Bundesliga

Bundesliga slideshow

Thanks to an invitation from Bundesliga, Goal Malaysia's Zulhilmi Zainal got to attend the Ruhr derby, and visit Borussia Dortmund last weekend.
What Goal Malaysia learned about German clubs over two Bundesliga matches
Thanks to an invitation from Bundesliga, Goal Malaysia's Zulhilmi Zainal got to attend the Ruhr derby, and visit Borussia Dortmund last weekend.
Thanks to an invitation from Bundesliga, Goal Malaysia's Zulhilmi Zainal got to attend the Ruhr derby, and visit Borussia Dortmund last weekend.
What Goal Malaysia learned about German clubs over two Bundesliga matches
Thanks to an invitation from Bundesliga, Goal Malaysia's Zulhilmi Zainal got to attend the Ruhr derby, and visit Borussia Dortmund last weekend.
Thanks to an invitation from Bundesliga, Goal Malaysia's Zulhilmi Zainal got to attend the Ruhr derby, and visit Borussia Dortmund last weekend.
What Goal Malaysia learned about German clubs over two Bundesliga matches
Thanks to an invitation from Bundesliga, Goal Malaysia's Zulhilmi Zainal got to attend the Ruhr derby, and visit Borussia Dortmund last weekend.
Thanks to an invitation from Bundesliga, Goal Malaysia's Zulhilmi Zainal got to attend the Ruhr derby, and visit Borussia Dortmund last weekend.
What Goal Malaysia learned about German clubs over two Bundesliga matches
Thanks to an invitation from Bundesliga, Goal Malaysia's Zulhilmi Zainal got to attend the Ruhr derby, and visit Borussia Dortmund last weekend.
Thanks to an invitation from Bundesliga, Goal Malaysia's Zulhilmi Zainal got to attend the Ruhr derby, and visit Borussia Dortmund last weekend.
What Goal Malaysia learned about German clubs over two Bundesliga matches
Thanks to an invitation from Bundesliga, Goal Malaysia's Zulhilmi Zainal got to attend the Ruhr derby, and visit Borussia Dortmund last weekend.
Thanks to an invitation from Bundesliga, Goal Malaysia's Zulhilmi Zainal got to attend the Ruhr derby, and visit Borussia Dortmund last weekend.
What Goal Malaysia learned about German clubs over two Bundesliga matches
Thanks to an invitation from Bundesliga, Goal Malaysia's Zulhilmi Zainal got to attend the Ruhr derby, and visit Borussia Dortmund last weekend.
Thanks to an invitation from Bundesliga, Goal Malaysia's Zulhilmi Zainal got to attend the Ruhr derby, and visit Borussia Dortmund last weekend.
What Goal Malaysia learned about German clubs over two Bundesliga matches
Thanks to an invitation from Bundesliga, Goal Malaysia's Zulhilmi Zainal got to attend the Ruhr derby, and visit Borussia Dortmund last weekend.
Thanks to an invitation from Bundesliga, Goal Malaysia's Zulhilmi Zainal got to attend the Ruhr derby, and visit Borussia Dortmund last weekend.
What Goal Malaysia learned about German clubs over two Bundesliga matches
Thanks to an invitation from Bundesliga, Goal Malaysia's Zulhilmi Zainal got to attend the Ruhr derby, and visit Borussia Dortmund last weekend.
Thanks to an invitation from Bundesliga, Goal Malaysia's Zulhilmi Zainal got to attend the Ruhr derby, and visit Borussia Dortmund last weekend.
What Goal Malaysia learned about German clubs over two Bundesliga matches
Thanks to an invitation from Bundesliga, Goal Malaysia's Zulhilmi Zainal got to attend the Ruhr derby, and visit Borussia Dortmund last weekend.
FILE - In this March 31, 2018 file photo, Dortmund coach Peter Stoeger sits on the bench prior to the German Bundesliga soccer match between FC Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund in Munich, Germany. Borussia Dortmund coach Peter Stoeger is yet to show that he is the man to oversee the sides revitalization after another difficult season for the club. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader,file)
Future uncertain at Borussia Dortmund ahead of crunch games
FILE - In this March 31, 2018 file photo, Dortmund coach Peter Stoeger sits on the bench prior to the German Bundesliga soccer match between FC Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund in Munich, Germany. Borussia Dortmund coach Peter Stoeger is yet to show that he is the man to oversee the sides revitalization after another difficult season for the club. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader,file)
FILE - In this March 31, 2018 file photo, Dortmund coach Peter Stoeger sits on the bench prior to the German Bundesliga soccer match between FC Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund in Munich, Germany. Borussia Dortmund coach Peter Stoeger is yet to show that he is the man to oversee the side’s revitalization after another difficult season for the club. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader,file)
FILE - In this March 31, 2018 file photo, Dortmund coach Peter Stoeger sits on the bench prior to the German Bundesliga soccer match between FC Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund in Munich, Germany. Borussia Dortmund coach Peter Stoeger is yet to show that he is the man to oversee the side’s revitalization after another difficult season for the club. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader,file)
FILE - In this March 31, 2018 file photo, Dortmund coach Peter Stoeger sits on the bench prior to the German Bundesliga soccer match between FC Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund in Munich, Germany. Borussia Dortmund coach Peter Stoeger is yet to show that he is the man to oversee the side’s revitalization after another difficult season for the club. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader,file)
FILE - In this Monday, Feb 26, 2018 file photo, Dortmund's Michy Batshuayi looks on during their German Bundesliga soccer match against FC Augsburg in Dortmund, Germany. FIFA has on Thursday, April 19 closed an investigation into a Spain player allegedly racially abusing an England opponent in the Under-17 World Cup final. FIFA says its disciplinary panel dismissed the charge due to "lack of sufficient evidence that could corroborate the English player's claim." It is the third recent case of a high-profile allegation of racist abuse of black players being closed without action.Those claims were made by Borussia Dortmund forward Michy Batshuayi against Italian club Atalanta, and Liverpool youth forward Rhian Brewster against a Spartak Moscow opponent.(AP Photo/Martin Meissner, file)
FILE - In this Monday, Feb 26, 2018 file photo, Dortmund's Michy Batshuayi looks on during their German Bundesliga soccer match against FC Augsburg in Dortmund, Germany. FIFA has on Thursday, April 19 closed an investigation into a Spain player allegedly racially abusing an England opponent in the Under-17 World Cup final. FIFA says its disciplinary panel dismissed the charge due to "lack of sufficient evidence that could corroborate the English player's claim." It is the third recent case of a high-profile allegation of racist abuse of black players being closed without action.Those claims were made by Borussia Dortmund forward Michy Batshuayi against Italian club Atalanta, and Liverpool youth forward Rhian Brewster against a Spartak Moscow opponent.(AP Photo/Martin Meissner, file)
FILE - In this Monday, Feb 26, 2018 file photo, Dortmund's Michy Batshuayi looks on during their German Bundesliga soccer match against FC Augsburg in Dortmund, Germany. FIFA has on Thursday, April 19 closed an investigation into a Spain player allegedly racially abusing an England opponent in the Under-17 World Cup final. FIFA says its disciplinary panel dismissed the charge due to "lack of sufficient evidence that could corroborate the English player's claim." It is the third recent case of a high-profile allegation of racist abuse of black players being closed without action.Those claims were made by Borussia Dortmund forward Michy Batshuayi against Italian club Atalanta, and Liverpool youth forward Rhian Brewster against a Spartak Moscow opponent.(AP Photo/Martin Meissner, file)
The Blancos' next outing will be against the Bundesliga champions in the Allianz Arena, a game that Lucas says holds no fear for them
Not a single doubt for Madrid ahead of Bayern clash, claims Lucas
The Blancos' next outing will be against the Bundesliga champions in the Allianz Arena, a game that Lucas says holds no fear for them
The Blancos' next outing will be against the Bundesliga champions in the Allianz Arena, a game that Lucas says holds no fear for them
Not a single doubt for Madrid ahead of Bayern clash, claims Lucas
The Blancos' next outing will be against the Bundesliga champions in the Allianz Arena, a game that Lucas says holds no fear for them
Arsenal are split over who they want to replace Arsene Wenger as the club step up their search for his successor. This is expected to be Wenger’s final season in charge at the Emirates, even if Arsenal win the Europa League and qualify for the Champions League. Attention is now turning to how Wenger will be replaced, with head of football relations Raul Sanllehi, head of recruitment Sven Mislintat and chief executive Ivan Gazidis all working on the succession plan. Spanish sources claim that Sanllehi’s favoured candidate is Luis Enrique, who he worked with successfully at Barcelona. Enrique won two La Liga titles and the Champions League while in charge of Barcelona and is keen to resume his managerial career in England when he completes his year-long sabbatical. The Spaniard has also been linked with Chelsea, but his wage demands, which are said to top £10 million-a-year, could put off both clubs. Luis Enrique, who is keen on managing in England, has been linked with Arsenal Credit: Getty Images Mislintat is believed to be concentrating his attention in Germany. He is a big fan of 30-year-old Hoffenheim manager Julian Nagelsmann and Shalke’s Domenico Tedesco, who is just two years older. A picture emerged of Mislintat at Shalke’s 2-0 victory over his former club Borussia Dortmund over the weekend and Tedesco’s team are second in the Bundesliga table. Hoffenheim are four places back in sixth and Nagelsmann’s work in his two-and-a-half years in charge have earned him a reputation for being one of the best young coaches in Europe. Gazidis is known to be a big admirer of former Arsenal captain Mikel Arteta, who is also somebody Sanllehi rates, and is impressed by the work of Monaco’s Leonardo Jardim and Celtic’s Brendan Rodgers. Arsenal ideally want a younger man to replace 68-year-old Wenger and Sanllehi, Mislintat and Gazidis will all work together to try to find common ground on exactly who should make their shortlist. Brendan Rodgers is another manager who has been touted as a possible replacement for Wenger Credit: Getty Images But that will not be an easy job with each man favouring different candidates and working to their own agendas. Arsenal’s determination to ensure Wenger is given a respectful exit also complicates the process over finding his successor, as the club do not want to be seen to be approaching candidates while the Frenchman is in post. That means that while other clubs are openly speaking with managers and their agents, the Gunners are having to tread carefully and act discreetly. Majority shareholder Stan Kroenke will ultimately have the final say on who replaces Wenger and he will also listen to advice from his son Josh. But both Kroenke’s will rely heavily on the advice of Sanllehi, Mislintat and Gazidis. It is a similar scenario in terms of player recruitment with agents and middle men currently unsure who has casting vote in terms of summer transfer targets. Premier League and Football League relegation, promotion and play-offs Arsenal want a goalkeeper, a central defender and a midfielder to bolster their squad, but there is a level of confusion from outside the club over who is in charge. Agents have traditionally either gone direct to Wenger or approached Dick Law, who this season stepped down from his job that saw him directly involved in player recruitment and contracts. Mislintat and Gazidis took the lead during the January transfer window, as the pair were pictured in Germany to negotiate the club record transfer of Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang and Mislintat recommended Henrikh Mkhitaryan.
Arsenal split on who they want to succeed Arsene Wenger
Arsenal are split over who they want to replace Arsene Wenger as the club step up their search for his successor. This is expected to be Wenger’s final season in charge at the Emirates, even if Arsenal win the Europa League and qualify for the Champions League. Attention is now turning to how Wenger will be replaced, with head of football relations Raul Sanllehi, head of recruitment Sven Mislintat and chief executive Ivan Gazidis all working on the succession plan. Spanish sources claim that Sanllehi’s favoured candidate is Luis Enrique, who he worked with successfully at Barcelona. Enrique won two La Liga titles and the Champions League while in charge of Barcelona and is keen to resume his managerial career in England when he completes his year-long sabbatical. The Spaniard has also been linked with Chelsea, but his wage demands, which are said to top £10 million-a-year, could put off both clubs. Luis Enrique, who is keen on managing in England, has been linked with Arsenal Credit: Getty Images Mislintat is believed to be concentrating his attention in Germany. He is a big fan of 30-year-old Hoffenheim manager Julian Nagelsmann and Shalke’s Domenico Tedesco, who is just two years older. A picture emerged of Mislintat at Shalke’s 2-0 victory over his former club Borussia Dortmund over the weekend and Tedesco’s team are second in the Bundesliga table. Hoffenheim are four places back in sixth and Nagelsmann’s work in his two-and-a-half years in charge have earned him a reputation for being one of the best young coaches in Europe. Gazidis is known to be a big admirer of former Arsenal captain Mikel Arteta, who is also somebody Sanllehi rates, and is impressed by the work of Monaco’s Leonardo Jardim and Celtic’s Brendan Rodgers. Arsenal ideally want a younger man to replace 68-year-old Wenger and Sanllehi, Mislintat and Gazidis will all work together to try to find common ground on exactly who should make their shortlist. Brendan Rodgers is another manager who has been touted as a possible replacement for Wenger Credit: Getty Images But that will not be an easy job with each man favouring different candidates and working to their own agendas. Arsenal’s determination to ensure Wenger is given a respectful exit also complicates the process over finding his successor, as the club do not want to be seen to be approaching candidates while the Frenchman is in post. That means that while other clubs are openly speaking with managers and their agents, the Gunners are having to tread carefully and act discreetly. Majority shareholder Stan Kroenke will ultimately have the final say on who replaces Wenger and he will also listen to advice from his son Josh. But both Kroenke’s will rely heavily on the advice of Sanllehi, Mislintat and Gazidis. It is a similar scenario in terms of player recruitment with agents and middle men currently unsure who has casting vote in terms of summer transfer targets. Premier League and Football League relegation, promotion and play-offs Arsenal want a goalkeeper, a central defender and a midfielder to bolster their squad, but there is a level of confusion from outside the club over who is in charge. Agents have traditionally either gone direct to Wenger or approached Dick Law, who this season stepped down from his job that saw him directly involved in player recruitment and contracts. Mislintat and Gazidis took the lead during the January transfer window, as the pair were pictured in Germany to negotiate the club record transfer of Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang and Mislintat recommended Henrikh Mkhitaryan.
