Bristol City

Bristol City slideshow

Kasey Palmer’s part in helping Huddersfield win promotion to the Premier League may explain why Chelsea’s decision to send him out for another spell on loan during the January transfer window had a number of Championship clubs jostling to add him to their squad. On Wednesday evening, the 21-year-old underlined his potential by coming up with a stoppage-time goal to salvage a point for Derby, although it was a slightly bitter-sweet moment for the attacking midfielder after Leeds had threatened to steal a smash-and-grab first win for new head coach Paul Heckingbottom. The second Leeds goal with 11 minutes that looked to have made it a sour night for Gary Rowett’s team came on a breakaway following a poorly executed free kick by the youngster with Derby players loading the opposition penalty area. It led to Leeds substitutes Samuel Saiz and Ezgjan Alioski combining to punish the home side, Saiz supplying the pass as Alioski ran into unguarded space. Scott Carson narrowed the angle to block as the Macedonian shot for goal only to beaten as Alioski headed home the rebound. Although they have suffered only one defeat in 14 matches in the Championship, Derby’s last six matches have produced only one win and Rowett admitted to feeling frustrated. Pierre-Michel Lasogga puts Leeds ahead for the first time Credit: Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images “We played as well in the first half as we have at home for a long time and earlier in the season we would have taken our chances and won the game,” he said. “But we are just lacking a bit of composure at the moment and the way we conceded the goals was disappointing. At this stage of the season a draw feels like a defeat.” Leeds rode their luck at times, but having fought back from 2-0 down to salvage a point against Bristol City last Saturday they had enough self-belief to disregard the moments they might have been punished. Derby went behind after 34 minutes when Pierre-Michel Lasogga punished them for switching off at the back, the striker running into a gaping hole in the home side’s back four to nod home a Stuart Dallas cross. They warranted the equaliser they grabbed just before half-time, when Andreas Weimann took advantage of a poor header by Liam Cooper, but it was the only opportunity they made to count among a host of chances until Palmer’s rescue act. “We made it hard for ourselves in the first half but I felt we grew into the game and after the second goal I couldn’t see Derby scoring,” Leeds boss Heckingbottom said. “But we didn’t deal with a ball into the box at the end and those are the kind of things we need to iron out.”
Derby County 2 Leeds United 2: Kasey Palmer strikes at the death to deny Paul Heckingbottom a first win
Kasey Palmer’s part in helping Huddersfield win promotion to the Premier League may explain why Chelsea’s decision to send him out for another spell on loan during the January transfer window had a number of Championship clubs jostling to add him to their squad. On Wednesday evening, the 21-year-old underlined his potential by coming up with a stoppage-time goal to salvage a point for Derby, although it was a slightly bitter-sweet moment for the attacking midfielder after Leeds had threatened to steal a smash-and-grab first win for new head coach Paul Heckingbottom. The second Leeds goal with 11 minutes that looked to have made it a sour night for Gary Rowett’s team came on a breakaway following a poorly executed free kick by the youngster with Derby players loading the opposition penalty area. It led to Leeds substitutes Samuel Saiz and Ezgjan Alioski combining to punish the home side, Saiz supplying the pass as Alioski ran into unguarded space. Scott Carson narrowed the angle to block as the Macedonian shot for goal only to beaten as Alioski headed home the rebound. Although they have suffered only one defeat in 14 matches in the Championship, Derby’s last six matches have produced only one win and Rowett admitted to feeling frustrated. Pierre-Michel Lasogga puts Leeds ahead for the first time Credit: Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images “We played as well in the first half as we have at home for a long time and earlier in the season we would have taken our chances and won the game,” he said. “But we are just lacking a bit of composure at the moment and the way we conceded the goals was disappointing. At this stage of the season a draw feels like a defeat.” Leeds rode their luck at times, but having fought back from 2-0 down to salvage a point against Bristol City last Saturday they had enough self-belief to disregard the moments they might have been punished. Derby went behind after 34 minutes when Pierre-Michel Lasogga punished them for switching off at the back, the striker running into a gaping hole in the home side’s back four to nod home a Stuart Dallas cross. They warranted the equaliser they grabbed just before half-time, when Andreas Weimann took advantage of a poor header by Liam Cooper, but it was the only opportunity they made to count among a host of chances until Palmer’s rescue act. “We made it hard for ourselves in the first half but I felt we grew into the game and after the second goal I couldn’t see Derby scoring,” Leeds boss Heckingbottom said. “But we didn’t deal with a ball into the box at the end and those are the kind of things we need to iron out.”
Kasey Palmer’s part in helping Huddersfield win promotion to the Premier League may explain why Chelsea’s decision to send him out for another spell on loan during the January transfer window had a number of Championship clubs jostling to add him to their squad. On Wednesday evening, the 21-year-old underlined his potential by coming up with a stoppage-time goal to salvage a point for Derby, although it was a slightly bitter-sweet moment for the attacking midfielder after Leeds had threatened to steal a smash-and-grab first win for new head coach Paul Heckingbottom. The second Leeds goal with 11 minutes that looked to have made it a sour night for Gary Rowett’s team came on a breakaway following a poorly executed free kick by the youngster with Derby players loading the opposition penalty area. It led to Leeds substitutes Samuel Saiz and Ezgjan Alioski combining to punish the home side, Saiz supplying the pass as Alioski ran into unguarded space. Scott Carson narrowed the angle to block as the Macedonian shot for goal only to beaten as Alioski headed home the rebound. Although they have suffered only one defeat in 14 matches in the Championship, Derby’s last six matches have produced only one win and Rowett admitted to feeling frustrated. Pierre-Michel Lasogga puts Leeds ahead for the first time Credit: Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images “We played as well in the first half as we have at home for a long time and earlier in the season we would have taken our chances and won the game,” he said. “But we are just lacking a bit of composure at the moment and the way we conceded the goals was disappointing. At this stage of the season a draw feels like a defeat.” Leeds rode their luck at times, but having fought back from 2-0 down to salvage a point against Bristol City last Saturday they had enough self-belief to disregard the moments they might have been punished. Derby went behind after 34 minutes when Pierre-Michel Lasogga punished them for switching off at the back, the striker running into a gaping hole in the home side’s back four to nod home a Stuart Dallas cross. They warranted the equaliser they grabbed just before half-time, when Andreas Weimann took advantage of a poor header by Liam Cooper, but it was the only opportunity they made to count among a host of chances until Palmer’s rescue act. “We made it hard for ourselves in the first half but I felt we grew into the game and after the second goal I couldn’t see Derby scoring,” Leeds boss Heckingbottom said. “But we didn’t deal with a ball into the box at the end and those are the kind of things we need to iron out.”
