable as a ‘sitter’ in Serie A. The entire Eighties can be considered the Bryan Robson years. Bobby was besotted by him but for understandable reasons, as Alex Ferguson outlined: "He had good control, was a decisive tackler, passed the ball well and his combination of stamina and perceptive reading of movement enabled him to make sudden and deadly infiltrations from midfield into the opposition's box." His fitness became a national preoccupation and he lasted two games each of the 1986 and 1990 World Cups after driving England to qualification at both. We saw him at his very best only in 1982 and Euro 88 when he needed support that his team-mates could not provide. Wilkins was his regular partner, replaced by Hoddle for 1988 and Neil Webb thereafter until Paul Gascoigne finally charmed the sceptical Bobby Robson in 1990. Peter Reid, Everton’s tigerish beating heart, took centre stage in 1986 when Robson’s shoulder popped out again but the promise of his Goodison colleague Paul Bracewell was ravaged by  an ankle injury that took almost two years out of his career. England's all-action 'Captain Marvel' Credit: David Cannon/Getty Images Italia 90 began with Robson, Gascoigne and Chris Waddle in a midfield three and ended in unforgettable drama with David Platt in for the captain, having seen off Steve McMahon. Graham Taylor initially stuck with the Platt-Gascoigne axis for the victory over Poland but went with his Aston Villa pairing of Platt and Sid Cowans for the trip to Dublin. Gascoigne’s injuries and drinking alarmed Taylor who kept him around the squad when fit but his absences provoked some of the strangest selections in memory, noticeably Geoff Thomas, Andy Gray and Carlton Palmer. David Batty and Paul Ince injected some quality, the latter a mainstay for Venables and Hoddle - playing with Platt and Gascoigne at Euro 96, Paul Scholes at the 1998 World Cup. Jamie Redknapp was ill-served by injury, Nicky Butt ill-served by managers until Sven Goran-Eriksson’s hand was forced in 2002 by Steven Gerrard’s absence and Ray Parlour by the wrong-headed perception that he was well, in Lovejoy’s words, ‘only Ray Parlour’. Gascoigne lights up Wembley v Scotland at Euro 96 Credit: Stu Forster/Allsport Frank Lampard made his debut in 1999 but did not become a regular for four seasons when his class tempted Eriksson to fudge the biggest decision of his England career and stick Scholes on the left to start the ‘Lampard-Gerrard’ compatibility saga that was to run for the next 11 years. Once Scholes decided he’d had enough after Euro 2004 (ending a 29-game goal drought in his penultimate match), Gerrard and Lampard, Lampard and Gerrard held their positions until Steve McClaren recalled Gareth Barry, who impressed Capello so firmly that he put Gerrard on the left. The Golden Generation and its hangover phase featured cameos from Danny Murphy, Owen Hargreaves (though he normally played wide), Scott ‘Scottie’ Parker, Michael Carrick and Jermaine Jenas though none could either usurp Gerrard or Lampard or make the combination look convincing in tournament football.    Both were still in the squad at the 2014 World Cup though age had taken the shine off them. Lampard was reduced to the bench, Gerrard captained the side but his one-paced partnership with Jordan Henderson left a dodgy defence too exposed to cope with Italy and Uruguay. Capello gave Jack Wilshere his debut at the age of 18 yet seven years later we are still waiting for him, probably forlornly, to be blessed with the physical resilience to regain his verve. Eric Dier has been the default starter with Henderson for the past 18 months but Jake Livermore is currently back in the squad, Tom Cleverly has been and gone, Fabian Delph gets in whenever he manages a couple of games for Man City while James Ward-Prowse and Harry Winks put the twinkle in Gareth Southgate’s eye.   Wide men Should we just end this segment here? Stan Matthews and Tom Finney in the Forties and Fifties are the best pair of wingers England have ever had. In 1948 a forward line of Matthews, Stan Mortensen, Tommy Lawton, Wilf Mannion and Finney put on arguably England’s greatest performance in the 4-0 away victory over Italy but never played together again. Finney was an England regular for 12 years, playing on the right, left and through the middle until 1958 but Matthews, seven years Finney’s senior, was eased out only a year earlier at the age of 42 with 54 caps. He was not deemed as indispensable by myopic selectors who gave run-outs on the wings in his stead to Peter Harris, Les Medley, Billy Elliott and Johnny Berry. Blackburn’s Bryan Douglas took the No7 shirt 36 times and scored 11 goals from 1975-63 and Bobby Charlton won the majority of his caps until 1964 on the left flank, seeing out the decade in a Lancs touchline hegemony.   In the Sixties, after the end of the Douglas-Charlton years, Ramsey tried John Connelly, Terry Paine, Peter Thompson, Derek Temple and Ian Callaghan before deciding on a narrower road to triumph. Alan Ball, essentially an auxiliary central midfielder, edged out to patrol the right for the latter stages of the 1966 World Cup, driving England on with his stamina, skill and heart but victory convinced the manager to stick to his system, using the full-backs for width with Peters augmenting the strikers from a nominal position on the left and Ball from the right. Wingers were out of vogue for most of decade after 1966 - Ian Storey Moore kept the flame flickering briefly and Revie tried with QPR’s Dave Thomas and Merlin himself. Gordon Hill, but it wasn’t until Ron Greenwood picked Manchester City’s Peter Barnes and United’s Steve Coppell together in 1977 that England took flight again. Coppell evolved into a solid right-sided player but at that point was an out and out winger who held the position for five years. Laurie Cunningham made three starts alongside him but by the start of the following decade Greenwood had cramped his own style. John Barnes at the Maracana Credit: David Cannon/Allsport The Eighties should have been the decade of Waddle and John Barnes and in popular memory it remains so but England started the decade with a tighter system, using Coppell and Graham Rix at the 1982 World Cup, and got to the quarter-finals of the 1986 tournament having ditched the wingers for Trevor Steven and Steve Hodge. Villa’s European Cup-winner Tony Morley briefly enraptured Bobby Robson and Mark Chamberlain preceded Waddle into the side by two years but it was largely a Barnes-Waddle duopoly from then on, though rarely in tandem and both, despite their brilliance and that goal at the Maracana, the first scapegoats. Lee Sharpe was the great left hope of the Nineties but faded away, Venables got the best out of Darren Anderton and Steve McManaman to provide hope of a more expansive future until David Beckham took freehold of the No7 shirt and front pages for eight years with a revolving cast of Nick Barmby, Paul Merson or a wing-back on the left. Eriksson blanked McManaman at the start of the 2000s and tried Trevor Sinclair, Scholes and Joe Cole out there to give some balance for Beckham. Stewart Downing became a mainstay of Steve McClaren’s squads while Aaron Lennon and David Bentley were tried out on the right. Ultimately he went back to Beckham. Capello got the best out of Theo Walcott for a few games, pulled Gerrard out to the left and employed James Milner as a Steady Eddie solution. Hodgson switched to 4-2-3-1 and used Raheem Sterling, Danny Welbeck, Wayne Rooney and Adam Lallana to provide width which is largely, with the exception of Rooney, where we remain apart from the saving grace of Rashford. Forwards To the summit … and, controversially, I am going to include some inside-forwards for the first three eras. So, for our post-war pioneers we will go with the aforementioned Mortensen, scorer of 23 goals in 25 games, Lawton, who scored 22 times in 23 starts, and Mannion, ‘the Mozart of football’ as Matthews put it. Len Shackleton and ‘Wor’ Jackie Milburn straddled the Forties and Fifties while Mortensen played on until 1953. The No9 shirt fell vacant in 1948 when Lawton told Walter Winterbottom that the coach didn’t know enough to be giving him advice, Milburn filled it for a spell before Nat Lofthouse won 33 caps and scored 30 goals, including the two at the Praterstadion that made him forever ‘The Lion of Vienna’. Tommy Taylor, one of the eight ‘Flowers of Manchester’ among the 23 victims of the Munich Air Crash, shot powerfully with both feet, had pace, guile and spatial awareness, and the fast-twitch reflexes of the thoroughbred goalscorer. He bagged 16 goals in 19 appearances as the other out-and-out England centre-forward of the decade. Lofty and Tommy were supported by Ivor Broadis and the finest, most astute passer in the team’s history, Johnny Haynes, who was only 27 in 1962 when he played his 56th and final game for England (his 22nd as captain) in the 1962 World Cup quarter-final. He was never as fluent again after a car crash on his return from Chile. Geoff Hurst’s hat-trick in the 1966 World Cup final overshadows anything any other England striker can match. Roger Hunt, the other Wembley immortal, was so crucial to Ramsey’s system because his tireless movement made space for Bobby Charlton to fill that it is forgotten that he scored 18 times in 34 appearances, and Jimmy Greaves, English football’s most cold-hearted and deadly finisher, gave the manager a richness of options. By the end of the Sixties Franny Lee had taken over from Hunt and Greaves as Hurst’s partner for Mexico Sniffer Clarke, the heir to Greaves, made his debut in 1970, Peter Osgood made only a couple of starts and Martin Chivers became Ramsey’s preferred No9 for two years, scoring 13 times in 24 appearances. Rodney Marsh exasperated his manager, Malcolm MacDonald thrashed five past Cyprus for Revie but made his distaste for the man who picked him well known, which meant the search for an ‘oppo’ for Kevin Keegan - the human dynamo, a rampaging forward who could leap, head, shoot and pass with distinction - lasted too long. Bob Latchford found favour for a while as did Stuart Pearson, Mick Channon moved over from the right, Paul Mariner began the international career that would yield 35 caps and 13 goals and Tricky Trevor Francis beguiled us all with his positioning and vision. Kevin Keegan scores against Scotland in 1979 Credit: Steve Powell/Allsport Cyrille Regis would have made more than two starts in the Eighties had he moved to Manchester United from West Brom instead of Coventry but he couldn’t displace the Keegan-Mariner-Woodcock-Francis usual suspects for the World Cup in Spain. Robson ushered Keegan into retirement but kept faith with the others until Gary Lineker, the quicksilver scavenger, gave him no excuse in 1984 and began the march to the Mexico Golden Boot, a World Cup quarter- and semi-final and 48 goals in 80 games. He was at his best with Peter Beardsley - who brought out the best in everyone - but also fed off Mark Hateley, Alan Smith,  and Steve Bull. The Nineties began with Lineker and Italia 90, Taylor then gave him the captaincy and slim pickings to work with up front and he left the scene in 1992 when shown the managerial big curly finger despite England desperately requiring a goal against Sweden. Taylor turned to Ian Wright who made a terrific return under Hoddle after being ignored by Venables and Les Ferdinand. Alan Shearer, impressive at Southampton, unstoppable except by injury at  Blackburn, won his first cap  in 1992 but had scored only five times in 23 appearances before the start of Euro 96 and hadn’t managed an international goal for 21 months. He hit five in the five games, was elevated to the captaincy for four years and ended still the talisman, though far less mobile, in 2000 with 30 goals. Teddy Sheringham played the Beardsley role for him perfectly and kept Andy Cole out of the squad and Robbie Fowler out of the side until Michael Owen came off the bench to score against Romania at France 98 and could not be left out again. Two games later he scored the wonder goal against Argentina that sounded the trumpets for his charge to the Ballon d’Or three years later. Michael Owen scores against Argentina at the 1998 World Cup Credit: Pawel Kopczynski REUTERS Owen was never really considered part of the Golden Generation because of a certain diffidence but he was its spearhead, when fit, and its yearned for king over the water when absent. He began the decade with Shearer, combined with club-mate Emile Heskey for the 1-5 in Munich and spent time up-front with Fowler and Darius Vassell before Eriksson promoted Wayne Rooney in 2003. Over 14 years Rooney would surpass Bobby Charlton’s England goalscoring record, beginning by playing off the cuff with boundless zip and chutzpah, maturing into that rarity, a workhorse with ebullient, irrepressible swagger and ending up a shadow of electrifying presence he once had been. During the decade Rooney played up top with Owen, Jermaine Defoe and Peter Crouch most frequently. Dean Ashton seemed to fit the part but it wasn’t to be. Rooney has been the key striker and player of this last decade, too and very much undroppable until Southgate took charge. Opportunities for Jay Rodriguez, Andy Carroll and Daniel Sturridge have been curtailed by long-term injuries, Hodgson thought it wise to take Rickie Lambert to the World Cup but in 2015 Harry Kane was given a chance and grabbed it. Jamie Vardy remains among the alternatives along with Sturridge and the second (third and fourth) coming of Defoe.   Conclusion How do you come up with a decision on the relative strengths and weaknesses over eight decades? Subjectively, obviously, but without prejudice:  Goalkeepers: Seventies - Banks, Shilton, Clemence. Full-backs: Sixties - Armfield, Cohen, Wilson, Cooper. Central defenders: Seventies - Moore, Labone, Todd, McFarland, Thompson. Central midfielders: Eighties - Robson, Wilkins, Gascoigne, Hoddle. Wide men: Fifties - Matthews, Finney, Charlton R.   Strikers: Nineties - Lineker, Shearer, Owen, Beardsley.  Please feel free to dispute this 23-man squad selection in the comments section. 

The England dream team by eras: which decade comes out on top?

Scroll to the bottom of the article for Rob Bagchi's all-time 23-man England squad August is traditionally silly season for journalism but on the football beat the two-week autumn and spring international breaks are the cue for extreme resourcefulness. Watching England toil through yet another developmental stage, the slimness of their options and assets in central midfield and the heart of defence as blatant as the consoling promise of Harry Kane and Marcus Rashford, made us wonder in which eras each part of the team have been at their strongest? Was English goalkeeping, say, at its apex in the 1970s or have the wide players of the Forties never been surpassed? For once a decision to truncate the period for analysis is not motivated by either sloth or rampant neophilia. England rejoined Fifa only in 1946 and their first international tournament was the 1950 World Cup, having spurned the first three.  Therefore it makes sense to start in the immediate post-war years and to help the process we will look at each phase for every sector - goalkeeper, full-backs, central defenders, midfielders, wide players and strikers - look at the players picked and the breadth of quality alternatives. Some will represent generations or decades, others distinct stages in the team’s evolution. We’ll begin in goal and chart the progression, chronological at least, from Frank Swift and his primrose polo neck sweater to Joe Hart and his binman chic high-vis short-sleeves, concluding with our stab at an answer. Goalkeepers If you’ve been paying attention to anything involving England without being so bored you’ve felt compelled to make a paper plane, our first contender will be obvious. Frank Swift, the wok-handed, spring-heeled Manchester City goalkeeper who pioneered the throw-out, was the first keeper to captain England and as the man in goal when England travelled to Turin to defeat the double world champions Italy (a pre Superga full-strength Azzurri side) 4-0, is our candidate from the Forties. He won 19 caps despite the war depriving him of his career from the age of 25 to 32, let in 18 goals and played in other memorable victories over France, Sweden, Scotland and Portugal. Other standouts from the truncated decade include Tottenham’s title-winning Ted Ditchburn, who won six caps, and the brave, acrobatic, sure-handed Bert Williams of Wolves who succeeded Swift after his international retirement and earned 24 caps over the next six years. Our Fifties options begin with Williams and Gil Merrick of Birmingham City who earned the most caps (23) of the decade and kept five clean sheets. It was Merrick’s misfortune to be in goal for the mortifying, 3-6 defeat by Hungary at Wembley in 1953 and the 7-1 thrashing in the Nepstadion a year later. Admittedly he appeared rattled on both occasions but only because the Magnificent Magyars and his shaky defence left him horribly exposed. The sight of him picking the ball out of the net 13 times have haunted English football ever since but he was not responsible. Those defeats should have marked a paradigm shift but the England system - once again propped up by a crop of excellent players - did not significantly change until much later.  Other notable stalwarts of the decade were Bolton’s 5ft 8in Eddie Hopkinson, the master of one-on-ones who won 13 caps, and Colin McDonald of Burnley who kept goal at the 1958 World Cup and was a dominant, cross-catching doyen of the old school. The Sixties begin with Sheffield Wednesday’s, quick, agile Ron Springett who played 33 times including all four at the 1962 World Cup where he repeatedly saved Walter Winterbottom's side from a proper drubbing in the 3-1 quarter-final defeat by Brazil, and end with Banks of England, Springett’s understudy in Chile, justly recognised as the greatest goalie in the world. It wasn’t just his majesty during England’s 1966 campaign, it was his general safehandedness - helped, trivia fans, in a pre-gloves age, with a generous rub of Beechnut chewing gum-laced saliva on the palms - his rare ability to save gymnastically equally well whether his goal was attacked high or low and his courage. He was so supreme that he restricted other fine goalkeepers such as Peter Bonetti, Gordon West, Alex Stepney and Springett to a handful of caps after Alf Ramsey made him first choice in 1964. Gordon Banks remained Ramsey’s default selection until he lost an eye in a car crash at the age of 34 in Oct 1972, taking in the save against Pele in 1970, the world’s greatest keeper defying the game’s best player by diving downwards, like an hour hand pointing to seven o’clock, and twisting his wrist to ensure he flicked it over the bar to prevent the great striker pouncing on the rebound. But Leicester City did not rate the marginal differentials between an established world-class player and an emerging one as highly as Ramsey and sold Banks to Stoke in 1967 to clear the way for 17-year-old Peter Shilton who owned the Eighties but duelled with the agile, commanding and astute Ray Clemence throughout the preceding decade to be England’s No1. Shilton was a brilliant shot-stopper and all the hours of dedicated, unrelenting practice gave him uncommon agility and aerial mastery. From about 1978 onwards, the error against Poland in 1973 long overcome, Shilton has the right to be considered Banks’ equal and probably superior. The reign of the duopoly left those other excellent keepers, Joe Corrigan, Phil Parkes and Stepney feeding off scraps. When it game to goalkeepers Ron Greenwood had a touch of the Jimmy Armfields at Leeds (“the manager’s indecision is final) but at the start of 1982 after rotating them for five years, he eventually plumped for Shilton who stayed undisputed first choice for the whole of the Eighties. Clemence carried on as the first reserve until 1983 and from 1985 Chris Woods began to make the No13 shirt his second skin during international weeks. Woods made 14 starts in the decade but was mostly stuck on the bench occasionally conceding opportunities for the stand-by role to Gary Bailey, Nigel Spink, Dave Beasant and David Seaman. Poor Martin Hodge, Tony Coton and John Lukic never even got a sniff. Peter Shilton at the start of his international career Credit: Malcolm Croft/PA Bobby Robson stood by Peter Shilton for Italia 90 and kept the 40-year-old keeper between the sticks for the semi-final shootout against West Germany despite having not used all his substitute options and Shilton’s poor record at saving spot-kicks (one from 15). The veteran retired from international football at the end of the tournament but carried on playing for a variety of clubs until 1997. Woods, who once went 1196 minutes without conceding a goal for Rangers in successive matches, became Graham Taylor’s No1 and played at Euro 92 backed up by David Seaman and England’s first million-pound goalie, Nigel Martyn. Seaman came into his own under Terry Venables and proved himself a wonderfully athletic goalkeeper with great agility, positional awareness, sound judgment and, above all, consistency at Euro 96. He saved penalties, too. Glenn Hoddle logically opted for continuity but awarded caps to Ian Walker, David James, Tim Flowers and Martyn when injury or the need to see how the others shaped up demanded.   Seaman continued through the proto-Golden Generation era until his mistakes were compounded by his age, particularly, like Shilton in 1990, a leaden-footedness in reverse. Paul Robinson was anointed for the 2006 World Cup when David Beckham metamorphosed into Sally Bowles in Baden-Baden but Sven Goran-Eriksson also tried out Martyn, James (the Euro 2004) starter and Rob Green. If we consider the McClaren era a coda to the Golden Generation, The Together Again tour after Dean Martin had bailed on Frank Sinatra and Sammy Davis to be replaced by Liza Minelli, small wonder that it was largely a Robinson hangover with supporting roles for Scott Carson, Chris Kirkland, James and Ben Foster. Fabio Capello took a look at James and Green, didn’t like what he saw, blooded Joe Hart then went back to swapping between the other two, £4m a year not being enough to deliver decisiveness. Jack Butland, John Ruddy, Fraser Forster and Tom Heaton have made appearances under Roy Hodgson and Gareth Southgate. Foster, too, has returned from temporary retirement but the seven years since the 4-1 defeat by Germany in Bloemfontein have been the Hart hegemony, under whose dominion we linger. Poor old Whitney Houston did not live long enough for an answer to her question - where do broken Harts go? It’s West Ham, pet. Full backs Now we have established the decades we are going to compare, let us breeze through the options rather than dwelling in such detail to outline the parameters. First choices for full-backs of the Forties are Laurie Scott of Arsenal on the right and captain in all 13 appearances, George Hardwick of Middlesbrough on the left. Depth is added by Derby’s Bert Mozley as a back-up down the right and Manchester United’s Johnny Aston at left-back with 17 caps. George Hardwick, right, greets the Sweden captain Erik Nilsson in  1947 Credit: Reg Birkett/Keystone/Getty Images In the Fifties the selection panel had Spurs’ Alf Ramsey at the beginning of the decade to play on the right and Blackburn’s Bill Eckersley on the left. Birmingham’s Jeff Hall and West Brom’s Don Howe made the right-back slot the preserve of the West Midlands for the rest of the decade while Manchester United’s majestic and adventurous Roger Byrne played 33 successive matches at left-back until his death at Munich during a period when the selection committee made consistency virtually unknown. Tommy Banks, Bolton’s tank, did his best to replace the irreplaceable at the 1958 World Cup and Sheffield United’s Graham Shaw filled in the following year. Take your pick from the Sixties beginning with the two 1966 imperishables George Cohen and Ray Wilson, Jimmy Armfield, a former captain who played on the right at the 1962 World Cup, Keith Newton, who succeeded Cohen and Terry Cooper who took over from his fellow Yorkshireman Wilson at left-back. Add on all those reduced to a handful of caps because of Ramsey’s loyalty - Bob McNab, Paul Reaney, Chris Lawler, Gerry Byrne, Tommy Wright and Cyril Knowles - and you have the kind of riches that would make Gareth Southgate turn green with envy beneath his beard.   George Cohen, left, and Ray Wilson, holding the Jules Rimet Trophy, celebrate victory in 1966 Credit: PA Photos England’s least successful decade in terms of qualification is also, paradoxically, one remembered with a fondness for the quality of English teams – the best of which were bolstered by Scotsmen, Welshmen and Irishmen. England’s full-backs in the Seventies numbered the Liverpool pair Phil Neal and Emlyn Hughes (not that Hughes played there for his club as frequently as he did for the national side). Their versatility was a virtue, as it was for Ipswich’s Mick Mills and Leeds’ Paul Madeley and Trevor Cherry. More orthodox full-backs were plentiful, too: the magnificent Viv Anderson on the right and Don Revie’s choices, Leicester’s Steve Whitworth and QPR’s Dave Clement. On the left Frank Lampard, Alec Lindsay, David Nish, Mike Pejic and Ian Gillard won caps, as did Kevin Beattie playing out of position but in masterly fashion, particularly in the 5-1 thrashing of Scotland in 1975. Kenny Sansom began the Eighties in possession of the No 3 shirt and held it for eight years, playing consistently and with real skill to hold off the challenge of West Brom’s Derek Statham, until the claims of Stuart Pearce in 1988 could be resisted no more. The right side was more problematic once Mills, Neal and Anderson entered their mid thirties. Mick Duxbury had a run there, Danny Thomas could have been the long-term solution save for that rotten injury inflicted by Kevin Maguire while Gary Stevens won 45 caps after his debut during Everton’s title-winning campaign in 1984-85 including Mexico ’86, Euro ’88 and the beginning of Italia 90. Kenny Sansom made the left-back position his own in the Eighties Credit:  Duncan Raban/Allsport/Getty Images Pearce was key at the start of the next decade, becoming captain under Graham Taylor, taking a position in a back three for Euro 96 when Steve McManaman and Darren Anderton played wide, and was recalled at the age of 37 for a couple of starts under Kevin Keegan. Terry Venables initially preferred the Blackburn Rovers left-back Graeme Le Saux and but for injury he would have started Euro 96. Glenn Hoddle restored him as first-choice after a cameo from Andy Hinchcliffe but by the end of the Nineties the left side, in defence and midfield, had become something of a national neurosis. Phil Neville filled in there, playing alongside his brother, Gary, the undisputed No2 when fit. For club and country he succeeded Paul Parker and the challenges of Gary Charles and Rob Jones for the spot were sadly snuffed out by personal problems and injury respectively. Sven Goran-Eriksson promoted Ashley Cole as the man to solve the malaise on the left and over the 12 years of his international career from 2001 onwards he won 107 caps and held Wayne Bridge at bay. Gary Neville missed the 2002 World Cup where Danny Mills stood in but was back straight afterwards and carried on until 2007. Luke Young and Micah Richards stated their claims to be paired with Cole but ultimately Glen Johnson won the contest under Fabio Capello. Johnson stayed in situ under Roy Hodgson until the 2014 World Cup and was even recalled to the squad last year but Kyle Walker, Nathaniel Clyne and Kieran Trippier are now the default options after experiments with Chris Smalling and Phil Jones out wide. Leighton Baines played so well from 2012-14 that he essentially forced Cole into international retirement before the more athletic claims of Danny Rose and Ryan Bertrand did for him. Central defenders   Here we face a problem with the first two post-war decades before the four-back system really took off. A bodged solution for the Forties and Fifties, rather than trying to corral in a wing-half, would be to list the options at centre-half even though normally only one was picked. We don’t even have to do that for the Forties because Billy Wright, the centre-half for much of the Fifties, captain for 11 years and England’s first 100-cap player, played at wing-half for his country at the beginning of his international career, alongside the exemplary Neil Franklin at No 5. Franklin abandoned Stoke in 1950 to move to Colombia and circumvent the maximum wage but his wife did not settle there and he faced the opprobrium of his club and the FA on return, not adding to the 27 caps he earned before he left. Breadth of talent for the decade would be provided by Blackpool’s Harry Johnston, Allenby Chilton of Manchester United and Liverpool’s Bill Jones. Wright made the position his own after the 1954 World Cup where Bill McGarry and Syd Owen had taken the role. Johnston, too, continued to make appearances at the start of the Fifties and Liverpool’s Laurie Hughes stood in for Franklin at the 1950 World Cup. Jim Taylor of Fulham, Burnley’s Mal Barrass and Charlton’s Derek Ufton were also tried but no one could dislodge the 5ft 8in Wright, captain of Wolves and England, golden-haired paragon of the post-war game. The finest partnership of the Sixties, Jackie Charlton and Bobby Moore, came together only a year before they won the World Cup and had it not been for the disgrace of Peter Swan - who won 19 caps as a cultured but powerful stopper between 1960-62 - Charlton may never have joined his brother as a cornerstone of 1966 and all that. Maurice Norman, the Spurs Double-winning centre-half, joined forces with Moore for the 1962 World Cup because Swan was confined to quarters with dysentery in Chile and Brian Labone both preceded Charlton and succeeded him as first choice towards the end of the decade. Norman Hunter served as Moore’s understudy but the consistency of the captain restricted ‘Bites Yer Legs’ to 28 caps over nine seasons. Moore at his peak Credit: AP Photo/files Moore made the last of his 108 appearances in 1973 and by that point there were plenty of contenders for his position, notably Derby County’s Colin Todd, Hunter and Emlyn Hughes. Roy McFarland earned 28 caps in the centre-half slot from 1971-76 before injuries ruined his career and gave Dave Watson a long run as first choice until 1981. Watson won the last of his 65 caps at the age of 35 in June 1982 but was omitted from the final squad for the Spain World Cup, the first for which he had qualified after failures to reach West Germany and Argentina. Phil Thompson of Liverpool and Manchester United’s Brian Greenhoff were given their debuts by Don Revie but only the former flourished after he left for Abu Dhabi. Watson’s role as the tall, raw-bone aerial colossus was filled by Terry Butcher throughout the Eighties though we forget how good his left foot was, his skill overwhelmed by the ‘up and  at ‘em’ patriotism of his persona. Thompson led Liverpool to the 1981 European Cup and partnered the Ipswich defender at the Spain World Cup but Bobby Robson struggled to find a regular foil for Butcher thereafter and worked his way through Alvin Martin, Graham Roberts, Mark Wright, Terry Fenwick, Gary Pallister and a callow Tony Adams before settling on Des Walker for Italia 90 and a return for Wright in a back three. At the start of the Nineties Graham Taylor used Walker, Adams and Pallister but it was his successors, Terry Venables and Glenn Hoddle, who got the best out of Adams. Venables managed it at Euro 96 when Adams was white-knuckling his sobriety for the duration of the tournament and Hoddle benefited from Adams stopping drinking and finding a new poise. Both also used Gareth Southgate in a back three while Sol Campbell, given his debut by Venables, became a regular when Hoddle took charge. Taylor and Hoddle used Martin Keown but Venables never picked him and though Steve Howey, Neil Ruddock, Steve Bould, John Scales, Colin Cooper and David Unsworth were tried, none established himself. The so-called Golden Generation had three stalwarts in Rio Ferdinand, John Terry and Campbell while injuries prevented Jonathan Woodgate and Ledley King from the long international careers their talent deserved. Jamie Carragher won 31 caps over 11 years, Matthew Upson became a favourite of Fabio Capello’s and Steve McClaren gave Joleon Lescott his debut in 2007. Rio Ferdinand and John Terry before the latter racially abused the former's brother Credit: Action Images / Tony O'Brien Ferdinand failed to re-establish himself after missing the 2010 World Cup through injury and ended his England career with 81 caps in 2011, Terry retired from the international game in 2012 after an FA Commission went ahead with charging him over racially abusing Ferdinand’s brother, Anton. Since then we’ve had shaky alliances involving Gary Cahill, Phil Jagielka and Lescott, Chris Smalling, Phil Jones, John Stones and Michael Keane. Central midfielders Again we need to make an adjustment here for the Forties and Fifties and will restrict it to wing-halfs, elevating most inside-forwards to forwards for the sake of this exercise. The immediate post-war era used Billy Wright most often as the right-half and Manchester United’s Henry Cockburn as the left pivot. Portsmouth’s hard-tackling tyro Jimmy Dickinson succeeded Cockburn and played 48 times from 1949-56 while Phil Taylor of Liverpool and Villa’s Eddie Lowe shared six caps on the right. Before the emergence of the Busby Babes - and we must include Eddie Colman here as well as Duncan Edwards because he would have been an international but for his death at Munich at the age of 21 - Wright and Dickinson formed the regular partnership. The claims of Edwards  - simply the most complete player England has ever produced, skilful, forceful, bursting with stamina and natural authority - could no longer be ignored in 1955 and he won 18 caps before he was killed, also at the age of 21. Ron Flowers, who won three titles with Wolves in the Fifties, played once in tandem with Edwards and took over after the 1958 World Cup with Blackburn’s efficient Ronnie Clayton his usual foil after Clayton had seen off Wolves’ Eddie Clamp. Nobby Stiles played at centre-back for Manchester United but was magnificent as Ramsey’s midfield destroyer in the 1966 side, providing the platform from which Bobby Charlton could glide through the gears, the ball under his immaculate control, and ping passes, whip in crosses or fire thunderous shots at goal. Before the two of them joined up, Flowers and Bobby Robson had been the main men with Charlton out on the left wing and after injuries and age diminished Stiles, Tottenham’s Alan Mullery was given the job. Colin Bell, Man City’s Nijinsky, was blooded in 1968 and proved irreplaceable when Martin Buchan effectively ended his career in 1975 after 48 caps. For the first part of the Seventies Martin Peters tucked in from the left and Bell played the dynamic right-half role, sadly without as much freedom as he had to pelt forward for City. Trevor Brooking made his first start in Ramsey’s last match and became the co-key player with Kevin Keegan under Greenwood with his clever passing and penetrative movement. He was so good that he kept the magnificent Glenn Hoddle on the peripheries following his debut in 1978. Hoddle, as brilliant a playmaker as he is rotten as a pundit, would have a system tailored to his strengths for England’s last three games at the 1986 World Cup when crisis forced Robson’s hand. Gerry Francis, Revie’s second captain, would have given both stiff competition had he stayed fit after his 12th cap. Tony Currie and Alan Hudson join the list of inexpertly harnessed talents while Terry McDermott, so intrepid for Liverpool, was denied a consistent run in the side by Ray Wilkins who ended the decade a dynamic box-to-box midfielder with the skill, control and vision that would later make him so comfortable as a ‘sitter’ in Serie A. The entire Eighties can be considered the Bryan Robson years. Bobby was besotted by him but for understandable reasons, as Alex Ferguson outlined: "He had good control, was a decisive tackler, passed the ball well and his combination of stamina and perceptive reading of movement enabled him to make sudden and deadly infiltrations from midfield into the opposition's box." His fitness became a national preoccupation and he lasted two games each of the 1986 and 1990 World Cups after driving England to qualification at both. We saw him at his very best only in 1982 and Euro 88 when he needed support that his team-mates could not provide. Wilkins was his regular partner, replaced by Hoddle for 1988 and Neil Webb thereafter until Paul Gascoigne finally charmed the sceptical Bobby Robson in 1990. Peter Reid, Everton’s tigerish beating heart, took centre stage in 1986 when Robson’s shoulder popped out again but the promise of his Goodison colleague Paul Bracewell was ravaged by  an ankle injury that took almost two years out of his career. England's all-action 'Captain Marvel' Credit: David Cannon/Getty Images Italia 90 began with Robson, Gascoigne and Chris Waddle in a midfield three and ended in unforgettable drama with David Platt in for the captain, having seen off Steve McMahon. Graham Taylor initially stuck with the Platt-Gascoigne axis for the victory over Poland but went with his Aston Villa pairing of Platt and Sid Cowans for the trip to Dublin. Gascoigne’s injuries and drinking alarmed Taylor who kept him around the squad when fit but his absences provoked some of the strangest selections in memory, noticeably Geoff Thomas, Andy Gray and Carlton Palmer. David Batty and Paul Ince injected some quality, the latter a mainstay for Venables and Hoddle - playing with Platt and Gascoigne at Euro 96, Paul Scholes at the 1998 World Cup. Jamie Redknapp was ill-served by injury, Nicky Butt ill-served by managers until Sven Goran-Eriksson’s hand was forced in 2002 by Steven Gerrard’s absence and Ray Parlour by the wrong-headed perception that he was well, in Lovejoy’s words, ‘only Ray Parlour’. Gascoigne lights up Wembley v Scotland at Euro 96 Credit: Stu Forster/Allsport Frank Lampard made his debut in 1999 but did not become a regular for four seasons when his class tempted Eriksson to fudge the biggest decision of his England career and stick Scholes on the left to start the ‘Lampard-Gerrard’ compatibility saga that was to run for the next 11 years. Once Scholes decided he’d had enough after Euro 2004 (ending a 29-game goal drought in his penultimate match), Gerrard and Lampard, Lampard and Gerrard held their positions until Steve McClaren recalled Gareth Barry, who impressed Capello so firmly that he put Gerrard on the left. The Golden Generation and its hangover phase featured cameos from Danny Murphy, Owen Hargreaves (though he normally played wide), Scott ‘Scottie’ Parker, Michael Carrick and Jermaine Jenas though none could either usurp Gerrard or Lampard or make the combination look convincing in tournament football.    Both were still in the squad at the 2014 World Cup though age had taken the shine off them. Lampard was reduced to the bench, Gerrard captained the side but his one-paced partnership with Jordan Henderson left a dodgy defence too exposed to cope with Italy and Uruguay. Capello gave Jack Wilshere his debut at the age of 18 yet seven years later we are still waiting for him, probably forlornly, to be blessed with the physical resilience to regain his verve. Eric Dier has been the default starter with Henderson for the past 18 months but Jake Livermore is currently back in the squad, Tom Cleverly has been and gone, Fabian Delph gets in whenever he manages a couple of games for Man City while James Ward-Prowse and Harry Winks put the twinkle in Gareth Southgate’s eye.   Wide men Should we just end this segment here? Stan Matthews and Tom Finney in the Forties and Fifties are the best pair of wingers England have ever had. In 1948 a forward line of Matthews, Stan Mortensen, Tommy Lawton, Wilf Mannion and Finney put on arguably England’s greatest performance in the 4-0 away victory over Italy but never played together again. Finney was an England regular for 12 years, playing on the right, left and through the middle until 1958 but Matthews, seven years Finney’s senior, was eased out only a year earlier at the age of 42 with 54 caps. He was not deemed as indispensable by myopic selectors who gave run-outs on the wings in his stead to Peter Harris, Les Medley, Billy Elliott and Johnny Berry. Blackburn’s Bryan Douglas took the No7 shirt 36 times and scored 11 goals from 1975-63 and Bobby Charlton won the majority of his caps until 1964 on the left flank, seeing out the decade in a Lancs touchline hegemony.   In the Sixties, after the end of the Douglas-Charlton years, Ramsey tried John Connelly, Terry Paine, Peter Thompson, Derek Temple and Ian Callaghan before deciding on a narrower road to triumph. Alan Ball, essentially an auxiliary central midfielder, edged out to patrol the right for the latter stages of the 1966 World Cup, driving England on with his stamina, skill and heart but victory convinced the manager to stick to his system, using the full-backs for width with Peters augmenting the strikers from a nominal position on the left and Ball from the right. Wingers were out of vogue for most of decade after 1966 - Ian Storey Moore kept the flame flickering briefly and Revie tried with QPR’s Dave Thomas and Merlin himself. Gordon Hill, but it wasn’t until Ron Greenwood picked Manchester City’s Peter Barnes and United’s Steve Coppell together in 1977 that England took flight again. Coppell evolved into a solid right-sided player but at that point was an out and out winger who held the position for five years. Laurie Cunningham made three starts alongside him but by the start of the following decade Greenwood had cramped his own style. John Barnes at the Maracana Credit: David Cannon/Allsport The Eighties should have been the decade of Waddle and John Barnes and in popular memory it remains so but England started the decade with a tighter system, using Coppell and Graham Rix at the 1982 World Cup, and got to the quarter-finals of the 1986 tournament having ditched the wingers for Trevor Steven and Steve Hodge. Villa’s European Cup-winner Tony Morley briefly enraptured Bobby Robson and Mark Chamberlain preceded Waddle into the side by two years but it was largely a Barnes-Waddle duopoly from then on, though rarely in tandem and both, despite their brilliance and that goal at the Maracana, the first scapegoats. Lee Sharpe was the great left hope of the Nineties but faded away, Venables got the best out of Darren Anderton and Steve McManaman to provide hope of a more expansive future until David Beckham took freehold of the No7 shirt and front pages for eight years with a revolving cast of Nick Barmby, Paul Merson or a wing-back on the left. Eriksson blanked McManaman at the start of the 2000s and tried Trevor Sinclair, Scholes and Joe Cole out there to give some balance for Beckham. Stewart Downing became a mainstay of Steve McClaren’s squads while Aaron Lennon and David Bentley were tried out on the right. Ultimately he went back to Beckham. Capello got the best out of Theo Walcott for a few games, pulled Gerrard out to the left and employed James Milner as a Steady Eddie solution. Hodgson switched to 4-2-3-1 and used Raheem Sterling, Danny Welbeck, Wayne Rooney and Adam Lallana to provide width which is largely, with the exception of Rooney, where we remain apart from the saving grace of Rashford. Forwards To the summit … and, controversially, I am going to include some inside-forwards for the first three eras. So, for our post-war pioneers we will go with the aforementioned Mortensen, scorer of 23 goals in 25 games, Lawton, who scored 22 times in 23 starts, and Mannion, ‘the Mozart of football’ as Matthews put it. Len Shackleton and ‘Wor’ Jackie Milburn straddled the Forties and Fifties while Mortensen played on until 1953. The No9 shirt fell vacant in 1948 when Lawton told Walter Winterbottom that the coach didn’t know enough to be giving him advice, Milburn filled it for a spell before Nat Lofthouse won 33 caps and scored 30 goals, including the two at the Praterstadion that made him forever ‘The Lion of Vienna’. Tommy Taylor, one of the eight ‘Flowers of Manchester’ among the 23 victims of the Munich Air Crash, shot powerfully with both feet, had pace, guile and spatial awareness, and the fast-twitch reflexes of the thoroughbred goalscorer. He bagged 16 goals in 19 appearances as the other out-and-out England centre-forward of the decade. Lofty and Tommy were supported by Ivor Broadis and the finest, most astute passer in the team’s history, Johnny Haynes, who was only 27 in 1962 when he played his 56th and final game for England (his 22nd as captain) in the 1962 World Cup quarter-final. He was never as fluent again after a car crash on his return from Chile. Geoff Hurst’s hat-trick in the 1966 World Cup final overshadows anything any other England striker can match. Roger Hunt, the other Wembley immortal, was so crucial to Ramsey’s system because his tireless movement made space for Bobby Charlton to fill that it is forgotten that he scored 18 times in 34 appearances, and Jimmy Greaves, English football’s most cold-hearted and deadly finisher, gave the manager a richness of options. By the end of the Sixties Franny Lee had taken over from Hunt and Greaves as Hurst’s partner for Mexico Sniffer Clarke, the heir to Greaves, made his debut in 1970, Peter Osgood made only a couple of starts and Martin Chivers became Ramsey’s preferred No9 for two years, scoring 13 times in 24 appearances. Rodney Marsh exasperated his manager, Malcolm MacDonald thrashed five past Cyprus for Revie but made his distaste for the man who picked him well known, which meant the search for an ‘oppo’ for Kevin Keegan - the human dynamo, a rampaging forward who could leap, head, shoot and pass with distinction - lasted too long. Bob Latchford found favour for a while as did Stuart Pearson, Mick Channon moved over from the right, Paul Mariner began the international career that would yield 35 caps and 13 goals and Tricky Trevor Francis beguiled us all with his positioning and vision. Kevin Keegan scores against Scotland in 1979 Credit: Steve Powell/Allsport Cyrille Regis would have made more than two starts in the Eighties had he moved to Manchester United from West Brom instead of Coventry but he couldn’t displace the Keegan-Mariner-Woodcock-Francis usual suspects for the World Cup in Spain. Robson ushered Keegan into retirement but kept faith with the others until Gary Lineker, the quicksilver scavenger, gave him no excuse in 1984 and began the march to the Mexico Golden Boot, a World Cup quarter- and semi-final and 48 goals in 80 games. He was at his best with Peter Beardsley - who brought out the best in everyone - but also fed off Mark Hateley, Alan Smith,  and Steve Bull. The Nineties began with Lineker and Italia 90, Taylor then gave him the captaincy and slim pickings to work with up front and he left the scene in 1992 when shown the managerial big curly finger despite England desperately requiring a goal against Sweden. Taylor turned to Ian Wright who made a terrific return under Hoddle after being ignored by Venables and Les Ferdinand. Alan Shearer, impressive at Southampton, unstoppable except by injury at  Blackburn, won his first cap  in 1992 but had scored only five times in 23 appearances before the start of Euro 96 and hadn’t managed an international goal for 21 months. He hit five in the five games, was elevated to the captaincy for four years and ended still the talisman, though far less mobile, in 2000 with 30 goals. Teddy Sheringham played the Beardsley role for him perfectly and kept Andy Cole out of the squad and Robbie Fowler out of the side until Michael Owen came off the bench to score against Romania at France 98 and could not be left out again. Two games later he scored the wonder goal against Argentina that sounded the trumpets for his charge to the Ballon d’Or three years later. Michael Owen scores against Argentina at the 1998 World Cup Credit: Pawel Kopczynski REUTERS Owen was never really considered part of the Golden Generation because of a certain diffidence but he was its spearhead, when fit, and its yearned for king over the water when absent. He began the decade with Shearer, combined with club-mate Emile Heskey for the 1-5 in Munich and spent time up-front with Fowler and Darius Vassell before Eriksson promoted Wayne Rooney in 2003. Over 14 years Rooney would surpass Bobby Charlton’s England goalscoring record, beginning by playing off the cuff with boundless zip and chutzpah, maturing into that rarity, a workhorse with ebullient, irrepressible swagger and ending up a shadow of electrifying presence he once had been. During the decade Rooney played up top with Owen, Jermaine Defoe and Peter Crouch most frequently. Dean Ashton seemed to fit the part but it wasn’t to be. Rooney has been the key striker and player of this last decade, too and very much undroppable until Southgate took charge. Opportunities for Jay Rodriguez, Andy Carroll and Daniel Sturridge have been curtailed by long-term injuries, Hodgson thought it wise to take Rickie Lambert to the World Cup but in 2015 Harry Kane was given a chance and grabbed it. Jamie Vardy remains among the alternatives along with Sturridge and the second (third and fourth) coming of Defoe.   Conclusion How do you come up with a decision on the relative strengths and weaknesses over eight decades? Subjectively, obviously, but without prejudice:  Goalkeepers: Seventies - Banks, Shilton, Clemence. Full-backs: Sixties - Armfield, Cohen, Wilson, Cooper. Central defenders: Seventies - Moore, Labone, Todd, McFarland, Thompson. Central midfielders: Eighties - Robson, Wilkins, Gascoigne, Hoddle. Wide men: Fifties - Matthews, Finney, Charlton R.   Strikers: Nineties - Lineker, Shearer, Owen, Beardsley.  Please feel free to dispute this 23-man squad selection in the comments section. 

The England dream team by eras: which decade comes out on top?