Arsenal are split over who they want to replace Arsene Wenger as the club step up their search for his successor. This is expected to be Wenger’s final season in charge at the Emirates, even if Arsenal win the Europa League and qualify for the Champions League. Attention is now turning to how Wenger will be replaced, with head of football relations Raul Sanllehi, head of recruitment Sven Mislintat and chief executive Ivan Gazidis all working on the succession plan. Spanish sources claim that Sanllehi’s favoured candidate is Luis Enrique, who he worked with successfully at Barcelona. Enrique won two La Liga titles and the Champions League while in charge of Barcelona and is keen to resume his managerial career in England when he completes his year-long sabbatical. The Spaniard has also been linked with Chelsea, but his wage demands, which are said to top £10 million-a-year, could put off both clubs. Luis Enrique, who is keen on managing in England, has been linked with Arsenal Credit: Getty Images Mislintat is believed to be concentrating his attention in Germany. He is a big fan of 30-year-old Hoffenheim manager Julian Nagelsmann and Shalke’s Domenico Tedesco, who is just two years older. A picture emerged of Mislintat at Shalke’s 2-0 victory over his former club Borussia Dortmund over the weekend and Tedesco’s team are second in the Bundesliga table. Hoffenheim are four places back in sixth and Nagelsmann’s work in his two-and-a-half years in charge have earned him a reputation for being one of the best young coaches in Europe. Gazidis is known to be a big admirer of former Arsenal captain Mikel Arteta, who is also somebody Sanllehi rates, and is impressed by the work of Monaco’s Leonardo Jardim and Celtic’s Brendan Rodgers. Arsenal ideally want a younger man to replace 68-year-old Wenger and Sanllehi, Mislintat and Gazidis will all work together to try to find common ground on exactly who should make their shortlist. Brendan Rodgers is another manager who has been touted as a possible replacement for Wenger Credit: Getty Images But that will not be an easy job with each man favouring different candidates and working to their own agendas. Arsenal’s determination to ensure Wenger is given a respectful exit also complicates the process over finding his successor, as the club do not want to be seen to be approaching candidates while the Frenchman is in post. That means that while other clubs are openly speaking with managers and their agents, the Gunners are having to tread carefully and act discreetly. Majority shareholder Stan Kroenke will ultimately have the final say on who replaces Wenger and he will also listen to advice from his son Josh. But both Kroenke’s will rely heavily on the advice of Sanllehi, Mislintat and Gazidis. It is a similar scenario in terms of player recruitment with agents and middle men currently unsure who has casting vote in terms of summer transfer targets. Premier League and Football League relegation, promotion and play-offs Arsenal want a goalkeeper, a central defender and a midfielder to bolster their squad, but there is a level of confusion from outside the club over who is in charge. Agents have traditionally either gone direct to Wenger or approached Dick Law, who this season stepped down from his job that saw him directly involved in player recruitment and contracts. Mislintat and Gazidis took the lead during the January transfer window, as the pair were pictured in Germany to negotiate the club record transfer of Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang and Mislintat recommended Henrikh Mkhitaryan.
Arsenal split on who they want to succeed Arsene Wenger
Arsenal are split over who they want to replace Arsene Wenger as the club step up their search for his successor. This is expected to be Wenger’s final season in charge at the Emirates, even if Arsenal win the Europa League and qualify for the Champions League. Attention is now turning to how Wenger will be replaced, with head of football relations Raul Sanllehi, head of recruitment Sven Mislintat and chief executive Ivan Gazidis all working on the succession plan. Spanish sources claim that Sanllehi’s favoured candidate is Luis Enrique, who he worked with successfully at Barcelona. Enrique won two La Liga titles and the Champions League while in charge of Barcelona and is keen to resume his managerial career in England when he completes his year-long sabbatical. The Spaniard has also been linked with Chelsea, but his wage demands, which are said to top £10 million-a-year, could put off both clubs. Luis Enrique, who is keen on managing in England, has been linked with Arsenal Credit: Getty Images Mislintat is believed to be concentrating his attention in Germany. He is a big fan of 30-year-old Hoffenheim manager Julian Nagelsmann and Shalke’s Domenico Tedesco, who is just two years older. A picture emerged of Mislintat at Shalke’s 2-0 victory over his former club Borussia Dortmund over the weekend and Tedesco’s team are second in the Bundesliga table. Hoffenheim are four places back in sixth and Nagelsmann’s work in his two-and-a-half years in charge have earned him a reputation for being one of the best young coaches in Europe. Gazidis is known to be a big admirer of former Arsenal captain Mikel Arteta, who is also somebody Sanllehi rates, and is impressed by the work of Monaco’s Leonardo Jardim and Celtic’s Brendan Rodgers. Arsenal ideally want a younger man to replace 68-year-old Wenger and Sanllehi, Mislintat and Gazidis will all work together to try to find common ground on exactly who should make their shortlist. Brendan Rodgers is another manager who has been touted as a possible replacement for Wenger Credit: Getty Images But that will not be an easy job with each man favouring different candidates and working to their own agendas. Arsenal’s determination to ensure Wenger is given a respectful exit also complicates the process over finding his successor, as the club do not want to be seen to be approaching candidates while the Frenchman is in post. That means that while other clubs are openly speaking with managers and their agents, the Gunners are having to tread carefully and act discreetly. Majority shareholder Stan Kroenke will ultimately have the final say on who replaces Wenger and he will also listen to advice from his son Josh. But both Kroenke’s will rely heavily on the advice of Sanllehi, Mislintat and Gazidis. It is a similar scenario in terms of player recruitment with agents and middle men currently unsure who has casting vote in terms of summer transfer targets. Premier League and Football League relegation, promotion and play-offs Arsenal want a goalkeeper, a central defender and a midfielder to bolster their squad, but there is a level of confusion from outside the club over who is in charge. Agents have traditionally either gone direct to Wenger or approached Dick Law, who this season stepped down from his job that saw him directly involved in player recruitment and contracts. Mislintat and Gazidis took the lead during the January transfer window, as the pair were pictured in Germany to negotiate the club record transfer of Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang and Mislintat recommended Henrikh Mkhitaryan.
Arsenal are split over who they want to replace Arsene Wenger as the club step up their search for his successor. This is expected to be Wenger’s final season in charge at the Emirates, even if Arsenal win the Europa League and qualify for the Champions League. Attention is now turning to how Wenger will be replaced, with head of football relations Raul Sanllehi, head of recruitment Sven Mislintat and chief executive Ivan Gazidis all working on the succession plan. Spanish sources claim that Sanllehi’s favoured candidate is Luis Enrique, who he worked with successfully at Barcelona. Enrique won two La Liga titles and the Champions League while in charge of Barcelona and is keen to resume his managerial career in England when he completes his year-long sabbatical. The Spaniard has also been linked with Chelsea, but his wage demands, which are said to top £10 million-a-year, could put off both clubs. Luis Enrique, who is keen on managing in England, has been linked with Arsenal Credit: Getty Images Mislintat is believed to be concentrating his attention in Germany. He is a big fan of 30-year-old Hoffenheim manager Julian Nagelsmann and Shalke’s Domenico Tedesco, who is just two years older. A picture emerged of Mislintat at Shalke’s 2-0 victory over his former club Borussia Dortmund over the weekend and Tedesco’s team are second in the Bundesliga table. Hoffenheim are four places back in sixth and Nagelsmann’s work in his two-and-a-half years in charge have earned him a reputation for being one of the best young coaches in Europe. Gazidis is known to be a big admirer of former Arsenal captain Mikel Arteta, who is also somebody Sanllehi rates, and is impressed by the work of Monaco’s Leonardo Jardim and Celtic’s Brendan Rodgers. Arsenal ideally want a younger man to replace 68-year-old Wenger and Sanllehi, Mislintat and Gazidis will all work together to try to find common ground on exactly who should make their shortlist. Brendan Rodgers is another manager who has been touted as a possible replacement for Wenger Credit: Getty Images But that will not be an easy job with each man favouring different candidates and working to their own agendas. Arsenal’s determination to ensure Wenger is given a respectful exit also complicates the process over finding his successor, as the club do not want to be seen to be approaching candidates while the Frenchman is in post. That means that while other clubs are openly speaking with managers and their agents, the Gunners are having to tread carefully and act discreetly. Majority shareholder Stan Kroenke will ultimately have the final say on who replaces Wenger and he will also listen to advice from his son Josh. But both Kroenke’s will rely heavily on the advice of Sanllehi, Mislintat and Gazidis. It is a similar scenario in terms of player recruitment with agents and middle men currently unsure who has casting vote in terms of summer transfer targets. Premier League and Football League relegation, promotion and play-offs Arsenal want a goalkeeper, a central defender and a midfielder to bolster their squad, but there is a level of confusion from outside the club over who is in charge. Agents have traditionally either gone direct to Wenger or approached Dick Law, who this season stepped down from his job that saw him directly involved in player recruitment and contracts. Mislintat and Gazidis took the lead during the January transfer window, as the pair were pictured in Germany to negotiate the club record transfer of Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang and Mislintat recommended Henrikh Mkhitaryan.
Arsenal split on who they want to succeed Arsene Wenger
Arsenal are split over who they want to replace Arsene Wenger as the club step up their search for his successor. This is expected to be Wenger’s final season in charge at the Emirates, even if Arsenal win the Europa League and qualify for the Champions League. Attention is now turning to how Wenger will be replaced, with head of football relations Raul Sanllehi, head of recruitment Sven Mislintat and chief executive Ivan Gazidis all working on the succession plan. Spanish sources claim that Sanllehi’s favoured candidate is Luis Enrique, who he worked with successfully at Barcelona. Enrique won two La Liga titles and the Champions League while in charge of Barcelona and is keen to resume his managerial career in England when he completes his year-long sabbatical. The Spaniard has also been linked with Chelsea, but his wage demands, which are said to top £10 million-a-year, could put off both clubs. Luis Enrique, who is keen on managing in England, has been linked with Arsenal Credit: Getty Images Mislintat is believed to be concentrating his attention in Germany. He is a big fan of 30-year-old Hoffenheim manager Julian Nagelsmann and Shalke’s Domenico Tedesco, who is just two years older. A picture emerged of Mislintat at Shalke’s 2-0 victory over his former club Borussia Dortmund over the weekend and Tedesco’s team are second in the Bundesliga table. Hoffenheim are four places back in sixth and Nagelsmann’s work in his two-and-a-half years in charge have earned him a reputation for being one of the best young coaches in Europe. Gazidis is known to be a big admirer of former Arsenal captain Mikel Arteta, who is also somebody Sanllehi rates, and is impressed by the work of Monaco’s Leonardo Jardim and Celtic’s Brendan Rodgers. Arsenal ideally want a younger man to replace 68-year-old Wenger and Sanllehi, Mislintat and Gazidis will all work together to try to find common ground on exactly who should make their shortlist. Brendan Rodgers is another manager who has been touted as a possible replacement for Wenger Credit: Getty Images But that will not be an easy job with each man favouring different candidates and working to their own agendas. Arsenal’s determination to ensure Wenger is given a respectful exit also complicates the process over finding his successor, as the club do not want to be seen to be approaching candidates while the Frenchman is in post. That means that while other clubs are openly speaking with managers and their agents, the Gunners are having to tread carefully and act discreetly. Majority shareholder Stan Kroenke will ultimately have the final say on who replaces Wenger and he will also listen to advice from his son Josh. But both Kroenke’s will rely heavily on the advice of Sanllehi, Mislintat and Gazidis. It is a similar scenario in terms of player recruitment with agents and middle men currently unsure who has casting vote in terms of summer transfer targets. Premier League and Football League relegation, promotion and play-offs Arsenal want a goalkeeper, a central defender and a midfielder to bolster their squad, but there is a level of confusion from outside the club over who is in charge. Agents have traditionally either gone direct to Wenger or approached Dick Law, who this season stepped down from his job that saw him directly involved in player recruitment and contracts. Mislintat and Gazidis took the lead during the January transfer window, as the pair were pictured in Germany to negotiate the club record transfer of Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang and Mislintat recommended Henrikh Mkhitaryan.