Derby County 2 Leeds United 2: Kasey Palmer strikes at the death to deny Paul Heckingbottom a first win
Kasey Palmer’s part in helping Huddersfield win promotion to the Premier League may explain why Chelsea’s decision to send him out for another spell on loan during the January transfer window had a number of Championship clubs jostling to add him to their squad. On Wednesday evening, the 21-year-old underlined his potential by coming up with a stoppage-time goal to salvage a point for Derby, although it was a slightly bitter-sweet moment for the attacking midfielder after Leeds had threatened to steal a smash-and-grab first win for new head coach Paul Heckingbottom. The second Leeds goal with 11 minutes that looked to have made it a sour night for Gary Rowett’s team came on a breakaway following a poorly executed free kick by the youngster with Derby players loading the opposition penalty area. It led to Leeds substitutes Samuel Saiz and Ezgjan Alioski combining to punish the home side, Saiz supplying the pass as Alioski ran into unguarded space. Scott Carson narrowed the angle to block as the Macedonian shot for goal only to beaten as Alioski headed home the rebound. Although they have suffered only one defeat in 14 matches in the Championship, Derby’s last six matches have produced only one win and Rowett admitted to feeling frustrated. Pierre-Michel Lasogga puts Leeds ahead for the first time Credit: Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images “We played as well in the first half as we have at home for a long time and earlier in the season we would have taken our chances and won the game,” he said. “But we are just lacking a bit of composure at the moment and the way we conceded the goals was disappointing. At this stage of the season a draw feels like a defeat.” Leeds rode their luck at times, but having fought back from 2-0 down to salvage a point against Bristol City last Saturday they had enough self-belief to disregard the moments they might have been punished. Derby went behind after 34 minutes when Pierre-Michel Lasogga punished them for switching off at the back, the striker running into a gaping hole in the home side’s back four to nod home a Stuart Dallas cross. They warranted the equaliser they grabbed just before half-time, when Andreas Weimann took advantage of a poor header by Liam Cooper, but it was the only opportunity they made to count among a host of chances until Palmer’s rescue act. “We made it hard for ourselves in the first half but I felt we grew into the game and after the second goal I couldn’t see Derby scoring,” Leeds boss Heckingbottom said. “But we didn’t deal with a ball into the box at the end and those are the kind of things we need to iron out.”
What is it? It is the first major final of the English season as Manchester City face Arsenal in the Carabao Cup final. When is it? The final is at Wembley on Sunday afternoon. What time is kick-off? The match will get under way at 4.30pm, with a possibility of extra time and penalties. What TV channel is it on? The Carabao Cup final is part of a triple-header Super Sunday on Sky Sports Premier League and Sky Sports Main Event. Coverage begins at 11am, with Crystal Palace vs Tottenham Hotspur first up before Man Utd vs Chelsea at 2.05pm and then the big final. Sit back and enjoy, or bookmark this page and return on matchday to follow every kick at Wembley with our live blog. Get a NOW TV Sky Sports Day Pass for just £7.99 and stream Arsenal vs Man City live from 4.30pm on Sunday What is the team news? The fitness of Aaron Ramsey is Arsenal's principal injury concern as they head to Wembley. The central midfielder missed their 1-0 defeat to Spurs with a 'minor' groin injury but Arsene Wenger revealed last week he had not progressed as quickly as anticipated. The Arsenal manager is expected to respect his policy of starting second-choice goalkeeper David Ospina in cup competitions, while Henrikh Mkhitaryan is cup-tied. Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang is available again after sitting out Arsenal's back-to-back Europa League games. Pick your Arsenal XI to start against Man City Pep Guardiola will have to pick his Wembley left-back with Fabian Delph suspended following his straight red card in the FA Cup upset at Wigan. Leroy Sane has returned from injury, while Kevin De Bruyne will be restored to the starting XI after his rest at the DW Stadium. Claudio Bravo has been City's goalkeeper throughout the competition, but Guardiola could recall first-choice goalkeeper Ederson. Playmaker David Silva has missed games for family reasons but is back in the fold, while Raheem Sterling and Nicolas Otamendi are available. Gabriel Jesus remains sidelined. Pick your Man City XI to face Arsenal How have they made it to Wembley? Arsenal Third round: Arsenal 1 Doncaster Rovers 0 Fourth round: Arsenal 2 Norwich City 1 Quarter-final: Arsenal 1 West Ham 0 Semi-final: Arsenal 2 Chelsea 1 (aggregate) Man City Third round: West Brom 1 Man City 2 Fourth round: Man City 0 Wolves 0 (3-1 pens) Quarter-final: Leicester City 1 Man City 1 (3-4 pens) Semi-final: Man City 5 Bristol City 3 (aggregate) What is the history of both clubs in the League Cup? Arsenal have won the FA Cup a record 13 times, but have only won English football's other domestic cup twice. The last time was in 1993, when Steve Morrow scored the winner against Sheffield Wednesday. Arsenal captain Tony Adams then dropped Morrow during the post-match celebrations who spent the next day in hospital with a broken arm. Arsenal have lost two finals under Wenger - to Chelsea in 2007 and Birmingham City in 2011. Where will Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang fit in at Arsenal? City have won the cup on four times, including in 2014 and 2016. The 2014 victory over Sunderland was famous for two sumptuous strikes from Samir Nasri and Yaya Toure, while Wily Caballero was the hero in 2016 in a penalty shootout triumph over Liverpool. What are the odds? Match odds Arsenal 18/5 Man City 8/13 Draw 14/5 To lift the trophy Arsenal 2/1 Man City 4/11 What is our prediction? Arsenal have a fine Wembley record in cup competitions, but we cannot look past the champions elect. To have success against City, you either need to press intensely to stop their build-up play from the back or retreat into a deeper defensive shape and look to frustrate them. Arsenal do not really look suited to either strategy, and while Wenger's side have enough attacking talent to score we cannot see them halting the waves of light blue attacks. Verdict: Arsenal 1 Man City 3
Arsenal vs Manchester City, Carabao Cup final 2018: When is the match, what TV channel is it on and what are the latest odds?
What is it? It is the first major final of the English season as Manchester City face Arsenal in the Carabao Cup final. When is it? The final is at Wembley on Sunday afternoon. What time is kick-off? The match will get under way at 4.30pm, with a possibility of extra time and penalties. What TV channel is it on? The Carabao Cup final is part of a triple-header Super Sunday on Sky Sports Premier League and Sky Sports Main Event. Coverage begins at 11am, with Crystal Palace vs Tottenham Hotspur first up before Man Utd vs Chelsea at 2.05pm and then the big final. Sit back and enjoy, or bookmark this page and return on matchday to follow every kick at Wembley with our live blog. Get a NOW TV Sky Sports Day Pass for just £7.99 and stream Arsenal vs Man City live from 4.30pm on Sunday What is the team news? The fitness of Aaron Ramsey is Arsenal's principal injury concern as they head to Wembley. The central midfielder missed their 1-0 defeat to Spurs with a 'minor' groin injury but Arsene Wenger revealed last week he had not progressed as quickly as anticipated. The Arsenal manager is expected to respect his policy of starting second-choice goalkeeper David Ospina in cup competitions, while Henrikh Mkhitaryan is cup-tied. Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang is available again after sitting out Arsenal's back-to-back Europa League games. Pick your Arsenal XI to start against Man City Pep Guardiola will have to pick his Wembley left-back with Fabian Delph suspended following his straight red card in the FA Cup upset at Wigan. Leroy Sane has returned from injury, while Kevin De Bruyne will be restored to the starting XI after his rest at the DW Stadium. Claudio Bravo has been City's goalkeeper throughout the competition, but Guardiola could recall first-choice goalkeeper Ederson. Playmaker David Silva has missed games for family reasons but is back in the fold, while Raheem Sterling and Nicolas Otamendi are available. Gabriel Jesus remains sidelined. Pick your Man City XI to face Arsenal How have they made it to Wembley? Arsenal Third round: Arsenal 1 Doncaster Rovers 0 Fourth round: Arsenal 2 Norwich City 1 Quarter-final: Arsenal 1 West Ham 0 Semi-final: Arsenal 2 Chelsea 1 (aggregate) Man City Third round: West Brom 1 Man City 2 Fourth round: Man City 0 Wolves 0 (3-1 pens) Quarter-final: Leicester City 1 Man City 1 (3-4 pens) Semi-final: Man City 5 Bristol City 3 (aggregate) What is the history of both clubs in the League Cup? Arsenal have won the FA Cup a record 13 times, but have only won English football's other domestic cup twice. The last time was in 1993, when Steve Morrow scored the winner against Sheffield Wednesday. Arsenal captain Tony Adams then dropped Morrow during the post-match celebrations who spent the next day in hospital with a broken arm. Arsenal have lost two finals under Wenger - to Chelsea in 2007 and Birmingham City in 2011. Where will Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang fit in at Arsenal? City have won the cup on four times, including in 2014 and 2016. The 2014 victory over Sunderland was famous for two sumptuous strikes from Samir Nasri and Yaya Toure, while Wily Caballero was the hero in 2016 in a penalty shootout triumph over Liverpool. What are the odds? Match odds Arsenal 18/5 Man City 8/13 Draw 14/5 To lift the trophy Arsenal 2/1 Man City 4/11 What is our prediction? Arsenal have a fine Wembley record in cup competitions, but we cannot look past the champions elect. To have success against City, you either need to press intensely to stop their build-up play from the back or retreat into a deeper defensive shape and look to frustrate them. Arsenal do not really look suited to either strategy, and while Wenger's side have enough attacking talent to score we cannot see them halting the waves of light blue attacks. Verdict: Arsenal 1 Man City 3
His ordeal lasted for just over an hour, a fruitless and frustrating performance ending with a glance towards the Swansea bench and a grimace when he saw his number flashing up on the substitution board. Tammy Abraham peeled off his gloves, looked at the floor and trudged off the pitch. He had not had a sniff of a goal, had struggled to hold the ball up and, apart from the odd flash of fancy footwork, the striker, on loan from Chelsea, had done nothing to catch the eye of the watching England manager Gareth Southgate. A surprise spectator in the stands at Hillsborough for this unspectacular FA Cup clash, Southgate has surely put a line through Abraham’s name as he considers which players to cross off his World Cup squad list. It was always likely to be a tournament too soon for the 20-year-old, but Abraham has gone backwards this season. He has not scored a Premier League goal since October and is struggling to get into Swansea’s starting XI under new manager Carlos Carvalhal. Such are the pitfalls of a young English footballer. This was supposed to be the year he established himself as a Premier League player after a prolific season in the Championship with Bristol City. Swansea were not the only club who wanted to sign him on loan in the summer because of it, but interest will have waned since. Abraham's two goals in the thrashing of Notts County are his only strikes in 19 appearances Credit: Getty Images Europe In November, Abraham made his senior England debut against Germany, but there is no strength in the argument he should keep his place. Strikers who do not score goals are not needed and Abraham will be better served playing for the Under-21s. He is not ready and Southgate, who fast-tracked him into the senior side, must realise that after witnessing this ineffective display and the stroppy body language that accompanied it. It would be harsh to write Abraham off, as well as premature. He is young, a player with potential, a young man with much to learn. He clearly has talent, but a young footballer’s career is a delicate thing at this stage of their development. Carlos Carvalhal joined the voices of those who believe FA Cup matches should be settled on the day, not with replays Credit: REUTERS The problem is, Chelsea sent him out on loan to try and unlock that potential, but his move to Swansea has not gone to plan. A bright start has faded into a rather glum campaign in South Wales. Abraham was only playing in the FA Cup because he is no longer starts games in the Premier League. There were too many players like that in the Swansea line up and it did not help the Premier League side against a Sheffield Wednesday which, at the start of both halves, had the chances to knock them out of the FA Cup. In the end, a replay was the fairest result, but it is an extra game Swansea could do without. They have managed to haul themselves out of the bottom three, but the Swans remain in relegation danger and, as tends to the case, the FA Cup is a distraction. A nice one, but a distraction all the same. They should still have enough to beat Wednesday in the replay, but Carvalhal is just the latest manager to suggest it is time to settle FA Cup ties on the day, rather than play the fixture again.
Tammy Abraham misses chance to catch Gareth Southgate's eye as his season continues to go backwards
His ordeal lasted for just over an hour, a fruitless and frustrating performance ending with a glance towards the Swansea bench and a grimace when he saw his number flashing up on the substitution board. Tammy Abraham peeled off his gloves, looked at the floor and trudged off the pitch. He had not had a sniff of a goal, had struggled to hold the ball up and, apart from the odd flash of fancy footwork, the striker, on loan from Chelsea, had done nothing to catch the eye of the watching England manager Gareth Southgate. A surprise spectator in the stands at Hillsborough for this unspectacular FA Cup clash, Southgate has surely put a line through Abraham’s name as he considers which players to cross off his World Cup squad list. It was always likely to be a tournament too soon for the 20-year-old, but Abraham has gone backwards this season. He has not scored a Premier League goal since October and is struggling to get into Swansea’s starting XI under new manager Carlos Carvalhal. Such are the pitfalls of a young English footballer. This was supposed to be the year he established himself as a Premier League player after a prolific season in the Championship with Bristol City. Swansea were not the only club who wanted to sign him on loan in the summer because of it, but interest will have waned since. Abraham's two goals in the thrashing of Notts County are his only strikes in 19 appearances Credit: Getty Images Europe In November, Abraham made his senior England debut against Germany, but there is no strength in the argument he should keep his place. Strikers who do not score goals are not needed and Abraham will be better served playing for the Under-21s. He is not ready and Southgate, who fast-tracked him into the senior side, must realise that after witnessing this ineffective display and the stroppy body language that accompanied it. It would be harsh to write Abraham off, as well as premature. He is young, a player with potential, a young man with much to learn. He clearly has talent, but a young footballer’s career is a delicate thing at this stage of their development. Carlos Carvalhal joined the voices of those who believe FA Cup matches should be settled on the day, not with replays Credit: REUTERS The problem is, Chelsea sent him out on loan to try and unlock that potential, but his move to Swansea has not gone to plan. A bright start has faded into a rather glum campaign in South Wales. Abraham was only playing in the FA Cup because he is no longer starts games in the Premier League. There were too many players like that in the Swansea line up and it did not help the Premier League side against a Sheffield Wednesday which, at the start of both halves, had the chances to knock them out of the FA Cup. In the end, a replay was the fairest result, but it is an extra game Swansea could do without. They have managed to haul themselves out of the bottom three, but the Swans remain in relegation danger and, as tends to the case, the FA Cup is a distraction. A nice one, but a distraction all the same. They should still have enough to beat Wednesday in the replay, but Carvalhal is just the latest manager to suggest it is time to settle FA Cup ties on the day, rather than play the fixture again.
