Burnley

Burnley slideshow

Mark Hughes fighting to save job as Stoke players confronted by angry fans at train station

Mark Hughes is facing two potentially crucial games as he fights for his future at Stoke City. Hughes takes on Burnley on Tuesday night with his position fragile after a torrid 18 months which has seen him come under growing pressure from supporters. Stoke have lost three of their last four Premier League games and the situation reached crisis point when Hughes and his players were confronted by angry fans at Stoke railway station on Saturday night, hours after the 5-1 capitulation against Tottenham Hotspur. It is understood Hughes' job will be safe even if his team suffer defeat at Turf Moor but this weekend’s game against West Ham could be pivotal to his hopes of staying in charge. Peter Coates, the chairman, is determined to stay loyal to Hughes – who guided Stoke to three successive ninth-placed finishes in a row – but results and performances are becoming a huge concern for the club's board. Hughes has challenged his players to use Saturday’s heated confrontation with fans as inspiration as they head into a big week. Ryan Shawcross scored a consolation goal in Stoke's abysmal 5-1 defeat to Spurs Credit: GETTY IMAGES “That is still resonating and it’s good we have a game [on Tuesday] because it is still fresh in the mind, fresh in their ears probably, [we can] use it as a motivating factor,” he said. “Don’t allow people to have an opportunity to have a question you. You do that by playing well, getting results. “There could be individuals in our group who haven’t experienced it before, but they have now – so they can use it. You either suck it up and do something about it or you go under, and we can’t accept players like that. I don’t feel we have players like that. “Sometimes you need a reality check, and to understand how our results and performances affect people.” Stoke’s problems arguably stretch back to last season’s collapse at the end of the season, though some observers even insist the team has never recovered from their Capital One Cup semi-final defeat to Liverpool in January 2016. However, the warning signs were clearly there earlier this year when Hughes lost six of the last 10 games. Hughes was given the summer to repair the squad, selling Marko Arnautovic to West Ham for £24m which appeared one of the deals of the season, from a Stoke point of view. Stoke focused on the defence – spending £25m on Kevin Wimmer and Bruno Martins Indi, while also paying around £8m with the loan fee and wages to sign Kurt Zouma from Chelsea. However, Stoke have conceded 35 goals in the league, and a staggering 59 in 2017, and their defence appears slow and unbalanced. The experiment with a back-three has yet to produce an impact, while the selection of rookie defender Tom Edwards for tough games at Manchester City and Spurs surprised insiders at the bet365 Stadium. “There’s been an undercurrent since I’ve been here,” admitted Hughes.  “On the day I was appointed there was a car outside the stadium with ‘Hughes out’ written on it. That was before I even got here. “But I understand it, some people won’t like you or your teams, your picks, your substitutions, some don’t like your hair or the way you speak. “You can’t take exception to it, I’m the public face of the team so I have to take the brunt of it, I accept that to a certain extent.” Coates and his son John, the vice-chairman, plus chief executive Tony Scholes, will make the decision on whether Hughes is given more time to mount a revival. But the games against Burnley and West Ham appear vital for the Welshman as he bids to extend his tenure in the Potteries.

Mark Hughes fighting to save job as Stoke players confronted by angry fans at train station

Mark Hughes is facing two potentially crucial games as he fights for his future at Stoke City. Hughes takes on Burnley on Tuesday night with his position fragile after a torrid 18 months which has seen him come under growing pressure from supporters. Stoke have lost three of their last four Premier League games and the situation reached crisis point when Hughes and his players were confronted by angry fans at Stoke railway station on Saturday night, hours after the 5-1 capitulation against Tottenham Hotspur. It is understood Hughes' job will be safe even if his team suffer defeat at Turf Moor but this weekend’s game against West Ham could be pivotal to his hopes of staying in charge. Peter Coates, the chairman, is determined to stay loyal to Hughes – who guided Stoke to three successive ninth-placed finishes in a row – but results and performances are becoming a huge concern for the club's board. Hughes has challenged his players to use Saturday’s heated confrontation with fans as inspiration as they head into a big week. Ryan Shawcross scored a consolation goal in Stoke's abysmal 5-1 defeat to Spurs Credit: GETTY IMAGES “That is still resonating and it’s good we have a game [on Tuesday] because it is still fresh in the mind, fresh in their ears probably, [we can] use it as a motivating factor,” he said. “Don’t allow people to have an opportunity to have a question you. You do that by playing well, getting results. “There could be individuals in our group who haven’t experienced it before, but they have now – so they can use it. You either suck it up and do something about it or you go under, and we can’t accept players like that. I don’t feel we have players like that. “Sometimes you need a reality check, and to understand how our results and performances affect people.” Stoke’s problems arguably stretch back to last season’s collapse at the end of the season, though some observers even insist the team has never recovered from their Capital One Cup semi-final defeat to Liverpool in January 2016. However, the warning signs were clearly there earlier this year when Hughes lost six of the last 10 games. Hughes was given the summer to repair the squad, selling Marko Arnautovic to West Ham for £24m which appeared one of the deals of the season, from a Stoke point of view. Stoke focused on the defence – spending £25m on Kevin Wimmer and Bruno Martins Indi, while also paying around £8m with the loan fee and wages to sign Kurt Zouma from Chelsea. However, Stoke have conceded 35 goals in the league, and a staggering 59 in 2017, and their defence appears slow and unbalanced. The experiment with a back-three has yet to produce an impact, while the selection of rookie defender Tom Edwards for tough games at Manchester City and Spurs surprised insiders at the bet365 Stadium. “There’s been an undercurrent since I’ve been here,” admitted Hughes.  “On the day I was appointed there was a car outside the stadium with ‘Hughes out’ written on it. That was before I even got here. “But I understand it, some people won’t like you or your teams, your picks, your substitutions, some don’t like your hair or the way you speak. “You can’t take exception to it, I’m the public face of the team so I have to take the brunt of it, I accept that to a certain extent.” Coates and his son John, the vice-chairman, plus chief executive Tony Scholes, will make the decision on whether Hughes is given more time to mount a revival. But the games against Burnley and West Ham appear vital for the Welshman as he bids to extend his tenure in the Potteries.