Scroll to the bottom of the article for Rob Bagchi's all-time 23-man England squad August is traditionally silly season for journalism but on the football beat the two-week autumn and spring international breaks are the cue for extreme resourcefulness. Watching England toil through yet another developmental stage, the slimness of their options and assets in central midfield and the heart of defence as blatant as the consoling promise of Harry Kane and Marcus Rashford, made us wonder in which eras each part of the team have been at their strongest? Was English goalkeeping, say, at its apex in the 1970s or have the wide players of the Forties never been surpassed? For once a decision to truncate the period for analysis is not motivated by either sloth or rampant neophilia. England rejoined Fifa only in 1946 and their first international tournament was the 1950 World Cup, having spurned the first three.  Therefore it makes sense to start in the immediate post-war years and to help the process we will look at each phase for every sector - goalkeeper, full-backs, central defenders, midfielders, wide players and strikers - look at the players picked and the breadth of quality alternatives. Some will represent generations or decades, others distinct stages in the team’s evolution. We’ll begin in goal and chart the progression, chronological at least, from Frank Swift and his primrose polo neck sweater to Joe Hart and his binman chic high-vis short-sleeves, concluding with our stab at an answer. Goalkeepers If you’ve been paying attention to anything involving England without being so bored you’ve felt compelled to make a paper plane, our first contender will be obvious. Frank Swift, the wok-handed, spring-heeled Manchester City goalkeeper who pioneered the throw-out, was the first keeper to captain England and as the man in goal when England travelled to Turin to defeat the double world champions Italy (a pre Superga full-strength Azzurri side) 4-0, is our candidate from the Forties. He won 19 caps despite the war depriving him of his career from the age of 25 to 32, let in 18 goals and played in other memorable victories over France, Sweden, Scotland and Portugal. Other standouts from the truncated decade include Tottenham’s title-winning Ted Ditchburn, who won six caps, and the brave, acrobatic, sure-handed Bert Williams of Wolves who succeeded Swift after his international retirement and earned 24 caps over the next six years. Our Fifties options begin with Williams and Gil Merrick of Birmingham City who earned the most caps (23) of the decade and kept five clean sheets. It was Merrick’s misfortune to be in goal for the mortifying, 3-6 defeat by Hungary at Wembley in 1953 and the 7-1 thrashing in the Nepstadion a year later. Admittedly he appeared rattled on both occasions but only because the Magnificent Magyars and his shaky defence left him horribly exposed. The sight of him picking the ball out of the net 13 times have haunted English football ever since but he was not responsible. Those defeats should have marked a paradigm shift but the England system - once again propped up by a crop of excellent players - did not significantly change until much later.  Other notable stalwarts of the decade were Bolton’s 5ft 8in Eddie Hopkinson, the master of one-on-ones who won 13 caps, and Colin McDonald of Burnley who kept goal at the 1958 World Cup and was a dominant, cross-catching doyen of the old school. The Sixties begin with Sheffield Wednesday’s, quick, agile Ron Springett who played 33 times including all four at the 1962 World Cup where he repeatedly saved Walter Winterbottom's side from a proper drubbing in the 3-1 quarter-final defeat by Brazil, and end with Banks of England, Springett’s understudy in Chile, justly recognised as the greatest goalie in the world. It wasn’t just his majesty during England’s 1966 campaign, it was his general safehandedness - helped, trivia fans, in a pre-gloves age, with a generous rub of Beechnut chewing gum-laced saliva on the palms - his rare ability to save gymnastically equally well whether his goal was attacked high or low and his courage. He was so supreme that he restricted other fine goalkeepers such as Peter Bonetti, Gordon West, Alex Stepney and Springett to a handful of caps after Alf Ramsey made him first choice in 1964. Gordon Banks remained Ramsey’s default selection until he lost an eye in a car crash at the age of 34 in Oct 1972, taking in the save against Pele in 1970, the world’s greatest keeper defying the game’s best player by diving downwards, like an hour hand pointing to seven o’clock, and twisting his wrist to ensure he flicked it over the bar to prevent the great striker pouncing on the rebound. But Leicester City did not rate the marginal differentials between an established world-class player and an emerging one as highly as Ramsey and sold Banks to Stoke in 1967 to clear the way for 17-year-old Peter Shilton who owned the Eighties but duelled with the agile, commanding and astute Ray Clemence throughout the preceding decade to be England’s No1. Shilton was a brilliant shot-stopper and all the hours of dedicated, unrelenting practice gave him uncommon agility and aerial mastery. From about 1978 onwards, the error against Poland in 1973 long overcome, Shilton has the right to be considered Banks’ equal and probably superior. The reign of the duopoly left those other excellent keepers, Joe Corrigan, Phil Parkes and Stepney feeding off scraps. When it game to goalkeepers Ron Greenwood had a touch of the Jimmy Armfields at Leeds (“the manager’s indecision is final) but at the start of 1982 after rotating them for five years, he eventually plumped for Shilton who stayed undisputed first choice for the whole of the Eighties. Clemence carried on as the first reserve until 1983 and from 1985 Chris Woods began to make the No13 shirt his second skin during international weeks. Woods made 14 starts in the decade but was mostly stuck on the bench occasionally conceding opportunities for the stand-by role to Gary Bailey, Nigel Spink, Dave Beasant and David Seaman. Poor Martin Hodge, Tony Coton and John Lukic never even got a sniff. Peter Shilton at the start of his international career Credit: Malcolm Croft/PA Bobby Robson stood by Peter Shilton for Italia 90 and kept the 40-year-old keeper between the sticks for the semi-final shootout against West Germany despite having not used all his substitute options and Shilton’s poor record at saving spot-kicks (one from 15). The veteran retired from international football at the end of the tournament but carried on playing for a variety of clubs until 1997. Woods, who once went 1196 minutes without conceding a goal for Rangers in successive matches, became Graham Taylor’s No1 and played at Euro 92 backed up by David Seaman and England’s first million-pound goalie, Nigel Martyn. Seaman came into his own under Terry Venables and proved himself a wonderfully athletic goalkeeper with great agility, positional awareness, sound judgment and, above all, consistency at Euro 96. He saved penalties, too. Glenn Hoddle logically opted for continuity but awarded caps to Ian Walker, David James, Tim Flowers and Martyn when injury or the need to see how the others shaped up demanded.   Seaman continued through the proto-Golden Generation era until his mistakes were compounded by his age, particularly, like Shilton in 1990, a leaden-footedness in reverse. Paul Robinson was anointed for the 2006 World Cup when David Beckham metamorphosed into Sally Bowles in Baden-Baden but Sven Goran-Eriksson also tried out Martyn, James (the Euro 2004) starter and Rob Green. If we consider the McClaren era a coda to the Golden Generation, The Together Again tour after Dean Martin had bailed on Frank Sinatra and Sammy Davis to be replaced by Liza Minelli, small wonder that it was largely a Robinson hangover with supporting roles for Scott Carson, Chris Kirkland, James and Ben Foster. Fabio Capello took a look at James and Green, didn’t like what he saw, blooded Joe Hart then went back to swapping between the other two, £4m a year not being enough to deliver decisiveness. Jack Butland, John Ruddy, Fraser Forster and Tom Heaton have made appearances under Roy Hodgson and Gareth Southgate. Foster, too, has returned from temporary retirement but the seven years since the 4-1 defeat by Germany in Bloemfontein have been the Hart hegemony, under whose dominion we linger. Poor old Whitney Houston did not live long enough for an answer to her question - where do broken Harts go? It’s West Ham, pet. Full backs Now we have established the decades we are going to compare, let us breeze through the options rather than dwelling in such detail to outline the parameters. First choices for full-backs of the Forties are Laurie Scott of Arsenal on the right and captain in all 13 appearances, George Hardwick of Middlesbrough on the left. Depth is added by Derby’s Bert Mozley as a back-up down the right and Manchester United’s Johnny Aston at left-back with 17 caps. George Hardwick, right, greets the Sweden captain Erik Nilsson in  1947 Credit: Reg Birkett/Keystone/Getty Images In the Fifties the selection panel had Spurs’ Alf Ramsey at the beginning of the decade to play on the right and Blackburn’s Bill Eckersley on the left. Birmingham’s Jeff Hall and West Brom’s Don Howe made the right-back slot the preserve of the West Midlands for the rest of the decade while Manchester United’s majestic and adventurous Roger Byrne played 33 successive matches at left-back until his death at Munich during a period when the selection committee made consistency virtually unknown. Tommy Banks, Bolton’s tank, did his best to replace the irreplaceable at the 1958 World Cup and Sheffield United’s Graham Shaw filled in the following year. Take your pick from the Sixties beginning with the two 1966 imperishables George Cohen and Ray Wilson, Jimmy Armfield, a former captain who played on the right at the 1962 World Cup, Keith Newton, who succeeded Cohen and Terry Cooper who took over from his fellow Yorkshireman Wilson at left-back. Add on all those reduced to a handful of caps because of Ramsey’s loyalty - Bob McNab, Paul Reaney, Chris Lawler, Gerry Byrne, Tommy Wright and Cyril Knowles - and you have the kind of riches that would make Gareth Southgate turn green with envy beneath his beard.   George Cohen, left, and Ray Wilson, holding the Jules Rimet Trophy, celebrate victory in 1966 Credit: PA Photos England’s least successful decade in terms of qualification is also, paradoxically, one remembered with a fondness for the quality of English teams – the best of which were bolstered by Scotsmen, Welshmen and Irishmen. England’s full-backs in the Seventies numbered the Liverpool pair Phil Neal and Emlyn Hughes (not that Hughes played there for his club as frequently as he did for the national side). Their versatility was a virtue, as it was for Ipswich’s Mick Mills and Leeds’ Paul Madeley and Trevor Cherry. More orthodox full-backs were plentiful, too: the magnificent Viv Anderson on the right and Don Revie’s choices, Leicester’s Steve Whitworth and QPR’s Dave Clement. On the left Frank Lampard, Alec Lindsay, David Nish, Mike Pejic and Ian Gillard won caps, as did Kevin Beattie playing out of position but in masterly fashion, particularly in the 5-1 thrashing of Scotland in 1975. Kenny Sansom began the Eighties in possession of the No 3 shirt and held it for eight years, playing consistently and with real skill to hold off the challenge of West Brom’s Derek Statham, until the claims of Stuart Pearce in 1988 could be resisted no more. The right side was more problematic once Mills, Neal and Anderson entered their mid thirties. Mick Duxbury had a run there, Danny Thomas could have been the long-term solution save for that rotten injury inflicted by Kevin Maguire while Gary Stevens won 45 caps after his debut during Everton’s title-winning campaign in 1984-85 including Mexico ’86, Euro ’88 and the beginning of Italia 90. Kenny Sansom made the left-back position his own in the Eighties Credit:  Duncan Raban/Allsport/Getty Images Pearce was key at the start of the next decade, becoming captain under Graham Taylor, taking a position in a back three for Euro 96 when Steve McManaman and Darren Anderton played wide, and was recalled at the age of 37 for a couple of starts under Kevin Keegan. Terry Venables initially preferred the Blackburn Rovers left-back Graeme Le Saux and but for injury he would have started Euro 96. Glenn Hoddle restored him as first-choice after a cameo from Andy Hinchcliffe but by the end of the Nineties the left side, in defence and midfield, had become something of a national neurosis. Phil Neville filled in there, playing alongside his brother, Gary, the undisputed No2 when fit. For club and country he succeeded Paul Parker and the challenges of Gary Charles and Rob Jones for the spot were sadly snuffed out by personal problems and injury respectively. Sven Goran-Eriksson promoted Ashley Cole as the man to solve the malaise on the left and over the 12 years of his international career from 2001 onwards he won 107 caps and held Wayne Bridge at bay. Gary Neville missed the 2002 World Cup where Danny Mills stood in but was back straight afterwards and carried on until 2007. Luke Young and Micah Richards stated their claims to be paired with Cole but ultimately Glen Johnson won the contest under Fabio Capello. Johnson stayed in situ under Roy Hodgson until the 2014 World Cup and was even recalled to the squad last year but Kyle Walker, Nathaniel Clyne and Kieran Trippier are now the default options after experiments with Chris Smalling and Phil Jones out wide. Leighton Baines played so well from 2012-14 that he essentially forced Cole into international retirement before the more athletic claims of Danny Rose and Ryan Bertrand did for him. Central defenders   Here we face a problem with the first two post-war decades before the four-back system really took off. A bodged solution for the Forties and Fifties, rather than trying to corral in a wing-half, would be to list the options at centre-half even though normally only one was picked. We don’t even have to do that for the Forties because Billy Wright, the centre-half for much of the Fifties, captain for 11 years and England’s first 100-cap player, played at wing-half for his country at the beginning of his international career, alongside the exemplary Neil Franklin at No 5. Franklin abandoned Stoke in 1950 to move to Colombia and circumvent the maximum wage but his wife did not settle there and he faced the opprobrium of his club and the FA on return, not adding to the 27 caps he earned before he left. Breadth of talent for the decade would be provided by Blackpool’s Harry Johnston, Allenby Chilton of Manchester United and Liverpool’s Bill Jones. Wright made the position his own after the 1954 World Cup where Bill McGarry and Syd Owen had taken the role. Johnston, too, continued to make appearances at the start of the Fifties and Liverpool’s Laurie Hughes stood in for Franklin at the 1950 World Cup. Jim Taylor of Fulham, Burnley’s Mal Barrass and Charlton’s Derek Ufton were also tried but no one could dislodge the 5ft 8in Wright, captain of Wolves and England, golden-haired paragon of the post-war game. The finest partnership of the Sixties, Jackie Charlton and Bobby Moore, came together only a year before they won the World Cup and had it not been for the disgrace of Peter Swan - who won 19 caps as a cultured but powerful stopper between 1960-62 - Charlton may never have joined his brother as a cornerstone of 1966 and all that. Maurice Norman, the Spurs Double-winning centre-half, joined forces with Moore for the 1962 World Cup because Swan was confined to quarters with dysentery in Chile and Brian Labone both preceded Charlton and succeeded him as first choice towards the end of the decade. Norman Hunter served as Moore’s understudy but the consistency of the captain restricted ‘Bites Yer Legs’ to 28 caps over nine seasons. Moore at his peak Credit: AP Photo/files Moore made the last of his 108 appearances in 1973 and by that point there were plenty of contenders for his position, notably Derby County’s Colin Todd, Hunter and Emlyn Hughes. Roy McFarland earned 28 caps in the centre-half slot from 1971-76 before injuries ruined his career and gave Dave Watson a long run as first choice until 1981. Watson won the last of his 65 caps at the age of 35 in June 1982 but was omitted from the final squad for the Spain World Cup, the first for which he had qualified after failures to reach West Germany and Argentina. Phil Thompson of Liverpool and Manchester United’s Brian Greenhoff were given their debuts by Don Revie but only the former flourished after he left for Abu Dhabi. Watson’s role as the tall, raw-bone aerial colossus was filled by Terry Butcher throughout the Eighties though we forget how good his left foot was, his skill overwhelmed by the ‘up and  at ‘em’ patriotism of his persona. Thompson led Liverpool to the 1981 European Cup and partnered the Ipswich defender at the Spain World Cup but Bobby Robson struggled to find a regular foil for Butcher thereafter and worked his way through Alvin Martin, Graham Roberts, Mark Wright, Terry Fenwick, Gary Pallister and a callow Tony Adams before settling on Des Walker for Italia 90 and a return for Wright in a back three. At the start of the Nineties Graham Taylor used Walker, Adams and Pallister but it was his successors, Terry Venables and Glenn Hoddle, who got the best out of Adams. Venables managed it at Euro 96 when Adams was white-knuckling his sobriety for the duration of the tournament and Hoddle benefited from Adams stopping drinking and finding a new poise. Both also used Gareth Southgate in a back three while Sol Campbell, given his debut by Venables, became a regular when Hoddle took charge. Taylor and Hoddle used Martin Keown but Venables never picked him and though Steve Howey, Neil Ruddock, Steve Bould, John Scales, Colin Cooper and David Unsworth were tried, none established himself. The so-called Golden Generation had three stalwarts in Rio Ferdinand, John Terry and Campbell while injuries prevented Jonathan Woodgate and Ledley King from the long international careers their talent deserved. Jamie Carragher won 31 caps over 11 years, Matthew Upson became a favourite of Fabio Capello’s and Steve McClaren gave Joleon Lescott his debut in 2007. Rio Ferdinand and John Terry before the latter racially abused the former's brother Credit: Action Images / Tony O'Brien Ferdinand failed to re-establish himself after missing the 2010 World Cup through injury and ended his England career with 81 caps in 2011, Terry retired from the international game in 2012 after an FA Commission went ahead with charging him over racially abusing Ferdinand’s brother, Anton. Since then we’ve had shaky alliances involving Gary Cahill, Phil Jagielka and Lescott, Chris Smalling, Phil Jones, John Stones and Michael Keane. Central midfielders Again we need to make an adjustment here for the Forties and Fifties and will restrict it to wing-halfs, elevating most inside-forwards to forwards for the sake of this exercise. The immediate post-war era used Billy Wright most often as the right-half and Manchester United’s Henry Cockburn as the left pivot. Portsmouth’s hard-tackling tyro Jimmy Dickinson succeeded Cockburn and played 48 times from 1949-56 while Phil Taylor of Liverpool and Villa’s Eddie Lowe shared six caps on the right. Before the emergence of the Busby Babes - and we must include Eddie Colman here as well as Duncan Edwards because he would have been an international but for his death at Munich at the age of 21 - Wright and Dickinson formed the regular partnership. The claims of Edwards  - simply the most complete player England has ever produced, skilful, forceful, bursting with stamina and natural authority - could no longer be ignored in 1955 and he won 18 caps before he was killed, also at the age of 21. Ron Flowers, who won three titles with Wolves in the Fifties, played once in tandem with Edwards and took over after the 1958 World Cup with Blackburn’s efficient Ronnie Clayton his usual foil after Clayton had seen off Wolves’ Eddie Clamp. Nobby Stiles played at centre-back for Manchester United but was magnificent as Ramsey’s midfield destroyer in the 1966 side, providing the platform from which Bobby Charlton could glide through the gears, the ball under his immaculate control, and ping passes, whip in crosses or fire thunderous shots at goal. Before the two of them joined up, Flowers and Bobby Robson had been the main men with Charlton out on the left wing and after injuries and age diminished Stiles, Tottenham’s Alan Mullery was given the job. Colin Bell, Man City’s Nijinsky, was blooded in 1968 and proved irreplaceable when Martin Buchan effectively ended his career in 1975 after 48 caps. For the first part of the Seventies Martin Peters tucked in from the left and Bell played the dynamic right-half role, sadly without as much freedom as he had to pelt forward for City. Trevor Brooking made his first start in Ramsey’s last match and became the co-key player with Kevin Keegan under Greenwood with his clever passing and penetrative movement. He was so good that he kept the magnificent Glenn Hoddle on the peripheries following his debut in 1978. Hoddle, as brilliant a playmaker as he is rotten as a pundit, would have a system tailored to his strengths for England’s last three games at the 1986 World Cup when crisis forced Robson’s hand. Gerry Francis, Revie’s second captain, would have given both stiff competition had he stayed fit after his 12th cap. Tony Currie and Alan Hudson join the list of inexpertly harnessed talents while Terry McDermott, so intrepid for Liverpool, was denied a consistent run in the side by Ray Wilkins who ended the decade a dynamic box-to-box midfielder with the skill, control and vision that would later make him so comfortable as a ‘sitter’ in Serie A. The entire Eighties can be considered the Bryan Robson years. Bobby was besotted by him but for understandable reasons, as Alex Ferguson outlined: "He had good control, was a decisive tackler, passed the ball well and his combination of stamina and perceptive reading of movement enabled him to make sudden and deadly infiltrations from midfield into the opposition's box." His fitness became a national preoccupation and he lasted two games each of the 1986 and 1990 World Cups after driving England to qualification at both. We saw him at his very best only in 1982 and Euro 88 when he needed support that his team-mates could not provide. Wilkins was his regular partner, replaced by Hoddle for 1988 and Neil Webb thereafter until Paul Gascoigne finally charmed the sceptical Bobby Robson in 1990. Peter Reid, Everton’s tigerish beating heart, took centre stage in 1986 when Robson’s shoulder popped out again but the promise of his Goodison colleague Paul Bracewell was ravaged by  an ankle injury that took almost two years out of his career. England's all-action 'Captain Marvel' Credit: David Cannon/Getty Images Italia 90 began with Robson, Gascoigne and Chris Waddle in a midfield three and ended in unforgettable drama with David Platt in for the captain, having seen off Steve McMahon. Graham Taylor initially stuck with the Platt-Gascoigne axis for the victory over Poland but went with his Aston Villa pairing of Platt and Sid Cowans for the trip to Dublin. Gascoigne’s injuries and drinking alarmed Taylor who kept him around the squad when fit but his absences provoked some of the strangest selections in memory, noticeably Geoff Thomas, Andy Gray and Carlton Palmer. David Batty and Paul Ince injected some quality, the latter a mainstay for Venables and Hoddle - playing with Platt and Gascoigne at Euro 96, Paul Scholes at the 1998 World Cup. Jamie Redknapp was ill-served by injury, Nicky Butt ill-served by managers until Sven Goran-Eriksson’s hand was forced in 2002 by Steven Gerrard’s absence and Ray Parlour by the wrong-headed perception that he was well, in Lovejoy’s words, ‘only Ray Parlour’. Gascoigne lights up Wembley v Scotland at Euro 96 Credit: Stu Forster/Allsport Frank Lampard made his debut in 1999 but did not become a regular for four seasons when his class tempted Eriksson to fudge the biggest decision of his England career and stick Scholes on the left to start the ‘Lampard-Gerrard’ compatibility saga that was to run for the next 11 years. Once Scholes decided he’d had enough after Euro 2004 (ending a 29-game goal drought in his penultimate match), Gerrard and Lampard, Lampard and Gerrard held their positions until Steve McClaren recalled Gareth Barry, who impressed Capello so firmly that he put Gerrard on the left. The Golden Generation and its hangover phase featured cameos from Danny Murphy, Owen Hargreaves (though he normally played wide), Scott ‘Scottie’ Parker, Michael Carrick and Jermaine Jenas though none could either usurp Gerrard or Lampard or make the combination look convincing in tournament football.    Both were still in the squad at the 2014 World Cup though age had taken the shine off them. Lampard was reduced to the bench, Gerrard captained the side but his one-paced partnership with Jordan Henderson left a dodgy defence too exposed to cope with Italy and Uruguay. Capello gave Jack Wilshere his debut at the age of 18 yet seven years later we are still waiting for him, probably forlornly, to be blessed with the physical resilience to regain his verve. Eric Dier has been the default starter with Henderson for the past 18 months but Jake Livermore is currently back in the squad, Tom Cleverly has been and gone, Fabian Delph gets in whenever he manages a couple of games for Man City while James Ward-Prowse and Harry Winks put the twinkle in Gareth Southgate’s eye.   Wide men Should we just end this segment here? Stan Matthews and Tom Finney in the Forties and Fifties are the best pair of wingers England have ever had. In 1948 a forward line of Matthews, Stan Mortensen, Tommy Lawton, Wilf Mannion and Finney put on arguably England’s greatest performance in the 4-0 away victory over Italy but never played together again. Finney was an England regular for 12 years, playing on the right, left and through the middle until 1958 but Matthews, seven years Finney’s senior, was eased out only a year earlier at the age of 42 with 54 caps. He was not deemed as indispensable by myopic selectors who gave run-outs on the wings in his stead to Peter Harris, Les Medley, Billy Elliott and Johnny Berry. Blackburn’s Bryan Douglas took the No7 shirt 36 times and scored 11 goals from 1975-63 and Bobby Charlton won the majority of his caps until 1964 on the left flank, seeing out the decade in a Lancs touchline hegemony.   In the Sixties, after the end of the Douglas-Charlton years, Ramsey tried John Connelly, Terry Paine, Peter Thompson, Derek Temple and Ian Callaghan before deciding on a narrower road to triumph. Alan Ball, essentially an auxiliary central midfielder, edged out to patrol the right for the latter stages of the 1966 World Cup, driving England on with his stamina, skill and heart but victory convinced the manager to stick to his system, using the full-backs for width with Peters augmenting the strikers from a nominal position on the left and Ball from the right. Wingers were out of vogue for most of decade after 1966 - Ian Storey Moore kept the flame flickering briefly and Revie tried with QPR’s Dave Thomas and Merlin himself. Gordon Hill, but it wasn’t until Ron Greenwood picked Manchester City’s Peter Barnes and United’s Steve Coppell together in 1977 that England took flight again. Coppell evolved into a solid right-sided player but at that point was an out and out winger who held the position for five years. Laurie Cunningham made three starts alongside him but by the start of the following decade Greenwood had cramped his own style. John Barnes at the Maracana Credit: David Cannon/Allsport The Eighties should have been the decade of Waddle and John Barnes and in popular memory it remains so but England started the decade with a tighter system, using Coppell and Graham Rix at the 1982 World Cup, and got to the quarter-finals of the 1986 tournament having ditched the wingers for Trevor Steven and Steve Hodge. Villa’s European Cup-winner Tony Morley briefly enraptured Bobby Robson and Mark Chamberlain preceded Waddle into the side by two years but it was largely a Barnes-Waddle duopoly from then on, though rarely in tandem and both, despite their brilliance and that goal at the Maracana, the first scapegoats. Lee Sharpe was the great left hope of the Nineties but faded away, Venables got the best out of Darren Anderton and Steve McManaman to provide hope of a more expansive future until David Beckham took freehold of the No7 shirt and front pages for eight years with a revolving cast of Nick Barmby, Paul Merson or a wing-back on the left. Eriksson blanked McManaman at the start of the 2000s and tried Trevor Sinclair, Scholes and Joe Cole out there to give some balance for Beckham. Stewart Downing became a mainstay of Steve McClaren’s squads while Aaron Lennon and David Bentley were tried out on the right. Ultimately he went back to Beckham. Capello got the best out of Theo Walcott for a few games, pulled Gerrard out to the left and employed James Milner as a Steady Eddie solution. Hodgson switched to 4-2-3-1 and used Raheem Sterling, Danny Welbeck, Wayne Rooney and Adam Lallana to provide width which is largely, with the exception of Rooney, where we remain apart from the saving grace of Rashford. Forwards To the summit … and, controversially, I am going to include some inside-forwards for the first three eras. So, for our post-war pioneers we will go with the aforementioned Mortensen, scorer of 23 goals in 25 games, Lawton, who scored 22 times in 23 starts, and Mannion, ‘the Mozart of football’ as Matthews put it. Len Shackleton and ‘Wor’ Jackie Milburn straddled the Forties and Fifties while Mortensen played on until 1953. The No9 shirt fell vacant in 1948 when Lawton told Walter Winterbottom that the coach didn’t know enough to be giving him advice, Milburn filled it for a spell before Nat Lofthouse won 33 caps and scored 30 goals, including the two at the Praterstadion that made him forever ‘The Lion of Vienna’. Tommy Taylor, one of the eight ‘Flowers of Manchester’ among the 23 victims of the Munich Air Crash, shot powerfully with both feet, had pace, guile and spatial awareness, and the fast-twitch reflexes of the thoroughbred goalscorer. He bagged 16 goals in 19 appearances as the other out-and-out England centre-forward of the decade. Lofty and Tommy were supported by Ivor Broadis and the finest, most astute passer in the team’s history, Johnny Haynes, who was only 27 in 1962 when he played his 56th and final game for England (his 22nd as captain) in the 1962 World Cup quarter-final. He was never as fluent again after a car crash on his return from Chile. Geoff Hurst’s hat-trick in the 1966 World Cup final overshadows anything any other England striker can match. Roger Hunt, the other Wembley immortal, was so crucial to Ramsey’s system because his tireless movement made space for Bobby Charlton to fill that it is forgotten that he scored 18 times in 34 appearances, and Jimmy Greaves, English football’s most cold-hearted and deadly finisher, gave the manager a richness of options. By the end of the Sixties Franny Lee had taken over from Hunt and Greaves as Hurst’s partner for Mexico Sniffer Clarke, the heir to Greaves, made his debut in 1970, Peter Osgood made only a couple of starts and Martin Chivers became Ramsey’s preferred No9 for two years, scoring 13 times in 24 appearances. Rodney Marsh exasperated his manager, Malcolm MacDonald thrashed five past Cyprus for Revie but made his distaste for the man who picked him well known, which meant the search for an ‘oppo’ for Kevin Keegan - the human dynamo, a rampaging forward who could leap, head, shoot and pass with distinction - lasted too long. Bob Latchford found favour for a while as did Stuart Pearson, Mick Channon moved over from the right, Paul Mariner began the international career that would yield 35 caps and 13 goals and Tricky Trevor Francis beguiled us all with his positioning and vision. Kevin Keegan scores against Scotland in 1979 Credit: Steve Powell/Allsport Cyrille Regis would have made more than two starts in the Eighties had he moved to Manchester United from West Brom instead of Coventry but he couldn’t displace the Keegan-Mariner-Woodcock-Francis usual suspects for the World Cup in Spain. Robson ushered Keegan into retirement but kept faith with the others until Gary Lineker, the quicksilver scavenger, gave him no excuse in 1984 and began the march to the Mexico Golden Boot, a World Cup quarter- and semi-final and 48 goals in 80 games. He was at his best with Peter Beardsley - who brought out the best in everyone - but also fed off Mark Hateley, Alan Smith,  and Steve Bull. The Nineties began with Lineker and Italia 90, Taylor then gave him the captaincy and slim pickings to work with up front and he left the scene in 1992 when shown the managerial big curly finger despite England desperately requiring a goal against Sweden. Taylor turned to Ian Wright who made a terrific return under Hoddle after being ignored by Venables and Les Ferdinand. Alan Shearer, impressive at Southampton, unstoppable except by injury at  Blackburn, won his first cap  in 1992 but had scored only five times in 23 appearances before the start of Euro 96 and hadn’t managed an international goal for 21 months. He hit five in the five games, was elevated to the captaincy for four years and ended still the talisman, though far less mobile, in 2000 with 30 goals. Teddy Sheringham played the Beardsley role for him perfectly and kept Andy Cole out of the squad and Robbie Fowler out of the side until Michael Owen came off the bench to score against Romania at France 98 and could not be left out again. Two games later he scored the wonder goal against Argentina that sounded the trumpets for his charge to the Ballon d’Or three years later. Michael Owen scores against Argentina at the 1998 World Cup Credit: Pawel Kopczynski REUTERS Owen was never really considered part of the Golden Generation because of a certain diffidence but he was its spearhead, when fit, and its yearned for king over the water when absent. He began the decade with Shearer, combined with club-mate Emile Heskey for the 1-5 in Munich and spent time up-front with Fowler and Darius Vassell before Eriksson promoted Wayne Rooney in 2003. Over 14 years Rooney would surpass Bobby Charlton’s England goalscoring record, beginning by playing off the cuff with boundless zip and chutzpah, maturing into that rarity, a workhorse with ebullient, irrepressible swagger and ending up a shadow of electrifying presence he once had been. During the decade Rooney played up top with Owen, Jermaine Defoe and Peter Crouch most frequently. Dean Ashton seemed to fit the part but it wasn’t to be. Rooney has been the key striker and player of this last decade, too and very much undroppable until Southgate took charge. Opportunities for Jay Rodriguez, Andy Carroll and Daniel Sturridge have been curtailed by long-term injuries, Hodgson thought it wise to take Rickie Lambert to the World Cup but in 2015 Harry Kane was given a chance and grabbed it. Jamie Vardy remains among the alternatives along with Sturridge and the second (third and fourth) coming of Defoe.   Conclusion How do you come up with a decision on the relative strengths and weaknesses over eight decades? Subjectively, obviously, but without prejudice:  Goalkeepers: Seventies - Banks, Shilton, Clemence. Full-backs: Sixties - Armfield, Cohen, Wilson, Cooper. Central defenders: Seventies - Moore, Labone, Todd, McFarland, Thompson. Central midfielders: Eighties - Robson, Wilkins, Gascoigne, Hoddle. Wide men: Fifties - Matthews, Finney, Charlton R.   Strikers: Nineties - Lineker, Shearer, Owen, Beardsley.  Please feel free to dispute this 23-man squad selection in the comments section. 

The England dream team by eras: which decade comes out on top?

Scroll to the bottom of the article for Rob Bagchi's all-time 23-man England squad August is traditionally silly season for journalism but on the football beat the two-week autumn and spring international breaks are the cue for extreme resourcefulness. Watching England toil through yet another developmental stage, the slimness of their options and assets in central midfield and the heart of defence as blatant as the consoling promise of Harry Kane and Marcus Rashford, made us wonder in which eras each part of the team have been at their strongest? Was English goalkeeping, say, at its apex in the 1970s or have the wide players of the Forties never been surpassed? For once a decision to truncate the period for analysis is not motivated by either sloth or rampant neophilia. England rejoined Fifa only in 1946 and their first international tournament was the 1950 World Cup, having spurned the first three.  Therefore it makes sense to start in the immediate post-war years and to help the process we will look at each phase for every sector - goalkeeper, full-backs, central defenders, midfielders, wide players and strikers - look at the players picked and the breadth of quality alternatives. Some will represent generations or decades, others distinct stages in the team’s evolution. We’ll begin in goal and chart the progression, chronological at least, from Frank Swift and his primrose polo neck sweater to Joe Hart and his binman chic high-vis short-sleeves, concluding with our stab at an answer. Goalkeepers If you’ve been paying attention to anything involving England without being so bored you’ve felt compelled to make a paper plane, our first contender will be obvious. Frank Swift, the wok-handed, spring-heeled Manchester City goalkeeper who pioneered the throw-out, was the first keeper to captain England and as the man in goal when England travelled to Turin to defeat the double world champions Italy (a pre Superga full-strength Azzurri side) 4-0, is our candidate from the Forties. He won 19 caps despite the war depriving him of his career from the age of 25 to 32, let in 18 goals and played in other memorable victories over France, Sweden, Scotland and Portugal. Other standouts from the truncated decade include Tottenham’s title-winning Ted Ditchburn, who won six caps, and the brave, acrobatic, sure-handed Bert Williams of Wolves who succeeded Swift after his international retirement and earned 24 caps over the next six years. Our Fifties options begin with Williams and Gil Merrick of Birmingham City who earned the most caps (23) of the decade and kept five clean sheets. It was Merrick’s misfortune to be in goal for the mortifying, 3-6 defeat by Hungary at Wembley in 1953 and the 7-1 thrashing in the Nepstadion a year later. Admittedly he appeared rattled on both occasions but only because the Magnificent Magyars and his shaky defence left him horribly exposed. The sight of him picking the ball out of the net 13 times have haunted English football ever since but he was not responsible. Those defeats should have marked a paradigm shift but the England system - once again propped up by a crop of excellent players - did not significantly change until much later.  Other notable stalwarts of the decade were Bolton’s 5ft 8in Eddie Hopkinson, the master of one-on-ones who won 13 caps, and Colin McDonald of Burnley who kept goal at the 1958 World Cup and was a dominant, cross-catching doyen of the old school. The Sixties begin with Sheffield Wednesday’s, quick, agile Ron Springett who played 33 times including all four at the 1962 World Cup where he repeatedly saved Walter Winterbottom's side from a proper drubbing in the 3-1 quarter-final defeat by Brazil, and end with Banks of England, Springett’s understudy in Chile, justly recognised as the greatest goalie in the world. It wasn’t just his majesty during England’s 1966 campaign, it was his general safehandedness - helped, trivia fans, in a pre-gloves age, with a generous rub of Beechnut chewing gum-laced saliva on the palms - his rare ability to save gymnastically equally well whether his goal was attacked high or low and his courage. He was so supreme that he restricted other fine goalkeepers such as Peter Bonetti, Gordon West, Alex Stepney and Springett to a handful of caps after Alf Ramsey made him first choice in 1964. Gordon Banks remained Ramsey’s default selection until he lost an eye in a car crash at the age of 34 in Oct 1972, taking in the save against Pele in 1970, the world’s greatest keeper defying the game’s best player by diving downwards, like an hour hand pointing to seven o’clock, and twisting his wrist to ensure he flicked it over the bar to prevent the great striker pouncing on the rebound. But Leicester City did not rate the marginal differentials between an established world-class player and an emerging one as highly as Ramsey and sold Banks to Stoke in 1967 to clear the way for 17-year-old Peter Shilton who owned the Eighties but duelled with the agile, commanding and astute Ray Clemence throughout the preceding decade to be England’s No1. Shilton was a brilliant shot-stopper and all the hours of dedicated, unrelenting practice gave him uncommon agility and aerial mastery. From about 1978 onwards, the error against Poland in 1973 long overcome, Shilton has the right to be considered Banks’ equal and probably superior. The reign of the duopoly left those other excellent keepers, Joe Corrigan, Phil Parkes and Stepney feeding off scraps. When it game to goalkeepers Ron Greenwood had a touch of the Jimmy Armfields at Leeds (“the manager’s indecision is final) but at the start of 1982 after rotating them for five years, he eventually plumped for Shilton who stayed undisputed first choice for the whole of the Eighties. Clemence carried on as the first reserve until 1983 and from 1985 Chris Woods began to make the No13 shirt his second skin during international weeks. Woods made 14 starts in the decade but was mostly stuck on the bench occasionally conceding opportunities for the stand-by role to Gary Bailey, Nigel Spink, Dave Beasant and David Seaman. Poor Martin Hodge, Tony Coton and John Lukic never even got a sniff. Peter Shilton at the start of his international career Credit: Malcolm Croft/PA Bobby Robson stood by Peter Shilton for Italia 90 and kept the 40-year-old keeper between the sticks for the semi-final shootout against West Germany despite having not used all his substitute options and Shilton’s poor record at saving spot-kicks (one from 15). The veteran retired from international football at the end of the tournament but carried on playing for a variety of clubs until 1997. Woods, who once went 1196 minutes without conceding a goal for Rangers in successive matches, became Graham Taylor’s No1 and played at Euro 92 backed up by David Seaman and England’s first million-pound goalie, Nigel Martyn. Seaman came into his own under Terry Venables and proved himself a wonderfully athletic goalkeeper with great agility, positional awareness, sound judgment and, above all, consistency at Euro 96. He saved penalties, too. Glenn Hoddle logically opted for continuity but awarded caps to Ian Walker, David James, Tim Flowers and Martyn when injury or the need to see how the others shaped up demanded.   Seaman continued through the proto-Golden Generation era until his mistakes were compounded by his age, particularly, like Shilton in 1990, a leaden-footedness in reverse. Paul Robinson was anointed for the 2006 World Cup when David Beckham metamorphosed into Sally Bowles in Baden-Baden but Sven Goran-Eriksson also tried out Martyn, James (the Euro 2004) starter and Rob Green. If we consider the McClaren era a coda to the Golden Generation, The Together Again tour after Dean Martin had bailed on Frank Sinatra and Sammy Davis to be replaced by Liza Minelli, small wonder that it was largely a Robinson hangover with supporting roles for Scott Carson, Chris Kirkland, James and Ben Foster. Fabio Capello took a look at James and Green, didn’t like what he saw, blooded Joe Hart then went back to swapping between the other two, £4m a year not being enough to deliver decisiveness. Jack Butland, John Ruddy, Fraser Forster and Tom Heaton have made appearances under Roy Hodgson and Gareth Southgate. Foster, too, has returned from temporary retirement but the seven years since the 4-1 defeat by Germany in Bloemfontein have been the Hart hegemony, under whose dominion we linger. Poor old Whitney Houston did not live long enough for an answer to her question - where do broken Harts go? It’s West Ham, pet. Full backs Now we have established the decades we are going to compare, let us breeze through the options rather than dwelling in such detail to outline the parameters. First choices for full-backs of the Forties are Laurie Scott of Arsenal on the right and captain in all 13 appearances, George Hardwick of Middlesbrough on the left. Depth is added by Derby’s Bert Mozley as a back-up down the right and Manchester United’s Johnny Aston at left-back with 17 caps. George Hardwick, right, greets the Sweden captain Erik Nilsson in  1947 Credit: Reg Birkett/Keystone/Getty Images In the Fifties the selection panel had Spurs’ Alf Ramsey at the beginning of the decade to play on the right and Blackburn’s Bill Eckersley on the left. Birmingham’s Jeff Hall and West Brom’s Don Howe made the right-back slot the preserve of the West Midlands for the rest of the decade while Manchester United’s majestic and adventurous Roger Byrne played 33 successive matches at left-back until his death at Munich during a period when the selection committee made consistency virtually unknown. Tommy Banks, Bolton’s tank, did his best to replace the irreplaceable at the 1958 World Cup and Sheffield United’s Graham Shaw filled in the following year. Take your pick from the Sixties beginning with the two 1966 imperishables George Cohen and Ray Wilson, Jimmy Armfield, a former captain who played on the right at the 1962 World Cup, Keith Newton, who succeeded Cohen and Terry Cooper who took over from his fellow Yorkshireman Wilson at left-back. Add on all those reduced to a handful of caps because of Ramsey’s loyalty - Bob McNab, Paul Reaney, Chris Lawler, Gerry Byrne, Tommy Wright and Cyril Knowles - and you have the kind of riches that would make Gareth Southgate turn green with envy beneath his beard.   George Cohen, left, and Ray Wilson, holding the Jules Rimet Trophy, celebrate victory in 1966 Credit: PA Photos England’s least successful decade in terms of qualification is also, paradoxically, one remembered with a fondness for the quality of English teams – the best of which were bolstered by Scotsmen, Welshmen and Irishmen. England’s full-backs in the Seventies numbered the Liverpool pair Phil Neal and Emlyn Hughes (not that Hughes played there for his club as frequently as he did for the national side). Their versatility was a virtue, as it was for Ipswich’s Mick Mills and Leeds’ Paul Madeley and Trevor Cherry. More orthodox full-backs were plentiful, too: the magnificent Viv Anderson on the right and Don Revie’s choices, Leicester’s Steve Whitworth and QPR’s Dave Clement. On the left Frank Lampard, Alec Lindsay, David Nish, Mike Pejic and Ian Gillard won caps, as did Kevin Beattie playing out of position but in masterly fashion, particularly in the 5-1 thrashing of Scotland in 1975. Kenny Sansom began the Eighties in possession of the No 3 shirt and held it for eight years, playing consistently and with real skill to hold off the challenge of West Brom’s Derek Statham, until the claims of Stuart Pearce in 1988 could be resisted no more. The right side was more problematic once Mills, Neal and Anderson entered their mid thirties. Mick Duxbury had a run there, Danny Thomas could have been the long-term solution save for that rotten injury inflicted by Kevin Maguire while Gary Stevens won 45 caps after his debut during Everton’s title-winning campaign in 1984-85 including Mexico ’86, Euro ’88 and the beginning of Italia 90. Kenny Sansom made the left-back position his own in the Eighties Credit:  Duncan Raban/Allsport/Getty Images Pearce was key at the start of the next decade, becoming captain under Graham Taylor, taking a position in a back three for Euro 96 when Steve McManaman and Darren Anderton played wide, and was recalled at the age of 37 for a couple of starts under Kevin Keegan. Terry Venables initially preferred the Blackburn Rovers left-back Graeme Le Saux and but for injury he would have started Euro 96. Glenn Hoddle restored him as first-choice after a cameo from Andy Hinchcliffe but by the end of the Nineties the left side, in defence and midfield, had become something of a national neurosis. Phil Neville filled in there, playing alongside his brother, Gary, the undisputed No2 when fit. For club and country he succeeded Paul Parker and the challenges of Gary Charles and Rob Jones for the spot were sadly snuffed out by personal problems and injury respectively. Sven Goran-Eriksson promoted Ashley Cole as the man to solve the malaise on the left and over the 12 years of his international career from 2001 onwards he won 107 caps and held Wayne Bridge at bay. Gary Neville missed the 2002 World Cup where Danny Mills stood in but was back straight afterwards and carried on until 2007. Luke Young and Micah Richards stated their claims to be paired with Cole but ultimately Glen Johnson won the contest under Fabio Capello. Johnson stayed in situ under Roy Hodgson until the 2014 World Cup and was even recalled to the squad last year but Kyle Walker, Nathaniel Clyne and Kieran Trippier are now the default options after experiments with Chris Smalling and Phil Jones out wide. Leighton Baines played so well from 2012-14 that he essentially forced Cole into international retirement before the more athletic claims of Danny Rose and Ryan Bertrand did for him. Central defenders   Here we face a problem with the first two post-war decades before the four-back system really took off. A bodged solution for the Forties and Fifties, rather than trying to corral in a wing-half, would be to list the options at centre-half even though normally only one was picked. We don’t even have to do that for the Forties because Billy Wright, the centre-half for much of the Fifties, captain for 11 years and England’s first 100-cap player, played at wing-half for his country at the beginning of his international career, alongside the exemplary Neil Franklin at No 5. Franklin abandoned Stoke in 1950 to move to Colombia and circumvent the maximum wage but his wife did not settle there and he faced the opprobrium of his club and the FA on return, not adding to the 27 caps he earned before he left. Breadth of talent for the decade would be provided by Blackpool’s Harry Johnston, Allenby Chilton of Manchester United and Liverpool’s Bill Jones. Wright made the position his own after the 1954 World Cup where Bill McGarry and Syd Owen had taken the role. Johnston, too, continued to make appearances at the start of the Fifties and Liverpool’s Laurie Hughes stood in for Franklin at the 1950 World Cup. Jim Taylor of Fulham, Burnley’s Mal Barrass and Charlton’s Derek Ufton were also tried but no one could dislodge the 5ft 8in Wright, captain of Wolves and England, golden-haired paragon of the post-war game. The finest partnership of the Sixties, Jackie Charlton and Bobby Moore, came together only a year before they won the World Cup and had it not been for the disgrace of Peter Swan - who won 19 caps as a cultured but powerful stopper between 1960-62 - Charlton may never have joined his brother as a cornerstone of 1966 and all that. Maurice Norman, the Spurs Double-winning centre-half, joined forces with Moore for the 1962 World Cup because Swan was confined to quarters with dysentery in Chile and Brian Labone both preceded Charlton and succeeded him as first choice towards the end of the decade. Norman Hunter served as Moore’s understudy but the consistency of the captain restricted ‘Bites Yer Legs’ to 28 caps over nine seasons. Moore at his peak Credit: AP Photo/files Moore made the last of his 108 appearances in 1973 and by that point there were plenty of contenders for his position, notably Derby County’s Colin Todd, Hunter and Emlyn Hughes. Roy McFarland earned 28 caps in the centre-half slot from 1971-76 before injuries ruined his career and gave Dave Watson a long run as first choice until 1981. Watson won the last of his 65 caps at the age of 35 in June 1982 but was omitted from the final squad for the Spain World Cup, the first for which he had qualified after failures to reach West Germany and Argentina. Phil Thompson of Liverpool and Manchester United’s Brian Greenhoff were given their debuts by Don Revie but only the former flourished after he left for Abu Dhabi. Watson’s role as the tall, raw-bone aerial colossus was filled by Terry Butcher throughout the Eighties though we forget how good his left foot was, his skill overwhelmed by the ‘up and  at ‘em’ patriotism of his persona. Thompson led Liverpool to the 1981 European Cup and partnered the Ipswich defender at the Spain World Cup but Bobby Robson struggled to find a regular foil for Butcher thereafter and worked his way through Alvin Martin, Graham Roberts, Mark Wright, Terry Fenwick, Gary Pallister and a callow Tony Adams before settling on Des Walker for Italia 90 and a return for Wright in a back three. At the start of the Nineties Graham Taylor used Walker, Adams and Pallister but it was his successors, Terry Venables and Glenn Hoddle, who got the best out of Adams. Venables managed it at Euro 96 when Adams was white-knuckling his sobriety for the duration of the tournament and Hoddle benefited from Adams stopping drinking and finding a new poise. Both also used Gareth Southgate in a back three while Sol Campbell, given his debut by Venables, became a regular when Hoddle took charge. Taylor and Hoddle used Martin Keown but Venables never picked him and though Steve Howey, Neil Ruddock, Steve Bould, John Scales, Colin Cooper and David Unsworth were tried, none established himself. The so-called Golden Generation had three stalwarts in Rio Ferdinand, John Terry and Campbell while injuries prevented Jonathan Woodgate and Ledley King from the long international careers their talent deserved. Jamie Carragher won 31 caps over 11 years, Matthew Upson became a favourite of Fabio Capello’s and Steve McClaren gave Joleon Lescott his debut in 2007. Rio Ferdinand and John Terry before the latter racially abused the former's brother Credit: Action Images / Tony O'Brien Ferdinand failed to re-establish himself after missing the 2010 World Cup through injury and ended his England career with 81 caps in 2011, Terry retired from the international game in 2012 after an FA Commission went ahead with charging him over racially abusing Ferdinand’s brother, Anton. Since then we’ve had shaky alliances involving Gary Cahill, Phil Jagielka and Lescott, Chris Smalling, Phil Jones, John Stones and Michael Keane. Central midfielders Again we need to make an adjustment here for the Forties and Fifties and will restrict it to wing-halfs, elevating most inside-forwards to forwards for the sake of this exercise. The immediate post-war era used Billy Wright most often as the right-half and Manchester United’s Henry Cockburn as the left pivot. Portsmouth’s hard-tackling tyro Jimmy Dickinson succeeded Cockburn and played 48 times from 1949-56 while Phil Taylor of Liverpool and Villa’s Eddie Lowe shared six caps on the right. Before the emergence of the Busby Babes - and we must include Eddie Colman here as well as Duncan Edwards because he would have been an international but for his death at Munich at the age of 21 - Wright and Dickinson formed the regular partnership. The claims of Edwards  - simply the most complete player England has ever produced, skilful, forceful, bursting with stamina and natural authority - could no longer be ignored in 1955 and he won 18 caps before he was killed, also at the age of 21. Ron Flowers, who won three titles with Wolves in the Fifties, played once in tandem with Edwards and took over after the 1958 World Cup with Blackburn’s efficient Ronnie Clayton his usual foil after Clayton had seen off Wolves’ Eddie Clamp. Nobby Stiles played at centre-back for Manchester United but was magnificent as Ramsey’s midfield destroyer in the 1966 side, providing the platform from which Bobby Charlton could glide through the gears, the ball under his immaculate control, and ping passes, whip in crosses or fire thunderous shots at goal. Before the two of them joined up, Flowers and Bobby Robson had been the main men with Charlton out on the left wing and after injuries and age diminished Stiles, Tottenham’s Alan Mullery was given the job. Colin Bell, Man City’s Nijinsky, was blooded in 1968 and proved irreplaceable when Martin Buchan effectively ended his career in 1975 after 48 caps. For the first part of the Seventies Martin Peters tucked in from the left and Bell played the dynamic right-half role, sadly without as much freedom as he had to pelt forward for City. Trevor Brooking made his first start in Ramsey’s last match and became the co-key player with Kevin Keegan under Greenwood with his clever passing and penetrative movement. He was so good that he kept the magnificent Glenn Hoddle on the peripheries following his debut in 1978. Hoddle, as brilliant a playmaker as he is rotten as a pundit, would have a system tailored to his strengths for England’s last three games at the 1986 World Cup when crisis forced Robson’s hand. Gerry Francis, Revie’s second captain, would have given both stiff competition had he stayed fit after his 12th cap. Tony Currie and Alan Hudson join the list of inexpertly harnessed talents while Terry McDermott, so intrepid for Liverpool, was denied a consistent run in the side by Ray Wilkins who ended the decade a dynamic box-to-box midfielder with the skill, control and vision that would later make him so comfortable as a ‘sitter’ in Serie A. The entire Eighties can be considered the Bryan Robson years. Bobby was besotted by him but for understandable reasons, as Alex Ferguson outlined: "He had good control, was a decisive tackler, passed the ball well and his combination of stamina and perceptive reading of movement enabled him to make sudden and deadly infiltrations from midfield into the opposition's box." His fitness became a national preoccupation and he lasted two games each of the 1986 and 1990 World Cups after driving England to qualification at both. We saw him at his very best only in 1982 and Euro 88 when he needed support that his team-mates could not provide. Wilkins was his regular partner, replaced by Hoddle for 1988 and Neil Webb thereafter until Paul Gascoigne finally charmed the sceptical Bobby Robson in 1990. Peter Reid, Everton’s tigerish beating heart, took centre stage in 1986 when Robson’s shoulder popped out again but the promise of his Goodison colleague Paul Bracewell was ravaged by  an ankle injury that took almost two years out of his career. England's all-action 'Captain Marvel' Credit: David Cannon/Getty Images Italia 90 began with Robson, Gascoigne and Chris Waddle in a midfield three and ended in unforgettable drama with David Platt in for the captain, having seen off Steve McMahon. Graham Taylor initially stuck with the Platt-Gascoigne axis for the victory over Poland but went with his Aston Villa pairing of Platt and Sid Cowans for the trip to Dublin. Gascoigne’s injuries and drinking alarmed Taylor who kept him around the squad when fit but his absences provoked some of the strangest selections in memory, noticeably Geoff Thomas, Andy Gray and Carlton Palmer. David Batty and Paul Ince injected some quality, the latter a mainstay for Venables and Hoddle - playing with Platt and Gascoigne at Euro 96, Paul Scholes at the 1998 World Cup. Jamie Redknapp was ill-served by injury, Nicky Butt ill-served by managers until Sven Goran-Eriksson’s hand was forced in 2002 by Steven Gerrard’s absence and Ray Parlour by the wrong-headed perception that he was well, in Lovejoy’s words, ‘only Ray Parlour’. Gascoigne lights up Wembley v Scotland at Euro 96 Credit: Stu Forster/Allsport Frank Lampard made his debut in 1999 but did not become a regular for four seasons when his class tempted Eriksson to fudge the biggest decision of his England career and stick Scholes on the left to start the ‘Lampard-Gerrard’ compatibility saga that was to run for the next 11 years. Once Scholes decided he’d had enough after Euro 2004 (ending a 29-game goal drought in his penultimate match), Gerrard and Lampard, Lampard and Gerrard held their positions until Steve McClaren recalled Gareth Barry, who impressed Capello so firmly that he put Gerrard on the left. The Golden Generation and its hangover phase featured cameos from Danny Murphy, Owen Hargreaves (though he normally played wide), Scott ‘Scottie’ Parker, Michael Carrick and Jermaine Jenas though none could either usurp Gerrard or Lampard or make the combination look convincing in tournament football.    Both were still in the squad at the 2014 World Cup though age had taken the shine off them. Lampard was reduced to the bench, Gerrard captained the side but his one-paced partnership with Jordan Henderson left a dodgy defence too exposed to cope with Italy and Uruguay. Capello gave Jack Wilshere his debut at the age of 18 yet seven years later we are still waiting for him, probably forlornly, to be blessed with the physical resilience to regain his verve. Eric Dier has been the default starter with Henderson for the past 18 months but Jake Livermore is currently back in the squad, Tom Cleverly has been and gone, Fabian Delph gets in whenever he manages a couple of games for Man City while James Ward-Prowse and Harry Winks put the twinkle in Gareth Southgate’s eye.   Wide men Should we just end this segment here? Stan Matthews and Tom Finney in the Forties and Fifties are the best pair of wingers England have ever had. In 1948 a forward line of Matthews, Stan Mortensen, Tommy Lawton, Wilf Mannion and Finney put on arguably England’s greatest performance in the 4-0 away victory over Italy but never played together again. Finney was an England regular for 12 years, playing on the right, left and through the middle until 1958 but Matthews, seven years Finney’s senior, was eased out only a year earlier at the age of 42 with 54 caps. He was not deemed as indispensable by myopic selectors who gave run-outs on the wings in his stead to Peter Harris, Les Medley, Billy Elliott and Johnny Berry. Blackburn’s Bryan Douglas took the No7 shirt 36 times and scored 11 goals from 1975-63 and Bobby Charlton won the majority of his caps until 1964 on the left flank, seeing out the decade in a Lancs touchline hegemony.   In the Sixties, after the end of the Douglas-Charlton years, Ramsey tried John Connelly, Terry Paine, Peter Thompson, Derek Temple and Ian Callaghan before deciding on a narrower road to triumph. Alan Ball, essentially an auxiliary central midfielder, edged out to patrol the right for the latter stages of the 1966 World Cup, driving England on with his stamina, skill and heart but victory convinced the manager to stick to his system, using the full-backs for width with Peters augmenting the strikers from a nominal position on the left and Ball from the right. Wingers were out of vogue for most of decade after 1966 - Ian Storey Moore kept the flame flickering briefly and Revie tried with QPR’s Dave Thomas and Merlin himself. Gordon Hill, but it wasn’t until Ron Greenwood picked Manchester City’s Peter Barnes and United’s Steve Coppell together in 1977 that England took flight again. Coppell evolved into a solid right-sided player but at that point was an out and out winger who held the position for five years. Laurie Cunningham made three starts alongside him but by the start of the following decade Greenwood had cramped his own style. John Barnes at the Maracana Credit: David Cannon/Allsport The Eighties should have been the decade of Waddle and John Barnes and in popular memory it remains so but England started the decade with a tighter system, using Coppell and Graham Rix at the 1982 World Cup, and got to the quarter-finals of the 1986 tournament having ditched the wingers for Trevor Steven and Steve Hodge. Villa’s European Cup-winner Tony Morley briefly enraptured Bobby Robson and Mark Chamberlain preceded Waddle into the side by two years but it was largely a Barnes-Waddle duopoly from then on, though rarely in tandem and both, despite their brilliance and that goal at the Maracana, the first scapegoats. Lee Sharpe was the great left hope of the Nineties but faded away, Venables got the best out of Darren Anderton and Steve McManaman to provide hope of a more expansive future until David Beckham took freehold of the No7 shirt and front pages for eight years with a revolving cast of Nick Barmby, Paul Merson or a wing-back on the left. Eriksson blanked McManaman at the start of the 2000s and tried Trevor Sinclair, Scholes and Joe Cole out there to give some balance for Beckham. Stewart Downing became a mainstay of Steve McClaren’s squads while Aaron Lennon and David Bentley were tried out on the right. Ultimately he went back to Beckham. Capello got the best out of Theo Walcott for a few games, pulled Gerrard out to the left and employed James Milner as a Steady Eddie solution. Hodgson switched to 4-2-3-1 and used Raheem Sterling, Danny Welbeck, Wayne Rooney and Adam Lallana to provide width which is largely, with the exception of Rooney, where we remain apart from the saving grace of Rashford. Forwards To the summit … and, controversially, I am going to include some inside-forwards for the first three eras. So, for our post-war pioneers we will go with the aforementioned Mortensen, scorer of 23 goals in 25 games, Lawton, who scored 22 times in 23 starts, and Mannion, ‘the Mozart of football’ as Matthews put it. Len Shackleton and ‘Wor’ Jackie Milburn straddled the Forties and Fifties while Mortensen played on until 1953. The No9 shirt fell vacant in 1948 when Lawton told Walter Winterbottom that the coach didn’t know enough to be giving him advice, Milburn filled it for a spell before Nat Lofthouse won 33 caps and scored 30 goals, including the two at the Praterstadion that made him forever ‘The Lion of Vienna’. Tommy Taylor, one of the eight ‘Flowers of Manchester’ among the 23 victims of the Munich Air Crash, shot powerfully with both feet, had pace, guile and spatial awareness, and the fast-twitch reflexes of the thoroughbred goalscorer. He bagged 16 goals in 19 appearances as the other out-and-out England centre-forward of the decade. Lofty and Tommy were supported by Ivor Broadis and the finest, most astute passer in the team’s history, Johnny Haynes, who was only 27 in 1962 when he played his 56th and final game for England (his 22nd as captain) in the 1962 World Cup quarter-final. He was never as fluent again after a car crash on his return from Chile. Geoff Hurst’s hat-trick in the 1966 World Cup final overshadows anything any other England striker can match. Roger Hunt, the other Wembley immortal, was so crucial to Ramsey’s system because his tireless movement made space for Bobby Charlton to fill that it is forgotten that he scored 18 times in 34 appearances, and Jimmy Greaves, English football’s most cold-hearted and deadly finisher, gave the manager a richness of options. By the end of the Sixties Franny Lee had taken over from Hunt and Greaves as Hurst’s partner for Mexico Sniffer Clarke, the heir to Greaves, made his debut in 1970, Peter Osgood made only a couple of starts and Martin Chivers became Ramsey’s preferred No9 for two years, scoring 13 times in 24 appearances. Rodney Marsh exasperated his manager, Malcolm MacDonald thrashed five past Cyprus for Revie but made his distaste for the man who picked him well known, which meant the search for an ‘oppo’ for Kevin Keegan - the human dynamo, a rampaging forward who could leap, head, shoot and pass with distinction - lasted too long. Bob Latchford found favour for a while as did Stuart Pearson, Mick Channon moved over from the right, Paul Mariner began the international career that would yield 35 caps and 13 goals and Tricky Trevor Francis beguiled us all with his positioning and vision. Kevin Keegan scores against Scotland in 1979 Credit: Steve Powell/Allsport Cyrille Regis would have made more than two starts in the Eighties had he moved to Manchester United from West Brom instead of Coventry but he couldn’t displace the Keegan-Mariner-Woodcock-Francis usual suspects for the World Cup in Spain. Robson ushered Keegan into retirement but kept faith with the others until Gary Lineker, the quicksilver scavenger, gave him no excuse in 1984 and began the march to the Mexico Golden Boot, a World Cup quarter- and semi-final and 48 goals in 80 games. He was at his best with Peter Beardsley - who brought out the best in everyone - but also fed off Mark Hateley, Alan Smith,  and Steve Bull. The Nineties began with Lineker and Italia 90, Taylor then gave him the captaincy and slim pickings to work with up front and he left the scene in 1992 when shown the managerial big curly finger despite England desperately requiring a goal against Sweden. Taylor turned to Ian Wright who made a terrific return under Hoddle after being ignored by Venables and Les Ferdinand. Alan Shearer, impressive at Southampton, unstoppable except by injury at  Blackburn, won his first cap  in 1992 but had scored only five times in 23 appearances before the start of Euro 96 and hadn’t managed an international goal for 21 months. He hit five in the five games, was elevated to the captaincy for four years and ended still the talisman, though far less mobile, in 2000 with 30 goals. Teddy Sheringham played the Beardsley role for him perfectly and kept Andy Cole out of the squad and Robbie Fowler out of the side until Michael Owen came off the bench to score against Romania at France 98 and could not be left out again. Two games later he scored the wonder goal against Argentina that sounded the trumpets for his charge to the Ballon d’Or three years later. Michael Owen scores against Argentina at the 1998 World Cup Credit: Pawel Kopczynski REUTERS Owen was never really considered part of the Golden Generation because of a certain diffidence but he was its spearhead, when fit, and its yearned for king over the water when absent. He began the decade with Shearer, combined with club-mate Emile Heskey for the 1-5 in Munich and spent time up-front with Fowler and Darius Vassell before Eriksson promoted Wayne Rooney in 2003. Over 14 years Rooney would surpass Bobby Charlton’s England goalscoring record, beginning by playing off the cuff with boundless zip and chutzpah, maturing into that rarity, a workhorse with ebullient, irrepressible swagger and ending up a shadow of electrifying presence he once had been. During the decade Rooney played up top with Owen, Jermaine Defoe and Peter Crouch most frequently. Dean Ashton seemed to fit the part but it wasn’t to be. Rooney has been the key striker and player of this last decade, too and very much undroppable until Southgate took charge. Opportunities for Jay Rodriguez, Andy Carroll and Daniel Sturridge have been curtailed by long-term injuries, Hodgson thought it wise to take Rickie Lambert to the World Cup but in 2015 Harry Kane was given a chance and grabbed it. Jamie Vardy remains among the alternatives along with Sturridge and the second (third and fourth) coming of Defoe.   Conclusion How do you come up with a decision on the relative strengths and weaknesses over eight decades? Subjectively, obviously, but without prejudice:  Goalkeepers: Seventies - Banks, Shilton, Clemence. Full-backs: Sixties - Armfield, Cohen, Wilson, Cooper. Central defenders: Seventies - Moore, Labone, Todd, McFarland, Thompson. Central midfielders: Eighties - Robson, Wilkins, Gascoigne, Hoddle. Wide men: Fifties - Matthews, Finney, Charlton R.   Strikers: Nineties - Lineker, Shearer, Owen, Beardsley.  Please feel free to dispute this 23-man squad selection in the comments section. 