His ordeal lasted for just over an hour, a fruitless and frustrating performance ending with a glance towards the Swansea bench and a grimace when he saw his number flashing up on the substitution board. Tammy Abraham peeled off his gloves, looked at the floor and trudged off the pitch. He had not had a sniff of a goal, had struggled to hold the ball up and, apart from the odd flash of fancy footwork, the striker, on loan from Chelsea, had done nothing to catch the eye of the watching England manager Gareth Southgate. A surprise spectator in the stands at Hillsborough for this unspectacular FA Cup clash, Southgate has surely put a line through Abraham’s name as he considers which players to cross off his World Cup squad list. It was always likely to be a tournament too soon for the 20-year-old, but Abraham has gone backwards this season. He has not scored a Premier League goal since October and is struggling to get into Swansea’s starting XI under new manager Carlos Carvalhal. Such are the pitfalls of a young English footballer. This was supposed to be the year he established himself as a Premier League player after a prolific season in the Championship with Bristol City. Swansea were not the only club who wanted to sign him on loan in the summer because of it, but interest will have waned since. Abraham's two goals in the thrashing of Notts County are his only strikes in 19 appearances Credit: Getty Images Europe In November, Abraham made his senior England debut against Germany, but there is no strength in the argument he should keep his place. Strikers who do not score goals are not needed and Abraham will be better served playing for the Under-21s. He is not ready and Southgate, who fast-tracked him into the senior side, must realise that after witnessing this ineffective display and the stroppy body language that accompanied it. It would be harsh to write Abraham off, as well as premature. He is young, a player with potential, a young man with much to learn. He clearly has talent, but a young footballer’s career is a delicate thing at this stage of their development. Carlos Carvalhal joined the voices of those who believe FA Cup matches should be settled on the day, not with replays Credit: REUTERS The problem is, Chelsea sent him out on loan to try and unlock that potential, but his move to Swansea has not gone to plan. A bright start has faded into a rather glum campaign in South Wales. Abraham was only playing in the FA Cup because he is no longer starts games in the Premier League. There were too many players like that in the Swansea line up and it did not help the Premier League side against a Sheffield Wednesday which, at the start of both halves, had the chances to knock them out of the FA Cup. In the end, a replay was the fairest result, but it is an extra game Swansea could do without. They have managed to haul themselves out of the bottom three, but the Swans remain in relegation danger and, as tends to the case, the FA Cup is a distraction. A nice one, but a distraction all the same. They should still have enough to beat Wednesday in the replay, but Carvalhal is just the latest manager to suggest it is time to settle FA Cup ties on the day, rather than play the fixture again.
Tammy Abraham misses chance to catch Gareth Southgate's eye as his season continues to go backwards
His ordeal lasted for just over an hour, a fruitless and frustrating performance ending with a glance towards the Swansea bench and a grimace when he saw his number flashing up on the substitution board. Tammy Abraham peeled off his gloves, looked at the floor and trudged off the pitch. He had not had a sniff of a goal, had struggled to hold the ball up and, apart from the odd flash of fancy footwork, the striker, on loan from Chelsea, had done nothing to catch the eye of the watching England manager Gareth Southgate. A surprise spectator in the stands at Hillsborough for this unspectacular FA Cup clash, Southgate has surely put a line through Abraham’s name as he considers which players to cross off his World Cup squad list. It was always likely to be a tournament too soon for the 20-year-old, but Abraham has gone backwards this season. He has not scored a Premier League goal since October and is struggling to get into Swansea’s starting XI under new manager Carlos Carvalhal. Such are the pitfalls of a young English footballer. This was supposed to be the year he established himself as a Premier League player after a prolific season in the Championship with Bristol City. Swansea were not the only club who wanted to sign him on loan in the summer because of it, but interest will have waned since. Abraham's two goals in the thrashing of Notts County are his only strikes in 19 appearances Credit: Getty Images Europe In November, Abraham made his senior England debut against Germany, but there is no strength in the argument he should keep his place. Strikers who do not score goals are not needed and Abraham will be better served playing for the Under-21s. He is not ready and Southgate, who fast-tracked him into the senior side, must realise that after witnessing this ineffective display and the stroppy body language that accompanied it. It would be harsh to write Abraham off, as well as premature. He is young, a player with potential, a young man with much to learn. He clearly has talent, but a young footballer’s career is a delicate thing at this stage of their development. Carlos Carvalhal joined the voices of those who believe FA Cup matches should be settled on the day, not with replays Credit: REUTERS The problem is, Chelsea sent him out on loan to try and unlock that potential, but his move to Swansea has not gone to plan. A bright start has faded into a rather glum campaign in South Wales. Abraham was only playing in the FA Cup because he is no longer starts games in the Premier League. There were too many players like that in the Swansea line up and it did not help the Premier League side against a Sheffield Wednesday which, at the start of both halves, had the chances to knock them out of the FA Cup. In the end, a replay was the fairest result, but it is an extra game Swansea could do without. They have managed to haul themselves out of the bottom three, but the Swans remain in relegation danger and, as tends to the case, the FA Cup is a distraction. A nice one, but a distraction all the same. They should still have enough to beat Wednesday in the replay, but Carvalhal is just the latest manager to suggest it is time to settle FA Cup ties on the day, rather than play the fixture again.
His ordeal lasted for just over an hour, a fruitless and frustrating performance ending with a glance towards the Swansea bench and a grimace when he saw his number flashing up on the substitution board. Tammy Abraham peeled off his gloves, looked at the floor and trudged off the pitch. He had not had a sniff of a goal, had struggled to hold the ball up and, apart from the odd flash of fancy footwork, the striker, on loan from Chelsea, had done nothing to catch the eye of the watching England manager Gareth Southgate. A surprise spectator in the stands at Hillsborough for this unspectacular FA Cup clash, Southgate has surely put a line through Abraham’s name as he considers which players to cross off his World Cup squad list. It was always likely to be a tournament too soon for the 20-year-old, but Abraham has gone backwards this season. He has not scored a Premier League goal since October and is struggling to get into Swansea’s starting XI under new manager Carlos Carvalhal. Such are the pitfalls of a young English footballer. This was supposed to be the year he established himself as a Premier League player after a prolific season in the Championship with Bristol City. Swansea were not the only club who wanted to sign him on loan in the summer because of it, but interest will have waned since. Abraham's two goals in the thrashing of Notts County are his only strikes in 19 appearances Credit: Getty Images Europe In November, Abraham made his senior England debut against Germany, but there is no strength in the argument he should keep his place. Strikers who do not score goals are not needed and Abraham will be better served playing for the Under-21s. He is not ready and Southgate, who fast-tracked him into the senior side, must realise that after witnessing this ineffective display and the stroppy body language that accompanied it. It would be harsh to write Abraham off, as well as premature. He is young, a player with potential, a young man with much to learn. He clearly has talent, but a young footballer’s career is a delicate thing at this stage of their development. Carlos Carvalhal joined the voices of those who believe FA Cup matches should be settled on the day, not with replays Credit: REUTERS The problem is, Chelsea sent him out on loan to try and unlock that potential, but his move to Swansea has not gone to plan. A bright start has faded into a rather glum campaign in South Wales. Abraham was only playing in the FA Cup because he is no longer starts games in the Premier League. There were too many players like that in the Swansea line up and it did not help the Premier League side against a Sheffield Wednesday which, at the start of both halves, had the chances to knock them out of the FA Cup. In the end, a replay was the fairest result, but it is an extra game Swansea could do without. They have managed to haul themselves out of the bottom three, but the Swans remain in relegation danger and, as tends to the case, the FA Cup is a distraction. A nice one, but a distraction all the same. They should still have enough to beat Wednesday in the replay, but Carvalhal is just the latest manager to suggest it is time to settle FA Cup ties on the day, rather than play the fixture again.
