Charlton Athletic

Charlton Athletic slideshow

<p>Jack of all trades, Charlton is in tune as he keeps everyone entertained in 1970 </p>
The World Cup’s hidden gems

Jack of all trades, Charlton is in tune as he keeps everyone entertained in 1970

Charlton Athletic footballers held over alleged sex attack in Ibiza
Charlton Athletic footballers held over alleged sex attack in Ibiza
Charlton Athletic footballers held over alleged sex attack in Ibiza
Charlton Athletic footballers held over alleged sex attack in Ibiza
Charlton Athletic footballers held over alleged sex attack in Ibiza
Charlton Athletic footballers held over alleged sex attack in Ibiza
Charlton Athletic footballers held over alleged sex attack in Ibiza
Charlton Athletic footballers held over alleged sex attack in Ibiza
Charlton Athletic footballers held over alleged sex attack in Ibiza
Charlton Athletic footballers held over alleged sex attack in Ibiza
Charlton Athletic footballers held over alleged sex attack in Ibiza
Charlton Athletic footballers held over alleged sex attack in Ibiza
Lee Bowyer to continue as Charlton caretaker manager as takeover talks drag on
Lee Bowyer to continue as Charlton caretaker manager as takeover talks drag on
Lee Bowyer to continue as Charlton caretaker manager as takeover talks drag on
Lee Bowyer to continue as Charlton caretaker manager as takeover talks drag on
Lee Bowyer to continue as Charlton caretaker manager as takeover talks drag on
Lee Bowyer to continue as Charlton caretaker manager as takeover talks drag on
Jack Charlton's Republic of Ireland at USA ‘94 and their disputed Irishness
Jack Charlton's Republic of Ireland at USA ‘94 and their disputed Irishness
Jack Charlton's Republic of Ireland at USA ‘94 and their disputed Irishness
Jack Charlton's Republic of Ireland at USA ‘94 and their disputed Irishness
Jack Charlton's Republic of Ireland at USA ‘94 and their disputed Irishness
Jack Charlton's Republic of Ireland at USA ‘94 and their disputed Irishness
Jack Charlton's Republic of Ireland at USA ‘94 and their disputed Irishness
Jack Charlton's Republic of Ireland at USA ‘94 and their disputed Irishness
Jack Charlton's Republic of Ireland at USA ‘94 and their disputed Irishness
Jack Charlton's Republic of Ireland at USA ‘94 and their disputed Irishness
Jack Charlton's Republic of Ireland at USA ‘94 and their disputed Irishness
Jack Charlton's Republic of Ireland at USA ‘94 and their disputed Irishness
Jack Charlton's Republic of Ireland at USA ‘94 and their disputed Irishness
Jack Charlton's Republic of Ireland at USA ‘94 and their disputed Irishness
Jack Charlton's Republic of Ireland at USA ‘94 and their disputed Irishness
Friday 1 June Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm After losing her to the USA for 30 years, Tracey Ullman’s return to our shores two years ago has reminded us of her unparalleled talents as an impressionist. She captures the physicality of her famous subjects – Angela Merkel and Judi Dench are standouts – as well as their voices, and hats off to Ullman’s prosthetics teams for her remarkable transformations. After an acting stint in last year’s Howards End, Ullman returns to her comfort zone tonight with a second series of the topical sketch comedy show in which she skewers politicians, mostly – although we’ll also be treated to more of Ben Miller’s scene-stealing Rupert Murdoch, with Ullman as Jerry Hall. Although no preview tape was available due to last-minute filming, Ullman was pictured as Michael Gove in promotional material and has also promised impressions of Jeremy Corbyn and Jacob Rees-Mogg. The previous series attracted criticism for weak writing, and some skits do lack bite, but slack should be cut – it’s a notoriously difficult format to pull off. Ullman’s gift for mimicry means she hits the mark often enough for the show to be a welcome bit of light satire to wind up the week. VP Extreme Wales with Richard Parks BBC Two, 7.30pm Tonight’s final episode of Richard Parks’s adventure programme combines extreme sports with lush panoramas of the Welsh landscape. Daredevil Parks takes to the skies on a paramotor – nothing more than a parachute connected to a fan-like motor – to propel him the length of the country. VP The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Fugitive immigrant Taariq Shirazi (Alexander Behrang Keshtkar) makes a desperate bid to flee as the Scandi-noir crime series continues. When Saga (Sofia Helin) and Henrik (Thure Lindhardt) track him down, however, Saga’s inability to tell a lie has serious consequences. VP Friday Night Dinner Channel 4, 10.00pm This sitcom’s family squabbles are more uncomfortably familiar than laugh-out-loud funny in tonight’s penultimate visit to the Goodmans’ home. Writer Robert Popper capitalises on Simon Bird’s musical skills by having his character, Adam, reluctantly play the violin to cheer up Grandma. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm; Ethan Hawke, Toni Collette, Jo Brand and Aidan Turner offer their funniest anecdotes tonight. Plus, Liam Payne continues his post-One Direction solo career with a performance his new single, Familiar. VP The Everly Brothers: Harmonies from Heaven BBC Four, 9.00pm Art Garfunkel, Keith Richards and Graham Nash are among the luminaries paying tribute to Don and Phil Everly in this 2016 documentary, all of them claiming the brothers as an influence. Surviving sibling Don Everly returns to Iowa to recount the brothers’ first appearances, their pivotal move to Nashville and stardom in the late Fifties. Africa: A Journey into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm So much of the music we listen to has its roots in African music. In this new three-part documentary series, London DJ Rita Ray sets off to explore the continent’s influence. Kicking off her journey in Nigeria, Ray stumbles across impromptu drumming ceremonies in the streets as she explores the importance of rhythm in the country’s music and meets its major players. Future episodes take her to Mali and South Africa. VP Crocodile Dundee (1986) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.10pm Mick “Crocodile” Dundee (Paul Hogan), a bushman from northern Australia, is a dab hand at surviving in the Outback. But when he is invited to New York City by Sue Charlton (Linda Kozlowski), a high-class reporter, in this Oscar-nominated comedy drama, he finds life far tougher in the urban jungle. He’s a survivor though: muggers who accost Dundee discover that he has a bigger knife than they do. American Made (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Doug Liman directs Tom Cruise in this lively, madcap real-life tale of pilot, drug smuggler and CIA gun-runner Barry Seal, whose supersonic, if lawless, career path began, according to this script, when he was a bored TWA pilot in 1978 and was approached out of the blue by a CIA handler (Domhnall Gleeson, all greasy persuasion) to conduct reconnaissance flights across the Caribbean. GoodFellas (1990) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm Martin Scorsese’s Mafia masterpiece, adapted from a non-fiction book, has all the qualities of great cinema: it’s thrilling, it’s provocative, it’s stylish, and it’s got a young Robert De Niro in it. Ray Liotta plays the youngster who longs to be a gangster; De Niro and Joe Pesci are in the Mob. Pesci’s mother, meanwhile, reportedly asked him if he had to swear quite so much – the f-word is used 300 times. Saturday 2 June Nothing Like a Dame: Maggie Smith, Joan Plowright, Eileen Atkins and Judi Dench Credit: BBC Nothing Like a Dame BBC Two, 9.00pm If you have ever wondered what it might be like to sit in a room with four octogenarian, national treasure actresses and earwig on them chatting, laughing and cajoling each other, this enchanting Arena documentary offers exactly that. Eileen Atkins, Judy Dench, Joan Plowright and Maggie Smith are the stars of stage and screen gathered for an afternoon of amused retrospection; Roger Michell is the veteran director whose featherlight touch (deft use of rare archive photos and footage, entertaining employment of “off-camera” moments) gives a sense not only of wonderful personalities but the astonishing range of their individual achievements as well. The anecdotes are entertaining: from Judi Dench’s recollection of meeting Maggie Smith at the Edinburgh Festival in 1958 and having to hide between shows from amorous fellow actor Miles Malleson, to Smith’s waspish accounts of Plowright’s late husband Laurence Olivier’s towering opinion of himself. Ultimately, though, it is the atmosphere of ease exuded, of long friendship and gentle joshing (such as when Dench fails to tune into a conversation about hearing aids) that truly delights the most. GO The British Soap Awards 2018 ITV, 8.00pm A new award for Greatest Moment will be presented to celebrate 20 years of the Soap Awards, which also air live for the first time ever tonight. Coronation Street (which last won Best Soap in 2013) is tipped to win big due to recent hard-hitting storylines, most notably the Bethany Platt grooming plot, for which Lucy Fallon is favourite to scoop Best Actress. GO Queen Victoria and Her Tragic Family Channel 5, 8.00pm This series paints a far bleaker picture of the monarch than ITV’s drama Victoria. The final episode looks at Queen Victoria’s twilight years, when attachments to male members of staff, led to rifts among the royals. GO All Round to Mrs Brown’s BBC One, 9.10pm It’s mayhem at the Brown house in this episode of the comedy chat show as troubadour twosome of Shaggy and Sting turn up unexpectedly to serenade mammy Agnes (Brendan O’Carroll), just as she’s inviting Gino D’Acampo, Christine Lampard, Peter Jones and Deborah Meaden in for a cup of tea. GO All Girls Live at the Apollo BBC Two, 10.20pm Top names Roisin Conaty, Katherine Ryan, Michelle Wolf, Sara Pascoe, Shappi Khorsandi, Sarah Millican and Andi Osho are among the 12 comedians sharing their rib-tickling views on life in this all-female special edition. GO Inspector Montalbano BBC Four, 9.00pm The disappearance of a former prostitute is the focus of the second in this too-brief run of seductive Italian mysteries. It’s not the most convincing of storylines but, as long-time fans of the series know, the story is rarely the point. It’s simply an excuse to spend a couple of hours in the company of charismatic Salvo Montalbano (Luca Zingaretti) and his decidedly mixed bag of Sicilian cops, whose lives and loves in the fictional Sicilian town of Vigata never fail to entertain. GO Sid Vicious: Who Killed Nancy? Sky Arts, 9.00pm Almost 40 years have passed since Nancy Spungen, girlfriend of Sex Pistols bassist Sid Vicious, died from a stab wound in the hotel room they shared in New York. Many assumed Vicious was responsible, especially as he died of an overdose shortly afterwards. This film explores evidence suggesting that Spungen was actually the victim of a botched robbery. GO Shrek 2 (2004) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 6.05pm OK, so it’s not as good as the original, but this second outing is consistently entertaining all the same. Green ogre Shrek (Mike Myers) is now married to Princess Fiona (Cameron Diaz) but how will the rulers of Far Far Away fare with the new royal couple? However, it’s Eddie Murphy and Antonio Banderas, as Donkey and Puss in Boots, who are the real stars and make sure the sequel delivers in style. Ladies in Lavender (2004) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 7.20pm Formidable grande dame duo Judi Dench and Maggie Smith play spinster sisters, given to walking arm-in-arm along the shores of Thirties Cornwall until, for reasons never fully explained, a Polish violin prodigy (Daniel Bruhl) washes up in their cove. The film, Charles Dance’s directorial debut, makes for a perfectly cosy couple of hours. It’s as pleasantly innocuous as a warm afternoon spent rockpooling. Rocky (1976) ★★★★★ ITV, 11.15pm It’s remarkable that a low-budget drama written by and starring a then little-known actor has gone on to be an Oscar-winning all-time movie classic which has spawned multiple sequels. Sylvester Stallone is the archetypal underdog – a dim, small-time boxer from Philadelphia, who is chosen to take on the world heavyweight champion, Apollo Creed (Carl Weathers). It’s inspirational stuff, even 42 years on. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: Tracey Breaks the News, The Bridge and GoodFellas
Friday 1 June Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm After losing her to the USA for 30 years, Tracey Ullman’s return to our shores two years ago has reminded us of her unparalleled talents as an impressionist. She captures the physicality of her famous subjects – Angela Merkel and Judi Dench are standouts – as well as their voices, and hats off to Ullman’s prosthetics teams for her remarkable transformations. After an acting stint in last year’s Howards End, Ullman returns to her comfort zone tonight with a second series of the topical sketch comedy show in which she skewers politicians, mostly – although we’ll also be treated to more of Ben Miller’s scene-stealing Rupert Murdoch, with Ullman as Jerry Hall. Although no preview tape was available due to last-minute filming, Ullman was pictured as Michael Gove in promotional material and has also promised impressions of Jeremy Corbyn and Jacob Rees-Mogg. The previous series attracted criticism for weak writing, and some skits do lack bite, but slack should be cut – it’s a notoriously difficult format to pull off. Ullman’s gift for mimicry means she hits the mark often enough for the show to be a welcome bit of light satire to wind up the week. VP Extreme Wales with Richard Parks BBC Two, 7.30pm Tonight’s final episode of Richard Parks’s adventure programme combines extreme sports with lush panoramas of the Welsh landscape. Daredevil Parks takes to the skies on a paramotor – nothing more than a parachute connected to a fan-like motor – to propel him the length of the country. VP The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Fugitive immigrant Taariq Shirazi (Alexander Behrang Keshtkar) makes a desperate bid to flee as the Scandi-noir crime series continues. When Saga (Sofia Helin) and Henrik (Thure Lindhardt) track him down, however, Saga’s inability to tell a lie has serious consequences. VP Friday Night Dinner Channel 4, 10.00pm This sitcom’s family squabbles are more uncomfortably familiar than laugh-out-loud funny in tonight’s penultimate visit to the Goodmans’ home. Writer Robert Popper capitalises on Simon Bird’s musical skills by having his character, Adam, reluctantly play the violin to cheer up Grandma. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm; Ethan Hawke, Toni Collette, Jo Brand and Aidan Turner offer their funniest anecdotes tonight. Plus, Liam Payne continues his post-One Direction solo career with a performance his new single, Familiar. VP The Everly Brothers: Harmonies from Heaven BBC Four, 9.00pm Art Garfunkel, Keith Richards and Graham Nash are among the luminaries paying tribute to Don and Phil Everly in this 2016 documentary, all of them claiming the brothers as an influence. Surviving sibling Don Everly returns to Iowa to recount the brothers’ first appearances, their pivotal move to Nashville and stardom in the late Fifties. Africa: A Journey into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm So much of the music we listen to has its roots in African music. In this new three-part documentary series, London DJ Rita Ray sets off to explore the continent’s influence. Kicking off her journey in Nigeria, Ray stumbles across impromptu drumming ceremonies in the streets as she explores the importance of rhythm in the country’s music and meets its major players. Future episodes take her to Mali and South Africa. VP Crocodile Dundee (1986) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.10pm Mick “Crocodile” Dundee (Paul Hogan), a bushman from northern Australia, is a dab hand at surviving in the Outback. But when he is invited to New York City by Sue Charlton (Linda Kozlowski), a high-class reporter, in this Oscar-nominated comedy drama, he finds life far tougher in the urban jungle. He’s a survivor though: muggers who accost Dundee discover that he has a bigger knife than they do. American Made (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Doug Liman directs Tom Cruise in this lively, madcap real-life tale of pilot, drug smuggler and CIA gun-runner Barry Seal, whose supersonic, if lawless, career path began, according to this script, when he was a bored TWA pilot in 1978 and was approached out of the blue by a CIA handler (Domhnall Gleeson, all greasy persuasion) to conduct reconnaissance flights across the Caribbean. GoodFellas (1990) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm Martin Scorsese’s Mafia masterpiece, adapted from a non-fiction book, has all the qualities of great cinema: it’s thrilling, it’s provocative, it’s stylish, and it’s got a young Robert De Niro in it. Ray Liotta plays the youngster who longs to be a gangster; De Niro and Joe Pesci are in the Mob. Pesci’s mother, meanwhile, reportedly asked him if he had to swear quite so much – the f-word is used 300 times. Saturday 2 June Nothing Like a Dame: Maggie Smith, Joan Plowright, Eileen Atkins and Judi Dench Credit: BBC Nothing Like a Dame BBC Two, 9.00pm If you have ever wondered what it might be like to sit in a room with four octogenarian, national treasure actresses and earwig on them chatting, laughing and cajoling each other, this enchanting Arena documentary offers exactly that. Eileen Atkins, Judy Dench, Joan Plowright and Maggie Smith are the stars of stage and screen gathered for an afternoon of amused retrospection; Roger Michell is the veteran director whose featherlight touch (deft use of rare archive photos and footage, entertaining employment of “off-camera” moments) gives a sense not only of wonderful personalities but the astonishing range of their individual achievements as well. The anecdotes are entertaining: from Judi Dench’s recollection of meeting Maggie Smith at the Edinburgh Festival in 1958 and having to hide between shows from amorous fellow actor Miles Malleson, to Smith’s waspish accounts of Plowright’s late husband Laurence Olivier’s towering opinion of himself. Ultimately, though, it is the atmosphere of ease exuded, of long friendship and gentle joshing (such as when Dench fails to tune into a conversation about hearing aids) that truly delights the most. GO The British Soap Awards 2018 ITV, 8.00pm A new award for Greatest Moment will be presented to celebrate 20 years of the Soap Awards, which also air live for the first time ever tonight. Coronation Street (which last won Best Soap in 2013) is tipped to win big due to recent hard-hitting storylines, most notably the Bethany Platt grooming plot, for which Lucy Fallon is favourite to scoop Best Actress. GO Queen Victoria and Her Tragic Family Channel 5, 8.00pm This series paints a far bleaker picture of the monarch than ITV’s drama Victoria. The final episode looks at Queen Victoria’s twilight years, when attachments to male members of staff, led to rifts among the royals. GO All Round to Mrs Brown’s BBC One, 9.10pm It’s mayhem at the Brown house in this episode of the comedy chat show as troubadour twosome of Shaggy and Sting turn up unexpectedly to serenade mammy Agnes (Brendan O’Carroll), just as she’s inviting Gino D’Acampo, Christine Lampard, Peter Jones and Deborah Meaden in for a cup of tea. GO All Girls Live at the Apollo BBC Two, 10.20pm Top names Roisin Conaty, Katherine Ryan, Michelle Wolf, Sara Pascoe, Shappi Khorsandi, Sarah Millican and Andi Osho are among the 12 comedians sharing their rib-tickling views on life in this all-female special edition. GO Inspector Montalbano BBC Four, 9.00pm The disappearance of a former prostitute is the focus of the second in this too-brief run of seductive Italian mysteries. It’s not the most convincing of storylines but, as long-time fans of the series know, the story is rarely the point. It’s simply an excuse to spend a couple of hours in the company of charismatic Salvo Montalbano (Luca Zingaretti) and his decidedly mixed bag of Sicilian cops, whose lives and loves in the fictional Sicilian town of Vigata never fail to entertain. GO Sid Vicious: Who Killed Nancy? Sky Arts, 9.00pm Almost 40 years have passed since Nancy Spungen, girlfriend of Sex Pistols bassist Sid Vicious, died from a stab wound in the hotel room they shared in New York. Many assumed Vicious was responsible, especially as he died of an overdose shortly afterwards. This film explores evidence suggesting that Spungen was actually the victim of a botched robbery. GO Shrek 2 (2004) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 6.05pm OK, so it’s not as good as the original, but this second outing is consistently entertaining all the same. Green ogre Shrek (Mike Myers) is now married to Princess Fiona (Cameron Diaz) but how will the rulers of Far Far Away fare with the new royal couple? However, it’s Eddie Murphy and Antonio Banderas, as Donkey and Puss in Boots, who are the real stars and make sure the sequel delivers in style. Ladies in Lavender (2004) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 7.20pm Formidable grande dame duo Judi Dench and Maggie Smith play spinster sisters, given to walking arm-in-arm along the shores of Thirties Cornwall until, for reasons never fully explained, a Polish violin prodigy (Daniel Bruhl) washes up in their cove. The film, Charles Dance’s directorial debut, makes for a perfectly cosy couple of hours. It’s as pleasantly innocuous as a warm afternoon spent rockpooling. Rocky (1976) ★★★★★ ITV, 11.15pm It’s remarkable that a low-budget drama written by and starring a then little-known actor has gone on to be an Oscar-winning all-time movie classic which has spawned multiple sequels. Sylvester Stallone is the archetypal underdog – a dim, small-time boxer from Philadelphia, who is chosen to take on the world heavyweight champion, Apollo Creed (Carl Weathers). It’s inspirational stuff, even 42 years on. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
Friday 1 June Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm After losing her to the USA for 30 years, Tracey Ullman’s return to our shores two years ago has reminded us of her unparalleled talents as an impressionist. She captures the physicality of her famous subjects – Angela Merkel and Judi Dench are standouts – as well as their voices, and hats off to Ullman’s prosthetics teams for her remarkable transformations. After an acting stint in last year’s Howards End, Ullman returns to her comfort zone tonight with a second series of the topical sketch comedy show in which she skewers politicians, mostly – although we’ll also be treated to more of Ben Miller’s scene-stealing Rupert Murdoch, with Ullman as Jerry Hall. Although no preview tape was available due to last-minute filming, Ullman was pictured as Michael Gove in promotional material and has also promised impressions of Jeremy Corbyn and Jacob Rees-Mogg. The previous series attracted criticism for weak writing, and some skits do lack bite, but slack should be cut – it’s a notoriously difficult format to pull off. Ullman’s gift for mimicry means she hits the mark often enough for the show to be a welcome bit of light satire to wind up the week. VP Extreme Wales with Richard Parks BBC Two, 7.30pm Tonight’s final episode of Richard Parks’s adventure programme combines extreme sports with lush panoramas of the Welsh landscape. Daredevil Parks takes to the skies on a paramotor – nothing more than a parachute connected to a fan-like motor – to propel him the length of the country. VP The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Fugitive immigrant Taariq Shirazi (Alexander Behrang Keshtkar) makes a desperate bid to flee as the Scandi-noir crime series continues. When Saga (Sofia Helin) and Henrik (Thure Lindhardt) track him down, however, Saga’s inability to tell a lie has serious consequences. VP Friday Night Dinner Channel 4, 10.00pm This sitcom’s family squabbles are more uncomfortably familiar than laugh-out-loud funny in tonight’s penultimate visit to the Goodmans’ home. Writer Robert Popper capitalises on Simon Bird’s musical skills by having his character, Adam, reluctantly play the violin to cheer up Grandma. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm; Ethan Hawke, Toni Collette, Jo Brand and Aidan Turner offer their funniest anecdotes tonight. Plus, Liam Payne continues his post-One Direction solo career with a performance his new single, Familiar. VP The Everly Brothers: Harmonies from Heaven BBC Four, 9.00pm Art Garfunkel, Keith Richards and Graham Nash are among the luminaries paying tribute to Don and Phil Everly in this 2016 documentary, all of them claiming the brothers as an influence. Surviving sibling Don Everly returns to Iowa to recount the brothers’ first appearances, their pivotal move to Nashville and stardom in the late Fifties. Africa: A Journey into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm So much of the music we listen to has its roots in African music. In this new three-part documentary series, London DJ Rita Ray sets off to explore the continent’s influence. Kicking off her journey in Nigeria, Ray stumbles across impromptu drumming ceremonies in the streets as she explores the importance of rhythm in the country’s music and meets its major players. Future episodes take her to Mali and South Africa. VP Crocodile Dundee (1986) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.10pm Mick “Crocodile” Dundee (Paul Hogan), a bushman from northern Australia, is a dab hand at surviving in the Outback. But when he is invited to New York City by Sue Charlton (Linda Kozlowski), a high-class reporter, in this Oscar-nominated comedy drama, he finds life far tougher in the urban jungle. He’s a survivor though: muggers who accost Dundee discover that he has a bigger knife than they do. American Made (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Doug Liman directs Tom Cruise in this lively, madcap real-life tale of pilot, drug smuggler and CIA gun-runner Barry Seal, whose supersonic, if lawless, career path began, according to this script, when he was a bored TWA pilot in 1978 and was approached out of the blue by a CIA handler (Domhnall Gleeson, all greasy persuasion) to conduct reconnaissance flights across the Caribbean. GoodFellas (1990) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm Martin Scorsese’s Mafia masterpiece, adapted from a non-fiction book, has all the qualities of great cinema: it’s thrilling, it’s provocative, it’s stylish, and it’s got a young Robert De Niro in it. Ray Liotta plays the youngster who longs to be a gangster; De Niro and Joe Pesci are in the Mob. Pesci’s mother, meanwhile, reportedly asked him if he had to swear quite so much – the f-word is used 300 times. Saturday 2 June Nothing Like a Dame: Maggie Smith, Joan Plowright, Eileen Atkins and Judi Dench Credit: BBC Nothing Like a Dame BBC Two, 9.00pm If you have ever wondered what it might be like to sit in a room with four octogenarian, national treasure actresses and earwig on them chatting, laughing and cajoling each other, this enchanting Arena documentary offers exactly that. Eileen Atkins, Judy Dench, Joan Plowright and Maggie Smith are the stars of stage and screen gathered for an afternoon of amused retrospection; Roger Michell is the veteran director whose featherlight touch (deft use of rare archive photos and footage, entertaining employment of “off-camera” moments) gives a sense not only of wonderful personalities but the astonishing range of their individual achievements as well. The anecdotes are entertaining: from Judi Dench’s recollection of meeting Maggie Smith at the Edinburgh Festival in 1958 and having to hide between shows from amorous fellow actor Miles Malleson, to Smith’s waspish accounts of Plowright’s late husband Laurence Olivier’s towering opinion of himself. Ultimately, though, it is the atmosphere of ease exuded, of long friendship and gentle joshing (such as when Dench fails to tune into a conversation about hearing aids) that truly delights the most. GO The British Soap Awards 2018 ITV, 8.00pm A new award for Greatest Moment will be presented to celebrate 20 years of the Soap Awards, which also air live for the first time ever tonight. Coronation Street (which last won Best Soap in 2013) is tipped to win big due to recent hard-hitting storylines, most notably the Bethany Platt grooming plot, for which Lucy Fallon is favourite to scoop Best Actress. GO Queen Victoria and Her Tragic Family Channel 5, 8.00pm This series paints a far bleaker picture of the monarch than ITV’s drama Victoria. The final episode looks at Queen Victoria’s twilight years, when attachments to male members of staff, led to rifts among the royals. GO All Round to Mrs Brown’s BBC One, 9.10pm It’s mayhem at the Brown house in this episode of the comedy chat show as troubadour twosome of Shaggy and Sting turn up unexpectedly to serenade mammy Agnes (Brendan O’Carroll), just as she’s inviting Gino D’Acampo, Christine Lampard, Peter Jones and Deborah Meaden in for a cup of tea. GO All Girls Live at the Apollo BBC Two, 10.20pm Top names Roisin Conaty, Katherine Ryan, Michelle Wolf, Sara Pascoe, Shappi Khorsandi, Sarah Millican and Andi Osho are among the 12 comedians sharing their rib-tickling views on life in this all-female special edition. GO Inspector Montalbano BBC Four, 9.00pm The disappearance of a former prostitute is the focus of the second in this too-brief run of seductive Italian mysteries. It’s not the most convincing of storylines but, as long-time fans of the series know, the story is rarely the point. It’s simply an excuse to spend a couple of hours in the company of charismatic Salvo Montalbano (Luca Zingaretti) and his decidedly mixed bag of Sicilian cops, whose lives and loves in the fictional Sicilian town of Vigata never fail to entertain. GO Sid Vicious: Who Killed Nancy? Sky Arts, 9.00pm Almost 40 years have passed since Nancy Spungen, girlfriend of Sex Pistols bassist Sid Vicious, died from a stab wound in the hotel room they shared in New York. Many assumed Vicious was responsible, especially as he died of an overdose shortly afterwards. This film explores evidence suggesting that Spungen was actually the victim of a botched robbery. GO Shrek 2 (2004) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 6.05pm OK, so it’s not as good as the original, but this second outing is consistently entertaining all the same. Green ogre Shrek (Mike Myers) is now married to Princess Fiona (Cameron Diaz) but how will the rulers of Far Far Away fare with the new royal couple? However, it’s Eddie Murphy and Antonio Banderas, as Donkey and Puss in Boots, who are the real stars and make sure the sequel delivers in style. Ladies in Lavender (2004) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 7.20pm Formidable grande dame duo Judi Dench and Maggie Smith play spinster sisters, given to walking arm-in-arm along the shores of Thirties Cornwall until, for reasons never fully explained, a Polish violin prodigy (Daniel Bruhl) washes up in their cove. The film, Charles Dance’s directorial debut, makes for a perfectly cosy couple of hours. It’s as pleasantly innocuous as a warm afternoon spent rockpooling. Rocky (1976) ★★★★★ ITV, 11.15pm It’s remarkable that a low-budget drama written by and starring a then little-known actor has gone on to be an Oscar-winning all-time movie classic which has spawned multiple sequels. Sylvester Stallone is the archetypal underdog – a dim, small-time boxer from Philadelphia, who is chosen to take on the world heavyweight champion, Apollo Creed (Carl Weathers). It’s inspirational stuff, even 42 years on. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: Tracey Breaks the News, The Bridge and GoodFellas
Friday 1 June Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm After losing her to the USA for 30 years, Tracey Ullman’s return to our shores two years ago has reminded us of her unparalleled talents as an impressionist. She captures the physicality of her famous subjects – Angela Merkel and Judi Dench are standouts – as well as their voices, and hats off to Ullman’s prosthetics teams for her remarkable transformations. After an acting stint in last year’s Howards End, Ullman returns to her comfort zone tonight with a second series of the topical sketch comedy show in which she skewers politicians, mostly – although we’ll also be treated to more of Ben Miller’s scene-stealing Rupert Murdoch, with Ullman as Jerry Hall. Although no preview tape was available due to last-minute filming, Ullman was pictured as Michael Gove in promotional material and has also promised impressions of Jeremy Corbyn and Jacob Rees-Mogg. The previous series attracted criticism for weak writing, and some skits do lack bite, but slack should be cut – it’s a notoriously difficult format to pull off. Ullman’s gift for mimicry means she hits the mark often enough for the show to be a welcome bit of light satire to wind up the week. VP Extreme Wales with Richard Parks BBC Two, 7.30pm Tonight’s final episode of Richard Parks’s adventure programme combines extreme sports with lush panoramas of the Welsh landscape. Daredevil Parks takes to the skies on a paramotor – nothing more than a parachute connected to a fan-like motor – to propel him the length of the country. VP The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Fugitive immigrant Taariq Shirazi (Alexander Behrang Keshtkar) makes a desperate bid to flee as the Scandi-noir crime series continues. When Saga (Sofia Helin) and Henrik (Thure Lindhardt) track him down, however, Saga’s inability to tell a lie has serious consequences. VP Friday Night Dinner Channel 4, 10.00pm This sitcom’s family squabbles are more uncomfortably familiar than laugh-out-loud funny in tonight’s penultimate visit to the Goodmans’ home. Writer Robert Popper capitalises on Simon Bird’s musical skills by having his character, Adam, reluctantly play the violin to cheer up Grandma. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm; Ethan Hawke, Toni Collette, Jo Brand and Aidan Turner offer their funniest anecdotes tonight. Plus, Liam Payne continues his post-One Direction solo career with a performance his new single, Familiar. VP The Everly Brothers: Harmonies from Heaven BBC Four, 9.00pm Art Garfunkel, Keith Richards and Graham Nash are among the luminaries paying tribute to Don and Phil Everly in this 2016 documentary, all of them claiming the brothers as an influence. Surviving sibling Don Everly returns to Iowa to recount the brothers’ first appearances, their pivotal move to Nashville and stardom in the late Fifties. Africa: A Journey into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm So much of the music we listen to has its roots in African music. In this new three-part documentary series, London DJ Rita Ray sets off to explore the continent’s influence. Kicking off her journey in Nigeria, Ray stumbles across impromptu drumming ceremonies in the streets as she explores the importance of rhythm in the country’s music and meets its major players. Future episodes take her to Mali and South Africa. VP Crocodile Dundee (1986) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.10pm Mick “Crocodile” Dundee (Paul Hogan), a bushman from northern Australia, is a dab hand at surviving in the Outback. But when he is invited to New York City by Sue Charlton (Linda Kozlowski), a high-class reporter, in this Oscar-nominated comedy drama, he finds life far tougher in the urban jungle. He’s a survivor though: muggers who accost Dundee discover that he has a bigger knife than they do. American Made (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Doug Liman directs Tom Cruise in this lively, madcap real-life tale of pilot, drug smuggler and CIA gun-runner Barry Seal, whose supersonic, if lawless, career path began, according to this script, when he was a bored TWA pilot in 1978 and was approached out of the blue by a CIA handler (Domhnall Gleeson, all greasy persuasion) to conduct reconnaissance flights across the Caribbean. GoodFellas (1990) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm Martin Scorsese’s Mafia masterpiece, adapted from a non-fiction book, has all the qualities of great cinema: it’s thrilling, it’s provocative, it’s stylish, and it’s got a young Robert De Niro in it. Ray Liotta plays the youngster who longs to be a gangster; De Niro and Joe Pesci are in the Mob. Pesci’s mother, meanwhile, reportedly asked him if he had to swear quite so much – the f-word is used 300 times. Saturday 2 June Nothing Like a Dame: Maggie Smith, Joan Plowright, Eileen Atkins and Judi Dench Credit: BBC Nothing Like a Dame BBC Two, 9.00pm If you have ever wondered what it might be like to sit in a room with four octogenarian, national treasure actresses and earwig on them chatting, laughing and cajoling each other, this enchanting Arena documentary offers exactly that. Eileen Atkins, Judy Dench, Joan Plowright and Maggie Smith are the stars of stage and screen gathered for an afternoon of amused retrospection; Roger Michell is the veteran director whose featherlight touch (deft use of rare archive photos and footage, entertaining employment of “off-camera” moments) gives a sense not only of wonderful personalities but the astonishing range of their individual achievements as well. The anecdotes are entertaining: from Judi Dench’s recollection of meeting Maggie Smith at the Edinburgh Festival in 1958 and having to hide between shows from amorous fellow actor Miles Malleson, to Smith’s waspish accounts of Plowright’s late husband Laurence Olivier’s towering opinion of himself. Ultimately, though, it is the atmosphere of ease exuded, of long friendship and gentle joshing (such as when Dench fails to tune into a conversation about hearing aids) that truly delights the most. GO The British Soap Awards 2018 ITV, 8.00pm A new award for Greatest Moment will be presented to celebrate 20 years of the Soap Awards, which also air live for the first time ever tonight. Coronation Street (which last won Best Soap in 2013) is tipped to win big due to recent hard-hitting storylines, most notably the Bethany Platt grooming plot, for which Lucy Fallon is favourite to scoop Best Actress. GO Queen Victoria and Her Tragic Family Channel 5, 8.00pm This series paints a far bleaker picture of the monarch than ITV’s drama Victoria. The final episode looks at Queen Victoria’s twilight years, when attachments to male members of staff, led to rifts among the royals. GO All Round to Mrs Brown’s BBC One, 9.10pm It’s mayhem at the Brown house in this episode of the comedy chat show as troubadour twosome of Shaggy and Sting turn up unexpectedly to serenade mammy Agnes (Brendan O’Carroll), just as she’s inviting Gino D’Acampo, Christine Lampard, Peter Jones and Deborah Meaden in for a cup of tea. GO All Girls Live at the Apollo BBC Two, 10.20pm Top names Roisin Conaty, Katherine Ryan, Michelle Wolf, Sara Pascoe, Shappi Khorsandi, Sarah Millican and Andi Osho are among the 12 comedians sharing their rib-tickling views on life in this all-female special edition. GO Inspector Montalbano BBC Four, 9.00pm The disappearance of a former prostitute is the focus of the second in this too-brief run of seductive Italian mysteries. It’s not the most convincing of storylines but, as long-time fans of the series know, the story is rarely the point. It’s simply an excuse to spend a couple of hours in the company of charismatic Salvo Montalbano (Luca Zingaretti) and his decidedly mixed bag of Sicilian cops, whose lives and loves in the fictional Sicilian town of Vigata never fail to entertain. GO Sid Vicious: Who Killed Nancy? Sky Arts, 9.00pm Almost 40 years have passed since Nancy Spungen, girlfriend of Sex Pistols bassist Sid Vicious, died from a stab wound in the hotel room they shared in New York. Many assumed Vicious was responsible, especially as he died of an overdose shortly afterwards. This film explores evidence suggesting that Spungen was actually the victim of a botched robbery. GO Shrek 2 (2004) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 6.05pm OK, so it’s not as good as the original, but this second outing is consistently entertaining all the same. Green ogre Shrek (Mike Myers) is now married to Princess Fiona (Cameron Diaz) but how will the rulers of Far Far Away fare with the new royal couple? However, it’s Eddie Murphy and Antonio Banderas, as Donkey and Puss in Boots, who are the real stars and make sure the sequel delivers in style. Ladies in Lavender (2004) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 7.20pm Formidable grande dame duo Judi Dench and Maggie Smith play spinster sisters, given to walking arm-in-arm along the shores of Thirties Cornwall until, for reasons never fully explained, a Polish violin prodigy (Daniel Bruhl) washes up in their cove. The film, Charles Dance’s directorial debut, makes for a perfectly cosy couple of hours. It’s as pleasantly innocuous as a warm afternoon spent rockpooling. Rocky (1976) ★★★★★ ITV, 11.15pm It’s remarkable that a low-budget drama written by and starring a then little-known actor has gone on to be an Oscar-winning all-time movie classic which has spawned multiple sequels. Sylvester Stallone is the archetypal underdog – a dim, small-time boxer from Philadelphia, who is chosen to take on the world heavyweight champion, Apollo Creed (Carl Weathers). It’s inspirational stuff, even 42 years on. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
Revisit an old favourite this summer, suggests Gill Charlton, our Cornwall expert. You’ll find Scandi style, picturesque hiking routes and the best burgers in Britain. Go now The quality of the summer light in St Ives has inspired generations of artists. Tate St Ives has doubled in size and a major Patrick Heron retrospective has just opened. For a quieter time and to enjoy the cultural side of the resort, visit before mid-July when the bucket-and-spade crowds arrive. Travel down by train (gwr.com) or leave your car at Lelant Saltings and ride the branch line around the bay. St Ives - City map Stay here Lovers of Scandi style will delight in Trevose Harbour House (2) (trevosehouse.co.uk), a few steps from the harbour. Doubles cost from £165 including breakfast. Rather cheaper and offering a particularly warm welcome as well as panoramic sea views, West by Five (1) (westbyfive.com) is the best B&B in town. Doubles cost from £120, including breakfast. Walk the coast path from St Ives to Zenno Credit: istock Walk here You can, of course, simply wander the alleys of the Downalong area or stroll along the harbour front and town beaches. But if you are feeling energetic, take the coastal path to Zennor, a three-hour hike along the cliffs. Look out for seals on the offshore Carracks (rocky islands). Reward yourself with a pint at the medieval Tinners Arms before catching the bus back. Try a spot of surfing Credit: istock See this Tate St Ives (3) (tate.org.uk) has a superbly curated permanent exhibition of works by leading 20th century St Ives artists. The new galleries will display Patrick Heron’s glorious vibrant abstracts until Sept 30. Entry £9.50. Tate St Ives Credit: 2017 Getty Images/Matt Cardy Try this The gentle swell that rolls on to Porthmeor Beach just below Tate makes it ideal for learning to surf. St Ives Surf School (4) (stivessurfschool.co.uk) offers lessons for all levels. Pub walks | Routes that start and end at a characterful inn Shop here Fore Street (5) has the best of the resort’s many art galleries and leisure clothes shops. For studio ceramics visit St Ives Ceramics (6) (st-ives-ceramics.co.uk) in Fish Street. For unusual gifts and exotic jewellery head for Sweet Lime (7) (sweetlimeuk.com) on Wills Lane. Drink here Porthmeor Café (8) (porthmeor-beach.co.uk) has an open-air cocktail bar with a grandstand view of surfers in action. Try the basil bramble fizz (£7.50) or split a jug of sangria (£15). The best hotels in Cornwall Eat here Beachside Porthminster Café (9) (porthminstercafe.co.uk) wins accolades for its modern take on fish and seafood classics, as well as its picture-postcard view of the harbour; around £40 per person including wine. Alternatively, Blas (10) (blasburgerworks.co.uk) in the Warren serves possibly the best burgers in Britain. Join the locals at West on Porthmeor Beach (5) for a superb stone-baked pizza May-September. St Michael’s Mount Off the map Take the bus to Marazion and – at low tide – walk across to St Michael’s Mount (stmichaelsmount.co.uk) and its colourful gardens, which are at their best in June. At high tide, the mount is cut off by the sea, but a small ferry will run you across for £2. Entry £15, closed Saturdays.