Premier League team of the weekend - by Jason Burt

Manchester City were not at their best but were good enough to beat Manchester United away, the first time United have lost at home in 41 matches… since City last beat them. So much was rightly made last weekend of the brilliance of David De Gea so it was ironic that it was City’s Ederson who made a De Gea-like double-save to preserve the victory. The Brazilian is an outfield player with gloves and has made such an incredible difference to City this season. Here's my team of the week, in a 4-4-2 formation: Ederson, goalkeeper The Brazilian is phenomenal with the ball at his feet and is also a fine goalkeeker, making an incredible double-save to secure Manchester City’s win away to Manchester United. Jonjoe Kenny, right back The 20-year-old from Kirkdale was Everton’s most impressive defender in the 1-1 draw away to Liverpool. Was offered little protection by Wayne Rooney ahead of him but coped well. Jonjoe Kenny showed maturity beyond his years Credit: Getty Images Nicolas Otamendi, centre back The Argentinean has been much-maligned at Manchester City but has stepped up this season and was his team’s senior defender, especially when Vincent Kompany went off injured. Forced one goal and scored another. Alfie Mawson, centre back It has been a difficult season for Mawson who was so outstanding in the second-half of the last campaign as Swansea saved themselves. He contained the threat West Brom’s Salomon Rondon posed, helped keep a clean sheet and earned a vital win. Arthur Masuaku, left back The left wing-back has found his best role at West Ham and was the pick of the bunch in the win over Chelsea. He also gave his team much-needed respite with his ability to run with the ball. Arthur Masuaku helped inspire West Ham to victory over Chelsea Credit: reuters Heung-Min Son, right midfield The Korean has become a more robust and positive player and showed that in Tottenham’s win over Stoke as he forced the opening goal, an own-goal, before claiming a brilliant strike in the rout. Got a standing ovation as he went off. Johann Gudmundsson, centre midfield The Icelandic winger has been one of the unsung heroes of Burnley’s outstanding season so far, but his energy and positive approach has been key to their success and was again in the win over Watford. David Silva, centre midfield The Spaniard is a Rolls-Royce of a player and was outstanding again in Manchester City’s derby win away to United. He scored, he controlled the game. He was competitive and played in a couple of positions. Brilliant. David SIlva controlled Sunday's Manchester derby Credit: getty images Demarai Gray, left midfield The winger is becoming a fixture in the ‘team of the weekend’ and has seized the chance given to him by new Leicester City manager Claude Puel. Scored and was a constant threat in the win away to Newcastle United. Jermain Defoe, forward Two predatory goals from the veteran striker again showed how he can still perform in the Premier League. His contribution, especially his smartly taken second goal, was overshadowed in Bournemouth’s 2-2 draw away to Crystal Palace by Christian Benteke’s penalty miss. Steve Mounie, forward The French striker started the season strongly, got injured, had a dip in form but scored both goals as Huddersfield Town defeated Brighton – who lack a striker such as Mounie. He would appear their best chance of scoring the goals to stay up.

Premier League team of the weekend - by Jason Burt

Manchester City were not at their best but were good enough to beat Manchester United away, the first time United have lost at home in 41 matches… since City last beat them. So much was rightly made last weekend of the brilliance of David De Gea so it was ironic that it was City’s Ederson who made a De Gea-like double-save to preserve the victory. The Brazilian is an outfield player with gloves and has made such an incredible difference to City this season. Here's my team of the week, in a 4-4-2 formation: Ederson, goalkeeper The Brazilian is phenomenal with the ball at his feet and is also a fine goalkeeker, making an incredible double-save to secure Manchester City’s win away to Manchester United. Jonjoe Kenny, right back The 20-year-old from Kirkdale was Everton’s most impressive defender in the 1-1 draw away to Liverpool. Was offered little protection by Wayne Rooney ahead of him but coped well. Jonjoe Kenny showed maturity beyond his years Credit: Getty Images Nicolas Otamendi, centre back The Argentinean has been much-maligned at Manchester City but has stepped up this season and was his team’s senior defender, especially when Vincent Kompany went off injured. Forced one goal and scored another. Alfie Mawson, centre back It has been a difficult season for Mawson who was so outstanding in the second-half of the last campaign as Swansea saved themselves. He contained the threat West Brom’s Salomon Rondon posed, helped keep a clean sheet and earned a vital win. Arthur Masuaku, left back The left wing-back has found his best role at West Ham and was the pick of the bunch in the win over Chelsea. He also gave his team much-needed respite with his ability to run with the ball. Arthur Masuaku helped inspire West Ham to victory over Chelsea Credit: reuters Heung-Min Son, right midfield The Korean has become a more robust and positive player and showed that in Tottenham’s win over Stoke as he forced the opening goal, an own-goal, before claiming a brilliant strike in the rout. Got a standing ovation as he went off. Johann Gudmundsson, centre midfield The Icelandic winger has been one of the unsung heroes of Burnley’s outstanding season so far, but his energy and positive approach has been key to their success and was again in the win over Watford. David Silva, centre midfield The Spaniard is a Rolls-Royce of a player and was outstanding again in Manchester City’s derby win away to United. He scored, he controlled the game. He was competitive and played in a couple of positions. Brilliant. David SIlva controlled Sunday's Manchester derby Credit: getty images Demarai Gray, left midfield The winger is becoming a fixture in the ‘team of the weekend’ and has seized the chance given to him by new Leicester City manager Claude Puel. Scored and was a constant threat in the win away to Newcastle United. Jermain Defoe, forward Two predatory goals from the veteran striker again showed how he can still perform in the Premier League. His contribution, especially his smartly taken second goal, was overshadowed in Bournemouth’s 2-2 draw away to Crystal Palace by Christian Benteke’s penalty miss. Steve Mounie, forward The French striker started the season strongly, got injured, had a dip in form but scored both goals as Huddersfield Town defeated Brighton – who lack a striker such as Mounie. He would appear their best chance of scoring the goals to stay up.