Tammy Abraham misses chance to catch Gareth Southgate's eye as his season continues to go backwards
His ordeal lasted for just over an hour, a fruitless and frustrating performance ending with a glance towards the Swansea bench and a grimace when he saw his number flashing up on the substitution board. Tammy Abraham peeled off his gloves, looked at the floor and trudged off the pitch. He had not had a sniff of a goal, had struggled to hold the ball up and, apart from the odd flash of fancy footwork, the striker, on loan from Chelsea, had done nothing to catch the eye of the watching England manager Gareth Southgate. A surprise spectator in the stands at Hillsborough for this unspectacular FA Cup clash, Southgate has surely put a line through Abraham’s name as he considers which players to cross off his World Cup squad list. It was always likely to be a tournament too soon for the 20-year-old, but Abraham has gone backwards this season. He has not scored a Premier League goal since October and is struggling to get into Swansea’s starting XI under new manager Carlos Carvalhal. Such are the pitfalls of a young English footballer. This was supposed to be the year he established himself as a Premier League player after a prolific season in the Championship with Bristol City. Swansea were not the only club who wanted to sign him on loan in the summer because of it, but interest will have waned since. Abraham's two goals in the thrashing of Notts County are his only strikes in 19 appearances Credit: Getty Images Europe In November, Abraham made his senior England debut against Germany, but there is no strength in the argument he should keep his place. Strikers who do not score goals are not needed and Abraham will be better served playing for the Under-21s. He is not ready and Southgate, who fast-tracked him into the senior side, must realise that after witnessing this ineffective display and the stroppy body language that accompanied it. It would be harsh to write Abraham off, as well as premature. He is young, a player with potential, a young man with much to learn. He clearly has talent, but a young footballer’s career is a delicate thing at this stage of their development. Carlos Carvalhal joined the voices of those who believe FA Cup matches should be settled on the day, not with replays Credit: REUTERS The problem is, Chelsea sent him out on loan to try and unlock that potential, but his move to Swansea has not gone to plan. A bright start has faded into a rather glum campaign in South Wales. Abraham was only playing in the FA Cup because he is no longer starts games in the Premier League. There were too many players like that in the Swansea line up and it did not help the Premier League side against a Sheffield Wednesday which, at the start of both halves, had the chances to knock them out of the FA Cup. In the end, a replay was the fairest result, but it is an extra game Swansea could do without. They have managed to haul themselves out of the bottom three, but the Swans remain in relegation danger and, as tends to the case, the FA Cup is a distraction. A nice one, but a distraction all the same. They should still have enough to beat Wednesday in the replay, but Carvalhal is just the latest manager to suggest it is time to settle FA Cup ties on the day, rather than play the fixture again.
Leeds 2 Bristol City 2: Visitors struggle to hold on to lead again as hosts rally for new manager
Leeds 2 Bristol City 2: Visitors struggle to hold on to lead again as hosts rally for new manager
Leeds 2 Bristol City 2: Visitors struggle to hold on to lead again as hosts rally for new manager
Bristol City’s inability to hold on to a lead proved a welcome weakness for new Leeds manager Paul Heckingbottom, who marked his first Elland Road game with a point that kept alive his team’s play-off hopes. After throwing away a three-goal lead against Sunderland last weekend, Lee Johnson’s side were just as frail today, racing into a 2-0 lead inside 16 minutes but, ultimately, being fortunate to emerge even with a point. With the last touch of the game, Pierre-Michel Lasogga rose menacingly to meet a Pablo Hernandez cross which thundered against the City bar and Johnson breathed a sigh of relief. The result left City still in the play-off places but with just one win in any competition since Boxing Day, a period which had also seen them take on ­Manchester City at the end of their famous run to the Carabao Cup semi-finals. “We are where we are really,” said Johnson. “I’ve never gone shouting my mouth off saying my team is going to smash promotion because we’re not there. “With 14 games left we’re in a good position and we’ve got belief. We’re a work in progress with a lot of young players who haven’t experienced this sort of atmosphere. We know we’ve done well to turn this team around; this time last year we were effectively competing against relegation. Now we have jumped 12 or 13 places up the division.” City looked every inch a promotion contender in that devastating opening spell which brought two goals, both from long throw-ins launched by Icelandic defender Hordur Magnusson. After 11 minutes, Leeds’ panicked goalkeeper Felix Wiedwald punched out to City forward Famara Diedhiou, who took a touch – a poor one, as it transpired – but still had time to drive the ball in from 12 yards. Five minutes later, Leeds again froze at a long throw, allowing Aden Flint to flick on to Marlon Pack, whose drive was turned in at the far post by Bobby Reid. There was certainly no clue of Leeds’ eventual fightback as their 10th manager in the past six years heard his team booed off at the interval. And the opening exchanges of the second half were no better as supporters sarcastically greeted the occasional accurate pass by their players with an “ole”. But, slowly, Hernandez was becoming more of an influence and Heckingbottom was using his bench effectively. After 72 minutes, Hernandez’s far-post cross picked out Lasogga, who volleyed emphatically past Frank Fielding and, eight minutes of Leeds pressure later, a Hernandez corner was flicked across goal for substitute Kemar Roofe to slide in the equaliser. By now Elland Road was an intimidating place, one which Johnson later admitted might have got to some of his younger players, and the situation might have become even more dire for the visitors. In a frantic finale, Adam Forshaw created room to curl a shot wide, another sub Kalvin Phillips headed over from yet another Hernandez set-piece and, with that last kick of the game, Lasogga rattled the City woodwork. “We definitely had opportunities to win it and I know when I watch it back I’m going to be cringing ­because they were good chances as well,” said Heckingbottom. “We still think we can make the play-offs. If we had lost, the gap would have been 11 points and that would have been big but we’re still in it. “We’ve got teams to play around us but nobody is getting away from us. If we can pick up some positive results against them, we will see where we are in the last few games.”
Leeds 2 Bristol City 2: Visitors struggle to hold on to lead again as hosts rally for new manager
Bristol City’s inability to hold on to a lead proved a welcome weakness for new Leeds manager Paul Heckingbottom, who marked his first Elland Road game with a point that kept alive his team’s play-off hopes. After throwing away a three-goal lead against Sunderland last weekend, Lee Johnson’s side were just as frail today, racing into a 2-0 lead inside 16 minutes but, ultimately, being fortunate to emerge even with a point. With the last touch of the game, Pierre-Michel Lasogga rose menacingly to meet a Pablo Hernandez cross which thundered against the City bar and Johnson breathed a sigh of relief. The result left City still in the play-off places but with just one win in any competition since Boxing Day, a period which had also seen them take on ­Manchester City at the end of their famous run to the Carabao Cup semi-finals. “We are where we are really,” said Johnson. “I’ve never gone shouting my mouth off saying my team is going to smash promotion because we’re not there. “With 14 games left we’re in a good position and we’ve got belief. We’re a work in progress with a lot of young players who haven’t experienced this sort of atmosphere. We know we’ve done well to turn this team around; this time last year we were effectively competing against relegation. Now we have jumped 12 or 13 places up the division.” City looked every inch a promotion contender in that devastating opening spell which brought two goals, both from long throw-ins launched by Icelandic defender Hordur Magnusson. After 11 minutes, Leeds’ panicked goalkeeper Felix Wiedwald punched out to City forward Famara Diedhiou, who took a touch – a poor one, as it transpired – but still had time to drive the ball in from 12 yards. Five minutes later, Leeds again froze at a long throw, allowing Aden Flint to flick on to Marlon Pack, whose drive was turned in at the far post by Bobby Reid. There was certainly no clue of Leeds’ eventual fightback as their 10th manager in the past six years heard his team booed off at the interval. And the opening exchanges of the second half were no better as supporters sarcastically greeted the occasional accurate pass by their players with an “ole”. But, slowly, Hernandez was becoming more of an influence and Heckingbottom was using his bench effectively. After 72 minutes, Hernandez’s far-post cross picked out Lasogga, who volleyed emphatically past Frank Fielding and, eight minutes of Leeds pressure later, a Hernandez corner was flicked across goal for substitute Kemar Roofe to slide in the equaliser. By now Elland Road was an intimidating place, one which Johnson later admitted might have got to some of his younger players, and the situation might have become even more dire for the visitors. In a frantic finale, Adam Forshaw created room to curl a shot wide, another sub Kalvin Phillips headed over from yet another Hernandez set-piece and, with that last kick of the game, Lasogga rattled the City woodwork. “We definitely had opportunities to win it and I know when I watch it back I’m going to be cringing ­because they were good chances as well,” said Heckingbottom. “We still think we can make the play-offs. If we had lost, the gap would have been 11 points and that would have been big but we’re still in it. “We’ve got teams to play around us but nobody is getting away from us. If we can pick up some positive results against them, we will see where we are in the last few games.”