Why we're still in love with St Ives
Revisit an old favourite this summer, suggests Gill Charlton, our Cornwall expert. You’ll find Scandi style, picturesque hiking routes and the best burgers in Britain. Go now The quality of the summer light in St Ives has inspired generations of artists. Tate St Ives has doubled in size and a major Patrick Heron retrospective has just opened. For a quieter time and to enjoy the cultural side of the resort, visit before mid-July when the bucket-and-spade crowds arrive. Travel down by train (gwr.com) or leave your car at Lelant Saltings and ride the branch line around the bay. St Ives - City map Stay here Lovers of Scandi style will delight in Trevose Harbour House (2) (trevosehouse.co.uk), a few steps from the harbour. Doubles cost from £165 including breakfast. Rather cheaper and offering a particularly warm welcome as well as panoramic sea views, West by Five (1) (westbyfive.com) is the best B&B in town. Doubles cost from £120, including breakfast. Walk the coast path from St Ives to Zenno Credit: istock Walk here You can, of course, simply wander the alleys of the Downalong area or stroll along the harbour front and town beaches. But if you are feeling energetic, take the coastal path to Zennor, a three-hour hike along the cliffs. Look out for seals on the offshore Carracks (rocky islands). Reward yourself with a pint at the medieval Tinners Arms before catching the bus back. Try a spot of surfing Credit: istock See this Tate St Ives (3) (tate.org.uk) has a superbly curated permanent exhibition of works by leading 20th century St Ives artists. The new galleries will display Patrick Heron’s glorious vibrant abstracts until Sept 30. Entry £9.50. Tate St Ives Credit: 2017 Getty Images/Matt Cardy Try this The gentle swell that rolls on to Porthmeor Beach just below Tate makes it ideal for learning to surf. St Ives Surf School (4) (stivessurfschool.co.uk) offers lessons for all levels. Pub walks | Routes that start and end at a characterful inn Shop here Fore Street (5) has the best of the resort’s many art galleries and leisure clothes shops. For studio ceramics visit St Ives Ceramics (6) (st-ives-ceramics.co.uk) in Fish Street. For unusual gifts and exotic jewellery head for Sweet Lime (7) (sweetlimeuk.com) on Wills Lane. Drink here Porthmeor Café (8) (porthmeor-beach.co.uk) has an open-air cocktail bar with a grandstand view of surfers in action. Try the basil bramble fizz (£7.50) or split a jug of sangria (£15). The best hotels in Cornwall Eat here Beachside Porthminster Café (9) (porthminstercafe.co.uk) wins accolades for its modern take on fish and seafood classics, as well as its picture-postcard view of the harbour; around £40 per person including wine. Alternatively, Blas (10) (blasburgerworks.co.uk) in the Warren serves possibly the best burgers in Britain. Join the locals at West on Porthmeor Beach (5) for a superb stone-baked pizza May-September. St Michael’s Mount Off the map Take the bus to Marazion and – at low tide – walk across to St Michael’s Mount (stmichaelsmount.co.uk) and its colourful gardens, which are at their best in June. At high tide, the mount is cut off by the sea, but a small ferry will run you across for £2. Entry £15, closed Saturdays.
Revisit an old favourite this summer, suggests Gill Charlton, our Cornwall expert. You’ll find Scandi style, picturesque hiking routes and the best burgers in Britain. Go now The quality of the summer light in St Ives has inspired generations of artists. Tate St Ives has doubled in size and a major Patrick Heron retrospective has just opened. For a quieter time and to enjoy the cultural side of the resort, visit before mid-July when the bucket-and-spade crowds arrive. Travel down by train (gwr.com) or leave your car at Lelant Saltings and ride the branch line around the bay. St Ives - City map Stay here Lovers of Scandi style will delight in Trevose Harbour House (2) (trevosehouse.co.uk), a few steps from the harbour. Doubles cost from £165 including breakfast. Rather cheaper and offering a particularly warm welcome as well as panoramic sea views, West by Five (1) (westbyfive.com) is the best B&B in town. Doubles cost from £120, including breakfast. Walk the coast path from St Ives to Zenno Credit: istock Walk here You can, of course, simply wander the alleys of the Downalong area or stroll along the harbour front and town beaches. But if you are feeling energetic, take the coastal path to Zennor, a three-hour hike along the cliffs. Look out for seals on the offshore Carracks (rocky islands). Reward yourself with a pint at the medieval Tinners Arms before catching the bus back. Try a spot of surfing Credit: istock See this Tate St Ives (3) (tate.org.uk) has a superbly curated permanent exhibition of works by leading 20th century St Ives artists. The new galleries will display Patrick Heron’s glorious vibrant abstracts until Sept 30. Entry £9.50. Tate St Ives Credit: 2017 Getty Images/Matt Cardy Try this The gentle swell that rolls on to Porthmeor Beach just below Tate makes it ideal for learning to surf. St Ives Surf School (4) (stivessurfschool.co.uk) offers lessons for all levels. Pub walks | Routes that start and end at a characterful inn Shop here Fore Street (5) has the best of the resort’s many art galleries and leisure clothes shops. For studio ceramics visit St Ives Ceramics (6) (st-ives-ceramics.co.uk) in Fish Street. For unusual gifts and exotic jewellery head for Sweet Lime (7) (sweetlimeuk.com) on Wills Lane. Drink here Porthmeor Café (8) (porthmeor-beach.co.uk) has an open-air cocktail bar with a grandstand view of surfers in action. Try the basil bramble fizz (£7.50) or split a jug of sangria (£15). The best hotels in Cornwall Eat here Beachside Porthminster Café (9) (porthminstercafe.co.uk) wins accolades for its modern take on fish and seafood classics, as well as its picture-postcard view of the harbour; around £40 per person including wine. Alternatively, Blas (10) (blasburgerworks.co.uk) in the Warren serves possibly the best burgers in Britain. Join the locals at West on Porthmeor Beach (5) for a superb stone-baked pizza May-September. St Michael’s Mount Off the map Take the bus to Marazion and – at low tide – walk across to St Michael’s Mount (stmichaelsmount.co.uk) and its colourful gardens, which are at their best in June. At high tide, the mount is cut off by the sea, but a small ferry will run you across for £2. Entry £15, closed Saturdays.
Why we're still in love with St Ives
Revisit an old favourite this summer, suggests Gill Charlton, our Cornwall expert. You’ll find Scandi style, picturesque hiking routes and the best burgers in Britain. Go now The quality of the summer light in St Ives has inspired generations of artists. Tate St Ives has doubled in size and a major Patrick Heron retrospective has just opened. For a quieter time and to enjoy the cultural side of the resort, visit before mid-July when the bucket-and-spade crowds arrive. Travel down by train (gwr.com) or leave your car at Lelant Saltings and ride the branch line around the bay. St Ives - City map Stay here Lovers of Scandi style will delight in Trevose Harbour House (2) (trevosehouse.co.uk), a few steps from the harbour. Doubles cost from £165 including breakfast. Rather cheaper and offering a particularly warm welcome as well as panoramic sea views, West by Five (1) (westbyfive.com) is the best B&B in town. Doubles cost from £120, including breakfast. Walk the coast path from St Ives to Zenno Credit: istock Walk here You can, of course, simply wander the alleys of the Downalong area or stroll along the harbour front and town beaches. But if you are feeling energetic, take the coastal path to Zennor, a three-hour hike along the cliffs. Look out for seals on the offshore Carracks (rocky islands). Reward yourself with a pint at the medieval Tinners Arms before catching the bus back. Try a spot of surfing Credit: istock See this Tate St Ives (3) (tate.org.uk) has a superbly curated permanent exhibition of works by leading 20th century St Ives artists. The new galleries will display Patrick Heron’s glorious vibrant abstracts until Sept 30. Entry £9.50. Tate St Ives Credit: 2017 Getty Images/Matt Cardy Try this The gentle swell that rolls on to Porthmeor Beach just below Tate makes it ideal for learning to surf. St Ives Surf School (4) (stivessurfschool.co.uk) offers lessons for all levels. Pub walks | Routes that start and end at a characterful inn Shop here Fore Street (5) has the best of the resort’s many art galleries and leisure clothes shops. For studio ceramics visit St Ives Ceramics (6) (st-ives-ceramics.co.uk) in Fish Street. For unusual gifts and exotic jewellery head for Sweet Lime (7) (sweetlimeuk.com) on Wills Lane. Drink here Porthmeor Café (8) (porthmeor-beach.co.uk) has an open-air cocktail bar with a grandstand view of surfers in action. Try the basil bramble fizz (£7.50) or split a jug of sangria (£15). The best hotels in Cornwall Eat here Beachside Porthminster Café (9) (porthminstercafe.co.uk) wins accolades for its modern take on fish and seafood classics, as well as its picture-postcard view of the harbour; around £40 per person including wine. Alternatively, Blas (10) (blasburgerworks.co.uk) in the Warren serves possibly the best burgers in Britain. Join the locals at West on Porthmeor Beach (5) for a superb stone-baked pizza May-September. St Michael’s Mount Off the map Take the bus to Marazion and – at low tide – walk across to St Michael’s Mount (stmichaelsmount.co.uk) and its colourful gardens, which are at their best in June. At high tide, the mount is cut off by the sea, but a small ferry will run you across for £2. Entry £15, closed Saturdays.
Revisit an old favourite this summer, suggests Gill Charlton, our Cornwall expert. You’ll find Scandi style, picturesque hiking routes and the best burgers in Britain. Go now The quality of the summer light in St Ives has inspired generations of artists. Tate St Ives has doubled in size and a major Patrick Heron retrospective has just opened. For a quieter time and to enjoy the cultural side of the resort, visit before mid-July when the bucket-and-spade crowds arrive. Travel down by train (gwr.com) or leave your car at Lelant Saltings and ride the branch line around the bay. St Ives - City map Stay here Lovers of Scandi style will delight in Trevose Harbour House (2) (trevosehouse.co.uk), a few steps from the harbour. Doubles cost from £165 including breakfast. Rather cheaper and offering a particularly warm welcome as well as panoramic sea views, West by Five (1) (westbyfive.com) is the best B&B in town. Doubles cost from £120, including breakfast. Walk the coast path from St Ives to Zenno Credit: istock Walk here You can, of course, simply wander the alleys of the Downalong area or stroll along the harbour front and town beaches. But if you are feeling energetic, take the coastal path to Zennor, a three-hour hike along the cliffs. Look out for seals on the offshore Carracks (rocky islands). Reward yourself with a pint at the medieval Tinners Arms before catching the bus back. Try a spot of surfing Credit: istock See this Tate St Ives (3) (tate.org.uk) has a superbly curated permanent exhibition of works by leading 20th century St Ives artists. The new galleries will display Patrick Heron’s glorious vibrant abstracts until Sept 30. Entry £9.50. Tate St Ives Credit: 2017 Getty Images/Matt Cardy Try this The gentle swell that rolls on to Porthmeor Beach just below Tate makes it ideal for learning to surf. St Ives Surf School (4) (stivessurfschool.co.uk) offers lessons for all levels. Pub walks | Routes that start and end at a characterful inn Shop here Fore Street (5) has the best of the resort’s many art galleries and leisure clothes shops. For studio ceramics visit St Ives Ceramics (6) (st-ives-ceramics.co.uk) in Fish Street. For unusual gifts and exotic jewellery head for Sweet Lime (7) (sweetlimeuk.com) on Wills Lane. Drink here Porthmeor Café (8) (porthmeor-beach.co.uk) has an open-air cocktail bar with a grandstand view of surfers in action. Try the basil bramble fizz (£7.50) or split a jug of sangria (£15). The best hotels in Cornwall Eat here Beachside Porthminster Café (9) (porthminstercafe.co.uk) wins accolades for its modern take on fish and seafood classics, as well as its picture-postcard view of the harbour; around £40 per person including wine. Alternatively, Blas (10) (blasburgerworks.co.uk) in the Warren serves possibly the best burgers in Britain. Join the locals at West on Porthmeor Beach (5) for a superb stone-baked pizza May-September. St Michael’s Mount Off the map Take the bus to Marazion and – at low tide – walk across to St Michael’s Mount (stmichaelsmount.co.uk) and its colourful gardens, which are at their best in June. At high tide, the mount is cut off by the sea, but a small ferry will run you across for £2. Entry £15, closed Saturdays.
Why we're still in love with St Ives
Revisit an old favourite this summer, suggests Gill Charlton, our Cornwall expert. You’ll find Scandi style, picturesque hiking routes and the best burgers in Britain. Go now The quality of the summer light in St Ives has inspired generations of artists. Tate St Ives has doubled in size and a major Patrick Heron retrospective has just opened. For a quieter time and to enjoy the cultural side of the resort, visit before mid-July when the bucket-and-spade crowds arrive. Travel down by train (gwr.com) or leave your car at Lelant Saltings and ride the branch line around the bay. St Ives - City map Stay here Lovers of Scandi style will delight in Trevose Harbour House (2) (trevosehouse.co.uk), a few steps from the harbour. Doubles cost from £165 including breakfast. Rather cheaper and offering a particularly warm welcome as well as panoramic sea views, West by Five (1) (westbyfive.com) is the best B&B in town. Doubles cost from £120, including breakfast. Walk the coast path from St Ives to Zenno Credit: istock Walk here You can, of course, simply wander the alleys of the Downalong area or stroll along the harbour front and town beaches. But if you are feeling energetic, take the coastal path to Zennor, a three-hour hike along the cliffs. Look out for seals on the offshore Carracks (rocky islands). Reward yourself with a pint at the medieval Tinners Arms before catching the bus back. Try a spot of surfing Credit: istock See this Tate St Ives (3) (tate.org.uk) has a superbly curated permanent exhibition of works by leading 20th century St Ives artists. The new galleries will display Patrick Heron’s glorious vibrant abstracts until Sept 30. Entry £9.50. Tate St Ives Credit: 2017 Getty Images/Matt Cardy Try this The gentle swell that rolls on to Porthmeor Beach just below Tate makes it ideal for learning to surf. St Ives Surf School (4) (stivessurfschool.co.uk) offers lessons for all levels. Pub walks | Routes that start and end at a characterful inn Shop here Fore Street (5) has the best of the resort’s many art galleries and leisure clothes shops. For studio ceramics visit St Ives Ceramics (6) (st-ives-ceramics.co.uk) in Fish Street. For unusual gifts and exotic jewellery head for Sweet Lime (7) (sweetlimeuk.com) on Wills Lane. Drink here Porthmeor Café (8) (porthmeor-beach.co.uk) has an open-air cocktail bar with a grandstand view of surfers in action. Try the basil bramble fizz (£7.50) or split a jug of sangria (£15). The best hotels in Cornwall Eat here Beachside Porthminster Café (9) (porthminstercafe.co.uk) wins accolades for its modern take on fish and seafood classics, as well as its picture-postcard view of the harbour; around £40 per person including wine. Alternatively, Blas (10) (blasburgerworks.co.uk) in the Warren serves possibly the best burgers in Britain. Join the locals at West on Porthmeor Beach (5) for a superb stone-baked pizza May-September. St Michael’s Mount Off the map Take the bus to Marazion and – at low tide – walk across to St Michael’s Mount (stmichaelsmount.co.uk) and its colourful gardens, which are at their best in June. At high tide, the mount is cut off by the sea, but a small ferry will run you across for £2. Entry £15, closed Saturdays.
Revisit an old favourite this summer, suggests Gill Charlton, our Cornwall expert. You’ll find Scandi style, picturesque hiking routes and the best burgers in Britain. Go now The quality of the summer light in St Ives has inspired generations of artists. Tate St Ives has doubled in size and a major Patrick Heron retrospective has just opened. For a quieter time and to enjoy the cultural side of the resort, visit before mid-July when the bucket-and-spade crowds arrive. Travel down by train (gwr.com) or leave your car at Lelant Saltings and ride the branch line around the bay. St Ives - City map Stay here Lovers of Scandi style will delight in Trevose Harbour House (2) (trevosehouse.co.uk), a few steps from the harbour. Doubles cost from £165 including breakfast. Rather cheaper and offering a particularly warm welcome as well as panoramic sea views, West by Five (1) (westbyfive.com) is the best B&B in town. Doubles cost from £120, including breakfast. Walk the coast path from St Ives to Zenno Credit: istock Walk here You can, of course, simply wander the alleys of the Downalong area or stroll along the harbour front and town beaches. But if you are feeling energetic, take the coastal path to Zennor, a three-hour hike along the cliffs. Look out for seals on the offshore Carracks (rocky islands). Reward yourself with a pint at the medieval Tinners Arms before catching the bus back. Try a spot of surfing Credit: istock See this Tate St Ives (3) (tate.org.uk) has a superbly curated permanent exhibition of works by leading 20th century St Ives artists. The new galleries will display Patrick Heron’s glorious vibrant abstracts until Sept 30. Entry £9.50. Tate St Ives Credit: 2017 Getty Images/Matt Cardy Try this The gentle swell that rolls on to Porthmeor Beach just below Tate makes it ideal for learning to surf. St Ives Surf School (4) (stivessurfschool.co.uk) offers lessons for all levels. Pub walks | Routes that start and end at a characterful inn Shop here Fore Street (5) has the best of the resort’s many art galleries and leisure clothes shops. For studio ceramics visit St Ives Ceramics (6) (st-ives-ceramics.co.uk) in Fish Street. For unusual gifts and exotic jewellery head for Sweet Lime (7) (sweetlimeuk.com) on Wills Lane. Drink here Porthmeor Café (8) (porthmeor-beach.co.uk) has an open-air cocktail bar with a grandstand view of surfers in action. Try the basil bramble fizz (£7.50) or split a jug of sangria (£15). The best hotels in Cornwall Eat here Beachside Porthminster Café (9) (porthminstercafe.co.uk) wins accolades for its modern take on fish and seafood classics, as well as its picture-postcard view of the harbour; around £40 per person including wine. Alternatively, Blas (10) (blasburgerworks.co.uk) in the Warren serves possibly the best burgers in Britain. Join the locals at West on Porthmeor Beach (5) for a superb stone-baked pizza May-September. St Michael’s Mount Off the map Take the bus to Marazion and – at low tide – walk across to St Michael’s Mount (stmichaelsmount.co.uk) and its colourful gardens, which are at their best in June. At high tide, the mount is cut off by the sea, but a small ferry will run you across for £2. Entry £15, closed Saturdays.
Why we're still in love with St Ives
Revisit an old favourite this summer, suggests Gill Charlton, our Cornwall expert. You’ll find Scandi style, picturesque hiking routes and the best burgers in Britain. Go now The quality of the summer light in St Ives has inspired generations of artists. Tate St Ives has doubled in size and a major Patrick Heron retrospective has just opened. For a quieter time and to enjoy the cultural side of the resort, visit before mid-July when the bucket-and-spade crowds arrive. Travel down by train (gwr.com) or leave your car at Lelant Saltings and ride the branch line around the bay. St Ives - City map Stay here Lovers of Scandi style will delight in Trevose Harbour House (2) (trevosehouse.co.uk), a few steps from the harbour. Doubles cost from £165 including breakfast. Rather cheaper and offering a particularly warm welcome as well as panoramic sea views, West by Five (1) (westbyfive.com) is the best B&B in town. Doubles cost from £120, including breakfast. Walk the coast path from St Ives to Zenno Credit: istock Walk here You can, of course, simply wander the alleys of the Downalong area or stroll along the harbour front and town beaches. But if you are feeling energetic, take the coastal path to Zennor, a three-hour hike along the cliffs. Look out for seals on the offshore Carracks (rocky islands). Reward yourself with a pint at the medieval Tinners Arms before catching the bus back. Try a spot of surfing Credit: istock See this Tate St Ives (3) (tate.org.uk) has a superbly curated permanent exhibition of works by leading 20th century St Ives artists. The new galleries will display Patrick Heron’s glorious vibrant abstracts until Sept 30. Entry £9.50. Tate St Ives Credit: 2017 Getty Images/Matt Cardy Try this The gentle swell that rolls on to Porthmeor Beach just below Tate makes it ideal for learning to surf. St Ives Surf School (4) (stivessurfschool.co.uk) offers lessons for all levels. Pub walks | Routes that start and end at a characterful inn Shop here Fore Street (5) has the best of the resort’s many art galleries and leisure clothes shops. For studio ceramics visit St Ives Ceramics (6) (st-ives-ceramics.co.uk) in Fish Street. For unusual gifts and exotic jewellery head for Sweet Lime (7) (sweetlimeuk.com) on Wills Lane. Drink here Porthmeor Café (8) (porthmeor-beach.co.uk) has an open-air cocktail bar with a grandstand view of surfers in action. Try the basil bramble fizz (£7.50) or split a jug of sangria (£15). The best hotels in Cornwall Eat here Beachside Porthminster Café (9) (porthminstercafe.co.uk) wins accolades for its modern take on fish and seafood classics, as well as its picture-postcard view of the harbour; around £40 per person including wine. Alternatively, Blas (10) (blasburgerworks.co.uk) in the Warren serves possibly the best burgers in Britain. Join the locals at West on Porthmeor Beach (5) for a superb stone-baked pizza May-September. St Michael’s Mount Off the map Take the bus to Marazion and – at low tide – walk across to St Michael’s Mount (stmichaelsmount.co.uk) and its colourful gardens, which are at their best in June. At high tide, the mount is cut off by the sea, but a small ferry will run you across for £2. Entry £15, closed Saturdays.
Revisit an old favourite this summer, suggests Gill Charlton, our Cornwall expert. You’ll find Scandi style, picturesque hiking routes and the best burgers in Britain. Go now The quality of the summer light in St Ives has inspired generations of artists. Tate St Ives has doubled in size and a major Patrick Heron retrospective has just opened. For a quieter time and to enjoy the cultural side of the resort, visit before mid-July when the bucket-and-spade crowds arrive. Travel down by train (gwr.com) or leave your car at Lelant Saltings and ride the branch line around the bay. St Ives - City map Stay here Lovers of Scandi style will delight in Trevose Harbour House (2) (trevosehouse.co.uk), a few steps from the harbour. Doubles cost from £165 including breakfast. Rather cheaper and offering a particularly warm welcome as well as panoramic sea views, West by Five (1) (westbyfive.com) is the best B&B in town. Doubles cost from £120, including breakfast. Walk the coast path from St Ives to Zenno Credit: istock Walk here You can, of course, simply wander the alleys of the Downalong area or stroll along the harbour front and town beaches. But if you are feeling energetic, take the coastal path to Zennor, a three-hour hike along the cliffs. Look out for seals on the offshore Carracks (rocky islands). Reward yourself with a pint at the medieval Tinners Arms before catching the bus back. Try a spot of surfing Credit: istock See this Tate St Ives (3) (tate.org.uk) has a superbly curated permanent exhibition of works by leading 20th century St Ives artists. The new galleries will display Patrick Heron’s glorious vibrant abstracts until Sept 30. Entry £9.50. Tate St Ives Credit: 2017 Getty Images/Matt Cardy Try this The gentle swell that rolls on to Porthmeor Beach just below Tate makes it ideal for learning to surf. St Ives Surf School (4) (stivessurfschool.co.uk) offers lessons for all levels. Pub walks | Routes that start and end at a characterful inn Shop here Fore Street (5) has the best of the resort’s many art galleries and leisure clothes shops. For studio ceramics visit St Ives Ceramics (6) (st-ives-ceramics.co.uk) in Fish Street. For unusual gifts and exotic jewellery head for Sweet Lime (7) (sweetlimeuk.com) on Wills Lane. Drink here Porthmeor Café (8) (porthmeor-beach.co.uk) has an open-air cocktail bar with a grandstand view of surfers in action. Try the basil bramble fizz (£7.50) or split a jug of sangria (£15). The best hotels in Cornwall Eat here Beachside Porthminster Café (9) (porthminstercafe.co.uk) wins accolades for its modern take on fish and seafood classics, as well as its picture-postcard view of the harbour; around £40 per person including wine. Alternatively, Blas (10) (blasburgerworks.co.uk) in the Warren serves possibly the best burgers in Britain. Join the locals at West on Porthmeor Beach (5) for a superb stone-baked pizza May-September. St Michael’s Mount Off the map Take the bus to Marazion and – at low tide – walk across to St Michael’s Mount (stmichaelsmount.co.uk) and its colourful gardens, which are at their best in June. At high tide, the mount is cut off by the sea, but a small ferry will run you across for £2. Entry £15, closed Saturdays.