Premier League team of the weekend - by Jason Burt

Manchester City were not at their best but were good enough to beat Manchester United away, the first time United have lost at home in 41 matches… since City last beat them. So much was rightly made last weekend of the brilliance of David De Gea so it was ironic that it was City’s Ederson who made a De Gea-like double-save to preserve the victory. The Brazilian is an outfield player with gloves and has made such an incredible difference to City this season. Here's my team of the week, in a 4-4-2 formation: Ederson, goalkeeper The Brazilian is phenomenal with the ball at his feet and is also a fine goalkeeker, making an incredible double-save to secure Manchester City’s win away to Manchester United. Jonjoe Kenny, right back The 20-year-old from Kirkdale was Everton’s most impressive defender in the 1-1 draw away to Liverpool. Was offered little protection by Wayne Rooney ahead of him but coped well. Jonjoe Kenny showed maturity beyond his years Credit: Getty Images Nicolas Otamendi, centre back The Argentinean has been much-maligned at Manchester City but has stepped up this season and was his team’s senior defender, especially when Vincent Kompany went off injured. Forced one goal and scored another. Alfie Mawson, centre back It has been a difficult season for Mawson who was so outstanding in the second-half of the last campaign as Swansea saved themselves. He contained the threat West Brom’s Salomon Rondon posed, helped keep a clean sheet and earned a vital win. Arthur Masuaku, left back The left wing-back has found his best role at West Ham and was the pick of the bunch in the win over Chelsea. He also gave his team much-needed respite with his ability to run with the ball. Arthur Masuaku helped inspire West Ham to victory over Chelsea Credit: reuters Heung-Min Son, right midfield The Korean has become a more robust and positive player and showed that in Tottenham’s win over Stoke as he forced the opening goal, an own-goal, before claiming a brilliant strike in the rout. Got a standing ovation as he went off. Johann Gudmundsson, centre midfield The Icelandic winger has been one of the unsung heroes of Burnley’s outstanding season so far, but his energy and positive approach has been key to their success and was again in the win over Watford. David Silva, centre midfield The Spaniard is a Rolls-Royce of a player and was outstanding again in Manchester City’s derby win away to United. He scored, he controlled the game. He was competitive and played in a couple of positions. Brilliant. David SIlva controlled Sunday's Manchester derby Credit: getty images Demarai Gray, left midfield The winger is becoming a fixture in the ‘team of the weekend’ and has seized the chance given to him by new Leicester City manager Claude Puel. Scored and was a constant threat in the win away to Newcastle United. Jermain Defoe, forward Two predatory goals from the veteran striker again showed how he can still perform in the Premier League. His contribution, especially his smartly taken second goal, was overshadowed in Bournemouth’s 2-2 draw away to Crystal Palace by Christian Benteke’s penalty miss. Steve Mounie, forward The French striker started the season strongly, got injured, had a dip in form but scored both goals as Huddersfield Town defeated Brighton – who lack a striker such as Mounie. He would appear their best chance of scoring the goals to stay up.

Premier League team of the weekend - by Jason Burt

Manchester City were not at their best but were good enough to beat Manchester United away, the first time United have lost at home in 41 matches… since City last beat them. So much was rightly made last weekend of the brilliance of David De Gea so it was ironic that it was City’s Ederson who made a De Gea-like double-save to preserve the victory. The Brazilian is an outfield player with gloves and has made such an incredible difference to City this season. Here's my team of the week, in a 4-4-2 formation: Ederson, goalkeeper The Brazilian is phenomenal with the ball at his feet and is also a fine goalkeeker, making an incredible double-save to secure Manchester City’s win away to Manchester United. Jonjoe Kenny, right back The 20-year-old from Kirkdale was Everton’s most impressive defender in the 1-1 draw away to Liverpool. Was offered little protection by Wayne Rooney ahead of him but coped well. Jonjoe Kenny showed maturity beyond his years Credit: Getty Images Nicolas Otamendi, centre back The Argentinean has been much-maligned at Manchester City but has stepped up this season and was his team’s senior defender, especially when Vincent Kompany went off injured. Forced one goal and scored another. Alfie Mawson, centre back It has been a difficult season for Mawson who was so outstanding in the second-half of the last campaign as Swansea saved themselves. He contained the threat West Brom’s Salomon Rondon posed, helped keep a clean sheet and earned a vital win. Arthur Masuaku, left back The left wing-back has found his best role at West Ham and was the pick of the bunch in the win over Chelsea. He also gave his team much-needed respite with his ability to run with the ball. Arthur Masuaku helped inspire West Ham to victory over Chelsea Credit: reuters Heung-Min Son, right midfield The Korean has become a more robust and positive player and showed that in Tottenham’s win over Stoke as he forced the opening goal, an own-goal, before claiming a brilliant strike in the rout. Got a standing ovation as he went off. Johann Gudmundsson, centre midfield The Icelandic winger has been one of the unsung heroes of Burnley’s outstanding season so far, but his energy and positive approach has been key to their success and was again in the win over Watford. David Silva, centre midfield The Spaniard is a Rolls-Royce of a player and was outstanding again in Manchester City’s derby win away to United. He scored, he controlled the game. He was competitive and played in a couple of positions. Brilliant. David SIlva controlled Sunday's Manchester derby Credit: getty images Demarai Gray, left midfield The winger is becoming a fixture in the ‘team of the weekend’ and has seized the chance given to him by new Leicester City manager Claude Puel. Scored and was a constant threat in the win away to Newcastle United. Jermain Defoe, forward Two predatory goals from the veteran striker again showed how he can still perform in the Premier League. His contribution, especially his smartly taken second goal, was overshadowed in Bournemouth’s 2-2 draw away to Crystal Palace by Christian Benteke’s penalty miss. Steve Mounie, forward The French striker started the season strongly, got injured, had a dip in form but scored both goals as Huddersfield Town defeated Brighton – who lack a striker such as Mounie. He would appear their best chance of scoring the goals to stay up.

Premier League - Burnley vs Watford

Soccer Football - Premier League - Burnley vs Watford - Turf Moor, Burnley, Britain - December 9, 2017 Burnley's Scott Arfield celebrates scoring their first goal REUTERS/Phil Noble

Andre Gray praises Marco Silva and Sean Dyche for sustaining Watford and Burnley's charge

Andre Gray praises Marco Silva and Sean Dyche for sustaining Watford and Burnley's charge

Andre Gray praises Marco Silva and Sean Dyche for sustaining Watford and Burnley's charge

Burnley and Watford’s on-field feats may have ensured that their reputation as the Premier League’s great overachievers remains intact, but perhaps the greatest undertaking of a heady campaign to date has been achieved in the boardrooms of Turf Moor and Vicarage Road. The striking start made by both clubs, who now sit in seventh and ninth, has not gone unnoticed. Nor has the capacity to transform relegation candidates of last season into contenders for European football this term. Resisting overtures for their managers and emerging unscathed from the recent managerial merry-go-round has been an accomplishment for both clubs, even if it is likely to be a problem that remains unresolved, while Sean Dyche and Marco Silva continue to parade their credentials for “big jobs”. A strength of unity and purpose has underscored successes. And while they have differing philosophies, the Watford forward, Andre Gray, who transferred allegiances in the summer when moving to Hertfordshire from Lancashire, believes the narrative is very much identical. “They’re both honest and they’ve both got the same sort of morals when it comes to managing,” Gray said. “The table doesn’t lie and what they’re doing with the group of players they’ve got is proving they’re good managers. Everyone speaks highly of both of them. “There is always somewhere for a player or a manager to leave and go to, whether it is a better club or a better league or for whatever reason. That’s how it is and, obviously, as long as our manager and Sean Dyche at Burnley are not top of the league then there is always somewhere for them to progress and move on to. It’s just part and parcel of football. If they keep doing well they’re always going to be linked with big jobs.” Scott Arfield (right) scored the winner for Burnley against Watford Credit: Reuters Burnley maintained their fine form with a narrow win over Watford to remain tucked in just behind Liverpool, Tottenham and Arsenal. And while their cause was aided by the 39th-minute dismissal of Watford left-back Marvin Zeegelaar, Gray stressed that he has been impressed by the way his former colleagues have gone about their business this year. Johann Berg Gudmundsson’s pass created the winning goal for Scott Arfield in the 45th minute and the hosts twice looked to have increased their margin of victory only to be denied by offside rulings against Ashley Barnes. “It’s 16 games into the season, not four or five where they’ve had a great run,” Gray said. “Burnley will not be spoken about until the end of the season and then, if they’re still there, maybe they will. It’s better for the team if they keep going under the radar and keep putting in the performances they have this season because the sky’s the limit. They will all know in the dressing room what they’re capable of. I think everyone will start to believe that sooner or later.”