The England dream team by eras: which decade comes out on top?

Scroll to the bottom of the article for Rob Bagchi's all-time 23-man England squad August is traditionally silly season for journalism but on the football beat the two-week autumn and spring international breaks are the cue for extreme resourcefulness. Watching England toil through yet another developmental stage, the slimness of their options and assets in central midfield and the heart of defence as blatant as the consoling promise of Harry Kane and Marcus Rashford, made us wonder in which eras each part of the team have been at their strongest? Was English goalkeeping, say, at its apex in the 1970s or have the wide players of the Forties never been surpassed? For once a decision to truncate the period for analysis is not motivated by either sloth or rampant neophilia. England rejoined Fifa only in 1946 and their first international tournament was the 1950 World Cup, having spurned the first three.  Therefore it makes sense to start in the immediate post-war years and to help the process we will look at each phase for every sector - goalkeeper, full-backs, central defenders, midfielders, wide players and strikers - look at the players picked and the breadth of quality alternatives. Some will represent generations or decades, others distinct stages in the team’s evolution. We’ll begin in goal and chart the progression, chronological at least, from Frank Swift and his primrose polo neck sweater to Joe Hart and his binman chic high-vis short-sleeves, concluding with our stab at an answer. Goalkeepers If you’ve been paying attention to anything involving England without being so bored you’ve felt compelled to make a paper plane, our first contender will be obvious. Frank Swift, the wok-handed, spring-heeled Manchester City goalkeeper who pioneered the throw-out, was the first keeper to captain England and as the man in goal when England travelled to Turin to defeat the double world champions Italy (a pre Superga full-strength Azzurri side) 4-0, is our candidate from the Forties. He won 19 caps despite the war depriving him of his career from the age of 25 to 32, let in 18 goals and played in other memorable victories over France, Sweden, Scotland and Portugal. Other standouts from the truncated decade include Tottenham’s title-winning Ted Ditchburn, who won six caps, and the brave, acrobatic, sure-handed Bert Williams of Wolves who succeeded Swift after his international retirement and earned 24 caps over the next six years. Our Fifties options begin with Williams and Gil Merrick of Birmingham City who earned the most caps (23) of the decade and kept five clean sheets. It was Merrick’s misfortune to be in goal for the mortifying, 3-6 defeat by Hungary at Wembley in 1953 and the 7-1 thrashing in the Nepstadion a year later. Admittedly he appeared rattled on both occasions but only because the Magnificent Magyars and his shaky defence left him horribly exposed. The sight of him picking the ball out of the net 13 times have haunted English football ever since but he was not responsible. Those defeats should have marked a paradigm shift but the England system - once again propped up by a crop of excellent players - did not significantly change until much later.  Other notable stalwarts of the decade were Bolton’s 5ft 8in Eddie Hopkinson, the master of one-on-ones who won 13 caps, and Colin McDonald of Burnley who kept goal at the 1958 World Cup and was a dominant, cross-catching doyen of the old school. The Sixties begin with Sheffield Wednesday’s, quick, agile Ron Springett who played 33 times including all four at the 1962 World Cup where he repeatedly saved Walter Winterbottom's side from a proper drubbing in the 3-1 quarter-final defeat by Brazil, and end with Banks of England, Springett’s understudy in Chile, justly recognised as the greatest goalie in the world. It wasn’t just his majesty during England’s 1966 campaign, it was his general safehandedness - helped, trivia fans, in a pre-gloves age, with a generous rub of Beechnut chewing gum-laced saliva on the palms - his rare ability to save gymnastically equally well whether his goal was attacked high or low and his courage. He was so supreme that he restricted other fine goalkeepers such as Peter Bonetti, Gordon West, Alex Stepney and Springett to a handful of caps after Alf Ramsey made him first choice in 1964. Gordon Banks remained Ramsey’s default selection until he lost an eye in a car crash at the age of 34 in Oct 1972, taking in the save against Pele in 1970, the world’s greatest keeper defying the game’s best player by diving downwards, like an hour hand pointing to seven o’clock, and twisting his wrist to ensure he flicked it over the bar to prevent the great striker pouncing on the rebound. But Leicester City did not rate the marginal differentials between an established world-class player and an emerging one as highly as Ramsey and sold Banks to Stoke in 1967 to clear the way for 17-year-old Peter Shilton who owned the Eighties but duelled with the agile, commanding and astute Ray Clemence throughout the preceding decade to be England’s No1. Shilton was a brilliant shot-stopper and all the hours of dedicated, unrelenting practice gave him uncommon agility and aerial mastery. From about 1978 onwards, the error against Poland in 1973 long overcome, Shilton has the right to be considered Banks’ equal and probably superior. The reign of the duopoly left those other excellent keepers, Joe Corrigan, Phil Parkes and Stepney feeding off scraps. When it game to goalkeepers Ron Greenwood had a touch of the Jimmy Armfields at Leeds (“the manager’s indecision is final) but at the start of 1982 after rotating them for five years, he eventually plumped for Shilton who stayed undisputed first choice for the whole of the Eighties. Clemence carried on as the first reserve until 1983 and from 1985 Chris Woods began to make the No13 shirt his second skin during international weeks. Woods made 14 starts in the decade but was mostly stuck on the bench occasionally conceding opportunities for the stand-by role to Gary Bailey, Nigel Spink, Dave Beasant and David Seaman. Poor Martin Hodge, Tony Coton and John Lukic never even got a sniff. Peter Shilton at the start of his international career Credit: Malcolm Croft/PA Bobby Robson stood by Peter Shilton for Italia 90 and kept the 40-year-old keeper between the sticks for the semi-final shootout against West Germany despite having not used all his substitute options and Shilton’s poor record at saving spot-kicks (one from 15). The veteran retired from international football at the end of the tournament but carried on playing for a variety of clubs until 1997. Woods, who once went 1196 minutes without conceding a goal for Rangers in successive matches, became Graham Taylor’s No1 and played at Euro 92 backed up by David Seaman and England’s first million-pound goalie, Nigel Martyn. Seaman came into his own under Terry Venables and proved himself a wonderfully athletic goalkeeper with great agility, positional awareness, sound judgment and, above all, consistency at Euro 96. He saved penalties, too. Glenn Hoddle logically opted for continuity but awarded caps to Ian Walker, David James, Tim Flowers and Martyn when injury or the need to see how the others shaped up demanded.   Seaman continued through the proto-Golden Generation era until his mistakes were compounded by his age, particularly, like Shilton in 1990, a leaden-footedness in reverse. Paul Robinson was anointed for the 2006 World Cup when David Beckham metamorphosed into Sally Bowles in Baden-Baden but Sven Goran-Eriksson also tried out Martyn, James (the Euro 2004) starter and Rob Green. If we consider the McClaren era a coda to the Golden Generation, The Together Again tour after Dean Martin had bailed on Frank Sinatra and Sammy Davis to be replaced by Liza Minelli, small wonder that it was largely a Robinson hangover with supporting roles for Scott Carson, Chris Kirkland, James and Ben Foster. Fabio Capello took a look at James and Green, didn’t like what he saw, blooded Joe Hart then went back to swapping between the other two, £4m a year not being enough to deliver decisiveness. Jack Butland, John Ruddy, Fraser Forster and Tom Heaton have made appearances under Roy Hodgson and Gareth Southgate. Foster, too, has returned from temporary retirement but the seven years since the 4-1 defeat by Germany in Bloemfontein have been the Hart hegemony, under whose dominion we linger. Poor old Whitney Houston did not live long enough for an answer to her question - where do broken Harts go? It’s West Ham, pet. Full backs Now we have established the decades we are going to compare, let us breeze through the options rather than dwelling in such detail to outline the parameters. First choices for full-backs of the Forties are Laurie Scott of Arsenal on the right and captain in all 13 appearances, George Hardwick of Middlesbrough on the left. Depth is added by Derby’s Bert Mozley as a back-up down the right and Manchester United’s Johnny Aston at left-back with 17 caps. George Hardwick, right, greets the Sweden captain Erik Nilsson in  1947 Credit: Reg Birkett/Keystone/Getty Images In the Fifties the selection panel had Spurs’ Alf Ramsey at the beginning of the decade to play on the right and Blackburn’s Bill Eckersley on the left. Birmingham’s Jeff Hall and West Brom’s Don Howe made the right-back slot the preserve of the West Midlands for the rest of the decade while Manchester United’s majestic and adventurous Roger Byrne played 33 successive matches at left-back until his death at Munich during a period when the selection committee made consistency virtually unknown. Tommy Banks, Bolton’s tank, did his best to replace the irreplaceable at the 1958 World Cup and Sheffield United’s Graham Shaw filled in the following year. Take your pick from the Sixties beginning with the two 1966 imperishables George Cohen and Ray Wilson, Jimmy Armfield, a former captain who played on the right at the 1962 World Cup, Keith Newton, who succeeded Cohen and Terry Cooper who took over from his fellow Yorkshireman Wilson at left-back. Add on all those reduced to a handful of caps because of Ramsey’s loyalty - Bob McNab, Paul Reaney, Chris Lawler, Gerry Byrne, Tommy Wright and Cyril Knowles - and you have the kind of riches that would make Gareth Southgate turn green with envy beneath his beard.   George Cohen, left, and Ray Wilson, holding the Jules Rimet Trophy, celebrate victory in 1966 Credit: PA Photos England’s least successful decade in terms of qualification is also, paradoxically, one remembered with a fondness for the quality of English teams – the best of which were bolstered by Scotsmen, Welshmen and Irishmen. England’s full-backs in the Seventies numbered the Liverpool pair Phil Neal and Emlyn Hughes (not that Hughes played there for his club as frequently as he did for the national side). Their versatility was a virtue, as it was for Ipswich’s Mick Mills and Leeds’ Paul Madeley and Trevor Cherry. More orthodox full-backs were plentiful, too: the magnificent Viv Anderson on the right and Don Revie’s choices, Leicester’s Steve Whitworth and QPR’s Dave Clement. On the left Frank Lampard, Alec Lindsay, David Nish, Mike Pejic and Ian Gillard won caps, as did Kevin Beattie playing out of position but in masterly fashion, particularly in the 5-1 thrashing of Scotland in 1975. Kenny Sansom began the Eighties in possession of the No 3 shirt and held it for eight years, playing consistently and with real skill to hold off the challenge of West Brom’s Derek Statham, until the claims of Stuart Pearce in 1988 could be resisted no more. The right side was more problematic once Mills, Neal and Anderson entered their mid thirties. Mick Duxbury had a run there, Danny Thomas could have been the long-term solution save for that rotten injury inflicted by Kevin Maguire while Gary Stevens won 45 caps after his debut during Everton’s title-winning campaign in 1984-85 including Mexico ’86, Euro ’88 and the beginning of Italia 90. Kenny Sansom made the left-back position his own in the Eighties Credit:  Duncan Raban/Allsport/Getty Images Pearce was key at the start of the next decade, becoming captain under Graham Taylor, taking a position in a back three for Euro 96 when Steve McManaman and Darren Anderton played wide, and was recalled at the age of 37 for a couple of starts under Kevin Keegan. Terry Venables initially preferred the Blackburn Rovers left-back Graeme Le Saux and but for injury he would have started Euro 96. Glenn Hoddle restored him as first-choice after a cameo from Andy Hinchcliffe but by the end of the Nineties the left side, in defence and midfield, had become something of a national neurosis. Phil Neville filled in there, playing alongside his brother, Gary, the undisputed No2 when fit. For club and country he succeeded Paul Parker and the challenges of Gary Charles and Rob Jones for the spot were sadly snuffed out by personal problems and injury respectively. Sven Goran-Eriksson promoted Ashley Cole as the man to solve the malaise on the left and over the 12 years of his international career from 2001 onwards he won 107 caps and held Wayne Bridge at bay. Gary Neville missed the 2002 World Cup where Danny Mills stood in but was back straight afterwards and carried on until 2007. Luke Young and Micah Richards stated their claims to be paired with Cole but ultimately Glen Johnson won the contest under Fabio Capello. Johnson stayed in situ under Roy Hodgson until the 2014 World Cup and was even recalled to the squad last year but Kyle Walker, Nathaniel Clyne and Kieran Trippier are now the default options after experiments with Chris Smalling and Phil Jones out wide. Leighton Baines played so well from 2012-14 that he essentially forced Cole into international retirement before the more athletic claims of Danny Rose and Ryan Bertrand did for him. Central defenders   Here we face a problem with the first two post-war decades before the four-back system really took off. A bodged solution for the Forties and Fifties, rather than trying to corral in a wing-half, would be to list the options at centre-half even though normally only one was picked. We don’t even have to do that for the Forties because Billy Wright, the centre-half for much of the Fifties, captain for 11 years and England’s first 100-cap player, played at wing-half for his country at the beginning of his international career, alongside the exemplary Neil Franklin at No 5. Franklin abandoned Stoke in 1950 to move to Colombia and circumvent the maximum wage but his wife did not settle there and he faced the opprobrium of his club and the FA on return, not adding to the 27 caps he earned before he left. Breadth of talent for the decade would be provided by Blackpool’s Harry Johnston, Allenby Chilton of Manchester United and Liverpool’s Bill Jones. Wright made the position his own after the 1954 World Cup where Bill McGarry and Syd Owen had taken the role. Johnston, too, continued to make appearances at the start of the Fifties and Liverpool’s Laurie Hughes stood in for Franklin at the 1950 World Cup. Jim Taylor of Fulham, Burnley’s Mal Barrass and Charlton’s Derek Ufton were also tried but no one could dislodge the 5ft 8in Wright, captain of Wolves and England, golden-haired paragon of the post-war game. The finest partnership of the Sixties, Jackie Charlton and Bobby Moore, came together only a year before they won the World Cup and had it not been for the disgrace of Peter Swan - who won 19 caps as a cultured but powerful stopper between 1960-62 - Charlton may never have joined his brother as a cornerstone of 1966 and all that. Maurice Norman, the Spurs Double-winning centre-half, joined forces with Moore for the 1962 World Cup because Swan was confined to quarters with dysentery in Chile and Brian Labone both preceded Charlton and succeeded him as first choice towards the end of the decade. Norman Hunter served as Moore’s understudy but the consistency of the captain restricted ‘Bites Yer Legs’ to 28 caps over nine seasons. Moore at his peak Credit: AP Photo/files Moore made the last of his 108 appearances in 1973 and by that point there were plenty of contenders for his position, notably Derby County’s Colin Todd, Hunter and Emlyn Hughes. Roy McFarland earned 28 caps in the centre-half slot from 1971-76 before injuries ruined his career and gave Dave Watson a long run as first choice until 1981. Watson won the last of his 65 caps at the age of 35 in June 1982 but was omitted from the final squad for the Spain World Cup, the first for which he had qualified after failures to reach West Germany and Argentina. Phil Thompson of Liverpool and Manchester United’s Brian Greenhoff were given their debuts by Don Revie but only the former flourished after he left for Abu Dhabi. Watson’s role as the tall, raw-bone aerial colossus was filled by Terry Butcher throughout the Eighties though we forget how good his left foot was, his skill overwhelmed by the ‘up and  at ‘em’ patriotism of his persona. Thompson led Liverpool to the 1981 European Cup and partnered the Ipswich defender at the Spain World Cup but Bobby Robson struggled to find a regular foil for Butcher thereafter and worked his way through Alvin Martin, Graham Roberts, Mark Wright, Terry Fenwick, Gary Pallister and a callow Tony Adams before settling on Des Walker for Italia 90 and a return for Wright in a back three. At the start of the Nineties Graham Taylor used Walker, Adams and Pallister but it was his successors, Terry Venables and Glenn Hoddle, who got the best out of Adams. Venables managed it at Euro 96 when Adams was white-knuckling his sobriety for the duration of the tournament and Hoddle benefited from Adams stopping drinking and finding a new poise. Both also used Gareth Southgate in a back three while Sol Campbell, given his debut by Venables, became a regular when Hoddle took charge. Taylor and Hoddle used Martin Keown but Venables never picked him and though Steve Howey, Neil Ruddock, Steve Bould, John Scales, Colin Cooper and David Unsworth were tried, none established himself. The so-called Golden Generation had three stalwarts in Rio Ferdinand, John Terry and Campbell while injuries prevented Jonathan Woodgate and Ledley King from the long international careers their talent deserved. Jamie Carragher won 31 caps over 11 years, Matthew Upson became a favourite of Fabio Capello’s and Steve McClaren gave Joleon Lescott his debut in 2007. Rio Ferdinand and John Terry before the latter racially abused the former's brother Credit: Action Images / Tony O'Brien Ferdinand failed to re-establish himself after missing the 2010 World Cup through injury and ended his England career with 81 caps in 2011, Terry retired from the international game in 2012 after an FA Commission went ahead with charging him over racially abusing Ferdinand’s brother, Anton. Since then we’ve had shaky alliances involving Gary Cahill, Phil Jagielka and Lescott, Chris Smalling, Phil Jones, John Stones and Michael Keane. Central midfielders Again we need to make an adjustment here for the Forties and Fifties and will restrict it to wing-halfs, elevating most inside-forwards to forwards for the sake of this exercise. The immediate post-war era used Billy Wright most often as the right-half and Manchester United’s Henry Cockburn as the left pivot. Portsmouth’s hard-tackling tyro Jimmy Dickinson succeeded Cockburn and played 48 times from 1949-56 while Phil Taylor of Liverpool and Villa’s Eddie Lowe shared six caps on the right. Before the emergence of the Busby Babes - and we must include Eddie Colman here as well as Duncan Edwards because he would have been an international but for his death at Munich at the age of 21 - Wright and Dickinson formed the regular partnership. The claims of Edwards  - simply the most complete player England has ever produced, skilful, forceful, bursting with stamina and natural authority - could no longer be ignored in 1955 and he won 18 caps before he was killed, also at the age of 21. Ron Flowers, who won three titles with Wolves in the Fifties, played once in tandem with Edwards and took over after the 1958 World Cup with Blackburn’s efficient Ronnie Clayton his usual foil after Clayton had seen off Wolves’ Eddie Clamp. Nobby Stiles played at centre-back for Manchester United but was magnificent as Ramsey’s midfield destroyer in the 1966 side, providing the platform from which Bobby Charlton could glide through the gears, the ball under his immaculate control, and ping passes, whip in crosses or fire thunderous shots at goal. Before the two of them joined up, Flowers and Bobby Robson had been the main men with Charlton out on the left wing and after injuries and age diminished Stiles, Tottenham’s Alan Mullery was given the job. Colin Bell, Man City’s Nijinsky, was blooded in 1968 and proved irreplaceable when Martin Buchan effectively ended his career in 1975 after 48 caps. For the first part of the Seventies Martin Peters tucked in from the left and Bell played the dynamic right-half role, sadly without as much freedom as he had to pelt forward for City. Trevor Brooking made his first start in Ramsey’s last match and became the co-key player with Kevin Keegan under Greenwood with his clever passing and penetrative movement. He was so good that he kept the magnificent Glenn Hoddle on the peripheries following his debut in 1978. Hoddle, as brilliant a playmaker as he is rotten as a pundit, would have a system tailored to his strengths for England’s last three games at the 1986 World Cup when crisis forced Robson’s hand. Gerry Francis, Revie’s second captain, would have given both stiff competition had he stayed fit after his 12th cap. Tony Currie and Alan Hudson join the list of inexpertly harnessed talents while Terry McDermott, so intrepid for Liverpool, was denied a consistent run in the side by Ray Wilkins who ended the decade a dynamic box-to-box midfielder with the skill, control and vision that would later make him so comfortable as a ‘sitter’ in Serie A. The entire Eighties can be considered the Bryan Robson years. Bobby was besotted by him but for understandable reasons, as Alex Ferguson outlined: "He had good control, was a decisive tackler, passed the ball well and his combination of stamina and perceptive reading of movement enabled him to make sudden and deadly infiltrations from midfield into the opposition's box." His fitness became a national preoccupation and he lasted two games each of the 1986 and 1990 World Cups after driving England to qualification at both. We saw him at his very best only in 1982 and Euro 88 when he needed support that his team-mates could not provide. Wilkins was his regular partner, replaced by Hoddle for 1988 and Neil Webb thereafter until Paul Gascoigne finally charmed the sceptical Bobby Robson in 1990. Peter Reid, Everton’s tigerish beating heart, took centre stage in 1986 when Robson’s shoulder popped out again but the promise of his Goodison colleague Paul Bracewell was ravaged by  an ankle injury that took almost two years out of his career. England's all-action 'Captain Marvel' Credit: David Cannon/Getty Images Italia 90 began with Robson, Gascoigne and Chris Waddle in a midfield three and ended in unforgettable drama with David Platt in for the captain, having seen off Steve McMahon. Graham Taylor initially stuck with the Platt-Gascoigne axis for the victory over Poland but went with his Aston Villa pairing of Platt and Sid Cowans for the trip to Dublin. Gascoigne’s injuries and drinking alarmed Taylor who kept him around the squad when fit but his absences provoked some of the strangest selections in memory, noticeably Geoff Thomas, Andy Gray and Carlton Palmer. David Batty and Paul Ince injected some quality, the latter a mainstay for Venables and Hoddle - playing with Platt and Gascoigne at Euro 96, Paul Scholes at the 1998 World Cup. Jamie Redknapp was ill-served by injury, Nicky Butt ill-served by managers until Sven Goran-Eriksson’s hand was forced in 2002 by Steven Gerrard’s absence and Ray Parlour by the wrong-headed perception that he was well, in Lovejoy’s words, ‘only Ray Parlour’. Gascoigne lights up Wembley v Scotland at Euro 96 Credit: Stu Forster/Allsport Frank Lampard made his debut in 1999 but did not become a regular for four seasons when his class tempted Eriksson to fudge the biggest decision of his England career and stick Scholes on the left to start the ‘Lampard-Gerrard’ compatibility saga that was to run for the next 11 years. Once Scholes decided he’d had enough after Euro 2004 (ending a 29-game goal drought in his penultimate match), Gerrard and Lampard, Lampard and Gerrard held their positions until Steve McClaren recalled Gareth Barry, who impressed Capello so firmly that he put Gerrard on the left. The Golden Generation and its hangover phase featured cameos from Danny Murphy, Owen Hargreaves (though he normally played wide), Scott ‘Scottie’ Parker, Michael Carrick and Jermaine Jenas though none could either usurp Gerrard or Lampard or make the combination look convincing in tournament football.    Both were still in the squad at the 2014 World Cup though age had taken the shine off them. Lampard was reduced to the bench, Gerrard captained the side but his one-paced partnership with Jordan Henderson left a dodgy defence too exposed to cope with Italy and Uruguay. Capello gave Jack Wilshere his debut at the age of 18 yet seven years later we are still waiting for him, probably forlornly, to be blessed with the physical resilience to regain his verve. Eric Dier has been the default starter with Henderson for the past 18 months but Jake Livermore is currently back in the squad, Tom Cleverly has been and gone, Fabian Delph gets in whenever he manages a couple of games for Man City while James Ward-Prowse and Harry Winks put the twinkle in Gareth Southgate’s eye.   Wide men Should we just end this segment here? Stan Matthews and Tom Finney in the Forties and Fifties are the best pair of wingers England have ever had. In 1948 a forward line of Matthews, Stan Mortensen, Tommy Lawton, Wilf Mannion and Finney put on arguably England’s greatest performance in the 4-0 away victory over Italy but never played together again. Finney was an England regular for 12 years, playing on the right, left and through the middle until 1958 but Matthews, seven years Finney’s senior, was eased out only a year earlier at the age of 42 with 54 caps. He was not deemed as indispensable by myopic selectors who gave run-outs on the wings in his stead to Peter Harris, Les Medley, Billy Elliott and Johnny Berry. Blackburn’s Bryan Douglas took the No7 shirt 36 times and scored 11 goals from 1975-63 and Bobby Charlton won the majority of his caps until 1964 on the left flank, seeing out the decade in a Lancs touchline hegemony.   In the Sixties, after the end of the Douglas-Charlton years, Ramsey tried John Connelly, Terry Paine, Peter Thompson, Derek Temple and Ian Callaghan before deciding on a narrower road to triumph. Alan Ball, essentially an auxiliary central midfielder, edged out to patrol the right for the latter stages of the 1966 World Cup, driving England on with his stamina, skill and heart but victory convinced the manager to stick to his system, using the full-backs for width with Peters augmenting the strikers from a nominal position on the left and Ball from the right. Wingers were out of vogue for most of decade after 1966 - Ian Storey Moore kept the flame flickering briefly and Revie tried with QPR’s Dave Thomas and Merlin himself. Gordon Hill, but it wasn’t until Ron Greenwood picked Manchester City’s Peter Barnes and United’s Steve Coppell together in 1977 that England took flight again. Coppell evolved into a solid right-sided player but at that point was an out and out winger who held the position for five years. Laurie Cunningham made three starts alongside him but by the start of the following decade Greenwood had cramped his own style. John Barnes at the Maracana Credit: David Cannon/Allsport The Eighties should have been the decade of Waddle and John Barnes and in popular memory it remains so but England started the decade with a tighter system, using Coppell and Graham Rix at the 1982 World Cup, and got to the quarter-finals of the 1986 tournament having ditched the wingers for Trevor Steven and Steve Hodge. Villa’s European Cup-winner Tony Morley briefly enraptured Bobby Robson and Mark Chamberlain preceded Waddle into the side by two years but it was largely a Barnes-Waddle duopoly from then on, though rarely in tandem and both, despite their brilliance and that goal at the Maracana, the first scapegoats. Lee Sharpe was the great left hope of the Nineties but faded away, Venables got the best out of Darren Anderton and Steve McManaman to provide hope of a more expansive future until David Beckham took freehold of the No7 shirt and front pages for eight years with a revolving cast of Nick Barmby, Paul Merson or a wing-back on the left. Eriksson blanked McManaman at the start of the 2000s and tried Trevor Sinclair, Scholes and Joe Cole out there to give some balance for Beckham. Stewart Downing became a mainstay of Steve McClaren’s squads while Aaron Lennon and David Bentley were tried out on the right. Ultimately he went back to Beckham. Capello got the best out of Theo Walcott for a few games, pulled Gerrard out to the left and employed James Milner as a Steady Eddie solution. Hodgson switched to 4-2-3-1 and used Raheem Sterling, Danny Welbeck, Wayne Rooney and Adam Lallana to provide width which is largely, with the exception of Rooney, where we remain apart from the saving grace of Rashford. Forwards To the summit … and, controversially, I am going to include some inside-forwards for the first three eras. So, for our post-war pioneers we will go with the aforementioned Mortensen, scorer of 23 goals in 25 games, Lawton, who scored 22 times in 23 starts, and Mannion, ‘the Mozart of football’ as Matthews put it. Len Shackleton and ‘Wor’ Jackie Milburn straddled the Forties and Fifties while Mortensen played on until 1953. The No9 shirt fell vacant in 1948 when Lawton told Walter Winterbottom that the coach didn’t know enough to be giving him advice, Milburn filled it for a spell before Nat Lofthouse won 33 caps and scored 30 goals, including the two at the Praterstadion that made him forever ‘The Lion of Vienna’. Tommy Taylor, one of the eight ‘Flowers of Manchester’ among the 23 victims of the Munich Air Crash, shot powerfully with both feet, had pace, guile and spatial awareness, and the fast-twitch reflexes of the thoroughbred goalscorer. He bagged 16 goals in 19 appearances as the other out-and-out England centre-forward of the decade. Lofty and Tommy were supported by Ivor Broadis and the finest, most astute passer in the team’s history, Johnny Haynes, who was only 27 in 1962 when he played his 56th and final game for England (his 22nd as captain) in the 1962 World Cup quarter-final. He was never as fluent again after a car crash on his return from Chile. Geoff Hurst’s hat-trick in the 1966 World Cup final overshadows anything any other England striker can match. Roger Hunt, the other Wembley immortal, was so crucial to Ramsey’s system because his tireless movement made space for Bobby Charlton to fill that it is forgotten that he scored 18 times in 34 appearances, and Jimmy Greaves, English football’s most cold-hearted and deadly finisher, gave the manager a richness of options. By the end of the Sixties Franny Lee had taken over from Hunt and Greaves as Hurst’s partner for Mexico Sniffer Clarke, the heir to Greaves, made his debut in 1970, Peter Osgood made only a couple of starts and Martin Chivers became Ramsey’s preferred No9 for two years, scoring 13 times in 24 appearances. Rodney Marsh exasperated his manager, Malcolm MacDonald thrashed five past Cyprus for Revie but made his distaste for the man who picked him well known, which meant the search for an ‘oppo’ for Kevin Keegan - the human dynamo, a rampaging forward who could leap, head, shoot and pass with distinction - lasted too long. Bob Latchford found favour for a while as did Stuart Pearson, Mick Channon moved over from the right, Paul Mariner began the international career that would yield 35 caps and 13 goals and Tricky Trevor Francis beguiled us all with his positioning and vision. Kevin Keegan scores against Scotland in 1979 Credit: Steve Powell/Allsport Cyrille Regis would have made more than two starts in the Eighties had he moved to Manchester United from West Brom instead of Coventry but he couldn’t displace the Keegan-Mariner-Woodcock-Francis usual suspects for the World Cup in Spain. Robson ushered Keegan into retirement but kept faith with the others until Gary Lineker, the quicksilver scavenger, gave him no excuse in 1984 and began the march to the Mexico Golden Boot, a World Cup quarter- and semi-final and 48 goals in 80 games. He was at his best with Peter Beardsley - who brought out the best in everyone - but also fed off Mark Hateley, Alan Smith,  and Steve Bull. The Nineties began with Lineker and Italia 90, Taylor then gave him the captaincy and slim pickings to work with up front and he left the scene in 1992 when shown the managerial big curly finger despite England desperately requiring a goal against Sweden. Taylor turned to Ian Wright who made a terrific return under Hoddle after being ignored by Venables and Les Ferdinand. Alan Shearer, impressive at Southampton, unstoppable except by injury at  Blackburn, won his first cap  in 1992 but had scored only five times in 23 appearances before the start of Euro 96 and hadn’t managed an international goal for 21 months. He hit five in the five games, was elevated to the captaincy for four years and ended still the talisman, though far less mobile, in 2000 with 30 goals. Teddy Sheringham played the Beardsley role for him perfectly and kept Andy Cole out of the squad and Robbie Fowler out of the side until Michael Owen came off the bench to score against Romania at France 98 and could not be left out again. Two games later he scored the wonder goal against Argentina that sounded the trumpets for his charge to the Ballon d’Or three years later. Michael Owen scores against Argentina at the 1998 World Cup Credit: Pawel Kopczynski REUTERS Owen was never really considered part of the Golden Generation because of a certain diffidence but he was its spearhead, when fit, and its yearned for king over the water when absent. He began the decade with Shearer, combined with club-mate Emile Heskey for the 1-5 in Munich and spent time up-front with Fowler and Darius Vassell before Eriksson promoted Wayne Rooney in 2003. Over 14 years Rooney would surpass Bobby Charlton’s England goalscoring record, beginning by playing off the cuff with boundless zip and chutzpah, maturing into that rarity, a workhorse with ebullient, irrepressible swagger and ending up a shadow of electrifying presence he once had been. During the decade Rooney played up top with Owen, Jermaine Defoe and Peter Crouch most frequently. Dean Ashton seemed to fit the part but it wasn’t to be. Rooney has been the key striker and player of this last decade, too and very much undroppable until Southgate took charge. Opportunities for Jay Rodriguez, Andy Carroll and Daniel Sturridge have been curtailed by long-term injuries, Hodgson thought it wise to take Rickie Lambert to the World Cup but in 2015 Harry Kane was given a chance and grabbed it. Jamie Vardy remains among the alternatives along with Sturridge and the second (third and fourth) coming of Defoe.   Conclusion How do you come up with a decision on the relative strengths and weaknesses over eight decades? Subjectively, obviously, but without prejudice:  Goalkeepers: Seventies - Banks, Shilton, Clemence. Full-backs: Sixties - Armfield, Cohen, Wilson, Cooper. Central defenders: Seventies - Moore, Labone, Todd, McFarland, Thompson. Central midfielders: Eighties - Robson, Wilkins, Gascoigne, Hoddle. Wide men: Fifties - Matthews, Finney, Charlton R.   Strikers: Nineties - Lineker, Shearer, Owen, Beardsley.  Please feel free to dispute this 23-man squad selection in the comments section. 

The England dream team by eras: which decade comes out on top?