Jason Burt: Pep Guardiola (Man City) Net spend:£174.6m Points per game: 2.63 Points per pound: 3.1* Average goals per game: 2.6 One of the key criteria for selecting manager of the season is how best he uses his resources. Some might argue that rules out Pep Guardiola. In fact the Manchester City manager has used the vast financial backing he has at his disposal superbly. He has overhauled an ageing squad, he has brought in exciting young players and he has improved those he inherited. No-one could argue that the likes of David Silva, Raheem Sterling, Nicolas Otamendi and, yes, Fabian Delph are not better under Guardiola. But it goes beyond that. It goes to the heart of the football being played. Guardiola has raised the bar for the rest of the Premier League. City are playing such an exciting, attacking progressive football. There has not been a disappointing match all season. Not one. They are a joy to watch. A lesson to everyone. Man City player ratings for title-winning season Luke Edwards: Rafa Benitez (Newcastle) Net spend:£10.25m Points per game: 1.24 Points per pound: 1.13 Average goals per game: 1.1 To put Rafa Benitez’s success at Newcastle into context you have to understand he has not only spent less than Brighton and Huddersfield, he is on course to secure the club only their third top 10 finish since Mike Ashley became owner in 2007. To do so with a squad that relied solely on loan signings in January, because the board refused to spend on transfer fees, and the same core group of players who played in the Championship, is testimony to his skill on the training pitch. But the job Benitez has done is about more than just improving a football team. He has rebuilt a football club, re-bonded supporters with the players, overhauled the scouting system, and raised standards in every aspect of the business. For the first time in more than a decade, when you hear Newcastle mentioned you think of his class as manager and a brave, hardworking team that cares about the shirt, not the crass, arrogant and blundering Ashley. Benitez has re-bonded Newcastle's supporters with the players Credit: Getty Images Matt Law: Roy Hodgson (Crystal Palace) Net spend:£9m Points per game: 1.13 Points per pound: N/A Average goals scored: 1.21 No points, no goals and no hope. That was what Roy Hodgson was facing when he took over at Crystal Palace in September. Hodgson also had to deal with the fact that he had been unfairly written off by those who could not bring themselves to look past the 2016 European Championships. Sure, England’s defeat to Iceland was a terrible moment, but it was just that - a moment - and the 70-year-old is proving once again what a skilled manager he is. He has lifted Palace clear of the relegation zone, despite long injuries to key players and a difficult January transfer window. Palace and Hodgson just feel like a really good fit. He understands the locals and the high-tempo brand of football they react to, and they appreciate his affinity to the club. Hodgson’s long career should never have been defined by the Euros and his work at Palace is reminding even his critics of that. Hodgson is a good fit for Palace Credit: Getty Images Rob Bagchi: David Wagner Net spend:£44.5m Points per pound: 0.71 Points per game: 1.02 Average goals scored: 0.92 David Wagner will have to keep Huddersfield Town up to be a credible contender but if he does, as seems likely, he deserves boundless praise for achieving safety with the Premier League's weakest squad. Wagner has maintained the coherence and confidence of his promotion-winning side and the high tempo intensity of their pressing that marked them out last year was harnessed to give them their lightning start. After opponents began to suss them out and stymie Town's whirling, dynamic counter-attacking with their greater individual quality, Wagner still managed to deploy his full-backs and wingers to create the space to stretch teams and use Aaron Mooy and Alex Pritchard to exploit it. Victories and goals have been scarce but their knack of beating strugglers when it matters is testament to their pluck and belief. Regular defeats have also not dispirited them. The resolve and raucous support that earned them that unforgettable victory over Manchester United shows how Wagner is not just leading a club but a cause. Wagner has maintained Huddersfield's confidence this season Credit: Reuters Sam Wallace: Jurgen Klopp (Liverpool) Net spend: -£28m Points per game:2.05 Points per pound: 2.15 Average goals scored: 2.38 It is hard to think of many Champions League semi-finalists who sold their best player midway through a season. Of course, Philippe Coutinho, had he stayed, might no longer be Liverpool’s best player but then that would be more to do with the bullseye aim of the club in the transfer market in recent windows, and their manager’s pursuit of improvement. Klopp’s net spend at Anfield is negligible. He came to Liverpool with a clear idea of how he wanted to play but rather than chuck out one group of players and start afresh he has, on the whole, coached his way through it. Tactically, he seems to get better with every season. He has made the occasional misjudgement but is a man given to apologising when he realises he has erred. He knows football from both ends, life as the European super-coach and also as the penniless Bundesliga 2 centre-half. It gives him perspective and the courage to follow his convictions - and how that is paying off. Klopp exclusive interview Jim White: Sean Dyche (Burnley) Net spend: -£12.3m Points per pound: 1.69 Points per game: 1.57 Average goals scored: 0.94 What Sean Dyche has done at Turf Moor this season is remarkable. It is not simply that he has taken Burnley to the brink of European qualification, playing smart football along the way, his personal approach one of charm, optimism and good humour. Though all that would be qualification enough. What he has done that is so different is completely to reverse the brutal economic laws of the modern game, establishing a club with a budget that wouldn’t look out of place in League One at the heart of the Premier League. This is the lightweight slugging it out among the heavyweights. And frequently coming away with a knock out. Sean Dyche's Burnley squad have been punching above their weight Credit: Mark Robinson Jeremy Wilson: Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Net spend:£11.95m Points per pound: 3.1 Points per game: 1.11 Goals per game: 1.25 Had this been Bournemouth’s first season back in the Premier League, people would have been queuing up to outline Eddie Howe’s credentials for manager of the year. As it is their third, his achievements seem now almost to be taken for granted, even though consistently repeating success for a club on Bournemouth’s budget only gets progressively harder. It is remarkable that Bournemouth could yet clinch a second successive top-half finish on a wage bill and turnover that is still a fraction of most of their competitors, including Newcastle where Rafael Benitez is more vocally lauded for his work, and with an attacking, passing style that has never been compromised. Attention spans in football can be short – and we do very quickly move on to the next big flavour of the moment - but Howe’s Bournemouth have never stopped punching far above their natural resources. Bournemouth could yet clinch a second successive top-half finish Credit: Reuters
Who is your Premier League manager of the year? Our writers have their say
Jason Burt: Pep Guardiola (Man City) Net spend:£174.6m Points per game: 2.63 Points per pound: 3.1* Average goals per game: 2.6 One of the key criteria for selecting manager of the season is how best he uses his resources. Some might argue that rules out Pep Guardiola. In fact the Manchester City manager has used the vast financial backing he has at his disposal superbly. He has overhauled an ageing squad, he has brought in exciting young players and he has improved those he inherited. No-one could argue that the likes of David Silva, Raheem Sterling, Nicolas Otamendi and, yes, Fabian Delph are not better under Guardiola. But it goes beyond that. It goes to the heart of the football being played. Guardiola has raised the bar for the rest of the Premier League. City are playing such an exciting, attacking progressive football. There has not been a disappointing match all season. Not one. They are a joy to watch. A lesson to everyone. Man City player ratings for title-winning season Luke Edwards: Rafa Benitez (Newcastle) Net spend:£10.25m Points per game: 1.24 Points per pound: 1.13 Average goals per game: 1.1 To put Rafa Benitez’s success at Newcastle into context you have to understand he has not only spent less than Brighton and Huddersfield, he is on course to secure the club only their third top 10 finish since Mike Ashley became owner in 2007. To do so with a squad that relied solely on loan signings in January, because the board refused to spend on transfer fees, and the same core group of players who played in the Championship, is testimony to his skill on the training pitch. But the job Benitez has done is about more than just improving a football team. He has rebuilt a football club, re-bonded supporters with the players, overhauled the scouting system, and raised standards in every aspect of the business. For the first time in more than a decade, when you hear Newcastle mentioned you think of his class as manager and a brave, hardworking team that cares about the shirt, not the crass, arrogant and blundering Ashley. Benitez has re-bonded Newcastle's supporters with the players Credit: Getty Images Matt Law: Roy Hodgson (Crystal Palace) Net spend:£9m Points per game: 1.13 Points per pound: N/A Average goals scored: 1.21 No points, no goals and no hope. That was what Roy Hodgson was facing when he took over at Crystal Palace in September. Hodgson also had to deal with the fact that he had been unfairly written off by those who could not bring themselves to look past the 2016 European Championships. Sure, England’s defeat to Iceland was a terrible moment, but it was just that - a moment - and the 70-year-old is proving once again what a skilled manager he is. He has lifted Palace clear of the relegation zone, despite long injuries to key players and a difficult January transfer window. Palace and Hodgson just feel like a really good fit. He understands the locals and the high-tempo brand of football they react to, and they appreciate his affinity to the club. Hodgson’s long career should never have been defined by the Euros and his work at Palace is reminding even his critics of that. Hodgson is a good fit for Palace Credit: Getty Images Rob Bagchi: David Wagner Net spend:£44.5m Points per pound: 0.71 Points per game: 1.02 Average goals scored: 0.92 David Wagner will have to keep Huddersfield Town up to be a credible contender but if he does, as seems likely, he deserves boundless praise for achieving safety with the Premier League's weakest squad. Wagner has maintained the coherence and confidence of his promotion-winning side and the high tempo intensity of their pressing that marked them out last year was harnessed to give them their lightning start. After opponents began to suss them out and stymie Town's whirling, dynamic counter-attacking with their greater individual quality, Wagner still managed to deploy his full-backs and wingers to create the space to stretch teams and use Aaron Mooy and Alex Pritchard to exploit it. Victories and goals have been scarce but their knack of beating strugglers when it matters is testament to their pluck and belief. Regular defeats have also not dispirited them. The resolve and raucous support that earned them that unforgettable victory over Manchester United shows how Wagner is not just leading a club but a cause. Wagner has maintained Huddersfield's confidence this season Credit: Reuters Sam Wallace: Jurgen Klopp (Liverpool) Net spend: -£28m Points per game:2.05 Points per pound: 2.15 Average goals scored: 2.38 It is hard to think of many Champions League semi-finalists who sold their best player midway through a season. Of course, Philippe Coutinho, had he stayed, might no longer be Liverpool’s best player but then that would be more to do with the bullseye aim of the club in the transfer market in recent windows, and their manager’s pursuit of improvement. Klopp’s net spend at Anfield is negligible. He came to Liverpool with a clear idea of how he wanted to play but rather than chuck out one group of players and start afresh he has, on the whole, coached his way through it. Tactically, he seems to get better with every season. He has made the occasional misjudgement but is a man given to apologising when he realises he has erred. He knows football from both ends, life as the European super-coach and also as the penniless Bundesliga 2 centre-half. It gives him perspective and the courage to follow his convictions - and how that is paying off. Klopp exclusive interview Jim White: Sean Dyche (Burnley) Net spend: -£12.3m Points per pound: 1.69 Points per game: 1.57 Average goals scored: 0.94 What Sean Dyche has done at Turf Moor this season is remarkable. It is not simply that he has taken Burnley to the brink of European qualification, playing smart football along the way, his personal approach one of charm, optimism and good humour. Though all that would be qualification enough. What he has done that is so different is completely to reverse the brutal economic laws of the modern game, establishing a club with a budget that wouldn’t look out of place in League One at the heart of the Premier League. This is the lightweight slugging it out among the heavyweights. And frequently coming away with a knock out. Sean Dyche's Burnley squad have been punching above their weight Credit: Mark Robinson Jeremy Wilson: Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Net spend:£11.95m Points per pound: 3.1 Points per game: 1.11 Goals per game: 1.25 Had this been Bournemouth’s first season back in the Premier League, people would have been queuing up to outline Eddie Howe’s credentials for manager of the year. As it is their third, his achievements seem now almost to be taken for granted, even though consistently repeating success for a club on Bournemouth’s budget only gets progressively harder. It is remarkable that Bournemouth could yet clinch a second successive top-half finish on a wage bill and turnover that is still a fraction of most of their competitors, including Newcastle where Rafael Benitez is more vocally lauded for his work, and with an attacking, passing style that has never been compromised. Attention spans in football can be short – and we do very quickly move on to the next big flavour of the moment - but Howe’s Bournemouth have never stopped punching far above their natural resources. Bournemouth could yet clinch a second successive top-half finish Credit: Reuters
Jason Burt: Pep Guardiola (Man City) Net spend:£174.6m Points per game: 2.63 Points per pound: 3.1* Average goals per game: 2.6 One of the key criteria for selecting manager of the season is how best he uses his resources. Some might argue that rules out Pep Guardiola. In fact the Manchester City manager has used the vast financial backing he has at his disposal superbly. He has overhauled an ageing squad, he has brought in exciting young players and he has improved those he inherited. No-one could argue that the likes of David Silva, Raheem Sterling, Nicolas Otamendi and, yes, Fabian Delph are not better under Guardiola. But it goes beyond that. It goes to the heart of the football being played. Guardiola has raised the bar for the rest of the Premier League. City are playing such an exciting, attacking progressive football. There has not been a disappointing match all season. Not one. They are a joy to watch. A lesson to everyone. Man City player ratings for title-winning season Luke Edwards: Rafa Benitez (Newcastle) Net spend:£10.25m Points per game: 1.24 Points per pound: 1.13 Average goals per game: 1.1 To put Rafa Benitez’s success at Newcastle into context you have to understand he has not only spent less than Brighton and Huddersfield, he is on course to secure the club only their third top 10 finish since Mike Ashley became owner in 2007. To do so with a squad that relied solely on loan signings in January, because the board refused to spend on transfer fees, and the same core group of players who played in the Championship, is testimony to his skill on the training pitch. But the job Benitez has done is about more than just improving a football team. He has rebuilt a football club, re-bonded supporters with the players, overhauled the scouting system, and raised standards in every aspect of the business. For the first time in more than a decade, when you hear Newcastle mentioned you think of his class as manager and a brave, hardworking team that cares about the shirt, not the crass, arrogant and blundering Ashley. Benitez has re-bonded Newcastle's supporters with the players Credit: Getty Images Matt Law: Roy Hodgson (Crystal Palace) Net spend:£9m Points per game: 1.13 Points per pound: N/A Average goals scored: 1.21 No points, no goals and no hope. That was what Roy Hodgson was facing when he took over at Crystal Palace in September. Hodgson also had to deal with the fact that he had been unfairly written off by those who could not bring themselves to look past the 2016 European Championships. Sure, England’s defeat to Iceland was a terrible moment, but it was just that - a moment - and the 70-year-old is proving once again what a skilled manager he is. He has lifted Palace clear of the relegation zone, despite long injuries to key players and a difficult January transfer window. Palace and Hodgson just feel like a really good fit. He understands the locals and the high-tempo brand of football they react to, and they appreciate his affinity to the club. Hodgson’s