Andre Gray praises Marco Silva and Sean Dyche for sustaining Watford and Burnley's charge

Burnley and Watford’s on-field feats may have ensured that their reputation as the Premier League’s great overachievers remains intact, but perhaps the greatest undertaking of a heady campaign to date has been achieved in the boardrooms of Turf Moor and Vicarage Road. The striking start made by both clubs, who now sit in seventh and ninth, has not gone unnoticed. Nor has the capacity to transform relegation candidates of last season into contenders for European football this term. Resisting overtures for their managers and emerging unscathed from the recent managerial merry-go-round has been an accomplishment for both clubs, even if it is likely to be a problem that remains unresolved, while Sean Dyche and Marco Silva continue to parade their credentials for “big jobs”. A strength of unity and purpose has underscored successes. And while they have differing philosophies, the Watford forward, Andre Gray, who transferred allegiances in the summer when moving to Hertfordshire from Lancashire, believes the narrative is very much identical. “They’re both honest and they’ve both got the same sort of morals when it comes to managing,” Gray said. “The table doesn’t lie and what they’re doing with the group of players they’ve got is proving they’re good managers. Everyone speaks highly of both of them. “There is always somewhere for a player or a manager to leave and go to, whether it is a better club or a better league or for whatever reason. That’s how it is and, obviously, as long as our manager and Sean Dyche at Burnley are not top of the league then there is always somewhere for them to progress and move on to. It’s just part and parcel of football. If they keep doing well they’re always going to be linked with big jobs.” Scott Arfield (right) scored the winner for Burnley against Watford Credit: Reuters Burnley maintained their fine form with a narrow win over Watford to remain tucked in just behind Liverpool, Tottenham and Arsenal. And while their cause was aided by the 39th-minute dismissal of Watford left-back Marvin Zeegelaar, Gray stressed that he has been impressed by the way his former colleagues have gone about their business this year. Johann Berg Gudmundsson’s pass created the winning goal for Scott Arfield in the 45th minute and the hosts twice looked to have increased their margin of victory only to be denied by offside rulings against Ashley Barnes. “It’s 16 games into the season, not four or five where they’ve had a great run,” Gray said. “Burnley will not be spoken about until the end of the season and then, if they’re still there, maybe they will. It’s better for the team if they keep going under the radar and keep putting in the performances they have this season because the sky’s the limit. They will all know in the dressing room what they’re capable of. I think everyone will start to believe that sooner or later.”

Andre Gray praises Marco Silva and Sean Dyche for sustaining Watford and Burnley's charge

Andre Gray praises Marco Silva and Sean Dyche for sustaining Watford and Burnley's charge

Andre Gray admits the rest of the Premier League need to take Burnley more seriously after narrow defeat

Andre Gray admits the rest of the Premier League need to take Burnley more seriously after narrow defeat

Andre Gray admits the rest of the Premier League need to take Burnley more seriously after narrow defeat

Andre Gray admits the rest of the Premier League need to take Burnley more seriously after narrow defeat

Derby day: From one-sided fixtures to tight affairs - how will Merseyside and Manchester clashes play out?

It is a fact not lost on Merseyside that a generation of young Everton fans have never seen their side win at Anfield. More than 18 years have passed since the Toffees last took three points home with them on the short trip back across Stanley Park, with David Moyes, Roberto Martinez and Ronald Koeman all trying and failing to build a side capable of breaking the Anfield curse. It now falls to Sam Allardyce to rekindle the spirit of September 1999, when an early Kevin Campbell goal, created by a young Francis Jeffers, was enough to secure victory in a typically fiery encounter. Jeffers was later sent off, along with Liverpool goalkeeper Sander Westerveld, and they were soon joined by a fresh-faced Steven Gerrard, making just his second appearance in a Merseyside derby. Everton have beaten Liverpool at Goodison Park on just four occasions since then, making their rivalry one of the most one-sided in recent history. Liverpool have dominated Everton in recent years Credit: Getty There has, however, been plenty of competition down the years for the title of football’s most unbalanced derby. In some cases, a local derby serves as an equaliser, when better teams are routinely pegged back by smaller rivals. In others, the derby atmosphere has the opposite effect, causing one side to shrink and another to thrive… One-sided derbies Everton are by no means alone in consistently struggling against their local rivals. Famously, Atletico Madrid did not beat Real Madrid, home or away, for 14 years. When they finally broke that duck, it was in the Santiago Bernabeu in the final of the Copa del Rey. “If you had made the fans an offer in which you had said we won’t win against them for 14 years but when we do, it will be in the Cup final at their stadium, with them scoring first, hitting the post three times and us winning in extra time, they would have signed up for that,” said manager Diego Simeone afterwards. Elsewhere in Spain, Barcelona have won 97 of 167 derbies with Espanyol, and have lost just three of the last 41 meetings with their local rivals. It is a similar story in west London, where Chelsea have won 46 games against neighbours Fulham, losing just 11. Although they have not always been in the same division, Chelsea have been defeated by Fulham just once, in 2006, since 1979. Chelsea have had the upper hand over Fulham Credit: Getty Images Over in Germany, Bayern Munich have dominated the Munich derby, winning 104 games against 1860 Munich and losing just 50. And on an international level, it is hard to find a more barren run of form than in the early decades of the USA’s rivalry with Mexico. After the Americans won in their first meeting, at the 1934 World Cup, Mexico went on an unbeaten run against the USA that stretched over 46 years and 26 matches until they were finally defeated in 1980. The anomalies In most of these cases, the results are an obvious consequence of the reflective sizes of the two clubs involved. It is no surprise, for example, that a club of Barcelona’s stature is so dominant over the comparably small Espanyol. But sometimes the derby serves as an equaliser, when the size of the various trophy cabinets has no impact on results. The so-called ‘smaller’ clubs can regularly claim the scalps of their ‘bigger’ rivals, or matches between sides at similar levels can become inexplicably uneven. Just look at the recent history of the ‘M23 derby’, between Crystal Palace and Brighton. Palace have had the upper hand, losing just one of the last eight games between the two. The 'M23 derby' is a fiercely-contested derby Credit: Getty And then there’s the East Anglian derby between Ipswich Town and Norwich City, two sides who, by and large, exist at the same echelons of English football. Norwich have not lost to Ipswich in nine matches since 2009. It is also an odd quirk that Stoke City have gone six matches without victory over Port Vale, and have won just two of the last 13 meetings between the two (that said, they have not faced each other since 2002, so those particular figures can appear misleading at first). What of Birmingham and Aston Villa? Here are two sides that played each other regularly in the Premier League in the 00s and have since faced off three times in the Championship, yet Birmingham have not won a league game between them in 11 attempts. The same applies to Sunderland and Newcastle. Both have generally operated at the lower end of the Premier League for the last five years, yet Sunderland’s record is one you would expect of a Champions League team playing a League One side: six wins in their last seven derbies, and no defeats in their last nine. Oxford United and Swindon Town have a similarly unbalanced recent record, with Oxford winning seven of the last eight meetings and going unbeaten in seven matches, in both league and cup competitions, since 2011. Too tight to call Of course, there are also those derbies that are so tightly-contested it is almost impossible to divide the two teams. For this, look no further than Nottingham Forest v Derby. Forest have won 39 times, while Derby have won 37. Burnley’s record against Blackburn Rovers is similarly tight: Burnley have won 41 while Blackburn have won 42. El Clasico is one of the tighest, high-profile rivalries Credit: AP Fulham may not have had much luck against Chelsea, but it’s a far tighter affair with fellow west Londoners QPR, who they have beaten 16 times but lost on 14 occasions. The ultimate in close derbies, though, is El Clasico. Barcelona and Real Madrid have played 172 times, with Real winning 72 and Barcelona winning 68. There’s also just seven goals between them: Real have scored 280, while Barcelona have scored 273.