Why we're still in love with St Ives
Revisit an old favourite this summer, suggests Gill Charlton, our Cornwall expert. You’ll find Scandi style, picturesque hiking routes and the best burgers in Britain. Go now The quality of the summer light in St Ives has inspired generations of artists. Tate St Ives has doubled in size and a major Patrick Heron retrospective has just opened. For a quieter time and to enjoy the cultural side of the resort, visit before mid-July when the bucket-and-spade crowds arrive. Travel down by train (gwr.com) or leave your car at Lelant Saltings and ride the branch line around the bay. St Ives - City map Stay here Lovers of Scandi style will delight in Trevose Harbour House (2) (trevosehouse.co.uk), a few steps from the harbour. Doubles cost from £165 including breakfast. Rather cheaper and offering a particularly warm welcome as well as panoramic sea views, West by Five (1) (westbyfive.com) is the best B&B in town. Doubles cost from £120, including breakfast. Walk the coast path from St Ives to Zenno Credit: istock Walk here You can, of course, simply wander the alleys of the Downalong area or stroll along the harbour front and town beaches. But if you are feeling energetic, take the coastal path to Zennor, a three-hour hike along the cliffs. Look out for seals on the offshore Carracks (rocky islands). Reward yourself with a pint at the medieval Tinners Arms before catching the bus back. Try a spot of surfing Credit: istock See this Tate St Ives (3) (tate.org.uk) has a superbly curated permanent exhibition of works by leading 20th century St Ives artists. The new galleries will display Patrick Heron’s glorious vibrant abstracts until Sept 30. Entry £9.50. Tate St Ives Credit: 2017 Getty Images/Matt Cardy Try this The gentle swell that rolls on to Porthmeor Beach just below Tate makes it ideal for learning to surf. St Ives Surf School (4) (stivessurfschool.co.uk) offers lessons for all levels. Pub walks | Routes that start and end at a characterful inn Shop here Fore Street (5) has the best of the resort’s many art galleries and leisure clothes shops. For studio ceramics visit St Ives Ceramics (6) (st-ives-ceramics.co.uk) in Fish Street. For unusual gifts and exotic jewellery head for Sweet Lime (7) (sweetlimeuk.com) on Wills Lane. Drink here Porthmeor Café (8) (porthmeor-beach.co.uk) has an open-air cocktail bar with a grandstand view of surfers in action. Try the basil bramble fizz (£7.50) or split a jug of sangria (£15). The best hotels in Cornwall Eat here Beachside Porthminster Café (9) (porthminstercafe.co.uk) wins accolades for its modern take on fish and seafood classics, as well as its picture-postcard view of the harbour; around £40 per person including wine. Alternatively, Blas (10) (blasburgerworks.co.uk) in the Warren serves possibly the best burgers in Britain. Join the locals at West on Porthmeor Beach (5) for a superb stone-baked pizza May-September. St Michael’s Mount Off the map Take the bus to Marazion and – at low tide – walk across to St Michael’s Mount (stmichaelsmount.co.uk) and its colourful gardens, which are at their best in June. At high tide, the mount is cut off by the sea, but a small ferry will run you across for £2. Entry £15, closed Saturdays.
A complex family feud which stemmed from one of the largest corporate collapses of the credit crunch has been thrown out of courts in Cayman, which ruled that the two companies involved had instead systematically defrauded banks. In the judgment for the case, branded by liquidators as "the largest Ponzi scheme the world has ever seen", the court found the Al-Gosabi family, who owned Saudi conglomerate Ahmad Hamad Algosaibi & Brothers ​(AHAB), had been working with Maan Al Sanea, who married into the family, to commit fraud against over 100 banks over two decades. AHAB had originally been claiming that its collapse was due to fraud committed by Al Sanea, who it had put in charge of one of its financial services businesses, the money exchange. It had argued he took out multiple large unsecured loans and forged signatures and documents to gain access to cash for his Saad group of businesses. AHAB, which defaulted in 2009, had initially been seeking to recover the funds in order to return to creditors. However, instead Chief Justice Smellie said AHAB had been aware of the fraudulent activity through its money exchange business, and that "fraudulent practices were institutionalised for the purposes of defrauding the banks". He said the forgery allegations were made "on a random basis with reference to questioned documents which were selected under circumstances which were themselves questionable and without any reasonable foundation for a finding that the questioned documents and signatures were deployed by Al Sanea without the knowledge and authority of the AHAB partners". AHAB accepted the borrowing of Al Sanea as it was the "quid pro quo for his willingness to also use the money exchange to procure fraudulent borrowing on behalf of the AHAB Partners themselves", Justice Smellie added. The first instance judgment marked yet another twist in a ten-year battle that has seen multiple claims and counter-claims made, and which last October resulted in Al Sanea's arrest on charges of evading justice and owing large sums of money to creditors. Revealing the truth has required a huge investigative, forensic and legal effort Steve Akers, a partner at Grant Thornton which acted as liquidators for Al Sanea's Saad group of companies, said the latest judgment may mark a turning point in the matter. “The outcome of this hard fought litigation has highlighted an extraordinary fraud perpetrated over a protracted period of time. The losses involved are many billions of dollars," he said. "Revealing the truth has required a huge investigative, forensic and legal effort, which was handicapped by a lack of access to records and an unconscionable strategy by the Al-Gosaibis to brazen things out. Creditors of these businesses have had insult added to injury by the burden of the costs caused by the Al-Gosaibis bringing this 'smokescreen' litigation. The case should never have been started and it is to be hoped that they now accept the game is up.” AHAB's chief restructuring officer Simon Charlton said the judgment, which spanned 1,348 pages was a "very substantial document and, together with our lawyers, we are considering our next steps”. “Unfortunately, the effect of the judgment is that none of the assets in Cayman can be paid to AHAB’s creditors. It is important though that the counterclaims were defeated and also that the judgment against Al Sanea stands," he added.
Saudi giants defrauded over 100 banks, Cayman court finds
A complex family feud which stemmed from one of the largest corporate collapses of the credit crunch has been thrown out of courts in Cayman, which ruled that the two companies involved had instead systematically defrauded banks. In the judgment for the case, branded by liquidators as "the largest Ponzi scheme the world has ever seen", the court found the Al-Gosabi family, who owned Saudi conglomerate Ahmad Hamad Algosaibi & Brothers ​(AHAB), had been working with Maan Al Sanea, who married into the family, to commit fraud against over 100 banks over two decades. AHAB had originally been claiming that its collapse was due to fraud committed by Al Sanea, who it had put in charge of one of its financial services businesses, the money exchange. It had argued he took out multiple large unsecured loans and forged signatures and documents to gain access to cash for his Saad group of businesses. AHAB, which defaulted in 2009, had initially been seeking to recover the funds in order to return to creditors. However, instead Chief Justice Smellie said AHAB had been aware of the fraudulent activity through its money exchange business, and that "fraudulent practices were institutionalised for the purposes of defrauding the banks". He said the forgery allegations were made "on a random basis with reference to questioned documents which were selected under circumstances which were themselves questionable and without any reasonable foundation for a finding that the questioned documents and signatures were deployed by Al Sanea without the knowledge and authority of the AHAB partners". AHAB accepted the borrowing of Al Sanea as it was the "quid pro quo for his willingness to also use the money exchange to procure fraudulent borrowing on behalf of the AHAB Partners themselves", Justice Smellie added. The first instance judgment marked yet another twist in a ten-year battle that has seen multiple claims and counter-claims made, and which last October resulted in Al Sanea's arrest on charges of evading justice and owing large sums of money to creditors. Revealing the truth has required a huge investigative, forensic and legal effort Steve Akers, a partner at Grant Thornton which acted as liquidators for Al Sanea's Saad group of companies, said the latest judgment may mark a turning point in the matter. “The outcome of this hard fought litigation has highlighted an extraordinary fraud perpetrated over a protracted period of time. The losses involved are many billions of dollars," he said. "Revealing the truth has required a huge investigative, forensic and legal effort, which was handicapped by a lack of access to records and an unconscionable strategy by the Al-Gosaibis to brazen things out. Creditors of these businesses have had insult added to injury by the burden of the costs caused by the Al-Gosaibis bringing this 'smokescreen' litigation. The case should never have been started and it is to be hoped that they now accept the game is up.” AHAB's chief restructuring officer Simon Charlton said the judgment, which spanned 1,348 pages was a "very substantial document and, together with our lawyers, we are considering our next steps”. “Unfortunately, the effect of the judgment is that none of the assets in Cayman can be paid to AHAB’s creditors. It is important though that the counterclaims were defeated and also that the judgment against Al Sanea stands," he added.
Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm This third series of the thoughtful British science-fiction drama continues to benefit from a narrowing of focus; the big-name American actors and slightly strained global perspective have gone, but the thematic ambition has been retained. Less wilfully obscure than Sky Atlantic’s Westworld and considerably more affecting, Humans instead keeps a tight focus on emotion and relationships, whether the characters concerned are flesh and blood or gears and circuits. It can be heavy-handed with the allegories, certainly, but it’s never chilling or humourless – and leading synth performers Gemma Chan, Ivanno Jeremiah and Emily Berrington are as uncanny as ever. Mark Bonnar, too, is proving a handy addition to the cast as Neil, Laura’s (a brilliant Katherine Parkinson) professional antagonist and love interest – Bonnar’s history of playing characters with shifting loyalties comes in handy as Neil first opens his heart and then hardens his stance on the Dryden Commission. Mia (Chan), meanwhile, is on a one-synth mission to demonstrate coexistence is possible by moving into a hostile housing estate, and Leo (Colin Morgan) struggles with the realities of being human. GT Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm This week begins with chocolate puddings, which means the contestants are challenged to rustle up black forest gateaux and a dessert integrating a root vegetable, then aubergines and tofu take centre stage before the elimination round and an oriental classic. GT Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm Hollings and their “British chophouse classics” square up to an Italian-influenced brand serving fresh pasta from a cheese wheel, as Fred Sireix and a group of high-street investors gauge their potential. GT Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm Now with a Bafta award under its belt, this fine series follows the West Midlands Ambulance Service over the last Saturday night before Christmas. An inevitably busy period is made harder by a major traffic accident in central Birmingham – an incident which puts tremendous mental and physical demands on the crews, documented here with the clarity and honesty we’ve come to expect from the series. GT Great Art ITV, 10.50pm; not STV Tim Marlow takes a tour of the Royal Academy’s sell-out exhibition of the Parisian artist’s portraits, in the process assessing the man’s life, work, and reputation as “the father of modern art”. GT Urban Myths: Sex Pistols vs Bill Grundy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This pop cultural landmark, in which punk pioneers Sex Pistols grumbled, swore and generally misbehaved on Bill Grundy’s sleepily complacent regional chat-show, creating a national storm of outrage in the process, arguably received its definitive tribute from Kevin Eldon in 2013. The comedian’s loving reconstruction of the event imagined the Pistols as Amish people and bordered on performance art. Still, this gleefully silly take on the infamous encounter between the jobbing broadcaster (Steve Pemberton) and the Sex Pistols (played by members of the National Youth Theatre) is a lot of fun. GT Barry Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The eponymous depressed hitman (Bill Hader) tries to go it alone, only to be thwarted by his reckless partner Taylor (Dale Pavinski) and ructions among members of his acting class. GT Billion Dollar Brain (1967) ★★★★☆ Film4, 5.00pm Michael Caine returns as the reluctant secret agent Harry Palmer (The Ipcress File, Funeral in Berlin) in this film from Ken Russell, based on the novels by Len Deighton. Having left the British Secret Service to pursue a career as a private investigator, Palmer stumbles into a plot to overthrow Communism with the help of a supercomputer. But who is working for whom? It’s far-fetched but fun. Johnny Mnemonic (1995) ★★☆☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm Fresh from the rubber-burning success of Speed and four short years before The Matrix, Keanu Reeves starred in this high-concept dystopian adventure as the eponymous anti-hero – a 21st-century courier whose augmented brain is used to transport illicit data – that very nearly ruined his career. It’s adapted by cyberpunk godfather William Gibson from his own story. Munich (2005) ★★★☆☆ AMC, 12.50am Eric Bana stars in Steven Spielberg’s audacious, if lengthy, examination of the Israel-Palestine conflict. Set in 1972, it adroitly tackles the aftermath of the massacre of 11 Israeli Olympic athletes at the Munich Olympics. Bana plays a Mossad agent charged with hunting down the extremists who planned the Munich attack. Some of the rhetoric is clumsy, but the film-makers strive to be politically even-handed. Friday 1 June Tracey Breaks the News: Ullman as Michael Gove Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm After losing her to the USA for 30 years, Tracey Ullman’s return to our shores two years ago has reminded us of her unparalleled talents as an impressionist. She captures the physicality of her famous subjects – Angela Merkel and Judi Dench are standouts – as well as their voices, and hats off to Ullman’s prosthetics teams for her remarkable transformations. After an acting stint in last year’s Howards End, Ullman returns to her comfort zone tonight with a second series of the topical sketch comedy show in which she skewers politicians, mostly – although we’ll also be treated to more of Ben Miller’s scene-stealing Rupert Murdoch, with Ullman as Jerry Hall. Although no preview tape was available due to last-minute filming, Ullman was pictured as Michael Gove in promotional material and has also promised impressions of Jeremy Corbyn and Jacob Rees-Mogg. The previous series attracted criticism for weak writing, and some skits do lack bite, but slack should be cut – it’s a notoriously difficult format to pull off. Ullman’s gift for mimicry means she hits the mark often enough for the show to be a welcome bit of light satire to wind up the week. VP Extreme Wales with Richard Parks BBC Two, 7.30pm Tonight’s final episode of Richard Parks’s adventure programme combines extreme sports with lush panoramas of the Welsh landscape. Daredevil Parks takes to the skies on a paramotor – nothing more than a parachute connected to a fan-like motor – to propel him the length of the country. VP The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Fugitive immigrant Taariq Shirazi (Alexander Behrang Keshtkar) makes a desperate bid to flee as the Scandi-noir crime series continues. When Saga (Sofia Helin) and Henrik (Thure Lindhardt) track him down, however, Saga’s inability to tell a lie has serious consequences. VP Friday Night Dinner Channel 4, 10.00pm This sitcom’s family squabbles are more uncomfortably familiar than laugh-out-loud funny in tonight’s penultimate visit to the Goodmans’ home. Writer Robert Popper capitalises on Simon Bird’s musical skills by having his character, Adam, reluctantly play the violin to cheer up Grandma. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm; Ethan Hawke, Toni Collette, Jo Brand and Aidan Turner offer their funniest anecdotes tonight. Plus, Liam Payne continues his post-One Direction solo career with a performance his new single, Familiar. VP The Everly Brothers: Harmonies from Heaven BBC Four, 9.00pm Art Garfunkel, Keith Richards and Graham Nash are among the luminaries paying tribute to Don and Phil Everly in this 2016 documentary, all of them claiming the brothers as an influence. Surviving sibling Don Everly returns to Iowa to recount the brothers’ first appearances, their pivotal move to Nashville and stardom in the late Fifties. Africa: A Journey into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm So much of the music we listen to has its roots in African music. In this new three-part documentary series, London DJ Rita Ray sets off to explore the continent’s influence. Kicking off her journey in Nigeria, Ray stumbles across impromptu drumming ceremonies in the streets as she explores the importance of rhythm in the country’s music and meets its major players. Future episodes take her to Mali and South Africa. VP Crocodile Dundee (1986) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.10pm Mick “Crocodile” Dundee (Paul Hogan), a bushman from northern Australia, is a dab hand at surviving in the Outback. But when he is invited to New York City by Sue Charlton (Linda Kozlowski), a high-class reporter, in this Oscar-nominated comedy drama, he finds life far tougher in the urban jungle. He’s a survivor though: muggers who accost Dundee discover that he has a bigger knife than they do. American Made (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Doug Liman directs Tom Cruise in this lively, madcap real-life tale of pilot, drug smuggler and CIA gun-runner Barry Seal, whose supersonic, if lawless, career path began, according to this script, when he was a bored TWA pilot in 1978 and was approached out of the blue by a CIA handler (Domhnall Gleeson, all greasy persuasion) to conduct reconnaissance flights across the Caribbean. GoodFellas (1990) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm Martin Scorsese’s Mafia masterpiece, adapted from a non-fiction book, has all the qualities of great cinema: it’s thrilling, it’s provocative, it’s stylish, and it’s got a young Robert De Niro in it. Ray Liotta plays the youngster who longs to be a gangster; De Niro and Joe Pesci are in the Mob. Pesci’s mother, meanwhile, reportedly asked him if he had to swear quite so much – the f-word is used 300 times. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: Humans, Britain’s Best Home Cook and more
Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm This third series of the thoughtful British science-fiction drama continues to benefit from a narrowing of focus; the big-name American actors and slightly strained global perspective have gone, but the thematic ambition has been retained. Less wilfully obscure than Sky Atlantic’s Westworld and considerably more affecting, Humans instead keeps a tight focus on emotion and relationships, whether the characters concerned are flesh and blood or gears and circuits. It can be heavy-handed with the allegories, certainly, but it’s never chilling or humourless – and leading synth performers Gemma Chan, Ivanno Jeremiah and Emily Berrington are as uncanny as ever. Mark Bonnar, too, is proving a handy addition to the cast as Neil, Laura’s (a brilliant Katherine Parkinson) professional antagonist and love interest – Bonnar’s history of playing characters with shifting loyalties comes in handy as Neil first opens his heart and then hardens his stance on the Dryden Commission. Mia (Chan), meanwhile, is on a one-synth mission to demonstrate coexistence is possible by moving into a hostile housing estate, and Leo (Colin Morgan) struggles with the realities of being human. GT Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm This week begins with chocolate puddings, which means the contestants are challenged to rustle up black forest gateaux and a dessert integrating a root vegetable, then aubergines and tofu take centre stage before the elimination round and an oriental classic. GT Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm Hollings and their “British chophouse classics” square up to an Italian-influenced brand serving fresh pasta from a cheese wheel, as Fred Sireix and a group of high-street investors gauge their potential. GT Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm Now with a Bafta award under its belt, this fine series follows the West Midlands Ambulance Service over the last Saturday night before Christmas. An inevitably busy period is made harder by a major traffic accident in central Birmingham – an incident which puts tremendous mental and physical demands on the crews, documented here with the clarity and honesty we’ve come to expect from the series. GT Great Art ITV, 10.50pm; not STV Tim Marlow takes a tour of the Royal Academy’s sell-out exhibition of the Parisian artist’s portraits, in the process assessing the man’s life, work, and reputation as “the father of modern art”. GT Urban Myths: Sex Pistols vs Bill Grundy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This pop cultural landmark, in which punk pioneers Sex Pistols grumbled, swore and generally misbehaved on Bill Grundy’s sleepily complacent regional chat-show, creating a national storm of outrage in the process, arguably received its definitive tribute from Kevin Eldon in 2013. The comedian’s loving reconstruction of the event imagined the Pistols as Amish people and bordered on performance art. Still, this gleefully silly take on the infamous encounter between the jobbing broadcaster (Steve Pemberton) and the Sex Pistols (played by members of the National Youth Theatre) is a lot of fun. GT Barry Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The eponymous depressed hitman (Bill Hader) tries to go it alone, only to be thwarted by his reckless partner Taylor (Dale Pavinski) and ructions among members of his acting class. GT Billion Dollar Brain (1967) ★★★★☆ Film4, 5.00pm Michael Caine returns as the reluctant secret agent Harry Palmer (The Ipcress File, Funeral in Berlin) in this film from Ken Russell, based on the novels by Len Deighton. Having left the British Secret Service to pursue a career as a private investigator, Palmer stumbles into a plot to overthrow Communism with the help of a supercomputer. But who is working for whom? It’s far-fetched but fun. Johnny Mnemonic (1995) ★★☆☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm Fresh from the rubber-burning success of Speed and four short years before The Matrix, Keanu Reeves starred in this high-concept dystopian adventure as the eponymous anti-hero – a 21st-century courier whose augmented brain is used to transport illicit data – that very nearly ruined his career. It’s adapted by cyberpunk godfather William Gibson from his own story. Munich (2005) ★★★☆☆ AMC, 12.50am Eric Bana stars in Steven Spielberg’s audacious, if lengthy, examination of the Israel-Palestine conflict. Set in 1972, it adroitly tackles the aftermath of the massacre of 11 Israeli Olympic athletes at the Munich Olympics. Bana plays a Mossad agent charged with hunting down the extremists who planned the Munich attack. Some of the rhetoric is clumsy, but the film-makers strive to be politically even-handed. Friday 1 June Tracey Breaks the News: Ullman as Michael Gove Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm After losing her to the USA for 30 years, Tracey Ullman’s return to our shores two years ago has reminded us of her unparalleled talents as an impressionist. She captures the physicality of her famous subjects – Angela Merkel and Judi Dench are standouts – as well as their voices, and hats off to Ullman’s prosthetics teams for her remarkable transformations. After an acting stint in last year’s Howards End, Ullman returns to her comfort zone tonight with a second series of the topical sketch comedy show in which she skewers politicians, mostly – although we’ll also be treated to more of Ben Miller’s scene-stealing Rupert Murdoch, with Ullman as Jerry Hall. Although no preview tape was available due to last-minute filming, Ullman was pictured as Michael Gove in promotional material and has also promised impressions of Jeremy Corbyn and Jacob Rees-Mogg. The previous series attracted criticism for weak writing, and some skits do lack bite, but slack should be cut – it’s a notoriously difficult format to pull off. Ullman’s gift for mimicry means she hits the mark often enough for the show to be a welcome bit of light satire to wind up the week. VP Extreme Wales with Richard Parks BBC Two, 7.30pm Tonight’s final episode of Richard Parks’s adventure programme combines extreme sports with lush panoramas of the Welsh landscape. Daredevil Parks takes to the skies on a paramotor – nothing more than a parachute connected to a fan-like motor – to propel him the length of the country. VP The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Fugitive immigrant Taariq Shirazi (Alexander Behrang Keshtkar) makes a desperate bid to flee as the Scandi-noir crime series continues. When Saga (Sofia Helin) and Henrik (Thure Lindhardt) track him down, however, Saga’s inability to tell a lie has serious consequences. VP Friday Night Dinner Channel 4, 10.00pm This sitcom’s family squabbles are more uncomfortably familiar than laugh-out-loud funny in tonight’s penultimate visit to the Goodmans’ home. Writer Robert Popper capitalises on Simon Bird’s musical skills by having his character, Adam, reluctantly play the violin to cheer up Grandma. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm; Ethan Hawke, Toni Collette, Jo Brand and Aidan Turner offer their funniest anecdotes tonight. Plus, Liam Payne continues his post-One Direction solo career with a performance his new single, Familiar. VP The Everly Brothers: Harmonies from Heaven BBC Four, 9.00pm Art Garfunkel, Keith Richards and Graham Nash are among the luminaries paying tribute to Don and Phil Everly in this 2016 documentary, all of them claiming the brothers as an influence. Surviving sibling Don Everly returns to Iowa to recount the brothers’ first appearances, their pivotal move to Nashville and stardom in the late Fifties. Africa: A Journey into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm So much of the music we listen to has its roots in African music. In this new three-part documentary series, London DJ Rita Ray sets off to explore the continent’s influence. Kicking off her journey in Nigeria, Ray stumbles across impromptu drumming ceremonies in the streets as she explores the importance of rhythm in the country’s music and meets its major players. Future episodes take her to Mali and South Africa. VP Crocodile Dundee (1986) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.10pm Mick “Crocodile” Dundee (Paul Hogan), a bushman from northern Australia, is a dab hand at surviving in the Outback. But when he is invited to New York City by Sue Charlton (Linda Kozlowski), a high-class reporter, in this Oscar-nominated comedy drama, he finds life far tougher in the urban jungle. He’s a survivor though: muggers who accost Dundee discover that he has a bigger knife than they do. American Made (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Doug Liman directs Tom Cruise in this lively, madcap real-life tale of pilot, drug smuggler and CIA gun-runner Barry Seal, whose supersonic, if lawless, career path began, according to this script, when he was a bored TWA pilot in 1978 and was approached out of the blue by a CIA handler (Domhnall Gleeson, all greasy persuasion) to conduct reconnaissance flights across the Caribbean. GoodFellas (1990) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm Martin Scorsese’s Mafia masterpiece, adapted from a non-fiction book, has all the qualities of great cinema: it’s thrilling, it’s provocative, it’s stylish, and it’s got a young Robert De Niro in it. Ray Liotta plays the youngster who longs to be a gangster; De Niro and Joe Pesci are in the Mob. Pesci’s mother, meanwhile, reportedly asked him if he had to swear quite so much – the f-word is used 300 times. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm This third series of the thoughtful British science-fiction drama continues to benefit from a narrowing of focus; the big-name American actors and slightly strained global perspective have gone, but the thematic ambition has been retained. Less wilfully obscure than Sky Atlantic’s Westworld and considerably more affecting, Humans instead keeps a tight focus on emotion and relationships, whether the characters concerned are flesh and blood or gears and circuits. It can be heavy-handed with the allegories, certainly, but it’s never chilling or humourless – and leading synth performers Gemma Chan, Ivanno Jeremiah and Emily Berrington are as uncanny as ever. Mark Bonnar, too, is proving a handy addition to the cast as Neil, Laura’s (a brilliant Katherine Parkinson) professional antagonist and love interest – Bonnar’s history of playing characters with shifting loyalties comes in handy as Neil first opens his heart and then hardens his stance on the Dryden Commission. Mia (Chan), meanwhile, is on a one-synth mission to demonstrate coexistence is possible by moving into a hostile housing estate, and Leo (Colin Morgan) struggles with the realities of being human. GT Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm This week begins with chocolate puddings, which means the contestants are challenged to rustle up black forest gateaux and a dessert integrating a root vegetable, then aubergines and tofu take centre stage before the elimination round and an oriental classic. GT Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm Hollings and their “British chophouse classics” square up to an Italian-influenced brand serving fresh pasta from a cheese wheel, as Fred Sireix and a group of high-street investors gauge their potential. GT Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm Now with a Bafta award under its belt, this fine series follows the West Midlands Ambulance Service over the last Saturday night before Christmas. An inevitably busy period is made harder by a major traffic accident in central Birmingham – an incident which puts tremendous mental and physical demands on the crews, documented here with the clarity and honesty we’ve come to expect from the series. GT Great Art ITV, 10.50pm; not STV Tim Marlow takes a tour of the Royal Academy’s sell-out exhibition of the Parisian artist’s portraits, in the process assessing the man’s life, work, and reputation as “the father of modern art”. GT Urban Myths: Sex Pistols vs Bill Grundy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This pop cultural landmark, in which punk pioneers Sex Pistols grumbled, swore and generally misbehaved on Bill Grundy’s sleepily complacent regional chat-show, creating a national storm of outrage in the process, arguably received its definitive tribute from Kevin Eldon in 2013. The comedian’s loving reconstruction of the event imagined the Pistols as Amish people and bordered on performance art. Still, this gleefully silly take on the infamous encounter between the jobbing broadcaster (Steve Pemberton) and the Sex Pistols (played by members of the National Youth Theatre) is a lot of fun. GT Barry Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The eponymous depressed hitman (Bill Hader) tries to go it alone, only to be thwarted by his reckless partner Taylor (Dale Pavinski) and ructions among members of his acting class. GT Billion Dollar Brain (1967) ★★★★☆ Film4, 5.00pm Michael Caine returns as the reluctant secret agent Harry Palmer (The Ipcress File, Funeral in Berlin) in this film from Ken Russell, based on the novels by Len Deighton. Having left the British Secret Service to pursue a career as a private investigator, Palmer stumbles into a plot to overthrow Communism with the help of a supercomputer. But who is working for whom? It’s far-fetched but fun. Johnny Mnemonic (1995) ★★☆☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm Fresh from the rubber-burning success of Speed and four short years before The Matrix, Keanu Reeves starred in this high-concept dystopian adventure as the eponymous anti-hero – a 21st-century courier whose augmented brain is used to transport illicit data – that very nearly ruined his career. It’s adapted by cyberpunk godfather William Gibson from his own story. Munich (2005) ★★★☆☆ AMC, 12.50am Eric Bana stars in Steven Spielberg’s audacious, if lengthy, examination of the Israel-Palestine conflict. Set in 1972, it adroitly tackles the aftermath of the massacre of 11 Israeli Olympic athletes at the Munich Olympics. Bana plays a Mossad agent charged with hunting down the extremists who planned the Munich attack. Some of the rhetoric is clumsy, but the film-makers strive to be politically even-handed. Friday 1 June Tracey Breaks the News: Ullman as Michael Gove Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm After losing her to the USA for 30 years, Tracey Ullman’s return to our shores two years ago has reminded us of her unparalleled talents as an impressionist. She captures the physicality of her famous subjects – Angela Merkel and Judi Dench are standouts – as well as their voices, and hats off to Ullman’s prosthetics teams for her remarkable transformations. After an acting stint in last year’s Howards End, Ullman returns to her comfort zone tonight with a second series of the topical sketch comedy show in which she skewers politicians, mostly – although we’ll also be treated to more of Ben Miller’s scene-stealing Rupert Murdoch, with Ullman as Jerry Hall. Although no preview tape was available due to last-minute filming, Ullman was pictured as Michael Gove in promotional material and has also promised impressions of Jeremy Corbyn and Jacob Rees-Mogg. The previous series attracted criticism for weak writing, and some skits do lack bite, but slack should be cut – it’s a notoriously difficult format to pull off. Ullman’s gift for mimicry means she hits the mark often enough for the show to be a welcome bit of light satire to wind up the week. VP Extreme Wales with Richard Parks BBC Two, 7.30pm Tonight’s final episode of Richard Parks’s adventure programme combines extreme sports with lush panoramas of the Welsh landscape. Daredevil Parks takes to the skies on a paramotor – nothing more than a parachute connected to a fan-like motor – to propel him the length of the country. VP The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Fugitive immigrant Taariq Shirazi (Alexander Behrang Keshtkar) makes a desperate bid to flee as the Scandi-noir crime series continues. When Saga (Sofia Helin) and Henrik (Thure Lindhardt) track him down, however, Saga’s inability to tell a lie has serious consequences. VP Friday Night Dinner Channel 4, 10.00pm This sitcom’s family squabbles are more uncomfortably familiar than laugh-out-loud funny in tonight’s penultimate visit to the Goodmans’ home. Writer Robert Popper capitalises on Simon Bird’s musical skills by having his character, Adam, reluctantly play the violin to cheer up Grandma. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm; Ethan Hawke, Toni Collette, Jo Brand and Aidan Turner offer their funniest anecdotes tonight. Plus, Liam Payne continues his post-One Direction solo career with a performance his new single, Familiar. VP The Everly Brothers: Harmonies from Heaven BBC Four, 9.00pm Art Garfunkel, Keith Richards and Graham Nash are among the luminaries paying tribute to Don and Phil Everly in this 2016 documentary, all of them claiming the brothers as an influence. Surviving sibling Don Everly returns to Iowa to recount the brothers’ first appearances, their pivotal move to Nashville and stardom in the late Fifties. Africa: A Journey into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm So much of the music we listen to has its roots in African music. In this new three-part documentary series, London DJ Rita Ray sets off to explore the continent’s influence. Kicking off her journey in Nigeria, Ray stumbles across impromptu drumming ceremonies in the streets as she explores the importance of rhythm in the country’s music and meets its major players. Future episodes take her to Mali and South Africa. VP Crocodile Dundee (1986) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.10pm Mick “Crocodile” Dundee (Paul Hogan), a bushman from northern Australia, is a dab hand at surviving in the Outback. But when he is invited to New York City by Sue Charlton (Linda Kozlowski), a high-class reporter, in this Oscar-nominated comedy drama, he finds life far tougher in the urban jungle. He’s a survivor though: muggers who accost Dundee discover that he has a bigger knife than they do. American Made (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Doug Liman directs Tom Cruise in this lively, madcap real-life tale of pilot, drug smuggler and CIA gun-runner Barry Seal, whose supersonic, if lawless, career path began, according to this script, when he was a bored TWA pilot in 1978 and was approached out of the blue by a CIA handler (Domhnall Gleeson, all greasy persuasion) to conduct reconnaissance flights across the Caribbean. GoodFellas (1990) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm Martin Scorsese’s Mafia masterpiece, adapted from a non-fiction book, has all the qualities of great cinema: it’s thrilling, it’s provocative, it’s stylish, and it’s got a young Robert De Niro in it. Ray Liotta plays the youngster who longs to be a gangster; De Niro and Joe Pesci are in the Mob. Pesci’s mother, meanwhile, reportedly asked him if he had to swear quite so much – the f-word is used 300 times. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: Humans, Britain’s Best Home Cook and more
Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm This third series of the thoughtful British science-fiction drama continues to benefit from a narrowing of focus; the big-name American actors and slightly strained global perspective have gone, but the thematic ambition has been retained. Less wilfully obscure than Sky Atlantic’s Westworld and considerably more affecting, Humans instead keeps a tight focus on emotion and relationships, whether the characters concerned are flesh and blood or gears and circuits. It can be heavy-handed with the allegories, certainly, but it’s never chilling or humourless – and leading synth performers Gemma Chan, Ivanno Jeremiah and Emily Berrington are as uncanny as ever. Mark Bonnar, too, is proving a handy addition to the cast as Neil, Laura’s (a brilliant Katherine Parkinson) professional antagonist and love interest – Bonnar’s history of playing characters with shifting loyalties comes in handy as Neil first opens his heart and then hardens his stance on the Dryden Commission. Mia (Chan), meanwhile, is on a one-synth mission to demonstrate coexistence is possible by moving into a hostile housing estate, and Leo (Colin Morgan) struggles with the realities of being human. GT Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm This week begins with chocolate puddings, which means the contestants are challenged to rustle up black forest gateaux and a dessert integrating a root vegetable, then aubergines and tofu take centre stage before the elimination round and an oriental classic. GT Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm Hollings and their “British chophouse classics” square up to an Italian-influenced brand serving fresh pasta from a cheese wheel, as Fred Sireix and a group of high-street investors gauge their potential. GT Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm Now with a Bafta award under its belt, this fine series follows the West Midlands Ambulance Service over the last Saturday night before Christmas. An inevitably busy period is made harder by a major traffic accident in central Birmingham – an incident which puts tremendous mental and physical demands on the crews, documented here with the clarity and honesty we’ve come to expect from the series. GT Great Art ITV, 10.50pm; not STV Tim Marlow takes a tour of the Royal Academy’s sell-out exhibition of the Parisian artist’s portraits, in the process assessing the man’s life, work, and reputation as “the father of modern art”. GT Urban Myths: Sex Pistols vs Bill Grundy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This pop cultural landmark, in which punk pioneers Sex Pistols grumbled, swore and generally misbehaved on Bill Grundy’s sleepily complacent regional chat-show, creating a national storm of outrage in the process, arguably received its definitive tribute from Kevin Eldon in 2013. The comedian’s loving reconstruction of the event imagined the Pistols as Amish people and bordered on performance art. Still, this gleefully silly take on the infamous encounter between the jobbing broadcaster (Steve Pemberton) and the Sex Pistols (played by members of the National Youth Theatre) is a lot of fun. GT Barry Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The eponymous depressed hitman (Bill Hader) tries to go it alone, only to be thwarted by his reckless partner Taylor (Dale Pavinski) and ructions among members of his acting class. GT Billion Dollar Brain (1967) ★★★★☆ Film4, 5.00pm Michael Caine returns as the reluctant secret agent Harry Palmer (The Ipcress File, Funeral in Berlin) in this film from Ken Russell, based on the novels by Len Deighton. Having left the British Secret Service to pursue a career as a private investigator, Palmer stumbles into a plot to overthrow Communism with the help of a supercomputer. But who is working for whom? It’s far-fetched but fun. Johnny Mnemonic (1995) ★★☆☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm Fresh from the rubber-burning success of Speed and four short years before The Matrix, Keanu Reeves starred in this high-concept dystopian adventure as the eponymous anti-hero – a 21st-century courier whose augmented brain is used to transport illicit data – that very nearly ruined his career. It’s adapted by cyberpunk godfather William Gibson from his own story. Munich (2005) ★★★☆☆ AMC, 12.50am Eric Bana stars in Steven Spielberg’s audacious, if lengthy, examination of the Israel-Palestine conflict. Set in 1972, it adroitly tackles the aftermath of the massacre of 11 Israeli Olympic athletes at the Munich Olympics. Bana plays a Mossad agent charged with hunting down the extremists who planned the Munich attack. Some of the rhetoric is clumsy, but the film-makers strive to be politically even-handed. Friday 1 June Tracey Breaks the News: Ullman as Michael Gove Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm After losing her to the USA for 30 years, Tracey Ullman’s return to our shores two years ago has reminded us of her unparalleled talents as an impressionist. She captures the physicality of her famous subjects – Angela Merkel and Judi Dench are standouts – as well as their voices, and hats off to Ullman’s prosthetics teams for her remarkable transformations. After an acting stint in last year’s Howards End, Ullman returns to her comfort zone tonight with a second series of the topical sketch comedy show in which she skewers politicians, mostly – although we’ll also be treated to more of Ben Miller’s scene-stealing Rupert Murdoch, with Ullman as Jerry Hall. Although no preview tape was available due to last-minute filming, Ullman was pictured as Michael Gove in promotional material and has also promised impressions of Jeremy Corbyn and Jacob Rees-Mogg. The previous series attracted criticism for weak writing, and some skits do lack bite, but slack should be cut – it’s a notoriously difficult format to pull off. Ullman’s gift for mimicry means she hits the mark often enough for the show to be a welcome bit of light satire to wind up the week. VP Extreme Wales with Richard Parks BBC Two, 7.30pm Tonight’s final episode of Richard Parks’s adventure programme combines extreme sports with lush panoramas of the Welsh landscape. Daredevil Parks takes to the skies on a paramotor – nothing more than a parachute connected to a fan-like motor – to propel him the length of the country. VP The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Fugitive immigrant Taariq Shirazi (Alexander Behrang Keshtkar) makes a desperate bid to flee as the Scandi-noir crime series continues. When Saga (Sofia Helin) and Henrik (Thure Lindhardt) track him down, however, Saga’s inability to tell a lie has serious consequences. VP Friday Night Dinner Channel 4, 10.00pm This sitcom’s family squabbles are more uncomfortably familiar than laugh-out-loud funny in tonight’s penultimate visit to the Goodmans’ home. Writer Robert Popper capitalises on Simon Bird’s musical skills by having his character, Adam, reluctantly play the violin to cheer up Grandma. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm; Ethan Hawke, Toni Collette, Jo Brand and Aidan Turner offer their funniest anecdotes tonight. Plus, Liam Payne continues his post-One Direction solo career with a performance his new single, Familiar. VP The Everly Brothers: Harmonies from Heaven BBC Four, 9.00pm Art Garfunkel, Keith Richards and Graham Nash are among the luminaries paying tribute to Don and Phil Everly in this 2016 documentary, all of them claiming the brothers as an influence. Surviving sibling Don Everly returns to Iowa to recount the brothers’ first appearances, their pivotal move to Nashville and stardom in the late Fifties. Africa: A Journey into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm So much of the music we listen to has its roots in African music. In this new three-part documentary series, London DJ Rita Ray sets off to explore the continent’s influence. Kicking off her journey in Nigeria, Ray stumbles across impromptu drumming ceremonies in the streets as she explores the importance of rhythm in the country’s music and meets its major players. Future episodes take her to Mali and South Africa. VP Crocodile Dundee (1986) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.10pm Mick “Crocodile” Dundee (Paul Hogan), a bushman from northern Australia, is a dab hand at surviving in the Outback. But when he is invited to New York City by Sue Charlton (Linda Kozlowski), a high-class reporter, in this Oscar-nominated comedy drama, he finds life far tougher in the urban jungle. He’s a survivor though: muggers who accost Dundee discover that he has a bigger knife than they do. American Made (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Doug Liman directs Tom Cruise in this lively, madcap real-life tale of pilot, drug smuggler and CIA gun-runner Barry Seal, whose supersonic, if lawless, career path began, according to this script, when he was a bored TWA pilot in 1978 and was approached out of the blue by a CIA handler (Domhnall Gleeson, all greasy persuasion) to conduct reconnaissance flights across the Caribbean. GoodFellas (1990) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm Martin Scorsese’s Mafia masterpiece, adapted from a non-fiction book, has all the qualities of great cinema: it’s thrilling, it’s provocative, it’s stylish, and it’s got a young Robert De Niro in it. Ray Liotta plays the youngster who longs to be a gangster; De Niro and Joe Pesci are in the Mob. Pesci’s mother, meanwhile, reportedly asked him if he had to swear quite so much – the f-word is used 300 times. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
A man has been filmed taking a ferret for a walk on a lead on a street in Edinburgh. The video, captured by Calvin Charlton, was shot yesterday (May 30), and shows the man with a ferret on the lead. He picks the animal up and puts him in his bag after taking it for a walk. "I was driving to pick my partner up from a carer shift in the Stockbridge area when I was diverted (due to road closures) onto a different route. When driving down Pleasance in Edinburgh I spotted a man with a ferret on the lead - which I saw as too good an opportunity to miss for my social media platforms. I pulled up down the road, turned the engine off and stuck the hazards on and began filming. I'd never seen anything like it", writes the filmer.