long career should never have been defined by the Euros and his work at Palace is reminding even his critics of that. Hodgson is a good fit for Palace Credit: Getty Images Rob Bagchi: David Wagner Net spend:£44.5m Points per pound: 0.71 Points per game: 1.02 Average goals scored: 0.92 David Wagner will have to keep Huddersfield Town up to be a credible contender but if he does, as seems likely, he deserves boundless praise for achieving safety with the Premier League's weakest squad. Wagner has maintained the coherence and confidence of his promotion-winning side and the high tempo intensity of their pressing that marked them out last year was harnessed to give them their lightning start. After opponents began to suss them out and stymie Town's whirling, dynamic counter-attacking with their greater individual quality, Wagner still managed to deploy his full-backs and wingers to create the space to stretch teams and use Aaron Mooy and Alex Pritchard to exploit it. Victories and goals have been scarce but their knack of beating strugglers when it matters is testament to their pluck and belief. Regular defeats have also not dispirited them. The resolve and raucous support that earned them that unforgettable victory over Manchester United shows how Wagner is not just leading a club but a cause. Wagner has maintained Huddersfield's confidence this season Credit: Reuters Sam Wallace: Jurgen Klopp (Liverpool) Net spend: -£28m Points per game:2.05 Points per pound: 2.15 Average goals scored: 2.38 It is hard to think of many Champions League semi-finalists who sold their best player midway through a season. Of course, Philippe Coutinho, had he stayed, might no longer be Liverpool’s best player but then that would be more to do with the bullseye aim of the club in the transfer market in recent windows, and their manager’s pursuit of improvement. Klopp’s net spend at Anfield is negligible. He came to Liverpool with a clear idea of how he wanted to play but rather than chuck out one group of players and start afresh he has, on the whole, coached his way through it. Tactically, he seems to get better with every season. He has made the occasional misjudgement but is a man given to apologising when he realises he has erred. He knows football from both ends, life as the European super-coach and also as the penniless Bundesliga 2 centre-half. It gives him perspective and the courage to follow his convictions - and how that is paying off. Klopp exclusive interview Jim White: Sean Dyche (Burnley) Net spend: -£12.3m Points per pound: 1.69 Points per game: 1.57 Average goals scored: 0.94 What Sean Dyche has done at Turf Moor this season is remarkable. It is not simply that he has taken Burnley to the brink of European qualification, playing smart football along the way, his personal approach one of charm, optimism and good humour. Though all that would be qualification enough. What he has done that is so different is completely to reverse the brutal economic laws of the modern game, establishing a club with a budget that wouldn’t look out of place in League One at the heart of the Premier League. This is the lightweight slugging it out among the heavyweights. And frequently coming away with a knock out. Sean Dyche's Burnley squad have been punching above their weight Credit: Mark Robinson Jeremy Wilson: Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Net spend:£11.95m Points per pound: 3.1 Points per game: 1.11 Goals per game: 1.25 Had this been Bournemouth’s first season back in the Premier League, people would have been queuing up to outline Eddie Howe’s credentials for manager of the year. As it is their third, his achievements seem now almost to be taken for granted, even though consistently repeating success for a club on Bournemouth’s budget only gets progressively harder. It is remarkable that Bournemouth could yet clinch a second successive top-half finish on a wage bill and turnover that is still a fraction of most of their competitors, including Newcastle where Rafael Benitez is more vocally lauded for his work, and with an attacking, passing style that has never been compromised. Attention spans in football can be short – and we do very quickly move on to the next big flavour of the moment - but Howe’s Bournemouth have never stopped punching far above their natural resources. Bournemouth could yet clinch a second successive top-half finish Credit: Reuters
Who is your Premier League manager of the year? Our writers have their say
Jason Burt: Pep Guardiola (Man City) Net spend:£174.6m Points per game: 2.63 Points per pound: 3.1* Average goals per game: 2.6 One of the key criteria for selecting manager of the season is how best he uses his resources. Some might argue that rules out Pep Guardiola. In fact the Manchester City manager has used the vast financial backing he has at his disposal superbly. He has overhauled an ageing squad, he has brought in exciting young players and he has improved those he inherited. No-one could argue that the likes of David Silva, Raheem Sterling, Nicolas Otamendi and, yes, Fabian Delph are not better under Guardiola. But it goes beyond that. It goes to the heart of the football being played. Guardiola has raised the bar for the rest of the Premier League. City are playing such an exciting, attacking progressive football. There has not been a disappointing match all season. Not one. They are a joy to watch. A lesson to everyone. Man City player ratings for title-winning season Luke Edwards: Rafa Benitez (Newcastle) Net spend:£10.25m Points per game: 1.24 Points per pound: 1.13 Average goals per game: 1.1 To put Rafa Benitez’s success at Newcastle into context you have to understand he has not only spent less than Brighton and Huddersfield, he is on course to secure the club only their third top 10 finish since Mike Ashley became owner in 2007. To do so with a squad that relied solely on loan signings in January, because the board refused to spend on transfer fees, and the same core group of players who played in the Championship, is testimony to his skill on the training pitch. But the job Benitez has done is about more than just improving a football team. He has rebuilt a football club, re-bonded supporters with the players, overhauled the scouting system, and raised standards in every aspect of the business. For the first time in more than a decade, when you hear Newcastle mentioned you think of his class as manager and a brave, hardworking team that cares about the shirt, not the crass, arrogant and blundering Ashley. Benitez has re-bonded Newcastle's supporters with the players Credit: Getty Images Matt Law: Roy Hodgson (Crystal Palace) Net spend:£9m Points per game: 1.13 Points per pound: N/A Average goals scored: 1.21 No points, no goals and no hope. That was what Roy Hodgson was facing when he took over at Crystal Palace in September. Hodgson also had to deal with the fact that he had been unfairly written off by those who could not bring themselves to look past the 2016 European Championships. Sure, England’s defeat to Iceland was a terrible moment, but it was just that - a moment - and the 70-year-old is proving once again what a skilled manager he is. He has lifted Palace clear of the relegation zone, despite long injuries to key players and a difficult January transfer window. Palace and Hodgson just feel like a really good fit. He understands the locals and the high-tempo brand of football they react to, and they appreciate his affinity to the club. Hodgson’s long career should never have been defined by the Euros and his work at Palace is reminding even his critics of that. Hodgson is a good fit for Palace Credit: Getty Images Rob Bagchi: David Wagner Net spend:£44.5m Points per pound: 0.71 Points per game: 1.02 Average goals scored: 0.92 David Wagner will have to keep Huddersfield Town up to be a credible contender but if he does, as seems likely, he deserves boundless praise for achieving safety with the Premier League's weakest squad. Wagner has maintained the coherence and confidence of his promotion-winning side and the high tempo intensity of their pressing that marked them out last year was harnessed to give them their lightning start. After opponents began to suss them out and stymie Town's whirling, dynamic counter-attacking with their greater individual quality, Wagner still managed to deploy his full-backs and wingers to create the space to stretch teams and use Aaron Mooy and Alex Pritchard to exploit it. Victories and goals have been scarce but their knack of beating strugglers when it matters is testament to their pluck and belief. Regular defeats have also not dispirited them. The resolve and raucous support that earned them that unforgettable victory over Manchester United shows how Wagner is not just leading a club but a cause. Wagner has maintained Huddersfield's confidence this season Credit: Reuters Sam Wallace: Jurgen Klopp (Liverpool) Net spend: -£28m Points per game:2.05 Points per pound: 2.15 Average goals scored: 2.38 It is hard to think of many Champions League semi-finalists who sold their best player midway through a season. Of course, Philippe Coutinho, had he stayed, might no longer be Liverpool’s best player but then that would be more to do with the bullseye aim of the club in the transfer market in recent windows, and their manager’s pursuit of improvement. Klopp’s net spend at Anfield is negligible. He came to Liverpool with a clear idea of how he wanted to play but rather than chuck out one group of players and start afresh he has, on the whole, coached his way through it. Tactically, he seems to get better with every season. He has made the occasional misjudgement but is a man given to apologising when he realises he has erred. He knows football from both ends, life as the European super-coach and also as the penniless Bundesliga 2 centre-half. It gives him perspective and the courage to follow his convictions - and how that is paying off. Klopp exclusive interview Jim White: Sean Dyche (Burnley) Net spend: -£12.3m Points per pound: 1.69 Points per game: 1.57 Average goals scored: 0.94 What Sean Dyche has done at Turf Moor this season is remarkable. It is not simply that he has taken Burnley to the brink of European qualification, playing smart football along the way, his personal approach one of charm, optimism and good humour. Though all that would be qualification enough. What he has done that is so different is completely to reverse the brutal economic laws of the modern game, establishing a club with a budget that wouldn’t look out of place in League One at the heart of the Premier League. This is the lightweight slugging it out among the heavyweights. And frequently coming away with a knock out. Sean Dyche's Burnley squad have been punching above their weight Credit: Mark Robinson Jeremy Wilson: Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Net spend:£11.95m Points per pound: 3.1 Points per game: 1.11 Goals per game: 1.25 Had this been Bournemouth’s first season back in the Premier League, people would have been queuing up to outline Eddie Howe’s credentials for manager of the year. As it is their third, his achievements seem now almost to be taken for granted, even though consistently repeating success for a club on Bournemouth’s budget only gets progressively harder. It is remarkable that Bournemouth could yet clinch a second successive top-half finish on a wage bill and turnover that is still a fraction of most of their competitors, including Newcastle where Rafael Benitez is more vocally lauded for his work, and with an attacking, passing style that has never been compromised. Attention spans in football can be short – and we do very quickly move on to the next big flavour of the moment - but Howe’s Bournemouth have never stopped punching far above their natural resources. Bournemouth could yet clinch a second successive top-half finish Credit: Reuters
Jason Burt: Pep Guardiola (Man City) Net spend:£174.6m Points per game: 2.63 Points per pound: 3.1* Average goals per game: 2.6 One of the key criteria for selecting manager of the season is how best he uses his resources. Some might argue that rules out Pep Guardiola. In fact the Manchester City manager has used the vast financial backing he has at his disposal superbly. He has overhauled an ageing squad, he has brought in exciting young players and he has improved those he inherited. No-one could argue that the likes of David Silva, Raheem Sterling, Nicolas Otamendi and, yes, Fabian Delph are not better under Guardiola. But it goes beyond that. It goes to the heart of the football being played. Guardiola has raised the bar for the rest of the Premier League. City are playing such an exciting, attacking progressive football. There has not been a disappointing match all season. Not one. They are a joy to watch. A lesson to everyone. Man City player ratings for title-winning season Luke Edwards: Rafa Benitez (Newcastle) Net spend:£10.25m Points per game: 1.24 Points per pound: 1.13 Average goals per game: 1.1 To put Rafa Benitez’s success at Newcastle into context you have to understand he has not only spent less than Brighton and Huddersfield, he is on course to secure the club only their third top 10 finish since Mike Ashley became owner in 2007. To do so with a squad that relied solely on loan signings in January, because the board refused to spend on transfer fees, and the same core group of players who played in the Championship, is testimony to his skill on the training pitch. But the job Benitez has done is about more than just improving a football team. He has rebuilt a football club, re-bonded supporters with the players, overhauled the scouting system, and raised standards in every aspect of the business. For the first time in more than a decade, when you hear Newcastle mentioned you think of his class as manager and a brave, hardworking team that cares about the shirt, not the crass, arrogant and blundering Ashley. Benitez has re-bonded Newcastle's supporters with the players Credit: Getty Images Matt Law: Roy Hodgson (Crystal Palace) Net spend:£9m Points per game: 1.13 Points per pound: N/A Average goals scored: 1.21 No points, no goals and no hope. That was what Roy Hodgson was facing when he took over at Crystal Palace in September. Hodgson also had to deal with the fact that he had been unfairly written off by those who could not bring themselves to look past the 2016 European Championships. Sure, England’s defeat to Iceland was a terrible moment, but it was just that - a moment - and the 70-year-old is proving once again what a skilled manager he is. He has lifted Palace clear of the relegation zone, despite long injuries to key players and a difficult January transfer window. Palace and Hodgson just feel like a really good fit. He understands the locals and the high-tempo brand of football they react to, and they appreciate his affinity to the club. Hodgson’s long career should never have been defined by the Euros and his work at Palace is reminding even his critics of that. Hodgson is a good fit for Palace Credit: Getty Images Rob Bagchi: David Wagner Net spend:£44.5m Points per pound: 0.71 Points per game: 1.02 Average goals scored: 0.92 David Wagner will have to keep Huddersfield Town up to be a credible contender but if he does, as seems likely, he deserves boundless praise for achieving safety with the Premier League's weakest squad. Wagner has maintained the coherence and confidence of his promotion-winning side and the high tempo intensity of their pressing that marked them out last year was harnessed to give them their lightning start. After opponents began to suss them out and stymie Town's whirling, dynamic counter-attacking with their greater individual quality, Wagner still managed to deploy his full-backs and wingers to create the space to stretch teams and use Aaron Mooy and Alex Pritchard to exploit it. Victories and goals have been scarce but their knack of beating strugglers when it matters is testament to their pluck and belief. Regular defeats have also not dispirited them. The resolve and raucous support that earned them that unforgettable victory over Manchester United shows how Wagner is not just leading a club but a cause. Wagner has maintained Huddersfield's confidence this season Credit: Reuters Sam Wallace: Jurgen Klopp (Liverpool) Net spend: -£28m Points per game:2.05 Points per pound: 2.15 Average goals scored: 2.38 It is hard to think of many Champions League semi-finalists who sold their best player midway through a season. Of course, Philippe Coutinho, had he stayed, might no longer be Liverpool’s best player but then that would be more to do with the bullseye aim of the club in the transfer market in recent windows, and their manager’s pursuit of improvement. Klopp’s net spend at Anfield is negligible. He came to Liverpool with a clear idea of how he wanted to play but rather than chuck out one group of players and start afresh he has, on the whole, coached his way through it. Tactically, he seems to get better with every season. He has made the occasional misjudgement but is a man given to apologising when he realises he has erred. He knows football from both ends, life as the European super-coach and also as the penniless Bundesliga 2 centre-half. It gives him perspective and the courage to follow his convictions - and how that is paying off. Klopp exclusive interview Jim White: Sean Dyche (Burnley) Net spend: -£12.3m Points per pound: 1.69 Points per game: 1.57 Average goals scored: 0.94 What Sean Dyche has done at Turf Moor this season is remarkable. It is not simply that he has taken Burnley to the brink of European qualification, playing smart football along the way, his personal approach one of charm, optimism and good humour. Though all that would be qualification enough. What he has done that is so different is completely to reverse the brutal economic laws of the modern game, establishing a club with a budget that wouldn’t look out of place in League One at the heart of the Premier League. This is the lightweight slugging it out among the heavyweights. And frequently coming away with a knock out. Sean Dyche's Burnley squad have been punching above their weight Credit: Mark Robinson Jeremy Wilson: Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Net spend:£11.95m Points per pound: 3.1 Points per game: 1.11 Goals per game: 1.25 Had this been Bournemouth’s first season back in the Premier League, people would have been queuing up to outline Eddie Howe’s credentials for manager of the year. As it is their third, his achievements seem now almost to be taken for granted, even though consistently repeating success for a club on Bournemouth’s budget only gets progressively harder. It is remarkable that Bournemouth could yet clinch a second successive top-half finish on a wage bill and turnover that is still a fraction of most of their competitors, including Newcastle where Rafael Benitez is more vocally lauded for his work, and with an attacking, passing style that has never been compromised. Attention spans in football can be short – and we do very quickly move on to the next big flavour of the moment - but Howe’s Bournemouth have never stopped punching far above their natural resources. Bournemouth could yet clinch a second successive top-half finish Credit: Reuters