Derby day: From one-sided fixtures to tight affairs - how will Merseyside and Manchester clashes play out?

It is a fact not lost on Merseyside that a generation of young Everton fans have never seen their side win at Anfield. More than 18 years have passed since the Toffees last took three points home with them on the short trip back across Stanley Park, with David Moyes, Roberto Martinez and Ronald Koeman all trying and failing to build a side capable of breaking the Anfield curse. It now falls to Sam Allardyce to rekindle the spirit of September 1999, when an early Kevin Campbell goal, created by a young Francis Jeffers, was enough to secure victory in a typically fiery encounter. Jeffers was later sent off, along with Liverpool goalkeeper Sander Westerveld, and they were soon joined by a fresh-faced Steven Gerrard, making just his second appearance in a Merseyside derby. Everton have beaten Liverpool at Goodison Park on just four occasions since then, making their rivalry one of the most one-sided in recent history. Liverpool have dominated Everton in recent years Credit: Getty There has, however, been plenty of competition down the years for the title of football’s most unbalanced derby. In some cases, a local derby serves as an equaliser, when better teams are routinely pegged back by smaller rivals. In others, the derby atmosphere has the opposite effect, causing one side to shrink and another to thrive… One-sided derbies Everton are by no means alone in consistently struggling against their local rivals. Famously, Atletico Madrid did not beat Real Madrid, home or away, for 14 years. When they finally broke that duck, it was in the Santiago Bernabeu in the final of the Copa del Rey. “If you had made the fans an offer in which you had said we won’t win against them for 14 years but when we do, it will be in the Cup final at their stadium, with them scoring first, hitting the post three times and us winning in extra time, they would have signed up for that,” said manager Diego Simeone afterwards. Elsewhere in Spain, Barcelona have won 97 of 167 derbies with Espanyol, and have lost just three of the last 41 meetings with their local rivals. It is a similar story in west London, where Chelsea have won 46 games against neighbours Fulham, losing just 11. Although they have not always been in the same division, Chelsea have been defeated by Fulham just once, in 2006, since 1979. Chelsea have had the upper hand over Fulham Credit: Getty Images Over in Germany, Bayern Munich have dominated the Munich derby, winning 104 games against 1860 Munich and losing just 50. And on an international level, it is hard to find a more barren run of form than in the early decades of the USA’s rivalry with Mexico. After the Americans won in their first meeting, at the 1934 World Cup, Mexico went on an unbeaten run against the USA that stretched over 46 years and 26 matches until they were finally defeated in 1980. The anomalies In most of these cases, the results are an obvious consequence of the reflective sizes of the two clubs involved. It is no surprise, for example, that a club of Barcelona’s stature is so dominant over the comparably small Espanyol. But sometimes the derby serves as an equaliser, when the size of the various trophy cabinets has no impact on results. The so-called ‘smaller’ clubs can regularly claim the scalps of their ‘bigger’ rivals, or matches between sides at similar levels can become inexplicably uneven. Just look at the recent history of the ‘M23 derby’, between Crystal Palace and Brighton. Palace have had the upper hand, losing just one of the last eight games between the two. The 'M23 derby' is a fiercely-contested derby Credit: Getty And then there’s the East Anglian derby between Ipswich Town and Norwich City, two sides who, by and large, exist at the same echelons of English football. Norwich have not lost to Ipswich in nine matches since 2009. It is also an odd quirk that Stoke City have gone six matches without victory over Port Vale, and have won just two of the last 13 meetings between the two (that said, they have not faced each other since 2002, so those particular figures can appear misleading at first). What of Birmingham and Aston Villa? Here are two sides that played each other regularly in the Premier League in the 00s and have since faced off three times in the Championship, yet Birmingham have not won a league game between them in 11 attempts. The same applies to Sunderland and Newcastle. Both have generally operated at the lower end of the Premier League for the last five years, yet Sunderland’s record is one you would expect of a Champions League team playing a League One side: six wins in their last seven derbies, and no defeats in their last nine. Oxford United and Swindon Town have a similarly unbalanced recent record, with Oxford winning seven of the last eight meetings and going unbeaten in seven matches, in both league and cup competitions, since 2011. Too tight to call Of course, there are also those derbies that are so tightly-contested it is almost impossible to divide the two teams. For this, look no further than Nottingham Forest v Derby. Forest have won 39 times, while Derby have won 37. Burnley’s record against Blackburn Rovers is similarly tight: Burnley have won 41 while Blackburn have won 42. El Clasico is one of the tighest, high-profile rivalries Credit: AP Fulham may not have had much luck against Chelsea, but it’s a far tighter affair with fellow west Londoners QPR, who they have beaten 16 times but lost on 14 occasions. The ultimate in close derbies, though, is El Clasico. Barcelona and Real Madrid have played 172 times, with Real winning 72 and Barcelona winning 68. There’s also just seven goals between them: Real have scored 280, while Barcelona have scored 273.