Edinburgh man spotted taking ferret for a walk on a lead
A man has been filmed taking a ferret for a walk on a lead on a street in Edinburgh. The video, captured by Calvin Charlton, was shot yesterday (May 30), and shows the man with a ferret on the lead. He picks the animal up and puts him in his bag after taking it for a walk. "I was driving to pick my partner up from a carer shift in the Stockbridge area when I was diverted (due to road closures) onto a different route. When driving down Pleasance in Edinburgh I spotted a man with a ferret on the lead - which I saw as too good an opportunity to miss for my social media platforms. I pulled up down the road, turned the engine off and stuck the hazards on and began filming. I'd never seen anything like it", writes the filmer.
A man has been filmed taking a ferret for a walk on a lead on a street in Edinburgh. The video, captured by Calvin Charlton, was shot yesterday (May 30), and shows the man with a ferret on the lead. He picks the animal up and puts him in his bag after taking it for a walk. "I was driving to pick my partner up from a carer shift in the Stockbridge area when I was diverted (due to road closures) onto a different route. When driving down Pleasance in Edinburgh I spotted a man with a ferret on the lead - which I saw as too good an opportunity to miss for my social media platforms. I pulled up down the road, turned the engine off and stuck the hazards on and began filming. I'd never seen anything like it", writes the filmer.
Edinburgh man spotted taking ferret for a walk on a lead
A man has been filmed taking a ferret for a walk on a lead on a street in Edinburgh. The video, captured by Calvin Charlton, was shot yesterday (May 30), and shows the man with a ferret on the lead. He picks the animal up and puts him in his bag after taking it for a walk. "I was driving to pick my partner up from a carer shift in the Stockbridge area when I was diverted (due to road closures) onto a different route. When driving down Pleasance in Edinburgh I spotted a man with a ferret on the lead - which I saw as too good an opportunity to miss for my social media platforms. I pulled up down the road, turned the engine off and stuck the hazards on and began filming. I'd never seen anything like it", writes the filmer.
A man has been filmed taking a ferret for a walk on a lead on a street in Edinburgh. The video, captured by Calvin Charlton, was shot yesterday (May 30), and shows the man with a ferret on the lead. He picks the animal up and puts him in his bag after taking it for a walk. "I was driving to pick my partner up from a carer shift in the Stockbridge area when I was diverted (due to road closures) onto a different route. When driving down Pleasance in Edinburgh I spotted a man with a ferret on the lead - which I saw as too good an opportunity to miss for my social media platforms. I pulled up down the road, turned the engine off and stuck the hazards on and began filming. I'd never seen anything like it", writes the filmer.
Edinburgh man spotted taking ferret for a walk on a lead
A man has been filmed taking a ferret for a walk on a lead on a street in Edinburgh. The video, captured by Calvin Charlton, was shot yesterday (May 30), and shows the man with a ferret on the lead. He picks the animal up and puts him in his bag after taking it for a walk. "I was driving to pick my partner up from a carer shift in the Stockbridge area when I was diverted (due to road closures) onto a different route. When driving down Pleasance in Edinburgh I spotted a man with a ferret on the lead - which I saw as too good an opportunity to miss for my social media platforms. I pulled up down the road, turned the engine off and stuck the hazards on and began filming. I'd never seen anything like it", writes the filmer.
A man has been filmed taking a ferret for a walk on a lead on a street in Edinburgh. The video, captured by Calvin Charlton, was shot yesterday (May 30), and shows the man with a ferret on the lead. He picks the animal up and puts him in his bag after taking it for a walk. "I was driving to pick my partner up from a carer shift in the Stockbridge area when I was diverted (due to road closures) onto a different route. When driving down Pleasance in Edinburgh I spotted a man with a ferret on the lead - which I saw as too good an opportunity to miss for my social media platforms. I pulled up down the road, turned the engine off and stuck the hazards on and began filming. I'd never seen anything like it", writes the filmer.
Edinburgh man spotted taking ferret for a walk on a lead
A man has been filmed taking a ferret for a walk on a lead on a street in Edinburgh. The video, captured by Calvin Charlton, was shot yesterday (May 30), and shows the man with a ferret on the lead. He picks the animal up and puts him in his bag after taking it for a walk. "I was driving to pick my partner up from a carer shift in the Stockbridge area when I was diverted (due to road closures) onto a different route. When driving down Pleasance in Edinburgh I spotted a man with a ferret on the lead - which I saw as too good an opportunity to miss for my social media platforms. I pulled up down the road, turned the engine off and stuck the hazards on and began filming. I'd never seen anything like it", writes the filmer.
FILE PHOTO: Soccer Football - League One Play Off Semi Final Second Leg - Shrewsbury Town vs Charlton Athletic - Montgomery Waters Meadow, Shrewsbury, Britain - May 13, 2018 Shrewsbury Town manager Paul Hurst Action Images/Paul Burrows
League One Play Off Semi Final Second Leg - Shrewsbury Town vs Charlton Athletic
FILE PHOTO: Soccer Football - League One Play Off Semi Final Second Leg - Shrewsbury Town vs Charlton Athletic - Montgomery Waters Meadow, Shrewsbury, Britain - May 13, 2018 Shrewsbury Town manager Paul Hurst Action Images/Paul Burrows
The Big Crash Diet Experiment BBC One, 8.00pm Is it time to rethink our attitude to crash dieting? That’s the question posed by tonight’s revealing documentary, which assesses the health impact of this extreme approach to weight loss. Our guide is Dr Javid Abdelmoneim, who along with a raft of health professionals, aims to challenge orthodox beliefs about what some see as nutritionally inadequate eating regimes with only short-term benefits. Abdelmoneim persuades four obese volunteers to give up the food that they love and opt for a scary-sounding liquid-only intake of soups and shakes, using scans and blood tests to monitor them over nine weeks. Each of the group has their fair share of weight-related issues. Portly Catholic priest Paul, for example, has been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, takeaway fan Rebecca believes that she’s in the grip of a fast-food addiction, and secret binge-eater Yolande already has fatty liver disease. Watching them tackle the programme and shed the pounds is admirable enough, but even more striking is the positive effect that the diet has on their health. In fact, the implications of the results could be a huge money saver for the NHS. TD The Doctor Who Gave Up Drugs BBC One, 9.00pm; Scotland, 10.45pm Dr Chris van Tulleken continues his crusade against the over-medication of children. Tonight, he explores why so many young people are prescribed anti-depressants, and becomes suspicious over the rise in babies diagnosed with cow’s milk allergy. TD Love in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm “The nearest gay scene for me is Belfast,” says cattle farmer Richard, a problem seeing as he lives a three-hour ferry ride away in remote Dumfries and Galloway. Not to be defeated, Richard invites three potential partners to his farm. TD Carry On Brussels Channel 4, 10.00pm More shenanigans from behind the doors of the European Parliament. We meet lone Liberal Democrat MEP Catherine Bearder, whose staunch pro-Europe stance lands her in trouble with Brexit minister David Davis. TD Miranda Barbour: Serial Killer or Liar? BBC One, 10.45pm; Northern Ireland, 11.40pm; Scotland, 11.45pm; Wales, 11.05pm This gripping true crime documentary charts the case of teenage murderer Miranda Barbour. The young mother admitted killing internet date Troy La Ferarra but later confessed to a further 22 murders as part of a Satanic cult. TD Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt Netflix, from today This snappy sitcom about a cult escapee in the big city has proved a delight. A shame, then, that this fourth season is to be its last, with the first six episodes launching today and the remainder to come later this year. Kimmy’s (Ellie Kemper) new job at a tech start-up proves ripe for nerd-baiting satire. TD Big Sky, Big Dreams, Big Art: Made in the USA BBC Four, 9.00pm Presenter Waldemar Januszczak swaps the vastness of the Wild West featured in last week’s episode for the “pulsing, futuristic excitement of the American city”, as his fascinating series on American art continues. He starts out amid the skyscrapers of New York, explaining how the vaulting architecture of the Chrysler Building exemplified the hope and ambition of the burgeoning metropolis. We then move on to the Great Depression, presaged by artists such as Thomas Hart Benton in his restless murals of urban life. TD Great Expectations (1946, b/w) ★★★★★ BBC Two, 12.35pm David Lean’s peerless version of Dickens’s novel is packed with memorable moments, from its opening scenes on the marshes, where Pip first meets the escaped convict Magwitch, to the enduring images of Miss Havisham’s house… not forgetting Pip’s boxing match with Herbert Pocket. John Mills is twice the age of the book’s Pip, but there’s a subtle ingenuousness in his performance. Rebecca (1940, b/w) ★★★★★ Talking Pictures TV, 9.00pm One of Hitchcock’s most disconcerting and finest films was adapted from a Daphne du Maurier story, though he departed from the text in many ways. A bride (Joan Fontaine) is haunted by the memory of her husband’s (Laurence Olivier) dead first wife. The excellent cast (Judith Anderson as formidable housekeeper Mrs Danvers is a particular highlight) adds class to this eerily suspenseful treat. Inglourious Basterds (2009) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 10.00pm It wasn’t quite the masterpiece we were told to expect, but Quentin Tarantino’s pastiche of war films and spaghetti westerns is still rollicking good fun and has all the ingredients of a classic Tarantino film. A celebration of vengeance, it’s an audacious take on the Second World War. Christoph Waltz deservedly won an Oscar for his incendiary turn as the “Jew Hunter”. Brad Pitt also stars. Thursday 31 May Humans Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm This third series of the thoughtful British science-fiction drama continues to benefit from a narrowing of focus; the big-name American actors and slightly strained global perspective have gone, but the thematic ambition has been retained. Less wilfully obscure than Sky Atlantic’s Westworld and considerably more affecting, Humans instead keeps a tight focus on emotion and relationships, whether the characters concerned are flesh and blood or gears and circuits. It can be heavy-handed with the allegories, certainly, but it’s never chilling or humourless – and leading synth performers Gemma Chan, Ivanno Jeremiah and Emily Berrington are as uncanny as ever. Mark Bonnar, too, is proving a handy addition to the cast as Neil, Laura’s (a brilliant Katherine Parkinson) professional antagonist and love interest – Bonnar’s history of playing characters with shifting loyalties comes in handy as Neil first opens his heart and then hardens his stance on the Dryden Commission. Mia (Chan), meanwhile, is on a one-synth mission to demonstrate coexistence is possible by moving into a hostile housing estate, and Leo (Colin Morgan) struggles with the realities of being human. GT Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm This week begins with chocolate puddings, which means the contestants are challenged to rustle up black forest gateaux and a dessert integrating a root vegetable, then aubergines and tofu take centre stage before the elimination round and an oriental classic. GT Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm Hollings and their “British chophouse classics” square up to an Italian-influenced brand serving fresh pasta from a cheese wheel, as Fred Sireix and a group of high-street investors gauge their potential. GT Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm Now with a Bafta award under its belt, this fine series follows the West Midlands Ambulance Service over the last Saturday night before Christmas. An inevitably busy period is made harder by a major traffic accident in central Birmingham – an incident which puts tremendous mental and physical demands on the crews, documented here with the clarity and honesty we’ve come to expect from the series. GT Great Art ITV, 10.50pm; not STV Tim Marlow takes a tour of the Royal Academy’s sell-out exhibition of the Parisian artist’s portraits, in the process assessing the man’s life, work, and reputation as “the father of modern art”. GT Urban Myths: Sex Pistols vs Bill Grundy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This pop cultural landmark, in which punk pioneers Sex Pistols grumbled, swore and generally misbehaved on Bill Grundy’s sleepily complacent regional chat-show, creating a national storm of outrage in the process, arguably received its definitive tribute from Kevin Eldon in 2013. The comedian’s loving reconstruction of the event imagined the Pistols as Amish people and bordered on performance art. Still, this gleefully silly take on the infamous encounter between the jobbing broadcaster (Steve Pemberton) and the Sex Pistols (played by members of the National Youth Theatre) is a lot of fun. GT Barry Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The eponymous depressed hitman (Bill Hader) tries to go it alone, only to be thwarted by his reckless partner Taylor (Dale Pavinski) and ructions among members of his acting class. GT Billion Dollar Brain (1967) ★★★★☆ Film4, 5.00pm Michael Caine returns as the reluctant secret agent Harry Palmer (The Ipcress File, Funeral in Berlin) in this film from Ken Russell, based on the novels by Len Deighton. Having left the British Secret Service to pursue a career as a private investigator, Palmer stumbles into a plot to overthrow Communism with the help of a supercomputer. But who is working for whom? It’s far-fetched but fun. Johnny Mnemonic (1995) ★★☆☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm Fresh from the rubber-burning success of Speed and four short years before The Matrix, Keanu Reeves starred in this high-concept dystopian adventure as the eponymous anti-hero – a 21st-century courier whose augmented brain is used to transport illicit data – that very nearly ruined his career. It’s adapted by cyberpunk godfather William Gibson from his own story. Munich (2005) ★★★☆☆ AMC, 12.50am Eric Bana stars in Steven Spielberg’s audacious, if lengthy, examination of the Israel-Palestine conflict. Set in 1972, it adroitly tackles the aftermath of the massacre of 11 Israeli Olympic athletes at the Munich Olympics. Bana plays a Mossad agent charged with hunting down the extremists who planned the Munich attack. Some of the rhetoric is clumsy, but the film-makers strive to be politically even-handed. Friday 1 June Tracey Breaks the News: Ullman as Michael Gove Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm After losing her to the USA for 30 years, Tracey Ullman’s return to our shores two years ago has reminded us of her unparalleled talents as an impressionist. She captures the physicality of her famous subjects – Angela Merkel and Judi Dench are standouts – as well as their voices, and hats off to Ullman’s prosthetics teams for her remarkable transformations. After an acting stint in last year’s Howards End, Ullman returns to her comfort zone tonight with a second series of the topical sketch comedy show in which she skewers politicians, mostly – although we’ll also be treated to more of Ben Miller’s scene-stealing Rupert Murdoch, with Ullman as Jerry Hall. Although no preview tape was available due to last-minute filming, Ullman was pictured as Michael Gove in promotional material and has also promised impressions of Jeremy Corbyn and Jacob Rees-Mogg. The previous series attracted criticism for weak writing, and some skits do lack bite, but slack should be cut – it’s a notoriously difficult format to pull off. Ullman’s gift for mimicry means she hits the mark often enough for the show to be a welcome bit of light satire to wind up the week. VP Extreme Wales with Richard Parks BBC Two, 7.30pm Tonight’s final episode of Richard Parks’s adventure programme combines extreme sports with lush panoramas of the Welsh landscape. Daredevil Parks takes to the skies on a paramotor – nothing more than a parachute connected to a fan-like motor – to propel him the length of the country. VP The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Fugitive immigrant Taariq Shirazi (Alexander Behrang Keshtkar) makes a desperate bid to flee as the Scandi-noir crime series continues. When Saga (Sofia Helin) and Henrik (Thure Lindhardt) track him down, however, Saga’s inability to tell a lie has serious consequences. VP Friday Night Dinner Channel 4, 10.00pm This sitcom’s family squabbles are more uncomfortably familiar than laugh-out-loud funny in tonight’s penultimate visit to the Goodmans’ home. Writer Robert Popper capitalises on Simon Bird’s musical skills by having his character, Adam, reluctantly play the violin to cheer up Grandma. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm; Ethan Hawke, Toni Collette, Jo Brand and Aidan Turner offer their funniest anecdotes tonight. Plus, Liam Payne continues his post-One Direction solo career with a performance his new single, Familiar. VP The Everly Brothers: Harmonies from Heaven BBC Four, 9.00pm Art Garfunkel, Keith Richards and Graham Nash are among the luminaries paying tribute to Don and Phil Everly in this 2016 documentary, all of them claiming the brothers as an influence. Surviving sibling Don Everly returns to Iowa to recount the brothers’ first appearances, their pivotal move to Nashville and stardom in the late Fifties. Africa: A Journey into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm So much of the music we listen to has its roots in African music. In this new three-part documentary series, London DJ Rita Ray sets off to explore the continent’s influence. Kicking off her journey in Nigeria, Ray stumbles across impromptu drumming ceremonies in the streets as she explores the importance of rhythm in the country’s music and meets its major players. Future episodes take her to Mali and South Africa. VP Crocodile Dundee (1986) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.10pm Mick “Crocodile” Dundee (Paul Hogan), a bushman from northern Australia, is a dab hand at surviving in the Outback. But when he is invited to New York City by Sue Charlton (Linda Kozlowski), a high-class reporter, in this Oscar-nominated comedy drama, he finds life far tougher in the urban jungle. He’s a survivor though: muggers who accost Dundee discover that he has a bigger knife than they do. American Made (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Doug Liman directs Tom Cruise in this lively, madcap real-life tale of pilot, drug smuggler and CIA gun-runner Barry Seal, whose supersonic, if lawless, career path began, according to this script, when he was a bored TWA pilot in 1978 and was approached out of the blue by a CIA handler (Domhnall Gleeson, all greasy persuasion) to conduct reconnaissance flights across the Caribbean. GoodFellas (1990) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm Martin Scorsese’s Mafia masterpiece, adapted from a non-fiction book, has all the qualities of great cinema: it’s thrilling, it’s provocative, it’s stylish, and it’s got a young Robert De Niro in it. Ray Liotta plays the youngster who longs to be a gangster; De Niro and Joe Pesci are in the Mob. Pesci’s mother, meanwhile, reportedly asked him if he had to swear quite so much – the f-word is used 300 times. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: The Big Crash Diet Experiment, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt and more
The Big Crash Diet Experiment BBC One, 8.00pm Is it time to rethink our attitude to crash dieting? That’s the question posed by tonight’s revealing documentary, which assesses the health impact of this extreme approach to weight loss. Our guide is Dr Javid Abdelmoneim, who along with a raft of health professionals, aims to challenge orthodox beliefs about what some see as nutritionally inadequate eating regimes with only short-term benefits. Abdelmoneim persuades four obese volunteers to give up the food that they love and opt for a scary-sounding liquid-only intake of soups and shakes, using scans and blood tests to monitor them over nine weeks. Each of the group has their fair share of weight-related issues. Portly Catholic priest Paul, for example, has been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, takeaway fan Rebecca believes that she’s in the grip of a fast-food addiction, and secret binge-eater Yolande already has fatty liver disease. Watching them tackle the programme and shed the pounds is admirable enough, but even more striking is the positive effect that the diet has on their health. In fact, the implications of the results could be a huge money saver for the NHS. TD The Doctor Who Gave Up Drugs BBC One, 9.00pm; Scotland, 10.45pm Dr Chris van Tulleken continues his crusade against the over-medication of children. Tonight, he explores why so many young people are prescribed anti-depressants, and becomes suspicious over the rise in babies diagnosed with cow’s milk allergy. TD Love in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm “The nearest gay scene for me is Belfast,” says cattle farmer Richard, a problem seeing as he lives a three-hour ferry ride away in remote Dumfries and Galloway. Not to be defeated, Richard invites three potential partners to his farm. TD Carry On Brussels Channel 4, 10.00pm More shenanigans from behind the doors of the European Parliament. We meet lone Liberal Democrat MEP Catherine Bearder, whose staunch pro-Europe stance lands her in trouble with Brexit minister David Davis. TD Miranda Barbour: Serial Killer or Liar? BBC One, 10.45pm; Northern Ireland, 11.40pm; Scotland, 11.45pm; Wales, 11.05pm This gripping true crime documentary charts the case of teenage murderer Miranda Barbour. The young mother admitted killing internet date Troy La Ferarra but later confessed to a further 22 murders as part of a Satanic cult. TD Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt Netflix, from today This snappy sitcom about a cult escapee in the big city has proved a delight. A shame, then, that this fourth season is to be its last, with the first six episodes launching today and the remainder to come later this year. Kimmy’s (Ellie Kemper) new job at a tech start-up proves ripe for nerd-baiting satire. TD Big Sky, Big Dreams, Big Art: Made in the USA BBC Four, 9.00pm Presenter Waldemar Januszczak swaps the vastness of the Wild West featured in last week’s episode for the “pulsing, futuristic excitement of the American city”, as his fascinating series on American art continues. He starts out amid the skyscrapers of New York, explaining how the vaulting architecture of the Chrysler Building exemplified the hope and ambition of the burgeoning metropolis. We then move on to the Great Depression, presaged by artists such as Thomas Hart Benton in his restless murals of urban life. TD Great Expectations (1946, b/w) ★★★★★ BBC Two, 12.35pm David Lean’s peerless version of Dickens’s novel is packed with memorable moments, from its opening scenes on the marshes, where Pip first meets the escaped convict Magwitch, to the enduring images of Miss Havisham’s house… not forgetting Pip’s boxing match with Herbert Pocket. John Mills is twice the age of the book’s Pip, but there’s a subtle ingenuousness in his performance. Rebecca (1940, b/w) ★★★★★ Talking Pictures TV, 9.00pm One of Hitchcock’s most disconcerting and finest films was adapted from a Daphne du Maurier story, though he departed from the text in many ways. A bride (Joan Fontaine) is haunted by the memory of her husband’s (Laurence Olivier) dead first wife. The excellent cast (Judith Anderson as formidable housekeeper Mrs Danvers is a particular highlight) adds class to this eerily suspenseful treat. Inglourious Basterds (2009) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 10.00pm It wasn’t quite the masterpiece we were told to expect, but Quentin Tarantino’s pastiche of war films and spaghetti westerns is still rollicking good fun and has all the ingredients of a classic Tarantino film. A celebration of vengeance, it’s an audacious take on the Second World War. Christoph Waltz deservedly won an Oscar for his incendiary turn as the “Jew Hunter”. Brad Pitt also stars. Thursday 31 May Humans Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm This third series of the thoughtful British science-fiction drama continues to benefit from a narrowing of focus; the big-name American actors and slightly strained global perspective have gone, but the thematic ambition has been retained. Less wilfully obscure than Sky Atlantic’s Westworld and considerably more affecting, Humans instead keeps a tight focus on emotion and relationships, whether the characters concerned are flesh and blood or gears and circuits. It can be heavy-handed with the allegories, certainly, but it’s never chilling or humourless – and leading synth performers Gemma Chan, Ivanno Jeremiah and Emily Berrington are as uncanny as ever. Mark Bonnar, too, is proving a handy addition to the cast as Neil, Laura’s (a brilliant Katherine Parkinson) professional antagonist and love interest – Bonnar’s history of playing characters with shifting loyalties comes in handy as Neil first opens his heart and then hardens his stance on the Dryden Commission. Mia (Chan), meanwhile, is on a one-synth mission to demonstrate coexistence is possible by moving into a hostile housing estate, and Leo (Colin Morgan) struggles with the realities of being human. GT Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm This week begins with chocolate puddings, which means the contestants are challenged to rustle up black forest gateaux and a dessert integrating a root vegetable, then aubergines and tofu take centre stage before the elimination round and an oriental classic. GT Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm Hollings and their “British chophouse classics” square up to an Italian-influenced brand serving fresh pasta from a cheese wheel, as Fred Sireix and a group of high-street investors gauge their potential. GT Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm Now with a Bafta award under its belt, this fine series follows the West Midlands Ambulance Service over the last Saturday night before Christmas. An inevitably busy period is made harder by a major traffic accident in central Birmingham – an incident which puts tremendous mental and physical demands on the crews, documented here with the clarity and honesty we’ve come to expect from the series. GT Great Art ITV, 10.50pm; not STV Tim Marlow takes a tour of the Royal Academy’s sell-out exhibition of the Parisian artist’s portraits, in the process assessing the man’s life, work, and reputation as “the father of modern art”. GT Urban Myths: Sex Pistols vs Bill Grundy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This pop cultural landmark, in which punk pioneers Sex Pistols grumbled, swore and generally misbehaved on Bill Grundy’s sleepily complacent regional chat-show, creating a national storm of outrage in the process, arguably received its definitive tribute from Kevin Eldon in 2013. The comedian’s loving reconstruction of the event imagined the Pistols as Amish people and bordered on performance art. Still, this gleefully silly take on the infamous encounter between the jobbing broadcaster (Steve Pemberton) and the Sex Pistols (played by members of the National Youth Theatre) is a lot of fun. GT Barry Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The eponymous depressed hitman (Bill Hader) tries to go it alone, only to be thwarted by his reckless partner Taylor (Dale Pavinski) and ructions among members of his acting class. GT Billion Dollar Brain (1967) ★★★★☆ Film4, 5.00pm Michael Caine returns as the reluctant secret agent Harry Palmer (The Ipcress File, Funeral in Berlin) in this film from Ken Russell, based on the novels by Len Deighton. Having left the British Secret Service to pursue a career as a private investigator, Palmer stumbles into a plot to overthrow Communism with the help of a supercomputer. But who is working for whom? It’s far-fetched but fun. Johnny Mnemonic (1995) ★★☆☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm Fresh from the rubber-burning success of Speed and four short years before The Matrix, Keanu Reeves starred in this high-concept dystopian adventure as the eponymous anti-hero – a 21st-century courier whose augmented brain is used to transport illicit data – that very nearly ruined his career. It’s adapted by cyberpunk godfather William Gibson from his own story. Munich (2005) ★★★☆☆ AMC, 12.50am Eric Bana stars in Steven Spielberg’s audacious, if lengthy, examination of the Israel-Palestine conflict. Set in 1972, it adroitly tackles the aftermath of the massacre of 11 Israeli Olympic athletes at the Munich Olympics. Bana plays a Mossad agent charged with hunting down the extremists who planned the Munich attack. Some of the rhetoric is clumsy, but the film-makers strive to be politically even-handed. Friday 1 June Tracey Breaks the News: Ullman as Michael Gove Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm After losing her to the USA for 30 years, Tracey Ullman’s return to our shores two years ago has reminded us of her unparalleled talents as an impressionist. She captures the physicality of her famous subjects – Angela Merkel and Judi Dench are standouts – as well as their voices, and hats off to Ullman’s prosthetics teams for her remarkable transformations. After an acting stint in last year’s Howards End, Ullman returns to her comfort zone tonight with a second series of the topical sketch comedy show in which she skewers politicians, mostly – although we’ll also be treated to more of Ben Miller’s scene-stealing Rupert Murdoch, with Ullman as Jerry Hall. Although no preview tape was available due to last-minute filming, Ullman was pictured as Michael Gove in promotional material and has also promised impressions of Jeremy Corbyn and Jacob Rees-Mogg. The previous series attracted criticism for weak writing, and some skits do lack bite, but slack should be cut – it’s a notoriously difficult format to pull off. Ullman’s gift for mimicry means she hits the mark often enough for the show to be a welcome bit of light satire to wind up the week. VP Extreme Wales with Richard Parks BBC Two, 7.30pm Tonight’s final episode of Richard Parks’s adventure programme combines extreme sports with lush panoramas of the Welsh landscape. Daredevil Parks takes to the skies on a paramotor – nothing more than a parachute connected to a fan-like motor – to propel him the length of the country. VP The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Fugitive immigrant Taariq Shirazi (Alexander Behrang Keshtkar) makes a desperate bid to flee as the Scandi-noir crime series continues. When Saga (Sofia Helin) and Henrik (Thure Lindhardt) track him down, however, Saga’s inability to tell a lie has serious consequences. VP Friday Night Dinner Channel 4, 10.00pm This sitcom’s family squabbles are more uncomfortably familiar than laugh-out-loud funny in tonight’s penultimate visit to the Goodmans’ home. Writer Robert Popper capitalises on Simon Bird’s musical skills by having his character, Adam, reluctantly play the violin to cheer up Grandma. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm; Ethan Hawke, Toni Collette, Jo Brand and Aidan Turner offer their funniest anecdotes tonight. Plus, Liam Payne continues his post-One Direction solo career with a performance his new single, Familiar. VP The Everly Brothers: Harmonies from Heaven BBC Four, 9.00pm Art Garfunkel, Keith Richards and Graham Nash are among the luminaries paying tribute to Don and Phil Everly in this 2016 documentary, all of them claiming the brothers as an influence. Surviving sibling Don Everly returns to Iowa to recount the brothers’ first appearances, their pivotal move to Nashville and stardom in the late Fifties. Africa: A Journey into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm So much of the music we listen to has its roots in African music. In this new three-part documentary series, London DJ Rita Ray sets off to explore the continent’s influence. Kicking off her journey in Nigeria, Ray stumbles across impromptu drumming ceremonies in the streets as she explores the importance of rhythm in the country’s music and meets its major players. Future episodes take her to Mali and South Africa. VP Crocodile Dundee (1986) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.10pm Mick “Crocodile” Dundee (Paul Hogan), a bushman from northern Australia, is a dab hand at surviving in the Outback. But when he is invited to New York City by Sue Charlton (Linda Kozlowski), a high-class reporter, in this Oscar-nominated comedy drama, he finds life far tougher in the urban jungle. He’s a survivor though: muggers who accost Dundee discover that he has a bigger knife than they do. American Made (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Doug Liman directs Tom Cruise in this lively, madcap real-life tale of pilot, drug smuggler and CIA gun-runner Barry Seal, whose supersonic, if lawless, career path began, according to this script, when he was a bored TWA pilot in 1978 and was approached out of the blue by a CIA handler (Domhnall Gleeson, all greasy persuasion) to conduct reconnaissance flights across the Caribbean. GoodFellas (1990) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm Martin Scorsese’s Mafia masterpiece, adapted from a non-fiction book, has all the qualities of great cinema: it’s thrilling, it’s provocative, it’s stylish, and it’s got a young Robert De Niro in it. Ray Liotta plays the youngster who longs to be a gangster; De Niro and Joe Pesci are in the Mob. Pesci’s mother, meanwhile, reportedly asked him if he had to swear quite so much – the f-word is used 300 times. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