​Bristol City's billionaire owner Stephen Lansdown was fed up with sport in his city being a joke, and made it his responsibility to change the culture in the city. Lansdown started the reshaping of the City's sport culture with a £45m renovation to Ashton Gate stadium, and added the Bristol Rugby club to the fold. He also founded the Bristol Flyers, who now compete in the top-flight. As reported by the Mirror, Lansdown claims that this is only 'the start of the journey', and has been...
Bristelona: How Stephen Lansdown Has Made it His Mission to Mould Bristol City Into a Mega Club
​Bristol City's billionaire owner Stephen Lansdown was fed up with sport in his city being a joke, and made it his responsibility to change the culture in the city. Lansdown started the reshaping of the City's sport culture with a £45m renovation to Ashton Gate stadium, and added the Bristol Rugby club to the fold. He also founded the Bristol Flyers, who now compete in the top-flight. As reported by the Mirror, Lansdown claims that this is only 'the start of the journey', and has been...
​Bristol City's billionaire owner Stephen Lansdown was fed up with sport in his city being a joke, and made it his responsibility to change the culture in the city. Lansdown started the reshaping of the City's sport culture with a £45m renovation to Ashton Gate stadium, and added the Bristol Rugby club to the fold. He also founded the Bristol Flyers, who now compete in the top-flight. As reported by the Mirror, Lansdown claims that this is only 'the start of the journey', and has been...
Bristelona: How Stephen Lansdown Has Made it His Mission to Mould Bristol City Into a Mega Club
​Bristol City's billionaire owner Stephen Lansdown was fed up with sport in his city being a joke, and made it his responsibility to change the culture in the city. Lansdown started the reshaping of the City's sport culture with a £45m renovation to Ashton Gate stadium, and added the Bristol Rugby club to the fold. He also founded the Bristol Flyers, who now compete in the top-flight. As reported by the Mirror, Lansdown claims that this is only 'the start of the journey', and has been...
​Bristol City's billionaire owner Stephen Lansdown was fed up with sport in his city being a joke, and made it his responsibility to change the culture in the city. Lansdown started the reshaping of the City's sport culture with a £45m renovation to Ashton Gate stadium, and added the Bristol Rugby club to the fold. He also founded the Bristol Flyers, who now compete in the top-flight. As reported by the Mirror, Lansdown claims that this is only 'the start of the journey', and has been...
Bristelona: How Stephen Lansdown Has Made it His Mission to Mould Bristol City Into a Mega Club
​Bristol City's billionaire owner Stephen Lansdown was fed up with sport in his city being a joke, and made it his responsibility to change the culture in the city. Lansdown started the reshaping of the City's sport culture with a £45m renovation to Ashton Gate stadium, and added the Bristol Rugby club to the fold. He also founded the Bristol Flyers, who now compete in the top-flight. As reported by the Mirror, Lansdown claims that this is only 'the start of the journey', and has been...
​Bristol City's billionaire owner Stephen Lansdown was fed up with sport in his city being a joke, and made it his responsibility to change the culture in the city. Lansdown started the reshaping of the City's sport culture with a £45m renovation to Ashton Gate stadium, and added the Bristol Rugby club to the fold. He also founded the Bristol Flyers, who now compete in the top-flight. As reported by the Mirror, Lansdown claims that this is only 'the start of the journey', and has been...
Bristelona: How Stephen Lansdown Has Made it His Mission to Mould Bristol City Into a Mega Club
​Bristol City's billionaire owner Stephen Lansdown was fed up with sport in his city being a joke, and made it his responsibility to change the culture in the city. Lansdown started the reshaping of the City's sport culture with a £45m renovation to Ashton Gate stadium, and added the Bristol Rugby club to the fold. He also founded the Bristol Flyers, who now compete in the top-flight. As reported by the Mirror, Lansdown claims that this is only 'the start of the journey', and has been...
​Bristol City's billionaire owner Stephen Lansdown was fed up with sport in his city being a joke, and made it his responsibility to change the culture in the city. Lansdown started the reshaping of the City's sport culture with a £45m renovation to Ashton Gate stadium, and added the Bristol Rugby club to the fold. He also founded the Bristol Flyers, who now compete in the top-flight. As reported by the Mirror, Lansdown claims that this is only 'the start of the journey', and has been...
Bristelona: How Stephen Lansdown Has Made it His Mission to Mould Bristol City Into a Mega Club
​Bristol City's billionaire owner Stephen Lansdown was fed up with sport in his city being a joke, and made it his responsibility to change the culture in the city. Lansdown started the reshaping of the City's sport culture with a £45m renovation to Ashton Gate stadium, and added the Bristol Rugby club to the fold. He also founded the Bristol Flyers, who now compete in the top-flight. As reported by the Mirror, Lansdown claims that this is only 'the start of the journey', and has been...
Martin Bain, the chief executive, was subjected to verbal abuse by angry supporters as Sunderland’s wretched campaign hit an almost implausible new low. Bain was berated by a fan sat within yards of the Scot’s seat high in the Stadium of Light directors’ box, the frustrated individual swiftly joined by others in expressing their disgust in a sustained protest at this latest no-show by Chris Coleman’s side, who seem to end up veering headlong down a cul-de-sac every time they appear ready to turn a corner. Unsurprisingly, the hosts were jeered off by the few home followers who bothered to remain until the bitter end, the players left in little doubt as to their status at being wholly unfit to wear the once proud, red-and-white shirts that look increasingly likely to be scuffling around League One next season. Bain remains the public face of the Sunderland hierarchy, given the infrequent visits of the club’s increasingly detached owner Ellis Short. “Martin’s left holding the baby if you like,” Coleman admitted. “He’s a big boy, he knows how it goes and he will be OK.” The same can’t be said of the team after this latest supine surrender. Unlike last week, when Sunderland improbably came back from three goals down to earn a point at Ashton Gate, there was no miracle escape, no “Bristanbul” repeat. Brentford’s first visit to this venue proved a profitable one given they emerged with arguably the most comfortable victory they will enjoy all season to maintain their position on the coat-tails of the play-off contenders, five points adrift of the top six. “It was more grief, more frustration, and more suffering,” Coleman added. “I need to take a long, hard look at things because maybe it’s too much for one or two of the players.” George Honeyman should have reduced the deficit on the stoke of half-time but the unmarked midfielder’s shot grazed the bar from a dozen yards, while immediately after the re-start Aiden McGeady wasted an equally clear chance when side-footing wide from Joel Asoro’s centre. Chris Coleman has won just 20% of games since taking over Credit: Getty Images “We were nervous, there was panic and a lack of cohesion,” added Coleman, arguably listing Sunderland’s good points. He added: “There’s an acceptance of negativity and defeat, and I find that tough to take.” Two goals in 15 minutes midway through the first-half sufficed, Kamo Mokotjo reacting first to Neal Maupay’s inviting lay-off to find the bottom corner from 20 yards for the South African’s first goal since the midfielder’s arrival from FC Twente in the summer. Maupay then claimed his eighth goal of the season, and only his second since the start of November, with a confident back-heel finish from Ollie Watkins’ cutback as Sunderland were carved open almost at will. Dean Smith had the distinction of becoming the first Brentford manager to guide his side to a clean sheet against the Wearside club for 81 years. He backed his counterpart to turn things round, but on this evidence it’s a view with which it’s hard to concur. He said: “We were straight out of the blocks, and the only issue from me at half-time was that the scoreline wasn’t as comfortable as I would have liked.”