Derby day: From one-sided fixtures to tight affairs - how will Merseyside and Manchester clashes play out?

It is a fact not lost on Merseyside that a generation of young Everton fans have never seen their side win at Anfield. More than 18 years have passed since the Toffees last took three points home with them on the short trip back across Stanley Park, with David Moyes, Roberto Martinez and Ronald Koeman all trying and failing to build a side capable of breaking the Anfield curse. It now falls to Sam Allardyce to rekindle the spirit of September 1999, when an early Kevin Campbell goal, created by a young Francis Jeffers, was enough to secure victory in a typically fiery encounter. Jeffers was later sent off, along with Liverpool goalkeeper Sander Westerveld, and they were soon joined by a fresh-faced Steven Gerrard, making just his second appearance in a Merseyside derby. Everton have beaten Liverpool at Goodison Park on just four occasions since then, making their rivalry one of the most one-sided in recent history. Liverpool have dominated Everton in recent years Credit: Getty There has, however, been plenty of competition down the years for the title of football’s most unbalanced derby. In some cases, a local derby serves as an equaliser, when better teams are routinely pegged back by smaller rivals. In others, the derby atmosphere has the opposite effect, causing one side to shrink and another to thrive… One-sided derbies Everton are by no means alone in consistently struggling against their local rivals. Famously, Atletico Madrid did not beat Real Madrid, home or away, for 14 years. When they finally broke that duck, it was in the Santiago Bernabeu in the final of the Copa del Rey. “If you had made the fans an offer in which you had said we won’t win against them for 14 years but when we do, it will be in the Cup final at their stadium, with them scoring first, hitting the post three times and us winning in extra time, they would have signed up for that,” said manager Diego Simeone afterwards. Elsewhere in Spain, Barcelona have won 97 of 167 derbies with Espanyol, and have lost just three of the last 41 meetings with their local rivals. It is a similar story in west London, where Chelsea have won 46 games against neighbours Fulham, losing just 11. Although they have not always been in the same division, Chelsea have been defeated by Fulham just once, in 2006, since 1979. Chelsea have had the upper hand over Fulham Credit: Getty Images Over in Germany, Bayern Munich have dominated the Munich derby, winning 104 games against 1860 Munich and losing just 50. And on an international level, it is hard to find a more barren run of form than in the early decades of the USA’s rivalry with Mexico. After the Americans won in their first meeting, at the 1934 World Cup, Mexico went on an unbeaten run against the USA that stretched over 46 years and 26 matches until they were finally defeated in 1980. The anomalies In most of these cases, the results are an obvious consequence of the reflective sizes of the two clubs involved. It is no surprise, for example, that a club of Barcelona’s stature is so dominant over the comparably small Espanyol. But sometimes the derby serves as an equaliser, when the size of the various trophy cabinets has no impact on results. The so-called ‘smaller’ clubs can regularly claim the scalps of their ‘bigger’ rivals, or matches between sides at similar levels can become inexplicably uneven. Just look at the recent history of the ‘M23 derby’, between Crystal Palace and Brighton. Palace have had the upper hand, losing just one of the last eight games between the two. The 'M23 derby' is a fiercely-contested derby Credit: Getty And then there’s the East Anglian derby between Ipswich Town and Norwich City, two sides who, by and large, exist at the same echelons of English football. Norwich have not lost to Ipswich in nine matches since 2009. It is also an odd quirk that Stoke City have gone six matches without victory over Port Vale, and have won just two of the last 13 meetings between the two (that said, they have not faced each other since 2002, so those particular figures can appear misleading at first). What of Birmingham and Aston Villa? Here are two sides that played each other regularly in the Premier League in the 00s and have since faced off three times in the Championship, yet Birmingham have not won a league game between them in 11 attempts. The same applies to Sunderland and Newcastle. Both have generally operated at the lower end of the Premier League for the last five years, yet Sunderland’s record is one you would expect of a Champions League team playing a League One side: six wins in their last seven derbies, and no defeats in their last nine. Oxford United and Swindon Town have a similarly unbalanced recent record, with Oxford winning seven of the last eight meetings and going unbeaten in seven matches, in both league and cup competitions, since 2011. Too tight to call Of course, there are also those derbies that are so tightly-contested it is almost impossible to divide the two teams. For this, look no further than Nottingham Forest v Derby. Forest have won 39 times, while Derby have won 37. Burnley’s record against Blackburn Rovers is similarly tight: Burnley have won 41 while Blackburn have won 42. El Clasico is one of the tighest, high-profile rivalries Credit: AP Fulham may not have had much luck against Chelsea, but it’s a far tighter affair with fellow west Londoners QPR, who they have beaten 16 times but lost on 14 occasions. The ultimate in close derbies, though, is El Clasico. Barcelona and Real Madrid have played 172 times, with Real winning 72 and Barcelona winning 68. There’s also just seven goals between them: Real have scored 280, while Barcelona have scored 273.

Derby day: From one-sided fixtures to tight affairs - how will Merseyside and Manchester clashes play out?