Scroll to the bottom of the article for Rob Bagchi's all-time 23-man England squad August is traditionally silly season for journalism but on the football beat the two-week autumn and spring international breaks are the cue for extreme resourcefulness. Watching England toil through yet another developmental stage, the slimness of their options and assets in central midfield and the heart of defence as blatant as the consoling promise of Harry Kane and Marcus Rashford, made us wonder in which eras each part of the team have been at their strongest? Was English goalkeeping, say, at its apex in the 1970s or have the wide players of the Forties never been surpassed? For once a decision to truncate the period for analysis is not motivated by either sloth or rampant neophilia. England rejoined Fifa only in 1946 and their first international tournament was the 1950 World Cup, having spurned the first three.  Therefore it makes sense to start in the immediate post-war years and to help the process we will look at each phase for every sector - goalkeeper, full-backs, central defenders, midfielders, wide players and strikers - look at the players picked and the breadth of quality alternatives. Some will represent generations or decades, others distinct stages in the team’s evolution. We’ll begin in goal and chart the progression, chronological at least, from Frank Swift and his primrose polo neck sweater to Joe Hart and his binman chic high-vis short-sleeves, concluding with our stab at an answer. Goalkeepers If you’ve been paying attention to anything involving England without being so bored you’ve felt compelled to make a paper plane, our first contender will be obvious. Frank Swift, the wok-handed, spring-heeled Manchester City goalkeeper who pioneered the throw-out, was the first keeper to captain England and as the man in goal when England travelled to Turin to defeat the double world champions Italy (a pre Superga full-strength Azzurri side) 4-0, is our candidate from the Forties. He won 19 caps despite the war depriving him of his career from the age of 25 to 32, let in 18 goals and played in other memorable victories over France, Sweden, Scotland and Portugal. Other standouts from the truncated decade include Tottenham’s title-winning Ted Ditchburn, who won six caps, and the brave, acrobatic, sure-handed Bert Williams of Wolves who succeeded Swift after his international retirement and earned 24 caps over the next six years. Our Fifties options begin with Williams and Gil Merrick of Birmingham City who earned the most caps (23) of the decade and kept five clean sheets. It was Merrick’s misfortune to be in goal for the mortifying, 3-6 defeat by Hungary at Wembley in 1953 and the 7-1 thrashing in the Nepstadion a year later. Admittedly he appeared rattled on both occasions but only because the Magnificent Magyars and his shaky defence left him horribly exposed. The sight of him picking the ball out of the net 13 times have haunted English football ever since but he was not responsible. Those defeats should have marked a paradigm shift but the England system - once again propped up by a crop of excellent players - did not significantly change until much later.  Other notable stalwarts of the decade were Bolton’s 5ft 8in Eddie Hopkinson, the master of one-on-ones who won 13 caps, and Colin McDonald of Burnley who kept goal at the 1958 World Cup and was a dominant, cross-catching doyen of the old school. The Sixties begin with Sheffield Wednesday’s, quick, agile Ron Springett who played 33 times including all four at the 1962 World Cup where he repeatedly saved Walter Winterbottom's side from a proper drubbing in the 3-1 quarter-final defeat by Brazil, and end with Banks of England, Springett’s understudy in Chile, justly recognised as the greatest goalie in the world. It wasn’t just his majesty during England’s 1966 campaign, it was his general safehandedness - helped, trivia fans, in a pre-gloves age, with a generous rub of Beechnut chewing gum-laced saliva on the palms - his rare ability to save gymnastically equally well whether his goal was attacked high or low and his courage. He was so supreme that he restricted other fine goalkeepers such as Peter Bonetti, Gordon West, Alex Stepney and Springett to a handful of caps after Alf Ramsey made him first choice in 1964. Gordon Banks remained Ramsey’s default selection until he lost an eye in a car crash at the age of 34 in Oct 1972, taking in the save against Pele in 1970, the world’s greatest keeper defying the game’s best player by diving downwards, like an hour hand pointing to seven o’clock, and twisting his wrist to ensure he flicked it over the bar to prevent the great striker pouncing on the rebound. But Leicester City did not rate the marginal differentials between an established world-class player and an emerging one as highly as Ramsey and sold Banks to Stoke in 1967 to clear the way for 17-year-old Peter Shilton who owned the Eighties but duelled with the agile, commanding and astute Ray Clemence throughout the preceding decade to be England’s No1. Shilton was a brilliant shot-stopper and all the hours of dedicated, unrelenting practice gave him uncommon agility and aerial mastery. From about 1978 onwards, the error against Poland in 1973 long overcome, Shilton has the right to be considered Banks’ equal and probably superior. The reign of the duopoly left those other excellent keepers, Joe Corrigan, Phil Parkes and Stepney feeding off scraps. When it game to goalkeepers Ron Greenwood had a touch of the Jimmy Armfields at Leeds (“the manager’s indecision is final) but at the start of 1982 after rotating them for five years, he eventually plumped for Shilton who stayed undisputed first choice for the whole of the Eighties. Clemence carried on as the first reserve until 1983 and from 1985 Chris Woods began to make the No13 shirt his second skin during international weeks. Woods made 14 starts in the decade but was mostly stuck on the bench occasionally conceding opportunities for the stand-by role to Gary Bailey, Nigel Spink, Dave Beasant and David Seaman. Poor Martin Hodge, Tony Coton and John Lukic never even got a sniff. Peter Shilton at the start of his international career Credit: Malcolm Croft/PA Bobby Robson stood by Peter Shilton for Italia 90 and kept the 40-year-old keeper between the sticks for the semi-final shootout against West Germany despite having not used all his substitute options and Shilton’s poor record at saving spot-kicks (one from 15). The veteran retired from international football at the end of the tournament but carried on playing for a variety of clubs until 1997. Woods, who once went 1196 minutes without conceding a goal for Rangers in successive matches, became Graham Taylor’s No1 and played at Euro 92 backed up by David Seaman and England’s first million-pound goalie, Nigel Martyn. Seaman came into his own under Terry Venables and proved himself a wonderfully athletic goalkeeper with great agility, positional awareness, sound judgment and, above all, consistency at Euro 96. He saved penalties, too. Glenn Hoddle logically opted for continuity but awarded caps to Ian Walker, David James, Tim Flowers and Martyn when injury or the need to see how the others shaped up demanded.   Seaman continued through the proto-Golden Generation era until his mistakes were compounded by his age, particularly, like Shilton in 1990, a leaden-footedness in reverse. Paul Robinson was anointed for the 2006 World Cup when David Beckham metamorphosed into Sally Bowles in Baden-Baden but Sven Goran-Eriksson also tried out Martyn, James (the Euro 2004) starter and Rob Green. If we consider the McClaren era a coda to the Golden Generation, The Together Again tour after Dean Martin had bailed on Frank Sinatra and Sammy Davis to be replaced by Liza Minelli, small wonder that it was largely a Robinson hangover with supporting roles for Scott Carson, Chris Kirkland, James and Ben Foster. Fabio Capello took a look at James and Green, didn’t like what he saw, blooded Joe Hart then went back to swapping between the other two, £4m a year not being enough to deliver decisiveness. Jack Butland, John Ruddy, Fraser Forster and Tom Heaton have made appearances under Roy Hodgson and Gareth Southgate. Foster, too, has returned from temporary retirement but the seven years since the 4-1 defeat by Germany in Bloemfontein have been the Hart hegemony, under whose dominion we linger. Poor old Whitney Houston did not live long enough for an answer to her question - where do broken Harts go? It’s West Ham, pet. Full backs Now we have established the decades we are going to compare, let us breeze through the options rather than dwelling in such detail to outline the parameters. First choices for full-backs of the Forties are Laurie Scott of Arsenal on the right and captain in all 13 appearances, George Hardwick of Middlesbrough on the left. Depth is added by Derby’s Bert Mozley as a back-up down the right and Manchester United’s Johnny Aston at left-back with 17 caps. George Hardwick, right, greets the Sweden captain Erik Nilsson in  1947 Credit: Reg Birkett/Keystone/Getty Images In the Fifties the selection panel had Spurs’ Alf Ramsey at the beginning of the decade to play on the right and Blackburn’s Bill Eckersley on the left. Birmingham’s Jeff Hall and West Brom’s Don Howe made the right-back slot the preserve of the West Midlands for the rest of the decade while Manchester United’s majestic and adventurous Roger Byrne played 33 successive matches at left-back until his death at Munich during a period when the selection committee made consistency virtually unknown. Tommy Banks, Bolton’s tank, did his best to replace the irreplaceable at the 1958 World Cup and Sheffield United’s Graham Shaw filled in the following year. Take your pick from the Sixties beginning with the two 1966 imperishables George Cohen and Ray Wilson, Jimmy Armfield, a former captain who played on the right at the 1962 World Cup, Keith Newton, who succeeded Cohen and Terry Cooper who took over from his fellow Yorkshireman Wilson at left-back. Add on all those reduced to a handful of caps because of Ramsey’s loyalty - Bob McNab, Paul Reaney, Chris Lawler, Gerry Byrne, Tommy Wright and Cyril Knowles - and you have the kind of riches that would make Gareth Southgate turn green with envy beneath his beard.   George Cohen, left, and Ray Wilson, holding the Jules Rimet Trophy, celebrate victory in 1966 Credit: PA Photos England’s least successful decade in terms of qualification is also, paradoxically, one remembered with a fondness for the quality of English teams – the best of which were bolstered by Scotsmen, Welshmen and Irishmen. England’s full-backs in the Seventies numbered the Liverpool pair Phil Neal and Emlyn Hughes (not that Hughes played there for his club as frequently as he did for the national side). Their versatility was a virtue, as it was for Ipswich’s Mick Mills and Leeds’ Paul Madeley and Trevor Cherry. More orthodox full-backs were plentiful, too: the magnificent Viv Anderson on the right and Don Revie’s choices, Leicester’s Steve Whitworth and QPR’s Dave Clement. On the left Frank Lampard, Alec Lindsay, David Nish, Mike Pejic and Ian Gillard won caps, as did Kevin Beattie playing out of position but in masterly fashion, particularly in the 5-1 thrashing of Scotland in 1975. Kenny Sansom began the Eighties in possession of the No 3 shirt and held it for eight years, playing consistently and with real skill to hold off the challenge of West Brom’s Derek Statham, until the claims of Stuart Pearce in 1988 could be resisted no more. The right side was more problematic once Mills, Neal and Anderson entered their mid thirties. Mick Duxbury had a run there, Danny Thomas could have been the long-term solution save for that rotten injury inflicted by Kevin Maguire while Gary Stevens won 45 caps after his debut during Everton’s title-winning campaign in 1984-85 including Mexico ’86, Euro ’88 and the beginning of Italia 90. Kenny Sansom made the left-back position his own in the Eighties Credit:  Duncan Raban/Allsport/Getty Images Pearce was key at the start of the next decade, becoming captain under Graham Taylor, taking a position in a back three for Euro 96 when Steve McManaman and Darren Anderton played wide, and was recalled at the age of 37 for a couple of starts under Kevin Keegan. Terry Venables initially preferred the Blackburn Rovers left-back Graeme Le Saux and but for injury he would have started Euro 96. Glenn Hoddle restored him as first-choice after a cameo from Andy Hinchcliffe but by the end of the Nineties the left side, in defence and midfield, had become something of a national neurosis. Phil Neville filled in there, playing alongside his brother, Gary, the undisputed No2 when fit. For club and country he succeeded Paul Parker and the challenges of Gary Charles and Rob Jones for the spot were sadly snuffed out by personal problems and injury respectively. Sven Goran-Eriksson promoted Ashley Cole as the man to solve the malaise on the left and over the 12 years of his international career from 2001 onwards he won 107 caps and held Wayne Bridge at bay. Gary Neville missed the 2002 World Cup where Danny Mills stood in but was back straight afterwards and carried on until 2007. Luke Young and Micah Richards stated their claims to be paired with Cole but ultimately Glen Johnson won the contest under Fabio Capello. Johnson stayed in situ under Roy Hodgson until the 2014 World Cup and was even recalled to the squad last year but Kyle Walker, Nathaniel Clyne and Kieran Trippier are now the default options after experiments with Chris Smalling and Phil Jones out wide. Leighton Baines played so well from 2012-14 that he essentially forced Cole into international retirement before the more athletic claims of Danny Rose and Ryan Bertrand did for him. Central defenders   Here we face a problem with the first two post-war decades before the four-back system really took off. A bodged solution for the Forties and Fifties, rather than trying to corral in a wing-half, would be to list the options at centre-half even though normally only one was picked. We don’t even have to do that for the Forties because Billy Wright, the centre-half for much of the Fifties, captain for 11 years and England’s first 100-cap player, played at wing-half for his country at the beginning of his international career, alongside the exemplary Neil Franklin at No 5. Franklin abandoned Stoke in 1950 to move to Colombia and circumvent the maximum wage but his wife did not settle there and he faced the opprobrium of his club and the FA on return, not adding to the 27 caps he earned before he left. Breadth of talent for the decade would be provided by Blackpool’s Harry Johnston, Allenby Chilton of Manchester United and Liverpool’s Bill Jones. Wright made the position his own after the 1954 World Cup where Bill McGarry and Syd Owen had taken the role. Johnston, too, continued to make appearances at the start of the Fifties and Liverpool’s Laurie Hughes stood in for Franklin at the 1950 World Cup. Jim Taylor of Fulham, Burnley’s Mal Barrass and Charlton’s Derek Ufton were also tried but no one could dislodge the 5ft 8in Wright, captain of Wolves and England, golden-haired paragon of the post-war game. The finest partnership of the Sixties, Jackie Charlton and Bobby Moore, came together only a year before they won the World Cup and had it not been for the disgrace of Peter Swan - who won 19 caps as a cultured but powerful stopper between 1960-62 - Charlton may never have joined his brother as a cornerstone of 1966 and all that. Maurice Norman, the Spurs Double-winning centre-half, joined forces with Moore for the 1962 World Cup because Swan was confined to quarters with dysentery in Chile and Brian Labone both preceded Charlton and succeeded him as first choice towards the end of the decade. Norman Hunter served as Moore’s understudy but the consistency of the captain restricted ‘Bites Yer Legs’ to 28 caps over nine seasons. Moore at his peak Credit: AP Photo/files Moore made the last of his 108 appearances in 1973 and by that point there were plenty of contenders for his position, notably Derby County’s Colin Todd, Hunter and Emlyn Hughes. Roy McFarland earned 28 caps in the centre-half slot from 1971-76 before injuries ruined his career and gave Dave Watson a long run as first choice until 1981. Watson won the last of his 65 caps at the age of 35 in June 1982 but was omitted from the final squad for the Spain World Cup, the first for which he had qualified after failures to reach West Germany and Argentina. Phil Thompson of Liverpool and Manchester United’s Brian Greenhoff were given their debuts by Don Revie but only the former flourished after he left for Abu Dhabi. Watson’s role as the tall, raw-bone aerial colossus was filled by Terry Butcher throughout the Eighties though we forget how good his left foot was, his skill overwhelmed by the ‘up and  at ‘em’ patriotism of his persona. Thompson led Liverpool to the 1981 European Cup and partnered the Ipswich defender at the Spain World Cup but Bobby Robson struggled to find a regular foil for Butcher thereafter and worked his way through Alvin Martin, Graham Roberts, Mark Wright, Terry Fenwick, Gary Pallister and a callow Tony Adams before settling on Des Walker for Italia 90 and a return for Wright in a back three. At the start of the Nineties Graham Taylor used Walker, Adams and Pallister but it was his successors, Terry Venables and Glenn Hoddle, who got the best out of Adams. Venables managed it at Euro 96 when Adams was white-knuckling his sobriety for the duration of the tournament and Hoddle benefited from Adams stopping drinking and finding a new poise. Both also used Gareth Southgate in a back three while Sol Campbell, given his debut by Venables, became a regular when Hoddle took charge. Taylor and Hoddle used Martin Keown but Venables never picked him and though Steve Howey, Neil Ruddock, Steve Bould, John Scales, Colin Cooper and David Unsworth were tried, none established himself. The so-called Golden Generation had three stalwarts in Rio Ferdinand, John Terry and Campbell while injuries prevented Jonathan Woodgate and Ledley King from the long international careers their talent deserved. Jamie Carragher won 31 caps over 11 years, Matthew Upson became a favourite of Fabio Capello’s and Steve McClaren gave Joleon Lescott his debut in 2007. Rio Ferdinand and John Terry before the latter racially abused the former's brother Credit: Action Images / Tony O'Brien Ferdinand failed to re-establish himself after missing the 2010 World Cup through injury and ended his England career with 81 caps in 2011, Terry retired from the international game in 2012 after an FA Commission went ahead with charging him over racially abusing Ferdinand’s brother, Anton. Since then we’ve had shaky alliances involving Gary Cahill, Phil Jagielka and Lescott, Chris Smalling, Phil Jones, John Stones and Michael Keane. Central midfielders Again we need to make an adjustment here for the Forties and Fifties and will restrict it to wing-halfs, elevating most inside-forwards to forwards for the sake of this exercise. The immediate post-war era used Billy Wright most often as the right-half and Manchester United’s Henry Cockburn as the left pivot. Portsmouth’s hard-tackling tyro Jimmy Dickinson succeeded Cockburn and played 48 times from 1949-56 while Phil Taylor of Liverpool and Villa’s Eddie Lowe shared six caps on the right. Before the emergence of the Busby Babes - and we must include Eddie Colman here as well as Duncan Edwards because he would have been an international but for his death at Munich at the age of 21 - Wright and Dickinson formed the regular partnership. The claims of Edwards  - simply the most complete player England has ever produced, skilful, forceful, bursting with stamina and natural authority - could no longer be ignored in 1955 and he won 18 caps before he was killed, also at the age of 21. Ron Flowers, who won three titles with Wolves in the Fifties, played once in tandem with Edwards and took over after the 1958 World Cup with Blackburn’s efficient Ronnie Clayton his usual foil after Clayton had seen off Wolves’ Eddie Clamp. Nobby Stiles played at centre-back for Manchester United but was magnificent as Ramsey’s midfield destroyer in the 1966 side, providing the platform from which Bobby Charlton could glide through the gears, the ball under his immaculate control, and ping passes, whip in crosses or fire thunderous shots at goal. Before the two of them joined up, Flowers and Bobby Robson had been the main men with Charlton out on the left wing and after injuries and age diminished Stiles, Tottenham’s Alan Mullery was given the job. Colin Bell, Man City’s Nijinsky, was blooded in 1968 and proved irreplaceable when Martin Buchan effectively ended his career in 1975 after 48 caps. For the first part of the Seventies Martin Peters tucked in from the left and Bell played the dynamic right-half role, sadly without as much freedom as he had to pelt forward for City. Trevor Brooking made his first start in Ramsey’s last match and became the co-key player with Kevin Keegan under Greenwood with his clever passing and penetrative movement. He was so good that he kept the magnificent Glenn Hoddle on the peripheries following his debut in 1978. Hoddle, as brilliant a playmaker as he is rotten as a pundit, would have a system tailored to his strengths for England’s last three games at the 1986 World Cup when crisis forced Robson’s hand. Gerry Francis, Revie’s second captain, would have given both stiff competition had he stayed fit after his 12th cap. Tony Currie and Alan Hudson join the list of inexpertly harnessed talents while Terry McDermott, so intrepid for Liverpool, was denied a consistent run in the side by Ray Wilkins who ended the decade a dynamic box-to-box midfielder with the skill, control and vision that would later make him so comfortable as a ‘sitter’ in Serie A. The entire Eighties can be considered the Bryan Robson years. Bobby was besotted by him but for understandable reasons, as Alex Ferguson outlined: "He had good control, was a decisive tackler, passed the ball well and his combination of stamina and perceptive reading of movement enabled him to make sudden and deadly infiltrations from midfield into the opposition's box." His fitness became a national preoccupation and he lasted two games each of the 1986 and 1990 World Cups after driving England to qualification at both. We saw him at his very best only in 1982 and Euro 88 when he needed support that his team-mates could not provide. Wilkins was his regular partner, replaced by Hoddle for 1988 and Neil Webb thereafter until Paul Gascoigne finally charmed the sceptical Bobby Robson in 1990. Peter Reid, Everton’s tigerish beating heart, took centre stage in 1986 when Robson’s shoulder popped out again but the promise of his Goodison colleague Paul Bracewell was ravaged by  an ankle injury that took almost two years out of his career. England's all-action 'Captain Marvel' Credit: David Cannon/Getty Images Italia 90 began with Robson, Gascoigne and Chris Waddle in a midfield three and ended in unforgettable drama with David Platt in for the captain, having seen off Steve McMahon. Graham Taylor initially stuck with the Platt-Gascoigne axis for the victory over Poland but went with his Aston Villa pairing of Platt and Sid Cowans for the trip to Dublin. Gascoigne’s injuries and drinking alarmed Taylor who kept him around the squad when fit but his absences provoked some of the strangest selections in memory, noticeably Geoff Thomas, Andy Gray and Carlton Palmer. David Batty and Paul Ince injected some quality, the latter a mainstay for Venables and Hoddle - playing with Platt and Gascoigne at Euro 96, Paul Scholes at the 1998 World Cup. Jamie Redknapp was ill-served by injury, Nicky Butt ill-served by managers until Sven Goran-Eriksson’s hand was forced in 2002 by Steven Gerrard’s absence and Ray Parlour by the wrong-headed perception that he was well, in Lovejoy’s words, ‘only Ray Parlour’. Gascoigne lights up Wembley v Scotland at Euro 96 Credit: Stu Forster/Allsport Frank Lampard made his debut in 1999 but did not become a regular for four seasons when his class tempted Eriksson to fudge the biggest decision of his England career and stick Scholes on the left to start the ‘Lampard-Gerrard’ compatibility saga that was to run for the next 11 years. Once Scholes decided he’d had enough after Euro 2004 (ending a 29-game goal drought in his penultimate match), Gerrard and Lampard, Lampard and Gerrard held their positions until Steve McClaren recalled Gareth Barry, who impressed Capello so firmly that he put Gerrard on the left. The Golden Generation and its hangover phase featured cameos from Danny Murphy, Owen Hargreaves (though he normally played wide), Scott ‘Scottie’ Parker, Michael Carrick and Jermaine Jenas though none could either usurp Gerrard or Lampard or make the combination look convincing in tournament football.    Both were still in the squad at the 2014 World Cup though age had taken the shine off them. Lampard was reduced to the bench, Gerrard captained the side but his one-paced partnership with Jordan Henderson left a dodgy defence too exposed to cope with Italy and Uruguay. Capello gave Jack Wilshere his debut at the age of 18 yet seven years later we are still waiting for him, probably forlornly, to be blessed with the physical resilience to regain his verve. Eric Dier has been the default starter with Henderson for the past 18 months but Jake Livermore is currently back in the squad, Tom Cleverly has been and gone, Fabian Delph gets in whenever he manages a couple of games for Man City while James Ward-Prowse and Harry Winks put the twinkle in Gareth Southgate’s eye.   Wide men Should we just end this segment here? Stan Matthews and Tom Finney in the Forties and Fifties are the best pair of wingers England have ever had. In 1948 a forward line of Matthews, Stan Mortensen, Tommy Lawton, Wilf Mannion and Finney put on arguably England’s greatest performance in the 4-0 away victory over Italy but never played together again. Finney was an England regular for 12 years, playing on the right, left and through the middle until 1958 but Matthews, seven years Finney’s senior, was eased out only a year earlier at the age of 42 with 54 caps. He was not deemed as indispensable by myopic selectors who gave run-outs on the wings in his stead to Peter Harris, Les Medley, Billy Elliott and Johnny Berry. Blackburn’s Bryan Douglas took the No7 shirt 36 times and scored 11 goals from 1975-63 and Bobby Charlton won the majority of his caps until 1964 on the left flank, seeing out the decade in a Lancs touchline hegemony.   In the Sixties, after the end of the Douglas-Charlton years, Ramsey tried John Connelly, Terry Paine, Peter Thompson, Derek Temple and Ian Callaghan before deciding on a narrower road to triumph. Alan Ball, essentially an auxiliary central midfielder, edged out to patrol the right for the latter stages of the 1966 World Cup, driving England on with his stamina, skill and heart but victory convinced the manager to stick to his system, using the full-backs for width with Peters augmenting the strikers from a nominal position on the left and Ball from the right. Wingers were out of vogue for most of decade after 1966 - Ian Storey Moore kept the flame flickering briefly and Revie tried with QPR’s Dave Thomas and Merlin himself. Gordon Hill, but it wasn’t until Ron Greenwood picked Manchester City’s Peter Barnes and United’s Steve Coppell together in 1977 that England took flight again. Coppell evolved into a solid right-sided player but at that point was an out and out winger who held the position for five years. Laurie Cunningham made three starts alongside him but by the start of the following decade Greenwood had cramped his own style. John Barnes at the Maracana Credit: David Cannon/Allsport The Eighties should have been the decade of Waddle and John Barnes and in popular memory it remains so but England started the decade with a tighter system, using Coppell and Graham Rix at the 1982 World Cup, and got to the quarter-finals of the 1986 tournament having ditched the wingers for Trevor Steven and Steve Hodge. Villa’s European Cup-winner Tony Morley briefly enraptured Bobby Robson and Mark Chamberlain preceded Waddle into the side by two years but it was largely a Barnes-Waddle duopoly from then on, though rarely in tandem and both, despite their brilliance and that goal at the Maracana, the first scapegoats. Lee Sharpe was the great left hope of the Nineties but faded away, Venables got the best out of Darren Anderton and Steve McManaman to provide hope of a more expansive future until David Beckham took freehold of the No7 shirt and front pages for eight years with a revolving cast of Nick Barmby, Paul Merson or a wing-back on the left. Eriksson blanked McManaman at the start of the 2000s and tried Trevor Sinclair, Scholes and Joe Cole out there to give some balance for Beckham. Stewart Downing became a mainstay of Steve McClaren’s squads while Aaron Lennon and David Bentley were tried out on the right. Ultimately he went back to Beckham. Capello got the best out of Theo Walcott for a few games, pulled Gerrard out to the left and employed James Milner as a Steady Eddie solution. Hodgson switched to 4-2-3-1 and used Raheem Sterling, Danny Welbeck, Wayne Rooney and Adam Lallana to provide width which is largely, with the exception of Rooney, where we remain apart from the saving grace of Rashford. Forwards To the summit … and, controversially, I am going to include some inside-forwards for the first three eras. So, for our post-war pioneers we will go with the aforementioned Mortensen, scorer of 23 goals in 25 games, Lawton, who scored 22 times in 23 starts, and Mannion, ‘the Mozart of football’ as Matthews put it. Len Shackleton and ‘Wor’ Jackie Milburn straddled the Forties and Fifties while Mortensen played on until 1953. The No9 shirt fell vacant in 1948 when Lawton told Walter Winterbottom that the coach didn’t know enough to be giving him advice, Milburn filled it for a spell before Nat Lofthouse won 33 caps and scored 30 goals, including the two at the Praterstadion that made him forever ‘The Lion of Vienna’. Tommy Taylor, one of the eight ‘Flowers of Manchester’ among the 23 victims of the Munich Air Crash, shot powerfully with both feet, had pace, guile and spatial awareness, and the fast-twitch reflexes of the thoroughbred goalscorer. He bagged 16 goals in 19 appearances as the other out-and-out England centre-forward of the decade. Lofty and Tommy were supported by Ivor Broadis and the finest, most astute passer in the team’s history, Johnny Haynes, who was only 27 in 1962 when he played his 56th and final game for England (his 22nd as captain) in the 1962 World Cup quarter-final. He was never as fluent again after a car crash on his return from Chile. Geoff Hurst’s hat-trick in the 1966 World Cup final overshadows anything any other England striker can match. Roger Hunt, the other Wembley immortal, was so crucial to Ramsey’s system because his tireless movement made space for Bobby Charlton to fill that it is forgotten that he scored 18 times in 34 appearances, and Jimmy Greaves, English football’s most cold-hearted and deadly finisher, gave the manager a richness of options. By the end of the Sixties Franny Lee had taken over from Hunt and Greaves as Hurst’s partner for Mexico Sniffer Clarke, the heir to Greaves, made his debut in 1970, Peter Osgood made only a couple of starts and Martin Chivers became Ramsey’s preferred No9 for two years, scoring 13 times in 24 appearances. Rodney Marsh exasperated his manager, Malcolm MacDonald thrashed five past Cyprus for Revie but made his distaste for the man who picked him well known, which meant the search for an ‘oppo’ for Kevin Keegan - the human dynamo, a rampaging forward who could leap, head, shoot and pass with distinction - lasted too long. Bob Latchford found favour for a while as did Stuart Pearson, Mick Channon moved over from the right, Paul Mariner began the international career that would yield 35 caps and 13 goals and Tricky Trevor Francis beguiled us all with his positioning and vision. Kevin Keegan scores against Scotland in 1979 Credit: Steve Powell/Allsport Cyrille Regis would have made more than two starts in the Eighties had he moved to Manchester United from West Brom instead of Coventry but he couldn’t displace the Keegan-Mariner-Woodcock-Francis usual suspects for the World Cup in Spain. Robson ushered Keegan into retirement but kept faith with the others until Gary Lineker, the quicksilver scavenger, gave him no excuse in 1984 and began the march to the Mexico Golden Boot, a World Cup quarter- and semi-final and 48 goals in 80 games. He was at his best with Peter Beardsley - who brought out the best in everyone - but also fed off Mark Hateley, Alan Smith,  and Steve Bull. The Nineties began with Lineker and Italia 90, Taylor then gave him the captaincy and slim pickings to work with up front and he left the scene in 1992 when shown the managerial big curly finger despite England desperately requiring a goal against Sweden. Taylor turned to Ian Wright who made a terrific return under Hoddle after being ignored by Venables and Les Ferdinand. Alan Shearer, impressive at Southampton, unstoppable except by injury at  Blackburn, won his first cap  in 1992 but had scored only five times in 23 appearances before the start of Euro 96 and hadn’t managed an international goal for 21 months. He hit five in the five games, was elevated to the captaincy for four years and ended still the talisman, though far less mobile, in 2000 with 30 goals. Teddy Sheringham played the Beardsley role for him perfectly and kept Andy Cole out of the squad and Robbie Fowler out of the side until Michael Owen came off the bench to score against Romania at France 98 and could not be left out again. Two games later he scored the wonder goal against Argentina that sounded the trumpets for his charge to the Ballon d’Or three years later. Michael Owen scores against Argentina at the 1998 World Cup Credit: Pawel Kopczynski REUTERS Owen was never really considered part of the Golden Generation because of a certain diffidence but he was its spearhead, when fit, and its yearned for king over the water when absent. He began the decade with Shearer, combined with club-mate Emile Heskey for the 1-5 in Munich and spent time up-front with Fowler and Darius Vassell before Eriksson promoted Wayne Rooney in 2003. Over 14 years Rooney would surpass Bobby Charlton’s England goalscoring record, beginning by playing off the cuff with boundless zip and chutzpah, maturing into that rarity, a workhorse with ebullient, irrepressible swagger and ending up a shadow of electrifying presence he once had been. During the decade Rooney played up top with Owen, Jermaine Defoe and Peter Crouch most frequently. Dean Ashton seemed to fit the part but it wasn’t to be. Rooney has been the key striker and player of this last decade, too and very much undroppable until Southgate took charge. Opportunities for Jay Rodriguez, Andy Carroll and Daniel Sturridge have been curtailed by long-term injuries, Hodgson thought it wise to take Rickie Lambert to the World Cup but in 2015 Harry Kane was given a chance and grabbed it. Jamie Vardy remains among the alternatives along with Sturridge and the second (third and fourth) coming of Defoe.   Conclusion How do you come up with a decision on the relative strengths and weaknesses over eight decades? Subjectively, obviously, but without prejudice:  Goalkeepers: Seventies - Banks, Shilton, Clemence. Full-backs: Sixties - Armfield, Cohen, Wilson, Cooper. Central defenders: Seventies - Moore, Labone, Todd, McFarland, Thompson. Central midfielders: Eighties - Robson, Wilkins, Gascoigne, Hoddle. Wide men: Fifties - Matthews, Finney, Charlton R.   Strikers: Nineties - Lineker, Shearer, Owen, Beardsley.  Please feel free to dispute this 23-man squad selection in the comments section. 

The England dream team by eras: which decade comes out on top?