Sunderland 0 Brentford 2: Fans vent fury at yet another home surrender
Martin Bain, the chief executive, was subjected to verbal abuse by angry supporters as Sunderland’s wretched campaign hit an almost implausible new low. Bain was berated by a fan sat within yards of the Scot’s seat high in the Stadium of Light directors’ box, the frustrated individual swiftly joined by others in expressing their disgust in a sustained protest at this latest no-show by Chris Coleman’s side, who seem to end up veering headlong down a cul-de-sac every time they appear ready to turn a corner. Unsurprisingly, the hosts were jeered off by the few home followers who bothered to remain until the bitter end, the players left in little doubt as to their status at being wholly unfit to wear the once proud, red-and-white shirts that look increasingly likely to be scuffling around League One next season. Bain remains the public face of the Sunderland hierarchy, given the infrequent visits of the club’s increasingly detached owner Ellis Short. “Martin’s left holding the baby if you like,” Coleman admitted. “He’s a big boy, he knows how it goes and he will be OK.” The same can’t be said of the team after this latest supine surrender. Unlike last week, when Sunderland improbably came back from three goals down to earn a point at Ashton Gate, there was no miracle escape, no “Bristanbul” repeat. Brentford’s first visit to this venue proved a profitable one given they emerged with arguably the most comfortable victory they will enjoy all season to maintain their position on the coat-tails of the play-off contenders, five points adrift of the top six. “It was more grief, more frustration, and more suffering,” Coleman added. “I need to take a long, hard look at things because maybe it’s too much for one or two of the players.” George Honeyman should have reduced the deficit on the stoke of half-time but the unmarked midfielder’s shot grazed the bar from a dozen yards, while immediately after the re-start Aiden McGeady wasted an equally clear chance when side-footing wide from Joel Asoro’s centre. Chris Coleman has won just 20% of games since taking over Credit: Getty Images “We were nervous, there was panic and a lack of cohesion,” added Coleman, arguably listing Sunderland’s good points. He added: “There’s an acceptance of negativity and defeat, and I find that tough to take.” Two goals in 15 minutes midway through the first-half sufficed, Kamo Mokotjo reacting first to Neal Maupay’s inviting lay-off to find the bottom corner from 20 yards for the South African’s first goal since the midfielder’s arrival from FC Twente in the summer. Maupay then claimed his eighth goal of the season, and only his second since the start of November, with a confident back-heel finish from Ollie Watkins’ cutback as Sunderland were carved open almost at will. Dean Smith had the distinction of becoming the first Brentford manager to guide his side to a clean sheet against the Wearside club for 81 years. He backed his counterpart to turn things round, but on this evidence it’s a view with which it’s hard to concur. He said: “We were straight out of the blocks, and the only issue from me at half-time was that the scoreline wasn’t as comfortable as I would have liked.”
Martin Bain, the chief executive, was subjected to verbal abuse by angry supporters as Sunderland’s wretched campaign hit an almost implausible new low. Bain was berated by a fan sat within yards of the Scot’s seat high in the Stadium of Light directors’ box, the frustrated individual swiftly joined by others in expressing their disgust in a sustained protest at this latest no-show by Chris Coleman’s side, who seem to end up veering headlong down a cul-de-sac every time they appear ready to turn a corner. Unsurprisingly, the hosts were jeered off by the few home followers who bothered to remain until the bitter end, the players left in little doubt as to their status at being wholly unfit to wear the once proud, red-and-white shirts that look increasingly likely to be scuffling around League One next season. Bain remains the public face of the Sunderland hierarchy, given the infrequent visits of the club’s increasingly detached owner Ellis Short. “Martin’s left holding the baby if you like,” Coleman admitted. “He’s a big boy, he knows how it goes and he will be OK.” The same can’t be said of the team after this latest supine surrender. Unlike last week, when Sunderland improbably came back from three goals down to earn a point at Ashton Gate, there was no miracle escape, no “Bristanbul” repeat. Brentford’s first visit to this venue proved a profitable one given they emerged with arguably the most comfortable victory they will enjoy all season to maintain their position on the coat-tails of the play-off contenders, five points adrift of the top six. “It was more grief, more frustration, and more suffering,” Coleman added. “I need to take a long, hard look at things because maybe it’s too much for one or two of the players.” George Honeyman should have reduced the deficit on the stoke of half-time but the unmarked midfielder’s shot grazed the bar from a dozen yards, while immediately after the re-start Aiden McGeady wasted an equally clear chance when side-footing wide from Joel Asoro’s centre. Chris Coleman has won just 20% of games since taking over Credit: Getty Images “We were nervous, there was panic and a lack of cohesion,” added Coleman, arguably listing Sunderland’s good points. He added: “There’s an acceptance of negativity and defeat, and I find that tough to take.” Two goals in 15 minutes midway through the first-half sufficed, Kamo Mokotjo reacting first to Neal Maupay’s inviting lay-off to find the bottom corner from 20 yards for the South African’s first goal since the midfielder’s arrival from FC Twente in the summer. Maupay then claimed his eighth goal of the season, and only his second since the start of November, with a confident back-heel finish from Ollie Watkins’ cutback as Sunderland were carved open almost at will. Dean Smith had the distinction of becoming the first Brentford manager to guide his side to a clean sheet against the Wearside club for 81 years. He backed his counterpart to turn things round, but on this evidence it’s a view with which it’s hard to concur. He said: “We were straight out of the blocks, and the only issue from me at half-time was that the scoreline wasn’t as comfortable as I would have liked.”
Sunderland 0 Brentford 2: Fans vent fury at yet another home surrender
Martin Bain, the chief executive, was subjected to verbal abuse by angry supporters as Sunderland’s wretched campaign hit an almost implausible new low. Bain was berated by a fan sat within yards of the Scot’s seat high in the Stadium of Light directors’ box, the frustrated individual swiftly joined by others in expressing their disgust in a sustained protest at this latest no-show by Chris Coleman’s side, who seem to end up veering headlong down a cul-de-sac every time they appear ready to turn a corner. Unsurprisingly, the hosts were jeered off by the few home followers who bothered to remain until the bitter end, the players left in little doubt as to their status at being wholly unfit to wear the once proud, red-and-white shirts that look increasingly likely to be scuffling around League One next season. Bain remains the public face of the Sunderland hierarchy, given the infrequent visits of the club’s increasingly detached owner Ellis Short. “Martin’s left holding the baby if you like,” Coleman admitted. “He’s a big boy, he knows how it goes and he will be OK.” The same can’t be said of the team after this latest supine surrender. Unlike last week, when Sunderland improbably came back from three goals down to earn a point at Ashton Gate, there was no miracle escape, no “Bristanbul” repeat. Brentford’s first visit to this venue proved a profitable one given they emerged with arguably the most comfortable victory they will enjoy all season to maintain their position on the coat-tails of the play-off contenders, five points adrift of the top six. “It was more grief, more frustration, and more suffering,” Coleman added. “I need to take a long, hard look at things because maybe it’s too much for one or two of the players.” George Honeyman should have reduced the deficit on the stoke of half-time but the unmarked midfielder’s shot grazed the bar from a dozen yards, while immediately after the re-start Aiden McGeady wasted an equally clear chance when side-footing wide from Joel Asoro’s centre. Chris Coleman has won just 20% of games since taking over Credit: Getty Images “We were nervous, there was panic and a lack of cohesion,” added Coleman, arguably listing Sunderland’s good points. He added: “There’s an acceptance of negativity and defeat, and I find that tough to take.” Two goals in 15 minutes midway through the first-half sufficed, Kamo Mokotjo reacting first to Neal Maupay’s inviting lay-off to find the bottom corner from 20 yards for the South African’s first goal since the midfielder’s arrival from FC Twente in the summer. Maupay then claimed his eighth goal of the season, and only his second since the start of November, with a confident back-heel finish from Ollie Watkins’ cutback as Sunderland were carved open almost at will. Dean Smith had the distinction of becoming the first Brentford manager to guide his side to a clean sheet against the Wearside club for 81 years. He backed his counterpart to turn things round, but on this evidence it’s a view with which it’s hard to concur. He said: “We were straight out of the blocks, and the only issue from me at half-time was that the scoreline wasn’t as comfortable as I would have liked.”