The Big Crash Diet Experiment BBC One, 8.00pm Is it time to rethink our attitude to crash dieting? That’s the question posed by tonight’s revealing documentary, which assesses the health impact of this extreme approach to weight loss. Our guide is Dr Javid Abdelmoneim, who along with a raft of health professionals, aims to challenge orthodox beliefs about what some see as nutritionally inadequate eating regimes with only short-term benefits. Abdelmoneim persuades four obese volunteers to give up the food that they love and opt for a scary-sounding liquid-only intake of soups and shakes, using scans and blood tests to monitor them over nine weeks. Each of the group has their fair share of weight-related issues. Portly Catholic priest Paul, for example, has been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, takeaway fan Rebecca believes that she’s in the grip of a fast-food addiction, and secret binge-eater Yolande already has fatty liver disease. Watching them tackle the programme and shed the pounds is admirable enough, but even more striking is the positive effect that the diet has on their health. In fact, the implications of the results could be a huge money saver for the NHS. TD The Doctor Who Gave Up Drugs BBC One, 9.00pm; Scotland, 10.45pm Dr Chris van Tulleken continues his crusade against the over-medication of children. Tonight, he explores why so many young people are prescribed anti-depressants, and becomes suspicious over the rise in babies diagnosed with cow’s milk allergy. TD Love in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm “The nearest gay scene for me is Belfast,” says cattle farmer Richard, a problem seeing as he lives a three-hour ferry ride away in remote Dumfries and Galloway. Not to be defeated, Richard invites three potential partners to his farm. TD Carry On Brussels Channel 4, 10.00pm More shenanigans from behind the doors of the European Parliament. We meet lone Liberal Democrat MEP Catherine Bearder, whose staunch pro-Europe stance lands her in trouble with Brexit minister David Davis. TD Miranda Barbour: Serial Killer or Liar? BBC One, 10.45pm; Northern Ireland, 11.40pm; Scotland, 11.45pm; Wales, 11.05pm This gripping true crime documentary charts the case of teenage murderer Miranda Barbour. The young mother admitted killing internet date Troy La Ferarra but later confessed to a further 22 murders as part of a Satanic cult. TD Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt Netflix, from today This snappy sitcom about a cult escapee in the big city has proved a delight. A shame, then, that this fourth season is to be its last, with the first six episodes launching today and the remainder to come later this year. Kimmy’s (Ellie Kemper) new job at a tech start-up proves ripe for nerd-baiting satire. TD Big Sky, Big Dreams, Big Art: Made in the USA BBC Four, 9.00pm Presenter Waldemar Januszczak swaps the vastness of the Wild West featured in last week’s episode for the “pulsing, futuristic excitement of the American city”, as his fascinating series on American art continues. He starts out amid the skyscrapers of New York, explaining how the vaulting architecture of the Chrysler Building exemplified the hope and ambition of the burgeoning metropolis. We then move on to the Great Depression, presaged by artists such as Thomas Hart Benton in his restless murals of urban life. TD Great Expectations (1946, b/w) ★★★★★ BBC Two, 12.35pm David Lean’s peerless version of Dickens’s novel is packed with memorable moments, from its opening scenes on the marshes, where Pip first meets the escaped convict Magwitch, to the enduring images of Miss Havisham’s house… not forgetting Pip’s boxing match with Herbert Pocket. John Mills is twice the age of the book’s Pip, but there’s a subtle ingenuousness in his performance. Rebecca (1940, b/w) ★★★★★ Talking Pictures TV, 9.00pm One of Hitchcock’s most disconcerting and finest films was adapted from a Daphne du Maurier story, though he departed from the text in many ways. A bride (Joan Fontaine) is haunted by the memory of her husband’s (Laurence Olivier) dead first wife. The excellent cast (Judith Anderson as formidable housekeeper Mrs Danvers is a particular highlight) adds class to this eerily suspenseful treat. Inglourious Basterds (2009) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 10.00pm It wasn’t quite the masterpiece we were told to expect, but Quentin Tarantino’s pastiche of war films and spaghetti westerns is still rollicking good fun and has all the ingredients of a classic Tarantino film. A celebration of vengeance, it’s an audacious take on the Second World War. Christoph Waltz deservedly won an Oscar for his incendiary turn as the “Jew Hunter”. Brad Pitt also stars. Thursday 31 May Humans Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm This third series of the thoughtful British science-fiction drama continues to benefit from a narrowing of focus; the big-name American actors and slightly strained global perspective have gone, but the thematic ambition has been retained. Less wilfully obscure than Sky Atlantic’s Westworld and considerably more affecting, Humans instead keeps a tight focus on emotion and relationships, whether the characters concerned are flesh and blood or gears and circuits. It can be heavy-handed with the allegories, certainly, but it’s never chilling or humourless – and leading synth performers Gemma Chan, Ivanno Jeremiah and Emily Berrington are as uncanny as ever. Mark Bonnar, too, is proving a handy addition to the cast as Neil, Laura’s (a brilliant Katherine Parkinson) professional antagonist and love interest – Bonnar’s history of playing characters with shifting loyalties comes in handy as Neil first opens his heart and then hardens his stance on the Dryden Commission. Mia (Chan), meanwhile, is on a one-synth mission to demonstrate coexistence is possible by moving into a hostile housing estate, and Leo (Colin Morgan) struggles with the realities of being human. GT Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm This week begins with chocolate puddings, which means the contestants are challenged to rustle up black forest gateaux and a dessert integrating a root vegetable, then aubergines and tofu take centre stage before the elimination round and an oriental classic. GT Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm Hollings and their “British chophouse classics” square up to an Italian-influenced brand serving fresh pasta from a cheese wheel, as Fred Sireix and a group of high-street investors gauge their potential. GT Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm Now with a Bafta award under its belt, this fine series follows the West Midlands Ambulance Service over the last Saturday night before Christmas. An inevitably busy period is made harder by a major traffic accident in central Birmingham – an incident which puts tremendous mental and physical demands on the crews, documented here with the clarity and honesty we’ve come to expect from the series. GT Great Art ITV, 10.50pm; not STV Tim Marlow takes a tour of the Royal Academy’s sell-out exhibition of the Parisian artist’s portraits, in the process assessing the man’s life, work, and reputation as “the father of modern art”. GT Urban Myths: Sex Pistols vs Bill Grundy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This pop cultural landmark, in which punk pioneers Sex Pistols grumbled, swore and generally misbehaved on Bill Grundy’s sleepily complacent regional chat-show, creating a national storm of outrage in the process, arguably received its definitive tribute from Kevin Eldon in 2013. The comedian’s loving reconstruction of the event imagined the Pistols as Amish people and bordered on performance art. Still, this gleefully silly take on the infamous encounter between the jobbing broadcaster (Steve Pemberton) and the Sex Pistols (played by members of the National Youth Theatre) is a lot of fun. GT Barry Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The eponymous depressed hitman (Bill Hader) tries to go it alone, only to be thwarted by his reckless partner Taylor (Dale Pavinski) and ructions among members of his acting class. GT Billion Dollar Brain (1967) ★★★★☆ Film4, 5.00pm Michael Caine returns as the reluctant secret agent Harry Palmer (The Ipcress File, Funeral in Berlin) in this film from Ken Russell, based on the novels by Len Deighton. Having left the British Secret Service to pursue a career as a private investigator, Palmer stumbles into a plot to overthrow Communism with the help of a supercomputer. But who is working for whom? It’s far-fetched but fun. Johnny Mnemonic (1995) ★★☆☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm Fresh from the rubber-burning success of Speed and four short years before The Matrix, Keanu Reeves starred in this high-concept dystopian adventure as the eponymous anti-hero – a 21st-century courier whose augmented brain is used to transport illicit data – that very nearly ruined his career. It’s adapted by cyberpunk godfather William Gibson from his own story. Munich (2005) ★★★☆☆ AMC, 12.50am Eric Bana stars in Steven Spielberg’s audacious, if lengthy, examination of the Israel-Palestine conflict. Set in 1972, it adroitly tackles the aftermath of the massacre of 11 Israeli Olympic athletes at the Munich Olympics. Bana plays a Mossad agent charged with hunting down the extremists who planned the Munich attack. Some of the rhetoric is clumsy, but the film-makers strive to be politically even-handed. Friday 1 June Tracey Breaks the News: Ullman as Michael Gove Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm After losing her to the USA for 30 years, Tracey Ullman’s return to our shores two years ago has reminded us of her unparalleled talents as an impressionist. She captures the physicality of her famous subjects – Angela Merkel and Judi Dench are standouts – as well as their voices, and hats off to Ullman’s prosthetics teams for her remarkable transformations. After an acting stint in last year’s Howards End, Ullman returns to her comfort zone tonight with a second series of the topical sketch comedy show in which she skewers politicians, mostly – although we’ll also be treated to more of Ben Miller’s scene-stealing Rupert Murdoch, with Ullman as Jerry Hall. Although no preview tape was available due to last-minute filming, Ullman was pictured as Michael Gove in promotional material and has also promised impressions of Jeremy Corbyn and Jacob Rees-Mogg. The previous series attracted criticism for weak writing, and some skits do lack bite, but slack should be cut – it’s a notoriously difficult format to pull off. Ullman’s gift for mimicry means she hits the mark often enough for the show to be a welcome bit of light satire to wind up the week. VP Extreme Wales with Richard Parks BBC Two, 7.30pm Tonight’s final episode of Richard Parks’s adventure programme combines extreme sports with lush panoramas of the Welsh landscape. Daredevil Parks takes to the skies on a paramotor – nothing more than a parachute connected to a fan-like motor – to propel him the length of the country. VP The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Fugitive immigrant Taariq Shirazi (Alexander Behrang Keshtkar) makes a desperate bid to flee as the Scandi-noir crime series continues. When Saga (Sofia Helin) and Henrik (Thure Lindhardt) track him down, however, Saga’s inability to tell a lie has serious consequences. VP Friday Night Dinner Channel 4, 10.00pm This sitcom’s family squabbles are more uncomfortably familiar than laugh-out-loud funny in tonight’s penultimate visit to the Goodmans’ home. Writer Robert Popper capitalises on Simon Bird’s musical skills by having his character, Adam, reluctantly play the violin to cheer up Grandma. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm; Ethan Hawke, Toni Collette, Jo Brand and Aidan Turner offer their funniest anecdotes tonight. Plus, Liam Payne continues his post-One Direction solo career with a performance his new single, Familiar. VP The Everly Brothers: Harmonies from Heaven BBC Four, 9.00pm Art Garfunkel, Keith Richards and Graham Nash are among the luminaries paying tribute to Don and Phil Everly in this 2016 documentary, all of them claiming the brothers as an influence. Surviving sibling Don Everly returns to Iowa to recount the brothers’ first appearances, their pivotal move to Nashville and stardom in the late Fifties. Africa: A Journey into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm So much of the music we listen to has its roots in African music. In this new three-part documentary series, London DJ Rita Ray sets off to explore the continent’s influence. Kicking off her journey in Nigeria, Ray stumbles across impromptu drumming ceremonies in the streets as she explores the importance of rhythm in the country’s music and meets its major players. Future episodes take her to Mali and South Africa. VP Crocodile Dundee (1986) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.10pm Mick “Crocodile” Dundee (Paul Hogan), a bushman from northern Australia, is a dab hand at surviving in the Outback. But when he is invited to New York City by Sue Charlton (Linda Kozlowski), a high-class reporter, in this Oscar-nominated comedy drama, he finds life far tougher in the urban jungle. He’s a survivor though: muggers who accost Dundee discover that he has a bigger knife than they do. American Made (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Doug Liman directs Tom Cruise in this lively, madcap real-life tale of pilot, drug smuggler and CIA gun-runner Barry Seal, whose supersonic, if lawless, career path began, according to this script, when he was a bored TWA pilot in 1978 and was approached out of the blue by a CIA handler (Domhnall Gleeson, all greasy persuasion) to conduct reconnaissance flights across the Caribbean. GoodFellas (1990) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm Martin Scorsese’s Mafia masterpiece, adapted from a non-fiction book, has all the qualities of great cinema: it’s thrilling, it’s provocative, it’s stylish, and it’s got a young Robert De Niro in it. Ray Liotta plays the youngster who longs to be a gangster; De Niro and Joe Pesci are in the Mob. Pesci’s mother, meanwhile, reportedly asked him if he had to swear quite so much – the f-word is used 300 times. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: The Big Crash Diet Experiment, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt and more
The Big Crash Diet Experiment BBC One, 8.00pm Is it time to rethink our attitude to crash dieting? That’s the question posed by tonight’s revealing documentary, which assesses the health impact of this extreme approach to weight loss. Our guide is Dr Javid Abdelmoneim, who along with a raft of health professionals, aims to challenge orthodox beliefs about what some see as nutritionally inadequate eating regimes with only short-term benefits. Abdelmoneim persuades four obese volunteers to give up the food that they love and opt for a scary-sounding liquid-only intake of soups and shakes, using scans and blood tests to monitor them over nine weeks. Each of the group has their fair share of weight-related issues. Portly Catholic priest Paul, for example, has been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, takeaway fan Rebecca believes that she’s in the grip of a fast-food addiction, and secret binge-eater Yolande already has fatty liver disease. Watching them tackle the programme and shed the pounds is admirable enough, but even more striking is the positive effect that the diet has on their health. In fact, the implications of the results could be a huge money saver for the NHS. TD The Doctor Who Gave Up Drugs BBC One, 9.00pm; Scotland, 10.45pm Dr Chris van Tulleken continues his crusade against the over-medication of children. Tonight, he explores why so many young people are prescribed anti-depressants, and becomes suspicious over the rise in babies diagnosed with cow’s milk allergy. TD Love in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm “The nearest gay scene for me is Belfast,” says cattle farmer Richard, a problem seeing as he lives a three-hour ferry ride away in remote Dumfries and Galloway. Not to be defeated, Richard invites three potential partners to his farm. TD Carry On Brussels Channel 4, 10.00pm More shenanigans from behind the doors of the European Parliament. We meet lone Liberal Democrat MEP Catherine Bearder, whose staunch pro-Europe stance lands her in trouble with Brexit minister David Davis. TD Miranda Barbour: Serial Killer or Liar? BBC One, 10.45pm; Northern Ireland, 11.40pm; Scotland, 11.45pm; Wales, 11.05pm This gripping true crime documentary charts the case of teenage murderer Miranda Barbour. The young mother admitted killing internet date Troy La Ferarra but later confessed to a further 22 murders as part of a Satanic cult. TD Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt Netflix, from today This snappy sitcom about a cult escapee in the big city has proved a delight. A shame, then, that this fourth season is to be its last, with the first six episodes launching today and the remainder to come later this year. Kimmy’s (Ellie Kemper) new job at a tech start-up proves ripe for nerd-baiting satire. TD Big Sky, Big Dreams, Big Art: Made in the USA BBC Four, 9.00pm Presenter Waldemar Januszczak swaps the vastness of the Wild West featured in last week’s episode for the “pulsing, futuristic excitement of the American city”, as his fascinating series on American art continues. He starts out amid the skyscrapers of New York, explaining how the vaulting architecture of the Chrysler Building exemplified the hope and ambition of the burgeoning metropolis. We then move on to the Great Depression, presaged by artists such as Thomas Hart Benton in his restless murals of urban life. TD Great Expectations (1946, b/w) ★★★★★ BBC Two, 12.35pm David Lean’s peerless version of Dickens’s novel is packed with memorable moments, from its opening scenes on the marshes, where Pip first meets the escaped convict Magwitch, to the enduring images of Miss Havisham’s house… not forgetting Pip’s boxing match with Herbert Pocket. John Mills is twice the age of the book’s Pip, but there’s a subtle ingenuousness in his performance. Rebecca (1940, b/w) ★★★★★ Talking Pictures TV, 9.00pm One of Hitchcock’s most disconcerting and finest films was adapted from a Daphne du Maurier story, though he departed from the text in many ways. A bride (Joan Fontaine) is haunted by the memory of her husband’s (Laurence Olivier) dead first wife. The excellent cast (Judith Anderson as formidable housekeeper Mrs Danvers is a particular highlight) adds class to this eerily suspenseful treat. Inglourious Basterds (2009) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 10.00pm It wasn’t quite the masterpiece we were told to expect, but Quentin Tarantino’s pastiche of war films and spaghetti westerns is still rollicking good fun and has all the ingredients of a classic Tarantino film. A celebration of vengeance, it’s an audacious take on the Second World War. Christoph Waltz deservedly won an Oscar for his incendiary turn as the “Jew Hunter”. Brad Pitt also stars. Thursday 31 May Humans Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm This third series of the thoughtful British science-fiction drama continues to benefit from a narrowing of focus; the big-name American actors and slightly strained global perspective have gone, but the thematic ambition has been retained. Less wilfully obscure than Sky Atlantic’s Westworld and considerably more affecting, Humans instead keeps a tight focus on emotion and relationships, whether the characters concerned are flesh and blood or gears and circuits. It can be heavy-handed with the allegories, certainly, but it’s never chilling or humourless – and leading synth performers Gemma Chan, Ivanno Jeremiah and Emily Berrington are as uncanny as ever. Mark Bonnar, too, is proving a handy addition to the cast as Neil, Laura’s (a brilliant Katherine Parkinson) professional antagonist and love interest – Bonnar’s history of playing characters with shifting loyalties comes in handy as Neil first opens his heart and then hardens his stance on the Dryden Commission. Mia (Chan), meanwhile, is on a one-synth mission to demonstrate coexistence is possible by moving into a hostile housing estate, and Leo (Colin Morgan) struggles with the realities of being human. GT Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm This week begins with chocolate puddings, which means the contestants are challenged to rustle up black forest gateaux and a dessert integrating a root vegetable, then aubergines and tofu take centre stage before the elimination round and an oriental classic. GT Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm Hollings and their “British chophouse classics” square up to an Italian-influenced brand serving fresh pasta from a cheese wheel, as Fred Sireix and a group of high-street investors gauge their potential. GT Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm Now with a Bafta award under its belt, this fine series follows the West Midlands Ambulance Service over the last Saturday night before Christmas. An inevitably busy period is made harder by a major traffic accident in central Birmingham – an incident which puts tremendous mental and physical demands on the crews, documented here with the clarity and honesty we’ve come to expect from the series. GT Great Art ITV, 10.50pm; not STV Tim Marlow takes a tour of the Royal Academy’s sell-out exhibition of the Parisian artist’s portraits, in the process assessing the man’s life, work, and reputation as “the father of modern art”. GT Urban Myths: Sex Pistols vs Bill Grundy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This pop cultural landmark, in which punk pioneers Sex Pistols grumbled, swore and generally misbehaved on Bill Grundy’s sleepily complacent regional chat-show, creating a national storm of outrage in the process, arguably received its definitive tribute from Kevin Eldon in 2013. The comedian’s loving reconstruction of the event imagined the Pistols as Amish people and bordered on performance art. Still, this gleefully silly take on the infamous encounter between the jobbing broadcaster (Steve Pemberton) and the Sex Pistols (played by members of the National Youth Theatre) is a lot of fun. GT Barry Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The eponymous depressed hitman (Bill Hader) tries to go it alone, only to be thwarted by his reckless partner Taylor (Dale Pavinski) and ructions among members of his acting class. GT Billion Dollar Brain (1967) ★★★★☆ Film4, 5.00pm Michael Caine returns as the reluctant secret agent Harry Palmer (The Ipcress File, Funeral in Berlin) in this film from Ken Russell, based on the novels by Len Deighton. Having left the British Secret Service to pursue a career as a private investigator, Palmer stumbles into a plot to overthrow Communism with the help of a supercomputer. But who is working for whom? It’s far-fetched but fun. Johnny Mnemonic (1995) ★★☆☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm Fresh from the rubber-burning success of Speed and four short years before The Matrix, Keanu Reeves starred in this high-concept dystopian adventure as the eponymous anti-hero – a 21st-century courier whose augmented brain is used to transport illicit data – that very nearly ruined his career. It’s adapted by cyberpunk godfather William Gibson from his own story. Munich (2005) ★★★☆☆ AMC, 12.50am Eric Bana stars in Steven Spielberg’s audacious, if lengthy, examination of the Israel-Palestine conflict. Set in 1972, it adroitly tackles the aftermath of the massacre of 11 Israeli Olympic athletes at the Munich Olympics. Bana plays a Mossad agent charged with hunting down the extremists who planned the Munich attack. Some of the rhetoric is clumsy, but the film-makers strive to be politically even-handed. Friday 1 June Tracey Breaks the News: Ullman as Michael Gove Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm After losing her to the USA for 30 years, Tracey Ullman’s return to our shores two years ago has reminded us of her unparalleled talents as an impressionist. She captures the physicality of her famous subjects – Angela Merkel and Judi Dench are standouts – as well as their voices, and hats off to Ullman’s prosthetics teams for her remarkable transformations. After an acting stint in last year’s Howards End, Ullman returns to her comfort zone tonight with a second series of the topical sketch comedy show in which she skewers politicians, mostly – although we’ll also be treated to more of Ben Miller’s scene-stealing Rupert Murdoch, with Ullman as Jerry Hall. Although no preview tape was available due to last-minute filming, Ullman was pictured as Michael Gove in promotional material and has also promised impressions of Jeremy Corbyn and Jacob Rees-Mogg. The previous series attracted criticism for weak writing, and some skits do lack bite, but slack should be cut – it’s a notoriously difficult format to pull off. Ullman’s gift for mimicry means she hits the mark often enough for the show to be a welcome bit of light satire to wind up the week. VP Extreme Wales with Richard Parks BBC Two, 7.30pm Tonight’s final episode of Richard Parks’s adventure programme combines extreme sports with lush panoramas of the Welsh landscape. Daredevil Parks takes to the skies on a paramotor – nothing more than a parachute connected to a fan-like motor – to propel him the length of the country. VP The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Fugitive immigrant Taariq Shirazi (Alexander Behrang Keshtkar) makes a desperate bid to flee as the Scandi-noir crime series continues. When Saga (Sofia Helin) and Henrik (Thure Lindhardt) track him down, however, Saga’s inability to tell a lie has serious consequences. VP Friday Night Dinner Channel 4, 10.00pm This sitcom’s family squabbles are more uncomfortably familiar than laugh-out-loud funny in tonight’s penultimate visit to the Goodmans’ home. Writer Robert Popper capitalises on Simon Bird’s musical skills by having his character, Adam, reluctantly play the violin to cheer up Grandma. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm; Ethan Hawke, Toni Collette, Jo Brand and Aidan Turner offer their funniest anecdotes tonight. Plus, Liam Payne continues his post-One Direction solo career with a performance his new single, Familiar. VP The Everly Brothers: Harmonies from Heaven BBC Four, 9.00pm Art Garfunkel, Keith Richards and Graham Nash are among the luminaries paying tribute to Don and Phil Everly in this 2016 documentary, all of them claiming the brothers as an influence. Surviving sibling Don Everly returns to Iowa to recount the brothers’ first appearances, their pivotal move to Nashville and stardom in the late Fifties. Africa: A Journey into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm So much of the music we listen to has its roots in African music. In this new three-part documentary series, London DJ Rita Ray sets off to explore the continent’s influence. Kicking off her journey in Nigeria, Ray stumbles across impromptu drumming ceremonies in the streets as she explores the importance of rhythm in the country’s music and meets its major players. Future episodes take her to Mali and South Africa. VP Crocodile Dundee (1986) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.10pm Mick “Crocodile” Dundee (Paul Hogan), a bushman from northern Australia, is a dab hand at surviving in the Outback. But when he is invited to New York City by Sue Charlton (Linda Kozlowski), a high-class reporter, in this Oscar-nominated comedy drama, he finds life far tougher in the urban jungle. He’s a survivor though: muggers who accost Dundee discover that he has a bigger knife than they do. American Made (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Doug Liman directs Tom Cruise in this lively, madcap real-life tale of pilot, drug smuggler and CIA gun-runner Barry Seal, whose supersonic, if lawless, career path began, according to this script, when he was a bored TWA pilot in 1978 and was approached out of the blue by a CIA handler (Domhnall Gleeson, all greasy persuasion) to conduct reconnaissance flights across the Caribbean. GoodFellas (1990) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm Martin Scorsese’s Mafia masterpiece, adapted from a non-fiction book, has all the qualities of great cinema: it’s thrilling, it’s provocative, it’s stylish, and it’s got a young Robert De Niro in it. Ray Liotta plays the youngster who longs to be a gangster; De Niro and Joe Pesci are in the Mob. Pesci’s mother, meanwhile, reportedly asked him if he had to swear quite so much – the f-word is used 300 times. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
The Northern and Southern champions, Blackburn Rovers and Charlton Athletic, take the field for the Championship play-off final. Charlton won 2-1 and move up but Blackburn’s application to join them was unsuccessful.
WSL revamp winners and losers: from Manchester United to Watford via Lewes
The Northern and Southern champions, Blackburn Rovers and Charlton Athletic, take the field for the Championship play-off final. Charlton won 2-1 and move up but Blackburn’s application to join them was unsuccessful.