It is a fact not lost on Merseyside that a generation of young Everton fans have never seen their side win at Anfield. More than 18 years have passed since the Toffees last took three points home with them on the short trip back across Stanley Park, with David Moyes, Roberto Martinez and Ronald Koeman all trying and failing to build a side capable of breaking the Anfield curse. It now falls to Sam Allardyce to rekindle the spirit of September 1999, when an early Kevin Campbell goal, created by a young Francis Jeffers, was enough to secure victory in a typically fiery encounter. Jeffers was later sent off, along with Liverpool goalkeeper Sander Westerveld, and they were soon joined by a fresh-faced Steven Gerrard, making just his second appearance in a Merseyside derby. Everton have beaten Liverpool at Goodison Park on just four occasions since then, making their rivalry one of the most one-sided in recent history. Liverpool have dominated Everton in recent years Credit: Getty There has, however, been plenty of competition down the years for the title of football’s most unbalanced derby. In some cases, a local derby serves as an equaliser, when better teams are routinely pegged back by smaller rivals. In others, the derby atmosphere has the opposite effect, causing one side to shrink and another to thrive… One-sided derbies Everton are by no means alone in consistently struggling against their local rivals. Famously, Atletico Madrid did not beat Real Madrid, home or away, for 14 years. When they finally broke that duck, it was in the Santiago Bernabeu in the final of the Copa del Rey. “If you had made the fans an offer in which you had said we won’t win against them for 14 years but when we do, it will be in the Cup final at their stadium, with them scoring first, hitting the post three times and us winning in extra time, they would have signed up for that,” said manager Diego Simeone afterwards. Elsewhere in Spain, Barcelona have won 97 of 167 derbies with Espanyol, and have lost just three of the last 41 meetings with their local rivals. It is a similar story in west London, where Chelsea have won 46 games against neighbours Fulham, losing just 11. Although they have not always been in the same division, Chelsea have been defeated by Fulham just once, in 2006, since 1979. Chelsea have had the upper hand over Fulham Credit: Getty Images Over in Germany, Bayern Munich have dominated the Munich derby, winning 104 games against 1860 Munich and losing just 50. And on an international level, it is hard to find a more barren run of form than in the early decades of the USA’s rivalry with Mexico. After the Americans won in their first meeting, at the 1934 World Cup, Mexico went on an unbeaten run against the USA that stretched over 46 years and 26 matches until they were finally defeated in 1980. The anomalies In most of these cases, the results are an obvious consequence of the reflective sizes of the two clubs involved. It is no surprise, for example, that a club of Barcelona’s stature is so dominant over the comparably small Espanyol. But sometimes the derby serves as an equaliser, when the size of the various trophy cabinets has no impact on results. The so-called ‘smaller’ clubs can regularly claim the scalps of their ‘bigger’ rivals, or matches between sides at similar levels can become inexplicably uneven. Just look at the recent history of the ‘M23 derby’, between Crystal Palace and Brighton. Palace have had the upper hand, losing just one of the last eight games between the two. The 'M23 derby' is a fiercely-contested derby Credit: Getty And then there’s the East Anglian derby between Ipswich Town and Norwich City, two sides who, by and large, exist at the same echelons of English football. Norwich have not lost to Ipswich in nine matches since 2009. It is also an odd quirk that Stoke City have gone six matches without victory over Port Vale, and have won just two of the last 13 meetings between the two (that said, they have not faced each other since 2002, so those particular figures can appear misleading at first). What of Birmingham and Aston Villa? Here are two sides that played each other regularly in the Premier League in the 00s and have since faced off three times in the Championship, yet Birmingham have not won a league game between them in 11 attempts. The same applies to Sunderland and Newcastle. Both have generally operated at the lower end of the Premier League for the last five years, yet Sunderland’s record is one you would expect of a Champions League team playing a League One side: six wins in their last seven derbies, and no defeats in their last nine. Oxford United and Swindon Town have a similarly unbalanced recent record, with Oxford winning seven of the last eight meetings and going unbeaten in seven matches, in both league and cup competitions, since 2011. Too tight to call Of course, there are also those derbies that are so tightly-contested it is almost impossible to divide the two teams. For this, look no further than Nottingham Forest v Derby. Forest have won 39 times, while Derby have won 37. Burnley’s record against Blackburn Rovers is similarly tight: Burnley have won 41 while Blackburn have won 42. El Clasico is one of the tighest, high-profile rivalries Credit: AP Fulham may not have had much luck against Chelsea, but it’s a far tighter affair with fellow west Londoners QPR, who they have beaten 16 times but lost on 14 occasions. The ultimate in close derbies, though, is El Clasico. Barcelona and Real Madrid have played 172 times, with Real winning 72 and Barcelona winning 68. There’s also just seven goals between them: Real have scored 280, while Barcelona have scored 273.

Derby day: From one-sided fixtures to tight affairs - how will Merseyside and Manchester clashes play out?

It is a fact not lost on Merseyside that a generation of young Everton fans have never seen their side win at Anfield. More than 18 years have passed since the Toffees last took three points home with them on the short trip back across Stanley Park, with David Moyes, Roberto Martinez and Ronald Koeman all trying and failing to build a side capable of breaking the Anfield curse. It now falls to Sam Allardyce to rekindle the spirit of September 1999, when an early Kevin Campbell goal, created by a young Francis Jeffers, was enough to secure victory in a typically fiery encounter. Jeffers was later sent off, along with Liverpool goalkeeper Sander Westerveld, and they were soon joined by a fresh-faced Steven Gerrard, making just his second appearance in a Merseyside derby. Everton have beaten Liverpool at Goodison Park on just four occasions since then, making their rivalry one of the most one-sided in recent history. Liverpool have dominated Everton in recent years Credit: Getty There has, however, been plenty of competition down the years for the title of football’s most unbalanced derby. In some cases, a local derby serves as an equaliser, when better teams are routinely pegged back by smaller rivals. In others, the derby atmosphere has the opposite effect, causing one side to shrink and another to thrive… One-sided derbies Everton are by no means alone in consistently struggling against their local rivals. Famously, Atletico Madrid did not beat Real Madrid, home or away, for 14 years. When they finally broke that duck, it was in the Santiago Bernabeu in the final of the Copa del Rey. “If you had made the fans an offer in which you had said we won’t win against them for 14 years but when we do, it will be in the Cup final at their stadium, with them scoring first, hitting the post three times and us winning in extra time, they would have signed up for that,” said manager Diego Simeone afterwards. Elsewhere in Spain, Barcelona have won 97 of 167 derbies with Espanyol, and have lost just three of the last 41 meetings with their local rivals. It is a similar story in west London, where Chelsea have won 46 games against neighbours Fulham, losing just 11. Although they have not always been in the same division, Chelsea have been defeated by Fulham just once, in 2006, since 1979. Chelsea have had the upper hand over Fulham Credit: Getty Images Over in Germany, Bayern Munich have dominated the Munich derby, winning 104 games against 1860 Munich and losing just 50. And on an international level, it is hard to find a more barren run of form than in the early decades of the USA’s rivalry with Mexico. After the Americans won in their first meeting, at the 1934 World Cup, Mexico went on an unbeaten run against the USA that stretched over 46 years and 26 matches until they were finally defeated in 1980. The anomalies In most of these cases, the results are an obvious consequence of the reflective sizes of the two clubs involved. It is no surprise, for example, that a club of Barcelona’s stature is so dominant over the comparably small Espanyol. But sometimes the derby serves as an equaliser, when the size of the various trophy cabinets has no impact on results. The so-called ‘smaller’ clubs can regularly claim the scalps of their ‘bigger’ rivals, or matches between sides at similar levels can become inexplicably uneven. Just look at the recent history of the ‘M23 derby’, between Crystal Palace and Brighton. Palace have had the upper hand, losing just one of the last eight games between the two. The 'M23 derby' is a fiercely-contested derby Credit: Getty And then there’s the East Anglian derby between Ipswich Town and Norwich City, two sides who, by and large, exist at the same echelons of English football. Norwich have not lost to Ipswich in nine matches since 2009. It is also an odd quirk that Stoke City have gone six matches without victory over Port Vale, and have won just two of the last 13 meetings between the two (that said, they have not faced each other since 2002, so those particular figures can appear misleading at first). What of Birmingham and Aston Villa? Here are two sides that played each other regularly in the Premier League in the 00s and have since faced off three times in the Championship, yet Birmingham have not won a league game between them in 11 attempts. The same applies to Sunderland and Newcastle. Both have generally operated at the lower end of the Premier League for the last five years, yet Sunderland’s record is one you would expect of a Champions League team playing a League One side: six wins in their last seven derbies, and no defeats in their last nine. Oxford United and Swindon Town have a similarly unbalanced recent record, with Oxford winning seven of the last eight meetings and going unbeaten in seven matches, in both league and cup competitions, since 2011. Too tight to call Of course, there are also those derbies that are so tightly-contested it is almost impossible to divide the two teams. For this, look no further than Nottingham Forest v Derby. Forest have won 39 times, while Derby have won 37. Burnley’s record against Blackburn Rovers is similarly tight: Burnley have won 41 while Blackburn have won 42. El Clasico is one of the tighest, high-profile rivalries Credit: AP Fulham may not have had much luck against Chelsea, but it’s a far tighter affair with fellow west Londoners QPR, who they have beaten 16 times but lost on 14 occasions. The ultimate in close derbies, though, is El Clasico. Barcelona and Real Madrid have played 172 times, with Real winning 72 and Barcelona winning 68. There’s also just seven goals between them: Real have scored 280, while Barcelona have scored 273.