Sunderland's social media team were made to feel both relieved and very embarrassed at the same time, after the Black Cats rallied back to snatch a point against promotion hopefuls Bristol City on Saturday. The Robins went up 3-0 in just 37 minutes, but the last 20 minutes of the match left the fans who had left prematurely quite regretful. Imagine traveling 290 miles from Sunderland to Bristol to leave early after going 3-0 down, only to come back and draw 3-3  #SAFC — The Away Fans...
Jumping the Gun: Sunderland Sheepishly Delete Tweet After Shock Comeback Against Bristol City
Sunderland's social media team were made to feel both relieved and very embarrassed at the same time, after the Black Cats rallied back to snatch a point against promotion hopefuls Bristol City on Saturday. The Robins went up 3-0 in just 37 minutes, but the last 20 minutes of the match left the fans who had left prematurely quite regretful. Imagine traveling 290 miles from Sunderland to Bristol to leave early after going 3-0 down, only to come back and draw 3-3  #SAFC — The Away Fans...
Sunderland's social media team were made to feel both relieved and very embarrassed at the same time, after the Black Cats rallied back to snatch a point against promotion hopefuls Bristol City on Saturday. The Robins went up 3-0 in just 37 minutes, but the last 20 minutes of the match left the fans who had left prematurely quite regretful. Imagine traveling 290 miles from Sunderland to Bristol to leave early after going 3-0 down, only to come back and draw 3-3  #SAFC — The Away Fans...
Jumping the Gun: Sunderland Sheepishly Delete Tweet After Shock Comeback Against Bristol City
Sunderland's social media team were made to feel both relieved and very embarrassed at the same time, after the Black Cats rallied back to snatch a point against promotion hopefuls Bristol City on Saturday. The Robins went up 3-0 in just 37 minutes, but the last 20 minutes of the match left the fans who had left prematurely quite regretful. Imagine traveling 290 miles from Sunderland to Bristol to leave early after going 3-0 down, only to come back and draw 3-3  #SAFC — The Away Fans...
Sunderland's social media team were made to feel both relieved and very embarrassed at the same time, after the Black Cats rallied back to snatch a point against promotion hopefuls Bristol City on Saturday. The Robins went up 3-0 in just 37 minutes, but the last 20 minutes of the match left the fans who had left prematurely quite regretful. Imagine traveling 290 miles from Sunderland to Bristol to leave early after going 3-0 down, only to come back and draw 3-3  #SAFC — The Away Fans...
Jumping the Gun: Sunderland Sheepishly Delete Tweet After Shock Comeback Against Bristol City
Sunderland's social media team were made to feel both relieved and very embarrassed at the same time, after the Black Cats rallied back to snatch a point against promotion hopefuls Bristol City on Saturday. The Robins went up 3-0 in just 37 minutes, but the last 20 minutes of the match left the fans who had left prematurely quite regretful. Imagine traveling 290 miles from Sunderland to Bristol to leave early after going 3-0 down, only to come back and draw 3-3  #SAFC — The Away Fans...
Soccer Football - Championship - Bristol City vs Sunderland - Ashton Gate Stadium, Bristol, Britain - February 10, 2018 Bristol City's Famara Diedhiou celebrates scoring their third goal Action Images/Adam Holt
Championship - Bristol City vs Sunderland
Soccer Football - Championship - Bristol City vs Sunderland - Ashton Gate Stadium, Bristol, Britain - February 10, 2018 Bristol City's Famara Diedhiou celebrates scoring their third goal Action Images/Adam Holt
Soccer Football - Championship - Bristol City vs Sunderland - Ashton Gate Stadium, Bristol, Britain - February 10, 2018 Bristol City's Famara Diedhiou has a goal disallowed for handball Action Images/Adam Holt
Championship - Bristol City vs Sunderland
Soccer Football - Championship - Bristol City vs Sunderland - Ashton Gate Stadium, Bristol, Britain - February 10, 2018 Bristol City's Famara Diedhiou has a goal disallowed for handball Action Images/Adam Holt
Soccer Football - Championship - Bristol City vs Sunderland - Ashton Gate Stadium, Bristol, Britain - February 10, 2018 Bristol City's Ryan Kent shoots wide Action Images/Adam Holt
Championship - Bristol City vs Sunderland
Soccer Football - Championship - Bristol City vs Sunderland - Ashton Gate Stadium, Bristol, Britain - February 10, 2018 Bristol City's Ryan Kent shoots wide Action Images/Adam Holt
Soccer Football - Championship - Bristol City vs Sunderland - Ashton Gate Stadium, Bristol, Britain - February 10, 2018 Bristol City's Aden Flint celebrates scoring their first goal Action Images/Adam Holt
Championship - Bristol City vs Sunderland
Soccer Football - Championship - Bristol City vs Sunderland - Ashton Gate Stadium, Bristol, Britain - February 10, 2018 Bristol City's Aden Flint celebrates scoring their first goal Action Images/Adam Holt
Soccer Football - Championship - Bristol City vs Sunderland - Ashton Gate Stadium, Bristol, Britain - February 10, 2018 Bristol City's Famara Diedhiou scores their second goal Action Images/Adam Holt
Championship - Bristol City vs Sunderland
Soccer Football - Championship - Bristol City vs Sunderland - Ashton Gate Stadium, Bristol, Britain - February 10, 2018 Bristol City's Famara Diedhiou scores their second goal Action Images/Adam Holt
Soccer Football - Championship - Bristol City vs Sunderland - Ashton Gate Stadium, Bristol, Britain - February 10, 2018 Bristol City's Aden Flint scores their first goal Action Images/Adam Holt
Championship - Bristol City vs Sunderland
Soccer Football - Championship - Bristol City vs Sunderland - Ashton Gate Stadium, Bristol, Britain - February 10, 2018 Bristol City's Aden Flint scores their first goal Action Images/Adam Holt
Soccer Football - Championship - Bristol City vs Sunderland - Ashton Gate Stadium, Bristol, Britain - February 10, 2018 Bristol City's Aden Flint scores their first goal Action Images/Adam Holt
Championship - Bristol City vs Sunderland
Soccer Football - Championship - Bristol City vs Sunderland - Ashton Gate Stadium, Bristol, Britain - February 10, 2018 Bristol City's Aden Flint scores their first goal Action Images/Adam Holt

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