Grammar Schools: Who Will Get In? BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Few education issues are as contentious in this country as that of grammar schools, with Prime Minister Theresa May among those supporting their return. This thought-provoking three-part documentary focusing on the London borough of Bexley, where each year over 5,000 children sit the selective exam for one of the area’s four grammar schools, could not, therefore, have come at a better time. We hear from both sides of the debate and are shown both the benefits and drawbacks of attending either a grammar or secondary modern school – although, as always, it’s the parents and children who make the most notable contributions. “If you want your child to become better in their future life, it’s good to go to a grammar school,” says one mother, who works long hours for minimum wage and pays £300 a month for a tutor for her daughter. Meanwhile, another, herself the product of a grammar school, despairs of the increasing parental competitiveness. And, for all the film-makers’ admirably even-handed approach, it’s the stress felt by the children that makes the biggest mark, with one youngster noting: “I don’t think grammar school is fair because people are far too young to feel they’ve failed.” SH Emmerdale ITV, 7.00pm Emmerdale confronts the difficult subject of child abuse when Charity Dingle (Emma Atkins) opens up about her past in this special flashback episode. Last November a similar technique was used, to great effect, to shed light on her cousin Cain’s experiences. Mica Proctor, in another triumph of casting, plays the young Charity. SH The Split BBC One, 9.00pm Abi Morgan’s enjoyable family saga comes to a climax with scores settled, decisions made and reconciliations all over the place. It works not least because Morgan never forgets that one person’s happy ending is another’s poisoned chalice, meaning there’s pain amid the laughter. SH The Battle for Britain’s Heroes Channel 4, 9.00pm “Our heroes often have a toxic past,” says Afua Hirsch at the start of this captivating and provocative film. She pulls no punches in her look at the darker side of our history, exploring slavery, racism and colonialism, in a film certain to enrage as many people as it informs. SH 4 Men, 175 Babies: Britain’s Super Sperm Donors Channel 4, 10.00pm This film follows men who donate their sperm for free, via unregulated websites. But why? “Being a sperm donor is like being a Samaritan,” says 61-year-old Clive, who began donating once he retired. SH Arrested Development Netflix, from today For anyone who didn’t watch the patchy fourth series of this popular Emmy-winning comedy about a rich family who lose their wealth, the good news is that you can pick up this new series with no problem. The bad news for those that did watch it is that this opening episode spends ages rehashing past events. Thankfully things do settle down – and become very funny – as we find out what happened after the infamous punch that George Michael (Michael Cera) landed on his father Michael (Jason Bateman). A proper return to form. SH Master of Photography Sky Arts, 8.00pm The international photography contest returns for a third series, with Oliviero Toscani joined on the judging panel by curator Mark Sealy and the New Yorker’s Elisabeth Biondi. Here’s hoping that this series avoids the problems of last year, which saw contestant Souvid Datta accused of plagiarism. SH All Creatures Great and Small (1975) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.45pm Simon Ward and a pre-Silence of the Lambs Anthony Hopkins star as Yorkshire vets James Herriot and Siegfried Farnon in this gentle drama set in the Thirties and based on the first two books of British vet Alf Wight (who wrote under the pseudonym of Herriot). The TV series that followed remains most memorable, but there’s warm-hearted performances here too. Operation Petticoat (1959) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.25pm A beguiling Second World War comedy directed by Blake Edwards and starring Cary Grant as a submarine captain with a strict sense of order and a rule-breaking hustler of a first officer (Tony Curtis). The vessel is bombed by the Japanese, but that’s the least of its worries. Five nurses in distress, a goat and a coating of pink paint all pose challenges for the effortlessly funny crew. The Enforcer (1976) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 11.00pm Clint Eastwood’s Harry Callahan is teamed up with rookie female partner Kate Moore (Tyne Daly) in this entertaining but ultimately disappointing third chapter of the Dirty Harry series. Together they battle violent eco-terrorists who have kidnapped the mayor of San Francisco (John Crawford) while, between the gun battles, cynical Callahan attempts to come to terms with his own male chauvinism. Wednesday 30 May Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt The Big Crash Diet Experiment BBC One, 8.00pm Is it time to rethink our attitude to crash dieting? That’s the question posed by tonight’s revealing documentary, which assesses the health impact of this extreme approach to weight loss. Our guide is Dr Javid Abdelmoneim, who along with a raft of health professionals, aims to challenge orthodox beliefs about what some see as nutritionally inadequate eating regimes with only short-term benefits. Abdelmoneim persuades four obese volunteers to give up the food that they love and opt for a scary-sounding liquid-only intake of soups and shakes, using scans and blood tests to monitor them over nine weeks. Each of the group has their fair share of weight-related issues. Portly Catholic priest Paul, for example, has been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, takeaway fan Rebecca believes that she’s in the grip of a fast-food addiction, and secret binge-eater Yolande already has fatty liver disease. Watching them tackle the programme and shed the pounds is admirable enough, but even more striking is the positive effect that the diet has on their health. In fact, the implications of the results could be a huge money saver for the NHS. TD The Doctor Who Gave Up Drugs BBC One, 9.00pm; Scotland, 10.45pm Dr Chris van Tulleken continues his crusade against the over-medication of children. Tonight, he explores why so many young people are prescribed anti-depressants, and becomes suspicious over the rise in babies diagnosed with cow’s milk allergy. TD Love in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm “The nearest gay scene for me is Belfast,” says cattle farmer Richard, a problem seeing as he lives a three-hour ferry ride away in remote Dumfries and Galloway. Not to be defeated, Richard invites three potential partners to his farm. TD Carry On Brussels Channel 4, 10.00pm More shenanigans from behind the doors of the European Parliament. We meet lone Liberal Democrat MEP Catherine Bearder, whose staunch pro-Europe stance lands her in trouble with Brexit minister David Davis. TD Miranda Barbour: Serial Killer or Liar? BBC One, 10.45pm; Northern Ireland, 11.40pm; Scotland, 11.45pm; Wales, 11.05pm This gripping true crime documentary charts the case of teenage murderer Miranda Barbour. The young mother admitted killing internet date Troy La Ferarra but later confessed to a further 22 murders as part of a Satanic cult. TD Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt Netflix, from today This snappy sitcom about a cult escapee in the big city has proved a delight. A shame, then, that this fourth season is to be its last, with the first six episodes launching today and the remainder to come later this year. Kimmy’s (Ellie Kemper) new job at a tech start-up proves ripe for nerd-baiting satire. TD Big Sky, Big Dreams, Big Art: Made in the USA BBC Four, 9.00pm Presenter Waldemar Januszczak swaps the vastness of the Wild West featured in last week’s episode for the “pulsing, futuristic excitement of the American city”, as his fascinating series on American art continues. He starts out amid the skyscrapers of New York, explaining how the vaulting architecture of the Chrysler Building exemplified the hope and ambition of the burgeoning metropolis. We then move on to the Great Depression, presaged by artists such as Thomas Hart Benton in his restless murals of urban life. TD Great Expectations (1946, b/w) ★★★★★ BBC Two, 12.35pm David Lean’s peerless version of Dickens’s novel is packed with memorable moments, from its opening scenes on the marshes, where Pip first meets the escaped convict Magwitch, to the enduring images of Miss Havisham’s house… not forgetting Pip’s boxing match with Herbert Pocket. John Mills is twice the age of the book’s Pip, but there’s a subtle ingenuousness in his performance. Rebecca (1940, b/w) ★★★★★ Talking Pictures TV, 9.00pm One of Hitchcock’s most disconcerting and finest films was adapted from a Daphne du Maurier story, though he departed from the text in many ways. A bride (Joan Fontaine) is haunted by the memory of her husband’s (Laurence Olivier) dead first wife. The excellent cast (Judith Anderson as formidable housekeeper Mrs Danvers is a particular highlight) adds class to this eerily suspenseful treat. Inglourious Basterds (2009) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 10.00pm It wasn’t quite the masterpiece we were told to expect, but Quentin Tarantino’s pastiche of war films and spaghetti westerns is still rollicking good fun and has all the ingredients of a classic Tarantino film. A celebration of vengeance, it’s an audacious take on the Second World War. Christoph Waltz deservedly won an Oscar for his incendiary turn as the “Jew Hunter”. Brad Pitt also stars. Thursday 31 May Humans Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm This third series of the thoughtful British science-fiction drama continues to benefit from a narrowing of focus; the big-name American actors and slightly strained global perspective have gone, but the thematic ambition has been retained. Less wilfully obscure than Sky Atlantic’s Westworld and considerably more affecting, Humans instead keeps a tight focus on emotion and relationships, whether the characters concerned are flesh and blood or gears and circuits. It can be heavy-handed with the allegories, certainly, but it’s never chilling or humourless – and leading synth performers Gemma Chan, Ivanno Jeremiah and Emily Berrington are as uncanny as ever. Mark Bonnar, too, is proving a handy addition to the cast as Neil, Laura’s (a brilliant Katherine Parkinson) professional antagonist and love interest – Bonnar’s history of playing characters with shifting loyalties comes in handy as Neil first opens his heart and then hardens his stance on the Dryden Commission. Mia (Chan), meanwhile, is on a one-synth mission to demonstrate coexistence is possible by moving into a hostile housing estate, and Leo (Colin Morgan) struggles with the realities of being human. GT Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm This week begins with chocolate puddings, which means the contestants are challenged to rustle up black forest gateaux and a dessert integrating a root vegetable, then aubergines and tofu take centre stage before the elimination round and an oriental classic. GT Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm Hollings and their “British chophouse classics” square up to an Italian-influenced brand serving fresh pasta from a cheese wheel, as Fred Sireix and a group of high-street investors gauge their potential. GT Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm Now with a Bafta award under its belt, this fine series follows the West Midlands Ambulance Service over the last Saturday night before Christmas. An inevitably busy period is made harder by a major traffic accident in central Birmingham – an incident which puts tremendous mental and physical demands on the crews, documented here with the clarity and honesty we’ve come to expect from the series. GT Great Art ITV, 10.50pm; not STV Tim Marlow takes a tour of the Royal Academy’s sell-out exhibition of the Parisian artist’s portraits, in the process assessing the man’s life, work, and reputation as “the father of modern art”. GT Urban Myths: Sex Pistols vs Bill Grundy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This pop cultural landmark, in which punk pioneers Sex Pistols grumbled, swore and generally misbehaved on Bill Grundy’s sleepily complacent regional chat-show, creating a national storm of outrage in the process, arguably received its definitive tribute from Kevin Eldon in 2013. The comedian’s loving reconstruction of the event imagined the Pistols as Amish people and bordered on performance art. Still, this gleefully silly take on the infamous encounter between the jobbing broadcaster (Steve Pemberton) and the Sex Pistols (played by members of the National Youth Theatre) is a lot of fun. GT Barry Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The eponymous depressed hitman (Bill Hader) tries to go it alone, only to be thwarted by his reckless partner Taylor (Dale Pavinski) and ructions among members of his acting class. GT Billion Dollar Brain (1967) ★★★★☆ Film4, 5.00pm Michael Caine returns as the reluctant secret agent Harry Palmer (The Ipcress File, Funeral in Berlin) in this film from Ken Russell, based on the novels by Len Deighton. Having left the British Secret Service to pursue a career as a private investigator, Palmer stumbles into a plot to overthrow Communism with the help of a supercomputer. But who is working for whom? It’s far-fetched but fun. Johnny Mnemonic (1995) ★★☆☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm Fresh from the rubber-burning success of Speed and four short years before The Matrix, Keanu Reeves starred in this high-concept dystopian adventure as the eponymous anti-hero – a 21st-century courier whose augmented brain is used to transport illicit data – that very nearly ruined his career. It’s adapted by cyberpunk godfather William Gibson from his own story. Munich (2005) ★★★☆☆ AMC, 12.50am Eric Bana stars in Steven Spielberg’s audacious, if lengthy, examination of the Israel-Palestine conflict. Set in 1972, it adroitly tackles the aftermath of the massacre of 11 Israeli Olympic athletes at the Munich Olympics. Bana plays a Mossad agent charged with hunting down the extremists who planned the Munich attack. Some of the rhetoric is clumsy, but the film-makers strive to be politically even-handed. Friday 1 June Tracey Breaks the News: Ullman as Michael Gove Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm After losing her to the USA for 30 years, Tracey Ullman’s return to our shores two years ago has reminded us of her unparalleled talents as an impressionist. She captures the physicality of her famous subjects – Angela Merkel and Judi Dench are standouts – as well as their voices, and hats off to Ullman’s prosthetics teams for her remarkable transformations. After an acting stint in last year’s Howards End, Ullman returns to her comfort zone tonight with a second series of the topical sketch comedy show in which she skewers politicians, mostly – although we’ll also be treated to more of Ben Miller’s scene-stealing Rupert Murdoch, with Ullman as Jerry Hall. Although no preview tape was available due to last-minute filming, Ullman was pictured as Michael Gove in promotional material and has also promised impressions of Jeremy Corbyn and Jacob Rees-Mogg. The previous series attracted criticism for weak writing, and some skits do lack bite, but slack should be cut – it’s a notoriously difficult format to pull off. Ullman’s gift for mimicry means she hits the mark often enough for the show to be a welcome bit of light satire to wind up the week. VP Extreme Wales with Richard Parks BBC Two, 7.30pm Tonight’s final episode of Richard Parks’s adventure programme combines extreme sports with lush panoramas of the Welsh landscape. Daredevil Parks takes to the skies on a paramotor – nothing more than a parachute connected to a fan-like motor – to propel him the length of the country. VP The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Fugitive immigrant Taariq Shirazi (Alexander Behrang Keshtkar) makes a desperate bid to flee as the Scandi-noir crime series continues. When Saga (Sofia Helin) and Henrik (Thure Lindhardt) track him down, however, Saga’s inability to tell a lie has serious consequences. VP Friday Night Dinner Channel 4, 10.00pm This sitcom’s family squabbles are more uncomfortably familiar than laugh-out-loud funny in tonight’s penultimate visit to the Goodmans’ home. Writer Robert Popper capitalises on Simon Bird’s musical skills by having his character, Adam, reluctantly play the violin to cheer up Grandma. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm; Ethan Hawke, Toni Collette, Jo Brand and Aidan Turner offer their funniest anecdotes tonight. Plus, Liam Payne continues his post-One Direction solo career with a performance his new single, Familiar. VP The Everly Brothers: Harmonies from Heaven BBC Four, 9.00pm Art Garfunkel, Keith Richards and Graham Nash are among the luminaries paying tribute to Don and Phil Everly in this 2016 documentary, all of them claiming the brothers as an influence. Surviving sibling Don Everly returns to Iowa to recount the brothers’ first appearances, their pivotal move to Nashville and stardom in the late Fifties. Africa: A Journey into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm So much of the music we listen to has its roots in African music. In this new three-part documentary series, London DJ Rita Ray sets off to explore the continent’s influence. Kicking off her journey in Nigeria, Ray stumbles across impromptu drumming ceremonies in the streets as she explores the importance of rhythm in the country’s music and meets its major players. Future episodes take her to Mali and South Africa. VP Crocodile Dundee (1986) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.10pm Mick “Crocodile” Dundee (Paul Hogan), a bushman from northern Australia, is a dab hand at surviving in the Outback. But when he is invited to New York City by Sue Charlton (Linda Kozlowski), a high-class reporter, in this Oscar-nominated comedy drama, he finds life far tougher in the urban jungle. He’s a survivor though: muggers who accost Dundee discover that he has a bigger knife than they do. American Made (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Doug Liman directs Tom Cruise in this lively, madcap real-life tale of pilot, drug smuggler and CIA gun-runner Barry Seal, whose supersonic, if lawless, career path began, according to this script, when he was a bored TWA pilot in 1978 and was approached out of the blue by a CIA handler (Domhnall Gleeson, all greasy persuasion) to conduct reconnaissance flights across the Caribbean. GoodFellas (1990) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm Martin Scorsese’s Mafia masterpiece, adapted from a non-fiction book, has all the qualities of great cinema: it’s thrilling, it’s provocative, it’s stylish, and it’s got a young Robert De Niro in it. Ray Liotta plays the youngster who longs to be a gangster; De Niro and Joe Pesci are in the Mob. Pesci’s mother, meanwhile, reportedly asked him if he had to swear quite so much – the f-word is used 300 times. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: Arrested Development, ​Grammar Schools: Who Will Get In? and The Split
Grammar Schools: Who Will Get In? BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Few education issues are as contentious in this country as that of grammar schools, with Prime Minister Theresa May among those supporting their return. This thought-provoking three-part documentary focusing on the London borough of Bexley, where each year over 5,000 children sit the selective exam for one of the area’s four grammar schools, could not, therefore, have come at a better time. We hear from both sides of the debate and are shown both the benefits and drawbacks of attending either a grammar or secondary modern school – although, as always, it’s the parents and children who make the most notable contributions. “If you want your child to become better in their future life, it’s good to go to a grammar school,” says one mother, who works long hours for minimum wage and pays £300 a month for a tutor for her daughter. Meanwhile, another, herself the product of a grammar school, despairs of the increasing parental competitiveness. And, for all the film-makers’ admirably even-handed approach, it’s the stress felt by the children that makes the biggest mark, with one youngster noting: “I don’t think grammar school is fair because people are far too young to feel they’ve failed.” SH Emmerdale ITV, 7.00pm Emmerdale confronts the difficult subject of child abuse when Charity Dingle (Emma Atkins) opens up about her past in this special flashback episode. Last November a similar technique was used, to great effect, to shed light on her cousin Cain’s experiences. Mica Proctor, in another triumph of casting, plays the young Charity. SH The Split BBC One, 9.00pm Abi Morgan’s enjoyable family saga comes to a climax with scores settled, decisions made and reconciliations all over the place. It works not least because Morgan never forgets that one person’s happy ending is another’s poisoned chalice, meaning there’s pain amid the laughter. SH The Battle for Britain’s Heroes Channel 4, 9.00pm “Our heroes often have a toxic past,” says Afua Hirsch at the start of this captivating and provocative film. She pulls no punches in her look at the darker side of our history, exploring slavery, racism and colonialism, in a film certain to enrage as many people as it informs. SH 4 Men, 175 Babies: Britain’s Super Sperm Donors Channel 4, 10.00pm This film follows men who donate their sperm for free, via unregulated websites. But why? “Being a sperm donor is like being a Samaritan,” says 61-year-old Clive, who began donating once he retired. SH Arrested Development Netflix, from today For anyone who didn’t watch the patchy fourth series of this popular Emmy-winning comedy about a rich family who lose their wealth, the good news is that you can pick up this new series with no problem. The bad news for those that did watch it is that this opening episode spends ages rehashing past events. Thankfully things do settle down – and become very funny – as we find out what happened after the infamous punch that George Michael (Michael Cera) landed on his father Michael (Jason Bateman). A proper return to form. SH Master of Photography Sky Arts, 8.00pm The international photography contest returns for a third series, with Oliviero Toscani joined on the judging panel by curator Mark Sealy and the New Yorker’s Elisabeth Biondi. Here’s hoping that this series avoids the problems of last year, which saw contestant Souvid Datta accused of plagiarism. SH All Creatures Great and Small (1975) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.45pm Simon Ward and a pre-Silence of the Lambs Anthony Hopkins star as Yorkshire vets James Herriot and Siegfried Farnon in this gentle drama set in the Thirties and based on the first two books of British vet Alf Wight (who wrote under the pseudonym of Herriot). The TV series that followed remains most memorable, but there’s warm-hearted performances here too. Operation Petticoat (1959) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.25pm A beguiling Second World War comedy directed by Blake Edwards and starring Cary Grant as a submarine captain with a strict sense of order and a rule-breaking hustler of a first officer (Tony Curtis). The vessel is bombed by the Japanese, but that’s the least of its worries. Five nurses in distress, a goat and a coating of pink paint all pose challenges for the effortlessly funny crew. The Enforcer (1976) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 11.00pm Clint Eastwood’s Harry Callahan is teamed up with rookie female partner Kate Moore (Tyne Daly) in this entertaining but ultimately disappointing third chapter of the Dirty Harry series. Together they battle violent eco-terrorists who have kidnapped the mayor of San Francisco (John Crawford) while, between the gun battles, cynical Callahan attempts to come to terms with his own male chauvinism. Wednesday 30 May Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt The Big Crash Diet Experiment BBC One, 8.00pm Is it time to rethink our attitude to crash dieting? That’s the question posed by tonight’s revealing documentary, which assesses the health impact of this extreme approach to weight loss. Our guide is Dr Javid Abdelmoneim, who along with a raft of health professionals, aims to challenge orthodox beliefs about what some see as nutritionally inadequate eating regimes with only short-term benefits. Abdelmoneim persuades four obese volunteers to give up the food that they love and opt for a scary-sounding liquid-only intake of soups and shakes, using scans and blood tests to monitor them over nine weeks. Each of the group has their fair share of weight-related issues. Portly Catholic priest Paul, for example, has been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, takeaway fan Rebecca believes that she’s in the grip of a fast-food addiction, and secret binge-eater Yolande already has fatty liver disease. Watching them tackle the programme and shed the pounds is admirable enough, but even more striking is the positive effect that the diet has on their health. In fact, the implications of the results could be a huge money saver for the NHS. TD The Doctor Who Gave Up Drugs BBC One, 9.00pm; Scotland, 10.45pm Dr Chris van Tulleken continues his crusade against the over-medication of children. Tonight, he explores why so many young people are prescribed anti-depressants, and becomes suspicious over the rise in babies diagnosed with cow’s milk allergy. TD Love in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm “The nearest gay scene for me is Belfast,” says cattle farmer Richard, a problem seeing as he lives a three-hour ferry ride away in remote Dumfries and Galloway. Not to be defeated, Richard invites three potential partners to his farm. TD Carry On Brussels Channel 4, 10.00pm More shenanigans from behind the doors of the European Parliament. We meet lone Liberal Democrat MEP Catherine Bearder, whose staunch pro-Europe stance lands her in trouble with Brexit minister David Davis. TD Miranda Barbour: Serial Killer or Liar? BBC One, 10.45pm; Northern Ireland, 11.40pm; Scotland, 11.45pm; Wales, 11.05pm This gripping true crime documentary charts the case of teenage murderer Miranda Barbour. The young mother admitted killing internet date Troy La Ferarra but later confessed to a further 22 murders as part of a Satanic cult. TD Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt Netflix, from today This snappy sitcom about a cult escapee in the big city has proved a delight. A shame, then, that this fourth season is to be its last, with the first six episodes launching today and the remainder to come later this year. Kimmy’s (Ellie Kemper) new job at a tech start-up proves ripe for nerd-baiting satire. TD Big Sky, Big Dreams, Big Art: Made in the USA BBC Four, 9.00pm Presenter Waldemar Januszczak swaps the vastness of the Wild West featured in last week’s episode for the “pulsing, futuristic excitement of the American city”, as his fascinating series on American art continues. He starts out amid the skyscrapers of New York, explaining how the vaulting architecture of the Chrysler Building exemplified the hope and ambition of the burgeoning metropolis. We then move on to the Great Depression, presaged by artists such as Thomas Hart Benton in his restless murals of urban life. TD Great Expectations (1946, b/w) ★★★★★ BBC Two, 12.35pm David Lean’s peerless version of Dickens’s novel is packed with memorable moments, from its opening scenes on the marshes, where Pip first meets the escaped convict Magwitch, to the enduring images of Miss Havisham’s house… not forgetting Pip’s boxing match with Herbert Pocket. John Mills is twice the age of the book’s Pip, but there’s a subtle ingenuousness in his performance. Rebecca (1940, b/w) ★★★★★ Talking Pictures TV, 9.00pm One of Hitchcock’s most disconcerting and finest films was adapted from a Daphne du Maurier story, though he departed from the text in many ways. A bride (Joan Fontaine) is haunted by the memory of her husband’s (Laurence Olivier) dead first wife. The excellent cast (Judith Anderson as formidable housekeeper Mrs Danvers is a particular highlight) adds class to this eerily suspenseful treat. Inglourious Basterds (2009) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 10.00pm It wasn’t quite the masterpiece we were told to expect, but Quentin Tarantino’s pastiche of war films and spaghetti westerns is still rollicking good fun and has all the ingredients of a classic Tarantino film. A celebration of vengeance, it’s an audacious take on the Second World War. Christoph Waltz deservedly won an Oscar for his incendiary turn as the “Jew Hunter”. Brad Pitt also stars. Thursday 31 May Humans Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm This third series of the thoughtful British science-fiction drama continues to benefit from a narrowing of focus; the big-name American actors and slightly strained global perspective have gone, but the thematic ambition has been retained. Less wilfully obscure than Sky Atlantic’s Westworld and considerably more affecting, Humans instead keeps a tight focus on emotion and relationships, whether the characters concerned are flesh and blood or gears and circuits. It can be heavy-handed with the allegories, certainly, but it’s never chilling or humourless – and leading synth performers Gemma Chan, Ivanno Jeremiah and Emily Berrington are as uncanny as ever. Mark Bonnar, too, is proving a handy addition to the cast as Neil, Laura’s (a brilliant Katherine Parkinson) professional antagonist and love interest – Bonnar’s history of playing characters with shifting loyalties comes in handy as Neil first opens his heart and then hardens his stance on the Dryden Commission. Mia (Chan), meanwhile, is on a one-synth mission to demonstrate coexistence is possible by moving into a hostile housing estate, and Leo (Colin Morgan) struggles with the realities of being human. GT Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm This week begins with chocolate puddings, which means the contestants are challenged to rustle up black forest gateaux and a dessert integrating a root vegetable, then aubergines and tofu take centre stage before the elimination round and an oriental classic. GT Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm Hollings and their “British chophouse classics” square up to an Italian-influenced brand serving fresh pasta from a cheese wheel, as Fred Sireix and a group of high-street investors gauge their potential. GT Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm Now with a Bafta award under its belt, this fine series follows the West Midlands Ambulance Service over the last Saturday night before Christmas. An inevitably busy period is made harder by a major traffic accident in central Birmingham – an incident which puts tremendous mental and physical demands on the crews, documented here with the clarity and honesty we’ve come to expect from the series. GT Great Art ITV, 10.50pm; not STV Tim Marlow takes a tour of the Royal Academy’s sell-out exhibition of the Parisian artist’s portraits, in the process assessing the man’s life, work, and reputation as “the father of modern art”. GT Urban Myths: Sex Pistols vs Bill Grundy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This pop cultural landmark, in which punk pioneers Sex Pistols grumbled, swore and generally misbehaved on Bill Grundy’s sleepily complacent regional chat-show, creating a national storm of outrage in the process, arguably received its definitive tribute from Kevin Eldon in 2013. The comedian’s loving reconstruction of the event imagined the Pistols as Amish people and bordered on performance art. Still, this gleefully silly take on the infamous encounter between the jobbing broadcaster (Steve Pemberton) and the Sex Pistols (played by members of the National Youth Theatre) is a lot of fun. GT Barry Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The eponymous depressed hitman (Bill Hader) tries to go it alone, only to be thwarted by his reckless partner Taylor (Dale Pavinski) and ructions among members of his acting class. GT Billion Dollar Brain (1967) ★★★★☆ Film4, 5.00pm Michael Caine returns as the reluctant secret agent Harry Palmer (The Ipcress File, Funeral in Berlin) in this film from Ken Russell, based on the novels by Len Deighton. Having left the British Secret Service to pursue a career as a private investigator, Palmer stumbles into a plot to overthrow Communism with the help of a supercomputer. But who is working for whom? It’s far-fetched but fun. Johnny Mnemonic (1995) ★★☆☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm Fresh from the rubber-burning success of Speed and four short years before The Matrix, Keanu Reeves starred in this high-concept dystopian adventure as the eponymous anti-hero – a 21st-century courier whose augmented brain is used to transport illicit data – that very nearly ruined his career. It’s adapted by cyberpunk godfather William Gibson from his own story. Munich (2005) ★★★☆☆ AMC, 12.50am Eric Bana stars in Steven Spielberg’s audacious, if lengthy, examination of the Israel-Palestine conflict. Set in 1972, it adroitly tackles the aftermath of the massacre of 11 Israeli Olympic athletes at the Munich Olympics. Bana plays a Mossad agent charged with hunting down the extremists who planned the Munich attack. Some of the rhetoric is clumsy, but the film-makers strive to be politically even-handed. Friday 1 June Tracey Breaks the News: Ullman as Michael Gove Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm After losing her to the USA for 30 years, Tracey Ullman’s return to our shores two years ago has reminded us of her unparalleled talents as an impressionist. She captures the physicality of her famous subjects – Angela Merkel and Judi Dench are standouts – as well as their voices, and hats off to Ullman’s prosthetics teams for her remarkable transformations. After an acting stint in last year’s Howards End, Ullman returns to her comfort zone tonight with a second series of the topical sketch comedy show in which she skewers politicians, mostly – although we’ll also be treated to more of Ben Miller’s scene-stealing Rupert Murdoch, with Ullman as Jerry Hall. Although no preview tape was available due to last-minute filming, Ullman was pictured as Michael Gove in promotional material and has also promised impressions of Jeremy Corbyn and Jacob Rees-Mogg. The previous series attracted criticism for weak writing, and some skits do lack bite, but slack should be cut – it’s a notoriously difficult format to pull off. Ullman’s gift for mimicry means she hits the mark often enough for the show to be a welcome bit of light satire to wind up the week. VP Extreme Wales with Richard Parks BBC Two, 7.30pm Tonight’s final episode of Richard Parks’s adventure programme combines extreme sports with lush panoramas of the Welsh landscape. Daredevil Parks takes to the skies on a paramotor – nothing more than a parachute connected to a fan-like motor – to propel him the length of the country. VP The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Fugitive immigrant Taariq Shirazi (Alexander Behrang Keshtkar) makes a desperate bid to flee as the Scandi-noir crime series continues. When Saga (Sofia Helin) and Henrik (Thure Lindhardt) track him down, however, Saga’s inability to tell a lie has serious consequences. VP Friday Night Dinner Channel 4, 10.00pm This sitcom’s family squabbles are more uncomfortably familiar than laugh-out-loud funny in tonight’s penultimate visit to the Goodmans’ home. Writer Robert Popper capitalises on Simon Bird’s musical skills by having his character, Adam, reluctantly play the violin to cheer up Grandma. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm; Ethan Hawke, Toni Collette, Jo Brand and Aidan Turner offer their funniest anecdotes tonight. Plus, Liam Payne continues his post-One Direction solo career with a performance his new single, Familiar. VP The Everly Brothers: Harmonies from Heaven BBC Four, 9.00pm Art Garfunkel, Keith Richards and Graham Nash are among the luminaries paying tribute to Don and Phil Everly in this 2016 documentary, all of them claiming the brothers as an influence. Surviving sibling Don Everly returns to Iowa to recount the brothers’ first appearances, their pivotal move to Nashville and stardom in the late Fifties. Africa: A Journey into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm So much of the music we listen to has its roots in African music. In this new three-part documentary series, London DJ Rita Ray sets off to explore the continent’s influence. Kicking off her journey in Nigeria, Ray stumbles across impromptu drumming ceremonies in the streets as she explores the importance of rhythm in the country’s music and meets its major players. Future episodes take her to Mali and South Africa. VP Crocodile Dundee (1986) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.10pm Mick “Crocodile” Dundee (Paul Hogan), a bushman from northern Australia, is a dab hand at surviving in the Outback. But when he is invited to New York City by Sue Charlton (Linda Kozlowski), a high-class reporter, in this Oscar-nominated comedy drama, he finds life far tougher in the urban jungle. He’s a survivor though: muggers who accost Dundee discover that he has a bigger knife than they do. American Made (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Doug Liman directs Tom Cruise in this lively, madcap real-life tale of pilot, drug smuggler and CIA gun-runner Barry Seal, whose supersonic, if lawless, career path began, according to this script, when he was a bored TWA pilot in 1978 and was approached out of the blue by a CIA handler (Domhnall Gleeson, all greasy persuasion) to conduct reconnaissance flights across the Caribbean. GoodFellas (1990) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm Martin Scorsese’s Mafia masterpiece, adapted from a non-fiction book, has all the qualities of great cinema: it’s thrilling, it’s provocative, it’s stylish, and it’s got a young Robert De Niro in it. Ray Liotta plays the youngster who longs to be a gangster; De Niro and Joe Pesci are in the Mob. Pesci’s mother, meanwhile, reportedly asked him if he had to swear quite so much – the f-word is used 300 times. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