Who is your Premier League manager of the year? Our writers have their say
Jason Burt: Pep Guardiola (Man City) Net spend:£174.6m Points per game: 2.63 Points per pound: 3.1* Average goals per game: 2.6 One of the key criteria for selecting manager of the season is how best he uses his resources. Some might argue that rules out Pep Guardiola. In fact the Manchester City manager has used the vast financial backing he has at his disposal superbly. He has overhauled an ageing squad, he has brought in exciting young players and he has improved those he inherited. No-one could argue that the likes of David Silva, Raheem Sterling, Nicolas Otamendi and, yes, Fabian Delph are not better under Guardiola. But it goes beyond that. It goes to the heart of the football being played. Guardiola has raised the bar for the rest of the Premier League. City are playing such an exciting, attacking progressive football. There has not been a disappointing match all season. Not one. They are a joy to watch. A lesson to everyone. Man City player ratings for title-winning season Luke Edwards: Rafa Benitez (Newcastle) Net spend:£10.25m Points per game: 1.24 Points per pound: 1.13 Average goals per game: 1.1 To put Rafa Benitez’s success at Newcastle into context you have to understand he has not only spent less than Brighton and Huddersfield, he is on course to secure the club only their third top 10 finish since Mike Ashley became owner in 2007. To do so with a squad that relied solely on loan signings in January, because the board refused to spend on transfer fees, and the same core group of players who played in the Championship, is testimony to his skill on the training pitch. But the job Benitez has done is about more than just improving a football team. He has rebuilt a football club, re-bonded supporters with the players, overhauled the scouting system, and raised standards in every aspect of the business. For the first time in more than a decade, when you hear Newcastle mentioned you think of his class as manager and a brave, hardworking team that cares about the shirt, not the crass, arrogant and blundering Ashley. Benitez has re-bonded Newcastle's supporters with the players Credit: Getty Images Matt Law: Roy Hodgson (Crystal Palace) Net spend:£9m Points per game: 1.13 Points per pound: N/A Average goals scored: 1.21 No points, no goals and no hope. That was what Roy Hodgson was facing when he took over at Crystal Palace in September. Hodgson also had to deal with the fact that he had been unfairly written off by those who could not bring themselves to look past the 2016 European Championships. Sure, England’s defeat to Iceland was a terrible moment, but it was just that - a moment - and the 70-year-old is proving once again what a skilled manager he is. He has lifted Palace clear of the relegation zone, despite long injuries to key players and a difficult January transfer window. Palace and Hodgson just feel like a really good fit. He understands the locals and the high-tempo brand of football they react to, and they appreciate his affinity to the club. Hodgson’s long career should never have been defined by the Euros and his work at Palace is reminding even his critics of that. Hodgson is a good fit for Palace Credit: Getty Images Rob Bagchi: David Wagner Net spend:£44.5m Points per pound: 0.71 Points per game: 1.02 Average goals scored: 0.92 David Wagner will have to keep Huddersfield Town up to be a credible contender but if he does, as seems likely, he deserves boundless praise for achieving safety with the Premier League's weakest squad. Wagner has maintained the coherence and confidence of his promotion-winning side and the high tempo intensity of their pressing that marked them out last year was harnessed to give them their lightning start. After opponents began to suss them out and stymie Town's whirling, dynamic counter-attacking with their greater individual quality, Wagner still managed to deploy his full-backs and wingers to create the space to stretch teams and use Aaron Mooy and Alex Pritchard to exploit it. Victories and goals have been scarce but their knack of beating strugglers when it matters is testament to their pluck and belief. Regular defeats have also not dispirited them. The resolve and raucous support that earned them that unforgettable victory over Manchester United shows how Wagner is not just leading a club but a cause. Wagner has maintained Huddersfield's confidence this season Credit: Reuters Sam Wallace: Jurgen Klopp (Liverpool) Net spend: -£28m Points per game:2.05 Points per pound: 2.15 Average goals scored: 2.38 It is hard to think of many Champions League semi-finalists who sold their best player midway through a season. Of course, Philippe Coutinho, had he stayed, might no longer be Liverpool’s best player but then that would be more to do with the bullseye aim of the club in the transfer market in recent windows, and their manager’s pursuit of improvement. Klopp’s net spend at Anfield is negligible. He came to Liverpool with a clear idea of how he wanted to play but rather than chuck out one group of players and start afresh he has, on the whole, coached his way through it. Tactically, he seems to get better with every season. He has made the occasional misjudgement but is a man given to apologising when he realises he has erred. He knows football from both ends, life as the European super-coach and also as the penniless Bundesliga 2 centre-half. It gives him perspective and the courage to follow his convictions - and how that is paying off. Klopp exclusive interview Jim White: Sean Dyche (Burnley) Net spend: -£12.3m Points per pound: 1.69 Points per game: 1.57 Average goals scored: 0.94 What Sean Dyche has done at Turf Moor this season is remarkable. It is not simply that he has taken Burnley to the brink of European qualification, playing smart football along the way, his personal approach one of charm, optimism and good humour. Though all that would be qualification enough. What he has done that is so different is completely to reverse the brutal economic laws of the modern game, establishing a club with a budget that wouldn’t look out of place in League One at the heart of the Premier League. This is the lightweight slugging it out among the heavyweights. And frequently coming away with a knock out. Sean Dyche's Burnley squad have been punching above their weight Credit: Mark Robinson Jeremy Wilson: Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Net spend:£11.95m Points per pound: 3.1 Points per game: 1.11 Goals per game: 1.25 Had this been Bournemouth’s first season back in the Premier League, people would have been queuing up to outline Eddie Howe’s credentials for manager of the year. As it is their third, his achievements seem now almost to be taken for granted, even though consistently repeating success for a club on Bournemouth’s budget only gets progressively harder. It is remarkable that Bournemouth could yet clinch a second successive top-half finish on a wage bill and turnover that is still a fraction of most of their competitors, including Newcastle where Rafael Benitez is more vocally lauded for his work, and with an attacking, passing style that has never been compromised. Attention spans in football can be short – and we do very quickly move on to the next big flavour of the moment - but Howe’s Bournemouth have never stopped punching far above their natural resources. Bournemouth could yet clinch a second successive top-half finish Credit: Reuters
Jason Burt: Pep Guardiola (Man City) Net spend:£174.6m Points per game: 2.63 Points per pound: 3.1* Average goals per game: 2.6 One of the key criteria for selecting manager of the season is how best he uses his resources. Some might argue that rules out Pep Guardiola. In fact the Manchester City manager has used the vast financial backing he has at his disposal superbly. He has overhauled an ageing squad, he has brought in exciting young players and he has improved those he inherited. No-one could argue that the likes of David Silva, Raheem Sterling, Nicolas Otamendi and, yes, Fabian Delph are not better under Guardiola. But it goes beyond that. It goes to the heart of the football being played. Guardiola has raised the bar for the rest of the Premier League. City are playing such an exciting, attacking progressive football. There has not been a disappointing match all season. Not one. They are a joy to watch. A lesson to everyone. Man City player ratings for title-winning season Luke Edwards: Rafa Benitez (Newcastle) Net spend:£10.25m Points per game: 1.24 Points per pound: 1.13 Average goals per game: 1.1 To put Rafa Benitez’s success at Newcastle into context you have to understand he has not only spent less than Brighton and Huddersfield, he is on course to secure the club only their third top 10 finish since Mike Ashley became owner in 2007. To do so with a squad that relied solely on loan signings in January, because the board refused to spend on transfer fees, and the same core group of players who played in the Championship, is testimony to his skill on the training pitch. But the job Benitez has done is about more than just improving a football team. He has rebuilt a football club, re-bonded supporters with the players, overhauled the scouting system, and raised standards in every aspect of the business. For the first time in more than a decade, when you hear Newcastle mentioned you think of his class as manager and a brave, hardworking team that cares about the shirt, not the crass, arrogant and blundering Ashley. Benitez has re-bonded Newcastle's supporters with the players Credit: Getty Images Matt Law: Roy Hodgson (Crystal Palace) Net spend:£9m Points per game: 1.13 Points per pound: N/A Average goals scored: 1.21 No points, no goals and no hope. That was what Roy Hodgson was facing when he took over at Crystal Palace in September. Hodgson also had to deal with the fact that he had been unfairly written off by those who could not bring themselves to look past the 2016 European Championships. Sure, England’s defeat to Iceland was a terrible moment, but it was just that - a moment - and the 70-year-old is proving once again what a skilled manager he is. He has lifted Palace clear of the relegation zone, despite long injuries to key players and a difficult January transfer window. Palace and Hodgson just feel like a really good fit. He understands the locals and the high-tempo brand of football they react to, and they appreciate his affinity to the club. Hodgson’s long career should never have been defined by the Euros and his work at Palace is reminding even his critics of that. Hodgson is a good fit for Palace Credit: Getty Images Rob Bagchi: David Wagner Net spend:£44.5m Points per pound: 0.71 Points per game: 1.02 Average goals scored: 0.92 David Wagner will have to keep Huddersfield Town up to be a credible contender but if he does, as seems likely, he deserves boundless praise for achieving safety with the Premier League's weakest squad. Wagner has maintained the coherence and confidence of his promotion-winning side and the high tempo intensity of their pressing that marked them out last year was harnessed to give them their lightning start. After opponents began to suss them out and stymie Town's whirling, dynamic counter-attacking with their greater individual quality, Wagner still managed to deploy his full-backs and wingers to create the space to stretch teams and use Aaron Mooy and Alex Pritchard to exploit it. Victories and goals have been scarce but their knack of beating strugglers when it matters is testament to their pluck and belief. Regular defeats have also not dispirited them. The resolve and raucous support that earned them that unforgettable victory over Manchester United shows how Wagner is not just leading a club but a cause. Wagner has maintained Huddersfield's confidence this season Credit: Reuters Sam Wallace: Jurgen Klopp (Liverpool) Net spend: -£28m Points per game:2.05 Points per pound: 2.15 Average goals scored: 2.38 It is hard to think of many Champions League semi-finalists who sold their best player midway through a season. Of course, Philippe Coutinho, had he stayed, might no longer be Liverpool’s best player but then that would be more to do with the bullseye aim of the club in the transfer market in recent windows, and their manager’s pursuit of improvement. Klopp’s net spend at Anfield is negligible. He came to Liverpool with a clear idea of how he wanted to play but rather than chuck out one group of players and start afresh he has, on the whole, coached his way through it. Tactically, he seems to get better with every season. He has made the occasional misjudgement but is a man given to apologising when he realises he has erred. He knows football from both ends, life as the European super-coach and also as the penniless Bundesliga 2 centre-half. It gives him perspective and the courage to follow his convictions - and how that is paying off. Klopp exclusive interview Jim White: Sean Dyche (Burnley) Net spend: -£12.3m Points per pound: 1.69 Points per game: 1.57 Average goals scored: 0.94 What Sean Dyche has done at Turf Moor this season is remarkable. It is not simply that he has taken Burnley to the brink of European qualification, playing smart football along the way, his personal approach one of charm, optimism and good humour. Though all that would be qualification enough. What he has done that is so different is completely to reverse the brutal economic laws of the modern game, establishing a club with a budget that wouldn’t look out of place in League One at the heart of the Premier League. This is the lightweight slugging it out among the heavyweights. And frequently coming away with a knock out. Sean Dyche's Burnley squad have been punching above their weight Credit: Mark Robinson Jeremy Wilson: Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Net spend:£11.95m Points per pound: 3.1 Points per game: 1.11 Goals per game: 1.25 Had this been Bournemouth’s first season back in the Premier League, people would have been queuing up to outline Eddie Howe’s credentials for manager of the year. As it is their third, his achievements seem now almost to be taken for granted, even though consistently repeating success for a club on Bournemouth’s budget only gets progressively harder. It is remarkable that Bournemouth could yet clinch a second successive top-half finish on a wage bill and turnover that is still a fraction of most of their competitors, including Newcastle where Rafael Benitez is more vocally lauded for his work, and with an attacking, passing style that has never been compromised. Attention spans in football can be short – and we do very quickly move on to the next big flavour of the moment - but Howe’s Bournemouth have never stopped punching far above their natural resources. Bournemouth could yet clinch a second successive top-half finish Credit: Reuters
Who is your Premier League manager of the year? Our writers have their say