Scroll to the bottom of the article for Rob Bagchi's all-time 23-man England squad August is traditionally silly season for journalism but on the football beat the two-week autumn and spring international breaks are the cue for extreme resourcefulness. Watching England toil through yet another developmental stage, the slimness of their options and assets in central midfield and the heart of defence as blatant as the consoling promise of Harry Kane and Marcus Rashford, made us wonder in which eras each part of the team have been at their strongest? Was English goalkeeping, say, at its apex in the 1970s or have the wide players of the Forties never been surpassed? For once a decision to truncate the period for analysis is not motivated by either sloth or rampant neophilia. England rejoined Fifa only in 1946 and their first international tournament was the 1950 World Cup, having spurned the first three.  Therefore it makes sense to start in the immediate post-war years and to help the process we will look at each phase for every sector - goalkeeper, full-backs, central defenders, midfielders, wide players and strikers - look at the players picked and the breadth of quality alternatives. Some will represent generations or decades, others distinct stages in the team’s evolution. We’ll begin in goal and chart the progression, chronological at least, from Frank Swift and his primrose polo neck sweater to Joe Hart and his binman chic high-vis short-sleeves, concluding with our stab at an answer. Goalkeepers If you’ve been paying attention to anything involving England without being so bored you’ve felt compelled to make a paper plane, our first contender will be obvious. Frank Swift, the wok-handed, spring-heeled Manchester City goalkeeper who pioneered the throw-out, was the first keeper to captain England and as the man in goal when England travelled to Turin to defeat the double world champions Italy (a pre Superga full-strength Azzurri side) 4-0, is our candidate from the Forties. He won 19 caps despite the war depriving him of his career from the age of 25 to 32, let in 18 goals and played in other memorable victories over France, Sweden, Scotland and Portugal. Other standouts from the truncated decade include Tottenham’s title-winning Ted Ditchburn, who won six caps, and the brave, acrobatic, sure-handed Bert Williams of Wolves who succeeded Swift after his international retirement and earned 24 caps over the next six years. Our Fifties options begin with Williams and Gil Merrick of Birmingham City who earned the most caps (23) of the decade and kept five clean sheets. It was Merrick’s misfortune to be in goal for the mortifying, 3-6 defeat by Hungary at Wembley in 1953 and the 7-1 thrashing in the Nepstadion a year later. Admittedly he appeared rattled on both occasions but only because the Magnificent Magyars and his shaky defence left him horribly exposed. The sight of him picking the ball out of the net 13 times have haunted English football ever since but he was not responsible. Those defeats should have marked a paradigm shift but the England system - once again propped up by a crop of excellent players - did not significantly change until much later.  Other notable stalwarts of the decade were Bolton’s 5ft 8in Eddie Hopkinson, the master of one-on-ones who won 13 caps, and Colin McDonald of Burnley who kept goal at the 1958 World Cup and was a dominant, cross-catching doyen of the old school. The Sixties begin with Sheffield Wednesday’s, quick, agile Ron Springett who played 33 times including all four at the 1962 World Cup where he repeatedly saved Walter Winterbottom's side from a proper drubbing in the 3-1 quarter-final defeat by Brazil, and end with Banks of England, Springett’s understudy in Chile, justly recognised as the greatest goalie in the world. It wasn’t just his majesty during England’s 1966 campaign, it was his general safehandedness - helped, trivia fans, in a pre-gloves age, with a generous rub of Beechnut chewing gum-laced saliva on the palms - his rare ability to save gymnastically equally well whether his goal was attacked high or low and his courage. He was so supreme that he restricted other fine goalkeepers such as Peter Bonetti, Gordon West, Alex Stepney and Springett to a handful of caps after Alf Ramsey made him first choice in 1964. Gordon Banks remained Ramsey’s default selection until he lost an eye in a car crash at the age of 34 in Oct 1972, taking in the save against Pele in 1970, the world’s greatest keeper defying the game’s best player by diving downwards, like an hour hand pointing to seven o’clock, and twisting his wrist to ensure he flicked it over the bar to prevent the great striker pouncing on the rebound. But Leicester City did not rate the marginal differentials between an established world-class player and an emerging one as highly as Ramsey and sold Banks to Stoke in 1967 to clear the way for 17-year-old Peter Shilton who owned the Eighties but duelled with the agile, commanding and astute Ray Clemence throughout the preceding decade to be England’s No1. Shilton was a brilliant shot-stopper and all the hours of dedicated, unrelenting practice gave him uncommon agility and aerial mastery. From about 1978 onwards, the error against Poland in 1973 long overcome, Shilton has the right to be considered Banks’ equal and probably superior. The reign of the duopoly left those other excellent keepers, Joe Corrigan, Phil Parkes and Stepney feeding off scraps. When it game to goalkeepers Ron Greenwood had a touch of the Jimmy Armfields at Leeds (“the manager’s indecision is final) but at the start of 1982 after rotating them for five years, he eventually plumped for Shilton who stayed undisputed first choice for the whole of the Eighties. Clemence carried on as the first reserve until 1983 and from 1985 Chris Woods began to make the No13 shirt his second skin during international weeks. Woods made 14 starts in the decade but was mostly stuck on the bench occasionally conceding opportunities for the stand-by role to Gary Bailey, Nigel Spink, Dave Beasant and David Seaman. Poor Martin Hodge, Tony Coton and John Lukic never even got a sniff. Peter Shilton at the start of his international career Credit: Malcolm Croft/PA Bobby Robson stood by Peter Shilton for Italia 90 and kept the 40-year-old keeper between the sticks for the semi-final shootout against West Germany despite having not used all his substitute options and Shilton’s poor record at saving spot-kicks (one from 15). The veteran retired from international football at the end of the tournament but carried on playing for a variety of clubs until 1997. Woods, who once went 1196 minutes without conceding a goal for Rangers in successive matches, became Graham Taylor’s No1 and played at Euro 92 backed up by David Seaman and England’s first million-pound goalie, Nigel Martyn. Seaman came into his own under Terry Venables and proved himself a wonderfully athletic goalkeeper with great agility, positional awareness, sound judgment and, above all, consistency at Euro 96. He saved penalties, too. Glenn Hoddle logically opted for continuity but awarded caps to Ian Walker, David James, Tim Flowers and Martyn when injury or the need to see how the others shaped up demanded.   Seaman continued through the proto-Golden Generation era until his mistakes were compounded by his age, particularly, like Shilton in 1990, a leaden-footedness in reverse. Paul Robinson was anointed for the 2006 World Cup when David Beckham metamorphosed into Sally Bowles in Baden-Baden but Sven Goran-Eriksson also tried out Martyn, James (the Euro 2004) starter and Rob Green. If we consider the McClaren era a coda to the Golden Generation, The Together Again tour after Dean Martin had bailed on Frank Sinatra and Sammy Davis to be replaced by Liza Minelli, small wonder that it was largely a Robinson hangover with supporting roles for Scott Carson, Chris Kirkland, James and Ben Foster. Fabio Capello took a look at James and Green, didn’t like what he saw, blooded Joe Hart then went back to swapping between the other two, £4m a year not being enough to deliver decisiveness. Jack Butland, John Ruddy, Fraser Forster and Tom Heaton have made appearances under Roy Hodgson and Gareth Southgate. Foster, too, has returned from temporary retirement but the seven years since the 4-1 defeat by Germany in Bloemfontein have been the Hart hegemony, under whose dominion we linger. Poor old Whitney Houston did not live long enough for an answer to her question - where do broken Harts go? It’s West Ham, pet. Full backs Now we have established the decades we are going to compare, let us breeze through the options rather than dwelling in such detail to outline the parameters. First choices for full-backs of the Forties are Laurie Scott of Arsenal on the right and captain in all 13 appearances, George Hardwick of Middlesbrough on the left. Depth is added by Derby’s Bert Mozley as a back-up down the right and Manchester United’s Johnny Aston at left-back with 17 caps. George Hardwick, right, greets the Sweden captain Erik Nilsson in  1947 Credit: Reg Birkett/Keystone/Getty Images In the Fifties the selection panel had Spurs’ Alf Ramsey at the beginning of the decade to play on the right and Blackburn’s Bill Eckersley on the left. Birmingham’s Jeff Hall and West Brom’s Don Howe made the right-back slot the preserve of the West Midlands for the rest of the decade while Manchester United’s majestic and adventurous Roger Byrne played 33 successive matches at left-back until his death at Munich during a period when the selection committee made consistency virtually unknown. Tommy Banks, Bolton’s tank, did his best to replace the irreplaceable at the 1958 World Cup and Sheffield United’s Graham Shaw filled in the following year. Take your pick from the Sixties beginning with the two 1966 imperishables George Cohen and Ray Wilson, Jimmy Armfield, a former captain who played on the right at the 1962 World Cup, Keith Newton, who succeeded Cohen and Terry Cooper who took over from his fellow Yorkshireman Wilson at left-back. Add on all those reduced to a handful of caps because of Ramsey’s loyalty - Bob McNab, Paul Reaney, Chris Lawler, Gerry Byrne, Tommy Wright and Cyril Knowles - and you have the kind of riches that would make Gareth Southgate turn green with envy beneath his beard.   George Cohen, left, and Ray Wilson, holding the Jules Rimet Trophy, celebrate victory in 1966 Credit: PA Photos England’s least successful decade in terms of qualification is also, paradoxically, one remembered with a fondness for the quality of English teams – the best of which were bolstered by Scotsmen, Welshmen and Irishmen. England’s full-backs in the Seventies numbered the Liverpool pair Phil Neal and Emlyn Hughes (not that Hughes played there for his club as frequently as he did for the national side). Their versatility was a virtue, as it was for Ipswich’s Mick Mills and Leeds’ Paul Madeley and Trevor Cherry. More orthodox full-backs were plentiful, too: the magnificent Viv Anderson on the right and Don Revie’s choices, Leicester’s Steve Whitworth and QPR’s Dave Clement. On the left Frank Lampard, Alec Lindsay, David Nish, Mike Pejic and Ian Gillard won caps, as did Kevin Beattie playing out of position but in masterly fashion, particularly in the 5-1 thrashing of Scotland in 1975. Kenny Sansom began the Eighties in possession of the No 3 shirt and held it for eight years, playing consistently and with real skill to hold off the challenge of West Brom’s Derek Statham, until the claims of Stuart Pearce in 1988 could be resisted no more. The right side was more problematic once Mills, Neal and Anderson entered their mid thirties. Mick Duxbury had a run there, Danny Thomas could have been the long-term solution save for that rotten injury inflicted by Kevin Maguire while Gary Stevens won 45 caps after his debut during Everton’s title-winning campaign in 1984-85 including Mexico ’86, Euro ’88 and the beginning of Italia 90. Kenny Sansom made the left-back position his own in the Eighties Credit:  Duncan Raban/Allsport/Getty Images Pearce was key at the start of the next decade, becoming captain under Graham Taylor, taking a position in a back three for Euro 96 when Steve McManaman and Darren Anderton played wide, and was recalled at the age of 37 for a couple of starts under Kevin Keegan. Terry Venables initially preferred the Blackburn Rovers left-back Graeme Le Saux and but for injury he would have started Euro 96. Glenn Hoddle restored him as first-choice after a cameo from Andy Hinchcliffe but by the end of the Nineties the left side, in defence and midfield, had become something of a national neurosis. Phil Neville filled in there, playing alongside his brother, Gary, the undisputed No2 when fit. For club and country he succeeded Paul Parker and the challenges of Gary Charles and Rob Jones for the spot were sadly snuffed out by personal problems and injury respectively. Sven Goran-Eriksson promoted Ashley Cole as the man to solve the malaise on the left and over the 12 years of his international career from 2001 onwards he won 107 caps and held Wayne Bridge at bay. Gary Neville missed the 2002 World Cup where Danny Mills stood in but was back straight afterwards and carried on until 2007. Luke Young and Micah Richards stated their claims to be paired with Cole but ultimately Glen Johnson won the contest under Fabio Capello. Johnson stayed in situ under Roy Hodgson until the 2014 World Cup and was even recalled to the squad last year but Kyle Walker, Nathaniel Clyne and Kieran Trippier are now the default options after experiments with Chris Smalling and Phil Jones out wide. Leighton Baines played so well from 2012-14 that he essentially forced Cole into international retirement before the more athletic claims of Danny Rose and Ryan Bertrand did for him. Central defenders   Here we face a problem with the first two post-war decades before the four-back system really took off. A bodged solution for the Forties and Fifties, rather than trying to corral in a wing-half, would be to list the options at centre-half even though normally only one was picked. We don’t even have to do that for the Forties because Billy Wright, the centre-half for much of the Fifties, captain for 11 years and England’s first 100-cap player, played at wing-half for his country at the beginning of his international career, alongside the exemplary Neil Franklin at No 5. Franklin abandoned Stoke in 1950 to move to Colombia and circumvent the maximum wage but his wife did not settle there and he faced the opprobrium of his club and the FA on return, not adding to the 27 caps he earned before he left. Breadth of talent for the decade would be provided by Blackpool’s Harry Johnston, Allenby Chilton of Manchester United and Liverpool’s Bill Jones. Wright made the position his own after the 1954 World Cup where Bill McGarry and Syd Owen had taken the role. Johnston, too, continued to make appearances at the start of the Fifties and Liverpool’s Laurie Hughes stood in for Franklin at the 1950 World Cup. Jim Taylor of Fulham, Burnley’s Mal Barrass and Charlton’s Derek Ufton were also tried but no one could dislodge the 5ft 8in Wright, captain of Wolves and England, golden-haired paragon of the post-war game. The finest partnership of the Sixties, Jackie Charlton and Bobby Moore, came together only a year before they won the World Cup and had it not been for the disgrace of Peter Swan - who won 19 caps as a cultured but powerful stopper between 1960-62 - Charlton may never have joined his brother as a cornerstone of 1966 and all that. Maurice Norman, the Spurs Double-winning centre-half, joined forces with Moore for the 1962 World Cup because Swan was confined to quarters with dysentery in Chile and Brian Labone both preceded Charlton and succeeded him as first choice towards the end of the decade. Norman Hunter served as Moore’s understudy but the consistency of the captain restricted ‘Bites Yer Legs’ to 28 caps over nine seasons. Moore at his peak Credit: AP Photo/files Moore made the last of his 108 appearances in 1973 and by that point there were plenty of contenders for his position, notably Derby County’s Colin Todd, Hunter and Emlyn Hughes. Roy McFarland earned 28 caps in the centre-half slot from 1971-76 before injuries ruined his career and gave Dave Watson a long run as first choice until 1981. Watson won the last of his 65 caps at the age of 35 in June 1982 but was omitted from the final squad for the Spain World Cup, the first for which he had qualified after failures to reach West Germany and Argentina. Phil Thompson of Liverpool and Manchester United’s Brian Greenhoff were given their debuts by Don Revie but only the former flourished after he left for Abu Dhabi. Watson’s role as the tall, raw-bone aerial colossus was filled by Terry Butcher throughout the Eighties though we forget how good his left foot was, his skill overwhelmed by the ‘up and  at ‘em’ patriotism of his persona. Thompson led Liverpool to the 1981 European Cup and partnered the Ipswich defender at the Spain World Cup but Bobby Robson struggled to find a regular foil for Butcher thereafter and worked his way through Alvin Martin, Graham Roberts, Mark Wright, Terry Fenwick, Gary Pallister and a callow Tony Adams before settling on Des Walker for Italia 90 and a return for Wright in a back three. At the start of the Nineties Graham Taylor used Walker, Adams and Pallister but it was his successors, Terry Venables and Glenn Hoddle, who got the best out of Adams. Venables managed it at Euro 96 when Adams was white-knuckling his sobriety for the duration of the tournament and Hoddle benefited from Adams stopping drinking and finding a new poise. Both also used Gareth Southgate in a back three while Sol Campbell, given his debut by Venables, became a regular when Hoddle took charge. Taylor and Hoddle used Martin Keown but Venables never picked him and though Steve Howey, Neil Ruddock, Steve Bould, John Scales, Colin Cooper and David Unsworth were tried, none established himself. The so-called Golden Generation had three stalwarts in Rio Ferdinand, John Terry and Campbell while injuries prevented Jonathan Woodgate and Ledley King from the long international careers their talent deserved. Jamie Carragher won 31 caps over 11 years, Matthew Upson became a favourite of Fabio Capello’s and Steve McClaren gave Joleon Lescott his debut in 2007. Rio Ferdinand and John Terry before the latter racially abused the former's brother Credit: Action Images / Tony O'Brien Ferdinand failed to re-establish himself after missing the 2010 World Cup through injury and ended his England career with 81 caps in 2011, Terry retired from the international game in 2012 after an FA Commission went ahead with charging him over racially abusing Ferdinand’s brother, Anton. Since then we’ve had shaky alliances involving Gary Cahill, Phil Jagielka and Lescott, Chris Smalling, Phil Jones, John Stones and Michael Keane. Central midfielders Again we need to make an adjustment here for the Forties and Fifties and will restrict it to wing-halfs, elevating most inside-forwards to forwards for the sake of this exercise. The immediate post-war era used Billy Wright most often as the right-half and Manchester United’s Henry Cockburn as the left pivot. Portsmouth’s hard-tackling tyro Jimmy Dickinson succeeded Cockburn and played 48 times from 1949-56 while Phil Taylor of Liverpool and Villa’s Eddie Lowe shared six caps on the right. Before the emergence of the Busby Babes - and we must include Eddie Colman here as well as Duncan Edwards because he would have been an international but for his death at Munich at the age of 21 - Wright and Dickinson formed the regular partnership. The claims of Edwards  - simply the most complete player England has ever produced, skilful, forceful, bursting with stamina and natural authority - could no longer be ignored in 1955 and he won 18 caps before he was killed, also at the age of 21. Ron Flowers, who won three titles with Wolves in the Fifties, played once in tandem with Edwards and took over after the 1958 World Cup with Blackburn’s efficient Ronnie Clayton his usual foil after Clayton had seen off Wolves’ Eddie Clamp. Nobby Stiles played at centre-back for Manchester United but was magnificent as Ramsey’s midfield destroyer in the 1966 side, providing the platform from which Bobby Charlton could glide through the gears, the ball under his immaculate control, and ping passes, whip in crosses or fire thunderous shots at goal. Before the two of them joined up, Flowers and Bobby Robson had been the main men with Charlton out on the left wing and after injuries and age diminished Stiles, Tottenham’s Alan Mullery was given the job. Colin Bell, Man City’s Nijinsky, was blooded in 1968 and proved irreplaceable when Martin Buchan effectively ended his career in 1975 after 48 caps. For the first part of the Seventies Martin Peters tucked in from the left and Bell played the dynamic right-half role, sadly without as much freedom as he had to pelt forward for City. Trevor Brooking made his first start in Ramsey’s last match and became the co-key player with Kevin Keegan under Greenwood with his clever passing and penetrative movement. He was so good that he kept the magnificent Glenn Hoddle on the peripheries following his debut in 1978. Hoddle, as brilliant a playmaker as he is rotten as a pundit, would have a system tailored to his strengths for England’s last three games at the 1986 World Cup when crisis forced Robson’s hand. Gerry Francis, Revie’s second captain, would have given both stiff competition had he stayed fit after his 12th cap. Tony Currie and Alan Hudson join the list of inexpertly harnessed talents while Terry McDermott, so intrepid for Liverpool, was denied a consistent run in the side by Ray Wilkins who ended the decade a dynamic box-to-box midfielder with the skill, control and vision that would later make him so comfortable as a ‘sitter’ in Serie A. The entire Eighties can be considered the Bryan Robson years. Bobby was besotted by him but for understandable reasons, as Alex Ferguson outlined: "He had good control, was a decisive tackler, passed the ball well and his combination of stamina and perceptive reading of movement enabled him to make sudden and deadly infiltrations from midfield into the opposition's box." His fitness became a national preoccupation and he lasted two games each of the 1986 and 1990 World Cups after driving England to qualification at both. We saw him at his very best only in 1982 and Euro 88 when he needed support that his team-mates could not provide. Wilkins was his regular partner, replaced by Hoddle for 1988 and Neil Webb thereafter until Paul Gascoigne finally charmed the sceptical Bobby Robson in 1990. Peter Reid, Everton’s tigerish beating heart, took centre stage in 1986 when Robson’s shoulder popped out again but the promise of his Goodison colleague Paul Bracewell was ravaged by  an ankle injury that took almost two years out of his career. England's all-action 'Captain Marvel' Credit: David Cannon/Getty Images Italia 90 began with Robson, Gascoigne and Chris Waddle in a midfield three and ended in unforgettable drama with David Platt in for the captain, having seen off Steve McMahon. Graham Taylor initially stuck with the Platt-Gascoigne axis for the victory over Poland but went with his Aston Villa pairing of Platt and Sid Cowans for the trip to Dublin. Gascoigne’s injuries and drinking alarmed Taylor who kept him around the squad when fit but his absences provoked some of the strangest selections in memory, noticeably Geoff Thomas, Andy Gray and Carlton Palmer. David Batty and Paul Ince injected some quality, the latter a mainstay for Venables and Hoddle - playing with Platt and Gascoigne at Euro 96, Paul Scholes at the 1998 World Cup. Jamie Redknapp was ill-served by injury, Nicky Butt ill-served by managers until Sven Goran-Eriksson’s hand was forced in 2002 by Steven Gerrard’s absence and Ray Parlour by the wrong-headed perception that he was well, in Lovejoy’s words, ‘only Ray Parlour’. Gascoigne lights up Wembley v Scotland at Euro 96 Credit: Stu Forster/Allsport Frank Lampard made his debut in 1999 but did not become a regular for four seasons when his class tempted Eriksson to fudge the biggest decision of his England career and stick Scholes on the left to start the ‘Lampard-Gerrard’ compatibility saga that was to run for the next 11 years. Once Scholes decided he’d had enough after Euro 2004 (ending a 29-game goal drought in his penultimate match), Gerrard and Lampard, Lampard and Gerrard held their positions until Steve McClaren recalled Gareth Barry, who impressed Capello so firmly that he put Gerrard on the left. The Golden Generation and its hangover phase featured cameos from Danny Murphy, Owen Hargreaves (though he normally played wide), Scott ‘Scottie’ Parker, Michael Carrick and Jermaine Jenas though none could either usurp Gerrard or Lampard or make the combination look convincing in tournament football.    Both were still in the squad at the 2014 World Cup though age had taken the shine off them. Lampard was reduced to the bench, Gerrard captained the side but his one-paced partnership with Jordan Henderson left a dodgy defence too exposed to cope with Italy and Uruguay. Capello gave Jack Wilshere his debut at the age of 18 yet seven years later we are still waiting for him, probably forlornly, to be blessed with the physical resilience to regain his verve. Eric Dier has been the default starter with Henderson for the past 18 months but Jake Livermore is currently back in the squad, Tom Cleverly has been and gone, Fabian Delph gets in whenever he manages a couple of games for Man City while James Ward-Prowse and Harry Winks put the twinkle in Gareth Southgate’s eye.   Wide men Should we just end this segment here? Stan Matthews and Tom Finney in the Forties and Fifties are the best pair of wingers England have ever had. In 1948 a forward line of Matthews, Stan Mortensen, Tommy Lawton, Wilf Mannion and Finney put on arguably England’s greatest performance in the 4-0 away victory over Italy but never played together again. Finney was an England regular for 12 years, playing on the right, left and through the middle until 1958 but Matthews, seven years Finney’s senior, was eased out only a year earlier at the age of 42 with 54 caps. He was not deemed as indispensable by myopic selectors who gave run-outs on the wings in his stead to Peter Harris, Les Medley, Billy Elliott and Johnny Berry. Blackburn’s Bryan Douglas took the No7 shirt 36 times and scored 11 goals from 1975-63 and Bobby Charlton won the majority of his caps until 1964 on the left flank, seeing out the decade in a Lancs touchline hegemony.   In the Sixties, after the end of the Douglas-Charlton years, Ramsey tried John Connelly, Terry Paine, Peter Thompson, Derek Temple and Ian Callaghan before deciding on a narrower road to triumph. Alan Ball, essentially an auxiliary central midfielder, edged out to patrol the right for the latter stages of the 1966 World Cup, driving England on with his stamina, skill and heart but victory convinced the manager to stick to his system, using the full-backs for width with Peters augmenting the strikers from a nominal position on the left and Ball from the right. Wingers were out of vogue for most of decade after 1966 - Ian Storey Moore kept the flame flickering briefly and Revie tried with QPR’s Dave Thomas and Merlin himself. Gordon Hill, but it wasn’t until Ron Greenwood picked Manchester City’s Peter Barnes and United’s Steve Coppell together in 1977 that England took flight again. Coppell evolved into a solid right-sided player but at that point was an out and out winger who held the position for five years. Laurie Cunningham made three starts alongside him but by the start of the following decade Greenwood had cramped his own style. John Barnes at the Maracana Credit: David Cannon/Allsport The Eighties should have been the decade of Waddle and John Barnes and in popular memory it remains so but England started the decade with a tighter system, using Coppell and Graham Rix at the 1982 World Cup, and got to the quarter-finals of the 1986 tournament having ditched the wingers for Trevor Steven and Steve Hodge. Villa’s European Cup-winner Tony Morley briefly enraptured Bobby Robson and Mark Chamberlain preceded Waddle into the side by two years but it was largely a Barnes-Waddle duopoly from then on, though rarely in tandem and both, despite their brilliance and that goal at the Maracana, the first scapegoats. Lee Sharpe was the great left hope of the Nineties but faded away, Venables got the best out of Darren Anderton and Steve McManaman to provide hope of a more expansive future until David Beckham took freehold of the No7 shirt and front pages for eight years with a revolving cast of Nick Barmby, Paul Merson or a wing-back on the left. Eriksson blanked McManaman at the start of the 2000s and tried Trevor Sinclair, Scholes and Joe Cole out there to give some balance for Beckham. Stewart Downing became a mainstay of Steve McClaren’s squads while Aaron Lennon and David Bentley were tried out on the right. Ultimately he went back to Beckham. Capello got the best out of Theo Walcott for a few games, pulled Gerrard out to the left and employed James Milner as a Steady Eddie solution. Hodgson switched to 4-2-3-1 and used Raheem Sterling, Danny Welbeck, Wayne Rooney and Adam Lallana to provide width which is largely, with the exception of Rooney, where we remain apart from the saving grace of Rashford. Forwards To the summit … and, controversially, I am going to include some inside-forwards for the first three eras. So, for our post-war pioneers we will go with the aforementioned Mortensen, scorer of 23 goals in 25 games, Lawton, who scored 22 times in 23 starts, and Mannion, ‘the Mozart of football’ as Matthews put it. Len Shackleton and ‘Wor’ Jackie Milburn straddled the Forties and Fifties while Mortensen played on until 1953. The No9 shirt fell vacant in 1948 when Lawton told Walter Winterbottom that the coach didn’t know enough to be giving him advice, Milburn filled it for a spell before Nat Lofthouse won 33 caps and scored 30 goals, including the two at the Praterstadion that made him forever ‘The Lion of Vienna’. Tommy Taylor, one of the eight ‘Flowers of Manchester’ among the 23 victims of the Munich Air Crash, shot powerfully with both feet, had pace, guile and spatial awareness, and the fast-twitch reflexes of the thoroughbred goalscorer. He bagged 16 goals in 19 appearances as the other out-and-out England centre-forward of the decade. Lofty and Tommy were supported by Ivor Broadis and the finest, most astute passer in the team’s history, Johnny Haynes, who was only 27 in 1962 when he played his 56th and final game for England (his 22nd as captain) in the 1962 World Cup quarter-final. He was never as fluent again after a car crash on his return from Chile. Geoff Hurst’s hat-trick in the 1966 World Cup final overshadows anything any other England striker can match. Roger Hunt, the other Wembley immortal, was so crucial to Ramsey’s system because his tireless movement made space for Bobby Charlton to fill that it is forgotten that he scored 18 times in 34 appearances, and Jimmy Greaves, English football’s most cold-hearted and deadly finisher, gave the manager a richness of options. By the end of the Sixties Franny Lee had taken over from Hunt and Greaves as Hurst’s partner for Mexico Sniffer Clarke, the heir to Greaves, made his debut in 1970, Peter Osgood made only a couple of starts and Martin Chivers became Ramsey’s preferred No9 for two years, scoring 13 times in 24 appearances. Rodney Marsh exasperated his manager, Malcolm MacDonald thrashed five past Cyprus for Revie but made his distaste for the man who picked him well known, which meant the search for an ‘oppo’ for Kevin Keegan - the human dynamo, a rampaging forward who could leap, head, shoot and pass with distinction - lasted too long. Bob Latchford found favour for a while as did Stuart Pearson, Mick Channon moved over from the right, Paul Mariner began the international career that would yield 35 caps and 13 goals and Tricky Trevor Francis beguiled us all with his positioning and vision. Kevin Keegan scores against Scotland in 1979 Credit: Steve Powell/Allsport Cyrille Regis would have made more than two starts in the Eighties had he moved to Manchester United from West Brom instead of Coventry but he couldn’t displace the Keegan-Mariner-Woodcock-Francis usual suspects for the World Cup in Spain. Robson ushered Keegan into retirement but kept faith with the others until Gary Lineker, the quicksilver scavenger, gave him no excuse in 1984 and began the march to the Mexico Golden Boot, a World Cup quarter- and semi-final and 48 goals in 80 games. He was at his best with Peter Beardsley - who brought out the best in everyone - but also fed off Mark Hateley, Alan Smith,  and Steve Bull. The Nineties began with Lineker and Italia 90, Taylor then gave him the captaincy and slim pickings to work with up front and he left the scene in 1992 when shown the managerial big curly finger despite England desperately requiring a goal against Sweden. Taylor turned to Ian Wright who made a terrific return under Hoddle after being ignored by Venables and Les Ferdinand. Alan Shearer, impressive at Southampton, unstoppable except by injury at  Blackburn, won his first cap  in 1992 but had scored only five times in 23 appearances before the start of Euro 96 and hadn’t managed an international goal for 21 months. He hit five in the five games, was elevated to the captaincy for four years and ended still the talisman, though far less mobile, in 2000 with 30 goals. Teddy Sheringham played the Beardsley role for him perfectly and kept Andy Cole out of the squad and Robbie Fowler out of the side until Michael Owen came off the bench to score against Romania at France 98 and could not be left out again. Two games later he scored the wonder goal against Argentina that sounded the trumpets for his charge to the Ballon d’Or three years later. Michael Owen scores against Argentina at the 1998 World Cup Credit: Pawel Kopczynski REUTERS Owen was never really considered part of the Golden Generation because of a certain diffidence but he was its spearhead, when fit, and its yearned for king over the water when absent. He began the decade with Shearer, combined with club-mate Emile Heskey for the 1-5 in Munich and spent time up-front with Fowler and Darius Vassell before Eriksson promoted Wayne Rooney in 2003. Over 14 years Rooney would surpass Bobby Charlton’s England goalscoring record, beginning by playing off the cuff with boundless zip and chutzpah, maturing into that rarity, a workhorse with ebullient, irrepressible swagger and ending up a shadow of electrifying presence he once had been. During the decade Rooney played up top with Owen, Jermaine Defoe and Peter Crouch most frequently. Dean Ashton seemed to fit the part but it wasn’t to be. Rooney has been the key striker and player of this last decade, too and very much undroppable until Southgate took charge. Opportunities for Jay Rodriguez, Andy Carroll and Daniel Sturridge have been curtailed by long-term injuries, Hodgson thought it wise to take Rickie Lambert to the World Cup but in 2015 Harry Kane was given a chance and grabbed it. Jamie Vardy remains among the alternatives along with Sturridge and the second (third and fourth) coming of Defoe.   Conclusion How do you come up with a decision on the relative strengths and weaknesses over eight decades? Subjectively, obviously, but without prejudice:  Goalkeepers: Seventies - Banks, Shilton, Clemence. Full-backs: Sixties - Armfield, Cohen, Wilson, Cooper. Central defenders: Seventies - Moore, Labone, Todd, McFarland, Thompson. Central midfielders: Eighties - Robson, Wilkins, Gascoigne, Hoddle. Wide men: Fifties - Matthews, Finney, Charlton R.   Strikers: Nineties - Lineker, Shearer, Owen, Beardsley.  Please feel free to dispute this 23-man squad selection in the comments section. 

The England dream team by eras: which decade comes out on top?

Scroll to the bottom of the article for Rob Bagchi's all-time 23-man England squad August is traditionally silly season for journalism but on the football beat the two-week autumn and spring international breaks are the cue for extreme resourcefulness. Watching England toil through yet another developmental stage, the slimness of their options and assets in central midfield and the heart of defence as blatant as the consoling promise of Harry Kane and Marcus Rashford, made us wonder in which eras each part of the team have been at their strongest? Was English goalkeeping, say, at its apex in the 1970s or have the wide players of the Forties never been surpassed? For once a decision to truncate the period for analysis is not motivated by either sloth or rampant neophilia. England rejoined Fifa only in 1946 and their first international tournament was the 1950 World Cup, having spurned the first three.  Therefore it makes sense to start in the immediate post-war years and to help the process we will look at each phase for every sector - goalkeeper, full-backs, central defenders, midfielders, wide players and strikers - look at the players picked and the breadth of quality alternatives. Some will represent generations or decades, others distinct stages in the team’s evolution. We’ll begin in goal and chart the progression, chronological at least, from Frank Swift and his primrose polo neck sweater to Joe Hart and his binman chic high-vis short-sleeves, concluding with our stab at an answer. Goalkeepers If you’ve been paying attention to anything involving England without being so bored you’ve felt compelled to make a paper plane, our first contender will be obvious. Frank Swift, the wok-handed, spring-heeled Manchester City goalkeeper who pioneered the throw-out, was the first keeper to captain England and as the man in goal when England travelled to Turin to defeat the double world champions Italy (a pre Superga full-strength Azzurri side) 4-0, is our candidate from the Forties. He won 19 caps despite the war depriving him of his career from the age of 25 to 32, let in 18 goals and played in other memorable victories over France, Sweden, Scotland and Portugal. Other standouts from the truncated decade include Tottenham’s title-winning Ted Ditchburn, who won six caps, and the brave, acrobatic, sure-handed Bert Williams of Wolves who succeeded Swift after his international retirement and earned 24 caps over the next six years. Our Fifties options begin with Williams and Gil Merrick of Birmingham City who earned the most caps (23) of the decade and kept five clean sheets. It was Merrick’s misfortune to be in goal for the mortifying, 3-6 defeat by Hungary at Wembley in 1953 and the 7-1 thrashing in the Nepstadion a year later. Admittedly he appeared rattled on both occasions but only because the Magnificent Magyars and his shaky defence left him horribly exposed. The sight of him picking the ball out of the net 13 times have haunted English football ever since but he was not responsible. Those defeats should have marked a paradigm shift but the England system - once again propped up by a crop of excellent players - did not significantly change until much later.  Other notable stalwarts of the decade were Bolton’s 5ft 8in Eddie Hopkinson, the master of one-on-ones who won 13 caps, and Colin McDonald of Burnley who kept goal at the 1958 World Cup and was a dominant, cross-catching doyen of the old school. The Sixties begin with Sheffield Wednesday’s, quick, agile Ron Springett who played 33 times including all four at the 1962 World Cup where he repeatedly saved Walter Winterbottom's side from a proper drubbing in the 3-1 quarter-final defeat by Brazil, and end with Banks of England, Springett’s understudy in Chile, justly recognised as the greatest goalie in the world. It wasn’t just his majesty during England’s 1966 campaign, it was his general safehandedness - helped, trivia fans, in a pre-gloves age, with a generous rub of Beechnut chewing gum-laced saliva on the palms - his rare ability to save gymnastically equally well whether his goal was attacked high or low and his courage. He was so supreme that he restricted other fine goalkeepers such as Peter Bonetti, Gordon West, Alex Stepney and Springett to a handful of caps after Alf Ramsey made him first choice in 1964. Gordon Banks remained Ramsey’s default selection until he lost an eye in a car crash at the age of 34 in Oct 1972, taking in the save against Pele in 1970, the world’s greatest keeper defying the game’s best player by diving downwards, like an hour hand pointing to seven o’clock, and twisting his wrist to ensure he flicked it over the bar to prevent the great striker pouncing on the rebound. But Leicester City did not rate the marginal differentials between an established world-class player and an emerging one as highly as Ramsey and sold Banks to Stoke in 1967 to clear the way for 17-year-old Peter Shilton who owned the Eighties but duelled with the agile, commanding and astute Ray Clemence throughout the preceding decade to be England’s No1. Shilton was a brilliant shot-stopper and all the hours of dedicated, unrelenting practice gave him uncommon agility and aerial mastery. From about 1978 onwards, the error against Poland in 1973 long overcome, Shilton has the right to be considered Banks’ equal and probably superior. The reign of the duopoly left those other excellent keepers, Joe Corrigan, Phil Parkes and Stepney feeding off scraps. When it game to goalkeepers Ron Greenwood had a touch of the Jimmy Armfields at Leeds (“the manager’s indecision is final) but at the start of 1982 after rotating them for five years, he eventually plumped for Shilton who stayed undisputed first choice for the whole of the Eighties. Clemence carried on as the first reserve until 1983 and from 1985 Chris Woods began to make the No13 shirt his second skin during international weeks. Woods made 14 starts in the decade but was mostly stuck on the bench occasionally conceding opportunities for the stand-by role to Gary Bailey, Nigel Spink, Dave Beasant and David Seaman. Poor Martin Hodge, Tony Coton and John Lukic never even got a sniff. Peter Shilton at the start of his international career Credit: Malcolm Croft/PA Bobby Robson stood by Peter Shilton for Italia 90 and kept the 40-year-old keeper between the sticks for the semi-final shootout against West Germany despite having not used all his substitute options and Shilton’s poor record at saving spot-kicks (one from 15). The veteran retired from international football at the end of the tournament but carried on playing for a variety of clubs until 1997. Woods, who once went 1196 minutes without conceding a goal for Rangers in successive matches, became Graham Taylor’s No1 and played at Euro 92 backed up by David Seaman and England’s first million-pound goalie, Nigel Martyn. Seaman came into his own under Terry Venables and proved himself a wonderfully athletic goalkeeper with great agility, positional awareness, sound judgment and, above all, consistency at Euro 96. He saved penalties, too. Glenn Hoddle logically opted for continuity but awarded caps to Ian Walker, David James, Tim Flowers and Martyn when injury or the need to see how the others shaped up demanded.   Seaman continued through the proto-Golden Generation era until his mistakes were compounded by his age, particularly, like Shilton in 1990, a leaden-footedness in reverse. Paul Robinson was anointed for the 2006 World Cup when David Beckham metamorphosed into Sally Bowles in Baden-Baden but Sven Goran-Eriksson also tried out Martyn, James (the Euro 2004) starter and Rob Green. If we consider the McClaren era a coda to the Golden Generation, The Together Again tour after Dean Martin had bailed on Frank Sinatra and Sammy Davis to be replaced by Liza Minelli, small wonder that it was largely a Robinson hangover with supporting roles for Scott Carson, Chris Kirkland, James and Ben Foster. Fabio Capello took a look at James and Green, didn’t like what he saw, blooded Joe Hart then went back to swapping between the other two, £4m a year not being enough to deliver decisiveness. Jack Butland, John Ruddy, Fraser Forster and Tom Heaton have made appearances under Roy Hodgson and Gareth Southgate. Foster, too, has returned from temporary retirement but the seven years since the 4-1 defeat by Germany in Bloemfontein have been the Hart hegemony, under whose dominion we linger. Poor old Whitney Houston did not live long enough for an answer to her question - where do broken Harts go? It’s West Ham, pet. Full backs Now we have established the decades we are going to compare, let us breeze through the options rather than dwelling in such detail to outline the parameters. First choices for full-backs of the Forties are Laurie Scott of Arsenal on the right and captain in all 13 appearances, George Hardwick of Middlesbrough on the left. Depth is added by Derby’s Bert Mozley as a back-up down the right and Manchester United’s Johnny Aston at left-back with 17 caps. George Hardwick, right, greets the Sweden captain Erik Nilsson in  1947 Credit: Reg Birkett/Keystone/Getty Images In the Fifties the selection panel had Spurs’ Alf Ramsey at the beginning of the decade to play on the right and Blackburn’s Bill Eckersley on the left. Birmingham’s Jeff Hall and West Brom’s Don Howe made the right-back slot the preserve of the West Midlands for the rest of the decade while Manchester United’s majestic and adventurous Roger Byrne played 33 successive matches at left-back until his death at Munich during a period when the selection committee made consistency virtually unknown. Tommy Banks, Bolton’s tank, did his best to replace the irreplaceable at the 1958 World Cup and Sheffield United’s Graham Shaw filled in the following year. Take your pick from the Sixties beginning with the two 1966 imperishables George Cohen and Ray Wilson, Jimmy Armfield, a former captain who played on the right at the 1962 World Cup, Keith Newton, who succeeded Cohen and Terry Cooper who took over from his fellow Yorkshireman Wilson at left-back. Add on all those reduced to a handful of caps because of Ramsey’s loyalty - Bob McNab, Paul Reaney, Chris Lawler, Gerry Byrne, Tommy Wright and Cyril Knowles - and you have the kind of riches that would make Gareth Southgate turn green with envy beneath his beard.   George Cohen, left, and Ray Wilson, holding the Jules Rimet Trophy, celebrate victory in 1966 Credit: PA Photos England’s least successful decade in terms of qualification is also, paradoxically, one remembered with a fondness for the quality of English teams – the best of which were bolstered by Scotsmen, Welshmen and Irishmen. England’s full-backs in the Seventies numbered the Liverpool pair Phil Neal and Emlyn Hughes (not that Hughes played there for his club as frequently as he did for the national side). Their versatility was a virtue, as it was for Ipswich’s Mick Mills and Leeds’ Paul Madeley and Trevor Cherry. More orthodox full-backs were plentiful, too: the magnificent Viv Anderson on the right and Don Revie’s choices, Leicester’s Steve Whitworth and QPR’s Dave Clement. On the left Frank Lampard, Alec Lindsay, David Nish, Mike Pejic and Ian Gillard won caps, as did Kevin Beattie playing out of position but in masterly fashion, particularly in the 5-1 thrashing of Scotland in 1975. Kenny Sansom began the Eighties in possession of the No 3 shirt and held it for eight years, playing consistently and with real skill to hold off the challenge of West Brom’s Derek Statham, until the claims of Stuart Pearce in 1988 could be resisted no more. The right side was more problematic once Mills, Neal and Anderson entered their mid thirties. Mick Duxbury had a run there, Danny Thomas could have been the long-term solution save for that rotten injury inflicted by Kevin Maguire while Gary Stevens won 45 caps after his debut during Everton’s title-winning campaign in 1984-85 including Mexico ’86, Euro ’88 and the beginning of Italia 90. Kenny Sansom made the left-back position his own in the Eighties Credit:  Duncan Raban/Allsport/Getty Images Pearce was key at the start of the next decade, becoming captain under Graham Taylor, taking a position in a back three for Euro 96 when Steve McManaman and Darren Anderton played wide, and was recalled at the age of 37 for a couple of starts under Kevin Keegan. Terry Venables initially preferred the Blackburn Rovers left-back Graeme Le Saux and but for injury he would have started Euro 96. Glenn Hoddle restored him as first-choice after a cameo from Andy Hinchcliffe but by the end of the Nineties the left side, in defence and midfield, had become something of a national neurosis. Phil Neville filled in there, playing alongside his brother, Gary, the undisputed No2 when fit. For club and country he succeeded Paul Parker and the challenges of Gary Charles and Rob Jones for the spot were sadly snuffed out by personal problems and injury respectively. Sven Goran-Eriksson promoted Ashley Cole as the man to solve the malaise on the left and over the 12 years of his international career from 2001 onwards he won 107 caps and held Wayne Bridge at bay. Gary Neville missed the 2002 World Cup where Danny Mills stood in but was back straight afterwards and carried on until 2007. Luke Young and Micah Richards stated their claims to be paired with Cole but ultimately Glen Johnson won the contest under Fabio Capello. Johnson stayed in situ under Roy Hodgson until the 2014 World Cup and was even recalled to the squad last year but Kyle Walker, Nathaniel Clyne and Kieran Trippier are now the default options after experiments with Chris Smalling and Phil Jones out wide. Leighton Baines played so well from 2012-14 that he essentially forced Cole into international retirement before the more athletic claims of Danny Rose and Ryan Bertrand did for him. Central defenders   Here we face a problem with the first two post-war decades before the four-back system really took off. A bodged solution for the Forties and Fifties, rather than trying to corral in a wing-half, would be to list the options at centre-half even though normally only one was picked. We don’t even have to do that for the Forties because Billy Wright, the centre-half for much of the Fifties, captain for 11 years and England’s first 100-cap player, played at wing-half for his country at the beginning of his international career, alongside the exemplary Neil Franklin at No 5. Franklin abandoned Stoke in 1950 to move to Colombia and circumvent the maximum wage but his wife did not settle there and he faced the opprobrium of his club and the FA on return, not adding to the 27 caps he earned before he left. Breadth of talent for the decade would be provided by Blackpool’s Harry Johnston, Allenby Chilton of Manchester United and Liverpool’s Bill Jones. Wright made the position his own after the 1954 World Cup where Bill McGarry and Syd Owen had taken the role. Johnston, too, continued to make appearances at the start of the Fifties and Liverpool’s Laurie Hughes stood in for Franklin at the 1950 World Cup. Jim Taylor of Fulham, Burnley’s Mal Barrass and Charlton’s Derek Ufton were also tried but no one could dislodge the 5ft 8in Wright, captain of Wolves and England, golden-haired paragon of the post-war game. The finest partnership of the Sixties, Jackie Charlton and Bobby Moore, came together only a year before they won the World Cup and had it not been for the disgrace of Peter Swan - who won 19 caps as a cultured but powerful stopper between 1960-62 - Charlton may never have joined his brother as a cornerstone of 1966 and all that. Maurice Norman, the Spurs Double-winning centre-half, joined forces with Moore for the 1962 World Cup because Swan was confined to quarters with dysentery in Chile and Brian Labone both preceded Charlton and succeeded him as first choice towards the end of the decade. Norman Hunter served as Moore’s understudy but the consistency of the captain restricted ‘Bites Yer Legs’ to 28 caps over nine seasons. Moore at his peak Credit: AP Photo/files Moore made the last of his 108 appearances in 1973 and by that point there were plenty of contenders for his position, notably Derby County’s Colin Todd, Hunter and Emlyn Hughes. Roy McFarland earned 28 caps in the centre-half slot from 1971-76 before injuries ruined his career and gave Dave Watson a long run as first choice until 1981. Watson won the last of his 65 caps at the age of 35 in June 1982 but was omitted from the final squad for the Spain World Cup, the first for which he had qualified after failures to reach West Germany and Argentina. Phil Thompson of Liverpool and Manchester United’s Brian Greenhoff were given their debuts by Don Revie but only the former flourished after he left for Abu Dhabi. Watson’s role as the tall, raw-bone aerial colossus was filled by Terry Butcher throughout the Eighties though we forget how good his left foot was, his skill overwhelmed by the ‘up and  at ‘em’ patriotism of his persona. Thompson led Liverpool to the 1981 European Cup and partnered the Ipswich defender at the Spain World Cup but Bobby Robson struggled to find a regular foil for Butcher thereafter and worked his way through Alvin Martin, Graham Roberts, Mark Wright, Terry Fenwick, Gary Pallister and a callow Tony Adams before settling on Des Walker for Italia 90 and a return for Wright in a back three. At the start of the Nineties Graham Taylor used Walker, Adams and Pallister but it was his successors, Terry Venables and Glenn Hoddle, who got the best out of Adams. Venables managed it at Euro 96 when Adams was white-knuckling his sobriety for the duration of the tournament and Hoddle benefited from Adams stopping drinking and finding a new poise. Both also used Gareth Southgate in a back three while Sol Campbell, given his debut by Venables, became a regular when Hoddle took charge. Taylor and Hoddle used Martin Keown but Venables never picked him and though Steve Howey, Neil Ruddock, Steve Bould, John Scales, Colin Cooper and David Unsworth were tried, none established himself. The so-called Golden Generation had three stalwarts in Rio Ferdinand, John Terry and Campbell while injuries prevented Jonathan Woodgate and Ledley King from the long international careers their talent deserved. Jamie Carragher won 31 caps over 11 years, Matthew Upson became a favourite of Fabio Capello’s and Steve McClaren gave Joleon Lescott his debut in 2007. Rio Ferdinand and John Terry before the latter racially abused the former's brother Credit: Action Images / Tony O'Brien Ferdinand failed to re-establish himself after missing the 2010 World Cup through injury and ended his England career with 81 caps in 2011, Terry retired from the international game in 2012 after an FA Commission went ahead with charging him over racially abusing Ferdinand’s brother, Anton. Since then we’ve had shaky alliances involving Gary Cahill, Phil Jagielka and Lescott, Chris Smalling, Phil Jones, John Stones and Michael Keane. Central midfielders Again we need to make an adjustment here for the Forties and Fifties and will restrict it to wing-halfs, elevating most inside-forwards to forwards for the sake of this exercise. The immediate post-war era used Billy Wright most often as the right-half and Manchester United’s Henry Cockburn as the left pivot. Portsmouth’s hard-tackling tyro Jimmy Dickinson succeeded Cockburn and played 48 times from 1949-56 while Phil Taylor of Liverpool and Villa’s Eddie Lowe shared six caps on the right. Before the emergence of the Busby Babes - and we must include Eddie Colman here as well as Duncan Edwards because he would have been an international but for his death at Munich at the age of 21 - Wright and Dickinson formed the regular partnership. The claims of Edwards  - simply the most complete player England has ever produced, skilful, forceful, bursting with stamina and natural authority - could no longer be ignored in 1955 and he won 18 caps before he was killed, also at the age of 21. Ron Flowers, who won three titles with Wolves in the Fifties, played once in tandem with Edwards and took over after the 1958 World Cup with Blackburn’s efficient Ronnie Clayton his usual foil after Clayton had seen off Wolves’ Eddie Clamp. Nobby Stiles played at centre-back for Manchester United but was magnificent as Ramsey’s midfield destroyer in the 1966 side, providing the platform from which Bobby Charlton could glide through the gears, the ball under his immaculate control, and ping passes, whip in crosses or fire thunderous shots at goal. Before the two of them joined up, Flowers and Bobby Robson had been the main men with Charlton out on the left wing and after injuries and age diminished Stiles, Tottenham’s Alan Mullery was given the job. Colin Bell, Man City’s Nijinsky, was blooded in 1968 and proved irreplaceable when Martin Buchan effectively ended his career in 1975 after 48 caps. For the first part of the Seventies Martin Peters tucked in from the left and Bell played the dynamic right-half role, sadly without as much freedom as he had to pelt forward for City. Trevor Brooking made his first start in Ramsey’s last match and became the co-key player with Kevin Keegan under Greenwood with his clever passing and penetrative movement. He was so good that he kept the magnificent Glenn Hoddle on the peripheries following his debut in 1978. Hoddle, as brilliant a playmaker as he is rotten as a pundit, would have a system tailored to his strengths for England’s last three games at the 1986 World Cup when crisis forced Robson’s hand. Gerry Francis, Revie’s second captain, would have given both stiff competition had he stayed fit after his 12th cap. Tony Currie and Alan Hudson join the list of inexpertly harnessed talents while Terry McDermott, so intrepid for Liverpool, was denied a consistent run in the side by Ray Wilkins who ended the decade a dynamic box-to-box midfielder with the skill, control and vision that would later make him so comfortable as a ‘sitter’ in Serie A. The entire Eighties can be considered the Bryan Robson years. Bobby was besotted by him but for understandable reasons, as Alex Ferguson outlined: "He had good control, was a decisive tackler, passed the ball well and his combination of stamina and perceptive reading of movement enabled him to make sudden and deadly infiltrations from midfield into the opposition's box." His fitness became a national preoccupation and he lasted two games each of the 1986 and 1990 World Cups after driving England to qualification at both. We saw him at his very best only in 1982 and Euro 88 when he needed support that his team-mates could not provide. Wilkins was his regular partner, replaced by Hoddle for 1988 and Neil Webb thereafter until Paul Gascoigne finally charmed the sceptical Bobby Robson in 1990. Peter Reid, Everton’s tigerish beating heart, took centre stage in 1986 when Robson’s shoulder popped out again but the promise of his Goodison colleague Paul Bracewell was ravaged by  an ankle injury that took almost two years out of his career. England's all-action 'Captain Marvel' Credit: David Cannon/Getty Images Italia 90 began with Robson, Gascoigne and Chris Waddle in a midfield three and ended in unforgettable drama with David Platt in for the captain, having seen off Steve McMahon. Graham Taylor initially stuck with the Platt-Gascoigne axis for the victory over Poland but went with his Aston Villa pairing of Platt and Sid Cowans for the trip to Dublin. Gascoigne’s injuries and drinking alarmed Taylor who kept him around the squad when fit but his absences provoked some of the strangest selections in memory, noticeably Geoff Thomas, Andy Gray and Carlton Palmer. David Batty and Paul Ince injected some quality, the latter a mainstay for Venables and Hoddle - playing with Platt and Gascoigne at Euro 96, Paul Scholes at the 1998 World Cup. Jamie Redknapp was ill-served by injury, Nicky Butt ill-served by managers until Sven Goran-Eriksson’s hand was forced in 2002 by Steven Gerrard’s absence and Ray Parlour by the wrong-headed perception that he was well, in Lovejoy’s words, ‘only Ray Parlour’. Gascoigne lights up Wembley v Scotland at Euro 96 Credit: Stu Forster/Allsport Frank Lampard made his debut in 1999 but did not become a regular for four seasons when his class tempted Eriksson to fudge the biggest decision of his England career and stick Scholes on the left to start the ‘Lampard-Gerrard’ compatibility saga that was to run for the next 11 years. Once Scholes decided he’d had enough after Euro 2004 (ending a 29-game goal drought in his penultimate match), Gerrard and Lampard, Lampard and Gerrard held their positions until Steve McClaren recalled Gareth Barry, who impressed Capello so firmly that he put Gerrard on the left. The Golden Generation and its hangover phase featured cameos from Danny Murphy, Owen Hargreaves (though he normally played wide), Scott ‘Scottie’ Parker, Michael Carrick and Jermaine Jenas though none could either usurp Gerrard or Lampard or make the combination look convincing in tournament football.    Both were still in the squad at the 2014 World Cup though age had taken the shine off them. Lampard was reduced to the bench, Gerrard captained the side but his one-paced partnership with Jordan Henderson left a dodgy defence too exposed to cope with Italy and Uruguay. Capello gave Jack Wilshere his debut at the age of 18 yet seven years later we are still waiting for him, probably forlornly, to be blessed with the physical resilience to regain his verve. Eric Dier has been the default starter with Henderson for the past 18 months but Jake Livermore is currently back in the squad, Tom Cleverly has been and gone, Fabian Delph gets in whenever he manages a couple of games for Man City while James Ward-Prowse and Harry Winks put the twinkle in Gareth Southgate’s eye.   Wide men Should we just end this segment here? Stan Matthews and Tom Finney in the Forties and Fifties are the best pair of wingers England have ever had. In 1948 a forward line of Matthews, Stan Mortensen, Tommy Lawton, Wilf Mannion and Finney put on arguably England’s greatest performance in the 4-0 away victory over Italy but never played together again. Finney was an England regular for 12 years, playing on the right, left and through the middle until 1958 but Matthews, seven years Finney’s senior, was eased out only a year earlier at the age of 42 with 54 caps. He was not deemed as indispensable by myopic selectors who gave run-outs on the wings in his stead to Peter Harris, Les Medley, Billy Elliott and Johnny Berry. Blackburn’s Bryan Douglas took the No7 shirt 36 times and scored 11 goals from 1975-63 and Bobby Charlton won the majority of his caps until 1964 on the left flank, seeing out the decade in a Lancs touchline hegemony.   In the Sixties, after the end of the Douglas-Charlton years, Ramsey tried John Connelly, Terry Paine, Peter Thompson, Derek Temple and Ian Callaghan before deciding on a narrower road to triumph. Alan Ball, essentially an auxiliary central midfielder, edged out to patrol the right for the latter stages of the 1966 World Cup, driving England on with his stamina, skill and heart but victory convinced the manager to stick to his system, using the full-backs for width with Peters augmenting the strikers from a nominal position on the left and Ball from the right. Wingers were out of vogue for most of decade after 1966 - Ian Storey Moore kept the flame flickering briefly and Revie tried with QPR’s Dave Thomas and Merlin himself. Gordon Hill, but it wasn’t until Ron Greenwood picked Manchester City’s Peter Barnes and United’s Steve Coppell together in 1977 that England took flight again. Coppell evolved into a solid right-sided player but at that point was an out and out winger who held the position for five years. Laurie Cunningham made three starts alongside him but by the start of the following decade Greenwood had cramped his own style. John Barnes at the Maracana Credit: David Cannon/Allsport The Eighties should have been the decade of Waddle and John Barnes and in popular memory it remains so but England started the decade with a tighter system, using Coppell and Graham Rix at the 1982 World Cup, and got to the quarter-finals of the 1986 tournament having ditched the wingers for Trevor Steven and Steve Hodge. Villa’s European Cup-winner Tony Morley briefly enraptured Bobby Robson and Mark Chamberlain preceded Waddle into the side by two years but it was largely a Barnes-Waddle duopoly from then on, though rarely in tandem and both, despite their brilliance and that goal at the Maracana, the first scapegoats. Lee Sharpe was the great left hope of the Nineties but faded away, Venables got the best out of Darren Anderton and Steve McManaman to provide hope of a more expansive future until David Beckham took freehold of the No7 shirt and front pages for eight years with a revolving cast of Nick Barmby, Paul Merson or a wing-back on the left. Eriksson blanked McManaman at the start of the 2000s and tried Trevor Sinclair, Scholes and Joe Cole out there to give some balance for Beckham. Stewart Downing became a mainstay of Steve McClaren’s squads while Aaron Lennon and David Bentley were tried out on the right. Ultimately he went back to Beckham. Capello got the best out of Theo Walcott for a few games, pulled Gerrard out to the left and employed James Milner as a Steady Eddie solution. Hodgson switched to 4-2-3-1 and used Raheem Sterling, Danny Welbeck, Wayne Rooney and Adam Lallana to provide width which is largely, with the exception of Rooney, where we remain apart from the saving grace of Rashford. Forwards To the summit … and, controversially, I am going to include some inside-forwards for the first three eras. So, for our post-war pioneers we will go with the aforementioned Mortensen, scorer of 23 goals in 25 games, Lawton, who scored 22 times in 23 starts, and Mannion, ‘the Mozart of football’ as Matthews put it. Len Shackleton and ‘Wor’ Jackie Milburn straddled the Forties and Fifties while Mortensen played on until 1953. The No9 shirt fell vacant in 1948 when Lawton told Walter Winterbottom that the coach didn’t know enough to be giving him advice, Milburn filled it for a spell before Nat Lofthouse won 33 caps and scored 30 goals, including the two at the Praterstadion that made him forever ‘The Lion of Vienna’. Tommy Taylor, one of the eight ‘Flowers of Manchester’ among the 23 victims of the Munich Air Crash, shot powerfully with both feet, had pace, guile and spatial awareness, and the fast-twitch reflexes of the thoroughbred goalscorer. He bagged 16 goals in 19 appearances as the other out-and-out England centre-forward of the decade. Lofty and Tommy were supported by Ivor Broadis and the finest, most astute passer in the team’s history, Johnny Haynes, who was only 27 in 1962 when he played his 56th and final game for England (his 22nd as captain) in the 1962 World Cup quarter-final. He was never as fluent again after a car crash on his return from Chile. Geoff Hurst’s hat-trick in the 1966 World Cup final overshadows anything any other England striker can match. Roger Hunt, the other Wembley immortal, was so crucial to Ramsey’s system because his tireless movement made space for Bobby Charlton to fill that it is forgotten that he scored 18 times in 34 appearances, and Jimmy Greaves, English football’s most cold-hearted and deadly finisher, gave the manager a richness of options. By the end of the Sixties Franny Lee had taken over from Hunt and Greaves as Hurst’s partner for Mexico Sniffer Clarke, the heir to Greaves, made his debut in 1970, Peter Osgood made only a couple of starts and Martin Chivers became Ramsey’s preferred No9 for two years, scoring 13 times in 24 appearances. Rodney Marsh exasperated his manager, Malcolm MacDonald thrashed five past Cyprus for Revie but made his distaste for the man who picked him well known, which meant the search for an ‘oppo’ for Kevin Keegan - the human dynamo, a rampaging forward who could leap, head, shoot and pass with distinction - lasted too long. Bob Latchford found favour for a while as did Stuart Pearson, Mick Channon moved over from the right, Paul Mariner began the international career that would yield 35 caps and 13 goals and Tricky Trevor Francis beguiled us all with his positioning and vision. Kevin Keegan scores against Scotland in 1979 Credit: Steve Powell/Allsport Cyrille Regis would have made more than two starts in the Eighties had he moved to Manchester United from West Brom instead of Coventry but he couldn’t displace the Keegan-Mariner-Woodcock-Francis usual suspects for the World Cup in Spain. Robson ushered Keegan into retirement but kept faith with the others until Gary Lineker, the quicksilver scavenger, gave him no excuse in 1984 and began the march to the Mexico Golden Boot, a World Cup quarter- and semi-final and 48 goals in 80 games. He was at his best with Peter Beardsley - who brought out the best in everyone - but also fed off Mark Hateley, Alan Smith,  and Steve Bull. The Nineties began with Lineker and Italia 90, Taylor then gave him the captaincy and slim pickings to work with up front and he left the scene in 1992 when shown the managerial big curly finger despite England desperately requiring a goal against Sweden. Taylor turned to Ian Wright who made a terrific return under Hoddle after being ignored by Venables and Les Ferdinand. Alan Shearer, impressive at Southampton, unstoppable except by injury at  Blackburn, won his first cap  in 1992 but had scored only five times in 23 appearances before the start of Euro 96 and hadn’t managed an international goal for 21 months. He hit five in the five games, was elevated to the captaincy for four years and ended still the talisman, though far less mobile, in 2000 with 30 goals. Teddy Sheringham played the Beardsley role for him perfectly and kept Andy Cole out of the squad and Robbie Fowler out of the side until Michael Owen came off the bench to score against Romania at France 98 and could not be left out again. Two games later he scored the wonder goal against Argentina that sounded the trumpets for his charge to the Ballon d’Or three years later. Michael Owen scores against Argentina at the 1998 World Cup Credit: Pawel Kopczynski REUTERS Owen was never really considered part of the Golden Generation because of a certain diffidence but he was its spearhead, when fit, and its yearned for king over the water when absent. He began the decade with Shearer, combined with club-mate Emile Heskey for the 1-5 in Munich and spent time up-front with Fowler and Darius Vassell before Eriksson promoted Wayne Rooney in 2003. Over 14 years Rooney would surpass Bobby Charlton’s England goalscoring record, beginning by playing off the cuff with boundless zip and chutzpah, maturing into that rarity, a workhorse with ebullient, irrepressible swagger and ending up a shadow of electrifying presence he once had been. During the decade Rooney played up top with Owen, Jermaine Defoe and Peter Crouch most frequently. Dean Ashton seemed to fit the part but it wasn’t to be. Rooney has been the key striker and player of this last decade, too and very much undroppable until Southgate took charge. Opportunities for Jay Rodriguez, Andy Carroll and Daniel Sturridge have been curtailed by long-term injuries, Hodgson thought it wise to take Rickie Lambert to the World Cup but in 2015 Harry Kane was given a chance and grabbed it. Jamie Vardy remains among the alternatives along with Sturridge and the second (third and fourth) coming of Defoe.   Conclusion How do you come up with a decision on the relative strengths and weaknesses over eight decades? Subjectively, obviously, but without prejudice:  Goalkeepers: Seventies - Banks, Shilton, Clemence. Full-backs: Sixties - Armfield, Cohen, Wilson, Cooper. Central defenders: Seventies - Moore, Labone, Todd, McFarland, Thompson. Central midfielders: Eighties - Robson, Wilkins, Gascoigne, Hoddle. Wide men: Fifties - Matthews, Finney, Charlton R.   Strikers: Nineties - Lineker, Shearer, Owen, Beardsley.  Please feel free to dispute this 23-man squad selection in the comments section. 