Grammar Schools: Who Will Get In? BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Few education issues are as contentious in this country as that of grammar schools, with Prime Minister Theresa May among those supporting their return. This thought-provoking three-part documentary focusing on the London borough of Bexley, where each year over 5,000 children sit the selective exam for one of the area’s four grammar schools, could not, therefore, have come at a better time. We hear from both sides of the debate and are shown both the benefits and drawbacks of attending either a grammar or secondary modern school – although, as always, it’s the parents and children who make the most notable contributions. “If you want your child to become better in their future life, it’s good to go to a grammar school,” says one mother, who works long hours for minimum wage and pays £300 a month for a tutor for her daughter. Meanwhile, another, herself the product of a grammar school, despairs of the increasing parental competitiveness. And, for all the film-makers’ admirably even-handed approach, it’s the stress felt by the children that makes the biggest mark, with one youngster noting: “I don’t think grammar school is fair because people are far too young to feel they’ve failed.” SH Emmerdale ITV, 7.00pm Emmerdale confronts the difficult subject of child abuse when Charity Dingle (Emma Atkins) opens up about her past in this special flashback episode. Last November a similar technique was used, to great effect, to shed light on her cousin Cain’s experiences. Mica Proctor, in another triumph of casting, plays the young Charity. SH The Split BBC One, 9.00pm Abi Morgan’s enjoyable family saga comes to a climax with scores settled, decisions made and reconciliations all over the place. It works not least because Morgan never forgets that one person’s happy ending is another’s poisoned chalice, meaning there’s pain amid the laughter. SH The Battle for Britain’s Heroes Channel 4, 9.00pm “Our heroes often have a toxic past,” says Afua Hirsch at the start of this captivating and provocative film. She pulls no punches in her look at the darker side of our history, exploring slavery, racism and colonialism, in a film certain to enrage as many people as it informs. SH 4 Men, 175 Babies: Britain’s Super Sperm Donors Channel 4, 10.00pm This film follows men who donate their sperm for free, via unregulated websites. But why? “Being a sperm donor is like being a Samaritan,” says 61-year-old Clive, who began donating once he retired. SH Arrested Development Netflix, from today For anyone who didn’t watch the patchy fourth series of this popular Emmy-winning comedy about a rich family who lose their wealth, the good news is that you can pick up this new series with no problem. The bad news for those that did watch it is that this opening episode spends ages rehashing past events. Thankfully things do settle down – and become very funny – as we find out what happened after the infamous punch that George Michael (Michael Cera) landed on his father Michael (Jason Bateman). A proper return to form. SH Master of Photography Sky Arts, 8.00pm The international photography contest returns for a third series, with Oliviero Toscani joined on the judging panel by curator Mark Sealy and the New Yorker’s Elisabeth Biondi. Here’s hoping that this series avoids the problems of last year, which saw contestant Souvid Datta accused of plagiarism. SH All Creatures Great and Small (1975) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.45pm Simon Ward and a pre-Silence of the Lambs Anthony Hopkins star as Yorkshire vets James Herriot and Siegfried Farnon in this gentle drama set in the Thirties and based on the first two books of British vet Alf Wight (who wrote under the pseudonym of Herriot). The TV series that followed remains most memorable, but there’s warm-hearted performances here too. Operation Petticoat (1959) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.25pm A beguiling Second World War comedy directed by Blake Edwards and starring Cary Grant as a submarine captain with a strict sense of order and a rule-breaking hustler of a first officer (Tony Curtis). The vessel is bombed by the Japanese, but that’s the least of its worries. Five nurses in distress, a goat and a coating of pink paint all pose challenges for the effortlessly funny crew. The Enforcer (1976) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 11.00pm Clint Eastwood’s Harry Callahan is teamed up with rookie female partner Kate Moore (Tyne Daly) in this entertaining but ultimately disappointing third chapter of the Dirty Harry series. Together they battle violent eco-terrorists who have kidnapped the mayor of San Francisco (John Crawford) while, between the gun battles, cynical Callahan attempts to come to terms with his own male chauvinism. Wednesday 30 May Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt The Big Crash Diet Experiment BBC One, 8.00pm Is it time to rethink our attitude to crash dieting? That’s the question posed by tonight’s revealing documentary, which assesses the health impact of this extreme approach to weight loss. Our guide is Dr Javid Abdelmoneim, who along with a raft of health professionals, aims to challenge orthodox beliefs about what some see as nutritionally inadequate eating regimes with only short-term benefits. Abdelmoneim persuades four obese volunteers to give up the food that they love and opt for a scary-sounding liquid-only intake of soups and shakes, using scans and blood tests to monitor them over nine weeks. Each of the group has their fair share of weight-related issues. Portly Catholic priest Paul, for example, has been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, takeaway fan Rebecca believes that she’s in the grip of a fast-food addiction, and secret binge-eater Yolande already has fatty liver disease. Watching them tackle the programme and shed the pounds is admirable enough, but even more striking is the positive effect that the diet has on their health. In fact, the implications of the results could be a huge money saver for the NHS. TD The Doctor Who Gave Up Drugs BBC One, 9.00pm; Scotland, 10.45pm Dr Chris van Tulleken continues his crusade against the over-medication of children. Tonight, he explores why so many young people are prescribed anti-depressants, and becomes suspicious over the rise in babies diagnosed with cow’s milk allergy. TD Love in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm “The nearest gay scene for me is Belfast,” says cattle farmer Richard, a problem seeing as he lives a three-hour ferry ride away in remote Dumfries and Galloway. Not to be defeated, Richard invites three potential partners to his farm. TD Carry On Brussels Channel 4, 10.00pm More shenanigans from behind the doors of the European Parliament. We meet lone Liberal Democrat MEP Catherine Bearder, whose staunch pro-Europe stance lands her in trouble with Brexit minister David Davis. TD Miranda Barbour: Serial Killer or Liar? BBC One, 10.45pm; Northern Ireland, 11.40pm; Scotland, 11.45pm; Wales, 11.05pm This gripping true crime documentary charts the case of teenage murderer Miranda Barbour. The young mother admitted killing internet date Troy La Ferarra but later confessed to a further 22 murders as part of a Satanic cult. TD Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt Netflix, from today This snappy sitcom about a cult escapee in the big city has proved a delight. A shame, then, that this fourth season is to be its last, with the first six episodes launching today and the remainder to come later this year. Kimmy’s (Ellie Kemper) new job at a tech start-up proves ripe for nerd-baiting satire. TD Big Sky, Big Dreams, Big Art: Made in the USA BBC Four, 9.00pm Presenter Waldemar Januszczak swaps the vastness of the Wild West featured in last week’s episode for the “pulsing, futuristic excitement of the American city”, as his fascinating series on American art continues. He starts out amid the skyscrapers of New York, explaining how the vaulting architecture of the Chrysler Building exemplified the hope and ambition of the burgeoning metropolis. We then move on to the Great Depression, presaged by artists such as Thomas Hart Benton in his restless murals of urban life. TD Great Expectations (1946, b/w) ★★★★★ BBC Two, 12.35pm David Lean’s peerless version of Dickens’s novel is packed with memorable moments, from its opening scenes on the marshes, where Pip first meets the escaped convict Magwitch, to the enduring images of Miss Havisham’s house… not forgetting Pip’s boxing match with Herbert Pocket. John Mills is twice the age of the book’s Pip, but there’s a subtle ingenuousness in his performance. Rebecca (1940, b/w) ★★★★★ Talking Pictures TV, 9.00pm One of Hitchcock’s most disconcerting and finest films was adapted from a Daphne du Maurier story, though he departed from the text in many ways. A bride (Joan Fontaine) is haunted by the memory of her husband’s (Laurence Olivier) dead first wife. The excellent cast (Judith Anderson as formidable housekeeper Mrs Danvers is a particular highlight) adds class to this eerily suspenseful treat. Inglourious Basterds (2009) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 10.00pm It wasn’t quite the masterpiece we were told to expect, but Quentin Tarantino’s pastiche of war films and spaghetti westerns is still rollicking good fun and has all the ingredients of a classic Tarantino film. A celebration of vengeance, it’s an audacious take on the Second World War. Christoph Waltz deservedly won an Oscar for his incendiary turn as the “Jew Hunter”. Brad Pitt also stars. Thursday 31 May Humans Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm This third series of the thoughtful British science-fiction drama continues to benefit from a narrowing of focus; the big-name American actors and slightly strained global perspective have gone, but the thematic ambition has been retained. Less wilfully obscure than Sky Atlantic’s Westworld and considerably more affecting, Humans instead keeps a tight focus on emotion and relationships, whether the characters concerned are flesh and blood or gears and circuits. It can be heavy-handed with the allegories, certainly, but it’s never chilling or humourless – and leading synth performers Gemma Chan, Ivanno Jeremiah and Emily Berrington are as uncanny as ever. Mark Bonnar, too, is proving a handy addition to the cast as Neil, Laura’s (a brilliant Katherine Parkinson) professional antagonist and love interest – Bonnar’s history of playing characters with shifting loyalties comes in handy as Neil first opens his heart and then hardens his stance on the Dryden Commission. Mia (Chan), meanwhile, is on a one-synth mission to demonstrate coexistence is possible by moving into a hostile housing estate, and Leo (Colin Morgan) struggles with the realities of being human. GT Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm This week begins with chocolate puddings, which means the contestants are challenged to rustle up black forest gateaux and a dessert integrating a root vegetable, then aubergines and tofu take centre stage before the elimination round and an oriental classic. GT Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm Hollings and their “British chophouse classics” square up to an Italian-influenced brand serving fresh pasta from a cheese wheel, as Fred Sireix and a group of high-street investors gauge their potential. GT Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm Now with a Bafta award under its belt, this fine series follows the West Midlands Ambulance Service over the last Saturday night before Christmas. An inevitably busy period is made harder by a major traffic accident in central Birmingham – an incident which puts tremendous mental and physical demands on the crews, documented here with the clarity and honesty we’ve come to expect from the series. GT Great Art ITV, 10.50pm; not STV Tim Marlow takes a tour of the Royal Academy’s sell-out exhibition of the Parisian artist’s portraits, in the process assessing the man’s life, work, and reputation as “the father of modern art”. GT Urban Myths: Sex Pistols vs Bill Grundy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This pop cultural landmark, in which punk pioneers Sex Pistols grumbled, swore and generally misbehaved on Bill Grundy’s sleepily complacent regional chat-show, creating a national storm of outrage in the process, arguably received its definitive tribute from Kevin Eldon in 2013. The comedian’s loving reconstruction of the event imagined the Pistols as Amish people and bordered on performance art. Still, this gleefully silly take on the infamous encounter between the jobbing broadcaster (Steve Pemberton) and the Sex Pistols (played by members of the National Youth Theatre) is a lot of fun. GT Barry Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The eponymous depressed hitman (Bill Hader) tries to go it alone, only to be thwarted by his reckless partner Taylor (Dale Pavinski) and ructions among members of his acting class. GT Billion Dollar Brain (1967) ★★★★☆ Film4, 5.00pm Michael Caine returns as the reluctant secret agent Harry Palmer (The Ipcress File, Funeral in Berlin) in this film from Ken Russell, based on the novels by Len Deighton. Having left the British Secret Service to pursue a career as a private investigator, Palmer stumbles into a plot to overthrow Communism with the help of a supercomputer. But who is working for whom? It’s far-fetched but fun. Johnny Mnemonic (1995) ★★☆☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm Fresh from the rubber-burning success of Speed and four short years before The Matrix, Keanu Reeves starred in this high-concept dystopian adventure as the eponymous anti-hero – a 21st-century courier whose augmented brain is used to transport illicit data – that very nearly ruined his career. It’s adapted by cyberpunk godfather William Gibson from his own story. Munich (2005) ★★★☆☆ AMC, 12.50am Eric Bana stars in Steven Spielberg’s audacious, if lengthy, examination of the Israel-Palestine conflict. Set in 1972, it adroitly tackles the aftermath of the massacre of 11 Israeli Olympic athletes at the Munich Olympics. Bana plays a Mossad agent charged with hunting down the extremists who planned the Munich attack. Some of the rhetoric is clumsy, but the film-makers strive to be politically even-handed. Friday 1 June Tracey Breaks the News: Ullman as Michael Gove Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm After losing her to the USA for 30 years, Tracey Ullman’s return to our shores two years ago has reminded us of her unparalleled talents as an impressionist. She captures the physicality of her famous subjects – Angela Merkel and Judi Dench are standouts – as well as their voices, and hats off to Ullman’s prosthetics teams for her remarkable transformations. After an acting stint in last year’s Howards End, Ullman returns to her comfort zone tonight with a second series of the topical sketch comedy show in which she skewers politicians, mostly – although we’ll also be treated to more of Ben Miller’s scene-stealing Rupert Murdoch, with Ullman as Jerry Hall. Although no preview tape was available due to last-minute filming, Ullman was pictured as Michael Gove in promotional material and has also promised impressions of Jeremy Corbyn and Jacob Rees-Mogg. The previous series attracted criticism for weak writing, and some skits do lack bite, but slack should be cut – it’s a notoriously difficult format to pull off. Ullman’s gift for mimicry means she hits the mark often enough for the show to be a welcome bit of light satire to wind up the week. VP Extreme Wales with Richard Parks BBC Two, 7.30pm Tonight’s final episode of Richard Parks’s adventure programme combines extreme sports with lush panoramas of the Welsh landscape. Daredevil Parks takes to the skies on a paramotor – nothing more than a parachute connected to a fan-like motor – to propel him the length of the country. VP The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Fugitive immigrant Taariq Shirazi (Alexander Behrang Keshtkar) makes a desperate bid to flee as the Scandi-noir crime series continues. When Saga (Sofia Helin) and Henrik (Thure Lindhardt) track him down, however, Saga’s inability to tell a lie has serious consequences. VP Friday Night Dinner Channel 4, 10.00pm This sitcom’s family squabbles are more uncomfortably familiar than laugh-out-loud funny in tonight’s penultimate visit to the Goodmans’ home. Writer Robert Popper capitalises on Simon Bird’s musical skills by having his character, Adam, reluctantly play the violin to cheer up Grandma. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm; Ethan Hawke, Toni Collette, Jo Brand and Aidan Turner offer their funniest anecdotes tonight. Plus, Liam Payne continues his post-One Direction solo career with a performance his new single, Familiar. VP The Everly Brothers: Harmonies from Heaven BBC Four, 9.00pm Art Garfunkel, Keith Richards and Graham Nash are among the luminaries paying tribute to Don and Phil Everly in this 2016 documentary, all of them claiming the brothers as an influence. Surviving sibling Don Everly returns to Iowa to recount the brothers’ first appearances, their pivotal move to Nashville and stardom in the late Fifties. Africa: A Journey into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm So much of the music we listen to has its roots in African music. In this new three-part documentary series, London DJ Rita Ray sets off to explore the continent’s influence. Kicking off her journey in Nigeria, Ray stumbles across impromptu drumming ceremonies in the streets as she explores the importance of rhythm in the country’s music and meets its major players. Future episodes take her to Mali and South Africa. VP Crocodile Dundee (1986) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.10pm Mick “Crocodile” Dundee (Paul Hogan), a bushman from northern Australia, is a dab hand at surviving in the Outback. But when he is invited to New York City by Sue Charlton (Linda Kozlowski), a high-class reporter, in this Oscar-nominated comedy drama, he finds life far tougher in the urban jungle. He’s a survivor though: muggers who accost Dundee discover that he has a bigger knife than they do. American Made (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Doug Liman directs Tom Cruise in this lively, madcap real-life tale of pilot, drug smuggler and CIA gun-runner Barry Seal, whose supersonic, if lawless, career path began, according to this script, when he was a bored TWA pilot in 1978 and was approached out of the blue by a CIA handler (Domhnall Gleeson, all greasy persuasion) to conduct reconnaissance flights across the Caribbean. GoodFellas (1990) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm Martin Scorsese’s Mafia masterpiece, adapted from a non-fiction book, has all the qualities of great cinema: it’s thrilling, it’s provocative, it’s stylish, and it’s got a young Robert De Niro in it. Ray Liotta plays the youngster who longs to be a gangster; De Niro and Joe Pesci are in the Mob. Pesci’s mother, meanwhile, reportedly asked him if he had to swear quite so much – the f-word is used 300 times. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: Arrested Development, ​Grammar Schools: Who Will Get In? and The Split
Grammar Schools: Who Will Get In? BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Few education issues are as contentious in this country as that of grammar schools, with Prime Minister Theresa May among those supporting their return. This thought-provoking three-part documentary focusing on the London borough of Bexley, where each year over 5,000 children sit the selective exam for one of the area’s four grammar schools, could not, therefore, have come at a better time. We hear from both sides of the debate and are shown both the benefits and drawbacks of attending either a grammar or secondary modern school – although, as always, it’s the parents and children who make the most notable contributions. “If you want your child to become better in their future life, it’s good to go to a grammar school,” says one mother, who works long hours for minimum wage and pays £300 a month for a tutor for her daughter. Meanwhile, another, herself the product of a grammar school, despairs of the increasing parental competitiveness. And, for all the film-makers’ admirably even-handed approach, it’s the stress felt by the children that makes the biggest mark, with one youngster noting: “I don’t think grammar school is fair because people are far too young to feel they’ve failed.” SH Emmerdale ITV, 7.00pm Emmerdale confronts the difficult subject of child abuse when Charity Dingle (Emma Atkins) opens up about her past in this special flashback episode. Last November a similar technique was used, to great effect, to shed light on her cousin Cain’s experiences. Mica Proctor, in another triumph of casting, plays the young Charity. SH The Split BBC One, 9.00pm Abi Morgan’s enjoyable family saga comes to a climax with scores settled, decisions made and reconciliations all over the place. It works not least because Morgan never forgets that one person’s happy ending is another’s poisoned chalice, meaning there’s pain amid the laughter. SH The Battle for Britain’s Heroes Channel 4, 9.00pm “Our heroes often have a toxic past,” says Afua Hirsch at the start of this captivating and provocative film. She pulls no punches in her look at the darker side of our history, exploring slavery, racism and colonialism, in a film certain to enrage as many people as it informs. SH 4 Men, 175 Babies: Britain’s Super Sperm Donors Channel 4, 10.00pm This film follows men who donate their sperm for free, via unregulated websites. But why? “Being a sperm donor is like being a Samaritan,” says 61-year-old Clive, who began donating once he retired. SH Arrested Development Netflix, from today For anyone who didn’t watch the patchy fourth series of this popular Emmy-winning comedy about a rich family who lose their wealth, the good news is that you can pick up this new series with no problem. The bad news for those that did watch it is that this opening episode spends ages rehashing past events. Thankfully things do settle down – and become very funny – as we find out what happened after the infamous punch that George Michael (Michael Cera) landed on his father Michael (Jason Bateman). A proper return to form. SH Master of Photography Sky Arts, 8.00pm The international photography contest returns for a third series, with Oliviero Toscani joined on the judging panel by curator Mark Sealy and the New Yorker’s Elisabeth Biondi. Here’s hoping that this series avoids the problems of last year, which saw contestant Souvid Datta accused of plagiarism. SH All Creatures Great and Small (1975) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.45pm Simon Ward and a pre-Silence of the Lambs Anthony Hopkins star as Yorkshire vets James Herriot and Siegfried Farnon in this gentle drama set in the Thirties and based on the first two books of British vet Alf Wight (who wrote under the pseudonym of Herriot). The TV series that followed remains most memorable, but there’s warm-hearted performances here too. Operation Petticoat (1959) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.25pm A beguiling Second World War comedy directed by Blake Edwards and starring Cary Grant as a submarine captain with a strict sense of order and a rule-breaking hustler of a first officer (Tony Curtis). The vessel is bombed by the Japanese, but that’s the least of its worries. Five nurses in distress, a goat and a coating of pink paint all pose challenges for the effortlessly funny crew. The Enforcer (1976) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 11.00pm Clint Eastwood’s Harry Callahan is teamed up with rookie female partner Kate Moore (Tyne Daly) in this entertaining but ultimately disappointing third chapter of the Dirty Harry series. Together they battle violent eco-terrorists who have kidnapped the mayor of San Francisco (John Crawford) while, between the gun battles, cynical Callahan attempts to come to terms with his own male chauvinism. Wednesday 30 May Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt The Big Crash Diet Experiment BBC One, 8.00pm Is it time to rethink our attitude to crash dieting? That’s the question posed by tonight’s revealing documentary, which assesses the health impact of this extreme approach to weight loss. Our guide is Dr Javid Abdelmoneim, who along with a raft of health professionals, aims to challenge orthodox beliefs about what some see as nutritionally inadequate eating regimes with only short-term benefits. Abdelmoneim persuades four obese volunteers to give up the food that they love and opt for a scary-sounding liquid-only intake of soups and shakes, using scans and blood tests to monitor them over nine weeks. Each of the group has their fair share of weight-related issues. Portly Catholic priest Paul, for example, has been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, takeaway fan Rebecca believes that she’s in the grip of a fast-food addiction, and secret binge-eater Yolande already has fatty liver disease. Watching them tackle the programme and shed the pounds is admirable enough, but even more striking is the positive effect that the diet has on their health. In fact, the implications of the results could be a huge money saver for the NHS. TD The Doctor Who Gave Up Drugs BBC One, 9.00pm; Scotland, 10.45pm Dr Chris van Tulleken continues his crusade against the over-medication of children. Tonight, he explores why so many young people are prescribed anti-depressants, and becomes suspicious over the rise in babies diagnosed with cow’s milk allergy. TD Love in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm “The nearest gay scene for me is Belfast,” says cattle farmer Richard, a problem seeing as he lives a three-hour ferry ride away in remote Dumfries and Galloway. Not to be defeated, Richard invites three potential partners to his farm. TD Carry On Brussels Channel 4, 10.00pm More shenanigans from behind the doors of the European Parliament. We meet lone Liberal Democrat MEP Catherine Bearder, whose staunch pro-Europe stance lands her in trouble with Brexit minister David Davis. TD Miranda Barbour: Serial Killer or Liar? BBC One, 10.45pm; Northern Ireland, 11.40pm; Scotland, 11.45pm; Wales, 11.05pm This gripping true crime documentary charts the case of teenage murderer Miranda Barbour. The young mother admitted killing internet date Troy La Ferarra but later confessed to a further 22 murders as part of a Satanic cult. TD Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt Netflix, from today This snappy sitcom about a cult escapee in the big city has proved a delight. A shame, then, that this fourth season is to be its last, with the first six episodes launching today and the remainder to come later this year. Kimmy’s (Ellie Kemper) new job at a tech start-up proves ripe for nerd-baiting satire. TD Big Sky, Big Dreams, Big Art: Made in the USA BBC Four, 9.00pm Presenter Waldemar Januszczak swaps the vastness of the Wild West featured in last week’s episode for the “pulsing, futuristic excitement of the American city”, as his fascinating series on American art continues. He starts out amid the skyscrapers of New York, explaining how the vaulting architecture of the Chrysler Building exemplified the hope and ambition of the burgeoning metropolis. We then move on to the Great Depression, presaged by artists such as Thomas Hart Benton in his restless murals of urban life. TD Great Expectations (1946, b/w) ★★★★★ BBC Two, 12.35pm David Lean’s peerless version of Dickens’s novel is packed with memorable moments, from its opening scenes on the marshes, where Pip first meets the escaped convict Magwitch, to the enduring images of Miss Havisham’s house… not forgetting Pip’s boxing match with Herbert Pocket. John Mills is twice the age of the book’s Pip, but there’s a subtle ingenuousness in his performance. Rebecca (1940, b/w) ★★★★★ Talking Pictures TV, 9.00pm One of Hitchcock’s most disconcerting and finest films was adapted from a Daphne du Maurier story, though he departed from the text in many ways. A bride (Joan Fontaine) is haunted by the memory of her husband’s (Laurence Olivier) dead first wife. The excellent cast (Judith Anderson as formidable housekeeper Mrs Danvers is a particular highlight) adds class to this eerily suspenseful treat. Inglourious Basterds (2009) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 10.00pm It wasn’t quite the masterpiece we were told to expect, but Quentin Tarantino’s pastiche of war films and spaghetti westerns is still rollicking good fun and has all the ingredients of a classic Tarantino film. A celebration of vengeance, it’s an audacious take on the Second World War. Christoph Waltz deservedly won an Oscar for his incendiary turn as the “Jew Hunter”. Brad Pitt also stars. Thursday 31 May Humans Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm This third series of the thoughtful British science-fiction drama continues to benefit from a narrowing of focus; the big-name American actors and slightly strained global perspective have gone, but the thematic ambition has been retained. Less wilfully obscure than Sky Atlantic’s Westworld and considerably more affecting, Humans instead keeps a tight focus on emotion and relationships, whether the characters concerned are flesh and blood or gears and circuits. It can be heavy-handed with the allegories, certainly, but it’s never chilling or humourless – and leading synth performers Gemma Chan, Ivanno Jeremiah and Emily Berrington are as uncanny as ever. Mark Bonnar, too, is proving a handy addition to the cast as Neil, Laura’s (a brilliant Katherine Parkinson) professional antagonist and love interest – Bonnar’s history of playing characters with shifting loyalties comes in handy as Neil first opens his heart and then hardens his stance on the Dryden Commission. Mia (Chan), meanwhile, is on a one-synth mission to demonstrate coexistence is possible by moving into a hostile housing estate, and Leo (Colin Morgan) struggles with the realities of being human. GT Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm This week begins with chocolate puddings, which means the contestants are challenged to rustle up black forest gateaux and a dessert integrating a root vegetable, then aubergines and tofu take centre stage before the elimination round and an oriental classic. GT Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm Hollings and their “British chophouse classics” square up to an Italian-influenced brand serving fresh pasta from a cheese wheel, as Fred Sireix and a group of high-street investors gauge their potential. GT Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm Now with a Bafta award under its belt, this fine series follows the West Midlands Ambulance Service over the last Saturday night before Christmas. An inevitably busy period is made harder by a major traffic accident in central Birmingham – an incident which puts tremendous mental and physical demands on the crews, documented here with the clarity and honesty we’ve come to expect from the series. GT Great Art ITV, 10.50pm; not STV Tim Marlow takes a tour of the Royal Academy’s sell-out exhibition of the Parisian artist’s portraits, in the process assessing the man’s life, work, and reputation as “the father of modern art”. GT Urban Myths: Sex Pistols vs Bill Grundy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This pop cultural landmark, in which punk pioneers Sex Pistols grumbled, swore and generally misbehaved on Bill Grundy’s sleepily complacent regional chat-show, creating a national storm of outrage in the process, arguably received its definitive tribute from Kevin Eldon in 2013. The comedian’s loving reconstruction of the event imagined the Pistols as Amish people and bordered on performance art. Still, this gleefully silly take on the infamous encounter between the jobbing broadcaster (Steve Pemberton) and the Sex Pistols (played by members of the National Youth Theatre) is a lot of fun. GT Barry Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The eponymous depressed hitman (Bill Hader) tries to go it alone, only to be thwarted by his reckless partner Taylor (Dale Pavinski) and ructions among members of his acting class. GT Billion Dollar Brain (1967) ★★★★☆ Film4, 5.00pm Michael Caine returns as the reluctant secret agent Harry Palmer (The Ipcress File, Funeral in Berlin) in this film from Ken Russell, based on the novels by Len Deighton. Having left the British Secret Service to pursue a career as a private investigator, Palmer stumbles into a plot to overthrow Communism with the help of a supercomputer. But who is working for whom? It’s far-fetched but fun. Johnny Mnemonic (1995) ★★☆☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm Fresh from the rubber-burning success of Speed and four short years before The Matrix, Keanu Reeves starred in this high-concept dystopian adventure as the eponymous anti-hero – a 21st-century courier whose augmented brain is used to transport illicit data – that very nearly ruined his career. It’s adapted by cyberpunk godfather William Gibson from his own story. Munich (2005) ★★★☆☆ AMC, 12.50am Eric Bana stars in Steven Spielberg’s audacious, if lengthy, examination of the Israel-Palestine conflict. Set in 1972, it adroitly tackles the aftermath of the massacre of 11 Israeli Olympic athletes at the Munich Olympics. Bana plays a Mossad agent charged with hunting down the extremists who planned the Munich attack. Some of the rhetoric is clumsy, but the film-makers strive to be politically even-handed. Friday 1 June Tracey Breaks the News: Ullman as Michael Gove Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm After losing her to the USA for 30 years, Tracey Ullman’s return to our shores two years ago has reminded us of her unparalleled talents as an impressionist. She captures the physicality of her famous subjects – Angela Merkel and Judi Dench are standouts – as well as their voices, and hats off to Ullman’s prosthetics teams for her remarkable transformations. After an acting stint in last year’s Howards End, Ullman returns to her comfort zone tonight with a second series of the topical sketch comedy show in which she skewers politicians, mostly – although we’ll also be treated to more of Ben Miller’s scene-stealing Rupert Murdoch, with Ullman as Jerry Hall. Although no preview tape was available due to last-minute filming, Ullman was pictured as Michael Gove in promotional material and has also promised impressions of Jeremy Corbyn and Jacob Rees-Mogg. The previous series attracted criticism for weak writing, and some skits do lack bite, but slack should be cut – it’s a notoriously difficult format to pull off. Ullman’s gift for mimicry means she hits the mark often enough for the show to be a welcome bit of light satire to wind up the week. VP Extreme Wales with Richard Parks BBC Two, 7.30pm Tonight’s final episode of Richard Parks’s adventure programme combines extreme sports with lush panoramas of the Welsh landscape. Daredevil Parks takes to the skies on a paramotor – nothing more than a parachute connected to a fan-like motor – to propel him the length of the country. VP The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Fugitive immigrant Taariq Shirazi (Alexander Behrang Keshtkar) makes a desperate bid to flee as the Scandi-noir crime series continues. When Saga (Sofia Helin) and Henrik (Thure Lindhardt) track him down, however, Saga’s inability to tell a lie has serious consequences. VP Friday Night Dinner Channel 4, 10.00pm This sitcom’s family squabbles are more uncomfortably familiar than laugh-out-loud funny in tonight’s penultimate visit to the Goodmans’ home. Writer Robert Popper capitalises on Simon Bird’s musical skills by having his character, Adam, reluctantly play the violin to cheer up Grandma. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm; Ethan Hawke, Toni Collette, Jo Brand and Aidan Turner offer their funniest anecdotes tonight. Plus, Liam Payne continues his post-One Direction solo career with a performance his new single, Familiar. VP The Everly Brothers: Harmonies from Heaven BBC Four, 9.00pm Art Garfunkel, Keith Richards and Graham Nash are among the luminaries paying tribute to Don and Phil Everly in this 2016 documentary, all of them claiming the brothers as an influence. Surviving sibling Don Everly returns to Iowa to recount the brothers’ first appearances, their pivotal move to Nashville and stardom in the late Fifties. Africa: A Journey into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm So much of the music we listen to has its roots in African music. In this new three-part documentary series, London DJ Rita Ray sets off to explore the continent’s influence. Kicking off her journey in Nigeria, Ray stumbles across impromptu drumming ceremonies in the streets as she explores the importance of rhythm in the country’s music and meets its major players. Future episodes take her to Mali and South Africa. VP Crocodile Dundee (1986) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.10pm Mick “Crocodile” Dundee (Paul Hogan), a bushman from northern Australia, is a dab hand at surviving in the Outback. But when he is invited to New York City by Sue Charlton (Linda Kozlowski), a high-class reporter, in this Oscar-nominated comedy drama, he finds life far tougher in the urban jungle. He’s a survivor though: muggers who accost Dundee discover that he has a bigger knife than they do. American Made (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Doug Liman directs Tom Cruise in this lively, madcap real-life tale of pilot, drug smuggler and CIA gun-runner Barry Seal, whose supersonic, if lawless, career path began, according to this script, when he was a bored TWA pilot in 1978 and was approached out of the blue by a CIA handler (Domhnall Gleeson, all greasy persuasion) to conduct reconnaissance flights across the Caribbean. GoodFellas (1990) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm Martin Scorsese’s Mafia masterpiece, adapted from a non-fiction book, has all the qualities of great cinema: it’s thrilling, it’s provocative, it’s stylish, and it’s got a young Robert De Niro in it. Ray Liotta plays the youngster who longs to be a gangster; De Niro and Joe Pesci are in the Mob. Pesci’s mother, meanwhile, reportedly asked him if he had to swear quite so much – the f-word is used 300 times. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
Manchester United have been awarded a place in the restructured Women’s Super League after launching their first professional female team, but there was anger in the North East after Sunderland were kicked out of the top two divisions. Former England defender, Casey Stoney, is expected to be confirmed as Manchester United women’s first manager, leaving her current role as assistant to former Red Devils defender Phil Neville with the national team in the next few days. Stoney played more than 100 times for England and is widely regarded as one of the brightest coaching prospects in the women’s game after being head-hunted by Neville when he became England manager in February. United, who will start in the second tier, have been heavily criticised in the past for failing to embrace the women’s game, even though they have run a successful academy which has produced several international players. The decision to apply for a place in the WSL was made by Manchester United’s Executive Vice Chairman, Ed Woodward after watching Manchester City turn into one of the main players in the women’s game. How the divisions shape up for 2018/19 | Man Utd feature in the second tier City, along with Chelsea, who won the double last season, have been the dominant forces in women’s football in recent years, but United are determined to challenge their duopoly and will look to recruit some high-profile players over the summer with a competitive budget, thought to be in the region of £5m. “The board is delighted that the FA has approved the application,” Woodward told the club’s official website. “The new women’s team will build on the success of the Girls’ Regional Talent Club and have the same philosophy as all Manchester United sides, creating a pathway from academy to first team. “We will be making some exciting announcements in the coming days and weeks. Starting a professional team from scratch is challenging but rewarding and we will make every effort to provide the support and experience for the new women’s team to be successful and to uphold the fine traditions of our great club.” However, the creation of the new two tier Premier League structure has not been without controversy after Sunderland Ladies, who finished seventh in the top division last season, were denied a place in either of the two restructured leagues, despite applying to continue in the second tier. Sunderland’s place in the Premier League has been given to West Ham, who along with Brighton, are the new arrivals into the 11 team elite group. That means there will be no teams located north of Manchester in the Premier League next season, with just two, Durham Women and Doncaster Belles, in the Championship. “Sunderland have been offered a place in tier 3 and we are waiting to hear back from them as to whether they will be accepting that offer,” said Katie Brazier, the FA’s Head of Women’s Leagues and Competitions. “There are clubs who will be disappointed with the decisions that have been made and they have 14 days to appeal if they want to challenge it. “Sunderland were given the first opportunity, as an existing WSL1 club to apply for a place last year, but they were one of three clubs who declined to do so, which meant they no longer had preferred bidder status. “I think that was down to the ongoing uncertainty regarding the ownership of the club. They did subsequently apply in the open bidding process, but they were up against a number of other clubs who have a firm commitment, both in terms of investment and resources, to grow the women’s game. Unfortunately, there were stronger bids.” Casey Stoney is expected to take over as Manchester United Women's manager Credit: Getty Images Sources have told Telegraph Sport that Sunderland are likely to appeal before they decide whether to accept a place in the third division. The decision to reject Sunderland’s application for a place in the tier two looks even stranger when Yeovil, who finished bottom, scoring just two goals, will remain in the elite group after raising £350,000 last year to stand on a firm financial footing. Economic security has played a big part in the FA’s decision-making process and is also believed to have been the reason why Brighton were named in the top division ahead of Doncaster Belles, even though the Yorkshire club finished above them last season. Crystal Palace, who had also applied for a place in the expanded, two division set up, are also likely to appeal, although it is Sunderland who appear to have the best chances of success. Seven of Neville’s Lionesses, including star player Lucy Bronze and captain Steph Houghton, began their careers at Sunderland, but they have been in trouble since ties were severed with the men’s club. They are no longer allowed to train at the Academy of Light and were forced to play their home games at South Shields FC last season. Nevertheless, Sunderland had still hoped to at least secure a place in the Championship, which has grown from 10 to 12 sides, welcoming Sheffield United, who will compete with their already established city neighbours Sheffield FC. Other newcomers include Charlton, who beat Blackburn in Sunday’s third-tier promotion play-off final, Leicester City, Lewes, as well as Manchester United. Baroness Sue Campbell, the FA’s head of women’s football, said: “The revised competition structure will positively impact on the delivery of the women’s game across all levels, both on and off the pitch.”