Jason Burt: Pep Guardiola (Man City) Net spend:£174.6m Points per game: 2.63 Points per pound: 3.1* Average goals per game: 2.6 One of the key criteria for selecting manager of the season is how best he uses his resources. Some might argue that rules out Pep Guardiola. In fact the Manchester City manager has used the vast financial backing he has at his disposal superbly. He has overhauled an ageing squad, he has brought in exciting young players and he has improved those he inherited. No-one could argue that the likes of David Silva, Raheem Sterling, Nicolas Otamendi and, yes, Fabian Delph are not better under Guardiola. But it goes beyond that. It goes to the heart of the football being played. Guardiola has raised the bar for the rest of the Premier League. City are playing such an exciting, attacking progressive football. There has not been a disappointing match all season. Not one. They are a joy to watch. A lesson to everyone. Man City player ratings for title-winning season Luke Edwards: Rafa Benitez (Newcastle) Net spend:£10.25m Points per game: 1.24 Points per pound: 1.13 Average goals per game: 1.1 To put Rafa Benitez’s success at Newcastle into context you have to understand he has not only spent less than Brighton and Huddersfield, he is on course to secure the club only their third top 10 finish since Mike Ashley became owner in 2007. To do so with a squad that relied solely on loan signings in January, because the board refused to spend on transfer fees, and the same core group of players who played in the Championship, is testimony to his skill on the training pitch. But the job Benitez has done is about more than just improving a football team. He has rebuilt a football club, re-bonded supporters with the players, overhauled the scouting system, and raised standards in every aspect of the business. For the first time in more than a decade, when you hear Newcastle mentioned you think of his class as manager and a brave, hardworking team that cares about the shirt, not the crass, arrogant and blundering Ashley. Benitez has re-bonded Newcastle's supporters with the players Credit: Getty Images Matt Law: Roy Hodgson (Crystal Palace) Net spend:£9m Points per game: 1.13 Points per pound: N/A Average goals scored: 1.21 No points, no goals and no hope. That was what Roy Hodgson was facing when he took over at Crystal Palace in September. Hodgson also had to deal with the fact that he had been unfairly written off by those who could not bring themselves to look past the 2016 European Championships. Sure, England’s defeat to Iceland was a terrible moment, but it was just that - a moment - and the 70-year-old is proving once again what a skilled manager he is. He has lifted Palace clear of the relegation zone, despite long injuries to key players and a difficult January transfer window. Palace and Hodgson just feel like a really good fit. He understands the locals and the high-tempo brand of football they react to, and they appreciate his affinity to the club. Hodgson’s long career should never have been defined by the Euros and his work at Palace is reminding even his critics of that. Hodgson is a good fit for Palace Credit: Getty Images Rob Bagchi: David Wagner Net spend:£44.5m Points per pound: 0.71 Points per game: 1.02 Average goals scored: 0.92 David Wagner will have to keep Huddersfield Town up to be a credible contender but if he does, as seems likely, he deserves boundless praise for achieving safety with the Premier League's weakest squad. Wagner has maintained the coherence and confidence of his promotion-winning side and the high tempo intensity of their pressing that marked them out last year was harnessed to give them their lightning start. After opponents began to suss them out and stymie Town's whirling, dynamic counter-attacking with their greater individual quality, Wagner still managed to deploy his full-backs and wingers to create the space to stretch teams and use Aaron Mooy and Alex Pritchard to exploit it. Victories and goals have been scarce but their knack of beating strugglers when it matters is testament to their pluck and belief. Regular defeats have also not dispirited them. The resolve and raucous support that earned them that unforgettable victory over Manchester United shows how Wagner is not just leading a club but a cause. Wagner has maintained Huddersfield's confidence this season Credit: Reuters Sam Wallace: Jurgen Klopp (Liverpool) Net spend: -£28m Points per game:2.05 Points per pound: 2.15 Average goals scored: 2.38 It is hard to think of many Champions League semi-finalists who sold their best player midway through a season. Of course, Philippe Coutinho, had he stayed, might no longer be Liverpool’s best player but then that would be more to do with the bullseye aim of the club in the transfer market in recent windows, and their manager’s pursuit of improvement. Klopp’s net spend at Anfield is negligible. He came to Liverpool with a clear idea of how he wanted to play but rather than chuck out one group of players and start afresh he has, on the whole, coached his way through it. Tactically, he seems to get better with every season. He has made the occasional misjudgement but is a man given to apologising when he realises he has erred. He knows football from both ends, life as the European super-coach and also as the penniless Bundesliga 2 centre-half. It gives him perspective and the courage to follow his convictions - and how that is paying off. Klopp exclusive interview Jim White: Sean Dyche (Burnley) Net spend: -£12.3m Points per pound: 1.69 Points per game: 1.57 Average goals scored: 0.94 What Sean Dyche has done at Turf Moor this season is remarkable. It is not simply that he has taken Burnley to the brink of European qualification, playing smart football along the way, his personal approach one of charm, optimism and good humour. Though all that would be qualification enough. What he has done that is so different is completely to reverse the brutal economic laws of the modern game, establishing a club with a budget that wouldn’t look out of place in League One at the heart of the Premier League. This is the lightweight slugging it out among the heavyweights. And frequently coming away with a knock out. Sean Dyche's Burnley squad have been punching above their weight Credit: Mark Robinson Jeremy Wilson: Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Net spend:£11.95m Points per pound: 3.1 Points per game: 1.11 Goals per game: 1.25 Had this been Bournemouth’s first season back in the Premier League, people would have been queuing up to outline Eddie Howe’s credentials for manager of the year. As it is their third, his achievements seem now almost to be taken for granted, even though consistently repeating success for a club on Bournemouth’s budget only gets progressively harder. It is remarkable that Bournemouth could yet clinch a second successive top-half finish on a wage bill and turnover that is still a fraction of most of their competitors, including Newcastle where Rafael Benitez is more vocally lauded for his work, and with an attacking, passing style that has never been compromised. Attention spans in football can be short – and we do very quickly move on to the next big flavour of the moment - but Howe’s Bournemouth have never stopped punching far above their natural resources. Bournemouth could yet clinch a second successive top-half finish Credit: Reuters
Jason Burt: Pep Guardiola (Man City) Net spend:£174.6m Points per game: 2.63 Points per pound: 3.1* Average goals per game: 2.6 One of the key criteria for selecting manager of the season is how best he uses his resources. Some might argue that rules out Pep Guardiola. In fact the Manchester City manager has used the vast financial backing he has at his disposal superbly. He has overhauled an ageing squad, he has brought in exciting young players and he has improved those he inherited. No-one could argue that the likes of David Silva, Raheem Sterling, Nicolas Otamendi and, yes, Fabian Delph are not better under Guardiola. But it goes beyond that. It goes to the heart of the football being played. Guardiola has raised the bar for the rest of the Premier League. City are playing such an exciting, attacking progressive football. There has not been a disappointing match all season. Not one. They are a joy to watch. A lesson to everyone. Man City player ratings for title-winning season Luke Edwards: Rafa Benitez (Newcastle) Net spend:£10.25m Points per game: 1.24 Points per pound: 1.13 Average goals per game: 1.1 To put Rafa Benitez’s success at Newcastle into context you have to understand he has not only spent less than Brighton and Huddersfield, he is on course to secure the club only their third top 10 finish since Mike Ashley became owner in 2007. To do so with a squad that relied solely on loan signings in January, because the board refused to spend on transfer fees, and the same core group of players who played in the Championship, is testimony to his skill on the training pitch. But the job Benitez has done is about more than just improving a football team. He has rebuilt a football club, re-bonded supporters with the players, overhauled the scouting system, and raised standards in every aspect of the business. For the first time in more than a decade, when you hear Newcastle mentioned you think of his class as manager and a brave, hardworking team that cares about the shirt, not the crass, arrogant and blundering Ashley. Benitez has re-bonded Newcastle's supporters with the players Credit: Getty Images Matt Law: Roy Hodgson (Crystal Palace) Net spend:£9m Points per game: 1.13 Points per pound: N/A Average goals scored: 1.21 No points, no goals and no hope. That was what Roy Hodgson was facing when he took over at Crystal Palace in September. Hodgson also had to deal with the fact that he had been unfairly written off by those who could not bring themselves to look past the 2016 European Championships. Sure, England’s defeat to Iceland was a terrible moment, but it was just that - a moment - and the 70-year-old is proving once again what a skilled manager he is. He has lifted Palace clear of the relegation zone, despite long injuries to key players and a difficult January transfer window. Palace and Hodgson just feel like a really good fit. He understands the locals and the high-tempo brand of football they react to, and they appreciate his affinity to the club. Hodgson’s long career should never have been defined by the Euros and his work at Palace is reminding even his critics of that. Hodgson is a good fit for Palace Credit: Getty Images Rob Bagchi: David Wagner Net spend:£44.5m Points per pound: 0.71 Points per game: 1.02 Average goals scored: 0.92 David Wagner will have to keep Huddersfield Town up to be a credible contender but if he does, as seems likely, he deserves boundless praise for achieving safety with the Premier League's weakest squad. Wagner has maintained the coherence and confidence of his promotion-winning side and the high tempo intensity of their pressing that marked them out last year was harnessed to give them their lightning start. After opponents began to suss them out and stymie Town's whirling, dynamic counter-attacking with their greater individual quality, Wagner still managed to deploy his full-backs and wingers to create the space to stretch teams and use Aaron Mooy and Alex Pritchard to exploit it. Victories and goals have been scarce but their knack of beating strugglers when it matters is testament to their pluck and belief. Regular defeats have also not dispirited them. The resolve and raucous support that earned them that unforgettable victory over Manchester United shows how Wagner is not just leading a club but a cause. Wagner has maintained Huddersfield's confidence this season Credit: Reuters Sam Wallace: Jurgen Klopp (Liverpool) Net spend: -£28m Points per game:2.05 Points per pound: 2.15 Average goals scored: 2.38 It is hard to think of many Champions League semi-finalists who sold their best player midway through a season. Of course, Philippe Coutinho, had he stayed, might no longer be Liverpool’s best player but then that would be more to do with the bullseye aim of the club in the transfer market in recent windows, and their manager’s pursuit of improvement. Klopp’s net spend at Anfield is negligible. He came to Liverpool with a clear idea of how he wanted to play but rather than chuck out one group of players and start afresh he has, on the whole, coached his way through it. Tactically, he seems to get better with every season. He has made the occasional misjudgement but is a man given to apologising when he realises he has erred. He knows football from both ends, life as the European super-coach and also as the penniless Bundesliga 2 centre-half. It gives him perspective and the courage to follow his convictions - and how that is paying off. Klopp exclusive interview Jim White: Sean Dyche (Burnley) Net spend: -£12.3m Points per pound: 1.69 Points per game: 1.57 Average goals scored: 0.94 What Sean Dyche has done at Turf Moor this season is remarkable. It is not simply that he has taken Burnley to the brink of European qualification, playing smart football along the way, his personal approach one of charm, optimism and good humour. Though all that would be qualification enough. What he has done that is so different is completely to reverse the brutal economic laws of the modern game, establishing a club with a budget that wouldn’t look out of place in League One at the heart of the Premier League. This is the lightweight slugging it out among the heavyweights. And frequently coming away with a knock out. Sean Dyche's Burnley squad have been punching above their weight Credit: Mark Robinson Jeremy Wilson: Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Net spend:£11.95m Points per pound: 3.1 Points per game: 1.11 Goals per game: 1.25 Had this been Bournemouth’s first season back in the Premier League, people would have been queuing up to outline Eddie Howe’s credentials for manager of the year. As it is their third, his achievements seem now almost to be taken for granted, even though consistently repeating success for a club on Bournemouth’s budget only gets progressively harder. It is remarkable that Bournemouth could yet clinch a second successive top-half finish on a wage bill and turnover that is still a fraction of most of their competitors, including Newcastle where Rafael Benitez is more vocally lauded for his work, and with an attacking, passing style that has never been compromised. Attention spans in football can be short – and we do very quickly move on to the next big flavour of the moment - but Howe’s Bournemouth have never stopped punching far above their natural resources. Bournemouth could yet clinch a second successive top-half finish Credit: Reuters
Who is your Premier League manager of the year? Our writers have their say
Jason Burt: Pep Guardiola (Man City) Net spend:£174.6m Points per game: 2.63 Points per pound: 3.1* Average goals per game: 2.6 One of the key criteria for selecting manager of the season is how best he uses his resources. Some might argue that rules out Pep Guardiola. In fact the Manchester City manager has used the vast financial backing he has at his disposal superbly. He has overhauled an ageing squad, he has brought in exciting young players and he has improved those he inherited. No-one could argue that the likes of David Silva, Raheem Sterling, Nicolas Otamendi and, yes, Fabian Delph are not better under Guardiola. But it goes beyond that. It goes to the heart of the football being played. Guardiola has raised the bar for the rest of the Premier League. City are playing such an exciting, attacking progressive football. There has not been a disappointing match all season. Not one. They are a joy to watch. A lesson to everyone. Man City player ratings for title-winning season Luke Edwards: Rafa Benitez (Newcastle) Net spend:£10.25m Points per game: 1.24 Points per pound: 1.13 Average goals per game: 1.1 To put Rafa Benitez’s success at Newcastle into context you have to understand he has not only spent less than Brighton and Huddersfield, he is on course to secure the club only their third top 10 finish since Mike Ashley became owner in 2007. To do so with a squad that relied solely on loan signings in January, because the board refused to spend on transfer fees, and the same core group of players who played in the Championship, is testimony to his skill on the training pitch. But the job Benitez has done is about more than just improving a football team. He has rebuilt a football club, re-bonded supporters with the players, overhauled the scouting system, and raised standards in every aspect of the business. For the first time in more than a decade, when you hear Newcastle mentioned you think of his class as manager and a brave, hardworking team that cares about the shirt, not the crass, arrogant and blundering Ashley. Benitez has re-bonded Newcastle's supporters with the players Credit: Getty Images Matt Law: Roy Hodgson (Crystal Palace) Net spend:£9m Points per game: 1.13 Points per pound: N/A Average goals scored: 1.21 No points, no goals and no hope. That was what Roy Hodgson was facing when he took over at Crystal Palace in September. Hodgson also had to deal with the fact that he had been unfairly written off by those who could not bring themselves to look past the 2016 European Championships. Sure, England’s defeat to Iceland was a terrible moment, but it was just that - a moment - and the 70-year-old is proving once again what a skilled manager he is. He has lifted Palace clear of the relegation zone, despite long injuries to key players and a difficult January transfer window. Palace and Hodgson just feel like a really good fit. He understands the locals and the high-tempo brand of football they react to, and they appreciate his affinity to the club. Hodgson’s long career should never have been defined by the Euros and his work at Palace is reminding even his critics of that. Hodgson is a good fit for Palace Credit: Getty Images Rob Bagchi: David Wagner Net spend:£44.5m Points per pound: 0.71 Points per game: 1.02 Average goals scored: 0.92 David Wagner will have to keep Huddersfield Town up to be a credible contender but if he does, as seems likely, he deserves boundless praise for achieving safety with the Premier League's weakest squad. Wagner has maintained the coherence and confidence of his promotion-winning side and the high tempo intensity of their pressing that marked them out last year was harnessed to give them their lightning start. After opponents began to suss them out and stymie Town's whirling, dynamic counter-attacking with their greater individual quality, Wagner still managed to deploy his full-backs and wingers to create the space to stretch teams and use Aaron Mooy and Alex Pritchard to exploit it. Victories and goals have been scarce but their knack of beating strugglers when it matters is testament to their pluck and belief. Regular defeats have also not dispirited them. The resolve and raucous support that earned them that unforgettable victory over Manchester United shows how Wagner is not just leading a club but a cause. Wagner has maintained Huddersfield's confidence this season Credit: Reuters Sam Wallace: Jurgen Klopp (Liverpool) Net spend: -£28m Points per game:2.05 Points per pound: 2.15 Average goals scored: 2.38 It is hard