The England dream team by eras: which decade comes out on top?

Scroll to the bottom of the article for Rob Bagchi's all-time 23-man England squad August is traditionally silly season for journalism but on the football beat the two-week autumn and spring international breaks are the cue for extreme resourcefulness. Watching England toil through yet another developmental stage, the slimness of their options and assets in central midfield and the heart of defence as blatant as the consoling promise of Harry Kane and Marcus Rashford, made us wonder in which eras each part of the team have been at their strongest? Was English goalkeeping, say, at its apex in the 1970s or have the wide players of the Forties never been surpassed? For once a decision to truncate the period for analysis is not motivated by either sloth or rampant neophilia. England rejoined Fifa only in 1946 and their first international tournament was the 1950 World Cup, having spurned the first three.  Therefore it makes sense to start in the immediate post-war years and to help the process we will look at each phase for every sector - goalkeeper, full-backs, central defenders, midfielders, wide players and strikers - look at the players picked and the breadth of quality alternatives. Some will represent generations or decades, others distinct stages in the team’s evolution. We’ll begin in goal and chart the progression, chronological at least, from Frank Swift and his primrose polo neck sweater to Joe Hart and his binman chic high-vis short-sleeves, concluding with our stab at an answer. Goalkeepers If you’ve been paying attention to anything involving England without being so bored you’ve felt compelled to make a paper plane, our first contender will be obvious. Frank Swift, the wok-handed, spring-heeled Manchester City goalkeeper who pioneered the throw-out, was the first keeper to captain England and as the man in goal when England travelled to Turin to defeat the double world champions Italy (a pre Superga full-strength Azzurri side) 4-0, is our candidate from the Forties. He won 19 caps despite the war depriving him of his career from the age of 25 to 32, let in 18 goals and played in other memorable victories over France, Sweden, Scotland and Portugal. Other standouts from the truncated decade include Tottenham’s title-winning Ted Ditchburn, who won six caps, and the brave, acrobatic, sure-handed Bert Williams of Wolves who succeeded Swift after his international retirement and earned 24 caps over the next six years. Our Fifties options begin with Williams and Gil Merrick of Birmingham City who earned the most caps (23) of the decade and kept five clean sheets. It was Merrick’s misfortune to be in goal for the mortifying, 3-6 defeat by Hungary at Wembley in 1953 and the 7-1 thrashing in the Nepstadion a year later. Admittedly he appeared rattled on both occasions but only because the Magnificent Magyars and his shaky defence left him horribly exposed. The sight of him picking the ball out of the net 13 times have haunted English football ever since but he was not responsible. Those defeats should have marked a paradigm shift but the England system - once again propped up by a crop of excellent players - did not significantly change until much later.  Other notable stalwarts of the decade were Bolton’s 5ft 8in Eddie Hopkinson, the master of one-on-ones who won 13 caps, and Colin McDonald of Burnley who kept goal at the 1958 World Cup and was a dominant, cross-catching doyen of the old school. The Sixties begin with Sheffield Wednesday’s, quick, agile Ron Springett who played 33 times including all four at the 1962 World Cup where he repeatedly saved Walter Winterbottom's side from a proper drubbing in the 3-1 quarter-final defeat by Brazil, and end with Banks of England, Springett’s understudy in Chile, justly recognised as the greatest goalie in the world. It wasn’t just his majesty during England’s 1966 campaign, it was his general safehandedness - helped, trivia fans, in a pre-gloves age, with a generous rub of Beechnut chewing gum-laced saliva on the palms - his rare ability to save gymnastically equally well whether his goal was attacked high or low and his courage. He was so supreme that he restricted other fine goalkeepers such as Peter Bonetti, Gordon West, Alex Stepney and Springett to a handful of caps after Alf Ramsey made him first choice in 1964. Gordon Banks remained Ramsey’s default selection until he lost an eye in a car crash at the age of 34 in Oct 1972, taking in the save against Pele in 1970, the world’s greatest keeper defying the game’s best player by diving downwards, like an hour hand pointing to seven o’clock, and twisting his wrist to ensure he flicked it over the bar to prevent the great striker pouncing on the rebound. But Leicester City did not rate the marginal differentials between an established world-class player and an emerging one as highly as Ramsey and sold Banks to Stoke in 1967 to clear the way for 17-year-old Peter Shilton who owned the Eighties but duelled with the agile, commanding and astute Ray Clemence throughout the preceding decade to be England’s No1. Shilton was a brilliant shot-stopper and all the hours of dedicated, unrelenting practice gave him uncommon agility and aerial mastery. From about 1978 onwards, the error against Poland in 1973 long overcome, Shilton has the right to be considered Banks’ equal and probably superior. The reign of the duopoly left those other excellent keepers, Joe Corrigan, Phil Parkes and Stepney feeding off scraps. When it game to goalkeepers Ron Greenwood had a touch of the Jimmy Armfields at Leeds (“the manager’s indecision is final) but at the start of 1982 after rotating them for five years, he eventually plumped for Shilton who stayed undisputed first choice for the whole of the Eighties. Clemence carried on as the first reserve until 1983 and from 1985 Chris Woods began to make the No13 shirt his second skin during international weeks. Woods made 14 starts in the decade but was mostly stuck on the bench occasionally conceding opportunities for the stand-by role to Gary Bailey, Nigel Spink, Dave Beasant and David Seaman. Poor Martin Hodge, Tony Coton and John Lukic never even got a sniff. Peter Shilton at the start of his international career Credit: Malcolm Croft/PA Bobby Robson stood by Peter Shilton for Italia 90 and kept the 40-year-old keeper between the sticks for the semi-final shootout against West Germany despite having not used all his substitute options and Shilton’s poor record at saving spot-kicks (one from 15). The veteran retired from international football at the end of the tournament but carried on playing for a variety of clubs until 1997. Woods, who once went 1196 minutes without conceding a goal for Rangers in successive matches, became Graham Taylor’s No1 and played at Euro 92 backed up by David Seaman and England’s first million-pound goalie, Nigel Martyn. Seaman came into his own under Terry Venables and proved himself a wonderfully athletic goalkeeper with great agility, positional awareness, sound judgment and, above all, consistency at Euro 96. He saved penalties, too. Glenn Hoddle logically opted for continuity but awarded caps to Ian Walker, David James, Tim Flowers and Martyn when injury or the need to see how the others shaped up demanded.   Seaman continued through the proto-Golden Generation era until his mistakes were compounded by his age, particularly, like Shilton in 1990, a leaden-footedness in reverse. Paul Robinson was anointed for the 2006 World Cup when David Beckham metamorphosed into Sally Bowles in Baden-Baden but Sven Goran-Eriksson also tried out Martyn, James (the Euro 2004) starter and Rob Green. If we consider the McClaren era a coda to the Golden Generation, The Together Again tour after Dean Martin had bailed on Frank Sinatra and Sammy Davis to be replaced by Liza Minelli, small wonder that it was largely a Robinson hangover with supporting roles for Scott Carson, Chris Kirkland, James and Ben Foster. Fabio Capello took a look at James and Green, didn’t like what he saw, blooded Joe Hart then went back to swapping between the other two, £4m a year not being enough to deliver decisiveness. Jack Butland, John Ruddy, Fraser Forster and Tom Heaton have made appearances under Roy Hodgson and Gareth Southgate. Foster, too, has returned from temporary retirement but the seven years since the 4-1 defeat by Germany in Bloemfontein have been the Hart hegemony, under whose dominion we linger. Poor old Whitney Houston did not live long enough for an answer to her question - where do broken Harts go? It’s West Ham, pet. Full backs Now we have established the decades we are going to compare, let us breeze through the options rather than dwelling in such detail to outline the parameters. First choices for full-backs of the Forties are Laurie Scott of Arsenal on the right and captain in all 13 appearances, George Hardwick of Middlesbrough on the left. Depth is added by Derby’s Bert Mozley as a back-up down the right and Manchester United’s Johnny Aston at left-back with 17 caps. George Hardwick, right, greets the Sweden captain Erik Nilsson in  1947 Credit: Reg Birkett/Keystone/Getty Images In the Fifties the selection panel had Spurs’ Alf Ramsey at the beginning of the decade to play on the right and Blackburn’s Bill Eckersley on the left. Birmingham’s Jeff Hall and West Brom’s Don Howe made the right-back slot the preserve of the West Midlands for the rest of the decade while Manchester United’s majestic and adventurous Roger Byrne played 33 successive matches at left-back until his death at Munich during a period when the selection committee made consistency virtually unknown. Tommy Banks, Bolton’s tank, did his best to replace the irreplaceable at the 1958 World Cup and Sheffield United’s Graham Shaw filled in the following year. Take your pick from the Sixties beginning with the two 1966 imperishables George Cohen and Ray Wilson, Jimmy Armfield, a former captain who played on the right at the 1962 World Cup, Keith Newton, who succeeded Cohen and Terry Cooper who took over from his fellow Yorkshireman Wilson at left-back. Add on all those reduced to a handful of caps because of Ramsey’s loyalty - Bob McNab, Paul Reaney, Chris Lawler, Gerry Byrne, Tommy Wright and Cyril Knowles - and you have the kind of riches that would make Gareth Southgate turn green with envy beneath his beard.   George Cohen, left, and Ray Wilson, holding the Jules Rimet Trophy, celebrate victory in 1966 Credit: PA Photos England’s least successful decade in terms of qualification is also, paradoxically, one remembered with a fondness for the quality of English teams – the best of which were bolstered by Scotsmen, Welshmen and Irishmen. England’s full-backs in the Seventies numbered the Liverpool pair Phil Neal and Emlyn Hughes (not that Hughes played there for his club as frequently as he did for the national side). Their versatility was a virtue, as it was for Ipswich’s Mick Mills and Leeds’ Paul Madeley and Trevor Cherry. More orthodox full-backs were plentiful, too: the magnificent Viv Anderson on the right and Don Revie’s choices, Leicester’s Steve Whitworth and QPR’s Dave Clement. On the left Frank Lampard, Alec Lindsay, David Nish, Mike Pejic and Ian Gillard won caps, as did Kevin Beattie playing out of position but in masterly fashion, particularly in the 5-1 thrashing of Scotland in 1975. Kenny Sansom began the Eighties in possession of the No 3 shirt and held it for eight years, playing consistently and with real skill to hold off the challenge of West Brom’s Derek Statham, until the claims of Stuart Pearce in 1988 could be resisted no more. The right side was more problematic once Mills, Neal and Anderson entered their mid thirties. Mick Duxbury had a run there, Danny Thomas could have been the long-term solution save for that rotten injury inflicted by Kevin Maguire while Gary Stevens won 45 caps after his debut during Everton’s title-winning campaign in 1984-85 including Mexico ’86, Euro ’88 and the beginning of Italia 90. Kenny Sansom made the left-back position his own in the Eighties Credit:  Duncan Raban/Allsport/Getty Images Pearce was key at the start of the next decade, becoming captain under Graham Taylor, taking a position in a back three for Euro 96 when Steve McManaman and Darren Anderton played wide, and was recalled at the age of 37 for a couple of starts under Kevin Keegan. Terry Venables initially preferred the Blackburn Rovers left-back Graeme Le Saux and but for injury he would have started Euro 96. Glenn Hoddle restored him as first-choice after a cameo from Andy Hinchcliffe but by the end of the Nineties the left side, in defence and midfield, had become something of a national neurosis. Phil Neville filled in there, playing alongside his brother, Gary, the undisputed No2 when fit. For club and country he succeeded Paul Parker and the challenges of Gary Charles and Rob Jones for the spot were sadly snuffed out by personal problems and injury respectively. Sven Goran-Eriksson promoted Ashley Cole as the man to solve the malaise on the left and over the 12 years of his international career from 2001 onwards he won 107 caps and held Wayne Bridge at bay. Gary Neville missed the 2002 World Cup where Danny Mills stood in but was back straight afterwards and carried on until 2007. Luke Young and Micah Richards stated their claims to be paired with Cole but ultimately Glen Johnson won the contest under Fabio Capello. Johnson stayed in situ under Roy Hodgson until the 2014 World Cup and was even recalled to the squad last year but Kyle Walker, Nathaniel Clyne and Kieran Trippier are now the default options after experiments with Chris Smalling and Phil Jones out wide. Leighton Baines played so well from 2012-14 that he essentially forced Cole into international retirement before the more athletic claims of Danny Rose and Ryan Bertrand did for him. Central defenders   Here we face a problem with the first two post-war decades before the four-back system really took off. A bodged solution for the Forties and Fifties, rather than trying to corral in a wing-half, would be to list the options at centre-half even though normally only one was picked. We don’t even have to do that for the Forties because Billy Wright, the centre-half for much of the Fifties, captain for 11 years and England’s first 100-cap player, played at wing-half for his country at the beginning of his international career, alongside the exemplary Neil Franklin at No 5. Franklin abandoned Stoke in 1950 to move to Colombia and circumvent the maximum wage but his wife did not settle there and he faced the opprobrium of his club and the FA on return, not adding to the 27 caps he earned before he left. Breadth of talent for the decade would be provided by Blackpool’s Harry Johnston, Allenby Chilton of Manchester United and Liverpool’s Bill Jones. Wright made the position his own after the 1954 World Cup where Bill McGarry and Syd Owen had taken the role. Johnston, too, continued to make appearances at the start of the Fifties and Liverpool’s Laurie Hughes stood in for Franklin at the 1950 World Cup. Jim Taylor of Fulham, Burnley’s Mal Barrass and Charlton’s Derek Ufton were also tried but no one could dislodge the 5ft 8in Wright, captain of Wolves and England, golden-haired paragon of the post-war game. The finest partnership of the Sixties, Jackie Charlton and Bobby Moore, came together only a year before they won the World Cup and had it not been for the disgrace of Peter Swan - who won 19 caps as a cultured but powerful stopper between 1960-62 - Charlton may never have joined his brother as a cornerstone of 1966 and all that. Maurice Norman, the Spurs Double-winning centre-half, joined forces with Moore for the 1962 World Cup because Swan was confined to quarters with dysentery in Chile and Brian Labone both preceded Charlton and succeeded him as first choice towards the end of the decade. Norman Hunter served as Moore’s understudy but the consistency of the captain restricted ‘Bites Yer Legs’ to 28 caps over nine seasons. Moore at his peak Credit: AP Photo/files Moore made the last of his 108 appearances in 1973 and by that point there were plenty of contenders for his position, notably Derby County’s Colin Todd, Hunter and Emlyn Hughes. Roy McFarland earned 28 caps in the centre-half slot from 1971-76 before injuries ruined his career and gave Dave Watson a long run as first choice until 1981. Watson won the last of his 65 caps at the age of 35 in June 1982 but was omitted from the final squad for the Spain World Cup, the first for which he had qualified after failures to reach West Germany and Argentina. Phil Thompson of Liverpool and Manchester United’s Brian Greenhoff were given their debuts by Don Revie but only the former flourished after he left for Abu Dhabi. Watson’s role as the tall, raw-bone aerial colossus was filled by Terry Butcher throughout the Eighties though we forget how good his left foot was, his skill overwhelmed by the ‘up and  at ‘em’ patriotism of his persona. Thompson led Liverpool to the 1981 European Cup and partnered the Ipswich defender at the Spain World Cup but Bobby Robson struggled to find a regular foil for Butcher thereafter and worked his way through Alvin Martin, Graham Roberts, Mark Wright, Terry Fenwick, Gary Pallister and a callow Tony Adams before settling on Des Walker for Italia 90 and a return for Wright in a back three. At the start of the Nineties Graham Taylor used Walker, Adams and Pallister but it was his successors, Terry Venables and Glenn Hoddle, who got the best out of Adams. Venables managed it at Euro 96 when Adams was white-knuckling his sobriety for the duration of the tournament and Hoddle benefited from Adams stopping drinking and finding a new poise. Both also used Gareth Southgate in a back three while Sol Campbell, given his debut by Venables, became a regular when Hoddle took charge. Taylor and Hoddle used Martin Keown but Venables never picked him and though Steve Howey, Neil Ruddock, Steve Bould, John Scales, Colin Cooper and David Unsworth were tried, none established himself. The so-called Golden Generation had three stalwarts in Rio Ferdinand, John Terry and Campbell while injuries prevented Jonathan Woodgate and Ledley King from the long international careers their talent deserved. Jamie Carragher won 31 caps over 11 years, Matthew Upson became a favourite of Fabio Capello’s and Steve McClaren gave Joleon Lescott his debut in 2007. Rio Ferdinand and John Terry before the latter racially abused the former's brother Credit: Action Images / Tony O'Brien Ferdinand failed to re-establish himself after missing the 2010 World Cup through injury and ended his England career with 81 caps in 2011, Terry retired from the international game in 2012 after an FA Commission went ahead with charging him over racially abusing Ferdinand’s brother, Anton. Since then we’ve had shaky alliances involving Gary Cahill, Phil Jagielka and Lescott, Chris Smalling, Phil Jones, John Stones and Michael Keane. Central midfielders Again we need to make an adjustment here for the Forties and Fifties and will restrict it to wing-halfs, elevating most inside-forwards to forwards for the sake of this exercise. The immediate post-war era used Billy Wright most often as the right-half and Manchester United’s Henry Cockburn as the left pivot. Portsmouth’s hard-tackling tyro Jimmy Dickinson succeeded Cockburn and played 48 times from 1949-56 while Phil Taylor of Liverpool and Villa’s Eddie Lowe shared six caps on the right. Before the emergence of the Busby Babes - and we must include Eddie Colman here as well as Duncan Edwards because he would have been an international but for his death at Munich at the age of 21 - Wright and Dickinson formed the regular partnership. The claims of Edwards  - simply the most complete player England has ever produced, skilful, forceful, bursting with stamina and natural authority - could no longer be ignored in 1955 and he won 18 caps before he was killed, also at the age of 21. Ron Flowers, who won three titles with Wolves in the Fifties, played once in tandem with Edwards and took over after the 1958 World Cup with Blackburn’s efficient Ronnie Clayton his usual foil after Clayton had seen off Wolves’ Eddie Clamp. Nobby Stiles played at centre-back for Manchester United but was magnificent as Ramsey’s midfield destroyer in the 1966 side, providing the platform from which Bobby Charlton could glide through the gears, the ball under his immaculate control, and ping passes, whip in crosses or fire thunderous shots at goal. Before the two of them joined up, Flowers and Bobby Robson had been the main men with Charlton out on the left wing and after injuries and age diminished Stiles, Tottenham’s Alan Mullery was given the job. Colin Bell, Man City’s Nijinsky, was blooded in 1968 and proved irreplaceable when Martin Buchan effectively ended his career in 1975 after 48 caps. For the first part of the Seventies Martin Peters tucked in from the left and Bell played the dynamic right-half role, sadly without as much freedom as he had to pelt forward for City. Trevor Brooking made his first start in Ramsey’s last match and became the co-key player with Kevin Keegan under Greenwood with his clever passing and penetrative movement. He was so good that he kept the magnificent Glenn Hoddle on the peripheries following his debut in 1978. Hoddle, as brilliant a playmaker as he is rotten as a pundit, would have a system tailored to his strengths for England’s last three games at the 1986 World Cup when crisis forced Robson’s hand. Gerry Francis, Revie’s second captain, would have given both stiff competition had he stayed fit after his 12th cap. Tony Currie and Alan Hudson join the list of inexpertly harnessed talents while Terry McDermott, so intrepid for Liverpool, was denied a consistent run in the side by Ray Wilkins who ended the decade a dynamic box-to-box midfielder with the skill, control and vision that would later make him so comfortable as a ‘sitter’ in Serie A. The entire Eighties can be considered the Bryan Robson years. Bobby was besotted by him but for understandable reasons, as Alex Ferguson outlined: "He had good control, was a decisive tackler, passed the ball well and his combination of stamina and perceptive reading of movement enabled him to make sudden and deadly infiltrations from midfield into the opposition's box." His fitness became a national preoccupation and he lasted two games each of the 1986 and 1990 World Cups after driving England to qualification at both. We saw him at his very best only in 1982 and Euro 88 when he needed support that his team-mates could not provide. Wilkins was his regular partner, replaced by Hoddle for 1988 and Neil Webb thereafter until Paul Gascoigne finally charmed the sceptical Bobby Robson in 1990. Peter Reid, Everton’s tigerish beating heart, took centre stage in 1986 when Robson’s shoulder popped out again but the promise of his Goodison colleague Paul Bracewell was ravaged by  an ankle injury that took almost two years out of his career. England's all-action 'Captain Marvel' Credit: David Cannon/Getty Images Italia 90 began with Robson, Gascoigne and Chris Waddle in a midfield three and ended in unforgettable drama with David Platt in for the captain, having seen off Steve McMahon. Graham Taylor initially stuck with the Platt-Gascoigne axis for the victory over Poland but went with his Aston Villa pairing of Platt and Sid Cowans for the trip to Dublin. Gascoigne’s injuries and drinking alarmed Taylor who kept him around the squad when fit but his absences provoked some of the strangest selections in memory, noticeably Geoff Thomas, Andy Gray and Carlton Palmer. David Batty and Paul Ince injected some quality, the latter a mainstay for Venables and Hoddle - playing with Platt and Gascoigne at Euro 96, Paul Scholes at the 1998 World Cup. Jamie Redknapp was ill-served by injury, Nicky Butt ill-served by managers until Sven Goran-Eriksson’s hand was forced in 2002 by Steven Gerrard’s absence and Ray Parlour by the wrong-headed perception that he was well, in Lovejoy’s words, ‘only Ray Parlour’. Gascoigne lights up Wembley v Scotland at Euro 96 Credit: Stu Forster/Allsport Frank Lampard made his debut in 1999 but did not become a regular for four seasons when his class tempted Eriksson to fudge the biggest decision of his England career and stick Scholes on the left to start the ‘Lampard-Gerrard’ compatibility saga that was to run for the next 11 years. Once Scholes decided he’d had enough after Euro 2004 (ending a 29-game goal drought in his penultimate match), Gerrard and Lampard, Lampard and Gerrard held their positions until Steve McClaren recalled Gareth Barry, who impressed Capello so firmly that he put Gerrard on the left. The Golden Generation and its hangover phase featured cameos from Danny Murphy, Owen Hargreaves (though he normally played wide), Scott ‘Scottie’ Parker, Michael Carrick and Jermaine Jenas though none could either usurp Gerrard or Lampard or make the combination look convincing in tournament football.    Both were still in the squad at the 2014 World Cup though age had taken the shine off them. Lampard was reduced to the bench, Gerrard captained the side but his one-paced partnership with Jordan Henderson left a dodgy defence too exposed to cope with Italy and Uruguay. Capello gave Jack Wilshere his debut at the age of 18 yet seven years later we are still waiting for him, probably forlornly, to be blessed with the physical resilience to regain his verve. Eric Dier has been the default starter with Henderson for the past 18 months but Jake Livermore is currently back in the squad, Tom Cleverly has been and gone, Fabian Delph gets in whenever he manages a couple of games for Man City while James Ward-Prowse and Harry Winks put the twinkle in Gareth Southgate’s eye.   Wide men Should we just end this segment here? Stan Matthews and Tom Finney in the Forties and Fifties are the best pair of wingers England have ever had. In 1948 a forward line of Matthews, Stan Mortensen, Tommy Lawton, Wilf Mannion and Finney put on arguably England’s greatest performance in the 4-0 away victory over Italy but never played together again. Finney was an England regular for 12 years, playing on the right, left and through the middle until 1958 but Matthews, seven years Finney’s senior, was eased out only a year earlier at the age of 42 with 54 caps. He was not deemed as indispensable by myopic selectors who gave run-outs on the wings in his stead to Peter Harris, Les Medley, Billy Elliott and Johnny Berry. Blackburn’s Bryan Douglas took the No7 shirt 36 times and scored 11 goals from 1975-63 and Bobby Charlton won the majority of his caps until 1964 on the left flank, seeing out the decade in a Lancs touchline hegemony.   In the Sixties, after the end of the Douglas-Charlton years, Ramsey tried John Connelly, Terry Paine, Peter Thompson, Derek Temple and Ian Callaghan before deciding on a narrower road to triumph. Alan Ball, essentially an auxiliary central midfielder, edged out to patrol the right for the latter stages of the 1966 World Cup, driving England on with his stamina, skill and heart but victory convinced the manager to stick to his system, using the full-backs for width with Peters augmenting the strikers from a nominal position on the left and Ball from the right. Wingers were out of vogue for most of decade after 1966 - Ian Storey Moore kept the flame flickering briefly and Revie tried with QPR’s Dave Thomas and Merlin himself. Gordon Hill, but it wasn’t until Ron Greenwood picked Manchester City’s Peter Barnes and United’s Steve Coppell together in 1977 that England took flight again. Coppell evolved into a solid right-sided player but at that point was an out and out winger who held the position for five years. Laurie Cunningham made three starts alongside him but by the start of the following decade Greenwood had cramped his own style. John Barnes at the Maracana Credit: David Cannon/Allsport The Eighties should have been the decade of Waddle and John Barnes and in popular memory it remains so but England started the decade with a tighter system, using Coppell and Graham Rix at the 1982 World Cup, and got to the quarter-finals of the 1986 tournament having ditched the wingers for Trevor Steven and Steve Hodge. Villa’s European Cup-winner Tony Morley briefly enraptured Bobby Robson and Mark Chamberlain preceded Waddle into the side by two years but it was largely a Barnes-Waddle duopoly from then on, though rarely in tandem and both, despite their brilliance and that goal at the Maracana, the first scapegoats. Lee Sharpe was the great left hope of the Nineties but faded away, Venables got the best out of Darren Anderton and Steve McManaman to provide hope of a more expansive future until David Beckham took freehold of the No7 shirt and front pages for eight years with a revolving cast of Nick Barmby, Paul Merson or a wing-back on the left. Eriksson blanked McManaman at the start of the 2000s and tried Trevor Sinclair, Scholes and Joe Cole out there to give some balance for Beckham. Stewart Downing became a mainstay of Steve McClaren’s squads while Aaron Lennon and David Bentley were tried out on the right. Ultimately he went back to Beckham. Capello got the best out of Theo Walcott for a few games, pulled Gerrard out to the left and employed James Milner as a Steady Eddie solution. Hodgson switched to 4-2-3-1 and used Raheem Sterling, Danny Welbeck, Wayne Rooney and Adam Lallana to provide width which is largely, with the exception of Rooney, where we remain apart from the saving grace of Rashford. Forwards To the summit … and, controversially, I am going to include some inside-forwards for the first three eras. So, for our post-war pioneers we will go with the aforementioned Mortensen, scorer of 23 goals in 25 games, Lawton, who scored 22 times in 23 starts, and Mannion, ‘the Mozart of football’ as Matthews put it. Len Shackleton and ‘Wor’ Jackie Milburn straddled the Forties and Fifties while Mortensen played on until 1953. The No9 shirt fell vacant in 1948 when Lawton told Walter Winterbottom that the coach didn’t know enough to be giving him advice, Milburn filled it for a spell before Nat Lofthouse won 33 caps and scored 30 goals, including the two at the Praterstadion that made him forever ‘The Lion of Vienna’. Tommy Taylor, one of the eight ‘Flowers of Manchester’ among the 23 victims of the Munich Air Crash, shot powerfully with both feet, had pace, guile and spatial awareness, and the fast-twitch reflexes of the thoroughbred goalscorer. He bagged 16 goals in 19 appearances as the other out-and-out England centre-forward of the decade. Lofty and Tommy were supported by Ivor Broadis and the finest, most astute passer in the team’s history, Johnny Haynes, who was only 27 in 1962 when he played his 56th and final game for England (his 22nd as captain) in the 1962 World Cup quarter-final. He was never as fluent again after a car crash on his return from Chile. Geoff Hurst’s hat-trick in the 1966 World Cup final overshadows anything any other England striker can match. Roger Hunt, the other Wembley immortal, was so crucial to Ramsey’s system because his tireless movement made space for Bobby Charlton to fill that it is forgotten that he scored 18 times in 34 appearances, and Jimmy Greaves, English football’s most cold-hearted and deadly finisher, gave the manager a richness of options. By the end of the Sixties Franny Lee had taken over from Hunt and Greaves as Hurst’s partner for Mexico Sniffer Clarke, the heir to Greaves, made his debut in 1970, Peter Osgood made only a couple of starts and Martin Chivers became Ramsey’s preferred No9 for two years, scoring 13 times in 24 appearances. Rodney Marsh exasperated his manager, Malcolm MacDonald thrashed five past Cyprus for Revie but made his distaste for the man who picked him well known, which meant the search for an ‘oppo’ for Kevin Keegan - the human dynamo, a rampaging forward who could leap, head, shoot and pass with distinction - lasted too long. Bob Latchford found favour for a while as did Stuart Pearson, Mick Channon moved over from the right, Paul Mariner began the international career that would yield 35 caps and 13 goals and Tricky Trevor Francis beguiled us all with his positioning and vision. Kevin Keegan scores against Scotland in 1979 Credit: Steve Powell/Allsport Cyrille Regis would have made more than two starts in the Eighties had he moved to Manchester United from West Brom instead of Coventry but he couldn’t displace the Keegan-Mariner-Woodcock-Francis usual suspects for the World Cup in Spain. Robson ushered Keegan into retirement but kept faith with the others until Gary Lineker, the quicksilver scavenger, gave him no excuse in 1984 and began the march to the Mexico Golden Boot, a World Cup quarter- and semi-final and 48 goals in 80 games. He was at his best with Peter Beardsley - who brought out the best in everyone - but also fed off Mark Hateley, Alan Smith,  and Steve Bull. The Nineties began with Lineker and Italia 90, Taylor then gave him the captaincy and slim pickings to work with up front and he left the scene in 1992 when shown the managerial big curly finger despite England desperately requiring a goal against Sweden. Taylor turned to Ian Wright who made a terrific return under Hoddle after being ignored by Venables and Les Ferdinand. Alan Shearer, impressive at Southampton, unstoppable except by injury at  Blackburn, won his first cap  in 1992 but had scored only five times in 23 appearances before the start of Euro 96 and hadn’t managed an international goal for 21 months. He hit five in the five games, was elevated to the captaincy for four years and ended still the talisman, though far less mobile, in 2000 with 30 goals. Teddy Sheringham played the Beardsley role for him perfectly and kept Andy Cole out of the squad and Robbie Fowler out of the side until Michael Owen came off the bench to score against Romania at France 98 and could not be left out again. Two games later he scored the wonder goal against Argentina that sounded the trumpets for his charge to the Ballon d’Or three years later. Michael Owen scores against Argentina at the 1998 World Cup Credit: Pawel Kopczynski REUTERS Owen was never really considered part of the Golden Generation because of a certain diffidence but he was its spearhead, when fit, and its yearned for king over the water when absent. He began the decade with Shearer, combined with club-mate Emile Heskey for the 1-5 in Munich and spent time up-front with Fowler and Darius Vassell before Eriksson promoted Wayne Rooney in 2003. Over 14 years Rooney would surpass Bobby Charlton’s England goalscoring record, beginning by playing off the cuff with boundless zip and chutzpah, maturing into that rarity, a workhorse with ebullient, irrepressible swagger and ending up a shadow of electrifying presence he once had been. During the decade Rooney played up top with Owen, Jermaine Defoe and Peter Crouch most frequently. Dean Ashton seemed to fit the part but it wasn’t to be. Rooney has been the key striker and player of this last decade, too and very much undroppable until Southgate took charge. Opportunities for Jay Rodriguez, Andy Carroll and Daniel Sturridge have been curtailed by long-term injuries, Hodgson thought it wise to take Rickie Lambert to the World Cup but in 2015 Harry Kane was given a chance and grabbed it. Jamie Vardy remains among the alternatives along with Sturridge and the second (third and fourth) coming of Defoe.   Conclusion How do you come up with a decision on the relative strengths and weaknesses over eight decades? Subjectively, obviously, but without prejudice:  Goalkeepers: Seventies - Banks, Shilton, Clemence. Full-backs: Sixties - Armfield, Cohen, Wilson, Cooper. Central defenders: Seventies - Moore, Labone, Todd, McFarland, Thompson. Central midfielders: Eighties - Robson, Wilkins, Gascoigne, Hoddle. Wide men: Fifties - Matthews, Finney, Charlton R.   Strikers: Nineties - Lineker, Shearer, Owen, Beardsley.  Please feel free to dispute this 23-man squad selection in the comments section. 

The England dream team by eras: which decade comes out on top?