Watford boss Silva slams 'harsh' Zeegelaar dismissal

Marco Silva has criticised Lee Probert's controversial decision to send Marvin Zeegelaar off in Watford's 1-0 defeat at Burnley.

Premier League - Burnley vs Watford

Soccer Football - Premier League - Burnley vs Watford - Turf Moor, Burnley, Britain - December 9, 2017 Burnley's Steven Defour in action REUTERS/Phil Noble

Premier League - Burnley vs Watford

Soccer Football - Premier League - Burnley vs Watford - Turf Moor, Burnley, Britain - December 9, 2017 Watford's Heurelho Gomes makes a save REUTERS/Phil Noble

Premier League - Burnley vs Watford

Soccer Football - Premier League - Burnley vs Watford - Turf Moor, Burnley, Britain - December 9, 2017 Burnley's Kevin Long in action with Watford's Jose Holebas Action Images via Reuters/Jason Cairnduff

Premier League - Burnley vs Watford

Soccer Football - Premier League - Burnley vs Watford - Turf Moor, Burnley, Britain - December 9, 2017 Watford's Andre Carrillo in action with Burnley's Jack Cork REUTERS/Phil Noble

Premier League - Burnley vs Watford

Soccer Football - Premier League - Burnley vs Watford - Turf Moor, Burnley, Britain - December 9, 2017 Watford's Marvin Zeegelaar fouls Burnley's Steven Defour before being sent off REUTERS/Phil Noble

Premier League - Burnley vs Watford

Soccer Football - Premier League - Burnley vs Watford - Turf Moor, Burnley, Britain - December 9, 2017 Watford's Heurelho Gomes makes a save REUTERS/Phil Noble

Premier League - Burnley vs Watford

Soccer Football - Premier League - Burnley vs Watford - Turf Moor, Burnley, Britain - December 9, 2017 Burnley's Steven Defour shoots at goal from a free kick Action Images via Reuters/Jason Cairnduff

Premier League - Burnley vs Watford

Soccer Football - Premier League - Burnley vs Watford - Turf Moor, Burnley, Britain - December 9, 2017 Burnley's Johann Berg Gudmundsson shoots from a free kick Action Images via Reuters/Jason Cairnduff

Premier League - Burnley vs Watford

Soccer Football - Premier League - Burnley vs Watford - Turf Moor, Burnley, Britain - December 9, 2017 Burnley's James Tarkowski gestures to fans at the end of the match Action Images via Reuters/Jason Cairnduff

Premier League - Burnley vs Watford

Soccer Football - Premier League - Burnley vs Watford - Turf Moor, Burnley, Britain - December 9, 2017 Burnley's Phil Bardsley in action with Watford's Richarlison REUTERS/Phil Noble

Premier League - Burnley vs Watford

Soccer Football - Premier League - Burnley vs Watford - Turf Moor, Burnley, Britain - December 9, 2017 Watford's Troy Deeney in action with Burnley's Jack Cork REUTERS/Phil Noble

Premier League - Burnley vs Watford

Soccer Football - Premier League - Burnley vs Watford - Turf Moor, Burnley, Britain - December 9, 2017 Burnley's Steven Defour receives medical attention REUTERS/Phil Noble

Premier League - Burnley vs Watford

Soccer Football - Premier League - Burnley vs Watford - Turf Moor, Burnley, Britain - December 9, 2017 Watford manager Marco Silva REUTERS/Phil Noble

Conte: Chelsea were never in title race

Antonio Conte concedes that Chelsea "were never in the title race" following their opening day defeat against Burnley. The champions suffered their fourth defeat of the campaign against West Ham, to all but end their hopes of retaining the crown.

Conte: Chelsea were never in title race

Antonio Conte concedes that Chelsea "were never in the title race" following their opening day defeat against Burnley. The champions suffered their fourth defeat of the campaign against West Ham, to all but end their hopes of retaining the crown.

Conte: Chelsea were never in title race

Antonio Conte concedes that Chelsea "were never in the title race" following their opening day defeat against Burnley. The champions suffered their fourth defeat of the campaign against West Ham, to all but end their hopes of retaining the crown.

Conte: Chelsea were never in title race

Antonio Conte concedes that Chelsea "were never in the title race" following their opening day defeat against Burnley. The champions suffered their fourth defeat of the campaign against West Ham, to all but end their hopes of retaining the crown.

Conte: Chelsea were never in title race

Antonio Conte concedes that Chelsea "were never in the title race" following their opening day defeat against Burnley. The champions suffered their fourth defeat of the campaign against West Ham, to all but end their hopes of retaining the crown.

Conte: Chelsea were never in title race

Antonio Conte concedes that Chelsea "were never in the title race" following their opening day defeat against Burnley. The champions suffered their fourth defeat of the campaign against West Ham, to all but end their hopes of retaining the crown.

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