to think of many Champions League semi-finalists who sold their best player midway through a season. Of course, Philippe Coutinho, had he stayed, might no longer be Liverpool’s best player but then that would be more to do with the bullseye aim of the club in the transfer market in recent windows, and their manager’s pursuit of improvement. Klopp’s net spend at Anfield is negligible. He came to Liverpool with a clear idea of how he wanted to play but rather than chuck out one group of players and start afresh he has, on the whole, coached his way through it. Tactically, he seems to get better with every season. He has made the occasional misjudgement but is a man given to apologising when he realises he has erred. He knows football from both ends, life as the European super-coach and also as the penniless Bundesliga 2 centre-half. It gives him perspective and the courage to follow his convictions - and how that is paying off. Klopp exclusive interview Jim White: Sean Dyche (Burnley) Net spend: -£12.3m Points per pound: 1.69 Points per game: 1.57 Average goals scored: 0.94 What Sean Dyche has done at Turf Moor this season is remarkable. It is not simply that he has taken Burnley to the brink of European qualification, playing smart football along the way, his personal approach one of charm, optimism and good humour. Though all that would be qualification enough. What he has done that is so different is completely to reverse the brutal economic laws of the modern game, establishing a club with a budget that wouldn’t look out of place in League One at the heart of the Premier League. This is the lightweight slugging it out among the heavyweights. And frequently coming away with a knock out. Sean Dyche's Burnley squad have been punching above their weight Credit: Mark Robinson Jeremy Wilson: Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Net spend:£11.95m Points per pound: 3.1 Points per game: 1.11 Goals per game: 1.25 Had this been Bournemouth’s first season back in the Premier League, people would have been queuing up to outline Eddie Howe’s credentials for manager of the year. As it is their third, his achievements seem now almost to be taken for granted, even though consistently repeating success for a club on Bournemouth’s budget only gets progressively harder. It is remarkable that Bournemouth could yet clinch a second successive top-half finish on a wage bill and turnover that is still a fraction of most of their competitors, including Newcastle where Rafael Benitez is more vocally lauded for his work, and with an attacking, passing style that has never been compromised. Attention spans in football can be short – and we do very quickly move on to the next big flavour of the moment - but Howe’s Bournemouth have never stopped punching far above their natural resources. Bournemouth could yet clinch a second successive top-half finish Credit: Reuters
Jason Burt: Pep Guardiola (Man City) Net spend:£174.6m Points per game: 2.63 Points per pound: 3.1* Average goals per game: 2.6 One of the key criteria for selecting manager of the season is how best he uses his resources. Some might argue that rules out Pep Guardiola. In fact the Manchester City manager has used the vast financial backing he has at his disposal superbly. He has overhauled an ageing squad, he has brought in exciting young players and he has improved those he inherited. No-one could argue that the likes of David Silva, Raheem Sterling, Nicolas Otamendi and, yes, Fabian Delph are not better under Guardiola. But it goes beyond that. It goes to the heart of the football being played. Guardiola has raised the bar for the rest of the Premier League. City are playing such an exciting, attacking progressive football. There has not been a disappointing match all season. Not one. They are a joy to watch. A lesson to everyone. Man City player ratings for title-winning season Luke Edwards: Rafa Benitez (Newcastle) Net spend:£10.25m Points per game: 1.24 Points per pound: 1.13 Average goals per game: 1.1 To put Rafa Benitez’s success at Newcastle into context you have to understand he has not only spent less than Brighton and Huddersfield, he is on course to secure the club only their third top 10 finish since Mike Ashley became owner in 2007. To do so with a squad that relied solely on loan signings in January, because the board refused to spend on transfer fees, and the same core group of players who played in the Championship, is testimony to his skill on the training pitch. But the job Benitez has done is about more than just improving a football team. He has rebuilt a football club, re-bonded supporters with the players, overhauled the scouting system, and raised standards in every aspect of the business. For the first time in more than a decade, when you hear Newcastle mentioned you think of his class as manager and a brave, hardworking team that cares about the shirt, not the crass, arrogant and blundering Ashley. Benitez has re-bonded Newcastle's supporters with the players Credit: Getty Images Matt Law: Roy Hodgson (Crystal Palace) Net spend:£9m Points per game: 1.13 Points per pound: N/A Average goals scored: 1.21 No points, no goals and no hope. That was what Roy Hodgson was facing when he took over at Crystal Palace in September. Hodgson also had to deal with the fact that he had been unfairly written off by those who could not bring themselves to look past the 2016 European Championships. Sure, England’s defeat to Iceland was a terrible moment, but it was just that - a moment - and the 70-year-old is proving once again what a skilled manager he is. He has lifted Palace clear of the relegation zone, despite long injuries to key players and a difficult January transfer window. Palace and Hodgson just feel like a really good fit. He understands the locals and the high-tempo brand of football they react to, and they appreciate his affinity to the club. Hodgson’s long career should never have been defined by the Euros and his work at Palace is reminding even his critics of that. Hodgson is a good fit for Palace Credit: Getty Images Rob Bagchi: David Wagner Net spend:£44.5m Points per pound: 0.71 Points per game: 1.02 Average goals scored: 0.92 David Wagner will have to keep Huddersfield Town up to be a credible contender but if he does, as seems likely, he deserves boundless praise for achieving safety with the Premier League's weakest squad. Wagner has maintained the coherence and confidence of his promotion-winning side and the high tempo intensity of their pressing that marked them out last year was harnessed to give them their lightning start. After opponents began to suss them out and stymie Town's whirling, dynamic counter-attacking with their greater individual quality, Wagner still managed to deploy his full-backs and wingers to create the space to stretch teams and use Aaron Mooy and Alex Pritchard to exploit it. Victories and goals have been scarce but their knack of beating strugglers when it matters is testament to their pluck and belief. Regular defeats have also not dispirited them. The resolve and raucous support that earned them that unforgettable victory over Manchester United shows how Wagner is not just leading a club but a cause. Wagner has maintained Huddersfield's confidence this season Credit: Reuters Sam Wallace: Jurgen Klopp (Liverpool) Net spend: -£28m Points per game:2.05 Points per pound: 2.15 Average goals scored: 2.38 It is hard to think of many Champions League semi-finalists who sold their best player midway through a season. Of course, Philippe Coutinho, had he stayed, might no longer be Liverpool’s best player but then that would be more to do with the bullseye aim of the club in the transfer market in recent windows, and their manager’s pursuit of improvement. Klopp’s net spend at Anfield is negligible. He came to Liverpool with a clear idea of how he wanted to play but rather than chuck out one group of players and start afresh he has, on the whole, coached his way through it. Tactically, he seems to get better with every season. He has made the occasional misjudgement but is a man given to apologising when he realises he has erred. He knows football from both ends, life as the European super-coach and also as the penniless Bundesliga 2 centre-half. It gives him perspective and the courage to follow his convictions - and how that is paying off. Klopp exclusive interview Jim White: Sean Dyche (Burnley) Net spend: -£12.3m Points per pound: 1.69 Points per game: 1.57 Average goals scored: 0.94 What Sean Dyche has done at Turf Moor this season is remarkable. It is not simply that he has taken Burnley to the brink of European qualification, playing smart football along the way, his personal approach one of charm, optimism and good humour. Though all that would be qualification enough. What he has done that is so different is completely to reverse the brutal economic laws of the modern game, establishing a club with a budget that wouldn’t look out of place in League One at the heart of the Premier League. This is the lightweight slugging it out among the heavyweights. And frequently coming away with a knock out. Sean Dyche's Burnley squad have been punching above their weight Credit: Mark Robinson Jeremy Wilson: Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Net spend:£11.95m Points per pound: 3.1 Points per game: 1.11 Goals per game: 1.25 Had this been Bournemouth’s first season back in the Premier League, people would have been queuing up to outline Eddie Howe’s credentials for manager of the year. As it is their third, his achievements seem now almost to be taken for granted, even though consistently repeating success for a club on Bournemouth’s budget only gets progressively harder. It is remarkable that Bournemouth could yet clinch a second successive top-half finish on a wage bill and turnover that is still a fraction of most of their competitors, including Newcastle where Rafael Benitez is more vocally lauded for his work, and with an attacking, passing style that has never been compromised. Attention spans in football can be short – and we do very quickly move on to the next big flavour of the moment - but Howe’s Bournemouth have never stopped punching far above their natural resources. Bournemouth could yet clinch a second successive top-half finish Credit: Reuters
Who is your Premier League manager of the year? Our writers have their say
Jason Burt: Pep Guardiola (Man City) Net spend:£174.6m Points per game: 2.63 Points per pound: 3.1* Average goals per game: 2.6 One of the key criteria for selecting manager of the season is how best he uses his resources. Some might argue that rules out Pep Guardiola. In fact the Manchester City manager has used the vast financial backing he has at his disposal superbly. He has overhauled an ageing squad, he has brought in exciting young players and he has improved those he inherited. No-one could argue that the likes of David Silva, Raheem Sterling, Nicolas Otamendi and, yes, Fabian Delph are not better under Guardiola. But it goes beyond that. It goes to the heart of the football being played. Guardiola has raised the bar for the rest of the Premier League. City are playing such an exciting, attacking progressive football. There has not been a disappointing match all season. Not one. They are a joy to watch. A lesson to everyone. Man City player ratings for title-winning season Luke Edwards: Rafa Benitez (Newcastle) Net spend:£10.25m Points per game: 1.24 Points per pound: 1.13 Average goals per game: 1.1 To put Rafa Benitez’s success at Newcastle into context you have to understand he has not only spent less than Brighton and Huddersfield, he is on course to secure the club only their third top 10 finish since Mike Ashley became owner in 2007. To do so with a squad that relied solely on loan signings in January, because the board refused to spend on transfer fees, and the same core group of players who played in the Championship, is testimony to his skill on the training pitch. But the job Benitez has done is about more than just improving a football team. He has rebuilt a football club, re-bonded supporters with the players, overhauled the scouting system, and raised standards in every aspect of the business. For the first time in more than a decade, when you hear Newcastle mentioned you think of his class as manager and a brave, hardworking team that cares about the shirt, not the crass, arrogant and blundering Ashley. Benitez has re-bonded Newcastle's supporters with the players Credit: Getty Images Matt Law: Roy Hodgson (Crystal Palace) Net spend:£9m Points per game: 1.13 Points per pound: N/A Average goals scored: 1.21 No points, no goals and no hope. That was what Roy Hodgson was facing when he took over at Crystal Palace in September. Hodgson also had to deal with the fact that he had been unfairly written off by those who could not bring themselves to look past the 2016 European Championships. Sure, England’s defeat to Iceland was a terrible moment, but it was just that - a moment - and the 70-year-old is proving once again what a skilled manager he is. He has lifted Palace clear of the relegation zone, despite long injuries to key players and a difficult January transfer window. Palace and Hodgson just feel like a really good fit. He understands the locals and the high-tempo brand of football they react to, and they appreciate his affinity to the club. Hodgson’s long career should never have been defined by the Euros and his work at Palace is reminding even his critics of that. Hodgson is a good fit for Palace Credit: Getty Images Rob Bagchi: David Wagner Net spend:£44.5m Points per pound: 0.71 Points per game: 1.02 Average goals scored: 0.92 David Wagner will have to keep Huddersfield Town up to be a credible contender but if he does, as seems likely, he deserves boundless praise for achieving safety with the Premier League's weakest squad. Wagner has maintained the coherence and confidence of his promotion-winning side and the high tempo intensity of their pressing that marked them out last year was harnessed to give them their lightning start. After opponents began to suss them out and stymie Town's whirling, dynamic counter-attacking with their greater individual quality, Wagner still managed to deploy his full-backs and wingers to create the space to stretch teams and use Aaron Mooy and Alex Pritchard to exploit it. Victories and goals have been scarce but their knack of beating strugglers when it matters is testament to their pluck and belief. Regular defeats have also not dispirited them. The resolve and raucous support that earned them that unforgettable victory over Manchester United shows how Wagner is not just leading a club but a cause. Wagner has maintained Huddersfield's confidence this season Credit: Reuters Sam Wallace: Jurgen Klopp (Liverpool) Net spend: -£28m Points per game:2.05 Points per pound: 2.15 Average goals scored: 2.38 It is hard to think of many Champions League semi-finalists who sold their best player midway through a season. Of course, Philippe Coutinho, had he stayed, might no longer be Liverpool’s best player but then that would be more to do with the bullseye aim of the club in the transfer market in recent windows, and their manager’s pursuit of improvement. Klopp’s net spend at Anfield is negligible. He came to Liverpool with a clear idea of how he wanted to play but rather than chuck out one group of players and start afresh he has, on the whole, coached his way through it. Tactically, he seems to get better with every season. He has made the occasional misjudgement but is a man given to apologising when he realises he has erred. He knows football from both ends, life as the European super-coach and also as the penniless Bundesliga 2 centre-half. It gives him perspective and the courage to follow his convictions - and how that is paying off. Klopp exclusive interview Jim White: Sean Dyche (Burnley) Net spend: -£12.3m Points per pound: 1.69 Points per game: 1.57 Average goals scored: 0.94 What Sean Dyche has done at Turf Moor this season is remarkable. It is not simply that he has taken Burnley to the brink of European qualification, playing smart football along the way, his personal approach one of charm, optimism and good humour. Though all that would be qualification enough. What he has done that is so different is completely to reverse the brutal economic laws of the modern game, establishing a club with a budget that wouldn’t look out of place in League One at the heart of the Premier League. This is the lightweight slugging it out among the heavyweights. And frequently coming away with a knock out. Sean Dyche's Burnley squad have been punching above their weight Credit: Mark Robinson Jeremy Wilson: Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Net spend:£11.95m Points per pound: 3.1 Points per game: 1.11 Goals per game: 1.25 Had this been Bournemouth’s first season back in the Premier League, people would have been queuing up to outline Eddie Howe’s credentials for manager of the year. As it is their third, his achievements seem now almost to be taken for granted, even though consistently repeating success for a club on Bournemouth’s budget only gets progressively harder. It is remarkable that Bournemouth could yet clinch a second successive top-half finish on a wage bill and turnover that is still a fraction of most of their competitors, including Newcastle where Rafael Benitez is more vocally lauded for his work, and with an attacking, passing style that has never been compromised. Attention spans in football can be short – and we do very quickly move on to the next big flavour of the moment - but Howe’s Bournemouth have never stopped punching far above their natural resources. Bournemouth could yet clinch a second successive top-half finish Credit: Reuters
At this point, it would be stunning if Hamburg isn't relegated from the Bundesliga for the first time since 1964.