Scroll to the bottom of the article for Rob Bagchi's all-time 23-man England squad August is traditionally silly season for journalism but on the football beat the two-week autumn and spring international breaks are the cue for extreme resourcefulness. Watching England toil through yet another developmental stage, the slimness of their options and assets in central midfield and the heart of defence as blatant as the consoling promise of Harry Kane and Marcus Rashford, made us wonder in which eras each part of the team have been at their strongest? Was English goalkeeping, say, at its apex in the 1970s or have the wide players of the Forties never been surpassed? For once a decision to truncate the period for analysis is not motivated by either sloth or rampant neophilia. England rejoined Fifa only in 1946 and their first international tournament was the 1950 World Cup, having spurned the first three.  Therefore it makes sense to start in the immediate post-war years and to help the process we will look at each phase for every sector - goalkeeper, full-backs, central defenders, midfielders, wide players and strikers - look at the players picked and the breadth of quality alternatives. Some will represent generations or decades, others distinct stages in the team’s evolution. We’ll begin in goal and chart the progression, chronological at least, from Frank Swift and his primrose polo neck sweater to Joe Hart and his binman chic high-vis short-sleeves, concluding with our stab at an answer. Goalkeepers If you’ve been paying attention to anything involving England without being so bored you’ve felt compelled to make a paper plane, our first contender will be obvious. Frank Swift, the wok-handed, spring-heeled Manchester City goalkeeper who pioneered the throw-out, was the first keeper to captain England and as the man in goal when England travelled to Turin to defeat the double world champions Italy (a pre Superga full-strength Azzurri side) 4-0, is our candidate from the Forties. He won 19 caps despite the war depriving him of his career from the age of 25 to 32, let in 18 goals and played in other memorable victories over France, Sweden, Scotland and Portugal. Other standouts from the truncated decade include Tottenham’s title-winning Ted Ditchburn, who won six caps, and the brave, acrobatic, sure-handed Bert Williams of Wolves who succeeded Swift after his international retirement and earned 24 caps over the next six years. Our Fifties options begin with Williams and Gil Merrick of Birmingham City who earned the most caps (23) of the decade and kept five clean sheets. It was Merrick’s misfortune to be in goal for the mortifying, 3-6 defeat by Hungary at Wembley in 1953 and the 7-1 thrashing in the Nepstadion a year later. Admittedly he appeared rattled on both occasions but only because the Magnificent Magyars and his shaky defence left him horribly exposed. The sight of him picking the ball out of the net 13 times have haunted English football ever since but he was not responsible. Those defeats should have marked a paradigm shift but the England system - once again propped up by a crop of excellent players - did not significantly change until much later.  Other notable stalwarts of the decade were Bolton’s 5ft 8in Eddie Hopkinson, the master of one-on-ones who won 13 caps, and Colin McDonald of Burnley who kept goal at the 1958 World Cup and was a dominant, cross-catching doyen of the old school. The Sixties begin with Sheffield Wednesday’s, quick, agile Ron Springett who played 33 times including all four at the 1962 World Cup where he repeatedly saved Walter Winterbottom's side from a proper drubbing in the 3-1 quarter-final defeat by Brazil, and end with Banks of England, Springett’s understudy in Chile, justly recognised as the greatest goalie in the world. It wasn’t just his majesty during England’s 1966 campaign, it was his general safehandedness - helped, trivia fans, in a pre-gloves age, with a generous rub of Beechnut chewing gum-laced saliva on the palms - his rare ability to save gymnastically equally well whether his goal was attacked high or low and his courage. He was so supreme that he restricted other fine goalkeepers such as Peter Bonetti, Gordon West, Alex Stepney and Springett to a handful of caps after Alf Ramsey made him first choice in 1964. Gordon Banks remained Ramsey’s default selection until he lost an eye in a car crash at the age of 34 in Oct 1972, taking in the save against Pele in 1970, the world’s greatest keeper defying the game’s best player by diving downwards, like an hour hand pointing to seven o’clock, and twisting his wrist to ensure he flicked it over the bar to prevent the great striker pouncing on the rebound. But Leicester City did not rate the marginal differentials between an established world-class player and an emerging one as highly as Ramsey and sold Banks to Stoke in 1967 to clear the way for 17-year-old Peter Shilton who owned the Eighties but duelled with the agile, commanding and astute Ray Clemence throughout the preceding decade to be England’s No1. Shilton was a brilliant shot-stopper and all the hours of dedicated, unrelenting practice gave him uncommon agility and aerial mastery. From about 1978 onwards, the error against Poland in 1973 long overcome, Shilton has the right to be considered Banks’ equal and probably superior. The reign of the duopoly left those other excellent keepers, Joe Corrigan, Phil Parkes and Stepney feeding off scraps. When it game to goalkeepers Ron Greenwood had a touch of the Jimmy Armfields at Leeds (“the manager’s indecision is final) but at the start of 1982 after rotating them for five years, he eventually plumped for Shilton who stayed undisputed first choice for the whole of the Eighties. Clemence carried on as the first reserve until 1983 and from 1985 Chris Woods began to make the No13 shirt his second skin during international weeks. Woods made 14 starts in the decade but was mostly stuck on the bench occasionally conceding opportunities for the stand-by role to Gary Bailey, Nigel Spink, Dave Beasant and David Seaman. Poor Martin Hodge, Tony Coton and John Lukic never even got a sniff. Peter Shilton at the start of his international career Credit: Malcolm Croft/PA Bobby Robson stood by Peter Shilton for Italia 90 and kept the 40-year-old keeper between the sticks for the semi-final shootout against West Germany despite having not used all his substitute options and Shilton’s poor record at saving spot-kicks (one from 15). The veteran retired from international football at the end of the tournament but carried on playing for a variety of clubs until 1997. Woods, who once went 1196 minutes without conceding a goal for Rangers in successive matches, became Graham Taylor’s No1 and played at Euro 92 backed up by David Seaman and England’s first million-pound goalie, Nigel Martyn. Seaman came into his own under Terry Venables and proved himself a wonderfully athletic goalkeeper with great agility, positional awareness, sound judgment and, above all, consistency at Euro 96. He saved penalties, too. Glenn Hoddle logically opted for continuity but awarded caps to Ian Walker, David James, Tim Flowers and Martyn when injury or the need to see how the others shaped up demanded.   Seaman continued through the proto-Golden Generation era until his mistakes were compounded by his age, particularly, like Shilton in 1990, a leaden-footedness in reverse. Paul Robinson was anointed for the 2006 World Cup when David Beckham metamorphosed into Sally Bowles in Baden-Baden but Sven Goran-Eriksson also tried out Martyn, James (the Euro 2004) starter and Rob Green. If we consider the McClaren era a coda to the Golden Generation, The Together Again tour after Dean Martin had bailed on Frank Sinatra and Sammy Davis to be replaced by Liza Minelli, small wonder that it was largely a Robinson hangover with supporting roles for Scott Carson, Chris Kirkland, James and Ben Foster. Fabio Capello took a look at James and Green, didn’t like what he saw, blooded Joe Hart then went back to swapping between the other two, £4m a year not being enough to deliver decisiveness. Jack Butland, John Ruddy, Fraser Forster and Tom Heaton have made appearances under Roy Hodgson and Gareth Southgate. Foster, too, has returned from temporary retirement but the seven years since the 4-1 defeat by Germany in Bloemfontein have been the Hart hegemony, under whose dominion we linger. Poor old Whitney Houston did not live long enough for an answer to her question - where do broken Harts go? It’s West Ham, pet. Full backs Now we have established the decades we are going to compare, let us breeze through the options rather than dwelling in such detail to outline the parameters. First choices for full-backs of the Forties are Laurie Scott of Arsenal on the right and captain in all 13 appearances, George Hardwick of Middlesbrough on the left. Depth is added by Derby’s Bert Mozley as a back-up down the right and Manchester United’s Johnny Aston at left-back with 17 caps. George Hardwick, right, greets the Sweden captain Erik Nilsson in  1947 Credit: Reg Birkett/Keystone/Getty Images In the Fifties the selection panel had Spurs’ Alf Ramsey at the beginning of the decade to play on the right and Blackburn’s Bill Eckersley on the left. Birmingham’s Jeff Hall and West Brom’s Don Howe made the right-back slot the preserve of the West Midlands for the rest of the decade while Manchester United’s majestic and adventurous Roger Byrne played 33 successive matches at left-back until his death at Munich during a period when the selection committee made consistency virtually unknown. Tommy Banks, Bolton’s tank, did his best to replace the irreplaceable at the 1958 World Cup and Sheffield United’s Graham Shaw filled in the following year. Take your pick from the Sixties beginning with the two 1966 imperishables George Cohen and Ray Wilson, Jimmy Armfield, a former captain who played on the right at the 1962 World Cup, Keith Newton, who succeeded Cohen and Terry Cooper who took over from his fellow Yorkshireman Wilson at left-back. Add on all those reduced to a handful of caps because of Ramsey’s loyalty - Bob McNab, Paul Reaney, Chris Lawler, Gerry Byrne, Tommy Wright and Cyril Knowles - and you have the kind of riches that would make Gareth Southgate turn green with envy beneath his beard.   George Cohen, left, and Ray Wilson, holding the Jules Rimet Trophy, celebrate victory in 1966 Credit: PA Photos England’s least successful decade in terms of qualification is also, paradoxically, one remembered with a fondness for the quality of English teams – the best of which were bolstered by Scotsmen, Welshmen and Irishmen. England’s full-backs in the Seventies numbered the Liverpool pair Phil Neal and Emlyn Hughes (not that Hughes played there for his club as frequently as he did for the national side). Their versatility was a virtue, as it was for Ipswich’s Mick Mills and Leeds’ Paul Madeley and Trevor Cherry. More orthodox full-backs were plentiful, too: the magnificent Viv Anderson on the right and Don Revie’s choices, Leicester’s Steve Whitworth and QPR’s Dave Clement. On the left Frank Lampard, Alec Lindsay, David Nish, Mike Pejic and Ian Gillard won caps, as did Kevin Beattie playing out of position but in masterly fashion, particularly in the 5-1 thrashing of Scotland in 1975. Kenny Sansom began the Eighties in possession of the No 3 shirt and held it for eight years, playing consistently and with real skill to hold off the challenge of West Brom’s Derek Statham, until the claims of Stuart Pearce in 1988 could be resisted no more. The right side was more problematic once Mills, Neal and Anderson entered their mid thirties. Mick Duxbury had a run there, Danny Thomas could have been the long-term solution save for that rotten injury inflicted by Kevin Maguire while Gary Stevens won 45 caps after his debut during Everton’s title-winning campaign in 1984-85 including Mexico ’86, Euro ’88 and the beginning of Italia 90. Kenny Sansom made the left-back position his own in the Eighties Credit:  Duncan Raban/Allsport/Getty Images Pearce was key at the start of the next decade, becoming captain under Graham Taylor, taking a position in a back three for Euro 96 when Steve McManaman and Darren Anderton played wide, and was recalled at the age of 37 for a couple of starts under Kevin Keegan. Terry Venables initially preferred the Blackburn Rovers left-back Graeme Le Saux and but for injury he would have started Euro 96. Glenn Hoddle restored him as first-choice after a cameo from Andy Hinchcliffe but by the end of the Nineties the left side, in defence and midfield, had become something of a national neurosis. Phil Neville filled in there, playing alongside his brother, Gary, the undisputed No2 when fit. For club and country he succeeded Paul Parker and the challenges of Gary Charles and Rob Jones for the spot were sadly snuffed out by personal problems and injury respectively. Sven Goran-Eriksson promoted Ashley Cole as the man to solve the malaise on the left and over the 12 years of his international career from 2001 onwards he won 107 caps and held Wayne Bridge at bay. Gary Neville missed the 2002 World Cup where Danny Mills stood in but was back straight afterwards and carried on until 2007. Luke Young and Micah Richards stated their claims to be paired with Cole but ultimately Glen Johnson won the contest under Fabio Capello. Johnson stayed in situ under Roy Hodgson until the 2014 World Cup and was even recalled to the squad last year but Kyle Walker, Nathaniel Clyne and Kieran Trippier are now the default options after experiments with Chris Smalling and Phil Jones out wide. Leighton Baines played so well from 2012-14 that he essentially forced Cole into international retirement before the more athletic claims of Danny Rose and Ryan Bertrand did for him. Central defenders   Here we face a problem with the first two post-war decades before the four-back system really took off. A bodged solution for the Forties and Fifties, rather than trying to corral in a wing-half, would be to list the options at centre-half even though normally only one was picked. We don’t even have to do that for the Forties because Billy Wright, the centre-half for much of the Fifties, captain for 11 years and England’s first 100-cap player, played at wing-half for his country at the beginning of his international career, alongside the exemplary Neil Franklin at No 5. Franklin abandoned Stoke in 1950 to move to Colombia and circumvent the maximum wage but his wife did not settle there and he faced the opprobrium of his club and the FA on return, not adding to the 27 caps he earned before he left. Breadth of talent for the decade would be provided by Blackpool’s Harry Johnston, Allenby Chilton of Manchester United and Liverpool’s Bill Jones. Wright made the position his own after the 1954 World Cup where Bill McGarry and Syd Owen had taken the role. Johnston, too, continued to make appearances at the start of the Fifties and Liverpool’s Laurie Hughes stood in for Franklin at the 1950 World Cup. Jim Taylor of Fulham, Burnley’s Mal Barrass and Charlton’s Derek Ufton were also tried but no one could dislodge the 5ft 8in Wright, captain of Wolves and England, golden-haired paragon of the post-war game. The finest partnership of the Sixties, Jackie Charlton and Bobby Moore, came together only a year before they won the World Cup and had it not been for the disgrace of Peter Swan - who won 19 caps as a cultured but powerful stopper between 1960-62 - Charlton may never have joined his brother as a cornerstone of 1966 and all that. Maurice Norman, the Spurs Double-winning centre-half, joined forces with Moore for the 1962 World Cup because Swan was confined to quarters with dysentery in Chile and Brian Labone both preceded Charlton and succeeded him as first choice towards the end of the decade. Norman Hunter served as Moore’s understudy but the consistency of the captain restricted ‘Bites Yer Legs’ to 28 caps over nine seasons. Moore at his peak Credit: AP Photo/files Moore made the last of his 108 appearances in 1973 and by that point there were plenty of contenders for his position, notably Derby County’s Colin Todd, Hunter and Emlyn Hughes. Roy McFarland earned 28 caps in the centre-half slot from 1971-76 before injuries ruined his career and gave Dave Watson a long run as first choice until 1981. Watson won the last of his 65 caps at the age of 35 in June 1982 but was omitted from the final squad for the Spain World Cup, the first for which he had qualified after failures to reach West Germany and Argentina. Phil Thompson of Liverpool and Manchester United’s Brian Greenhoff were given their debuts by Don Revie but only the former flourished after he left for Abu Dhabi. Watson’s role as the tall, raw-bone aerial colossus was filled by Terry Butcher throughout the Eighties though we forget how good his left foot was, his skill overwhelmed by the ‘up and  at ‘em’ patriotism of his persona. Thompson led Liverpool to the 1981 European Cup and partnered the Ipswich defender at the Spain World Cup but Bobby Robson struggled to find a regular foil for Butcher thereafter and worked his way through Alvin Martin, Graham Roberts, Mark Wright, Terry Fenwick, Gary Pallister and a callow Tony Adams before settling on Des Walker for Italia 90 and a return for Wright in a back three. At the start of the Nineties Graham Taylor used Walker, Adams and Pallister but it was his successors, Terry Venables and Glenn Hoddle, who got the best out of Adams. Venables managed it at Euro 96 when Adams was white-knuckling his sobriety for the duration of the tournament and Hoddle benefited from Adams stopping drinking and finding a new poise. Both also used Gareth Southgate in a back three while Sol Campbell, given his debut by Venables, became a regular when Hoddle took charge. Taylor and Hoddle used Martin Keown but Venables never picked him and though Steve Howey, Neil Ruddock, Steve Bould, John Scales, Colin Cooper and David Unsworth were tried, none established himself. The so-called Golden Generation had three stalwarts in Rio Ferdinand, John Terry and Campbell while injuries prevented Jonathan Woodgate and Ledley King from the long international careers their talent deserved. Jamie Carragher won 31 caps over 11 years, Matthew Upson became a favourite of Fabio Capello’s and Steve McClaren gave Joleon Lescott his debut in 2007. Rio Ferdinand and John Terry before the latter racially abused the former's brother Credit: Action Images / Tony O'Brien Ferdinand failed to re-establish himself after missing the 2010 World Cup through injury and ended his England career with 81 caps in 2011, Terry retired from the international game in 2012 after an FA Commission went ahead with charging him over racially abusing Ferdinand’s brother, Anton. Since then we’ve had shaky alliances involving Gary Cahill, Phil Jagielka and Lescott, Chris Smalling, Phil Jones, John Stones and Michael Keane. Central midfielders Again we need to make an adjustment here for the Forties and Fifties and will restrict it to wing-halfs, elevating most inside-forwards to forwards for the sake of this exercise. The immediate post-war era used Billy Wright most often as the right-half and Manchester United’s Henry Cockburn as the left pivot. Portsmouth’s hard-tackling tyro Jimmy Dickinson succeeded Cockburn and played 48 times from 1949-56 while Phil Taylor of Liverpool and Villa’s Eddie Lowe shared six caps on the right. Before the emergence of the Busby Babes - and we must include Eddie Colman here as well as Duncan Edwards because he would have been an international but for his death at Munich at the age of 21 - Wright and Dickinson formed the regular partnership. The claims of Edwards  - simply the most complete player England has ever produced, skilful, forceful, bursting with stamina and natural authority - could no longer be ignored in 1955 and he won 18 caps before he was killed, also at the age of 21. Ron Flowers, who won three titles with Wolves in the Fifties, played once in tandem with Edwards and took over after the 1958 World Cup with Blackburn’s efficient Ronnie Clayton his usual foil after Clayton had seen off Wolves’ Eddie Clamp. Nobby Stiles played at centre-back for Manchester United but was magnificent as Ramsey’s midfield destroyer in the 1966 side, providing the platform from which Bobby Charlton could glide through the gears, the ball under his immaculate control, and ping passes, whip in crosses or fire thunderous shots at goal. Before the two of them joined up, Flowers and Bobby Robson had been the main men with Charlton out on the left wing and after injuries and age diminished Stiles, Tottenham’s Alan Mullery was given the job. Colin Bell, Man City’s Nijinsky, was blooded in 1968 and proved irreplaceable when Martin Buchan effectively ended his career in 1975 after 48 caps. For the first part of the Seventies Martin Peters tucked in from the left and Bell played the dynamic right-half role, sadly without as much freedom as he had to pelt forward for City. Trevor Brooking made his first start in Ramsey’s last match and became the co-key player with Kevin Keegan under Greenwood with his clever passing and penetrative movement. He was so good that he kept the magnificent Glenn Hoddle on the peripheries following his debut in 1978. Hoddle, as brilliant a playmaker as he is rotten as a pundit, would have a system tailored to his strengths for England’s last three games at the 1986 World Cup when crisis forced Robson’s hand. Gerry Francis, Revie’s second captain, would have given both stiff competition had he stayed fit after his 12th cap. Tony Currie and Alan Hudson join the list of inexpertly harnessed talents while Terry McDermott, so intrepid for Liverpool, was denied a consistent run in the side by Ray Wilkins who ended the decade a dynamic box-to-box midfielder with the skill, control and vision that would later make him so comfortable as a ‘sitter’ in Serie A. The entire Eighties can be considered the Bryan Robson years. Bobby was besotted by him but for understandable reasons, as Alex Ferguson outlined: "He had good control, was a decisive tackler, passed the ball well and his combination of stamina and perceptive reading of movement enabled him to make sudden and deadly infiltrations from midfield into the opposition's box." His fitness became a national preoccupation and he lasted two games each of the 1986 and 1990 World Cups after driving England to qualification at both. We saw him at his very best only in 1982 and Euro 88 when he needed support that his team-mates could not provide. Wilkins was his regular partner, replaced by Hoddle for 1988 and Neil Webb thereafter until Paul Gascoigne finally charmed the sceptical Bobby Robson in 1990. Peter Reid, Everton’s tigerish beating heart, took centre stage in 1986 when Robson’s shoulder popped out again but the promise of his Goodison colleague Paul Bracewell was ravaged by  an ankle injury that took almost two years out of his career. England's all-action 'Captain Marvel' Credit: David Cannon/Getty Images Italia 90 began with Robson, Gascoigne and Chris Waddle in a midfield three and ended in unforgettable drama with David Platt in for the captain, having seen off Steve McMahon. Graham Taylor initially stuck with the Platt-Gascoigne axis for the victory over Poland but went with his Aston Villa pairing of Platt and Sid Cowans for the trip to Dublin. Gascoigne’s injuries and drinking alarmed Taylor who kept him around the squad when fit but his absences provoked some of the strangest selections in memory, noticeably Geoff Thomas, Andy Gray and Carlton Palmer. David Batty and Paul Ince injected some quality, the latter a mainstay for Venables and Hoddle - playing with Platt and Gascoigne at Euro 96, Paul Scholes at the 1998 World Cup. Jamie Redknapp was ill-served by injury, Nicky Butt ill-served by managers until Sven Goran-Eriksson’s hand was forced in 2002 by Steven Gerrard’s absence and Ray Parlour by the wrong-headed perception that he was well, in Lovejoy’s words, ‘only Ray Parlour’. Gascoigne lights up Wembley v Scotland at Euro 96 Credit: Stu Forster/Allsport Frank Lampard made his debut in 1999 but did not become a regular for four seasons when his class tempted Eriksson to fudge the biggest decision of his England career and stick Scholes on the left to start the ‘Lampard-Gerrard’ compatibility saga that was to run for the next 11 years. Once Scholes decided he’d had enough after Euro 2004 (ending a 29-game goal drought in his penultimate match), Gerrard and Lampard, Lampard and Gerrard held their positions until Steve McClaren recalled Gareth Barry, who impressed Capello so firmly that he put Gerrard on the left. The Golden Generation and its hangover phase featured cameos from Danny Murphy, Owen Hargreaves (though he normally played wide), Scott ‘Scottie’ Parker, Michael Carrick and Jermaine Jenas though none could either usurp Gerrard or Lampard or make the combination look convincing in tournament football.    Both were still in the squad at the 2014 World Cup though age had taken the shine off them. Lampard was reduced to the bench, Gerrard captained the side but his one-paced partnership with Jordan Henderson left a dodgy defence too exposed to cope with Italy and Uruguay. Capello gave Jack Wilshere his debut at the age of 18 yet seven years later we are still waiting for him, probably forlornly, to be blessed with the physical resilience to regain his verve. Eric Dier has been the default starter with Henderson for the past 18 months but Jake Livermore is currently back in the squad, Tom Cleverly has been and gone, Fabian Delph gets in whenever he manages a couple of games for Man City while James Ward-Prowse and Harry Winks put the twinkle in Gareth Southgate’s eye.   Wide men Should we just end this segment here? Stan Matthews and Tom Finney in the Forties and Fifties are the best pair of wingers England have ever had. In 1948 a forward line of Matthews, Stan Mortensen, Tommy Lawton, Wilf Mannion and Finney put on arguably England’s greatest performance in the 4-0 away victory over Italy but never played together again. Finney was an England regular for 12 years, playing on the right, left and through the middle until 1958 but Matthews, seven years Finney’s senior, was eased out only a year earlier at the age of 42 with 54 caps. He was not deemed as indispensable by myopic selectors who gave run-outs on the wings in his stead to Peter Harris, Les Medley, Billy Elliott and Johnny Berry. Blackburn’s Bryan Douglas took the No7 shirt 36 times and scored 11 goals from 1975-63 and Bobby Charlton won the majority of his caps until 1964 on the left flank, seeing out the decade in a Lancs touchline hegemony.   In the Sixties, after the end of the Douglas-Charlton years, Ramsey tried John Connelly, Terry Paine, Peter Thompson, Derek Temple and Ian Callaghan before deciding on a narrower road to triumph. Alan Ball, essentially an auxiliary central midfielder, edged out to patrol the right for the latter stages of the 1966 World Cup, driving England on with his stamina, skill and heart but victory convinced the manager to stick to his system, using the full-backs for width with Peters augmenting the strikers from a nominal position on the left and Ball from the right. Wingers were out of vogue for most of decade after 1966 - Ian Storey Moore kept the flame flickering briefly and Revie tried with QPR’s Dave Thomas and Merlin himself. Gordon Hill, but it wasn’t until Ron Greenwood picked Manchester City’s Peter Barnes and United’s Steve Coppell together in 1977 that England took flight again. Coppell evolved into a solid right-sided player but at that point was an out and out winger who held the position for five years. Laurie Cunningham made three starts alongside him but by the start of the following decade Greenwood had cramped his own style. John Barnes at the Maracana Credit: David Cannon/Allsport The Eighties should have been the decade of Waddle and John Barnes and in popular memory it remains so but England started the decade with a tighter system, using Coppell and Graham Rix at the 1982 World Cup, and got to the quarter-finals of the 1986 tournament having ditched the wingers for Trevor Steven and Steve Hodge. Villa’s European Cup-winner Tony Morley briefly enraptured Bobby Robson and Mark Chamberlain preceded Waddle into the side by two years but it was largely a Barnes-Waddle duopoly from then on, though rarely in tandem and both, despite their brilliance and that goal at the Maracana, the first scapegoats. Lee Sharpe was the great left hope of the Nineties but faded away, Venables got the best out of Darren Anderton and Steve McManaman to provide hope of a more expansive future until David Beckham took freehold of the No7 shirt and front pages for eight years with a revolving cast of Nick Barmby, Paul Merson or a wing-back on the left. Eriksson blanked McManaman at the start of the 2000s and tried Trevor Sinclair, Scholes and Joe Cole out there to give some balance for Beckham. Stewart Downing became a mainstay of Steve McClaren’s squads while Aaron Lennon and David Bentley were tried out on the right. Ultimately he went back to Beckham. Capello got the best out of Theo Walcott for a few games, pulled Gerrard out to the left and employed James Milner as a Steady Eddie solution. Hodgson switched to 4-2-3-1 and used Raheem Sterling, Danny Welbeck, Wayne Rooney and Adam Lallana to provide width which is largely, with the exception of Rooney, where we remain apart from the saving grace of Rashford. Forwards To the summit … and, controversially, I am going to include some inside-forwards for the first three eras. So, for our post-war pioneers we will go with the aforementioned Mortensen, scorer of 23 goals in 25 games, Lawton, who scored 22 times in 23 starts, and Mannion, ‘the Mozart of football’ as Matthews put it. Len Shackleton and ‘Wor’ Jackie Milburn straddled the Forties and Fifties while Mortensen played on until 1953. The No9 shirt fell vacant in 1948 when Lawton told Walter Winterbottom that the coach didn’t know enough to be giving him advice, Milburn filled it for a spell before Nat Lofthouse won 33 caps and scored 30 goals, including the two at the Praterstadion that made him forever ‘The Lion of Vienna’. Tommy Taylor, one of the eight ‘Flowers of Manchester’ among the 23 victims of the Munich Air Crash, shot powerfully with both feet, had pace, guile and spatial awareness, and the fast-twitch reflexes of the thoroughbred goalscorer. He bagged 16 goals in 19 appearances as the other out-and-out England centre-forward of the decade. Lofty and Tommy were supported by Ivor Broadis and the finest, most astute passer in the team’s history, Johnny Haynes, who was only 27 in 1962 when he played his 56th and final game for England (his 22nd as captain) in the 1962 World Cup quarter-final. He was never as fluent again after a car crash on his return from Chile. Geoff Hurst’s hat-trick in the 1966 World Cup final overshadows anything any other England striker can match. Roger Hunt, the other Wembley immortal, was so crucial to Ramsey’s system because his tireless movement made space for Bobby Charlton to fill that it is forgotten that he scored 18 times in 34 appearances, and Jimmy Greaves, English football’s most cold-hearted and deadly finisher, gave the manager a richness of options. By the end of the Sixties Franny Lee had taken over from Hunt and Greaves as Hurst’s partner for Mexico Sniffer Clarke, the heir to Greaves, made his debut in 1970, Peter Osgood made only a couple of starts and Martin Chivers became Ramsey’s preferred No9 for two years, scoring 13 times in 24 appearances. Rodney Marsh exasperated his manager, Malcolm MacDonald thrashed five past Cyprus for Revie but made his distaste for the man who picked him well known, which meant the search for an ‘oppo’ for Kevin Keegan - the human dynamo, a rampaging forward who could leap, head, shoot and pass with distinction - lasted too long. Bob Latchford found favour for a while as did Stuart Pearson, Mick Channon moved over from the right, Paul Mariner began the international career that would yield 35 caps and 13 goals and Tricky Trevor Francis beguiled us all with his positioning and vision. Kevin Keegan scores against Scotland in 1979 Credit: Steve Powell/Allsport Cyrille Regis would have made more than two starts in the Eighties had he moved to Manchester United from West Brom instead of Coventry but he couldn’t displace the Keegan-Mariner-Woodcock-Francis usual suspects for the World Cup in Spain. Robson ushered Keegan into retirement but kept faith with the others until Gary Lineker, the quicksilver scavenger, gave him no excuse in 1984 and began the march to the Mexico Golden Boot, a World Cup quarter- and semi-final and 48 goals in 80 games. He was at his best with Peter Beardsley - who brought out the best in everyone - but also fed off Mark Hateley, Alan Smith,  and Steve Bull. The Nineties began with Lineker and Italia 90, Taylor then gave him the captaincy and slim pickings to work with up front and he left the scene in 1992 when shown the managerial big curly finger despite England desperately requiring a goal against Sweden. Taylor turned to Ian Wright who made a terrific return under Hoddle after being ignored by Venables and Les Ferdinand. Alan Shearer, impressive at Southampton, unstoppable except by injury at  Blackburn, won his first cap  in 1992 but had scored only five times in 23 appearances before the start of Euro 96 and hadn’t managed an international goal for 21 months. He hit five in the five games, was elevated to the captaincy for four years and ended still the talisman, though far less mobile, in 2000 with 30 goals. Teddy Sheringham played the Beardsley role for him perfectly and kept Andy Cole out of the squad and Robbie Fowler out of the side until Michael Owen came off the bench to score against Romania at France 98 and could not be left out again. Two games later he scored the wonder goal against Argentina that sounded the trumpets for his charge to the Ballon d’Or three years later. Michael Owen scores against Argentina at the 1998 World Cup Credit: Pawel Kopczynski REUTERS Owen was never really considered part of the Golden Generation because of a certain diffidence but he was its spearhead, when fit, and its yearned for king over the water when absent. He began the decade with Shearer, combined with club-mate Emile Heskey for the 1-5 in Munich and spent time up-front with Fowler and Darius Vassell before Eriksson promoted Wayne Rooney in 2003. Over 14 years Rooney would surpass Bobby Charlton’s England goalscoring record, beginning by playing off the cuff with boundless zip and chutzpah, maturing into that rarity, a workhorse with ebullient, irrepressible swagger and ending up a shadow of electrifying presence he once had been. During the decade Rooney played up top with Owen, Jermaine Defoe and Peter Crouch most frequently. Dean Ashton seemed to fit the part but it wasn’t to be. Rooney has been the key striker and player of this last decade, too and very much undroppable until Southgate took charge. Opportunities for Jay Rodriguez, Andy Carroll and Daniel Sturridge have been curtailed by long-term injuries, Hodgson thought it wise to take Rickie Lambert to the World Cup but in 2015 Harry Kane was given a chance and grabbed it. Jamie Vardy remains among the alternatives along with Sturridge and the second (third and fourth) coming of Defoe.   Conclusion How do you come up with a decision on the relative strengths and weaknesses over eight decades? Subjectively, obviously, but without prejudice:  Goalkeepers: Seventies - Banks, Shilton, Clemence. Full-backs: Sixties - Armfield, Cohen, Wilson, Cooper. Central defenders: Seventies - Moore, Labone, Todd, McFarland, Thompson. Central midfielders: Eighties - Robson, Wilkins, Gascoigne, Hoddle. Wide men: Fifties - Matthews, Finney, Charlton R.   Strikers: Nineties - Lineker, Shearer, Owen, Beardsley.  Please feel free to dispute this 23-man squad selection in the comments section. 

The England dream team by eras: which decade comes out on top?

Scroll to the bottom of the article for Rob Bagchi's all-time 23-man England squad August is traditionally silly season for journalism but on the football beat the two-week autumn and spring international breaks are the cue for extreme resourcefulness. Watching England toil through yet another developmental stage, the slimness of their options and assets in central midfield and the heart of defence as blatant as the consoling promise of Harry Kane and Marcus Rashford, made us wonder in which eras each part of the team have been at their strongest? Was English goalkeeping, say, at its apex in the 1970s or have the wide players of the Forties never been surpassed? For once a decision to truncate the period for analysis is not motivated by either sloth or rampant neophilia. England rejoined Fifa only in 1946 and their first international tournament was the 1950 World Cup, having spurned the first three.  Therefore it makes sense to start in the immediate post-war years and to help the process we will look at each phase for every sector - goalkeeper, full-backs, central defenders, midfielders, wide players and strikers - look at the players picked and the breadth of quality alternatives. Some will represent generations or decades, others distinct stages in the team’s evolution. We’ll begin in goal and chart the progression, chronological at least, from Frank Swift and his primrose polo neck sweater to Joe Hart and his binman chic high-vis short-sleeves, concluding with our stab at an answer. Goalkeepers If you’ve been paying attention to anything involving England without being so bored you’ve felt compelled to make a paper plane, our first contender will be obvious. Frank Swift, the wok-handed, spring-heeled Manchester City goalkeeper who pioneered the throw-out, was the first keeper to captain England and as the man in goal when England travelled to Turin to defeat the double world champions Italy (a pre Superga full-strength Azzurri side) 4-0, is our candidate from the Forties. He won 19 caps despite the war depriving him of his career from the age of 25 to 32, let in 18 goals and played in other memorable victories over France, Sweden, Scotland and Portugal. Other standouts from the truncated decade include Tottenham’s title-winning Ted Ditchburn, who won six caps, and the brave, acrobatic, sure-handed Bert Williams of Wolves who succeeded Swift after his international retirement and earned 24 caps over the next six years. Our Fifties options begin with Williams and Gil Merrick of Birmingham City who earned the most caps (23) of the decade and kept five clean sheets. It was Merrick’s misfortune to be in goal for the mortifying, 3-6 defeat by Hungary at Wembley in 1953 and the 7-1 thrashing in the Nepstadion a year later. Admittedly he appeared rattled on both occasions but only because the Magnificent Magyars and his shaky defence left him horribly exposed. The sight of him picking the ball out of the net 13 times have haunted English football ever since but he was not responsible. Those defeats should have marked a paradigm shift but the England system - once again propped up by a crop of excellent players - did not significantly change until much later.  Other notable stalwarts of the decade were Bolton’s 5ft 8in Eddie Hopkinson, the master of one-on-ones who won 13 caps, and Colin McDonald of Burnley who kept goal at the 1958 World Cup and was a dominant, cross-catching doyen of the old school. The Sixties begin with Sheffield Wednesday’s, quick, agile Ron Springett who played 33 times including all four at the 1962 World Cup where he repeatedly saved Walter Winterbottom's side from a proper drubbing in the 3-1 quarter-final defeat by Brazil, and end with Banks of England, Springett’s understudy in Chile, justly recognised as the greatest goalie in the world. It wasn’t just his majesty during England’s 1966 campaign, it was his general safehandedness - helped, trivia fans, in a pre-gloves age, with a generous rub of Beechnut chewing gum-laced saliva on the palms - his rare ability to save gymnastically equally well whether his goal was attacked high or low and his courage. He was so supreme that he restricted other fine goalkeepers such as Peter Bonetti, Gordon West, Alex Stepney and Springett to a handful of caps after Alf Ramsey made him first choice in 1964. Gordon Banks remained Ramsey’s default selection until he lost an eye in a car crash at the age of 34 in Oct 1972, taking in the save against Pele in 1970, the world’s greatest keeper defying the game’s best player by diving downwards, like an hour hand pointing to seven o’clock, and twisting his wrist to ensure he flicked it over the bar to prevent the great striker pouncing on the rebound. But Leicester City did not rate the marginal differentials between an established world-class player and an emerging one as highly as Ramsey and sold Banks to Stoke in 1967 to clear the way for 17-year-old Peter Shilton who owned the Eighties but duelled with the agile, commanding and astute Ray Clemence throughout the preceding decade to be England’s No1. Shilton was a brilliant shot-stopper and all the hours of dedicated, unrelenting practice gave him uncommon agility and aerial mastery. From about 1978 onwards, the error against Poland in 1973 long overcome, Shilton has the right to be considered Banks’ equal and probably superior. The reign of the duopoly left those other excellent keepers, Joe Corrigan, Phil Parkes and Stepney feeding off scraps. When it game to goalkeepers Ron Greenwood had a touch of the Jimmy Armfields at Leeds (“the manager’s indecision is final) but at the start of 1982 after rotating them for five years, he eventually plumped for Shilton who stayed undisputed first choice for the whole of the Eighties. Clemence carried on as the first reserve until 1983 and from 1985 Chris Woods began to make the No13 shirt his second skin during international weeks. Woods made 14 starts in the decade but was mostly stuck on the bench occasionally conceding opportunities for the stand-by role to Gary Bailey, Nigel Spink, Dave Beasant and David Seaman. Poor Martin Hodge, Tony Coton and John Lukic never even got a sniff. Peter Shilton at the start of his international career Credit: Malcolm Croft/PA Bobby Robson stood by Peter Shilton for Italia 90 and kept the 40-year-old keeper between the sticks for the semi-final shootout against West Germany despite having not used all his substitute options and Shilton’s poor record at saving spot-kicks (one from 15). The veteran retired from international football at the end of the tournament but carried on playing for a variety of clubs until 1997. Woods, who once went 1196 minutes without conceding a goal for Rangers in successive matches, became Graham Taylor’s No1 and played at Euro 92 backed up by David Seaman and England’s first million-pound goalie, Nigel Martyn. Seaman came into his own under Terry Venables and proved himself a wonderfully athletic goalkeeper with great agility, positional awareness, sound judgment and, above all, consistency at Euro 96. He saved penalties, too. Glenn Hoddle logically opted for continuity but awarded caps to Ian Walker, David James, Tim Flowers and Martyn when injury or the need to see how the others shaped up demanded.   Seaman continued through the proto-Golden Generation era until his mistakes were compounded by his age, particularly, like Shilton in 1990, a leaden-footedness in reverse. Paul Robinson was anointed for the 2006 World Cup when David Beckham metamorphosed into Sally Bowles in Baden-Baden but Sven Goran-Eriksson also tried out Martyn, James (the Euro 2004) starter and Rob Green. If we consider the McClaren era a coda to the Golden Generation, The Together Again tour after Dean Martin had bailed on Frank Sinatra and Sammy Davis to be replaced by Liza Minelli, small wonder that it was largely a Robinson hangover with supporting roles for Scott Carson, Chris Kirkland, James and Ben Foster. Fabio Capello took a look at James and Green, didn’t like what he saw, blooded Joe Hart then went back to swapping between the other two, £4m a year not being enough to deliver decisiveness. Jack Butland, John Ruddy, Fraser Forster and Tom Heaton have made appearances under Roy Hodgson and Gareth Southgate. Foster, too, has returned from temporary retirement but the seven years since the 4-1 defeat by Germany in Bloemfontein have been the Hart hegemony, under whose dominion we linger. Poor old Whitney Houston did not live long enough for an answer to her question - where do broken Harts go? It’s West Ham, pet. Full backs Now we have established the decades we are going to compare, let us breeze through the options rather than dwelling in such detail to outline the parameters. First choices for full-backs of the Forties are Laurie Scott of Arsenal on the right and captain in all 13 appearances, George Hardwick of Middlesbrough on the left. Depth is added by Derby’s Bert Mozley as a back-up down the right and Manchester United’s Johnny Aston at left-back with 17 caps. George Hardwick, right, greets the Sweden captain Erik Nilsson in  1947 Credit: Reg Birkett/Keystone/Getty Images In the Fifties the selection panel had Spurs’ Alf Ramsey at the beginning of the decade to play on the right and Blackburn’s Bill Eckersley on the left. Birmingham’s Jeff Hall and West Brom’s Don Howe made the right-back slot the preserve of the West Midlands for the rest of the decade while Manchester United’s majestic and adventurous Roger Byrne played 33 successive matches at left-back until his death at Munich during a period when the selection committee made consistency virtually unknown. Tommy Banks, Bolton’s tank, did his best to replace the irreplaceable at the 1958 World Cup and Sheffield United’s Graham Shaw filled in the following year. Take your pick from the Sixties beginning with the two 1966 imperishables George Cohen and Ray Wilson, Jimmy Armfield, a former captain who played on the right at the 1962 World Cup, Keith Newton, who succeeded Cohen and Terry Cooper who took over from his fellow Yorkshireman Wilson at left-back. Add on all those reduced to a handful of caps because of Ramsey’s loyalty - Bob McNab, Paul Reaney, Chris Lawler, Gerry Byrne, Tommy Wright and Cyril Knowles - and you have the kind of riches that would make Gareth Southgate turn green with envy beneath his beard.   George Cohen, left, and Ray Wilson, holding the Jules Rimet Trophy, celebrate victory in 1966 Credit: PA Photos England’s least successful decade in terms of qualification is also, paradoxically, one remembered with a fondness for the quality of English teams – the best of which were bolstered by Scotsmen, Welshmen and Irishmen. England’s full-backs in the Seventies numbered the Liverpool pair Phil Neal and Emlyn Hughes (not that Hughes played there for his club as frequently as he did for the national side). Their versatility was a virtue, as it was for Ipswich’s Mick Mills and Leeds’ Paul Madeley and Trevor Cherry. More orthodox full-backs were plentiful, too: the magnificent Viv Anderson on the right and Don Revie’s choices, Leicester’s Steve Whitworth and QPR’s Dave Clement. On the left Frank Lampard, Alec Lindsay, David Nish, Mike Pejic and Ian Gillard won caps, as did Kevin Beattie playing out of position but in masterly fashion, particularly in the 5-1 thrashing of Scotland in 1975. Kenny Sansom began the Eighties in possession of the No 3 shirt and held it for eight years, playing consistently and with real skill to hold off the challenge of West Brom’s Derek Statham, until the claims of Stuart Pearce in 1988 could be resisted no more. The right side was more problematic once Mills, Neal and Anderson entered their mid thirties. Mick Duxbury had a run there, Danny Thomas could have been the long-term solution save for that rotten injury inflicted by Kevin Maguire while Gary Stevens won 45 caps after his debut during Everton’s title-winning campaign in 1984-85 including Mexico ’86, Euro ’88 and the beginning of Italia 90. Kenny Sansom made the left-back position his own in the Eighties Credit:  Duncan Raban/Allsport/Getty Images Pearce was key at the start of the next decade, becoming captain under Graham Taylor, taking a position in a back three for Euro 96 when Steve McManaman and Darren Anderton played wide, and was recalled at the age of 37 for a couple of starts under Kevin Keegan. Terry Venables initially preferred the Blackburn Rovers left-back Graeme Le Saux and but for injury he would have started Euro 96. Glenn Hoddle restored him as first-choice after a cameo from Andy Hinchcliffe but by the end of the Nineties the left side, in defence and midfield, had become something of a national neurosis. Phil Neville filled in there, playing alongside his brother, Gary, the undisputed No2 when fit. For club and country he succeeded Paul Parker and the challenges of Gary Charles and Rob Jones for the spot were sadly snuffed out by personal problems and injury respectively. Sven Goran-Eriksson promoted Ashley Cole as the man to solve the malaise on the left and over the 12 years of his international career from 2001 onwards he won 107 caps and held Wayne Bridge at bay. Gary Neville missed the 2002 World Cup where Danny Mills stood in but was back straight afterwards and carried on until 2007. Luke Young and Micah Richards stated their claims to be paired with Cole but ultimately Glen Johnson won the contest under Fabio Capello. Johnson stayed in situ under Roy Hodgson until the 2014 World Cup and was even recalled to the squad last year but Kyle Walker, Nathaniel Clyne and Kieran Trippier are now the default options after experiments with Chris Smalling and Phil Jones out wide. Leighton Baines played so well from 2012-14 that he essentially forced Cole into international retirement before the more athletic claims of Danny Rose and Ryan Bertrand did for him. Central defenders   Here we face a problem with the first two post-war decades before the four-back system really took off. A bodged solution for the Forties and Fifties, rather than trying to corral in a wing-half, would be to list the options at centre-half even though normally only one was picked. We don’t even have to do that for the Forties because Billy Wright, the centre-half for much of the Fifties, captain for 11 years and England’s first 100-cap player, played at wing-half for his country at the beginning of his international career, alongside the exemplary Neil Franklin at No 5. Franklin abandoned Stoke in 1950 to move to Colombia and circumvent the maximum wage but his wife did not settle there and he faced the opprobrium of his club and the FA on return, not adding to the 27 caps he earned before he left. Breadth of talent for the decade would be provided by Blackpool’s Harry Johnston, Allenby Chilton of Manchester United and Liverpool’s Bill Jones. Wright made the position his own after the 1954 World Cup where Bill McGarry and Syd Owen had taken the role. Johnston, too, continued to make appearances at the start of the Fifties and Liverpool’s Laurie Hughes stood in for Franklin at the 1950 World Cup. Jim Taylor of Fulham, Burnley’s Mal Barrass and Charlton’s Derek Ufton were also tried but no one could dislodge the 5ft 8in Wright, captain of Wolves and England, golden-haired paragon of the post-war game. The finest partnership of the Sixties, Jackie Charlton and Bobby Moore, came together only a year before they won the World Cup and had it not been for the disgrace of Peter Swan - who won 19 caps as a cultured but powerful stopper between 1960-62 - Charlton may never have joined his brother as a cornerstone of 1966 and all that. Maurice Norman, the Spurs Double-winning centre-half, joined forces with Moore for the 1962 World Cup because Swan was confined to quarters with dysentery in Chile and Brian Labone both preceded Charlton and succeeded him as first choice towards the end of the decade. Norman Hunter served as Moore’s understudy but the consistency of the captain restricted ‘Bites Yer Legs’ to 28 caps over nine seasons. Moore at his peak Credit: AP Photo/files Moore made the last of his 108 appearances in 1973 and by that point there were plenty of contenders for his position, notably Derby County’s Colin Todd, Hunter and Emlyn Hughes. Roy McFarland earned 28 caps in the centre-half slot from 1971-76 before injuries ruined his career and gave Dave Watson a long run as first choice until 1981. Watson won the last of his 65 caps at the age of 35 in June 1982 but was omitted from the final squad for the Spain World Cup, the first for which he had qualified after failures to reach West Germany and Argentina. Phil Thompson of Liverpool and Manchester United’s Brian Greenhoff were given their debuts by Don Revie but only the former flourished after he left for Abu Dhabi. Watson’s role as the tall, raw-bone aerial colossus was filled by Terry Butcher throughout the Eighties though we forget how good his left foot was, his skill overwhelmed by the ‘up and  at ‘em’ patriotism of his persona. Thompson led Liverpool to the 1981 European Cup and partnered the Ipswich defender at the Spain World Cup but Bobby Robson struggled to find a regular foil for Butcher thereafter and worked his way through Alvin Martin, Graham Roberts, Mark Wright, Terry Fenwick, Gary Pallister and a callow Tony Adams before settling on Des Walker for Italia 90 and a return for Wright in a back three. At the start of the Nineties Graham Taylor used Walker, Adams and Pallister but it was his successors, Terry Venables and Glenn Hoddle, who got the best out of Adams. Venables managed it at Euro 96 when Adams was white-knuckling his sobriety for the duration of the tournament and Hoddle benefited from Adams stopping drinking and finding a new poise. Both also used Gareth Southgate in a back three while Sol Campbell, given his debut by Venables, became a regular when Hoddle took charge. Taylor and Hoddle used Martin Keown but Venables never picked him and though Steve Howey, Neil Ruddock, Steve Bould, John Scales, Colin Cooper and David Unsworth were tried, none established himself. The so-called Golden Generation had three stalwarts in Rio Ferdinand, John Terry and Campbell while injuries prevented Jonathan Woodgate and Ledley King from the long international careers their talent deserved. Jamie Carragher won 31 caps over 11 years, Matthew Upson became a favourite of Fabio Capello’s and Steve McClaren gave Joleon Lescott his debut in 2007. Rio Ferdinand and John Terry before the latter racially abused the former's brother Credit: Action Images / Tony O'Brien Ferdinand failed to re-establish himself after missing the 2010 World Cup through injury and ended his England career with 81 caps in 2011, Terry retired from the international game in 2012 after an FA Commission went ahead with charging him over racially abusing Ferdinand’s brother, Anton. Since then we’ve had shaky alliances involving Gary Cahill, Phil Jagielka and Lescott, Chris Smalling, Phil Jones, John Stones and Michael Keane. Central midfielders Again we need to make an adjustment here for the Forties and Fifties and will restrict it to wing-halfs, elevating most inside-forwards to forwards for the sake of this exercise. The immediate post-war era used Billy Wright most often as the right-half and Manchester United’s Henry Cockburn as the left pivot. Portsmouth’s hard-tackling tyro Jimmy Dickinson succeeded Cockburn and played 48 times from 1949-56 while Phil Taylor of Liverpool and Villa’s Eddie Lowe shared six caps on the right. Before the emergence of the Busby Babes - and we must include Eddie Colman here as well as Duncan Edwards because he would have been an international but for his death at Munich at the age of 21 - Wright and Dickinson formed the regular partnership. The claims of Edwards  - simply the most complete player England has ever produced, skilful, forceful, bursting with stamina and natural authority - could no longer be ignored in 1955 and he won 18 caps before he was killed, also at the age of 21. Ron Flowers, who won three titles with Wolves in the Fifties, played once in tandem with Edwards and took over after the 1958 World Cup with Blackburn’s efficient Ronnie Clayton his usual foil after Clayton had seen off Wolves’ Eddie Clamp. Nobby Stiles played at centre-back for Manchester United but was magnificent as Ramsey’s midfield destroyer in the 1966 side, providing the platform from which Bobby Charlton could glide through the gears, the ball under his immaculate control, and ping passes, whip in crosses or fire thunderous shots at goal. Before the two of them joined up, Flowers and Bobby Robson had been the main men with Charlton out on the left wing and after injuries and age diminished Stiles, Tottenham’s Alan Mullery was given the job. Colin Bell, Man City’s Nijinsky, was blooded in 1968 and proved irreplaceable when Martin Buchan effectively ended his career in 1975 after 48 caps. For the first part of the Seventies Martin Peters tucked in from the left and Bell played the dynamic right-half role, sadly without as much freedom as he had to pelt forward for City. Trevor Brooking made his first start in Ramsey’s last match and became the co-key player with Kevin Keegan under Greenwood with his clever passing and penetrative movement. He was so good that he kept the magnificent Glenn Hoddle on the peripheries following his debut in 1978. Hoddle, as brilliant a playmaker as he is rotten as a pundit, would have a system tailored to his strengths for England’s last three games at the 1986 World Cup when crisis forced Robson’s hand. Gerry Francis, Revie’s second captain, would have given both stiff competition had he stayed fit after his 12th cap. Tony Currie and Alan Hudson join the list of inexpertly harnessed talents while Terry McDermott, so intrepid for Liverpool, was denied a consistent run in the side by Ray Wilkins who ended the decade a dynamic box-to-box midfielder with the skill, control and vision that would later make him so comfortable as a ‘sitter’ in Serie A. The entire Eighties can be considered the Bryan Robson years. Bobby was besotted by him but for understandable reasons, as Alex Ferguson outlined: "He had good control, was a decisive tackler, passed the ball well and his combination of stamina and perceptive reading of movement enabled him to make sudden and deadly infiltrations from midfield into the opposition's box." His fitness became a national preoccupation and he lasted two games each of the 1986 and 1990 World Cups after driving England to qualification at both. We saw him at his very best only in 1982 and Euro 88 when he needed support that his team-mates could not provide. Wilkins was his regular partner, replaced by Hoddle for 1988 and Neil Webb thereafter until Paul Gascoigne finally charmed the sceptical Bobby Robson in 1990. Peter Reid, Everton’s tigerish beating heart, took centre stage in 1986 when Robson’s shoulder popped out again but the promise of his Goodison colleague Paul Bracewell was ravaged by  an ankle injury that took almost two years out of his career. England's all-action 'Captain Marvel' Credit: David Cannon/Getty Images Italia 90 began with Robson, Gascoigne and Chris Waddle in a midfield three and ended in unforgettable drama with David Platt in for the captain, having seen off Steve McMahon. Graham Taylor initially stuck with the Platt-Gascoigne axis for the victory over Poland but went with his Aston Villa pairing of Platt and Sid Cowans for the trip to Dublin. Gascoigne’s injuries and drinking alarmed Taylor who kept him around the squad when fit but his absences provoked some of the strangest selections in memory, noticeably Geoff Thomas, Andy Gray and Carlton Palmer. David Batty and Paul Ince injected some quality, the latter a mainstay for Venables and Hoddle - playing with Platt and Gascoigne at Euro 96, Paul Scholes at the 1998 World Cup. Jamie Redknapp was ill-served by injury, Nicky Butt ill-served by managers until Sven Goran-Eriksson’s hand was forced in 2002 by Steven Gerrard’s absence and Ray Parlour by the wrong-headed perception that he was well, in Lovejoy’s words, ‘only Ray Parlour’. Gascoigne lights up Wembley v Scotland at Euro 96 Credit: Stu Forster/Allsport Frank Lampard made his debut in 1999 but did not become a regular for four seasons when his class tempted Eriksson to fudge the biggest decision of his England career and stick Scholes on the left to start the ‘Lampard-Gerrard’ compatibility saga that was to run for the next 11 years. Once Scholes decided he’d had enough after Euro 2004 (ending a 29-game goal drought in his penultimate match), Gerrard and Lampard, Lampard and Gerrard held their positions until Steve McClaren recalled Gareth Barry, who impressed Capello so firmly that he put Gerrard on the left. The Golden Generation and its hangover phase featured cameos from Danny Murphy, Owen Hargreaves (though he normally played wide), Scott ‘Scottie’ Parker, Michael Carrick and Jermaine Jenas though none could either usurp Gerrard or Lampard or make the combination look convincing in tournament football.    Both were still in the squad at the 2014 World Cup though age had taken the shine off them. Lampard was reduced to the bench, Gerrard captained the side but his one-paced partnership with Jordan Henderson left a dodgy defence too exposed to cope with Italy and Uruguay. Capello gave Jack Wilshere his debut at the age of 18 yet seven years later we are still waiting for him, probably forlornly, to be blessed with the physical resilience to regain his verve. Eric Dier has been the default starter with Henderson for the past 18 months but Jake Livermore is currently back in the squad, Tom Cleverly has been and gone, Fabian Delph gets in whenever he manages a couple of games for Man City while James Ward-Prowse and Harry Winks put the twinkle in Gareth Southgate’s eye.   Wide men Should we just end this segment here? Stan Matthews and Tom Finney in the Forties and Fifties are the best pair of wingers England have ever had. In 1948 a forward line of Matthews, Stan Mortensen, Tommy Lawton, Wilf Mannion and Finney put on arguably England’s greatest performance in the 4-0 away victory over Italy but never played together again. Finney was an England regular for 12 years, playing on the right, left and through the middle until 1958 but Matthews, seven years Finney’s senior, was eased out only a year earlier at the age of 42 with 54 caps. He was not deemed as indispensable by myopic selectors who gave run-outs on the wings in his stead to Peter Harris, Les Medley, Billy Elliott and Johnny Berry. Blackburn’s Bryan Douglas took the No7 shirt 36 times and scored 11 goals from 1975-63 and Bobby Charlton won the majority of his caps until 1964 on the left flank, seeing out the decade in a Lancs touchline hegemony.   In the Sixties, after the end of the Douglas-Charlton years, Ramsey tried John Connelly, Terry Paine, Peter Thompson, Derek Temple and Ian Callaghan before deciding on a narrower road to triumph. Alan Ball, essentially an auxiliary central midfielder, edged out to patrol the right for the latter stages of the 1966 World Cup, driving England on with his stamina, skill and heart but victory convinced the manager to stick to his system, using the full-backs for width with Peters augmenting the strikers from a nominal position on the left and Ball from the right. Wingers were out of vogue for most of decade after 1966 - Ian Storey Moore kept the flame flickering briefly and Revie tried with QPR’s Dave Thomas and Merlin himself. Gordon Hill, but it wasn’t until Ron Greenwood picked Manchester City’s Peter Barnes and United’s Steve Coppell together in 1977 that England took flight again. Coppell evolved into a solid right-sided player but at that point was an out and out winger who held the position for five years. Laurie Cunningham made three starts alongside him but by the start of the following decade Greenwood had cramped his own style. John Barnes at the Maracana Credit: David Cannon/Allsport The Eighties should have been the decade of Waddle and John Barnes and in popular memory it remains so but England started the decade with a tighter system, using Coppell and Graham Rix at the 1982 World Cup, and got to the quarter-finals of the 1986 tournament having ditched the wingers for Trevor Steven and Steve Hodge. Villa’s European Cup-winner Tony Morley briefly enraptured Bobby Robson and Mark Chamberlain preceded Waddle into the side by two years but it was largely a Barnes-Waddle duopoly from then on, though rarely in tandem and both, despite their brilliance and that goal at the Maracana, the first scapegoats. Lee Sharpe was the great left hope of the Nineties but faded away, Venables got the best out of Darren Anderton and Steve McManaman to provide hope of a more expansive future until David Beckham took freehold of the No7 shirt and front pages for eight years with a revolving cast of Nick Barmby, Paul Merson or a wing-back on the left. Eriksson blanked McManaman at the start of the 2000s and tried Trevor Sinclair, Scholes and Joe Cole out there to give some balance for Beckham. Stewart Downing became a mainstay of Steve McClaren’s squads while Aaron Lennon and David Bentley were tried out on the right. Ultimately he went back to Beckham. Capello got the best out of Theo Walcott for a few games, pulled Gerrard out to the left and employed James Milner as a Steady Eddie solution. Hodgson switched to 4-2-3-1 and used Raheem Sterling, Danny Welbeck, Wayne Rooney and Adam Lallana to provide width which is largely, with the exception of Rooney, where we remain apart from the saving grace of Rashford. Forwards To the summit … and, controversially, I am going to include some inside-forwards for the first three eras. So, for our post-war pioneers we will go with the aforementioned Mortensen, scorer of 23 goals in 25 games, Lawton, who scored 22 times in 23 starts, and Mannion, ‘the Mozart of football’ as Matthews put it. Len Shackleton and ‘Wor’ Jackie Milburn straddled the Forties and Fifties while Mortensen played on until 1953. The No9 shirt fell vacant in 1948 when Lawton told Walter Winterbottom that the coach didn’t know enough to be giving him advice, Milburn filled it for a spell before Nat Lofthouse won 33 caps and scored 30 goals, including the two at the Praterstadion that made him forever ‘The Lion of Vienna’. Tommy Taylor, one of the eight ‘Flowers of Manchester’ among the 23 victims of the Munich Air Crash, shot powerfully with both feet, had pace, guile and spatial awareness, and the fast-twitch reflexes of the thoroughbred goalscorer. He bagged 16 goals in 19 appearances as the other out-and-out England centre-forward of the decade. Lofty and Tommy were supported by Ivor Broadis and the finest, most astute passer in the team’s history, Johnny Haynes, who was only 27 in 1962 when he played his 56th and final game for England (his 22nd as captain) in the 1962 World Cup quarter-final. He was never as fluent again after a car crash on his return from Chile. Geoff Hurst’s hat-trick in the 1966 World Cup final overshadows anything any other England striker can match. Roger Hunt, the other Wembley immortal, was so crucial to Ramsey’s system because his tireless movement made space for Bobby Charlton to fill that it is forgotten that he scored 18 times in 34 appearances, and Jimmy Greaves, English football’s most cold-hearted and deadly finisher, gave the manager a richness of options. By the end of the Sixties Franny Lee had taken over from Hunt and Greaves as Hurst’s partner for Mexico Sniffer Clarke, the heir to Greaves, made his debut in 1970, Peter Osgood made only a couple of starts and Martin Chivers became Ramsey’s preferred No9 for two years, scoring 13 times in 24 appearances. Rodney Marsh exasperated his manager, Malcolm MacDonald thrashed five past Cyprus for Revie but made his distaste for the man who picked him well known, which meant the search for an ‘oppo’ for Kevin Keegan - the human dynamo, a rampaging forward who could leap, head, shoot and pass with distinction - lasted too long. Bob Latchford found favour for a while as did Stuart Pearson, Mick Channon moved over from the right, Paul Mariner began the international career that would yield 35 caps and 13 goals and Tricky Trevor Francis beguiled us all with his positioning and vision. Kevin Keegan scores against Scotland in 1979 Credit: Steve Powell/Allsport Cyrille Regis would have made more than two starts in the Eighties had he moved to Manchester United from West Brom instead of Coventry but he couldn’t displace the Keegan-Mariner-Woodcock-Francis usual suspects for the World Cup in Spain. Robson ushered Keegan into retirement but kept faith with the others until Gary Lineker, the quicksilver scavenger, gave him no excuse in 1984 and began the march to the Mexico Golden Boot, a World Cup quarter- and semi-final and 48 goals in 80 games. He was at his best with Peter Beardsley - who brought out the best in everyone - but also fed off Mark Hateley, Alan Smith,  and Steve Bull. The Nineties began with Lineker and Italia 90, Taylor then gave him the captaincy and slim pickings to work with up front and he left the scene in 1992 when shown the managerial big curly finger despite England desperately requiring a goal against Sweden. Taylor turned to Ian Wright who made a terrific return under Hoddle after being ignored by Venables and Les Ferdinand. Alan Shearer, impressive at Southampton, unstoppable except by injury at  Blackburn, won his first cap  in 1992 but had scored only five times in 23 appearances before the start of Euro 96 and hadn’t managed an international goal for 21 months. He hit five in the five games, was elevated to the captaincy for four years and ended still the talisman, though far less mobile, in 2000 with 30 goals. Teddy Sheringham played the Beardsley role for him perfectly and kept Andy Cole out of the squad and Robbie Fowler out of the side until Michael Owen came off the bench to score against Romania at France 98 and could not be left out again. Two games later he scored the wonder goal against Argentina that sounded the trumpets for his charge to the Ballon d’Or three years later. Michael Owen scores against Argentina at the 1998 World Cup Credit: Pawel Kopczynski REUTERS Owen was never really considered part of the Golden Generation because of a certain diffidence but he was its spearhead, when fit, and its yearned for king over the water when absent. He began the decade with Shearer, combined with club-mate Emile Heskey for the 1-5 in Munich and spent time up-front with Fowler and Darius Vassell before Eriksson promoted Wayne Rooney in 2003. Over 14 years Rooney would surpass Bobby Charlton’s England goalscoring record, beginning by playing off the cuff with boundless zip and chutzpah, maturing into that rarity, a workhorse with ebullient, irrepressible swagger and ending up a shadow of electrifying presence he once had been. During the decade Rooney played up top with Owen, Jermaine Defoe and Peter Crouch most frequently. Dean Ashton seemed to fit the part but it wasn’t to be. Rooney has been the key striker and player of this last decade, too and very much undroppable until Southgate took charge. Opportunities for Jay Rodriguez, Andy Carroll and Daniel Sturridge have been curtailed by long-term injuries, Hodgson thought it wise to take Rickie Lambert to the World Cup but in 2015 Harry Kane was given a chance and grabbed it. Jamie Vardy remains among the alternatives along with Sturridge and the second (third and fourth) coming of Defoe.   Conclusion How do you come up with a decision on the relative strengths and weaknesses over eight decades? Subjectively, obviously, but without prejudice:  Goalkeepers: Seventies - Banks, Shilton, Clemence. Full-backs: Sixties - Armfield, Cohen, Wilson, Cooper. Central defenders: Seventies - Moore, Labone, Todd, McFarland, Thompson. Central midfielders: Eighties - Robson, Wilkins, Gascoigne, Hoddle. Wide men: Fifties - Matthews, Finney, Charlton R.   Strikers: Nineties - Lineker, Shearer, Owen, Beardsley.  Please feel free to dispute this 23-man squad selection in the comments section. 