Report: Bobby Wood interested in MLS; Where would he fit?
At this point, it would be stunning if Hamburg isn't relegated from the Bundesliga for the first time since 1964.
At this point, it would be stunning if Hamburg isn't relegated from the Bundesliga for the first time since 1964.
Report: Bobby Wood interested in MLS; Where would he fit?
At this point, it would be stunning if Hamburg isn't relegated from the Bundesliga for the first time since 1964.
Arturo Vidal is out for the rest of the season, Bayern Munich announced Tuesday a day after confirming the Chile midfielder will miss next week's crunch Champions League semi-final clash at home to holders Real Madrid.
Bundesliga: Bayern Munich announce midfielder Arturo Vidal will miss rest of season with knee injury
Arturo Vidal is out for the rest of the season, Bayern Munich announced Tuesday a day after confirming the Chile midfielder will miss next week's crunch Champions League semi-final clash at home to holders Real Madrid.
The Chilean star will miss the Champions League semi-finals against Real Madrid as well as the remainder of the Bundesliga campaign
Bayern's Vidal out for rest of the season after surgery
The Chilean star will miss the Champions League semi-finals against Real Madrid as well as the remainder of the Bundesliga campaign
The Chilean star will miss the Champions League semi-finals against Real Madrid as well as the remainder of the Bundesliga campaign
Bayern's Vidal out for rest of the season after surgery
The Chilean star will miss the Champions League semi-finals against Real Madrid as well as the remainder of the Bundesliga campaign
Markus Anfang will take charge of relegation-bound Cologne for next season, after trying to help Holstein Kiel reach promotion to Germany's Bundesliga
Markus Anfang will take charge of relegation-bound Cologne for next season, after trying to help Holstein Kiel reach promotion to Germany's Bundesliga
Markus Anfang will take charge of relegation-bound Cologne for next season, after trying to help Holstein Kiel reach promotion to Germany's Bundesliga
Markus Anfang will take charge of relegation-bound Cologne for next season, after trying to help Holstein Kiel reach promotion to Germany's Bundesliga (AFP Photo/Sebastian Kahnert)
Markus Anfang will take charge of relegation-bound Cologne for next season, after trying to help Holstein Kiel reach promotion to Germany's Bundesliga
Markus Anfang will take charge of relegation-bound Cologne for next season, after trying to help Holstein Kiel reach promotion to Germany's Bundesliga (AFP Photo/Sebastian Kahnert)
Markus Anfang will take charge of relegation-bound Cologne for next season, after trying to help Holstein Kiel reach promotion to Germany's Bundesliga
Markus Anfang will take charge of relegation-bound Cologne for next season, after trying to help Holstein Kiel reach promotion to Germany's Bundesliga
Markus Anfang will take charge of relegation-bound Cologne for next season, after trying to help Holstein Kiel reach promotion to Germany's Bundesliga
Bundesliga strugglers Cologne have a new head coach for next season, with Markus Anfang joining from Holstein Kiel.
Cologne appoint Anfang as head coach
Bundesliga strugglers Cologne have a new head coach for next season, with Markus Anfang joining from Holstein Kiel.
Bayern Munich has already wrapped up the Bundesliga title, and it turns its focus to one of its two remaining cup competitions on Tuesday, when it faces Bayer Leverkusen in the semifinals of the DFB Pokal.
How to Watch Bayer Leverkusen vs. Bayern Munich: DFB Pokal Live Stream, TV Channel
Bayern Munich has already wrapped up the Bundesliga title, and it turns its focus to one of its two remaining cup competitions on Tuesday, when it faces Bayer Leverkusen in the semifinals of the DFB Pokal.
In this April 16, 2018 photo Mainz's Pablo de Blasis scores from the penalty spot past Freiburg goalkeeper Alexander Schwolow during a Bundesliga soccer match between FSV Mainz and SC Freiburg in Mainz, western Germany. (Arne Dedert/dpa via AP)
In this April 16, 2018 photo Mainz's Pablo de Blasis scores from the penalty spot past Freiburg goalkeeper Alexander Schwolow during a Bundesliga soccer match between FSV Mainz and SC Freiburg in Mainz, western Germany. (Arne Dedert/dpa via AP)
In this April 16, 2018 photo Mainz's Pablo de Blasis scores from the penalty spot past Freiburg goalkeeper Alexander Schwolow during a Bundesliga soccer match between FSV Mainz and SC Freiburg in Mainz, western Germany. (Arne Dedert/dpa via AP)
The players of Mainz 05 and Freiburg were ordered back onto the pitch having gone to the changing room at halftime because the video assistant referee (VAR) awarded a penalty for a handball in an eventful Bundesliga game on Monday.
Teams Ordered Back During Half-time After VAR Awards Penalty Kick
The players of Mainz 05 and Freiburg were ordered back onto the pitch having gone to the changing room at halftime because the video assistant referee (VAR) awarded a penalty for a handball in an eventful Bundesliga game on Monday.
A bizarre video assistant referee (VAR) decision caused mayhem in a Bundesliga game on Monday night when two teams were ordered back on to the pitch at half time because the referee decided to award a penalty after watching a replay on TV. Players of Mainz 05 and Freiburg were astonished when referee Guido Winkmann was notified by video referee Bibiana Steinhaus, who was watching in Cologne, that he should check a replay of a handball incident just before his half-time whistle. Winkmann watched the incident again on the pitchside screen and evidently decided Freiburg’s Marc Oliver Kempf had deliberately put his hand to the ball. He ordered the players back onto the pitch much to the bemusement of Freiburg coach Christian Streich, who was seen shaking his head in disbelief. “We’re not going out,” said Streich as he led his confused players back into the changing room. Some were looking at TVs to determine exactly what was going on. Marc-Oliver Kempf was adjudged to have handled the ball by video referee Bibiana Steinhaus Credit: REUTERS The Freiburg team eventually emerged back onto the pitch, where Winkmann explained to Streich that it was a penalty for the home side. Pablo de Blasis, who had to wait for Alexander Schwolow to retake his place in goal, held his nerve to score inside the left corner as the Freiburg keeper dived the other way. “We thought that when the whistle goes for half time, that the first 45 minutes are ticked off,” Freiburg sporting director Jochen Saier told Eurosport at half time. “That wasn’t the case in this scene, we have to accept that with heavy hearts. Things are getting stranger.” Pablo de Blasis kept his cool to score the controversial 'half-time' penalty Credit: REUTERS Kempf, who conceded the spot-kick, was substituted at half time. There was a further 10-minute delay before the start of the second half as fans threw hundreds of toilet rolls onto the pitch in a protest against Monday evening matches. Many German fans have opposed the introduction of Monday games, saying matches should be played at the weekend when most supporters can attend. Protests have taken place during most Monday games. Mainz went on to win the fixture 2-0.
VAR chaos strikes again as Bundesliga referee hands Mainz 'half-time' penalty
A bizarre video assistant referee (VAR) decision caused mayhem in a Bundesliga game on Monday night when two teams were ordered back on to the pitch at half time because the referee decided to award a penalty after watching a replay on TV. Players of Mainz 05 and Freiburg were astonished when referee Guido Winkmann was notified by video referee Bibiana Steinhaus, who was watching in Cologne, that he should check a replay of a handball incident just before his half-time whistle. Winkmann watched the incident again on the pitchside screen and evidently decided Freiburg’s Marc Oliver Kempf had deliberately put his hand to the ball. He ordered the players back onto the pitch much to the bemusement of Freiburg coach Christian Streich, who was seen shaking his head in disbelief. “We’re not going out,” said Streich as he led his confused players back into the changing room. Some were looking at TVs to determine exactly what was going on. Marc-Oliver Kempf was adjudged to have handled the ball by video referee Bibiana Steinhaus Credit: REUTERS The Freiburg team eventually emerged back onto the pitch, where Winkmann explained to Streich that it was a penalty for the home side. Pablo de Blasis, who had to wait for Alexander Schwolow to retake his place in goal, held his nerve to score inside the left corner as the Freiburg keeper dived the other way. “We thought that when the whistle goes for half time, that the first 45 minutes are ticked off,” Freiburg sporting director Jochen Saier told Eurosport at half time. “That wasn’t the case in this scene, we have to accept that with heavy hearts. Things are getting stranger.” Pablo de Blasis kept his cool to score the controversial 'half-time' penalty Credit: REUTERS Kempf, who conceded the spot-kick, was substituted at half time. There was a further 10-minute delay before the start of the second half as fans threw hundreds of toilet rolls onto the pitch in a protest against Monday evening matches. Many German fans have opposed the introduction of Monday games, saying matches should be played at the weekend when most supporters can attend. Protests have taken place during most Monday games. Mainz went on to win the fixture 2-0.
VAR chaos strikes again as Bundesliga referee hands Mainz 'half-time' penalty
VAR chaos strikes again as Bundesliga referee hands Mainz 'half-time' penalty
VAR chaos strikes again as Bundesliga referee hands Mainz 'half-time' penalty
VAR chaos strikes again as Bundesliga referee hands Mainz 'half-time' penalty
VAR chaos strikes again as Bundesliga referee hands Mainz 'half-time' penalty
VAR chaos strikes again as Bundesliga referee hands Mainz 'half-time' penalty
A bizarre video assistant referee (VAR) decision caused mayhem in a Bundesliga game on Monday night when two teams were ordered back on to the pitch at half time because the referee decided to award a penalty after watching a replay on TV. Players of Mainz 05 and Freiburg were astonished when referee Guido Winkmann was notified by video referee Bibiana Steinhaus, who was watching in Cologne, that he should check a replay of a handball incident just before his half-time whistle. Winkmann watched the incident again on the pitchside screen and evidently decided Freiburg’s Marc Oliver Kempf had deliberately put his hand to the ball. He ordered the players back onto the pitch much to the bemusement of Freiburg coach Christian Streich, who was seen shaking his head in disbelief. “We’re not going out,” said Streich as he led his confused players back into the changing room. Some were looking at TVs to determine exactly what was going on. Marc-Oliver Kempf was adjudged to have handled the ball by video referee Bibiana Steinhaus Credit: REUTERS The Freiburg team eventually emerged back onto the pitch, where Winkmann explained to Streich that it was a penalty for the home side. Pablo de Blasis, who had to wait for Alexander Schwolow to retake his place in goal, held his nerve to score inside the left corner as the Freiburg keeper dived the other way. “We thought that when the whistle goes for half time, that the first 45 minutes are ticked off,” Freiburg sporting director Jochen Saier told Eurosport at half time. “That wasn’t the case in this scene, we have to accept that with heavy hearts. Things are getting stranger.” Pablo de Blasis kept his cool to score the controversial 'half-time' penalty Credit: REUTERS Kempf, who conceded the spot-kick, was substituted at half time. There was a further 10-minute delay before the start of the second half as fans threw hundreds of toilet rolls onto the pitch in a protest against Monday evening matches. Many German fans have opposed the introduction of Monday games, saying matches should be played at the weekend when most supporters can attend. Protests have taken place during most Monday games. Mainz went on to win the fixture 2-0.
VAR chaos strikes again as Bundesliga referee hands Mainz 'half-time' penalty
A bizarre video assistant referee (VAR) decision caused mayhem in a Bundesliga game on Monday night when two teams were ordered back on to the pitch at half time because the referee decided to award a penalty after watching a replay on TV. Players of Mainz 05 and Freiburg were astonished when referee Guido Winkmann was notified by video referee Bibiana Steinhaus, who was watching in Cologne, that he should check a replay of a handball incident just before his half-time whistle. Winkmann watched the incident again on the pitchside screen and evidently decided Freiburg’s Marc Oliver Kempf had deliberately put his hand to the ball. He ordered the players back onto the pitch much to the bemusement of Freiburg coach Christian Streich, who was seen shaking his head in disbelief. “We’re not going out,” said Streich as he led his confused players back into the changing room. Some were looking at TVs to determine exactly what was going on. Marc-Oliver Kempf was adjudged to have handled the ball by video referee Bibiana Steinhaus Credit: REUTERS The Freiburg team eventually emerged back onto the pitch, where Winkmann explained to Streich that it was a penalty for the home side. Pablo de Blasis, who had to wait for Alexander Schwolow to retake his place in goal, held his nerve to score inside the left corner as the Freiburg keeper dived the other way. “We thought that when the whistle goes for half time, that the first 45 minutes are ticked off,” Freiburg sporting director Jochen Saier told Eurosport at half time. “That wasn’t the case in this scene, we have to accept that with heavy hearts. Things are getting stranger.” Pablo de Blasis kept his cool to score the controversial 'half-time' penalty Credit: REUTERS Kempf, who conceded the spot-kick, was substituted at half time. There was a further 10-minute delay before the start of the second half as fans threw hundreds of toilet rolls onto the pitch in a protest against Monday evening matches. Many German fans have opposed the introduction of Monday games, saying matches should be played at the weekend when most supporters can attend. Protests have taken place during most Monday games. Mainz went on to win the fixture 2-0.
VAR chaos strikes again as Bundesliga referee hands Mainz 'half-time' penalty
VAR chaos strikes again as Bundesliga referee hands Mainz 'half-time' penalty
VAR chaos strikes again as Bundesliga referee hands Mainz 'half-time' penalty

What to read next

By using Yahoo you agree that Yahoo and partners may use Cookies for personalisation and other purposes