The England dream team by eras: which decade comes out on top?

Scroll to the bottom of the article for Rob Bagchi's all-time 23-man England squad August is traditionally silly season for journalism but on the football beat the two-week autumn and spring international breaks are the cue for extreme resourcefulness. Watching England toil through yet another developmental stage, the slimness of their options and assets in central midfield and the heart of defence as blatant as the consoling promise of Harry Kane and Marcus Rashford, made us wonder in which eras each part of the team have been at their strongest? Was English goalkeeping, say, at its apex in the 1970s or have the wide players of the Forties never been surpassed? For once a decision to truncate the period for analysis is not motivated by either sloth or rampant neophilia. England rejoined Fifa only in 1946 and their first international tournament was the 1950 World Cup, having spurned the first three.  Therefore it makes sense to start in the immediate post-war years and to help the process we will look at each phase for every sector - goalkeeper, full-backs, central defenders, midfielders, wide players and strikers - look at the players picked and the breadth of quality alternatives. Some will represent generations or decades, others distinct stages in the team’s evolution. We’ll begin in goal and chart the progression, chronological at least, from Frank Swift and his primrose polo neck sweater to Joe Hart and his binman chic high-vis short-sleeves, concluding with our stab at an answer. Goalkeepers If you’ve been paying attention to anything involving England without being so bored you’ve felt compelled to make a paper plane, our first contender will be obvious. Frank Swift, the wok-handed, spring-heeled Manchester City goalkeeper who pioneered the throw-out, was the first keeper to captain England and as the man in goal when England travelled to Turin to defeat the double world champions Italy (a pre Superga full-strength Azzurri side) 4-0, is our candidate from the Forties. He won 19 caps despite the war depriving him of his career from the age of 25 to 32, let in 18 goals and played in other memorable victories over France, Sweden, Scotland and Portugal. Other standouts from the truncated decade include Tottenham’s title-winning Ted Ditchburn, who won six caps, and the brave, acrobatic, sure-handed Bert Williams of Wolves who succeeded Swift after his international retirement and earned 24 caps over the next six years. Our Fifties options begin with Williams and Gil Merrick of Birmingham City who earned the most caps (23) of the decade and kept five clean sheets. It was Merrick’s misfortune to be in goal for the mortifying, 3-6 defeat by Hungary at Wembley in 1953 and the 7-1 thrashing in the Nepstadion a year later. Admittedly he appeared rattled on both occasions but only because the Magnificent Magyars and his shaky defence left him horribly exposed. The sight of him picking the ball out of the net 13 times have haunted English football ever since but he was not responsible. Those defeats should have marked a paradigm shift but the England system - once again propped up by a crop of excellent players - did not significantly change until much later.  Other notable stalwarts of the decade were Bolton’s 5ft 8in Eddie Hopkinson, the master of one-on-ones who won 13 caps, and Colin McDonald of Burnley who kept goal at the 1958 World Cup and was a dominant, cross-catching doyen of the old school. The Sixties begin with Sheffield Wednesday’s, quick, agile Ron Springett who played 33 times including all four at the 1962 World Cup where he repeatedly saved Walter Winterbottom's side from a proper drubbing in the 3-1 quarter-final defeat by Brazil, and end with Banks of England, Springett’s understudy in Chile, justly recognised as the greatest goalie in the world. It wasn’t just his majesty during England’s 1966 campaign, it was his general safehandedness - helped, trivia fans, in a pre-gloves age, with a generous rub of Beechnut chewing gum-laced saliva on the palms - his rare ability to save gymnastically equally well whether his goal was attacked high or low and his courage. He was so supreme that he restricted other fine goalkeepers such as Peter Bonetti, Gordon West, Alex Stepney and Springett to a handful of caps after Alf Ramsey made him first choice in 1964. Gordon Banks remained Ramsey’s default selection until he lost an eye in a car crash at the age of 34 in Oct 1972, taking in the save against Pele in 1970, the world’s greatest keeper defying the game’s best player by diving downwards, like an hour hand pointing to seven o’clock, and twisting his wrist to ensure he flicked it over the bar to prevent the great striker pouncing on the rebound. But Leicester City did not rate the marginal differentials between an established world-class player and an emerging one as highly as Ramsey and sold Banks to Stoke in 1967 to clear the way for 17-year-old Peter Shilton who owned the Eighties but duelled with the agile, commanding and astute Ray Clemence throughout the preceding decade to be England’s No1. Shilton was a brilliant shot-stopper and all the hours of dedicated, unrelenting practice gave him uncommon agility and aerial mastery. From about 1978 onwards, the error against Poland in 1973 long overcome, Shilton has the right to be considered Banks’ equal and probably superior. The reign of the duopoly left those other excellent keepers, Joe Corrigan, Phil Parkes and Stepney feeding off scraps. When it game to goalkeepers Ron Greenwood had a touch of the Jimmy Armfields at Leeds (“the manager’s indecision is final) but at the start of 1982 after rotating them for five years, he eventually plumped for Shilton who stayed undisputed first choice for the whole of the Eighties. Clemence carried on as the first reserve until 1983 and from 1985 Chris Woods began to make the No13 shirt his second skin during international weeks. Woods made 14 starts in the decade but was mostly stuck on the bench occasionally conceding opportunities for the stand-by role to Gary Bailey, Nigel Spink, Dave Beasant and David Seaman. Poor Martin Hodge, Tony Coton and John Lukic never even got a sniff. Peter Shilton at the start of his international career Credit: Malcolm Croft/PA Bobby Robson stood by Peter Shilton for Italia 90 and kept the 40-year-old keeper between the sticks for the semi-final shootout against West Germany despite having not used all his substitute options and Shilton’s poor record at saving spot-kicks (one from 15). The veteran retired from international football at the end of the tournament but carried on playing for a variety of clubs until 1997. Woods, who once went 1196 minutes without conceding a goal for Rangers in successive matches, became Graham Taylor’s No1 and played at Euro 92 backed up by David Seaman and England’s first million-pound goalie, Nigel Martyn. Seaman came into his own under Terry Venables and proved himself a wonderfully athletic goalkeeper with great agility, positional awareness, sound judgment and, above all, consistency at Euro 96. He saved penalties, too. Glenn Hoddle logically opted for continuity but awarded caps to Ian Walker, David James, Tim Flowers and Martyn when injury or the need to see how the others shaped up demanded.   Seaman continued through the proto-Golden Generation era until his mistakes were compounded by his age, particularly, like Shilton in 1990, a leaden-footedness in reverse. Paul Robinson was anointed for the 2006 World Cup when David Beckham metamorphosed into Sally Bowles in Baden-Baden but Sven Goran-Eriksson also tried out Martyn, James (the Euro 2004) starter and Rob Green. If we consider the McClaren era a coda to the Golden Generation, The Together Again tour after Dean Martin had bailed on Frank Sinatra and Sammy Davis to be replaced by Liza Minelli, small wonder that it was largely a Robinson hangover with supporting roles for Scott Carson, Chris Kirkland, James and Ben Foster. Fabio Capello took a look at James and Green, didn’t like what he saw, blooded Joe Hart then went back to swapping between the other two, £4m a year not being enough to deliver decisiveness. Jack Butland, John Ruddy, Fraser Forster and Tom Heaton have made appearances under Roy Hodgson and Gareth Southgate. Foster, too, has returned from temporary retirement but the seven years since the 4-1 defeat by Germany in Bloemfontein have been the Hart hegemony, under whose dominion we linger. Poor old Whitney Houston did not live long enough for an answer to her question - where do broken Harts go? It’s West Ham, pet. Full backs Now we have established the decades we are going to compare, let us breeze through the options rather than dwelling in such detail to outline the parameters. First choices for full-backs of the Forties are Laurie Scott of Arsenal on the right and captain in all 13 appearances, George Hardwick of Middlesbrough on the left. Depth is added by Derby’s Bert Mozley as a back-up down the right and Manchester United’s Johnny Aston at left-back with 17 caps. George Hardwick, right, greets the Sweden captain Erik Nilsson in  1947 Credit: Reg Birkett/Keystone/Getty Images In the Fifties the selection panel had Spurs’ Alf Ramsey at the beginning of the decade to play on the right and Blackburn’s Bill Eckersley on the left. Birmingham’s Jeff Hall and West Brom’s Don Howe made the right-back slot the preserve of the West Midlands for the rest of the decade while Manchester United’s majestic and adventurous Roger Byrne played 33 successive matches at left-back until his death at Munich during a period when the selection committee made consistency virtually unknown. Tommy Banks, Bolton’s tank, did his best to replace the irreplaceable at the 1958 World Cup and Sheffield United’s Graham Shaw filled in the following year. Take your pick from the Sixties beginning with the two 1966 imperishables George Cohen and Ray Wilson, Jimmy Armfield, a former captain who played on the right at the 1962 World Cup, Keith Newton, who succeeded Cohen and Terry Cooper who took over from his fellow Yorkshireman Wilson at left-back. Add on all those reduced to a handful of caps because of Ramsey’s loyalty - Bob McNab, Paul Reaney, Chris Lawler, Gerry Byrne, Tommy Wright and Cyril Knowles - and you have the kind of riches that would make Gareth Southgate turn green with envy beneath his beard.   George Cohen, left, and Ray Wilson, holding the Jules Rimet Trophy, celebrate victory in 1966 Credit: PA Photos England’s least successful decade in terms of qualification is also, paradoxically, one remembered with a fondness for the quality of English teams – the best of which were bolstered by Scotsmen, Welshmen and Irishmen. England’s full-backs in the Seventies numbered the Liverpool pair Phil Neal and Emlyn Hughes (not that Hughes played there for his club as frequently as he did for the national side). Their versatility was a virtue, as it was for Ipswich’s Mick Mills and Leeds’ Paul Madeley and Trevor Cherry. More orthodox full-backs were plentiful, too: the magnificent Viv Anderson on the right and Don Revie’s choices, Leicester’s Steve Whitworth and QPR’s Dave Clement. On the left Frank Lampard, Alec Lindsay, David Nish, Mike Pejic and Ian Gillard won caps, as did Kevin Beattie playing out of position but in masterly fashion, particularly in the 5-1 thrashing of Scotland in 1975. Kenny Sansom began the Eighties in possession of the No 3 shirt and held it for eight years, playing consistently and with real skill to hold off the challenge of West Brom’s Derek Statham, until the claims of Stuart Pearce in 1988 could be resisted no more. The right side was more problematic once Mills, Neal and Anderson entered their mid thirties. Mick Duxbury had a run there, Danny Thomas could have been the long-term solution save for that rotten injury inflicted by Kevin Maguire while Gary Stevens won 45 caps after his debut during Everton’s title-winning campaign in 1984-85 including Mexico ’86, Euro ’88 and the beginning of Italia 90. Kenny Sansom made the left-back position his own in the Eighties Credit:  Duncan Raban/Allsport/Getty Images Pearce was key at the start of the next decade, becoming captain under Graham Taylor, taking a position in a back three for Euro 96 when Steve McManaman and Darren Anderton played wide, and was recalled at the age of 37 for a couple of starts under Kevin Keegan. Terry Venables initially preferred the Blackburn Rovers left-back Graeme Le Saux and but for injury he would have started Euro 96. Glenn Hoddle restored him as first-choice after a cameo from Andy Hinchcliffe but by the end of the Nineties the left side, in defence and midfield, had become something of a national neurosis. Phil Neville filled in there, playing alongside his brother, Gary, the undisputed No2 when fit. For club and country he succeeded Paul Parker and the challenges of Gary Charles and Rob Jones for the spot were sadly snuffed out by personal problems and injury respectively. Sven Goran-Eriksson promoted Ashley Cole as the man to solve the malaise on the left and over the 12 years of his international career from 2001 onwards he won 107 caps and held Wayne Bridge at bay. Gary Neville missed the 2002 World Cup where Danny Mills stood in but was back straight afterwards and carried on until 2007. Luke Young and Micah Richards stated their claims to be paired with Cole but ultimately Glen Johnson won the contest under Fabio Capello. Johnson stayed in situ under Roy Hodgson until the 2014 World Cup and was even recalled to the squad last year but Kyle Walker, Nathaniel Clyne and Kieran Trippier are now the default options after experiments with Chris Smalling and Phil Jones out wide. Leighton Baines played so well from 2012-14 that he essentially forced Cole into international retirement before the more athletic claims of Danny Rose and Ryan Bertrand did for him. Central defenders   Here we face a problem with the first two post-war decades before the four-back system really took off. A bodged solution for the Forties and Fifties, rather than trying to corral in a wing-half, would be to list the options at centre-half even though normally only one was picked. We don’t even have to do that for the Forties because Billy Wright, the centre-half for much of the Fifties, captain for 11 years and England’s first 100-cap player, played at wing-half for his country at the beginning of his international career, alongside the exemplary Neil Franklin at No 5. Franklin abandoned Stoke in 1950 to move to Colombia and circumvent the maximum wage but his wife did not settle there and he faced the opprobrium of his club and the FA on return, not adding to the 27 caps he earned before he left. Breadth of talent for the decade would be provided by Blackpool’s Harry Johnston, Allenby Chilton of Manchester United and Liverpool’s Bill Jones. Wright made the position his own after the 1954 World Cup where Bill McGarry and Syd Owen had taken the role. Johnston, too, continued to make appearances at the start of the Fifties and Liverpool’s Laurie Hughes stood in for Franklin at the 1950 World Cup. Jim Taylor of Fulham, Burnley’s Mal Barrass and Charlton’s Derek Ufton were also tried but no one could dislodge the 5ft 8in Wright, captain of Wolves and England, golden-haired paragon of the post-war game. The finest partnership of the Sixties, Jackie Charlton and Bobby Moore, came together only a year before they won the World Cup and had it not been for the disgrace of Peter Swan - who won 19 caps as a cultured but powerful stopper between 1960-62 - Charlton may never have joined his brother as a cornerstone of 1966 and all that. Maurice Norman, the Spurs Double-winning centre-half, joined forces with Moore for the 1962 World Cup because Swan was confined to quarters with dysentery in Chile and Brian Labone both preceded Charlton and succeeded him as first choice towards the end of the decade. Norman Hunter served as Moore’s understudy but the consistency of the captain restricted ‘Bites Yer Legs’ to 28 caps over nine seasons. Moore at his peak Credit: AP Photo/files Moore made the last of his 108 appearances in 1973 and by that point there were plenty of contenders for his position, notably Derby County’s Colin Todd, Hunter and Emlyn Hughes. Roy McFarland earned 28 caps in the centre-half slot from 1971-76 before injuries ruined his career and gave Dave Watson a long run as first choice until 1981. Watson won the last of his 65 caps at the age of 35 in June 1982 but was omitted from the final squad for the Spain World Cup, the first for which he had qualified after failures to reach West Germany and Argentina. Phil Thompson of Liverpool and Manchester United’s Brian Greenhoff were given their debuts by Don Revie but only the former flourished after he left for Abu Dhabi. Watson’s role as the tall, raw-bone aerial colossus was filled by Terry Butcher throughout the Eighties though we forget how good his left foot was, his skill overwhelmed by the ‘up and  at ‘em’ patriotism of his persona. Thompson led Liverpool to the 1981 European Cup and partnered the Ipswich defender at the Spain World Cup but Bobby Robson struggled to find a regular foil for Butcher thereafter and worked his way through Alvin Martin, Graham Roberts, Mark Wright, Terry Fenwick, Gary Pallister and a callow Tony Adams before settling on Des Walker for Italia 90 and a return for Wright in a back three. At the start of the Nineties Graham Taylor used Walker, Adams and Pallister but it was his successors, Terry Venables and Glenn Hoddle, who got the best out of Adams. Venables managed it at Euro 96 when Adams was white-knuckling his sobriety for the duration of the tournament and Hoddle benefited from Adams stopping drinking and finding a new poise. Both also used Gareth Southgate in a back three while Sol Campbell, given his debut by Venables, became a regular when Hoddle took charge. Taylor and Hoddle used Martin Keown but Venables never picked him and though Steve Howey, Neil Ruddock, Steve Bould, John Scales, Colin Cooper and David Unsworth were tried, none established himself. The so-called Golden Generation had three stalwarts in Rio Ferdinand, John Terry and Campbell while injuries prevented Jonathan Woodgate and Ledley King from the long international careers their talent deserved. Jamie Carragher won 31 caps over 11 years, Matthew Upson became a favourite of Fabio Capello’s and Steve McClaren gave Joleon Lescott his debut in 2007. Rio Ferdinand and John Terry before the latter racially abused the former's brother Credit: Action Images / Tony O'Brien Ferdinand failed to re-establish himself after missing the 2010 World Cup through injury and ended his England career with 81 caps in 2011, Terry retired from the international game in 2012 after an FA Commission went ahead with charging him over racially abusing Ferdinand’s brother, Anton. Since then we’ve had shaky alliances involving Gary Cahill, Phil Jagielka and Lescott, Chris Smalling, Phil Jones, John Stones and Michael Keane. Central midfielders Again we need to make an adjustment here for the Forties and Fifties and will restrict it to wing-halfs, elevating most inside-forwards to forwards for the sake of this exercise. The immediate post-war era used Billy Wright most often as the right-half and Manchester United’s Henry Cockburn as the left pivot. Portsmouth’s hard-tackling tyro Jimmy Dickinson succeeded Cockburn and played 48 times from 1949-56 while Phil Taylor of Liverpool and Villa’s Eddie Lowe shared six caps on the right. Before the emergence of the Busby Babes - and we must include Eddie Colman here as well as Duncan Edwards because he would have been an international but for his death at Munich at the age of 21 - Wright and Dickinson formed the regular partnership. The claims of Edwards  - simply the most complete player England has ever produced, skilful, forceful, bursting with stamina and natural authority - could no longer be ignored in 1955 and he won 18 caps before he was killed, also at the age of 21. Ron Flowers, who won three titles with Wolves in the Fifties, played once in tandem with Edwards and took over after the 1958 World Cup with Blackburn’s efficient Ronnie Clayton his usual foil after Clayton had seen off Wolves’ Eddie Clamp. Nobby Stiles played at centre-back for Manchester United but was magnificent as Ramsey’s midfield destroyer in the 1966 side, providing the platform from which Bobby Charlton could glide through the gears, the ball under his immaculate control, and ping passes, whip in crosses or fire thunderous shots at goal. Before the two of them joined up, Flowers and Bobby Robson had been the main men with Charlton out on the left wing and after injuries and age diminished Stiles, Tottenham’s Alan Mullery was given the job. Colin Bell, Man City’s Nijinsky, was blooded in 1968 and proved irreplaceable when Martin Buchan effectively ended his career in 1975 after 48 caps. For the first part of the Seventies Martin Peters tucked in from the left and Bell played the dynamic right-half role, sadly without as much freedom as he had to pelt forward for City. Trevor Brooking made his first start in Ramsey’s last match and became the co-key player with Kevin Keegan under Greenwood with his clever passing and penetrative movement. He was so good that he kept the magnificent Glenn Hoddle on the peripheries following his debut in 1978. Hoddle, as brilliant a playmaker as he is rotten as a pundit, would have a system tailored to his strengths for England’s last three games at the 1986 World Cup when crisis forced Robson’s hand. Gerry Francis, Revie’s second captain, would have given both stiff competition had he stayed fit after his 12th cap. Tony Currie and Alan Hudson join the list of inexpertly harnessed talents while Terry McDermott, so intrepid for Liverpool, was denied a consistent run in the side by Ray Wilkins who ended the decade a dynamic box-to-box midfielder with the skill, control and vision that would later make him so comfortable as a ‘sitter’ in Serie A. The entire Eighties can be considered the Bryan Robson years. Bobby was besotted by him but for understandable reasons, as Alex Ferguson outlined: "He had good control, was a decisive tackler, passed the ball well and his combination of stamina and perceptive reading of movement enabled him to make sudden and deadly infiltrations from midfield into the opposition's box." His fitness became a national preoccupation and he lasted two games each of the 1986 and 1990 World Cups after driving England to qualification at both. We saw him at his very best only in 1982 and Euro 88 when he needed support that his team-mates could not provide. Wilkins was his regular partner, replaced by Hoddle for 1988 and Neil Webb thereafter until Paul Gascoigne finally charmed the sceptical Bobby Robson in 1990. Peter Reid, Everton’s tigerish beating heart, took centre stage in 1986 when Robson’s shoulder popped out again but the promise of his Goodison colleague Paul Bracewell was ravaged by  an ankle injury that took almost two years out of his career. England's all-action 'Captain Marvel' Credit: David Cannon/Getty Images Italia 90 began with Robson, Gascoigne and Chris Waddle in a midfield three and ended in unforgettable drama with David Platt in for the captain, having seen off Steve McMahon. Graham Taylor initially stuck with the Platt-Gascoigne axis for the victory over Poland but went with his Aston Villa pairing of Platt and Sid Cowans for the trip to Dublin. Gascoigne’s injuries and drinking alarmed Taylor who kept him around the squad when fit but his absences provoked some of the strangest selections in memory, noticeably Geoff Thomas, Andy Gray and Carlton Palmer. David Batty and Paul Ince injected some quality, the latter a mainstay for Venables and Hoddle - playing with Platt and Gascoigne at Euro 96, Paul Scholes at the 1998 World Cup. Jamie Redknapp was ill-served by injury, Nicky Butt ill-served by managers until Sven Goran-Eriksson’s hand was forced in 2002 by Steven Gerrard’s absence and Ray Parlour by the wrong-headed perception that he was well, in Lovejoy’s words, ‘only Ray Parlour’. Gascoigne lights up Wembley v Scotland at Euro 96 Credit: Stu Forster/Allsport Frank Lampard made his debut in 1999 but did not become a regular for four seasons when his class tempted Eriksson to fudge the biggest decision of his England career and stick Scholes on the left to start the ‘Lampard-Gerrard’ compatibility saga that was to run for the next 11 years. Once Scholes decided he’d had enough after Euro 2004 (ending a 29-game goal drought in his penultimate match), Gerrard and Lampard, Lampard and Gerrard held their positions until Steve McClaren recalled Gareth Barry, who impressed Capello so firmly that he put Gerrard on the left. The Golden Generation and its hangover phase featured cameos from Danny Murphy, Owen Hargreaves (though he normally played wide), Scott ‘Scottie’ Parker, Michael Carrick and Jermaine Jenas though none could either usurp Gerrard or Lampard or make the combination look convincing in tournament football.    Both were still in the squad at the 2014 World Cup though age had taken the shine off them. Lampard was reduced to the bench, Gerrard captained the side but his one-paced partnership with Jordan Henderson left a dodgy defence too exposed to cope with Italy and Uruguay. Capello gave Jack Wilshere his debut at the age of 18 yet seven years later we are still waiting for him, probably forlornly, to be blessed with the physical resilience to regain his verve. Eric Dier has been the default starter with Henderson for the past 18 months but Jake Livermore is currently back in the squad, Tom Cleverly has been and gone, Fabian Delph gets in whenever he manages a couple of games for Man City while James Ward-Prowse and Harry Winks put the twinkle in Gareth Southgate’s eye.   Wide men Should we just end this segment here? Stan Matthews and Tom Finney in the Forties and Fifties are the best pair of wingers England have ever had. In 1948 a forward line of Matthews, Stan Mortensen, Tommy Lawton, Wilf Mannion and Finney put on arguably England’s greatest performance in the 4-0 away victory over Italy but never played together again. Finney was an England regular for 12 years, playing on the right, left and through the middle until 1958 but Matthews, seven years Finney’s senior, was eased out only a year earlier at the age of 42 with 54 caps. He was not deemed as indispensable by myopic selectors who gave run-outs on the wings in his stead to Peter Harris, Les Medley, Billy Elliott and Johnny Berry. Blackburn’s Bryan Douglas took the No7 shirt 36 times and scored 11 goals from 1975-63 and Bobby Charlton won the majority of his caps until 1964 on the left flank, seeing out the decade in a Lancs touchline hegemony.   In the Sixties, after the end of the Douglas-Charlton years, Ramsey tried John Connelly, Terry Paine, Peter Thompson, Derek Temple and Ian Callaghan before deciding on a narrower road to triumph. Alan Ball, essentially an auxiliary central midfielder, edged out to patrol the right for the latter stages of the 1966 World Cup, driving England on with his stamina, skill and heart but victory convinced the manager to stick to his system, using the full-backs for width with Peters augmenting the strikers from a nominal position on the left and Ball from the right. Wingers were out of vogue for most of decade after 1966 - Ian Storey Moore kept the flame flickering briefly and Revie tried with QPR’s Dave Thomas and Merlin himself. Gordon Hill, but it wasn’t until Ron Greenwood picked Manchester City’s Peter Barnes and United’s Steve Coppell together in 1977 that England took flight again. Coppell evolved into a solid right-sided player but at that point was an out and out winger who held the position for five years. Laurie Cunningham made three starts alongside him but by the start of the following decade Greenwood had cramped his own style. John Barnes at the Maracana Credit: David Cannon/Allsport The Eighties should have been the decade of Waddle and John Barnes and in popular memory it remains so but England started the decade with a tighter system, using Coppell and Graham Rix at the 1982 World Cup, and got to the quarter-finals of the 1986 tournament having ditched the wingers for Trevor Steven and Steve Hodge. Villa’s European Cup-winner Tony Morley briefly enraptured Bobby Robson and Mark Chamberlain preceded Waddle into the side by two years but it was largely a Barnes-Waddle duopoly from then on, though rarely in tandem and both, despite their brilliance and that goal at the Maracana, the first scapegoats. Lee Sharpe was the great left hope of the Nineties but faded away, Venables got the best out of Darren Anderton and Steve McManaman to provide hope of a more expansive future until David Beckham took freehold of the No7 shirt and front pages for eight years with a revolving cast of Nick Barmby, Paul Merson or a wing-back on the left. Eriksson blanked McManaman at the start of the 2000s and tried Trevor Sinclair, Scholes and Joe Cole out there to give some balance for Beckham. Stewart Downing became a mainstay of Steve McClaren’s squads while Aaron Lennon and David Bentley were tried out on the right. Ultimately he went back to Beckham. Capello got the best out of Theo Walcott for a few games, pulled Gerrard out to the left and employed James Milner as a Steady Eddie solution. Hodgson switched to 4-2-3-1 and used Raheem Sterling, Danny Welbeck, Wayne Rooney and Adam Lallana to provide width which is largely, with the exception of Rooney, where we remain apart from the saving grace of Rashford. Forwards To the summit … and, controversially, I am going to include some inside-forwards for the first three eras. So, for our post-war pioneers we will go with the aforementioned Mortensen, scorer of 23 goals in 25 games, Lawton, who scored 22 times in 23 starts, and Mannion, ‘the Mozart of football’ as Matthews put it. Len Shackleton and ‘Wor’ Jackie Milburn straddled the Forties and Fifties while Mortensen played on until 1953. The No9 shirt fell vacant in 1948 when Lawton told Walter Winterbottom that the coach didn’t know enough to be giving him advice, Milburn filled it for a spell before Nat Lofthouse won 33 caps and scored 30 goals, including the two at the Praterstadion that made him forever ‘The Lion of Vienna’. Tommy Taylor, one of the eight ‘Flowers of Manchester’ among the 23 victims of the Munich Air Crash, shot powerfully with both feet, had pace, guile and spatial awareness, and the fast-twitch reflexes of the thoroughbred goalscorer. He bagged 16 goals in 19 appearances as the other out-and-out England centre-forward of the decade. Lofty and Tommy were supported by Ivor Broadis and the finest, most astute passer in the team’s history, Johnny Haynes, who was only 27 in 1962 when he played his 56th and final game for England (his 22nd as captain) in the 1962 World Cup quarter-final. He was never as fluent again after a car crash on his return from Chile. Geoff Hurst’s hat-trick in the 1966 World Cup final overshadows anything any other England striker can match. Roger Hunt, the other Wembley immortal, was so crucial to Ramsey’s system because his tireless movement made space for Bobby Charlton to fill that it is forgotten that he scored 18 times in 34 appearances, and Jimmy Greaves, English football’s most cold-hearted and deadly finisher, gave the manager a richness of options. By the end of the Sixties Franny Lee had taken over from Hunt and Greaves as Hurst’s partner for Mexico Sniffer Clarke, the heir to Greaves, made his debut in 1970, Peter Osgood made only a couple of starts and Martin Chivers became Ramsey’s preferred No9 for two years, scoring 13 times in 24 appearances. Rodney Marsh exasperated his manager, Malcolm MacDonald thrashed five past Cyprus for Revie but made his distaste for the man who picked him well known, which meant the search for an ‘oppo’ for Kevin Keegan - the human dynamo, a rampaging forward who could leap, head, shoot and pass with distinction - lasted too long. Bob Latchford found favour for a while as did Stuart Pearson, Mick Channon moved over from the right, Paul Mariner began the international career that would yield 35 caps and 13 goals and Tricky Trevor Francis beguiled us all with his positioning and vision. Kevin Keegan scores against Scotland in 1979 Credit: Steve Powell/Allsport Cyrille Regis would have made more than two starts in the Eighties had he moved to Manchester United from West Brom instead of Coventry but he couldn’t displace the Keegan-Mariner-Woodcock-Francis usual suspects for the World Cup in Spain. Robson ushered Keegan into retirement but kept faith with the others until Gary Lineker, the quicksilver scavenger, gave him no excuse in 1984 and began the march to the Mexico Golden Boot, a World Cup quarter- and semi-final and 48 goals in 80 games. He was at his best with Peter Beardsley - who brought out the best in everyone - but also fed off Mark Hateley, Alan Smith,  and Steve Bull. The Nineties began with Lineker and Italia 90, Taylor then gave him the captaincy and slim pickings to work with up front and he left the scene in 1992 when shown the managerial big curly finger despite England desperately requiring a goal against Sweden. Taylor turned to Ian Wright who made a terrific return under Hoddle after being ignored by Venables and Les Ferdinand. Alan Shearer, impressive at Southampton, unstoppable except by injury at  Blackburn, won his first cap  in 1992 but had scored only five times in 23 appearances before the start of Euro 96 and hadn’t managed an international goal for 21 months. He hit five in the five games, was elevated to the captaincy for four years and ended still the talisman, though far less mobile, in 2000 with 30 goals. Teddy Sheringham played the Beardsley role for him perfectly and kept Andy Cole out of the squad and Robbie Fowler out of the side until Michael Owen came off the bench to score against Romania at France 98 and could not be left out again. Two games later he scored the wonder goal against Argentina that sounded the trumpets for his charge to the Ballon d’Or three years later. Michael Owen scores against Argentina at the 1998 World Cup Credit: Pawel Kopczynski REUTERS Owen was never really considered part of the Golden Generation because of a certain diffidence but he was its spearhead, when fit, and its yearned for king over the water when absent. He began the decade with Shearer, combined with club-mate Emile Heskey for the 1-5 in Munich and spent time up-front with Fowler and Darius Vassell before Eriksson promoted Wayne Rooney in 2003. Over 14 years Rooney would surpass Bobby Charlton’s England goalscoring record, beginning by playing off the cuff with boundless zip and chutzpah, maturing into that rarity, a workhorse with ebullient, irrepressible swagger and ending up a shadow of electrifying presence he once had been. During the decade Rooney played up top with Owen, Jermaine Defoe and Peter Crouch most frequently. Dean Ashton seemed to fit the part but it wasn’t to be. Rooney has been the key striker and player of this last decade, too and very much undroppable until Southgate took charge. Opportunities for Jay Rodriguez, Andy Carroll and Daniel Sturridge have been curtailed by long-term injuries, Hodgson thought it wise to take Rickie Lambert to the World Cup but in 2015 Harry Kane was given a chance and grabbed it. Jamie Vardy remains among the alternatives along with Sturridge and the second (third and fourth) coming of Defoe.   Conclusion How do you come up with a decision on the relative strengths and weaknesses over eight decades? Subjectively, obviously, but without prejudice:  Goalkeepers: Seventies - Banks, Shilton, Clemence. Full-backs: Sixties - Armfield, Cohen, Wilson, Cooper. Central defenders: Seventies - Moore, Labone, Todd, McFarland, Thompson. Central midfielders: Eighties - Robson, Wilkins, Gascoigne, Hoddle. Wide men: Fifties - Matthews, Finney, Charlton R.   Strikers: Nineties - Lineker, Shearer, Owen, Beardsley.  Please feel free to dispute this 23-man squad selection in the comments section. 

GOP Rep. Marsha Blackburn is running to replace Sen. Bob Corker next year

Rep. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., is running for Senate in Tennessee next year to succeed Sen. Bob Corker.

Brendan Rodgers leads continued Northern Irish dominance in Scotland

Scottish football made history on Saturday, although not of a sort that reflects well on native talent. For the first time, only one of the top six clubs in the table is managed by a Scot – Derek McInnes, of Aberdeen. Rangers’ Pedro Caixinha is Portuguese, while the other four – Brendan Rodgers (Celtic), Tommy Wright (St Johnstone), Stephen Robinson (Motherwell) and Neil Lennon (Hibernian) are Northern Irish. The situation is in stark contrast to the annus mirabilis of 2011 when, aside from the native complement at home, no fewer than seven Scots were in charge of Premier League clubs in England. They were Sir Alex Ferguson (Manchester United), Paul Lambert (Norwich City), Alex McLeish (Aston Villa), David Moyes (Everton), Kenny Dalglish (Liverpool), Steve Kean (Blackburn Rovers) and Owen Coyle (Bolton Wanderers) - Scottish born, of Irish parents. Since then, Northern Irish football has flourished at international level under Michael O’Neill, who lives in Edinburgh. “Michael’s done an incredible job with the international team,” Rodgers said. "Stevie Robinson’s starting out and Hibs look very much improved with Neil at the helm. I see a hunger and a desire and a shape to how they’re playing. Tommy Wright is another experienced coach and good manager. “In all of those guys, there’s real love and passion for football and, when you have that, you have a willingness to learn and improve and not just settle on what you’ve achieved.” Derek McInnes is the only Scot in the top six Credit: Getty images Lennon recently remarked on the phenomenon when he said: “The Scottish clubs have picked good managers. Brendan has been a revelation, so has Tommy, I have had my bit and now Stephen is cutting his teeth at Motherwell. I think there will be a few more coming through as well. “The Northern Ireland boys are a little bit of a throwback to the way the Scottish boys have been over the last 20 or 30 years. There is that real work ethic about us.” Rodgers’ Celtic are, of course, the exemplars of that doctrine, the evidence of which is their run of 58 successive domestic games unbeaten, but at one stage at Parkhead on Saturday it seemed that the extraordinary sequence would be ended by Lennon’s Hibs, who fell behind to a neatly worked goal by Callum McGregor after 15 minutes, but who recovered to take the lead with second half strikes from John McGinn. At that stage, many among the home support had recognised the irony that their team’s record was threatened by goals scored by the grandson of a former Celtic chairman, for a side under the guidance of a former Celtic manager. The scenario might have been fulfilled but for a supernatural save by Craig Gordon. Anthony Stokes – a former Celtic striker, of course – had flicked a header towards the back post, where it was met a yard or so from goal by Steven Whittaker with a shot that seemed certain to find the net. Gordon, though, somehow got a glove to the ball and diverted it for a corner to gasps and exclamations from both supports. Anthony Stokes described one of Craig Gordon's saves as 'a worldie' Credit: Getty images “As a striker, you hit shots and you think, ‘Goal – 100%!’ but he pulled off a worldie,” said Stokes of Gordon’s intervention. “That was him again - one of those you just think he’s never going to get. “It was flicked on and I’m just waiting on Whitts to turn it in, but Craig’s on it and it was an unbelievable save. Top, top class goalkeeper.” Asked if the block had been on a par with Gordon’s fabled stop from Zat Knight of Bolton Wanderers in 2010 - which was voted that season’s best save in the Premier League – Stokes said: “I’d have to see it again. “I thought it was a 100% goal but he ends up getting some hand on it. Keepers go through bad spells, like strikers when you’re not scoring, but that’s the standard he’s set throughout his career.” Gordon, meanwhile, confessed that he had not even realised Whittaker had been the thwarted opponent. “I didn’t know until after the game who had hit the shot,” he said. “I threw myself across it and made myself as big as possible and got a strong enough contact on it to put it round the post. “It was a certain goal from that distance and I managed to prevent it, so it’s probably the same feeling as a striker gets when he scores a goal.” There was, though, another goal in the contest, a second from McGregor which settled the outcome at 2-2. The midfielder has now been called to replace his injured club captain, Scott Brown, for Scotland’s World Cup qualifiers against Slovakia and Slovenia. The Scots must win both to reach the playoffs, unlike O’Neill’s Northern Ireland, who have almost guaranteed that status despite their marginal resources.

Brendan Rodgers leads continued Northern Irish dominance in Scotland

Scottish football made history on Saturday, although not of a sort that reflects well on native talent. For the first time, only one of the top six clubs in the table is managed by a Scot – Derek McInnes, of Aberdeen. Rangers’ Pedro Caixinha is Portuguese, while the other four – Brendan Rodgers (Celtic), Tommy Wright (St Johnstone), Stephen Robinson (Motherwell) and Neil Lennon (Hibernian) are Northern Irish. The situation is in stark contrast to the annus mirabilis of 2011 when, aside from the native complement at home, no fewer than seven Scots were in charge of Premier League clubs in England. They were Sir Alex Ferguson (Manchester United), Paul Lambert (Norwich City), Alex McLeish (Aston Villa), David Moyes (Everton), Kenny Dalglish (Liverpool), Steve Kean (Blackburn Rovers) and Owen Coyle (Bolton Wanderers) - Scottish born, of Irish parents. Since then, Northern Irish football has flourished at international level under Michael O’Neill, who lives in Edinburgh. “Michael’s done an incredible job with the international team,” Rodgers said. "Stevie Robinson’s starting out and Hibs look very much improved with Neil at the helm. I see a hunger and a desire and a shape to how they’re playing. Tommy Wright is another experienced coach and good manager. “In all of those guys, there’s real love and passion for football and, when you have that, you have a willingness to learn and improve and not just settle on what you’ve achieved.” Derek McInnes is the only Scot in the top six Credit: Getty images Lennon recently remarked on the phenomenon when he said: “The Scottish clubs have picked good managers. Brendan has been a revelation, so has Tommy, I have had my bit and now Stephen is cutting his teeth at Motherwell. I think there will be a few more coming through as well. “The Northern Ireland boys are a little bit of a throwback to the way the Scottish boys have been over the last 20 or 30 years. There is that real work ethic about us.” Rodgers’ Celtic are, of course, the exemplars of that doctrine, the evidence of which is their run of 58 successive domestic games unbeaten, but at one stage at Parkhead on Saturday it seemed that the extraordinary sequence would be ended by Lennon’s Hibs, who fell behind to a neatly worked goal by Callum McGregor after 15 minutes, but who recovered to take the lead with second half strikes from John McGinn. At that stage, many among the home support had recognised the irony that their team’s record was threatened by goals scored by the grandson of a former Celtic chairman, for a side under the guidance of a former Celtic manager. The scenario might have been fulfilled but for a supernatural save by Craig Gordon. Anthony Stokes – a former Celtic striker, of course – had flicked a header towards the back post, where it was met a yard or so from goal by Steven Whittaker with a shot that seemed certain to find the net. Gordon, though, somehow got a glove to the ball and diverted it for a corner to gasps and exclamations from both supports. Anthony Stokes described one of Craig Gordon's saves as 'a worldie' Credit: Getty images “As a striker, you hit shots and you think, ‘Goal – 100%!’ but he pulled off a worldie,” said Stokes of Gordon’s intervention. “That was him again - one of those you just think he’s never going to get. “It was flicked on and I’m just waiting on Whitts to turn it in, but Craig’s on it and it was an unbelievable save. Top, top class goalkeeper.” Asked if the block had been on a par with Gordon’s fabled stop from Zat Knight of Bolton Wanderers in 2010 - which was voted that season’s best save in the Premier League – Stokes said: “I’d have to see it again. “I thought it was a 100% goal but he ends up getting some hand on it. Keepers go through bad spells, like strikers when you’re not scoring, but that’s the standard he’s set throughout his career.” Gordon, meanwhile, confessed that he had not even realised Whittaker had been the thwarted opponent. “I didn’t know until after the game who had hit the shot,” he said. “I threw myself across it and made myself as big as possible and got a strong enough contact on it to put it round the post. “It was a certain goal from that distance and I managed to prevent it, so it’s probably the same feeling as a striker gets when he scores a goal.” There was, though, another goal in the contest, a second from McGregor which settled the outcome at 2-2. The midfielder has now been called to replace his injured club captain, Scott Brown, for Scotland’s World Cup qualifiers against Slovakia and Slovenia. The Scots must win both to reach the playoffs, unlike O’Neill’s Northern Ireland, who have almost guaranteed that status despite their marginal resources.

Brendan Rodgers leads continued Northern Irish dominance in Scotland

Scottish football made history on Saturday, although not of a sort that reflects well on native talent. For the first time, only one of the top six clubs in the table is managed by a Scot – Derek McInnes, of Aberdeen. Rangers’ Pedro Caixinha is Portuguese, while the other four – Brendan Rodgers (Celtic), Tommy Wright (St Johnstone), Stephen Robinson (Motherwell) and Neil Lennon (Hibernian) are Northern Irish. The situation is in stark contrast to the annus mirabilis of 2011 when, aside from the native complement at home, no fewer than seven Scots were in charge of Premier League clubs in England. They were Sir Alex Ferguson (Manchester United), Paul Lambert (Norwich City), Alex McLeish (Aston Villa), David Moyes (Everton), Kenny Dalglish (Liverpool), Steve Kean (Blackburn Rovers) and Owen Coyle (Bolton Wanderers) - Scottish born, of Irish parents. Since then, Northern Irish football has flourished at international level under Michael O’Neill, who lives in Edinburgh. “Michael’s done an incredible job with the international team,” Rodgers said. "Stevie Robinson’s starting out and Hibs look very much improved with Neil at the helm. I see a hunger and a desire and a shape to how they’re playing. Tommy Wright is another experienced coach and good manager. “In all of those guys, there’s real love and passion for football and, when you have that, you have a willingness to learn and improve and not just settle on what you’ve achieved.” Derek McInnes is the only Scot in the top six Credit: Getty images Lennon recently remarked on the phenomenon when he said: “The Scottish clubs have picked good managers. Brendan has been a revelation, so has Tommy, I have had my bit and now Stephen is cutting his teeth at Motherwell. I think there will be a few more coming through as well. “The Northern Ireland boys are a little bit of a throwback to the way the Scottish boys have been over the last 20 or 30 years. There is that real work ethic about us.” Rodgers’ Celtic are, of course, the exemplars of that doctrine, the evidence of which is their run of 58 successive domestic games unbeaten, but at one stage at Parkhead on Saturday it seemed that the extraordinary sequence would be ended by Lennon’s Hibs, who fell behind to a neatly worked goal by Callum McGregor after 15 minutes, but who recovered to take the lead with second half strikes from John McGinn. At that stage, many among the home support had recognised the irony that their team’s record was threatened by goals scored by the grandson of a former Celtic chairman, for a side under the guidance of a former Celtic manager. The scenario might have been fulfilled but for a supernatural save by Craig Gordon. Anthony Stokes – a former Celtic striker, of course – had flicked a header towards the back post, where it was met a yard or so from goal by Steven Whittaker with a shot that seemed certain to find the net. Gordon, though, somehow got a glove to the ball and diverted it for a corner to gasps and exclamations from both supports. Anthony Stokes described one of Craig Gordon's saves as 'a worldie' Credit: Getty images “As a striker, you hit shots and you think, ‘Goal – 100%!’ but he pulled off a worldie,” said Stokes of Gordon’s intervention. “That was him again - one of those you just think he’s never going to get. “It was flicked on and I’m just waiting on Whitts to turn it in, but Craig’s on it and it was an unbelievable save. Top, top class goalkeeper.” Asked if the block had been on a par with Gordon’s fabled stop from Zat Knight of Bolton Wanderers in 2010 - which was voted that season’s best save in the Premier League – Stokes said: “I’d have to see it again. “I thought it was a 100% goal but he ends up getting some hand on it. Keepers go through bad spells, like strikers when you’re not scoring, but that’s the standard he’s set throughout his career.” Gordon, meanwhile, confessed that he had not even realised Whittaker had been the thwarted opponent. “I didn’t know until after the game who had hit the shot,” he said. “I threw myself across it and made myself as big as possible and got a strong enough contact on it to put it round the post. “It was a certain goal from that distance and I managed to prevent it, so it’s probably the same feeling as a striker gets when he scores a goal.” There was, though, another goal in the contest, a second from McGregor which settled the outcome at 2-2. The midfielder has now been called to replace his injured club captain, Scott Brown, for Scotland’s World Cup qualifiers against Slovakia and Slovenia. The Scots must win both to reach the playoffs, unlike O’Neill’s Northern Ireland, who have almost guaranteed that status despite their marginal resources.

Tony Blackburn joins Grimmy to celebrate Radio 1’s 50th birthday

The inaugural host of the breakfast show in 1967 returned to the station.

Tony Blackburn joins Grimmy to celebrate Radio 1’s 50th birthday

The inaugural host of the breakfast show in 1967 returned to the station.

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