Manchester United awarded place in the restructured Women’s Super League - but Sunderland's omission sparks anger
Manchester United have been awarded a place in the restructured Women’s Super League after launching their first professional female team, but there was anger in the North East after Sunderland were kicked out of the top two divisions. Former England defender, Casey Stoney, is expected to be confirmed as Manchester United women’s first manager, leaving her current role as assistant to former Red Devils defender Phil Neville with the national team in the next few days. Stoney played more than 100 times for England and is widely regarded as one of the brightest coaching prospects in the women’s game after being head-hunted by Neville when he became England manager in February. United, who will start in the second tier, have been heavily criticised in the past for failing to embrace the women’s game, even though they have run a successful academy which has produced several international players. The decision to apply for a place in the WSL was made by Manchester United’s Executive Vice Chairman, Ed Woodward after watching Manchester City turn into one of the main players in the women’s game. How the divisions shape up for 2018/19 | Man Utd feature in the second tier City, along with Chelsea, who won the double last season, have been the dominant forces in women’s football in recent years, but United are determined to challenge their duopoly and will look to recruit some high-profile players over the summer with a competitive budget, thought to be in the region of £5m. “The board is delighted that the FA has approved the application,” Woodward told the club’s official website. “The new women’s team will build on the success of the Girls’ Regional Talent Club and have the same philosophy as all Manchester United sides, creating a pathway from academy to first team. “We will be making some exciting announcements in the coming days and weeks. Starting a professional team from scratch is challenging but rewarding and we will make every effort to provide the support and experience for the new women’s team to be successful and to uphold the fine traditions of our great club.” However, the creation of the new two tier Premier League structure has not been without controversy after Sunderland Ladies, who finished seventh in the top division last season, were denied a place in either of the two restructured leagues, despite applying to continue in the second tier. Sunderland’s place in the Premier League has been given to West Ham, who along with Brighton, are the new arrivals into the 11 team elite group. That means there will be no teams located north of Manchester in the Premier League next season, with just two, Durham Women and Doncaster Belles, in the Championship. “Sunderland have been offered a place in tier 3 and we are waiting to hear back from them as to whether they will be accepting that offer,” said Katie Brazier, the FA’s Head of Women’s Leagues and Competitions. “There are clubs who will be disappointed with the decisions that have been made and they have 14 days to appeal if they want to challenge it. “Sunderland were given the first opportunity, as an existing WSL1 club to apply for a place last year, but they were one of three clubs who declined to do so, which meant they no longer had preferred bidder status. “I think that was down to the ongoing uncertainty regarding the ownership of the club. They did subsequently apply in the open bidding process, but they were up against a number of other clubs who have a firm commitment, both in terms of investment and resources, to grow the women’s game. Unfortunately, there were stronger bids.” Casey Stoney is expected to take over as Manchester United Women's manager Credit: Getty Images Sources have told Telegraph Sport that Sunderland are likely to appeal before they decide whether to accept a place in the third division. The decision to reject Sunderland’s application for a place in the tier two looks even stranger when Yeovil, who finished bottom, scoring just two goals, will remain in the elite group after raising £350,000 last year to stand on a firm financial footing. Economic security has played a big part in the FA’s decision-making process and is also believed to have been the reason why Brighton were named in the top division ahead of Doncaster Belles, even though the Yorkshire club finished above them last season. Crystal Palace, who had also applied for a place in the expanded, two division set up, are also likely to appeal, although it is Sunderland who appear to have the best chances of success. Seven of Neville’s Lionesses, including star player Lucy Bronze and captain Steph Houghton, began their careers at Sunderland, but they have been in trouble since ties were severed with the men’s club. They are no longer allowed to train at the Academy of Light and were forced to play their home games at South Shields FC last season. Nevertheless, Sunderland had still hoped to at least secure a place in the Championship, which has grown from 10 to 12 sides, welcoming Sheffield United, who will compete with their already established city neighbours Sheffield FC. Other newcomers include Charlton, who beat Blackburn in Sunday’s third-tier promotion play-off final, Leicester City, Lewes, as well as Manchester United. Baroness Sue Campbell, the FA’s head of women’s football, said: “The revised competition structure will positively impact on the delivery of the women’s game across all levels, both on and off the pitch.”
Manchester United have been awarded a place in the restructured Women’s Super League after launching their first professional female team, but there was anger in the North East after Sunderland were kicked out of the top two divisions. Former England defender, Casey Stoney, is expected to be confirmed as Manchester United women’s first manager, leaving her current role as assistant to former Red Devils defender Phil Neville with the national team in the next few days. Stoney played more than 100 times for England and is widely regarded as one of the brightest coaching prospects in the women’s game after being head-hunted by Neville when he became England manager in February. United, who will start in the second tier, have been heavily criticised in the past for failing to embrace the women’s game, even though they have run a successful academy which has produced several international players. The decision to apply for a place in the WSL was made by Manchester United’s Executive Vice Chairman, Ed Woodward after watching Manchester City turn into one of the main players in the women’s game. How the divisions shape up for 2018/19 | Man Utd feature in the second tier City, along with Chelsea, who won the double last season, have been the dominant forces in women’s football in recent years, but United are determined to challenge their duopoly and will look to recruit some high-profile players over the summer with a competitive budget, thought to be in the region of £5m. “The board is delighted that the FA has approved the application,” Woodward told the club’s official website. “The new women’s team will build on the success of the Girls’ Regional Talent Club and have the same philosophy as all Manchester United sides, creating a pathway from academy to first team. “We will be making some exciting announcements in the coming days and weeks. Starting a professional team from scratch is challenging but rewarding and we will make every effort to provide the support and experience for the new women’s team to be successful and to uphold the fine traditions of our great club.” However, the creation of the new two tier Premier League structure has not been without controversy after Sunderland Ladies, who finished seventh in the top division last season, were denied a place in either of the two restructured leagues, despite applying to continue in the second tier. Sunderland’s place in the Premier League has been given to West Ham, who along with Brighton, are the new arrivals into the 11 team elite group. That means there will be no teams located north of Manchester in the Premier League next season, with just two, Durham Women and Doncaster Belles, in the Championship. “Sunderland have been offered a place in tier 3 and we are waiting to hear back from them as to whether they will be accepting that offer,” said Katie Brazier, the FA’s Head of Women’s Leagues and Competitions. “There are clubs who will be disappointed with the decisions that have been made and they have 14 days to appeal if they want to challenge it. “Sunderland were given the first opportunity, as an existing WSL1 club to apply for a place last year, but they were one of three clubs who declined to do so, which meant they no longer had preferred bidder status. “I think that was down to the ongoing uncertainty regarding the ownership of the club. They did subsequently apply in the open bidding process, but they were up against a number of other clubs who have a firm commitment, both in terms of investment and resources, to grow the women’s game. Unfortunately, there were stronger bids.” Casey Stoney is expected to take over as Manchester United Women's manager Credit: Getty Images Sources have told Telegraph Sport that Sunderland are likely to appeal before they decide whether to accept a place in the third division. The decision to reject Sunderland’s application for a place in the tier two looks even stranger when Yeovil, who finished bottom, scoring just two goals, will remain in the elite group after raising £350,000 last year to stand on a firm financial footing. Economic security has played a big part in the FA’s decision-making process and is also believed to have been the reason why Brighton were named in the top division ahead of Doncaster Belles, even though the Yorkshire club finished above them last season. Crystal Palace, who had also applied for a place in the expanded, two division set up, are also likely to appeal, although it is Sunderland who appear to have the best chances of success. Seven of Neville’s Lionesses, including star player Lucy Bronze and captain Steph Houghton, began their careers at Sunderland, but they have been in trouble since ties were severed with the men’s club. They are no longer allowed to train at the Academy of Light and were forced to play their home games at South Shields FC last season. Nevertheless, Sunderland had still hoped to at least secure a place in the Championship, which has grown from 10 to 12 sides, welcoming Sheffield United, who will compete with their already established city neighbours Sheffield FC. Other newcomers include Charlton, who beat Blackburn in Sunday’s third-tier promotion play-off final, Leicester City, Lewes, as well as Manchester United. Baroness Sue Campbell, the FA’s head of women’s football, said: “The revised competition structure will positively impact on the delivery of the women’s game across all levels, both on and off the pitch.”
Manchester United awarded place in the restructured Women’s Super League - but Sunderland's omission sparks anger
Manchester United have been awarded a place in the restructured Women’s Super League after launching their first professional female team, but there was anger in the North East after Sunderland were kicked out of the top two divisions. Former England defender, Casey Stoney, is expected to be confirmed as Manchester United women’s first manager, leaving her current role as assistant to former Red Devils defender Phil Neville with the national team in the next few days. Stoney played more than 100 times for England and is widely regarded as one of the brightest coaching prospects in the women’s game after being head-hunted by Neville when he became England manager in February. United, who will start in the second tier, have been heavily criticised in the past for failing to embrace the women’s game, even though they have run a successful academy which has produced several international players. The decision to apply for a place in the WSL was made by Manchester United’s Executive Vice Chairman, Ed Woodward after watching Manchester City turn into one of the main players in the women’s game. How the divisions shape up for 2018/19 | Man Utd feature in the second tier City, along with Chelsea, who won the double last season, have been the dominant forces in women’s football in recent years, but United are determined to challenge their duopoly and will look to recruit some high-profile players over the summer with a competitive budget, thought to be in the region of £5m. “The board is delighted that the FA has approved the application,” Woodward told the club’s official website. “The new women’s team will build on the success of the Girls’ Regional Talent Club and have the same philosophy as all Manchester United sides, creating a pathway from academy to first team. “We will be making some exciting announcements in the coming days and weeks. Starting a professional team from scratch is challenging but rewarding and we will make every effort to provide the support and experience for the new women’s team to be successful and to uphold the fine traditions of our great club.” However, the creation of the new two tier Premier League structure has not been without controversy after Sunderland Ladies, who finished seventh in the top division last season, were denied a place in either of the two restructured leagues, despite applying to continue in the second tier. Sunderland’s place in the Premier League has been given to West Ham, who along with Brighton, are the new arrivals into the 11 team elite group. That means there will be no teams located north of Manchester in the Premier League next season, with just two, Durham Women and Doncaster Belles, in the Championship. “Sunderland have been offered a place in tier 3 and we are waiting to hear back from them as to whether they will be accepting that offer,” said Katie Brazier, the FA’s Head of Women’s Leagues and Competitions. “There are clubs who will be disappointed with the decisions that have been made and they have 14 days to appeal if they want to challenge it. “Sunderland were given the first opportunity, as an existing WSL1 club to apply for a place last year, but they were one of three clubs who declined to do so, which meant they no longer had preferred bidder status. “I think that was down to the ongoing uncertainty regarding the ownership of the club. They did subsequently apply in the open bidding process, but they were up against a number of other clubs who have a firm commitment, both in terms of investment and resources, to grow the women’s game. Unfortunately, there were stronger bids.” Casey Stoney is expected to take over as Manchester United Women's manager Credit: Getty Images Sources have told Telegraph Sport that Sunderland are likely to appeal before they decide whether to accept a place in the third division. The decision to reject Sunderland’s application for a place in the tier two looks even stranger when Yeovil, who finished bottom, scoring just two goals, will remain in the elite group after raising £350,000 last year to stand on a firm financial footing. Economic security has played a big part in the FA’s decision-making process and is also believed to have been the reason why Brighton were named in the top division ahead of Doncaster Belles, even though the Yorkshire club finished above them last season. Crystal Palace, who had also applied for a place in the expanded, two division set up, are also likely to appeal, although it is Sunderland who appear to have the best chances of success. Seven of Neville’s Lionesses, including star player Lucy Bronze and captain Steph Houghton, began their careers at Sunderland, but they have been in trouble since ties were severed with the men’s club. They are no longer allowed to train at the Academy of Light and were forced to play their home games at South Shields FC last season. Nevertheless, Sunderland had still hoped to at least secure a place in the Championship, which has grown from 10 to 12 sides, welcoming Sheffield United, who will compete with their already established city neighbours Sheffield FC. Other newcomers include Charlton, who beat Blackburn in Sunday’s third-tier promotion play-off final, Leicester City, Lewes, as well as Manchester United. Baroness Sue Campbell, the FA’s head of women’s football, said: “The revised competition structure will positively impact on the delivery of the women’s game across all levels, both on and off the pitch.”
Monday 28 May King Lear BBC Two, 9.30pm Talk about event TV: After making movie magic in Howards End and The Remains of the Day, Anthony Hopkins and Emma Thompson, are reunited in Shakespeare’s tragedy, King Lear, under the direction of Richard Eyre. Plus they have a stellar supporting cast, that includes Jim Broadbent, Emily Watson and Andrew Scott. Eyre sets this version in a fictional modern-day and moves the action between castles and modern locales, such as a rundown shopping precinct, to keep it contemporary. Hopkins is on great form as Lear – his old king seems to be suffering from dementia from the start, making sense of his rashness in disinheriting youngest daughter Cordelia (Florence Pugh), of him kissing another, Regan (Watson), full on the lips, and of failing to recognise other loved ones. Eyre has cut the play judiciously and brings an interesting take on Lear – that it’s about flawed parenting – that offers some insight into the behaviour of his children. Ultimately, however, it’s about Lear’s tragedy, not theirs, and Hopkins delivers a barnstorming central performance. Having played the role more than 30 years ago at the National Theatre, he’s truly grown into it. VP Richard Osman’s House of Games BBC Two, 6.00pm Pointless’s scene-stealing sidekick Richard Osman gets his moment to shine as quizmaster of this trivia contest, returning for a five-night run with BBC Breakfast’s Naga Munchetty among those competing. It’s followed by a new series of game show Curious Creatures, hosted by Kate Humble. VP Britain’s Got Talent ITV, 7.30pm Declan Donnelly flies solo as host of the semi-finals, airing nightly up to next weekend’s final. Each evening, eight of the 40 acts will perform again in the hope of becoming one of two promoted to the final by the voting public. The results are at 9.30pm. VP Springwatch 2018 BBC Two, 8.00pm Cute footage of hatchlings and deft presenting by Chris Packham and Michaela Strachan provide a winning formula for this three-week wildlife extravaganza. Gillian Burke returns, this time as a roving reporter, with Steve Backshall the first of the guests replacing the much-missed Martin Hughes-Games. VP Peter Kay’s Car Share: The Finale BBC One, 10.00pm Bowing to fan pressure, Peter Kay offers closure with this finale to his charming comedy about supermarket employees sharing the journey to and from work. Laughs and surprises abound on John and Kayleigh’s (Kay and Sian Gibson) last jaunt, but will romance ensue? VP The Vicar of Dibley Gold, 7.40pm Here’s a chance to revisit the last-ever episode of Richard Curtis’s sitcom, which delivers a fairy-tale finale for Geraldine Granger (Dawn French) when she marries Harry (Richard Armitage). Hugh Bonneville makes an amusing cameo as a lovesick vicar in the episode that also showcases French’s chemistry with the late Emma Chambers, who played daft Alice Tinker. VP Nigel Kennedy at the Biggest Weekend BBC Four, 8.30pm The BBC’s music festival welcomes maverick violinist Nigel Kennedy to Coventry’s War Memorial Park. Suzy Klein and Lloyd Coleman present as Kennedy performs his inimitable renditions of Vivaldi and Jimi Hendrix with the BBC Concert Orchestra. VP WestWorld Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm As part of her master plan, Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood) appears to be taking control over Bernard (Jeffrey Wright) in this episode of the futuristic drama and his confusion grows. VP Over the Hedge (2006) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.25am An endearing animated adventure about a group of forest creatures that, on waking after their winter hibernation, discover humans have moved in next door to them. Apprehension gives way to curiosity and excitement as they discover what the humans have to offer. Featuring the voices of Bruce Willis, Steve Carell and Avril Lavigne, among others, it’s an enjoyable movie with a message – but avoids getting too preachy. Sing Street (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Young love is set to an Eighties beat in this delightful coming-of-age tale. As with all of John Carney’s films (i.e. 2006 hit Once), the message is clear: where there is music, there is hope. The film rattles along to a cracking soundtrack – The Jam, Motörhead, The Cure – as young Conor (Ferdia Walsh-Peelo) chaotically tries to put together a band to impress a girl at school. Brideshead Revisited (2008) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.25pm In the light of the 1981 TV version of Evelyn Waugh’s novel, you do have to admire the chutzpah of anyone else giving Brideshead a go. Julian Jarrold’s attempt suffers from a desire to force modern conventions upon a story defined by the mores of upper-class interwar Britain. Hayley Atwell and Ben Whishaw are the Flyte siblings, but Catholicism, the tale’s engine, is only pernicious, never seductive. Tuesday 29 May Arrested Development Grammar Schools: Who Will Get In? BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Few education issues are as contentious in this country as that of grammar schools, with Prime Minister Theresa May among those supporting their return. This thought-provoking three-part documentary focusing on the London borough of Bexley, where each year over 5,000 children sit the selective exam for one of the area’s four grammar schools, could not, therefore, have come at a better time. We hear from both sides of the debate and are shown both the benefits and drawbacks of attending either a grammar or secondary modern school – although, as always, it’s the parents and children who make the most notable contributions. “If you want your child to become better in their future life, it’s good to go to a grammar school,” says one mother, who works long hours for minimum wage and pays £300 a month for a tutor for her daughter. Meanwhile, another, herself the product of a grammar school, despairs of the increasing parental competitiveness. And, for all the film-makers’ admirably even-handed approach, it’s the stress felt by the children that makes the biggest mark, with one youngster noting: “I don’t think grammar school is fair because people are far too young to feel they’ve failed.” SH Emmerdale ITV, 7.00pm Emmerdale confronts the difficult subject of child abuse when Charity Dingle (Emma Atkins) opens up about her past in this special flashback episode. Last November a similar technique was used, to great effect, to shed light on her cousin Cain’s experiences. Mica Proctor, in another triumph of casting, plays the young Charity. SH The Split BBC One, 9.00pm Abi Morgan’s enjoyable family saga comes to a climax with scores settled, decisions made and reconciliations all over the place. It works not least because Morgan never forgets that one person’s happy ending is another’s poisoned chalice, meaning there’s pain amid the laughter. SH The Battle for Britain’s Heroes Channel 4, 9.00pm “Our heroes often have a toxic past,” says Afua Hirsch at the start of this captivating and provocative film. She pulls no punches in her look at the darker side of our history, exploring slavery, racism and colonialism, in a film certain to enrage as many people as it informs. SH 4 Men, 175 Babies: Britain’s Super Sperm Donors Channel 4, 10.00pm This film follows men who donate their sperm for free, via unregulated websites. But why? “Being a sperm donor is like being a Samaritan,” says 61-year-old Clive, who began donating once he retired. SH Arrested Development Netflix, from today For anyone who didn’t watch the patchy fourth series of this popular Emmy-winning comedy about a rich family who lose their wealth, the good news is that you can pick up this new series with no problem. The bad news for those that did watch it is that this opening episode spends ages rehashing past events. Thankfully things do settle down – and become very funny – as we find out what happened after the infamous punch that George Michael (Michael Cera) landed on his father Michael (Jason Bateman). A proper return to form. SH Master of Photography Sky Arts, 8.00pm The international photography contest returns for a third series, with Oliviero Toscani joined on the judging panel by curator Mark Sealy and the New Yorker’s Elisabeth Biondi. Here’s hoping that this series avoids the problems of last year, which saw contestant Souvid Datta accused of plagiarism. SH All Creatures Great and Small (1975) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.45pm Simon Ward and a pre-Silence of the Lambs Anthony Hopkins star as Yorkshire vets James Herriot and Siegfried Farnon in this gentle drama set in the Thirties and based on the first two books of British vet Alf Wight (who wrote under the pseudonym of Herriot). The TV series that followed remains most memorable, but there’s warm-hearted performances here too. Operation Petticoat (1959) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.25pm A beguiling Second World War comedy directed by Blake Edwards and starring Cary Grant as a submarine captain with a strict sense of order and a rule-breaking hustler of a first officer (Tony Curtis). The vessel is bombed by the Japanese, but that’s the least of its worries. Five nurses in distress, a goat and a coating of pink paint all pose challenges for the effortlessly funny crew. The Enforcer (1976) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 11.00pm Clint Eastwood’s Harry Callahan is teamed up with rookie female partner Kate Moore (Tyne Daly) in this entertaining but ultimately disappointing third chapter of the Dirty Harry series. Together they battle violent eco-terrorists who have kidnapped the mayor of San Francisco (John Crawford) while, between the gun battles, cynical Callahan attempts to come to terms with his own male chauvinism. Wednesday 30 May Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt The Big Crash Diet Experiment BBC One, 8.00pm Is it time to rethink our attitude to crash dieting? That’s the question posed by tonight’s revealing documentary, which assesses the health impact of this extreme approach to weight loss. Our guide is Dr Javid Abdelmoneim, who along with a raft of health professionals, aims to challenge orthodox beliefs about what some see as nutritionally inadequate eating regimes with only short-term benefits. Abdelmoneim persuades four obese volunteers to give up the food that they love and opt for a scary-sounding liquid-only intake of soups and shakes, using scans and blood tests to monitor them over nine weeks. Each of the group has their fair share of weight-related issues. Portly Catholic priest Paul, for example, has been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, takeaway fan Rebecca believes that she’s in the grip of a fast-food addiction, and secret binge-eater Yolande already has fatty liver disease. Watching them tackle the programme and shed the pounds is admirable enough, but even more striking is the positive effect that the diet has on their health. In fact, the implications of the results could be a huge money saver for the NHS. TD The Doctor Who Gave Up Drugs BBC One, 9.00pm; Scotland, 10.45pm Dr Chris van Tulleken continues his crusade against the over-medication of children. Tonight, he explores why so many young people are prescribed anti-depressants, and becomes suspicious over the rise in babies diagnosed with cow’s milk allergy. TD Love in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm “The nearest gay scene for me is Belfast,” says cattle farmer Richard, a problem seeing as he lives a three-hour ferry ride away in remote Dumfries and Galloway. Not to be defeated, Richard invites three potential partners to his farm. TD Carry On Brussels Channel 4, 10.00pm More shenanigans from behind the doors of the European Parliament. We meet lone Liberal Democrat MEP Catherine Bearder, whose staunch pro-Europe stance lands her in trouble with Brexit minister David Davis. TD Miranda Barbour: Serial Killer or Liar? BBC One, 10.45pm; Northern Ireland, 11.40pm; Scotland, 11.45pm; Wales, 11.05pm This gripping true crime documentary charts the case of teenage murderer Miranda Barbour. The young mother admitted killing internet date Troy La Ferarra but later confessed to a further 22 murders as part of a Satanic cult. TD Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt Netflix, from today This snappy sitcom about a cult escapee in the big city has proved a delight. A shame, then, that this fourth season is to be its last, with the first six episodes launching today and the remainder to come later this year. Kimmy’s (Ellie Kemper) new job at a tech start-up proves ripe for nerd-baiting satire. TD Big Sky, Big Dreams, Big Art: Made in the USA BBC Four, 9.00pm Presenter Waldemar Januszczak swaps the vastness of the Wild West featured in last week’s episode for the “pulsing, futuristic excitement of the American city”, as his fascinating series on American art continues. He starts out amid the skyscrapers of New York, explaining how the vaulting architecture of the Chrysler Building exemplified the hope and ambition of the burgeoning metropolis. We then move on to the Great Depression, presaged by artists such as Thomas Hart Benton in his restless murals of urban life. TD Great Expectations (1946, b/w) ★★★★★ BBC Two, 12.35pm David Lean’s peerless version of Dickens’s novel is packed with memorable moments, from its opening scenes on the marshes, where Pip first meets the escaped convict Magwitch, to the enduring images of Miss Havisham’s house… not forgetting Pip’s boxing match with Herbert Pocket. John Mills is twice the age of the book’s Pip, but there’s a subtle ingenuousness in his performance. Rebecca (1940, b/w) ★★★★★ Talking Pictures TV, 9.00pm One of Hitchcock’s most disconcerting and finest films was adapted from a Daphne du Maurier story, though he departed from the text in many ways. A bride (Joan Fontaine) is haunted by the memory of her husband’s (Laurence Olivier) dead first wife. The excellent cast (Judith Anderson as formidable housekeeper Mrs Danvers is a particular highlight) adds class to this eerily suspenseful treat. Inglourious Basterds (2009) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 10.00pm It wasn’t quite the masterpiece we were told to expect, but Quentin Tarantino’s pastiche of war films and spaghetti westerns is still rollicking good fun and has all the ingredients of a classic Tarantino film. A celebration of vengeance, it’s an audacious take on the Second World War. Christoph Waltz deservedly won an Oscar for his incendiary turn as the “Jew Hunter”. Brad Pitt also stars. Thursday 31 May Humans Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm This third series of the thoughtful British science-fiction drama continues to benefit from a narrowing of focus; the big-name American actors and slightly strained global perspective have gone, but the thematic ambition has been retained. Less wilfully obscure than Sky Atlantic’s Westworld and considerably more affecting, Humans instead keeps a tight focus on emotion and relationships, whether the characters concerned are flesh and blood or gears and circuits. It can be heavy-handed with the allegories, certainly, but it’s never chilling or humourless – and leading synth performers Gemma Chan, Ivanno Jeremiah and Emily Berrington are as uncanny as ever. Mark Bonnar, too, is proving a handy addition to the cast as Neil, Laura’s (a brilliant Katherine Parkinson) professional antagonist and love interest – Bonnar’s history of playing characters with shifting loyalties comes in handy as Neil first opens his heart and then hardens his stance on the Dryden Commission. Mia (Chan), meanwhile, is on a one-synth mission to demonstrate coexistence is possible by moving into a hostile housing estate, and Leo (Colin Morgan) struggles with the realities of being human. GT Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm This week begins with chocolate puddings, which means the contestants are challenged to rustle up black forest gateaux and a dessert integrating a root vegetable, then aubergines and tofu take centre stage before the elimination round and an oriental classic. GT Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm Hollings and their “British chophouse classics” square up to an Italian-influenced brand serving fresh pasta from a cheese wheel, as Fred Sireix and a group of high-street investors gauge their potential. GT Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm Now with a Bafta award under its belt, this fine series follows the West Midlands Ambulance Service over the last Saturday night before Christmas. An inevitably busy period is made harder by a major traffic accident in central Birmingham – an incident which puts tremendous mental and physical demands on the crews, documented here with the clarity and honesty we’ve come to expect from the series. GT Great Art ITV, 10.50pm; not STV Tim Marlow takes a tour of the Royal Academy’s sell-out exhibition of the Parisian artist’s portraits, in the process assessing the man’s life, work, and reputation as “the father of modern art”. GT Urban Myths: Sex Pistols vs Bill Grundy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This pop cultural landmark, in which punk pioneers Sex Pistols grumbled, swore and generally misbehaved on Bill Grundy’s sleepily complacent regional chat-show, creating a national storm of outrage in the process, arguably received its definitive tribute from Kevin Eldon in 2013. The comedian’s loving reconstruction of the event imagined the Pistols as Amish people and bordered on performance art. Still, this gleefully silly take on the infamous encounter between the jobbing broadcaster (Steve Pemberton) and the Sex Pistols (played by members of the National Youth Theatre) is a lot of fun. GT Barry Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The eponymous depressed hitman (Bill Hader) tries to go it alone, only to be thwarted by his reckless partner Taylor (Dale Pavinski) and ructions among members of his acting class. GT Billion Dollar Brain (1967) ★★★★☆ Film4, 5.00pm Michael Caine returns as the reluctant secret agent Harry Palmer (The Ipcress File, Funeral in Berlin) in this film from Ken Russell, based on the novels by Len Deighton. Having left the British Secret Service to pursue a career as a private investigator, Palmer stumbles into a plot to overthrow Communism with the help of a supercomputer. But who is working for whom? It’s far-fetched but fun. Johnny Mnemonic (1995) ★★☆☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm Fresh from the rubber-burning success of Speed and four short years before The Matrix, Keanu Reeves starred in this high-concept dystopian adventure as the eponymous anti-hero – a 21st-century courier whose augmented brain is used to transport illicit data – that very nearly ruined his career. It’s adapted by cyberpunk godfather William Gibson from his own story. Munich (2005) ★★★☆☆ AMC, 12.50am Eric Bana stars in Steven Spielberg’s audacious, if lengthy, examination of the Israel-Palestine conflict. Set in 1972, it adroitly tackles the aftermath of the massacre of 11 Israeli Olympic athletes at the Munich Olympics. Bana plays a Mossad agent charged with hunting down the extremists who planned the Munich attack. Some of the rhetoric is clumsy, but the film-makers strive to be politically even-handed. Friday 1 June Tracey Breaks the News: Ullman as Michael Gove Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm After losing her to the USA for 30 years, Tracey Ullman’s return to our shores two years ago has reminded us of her unparalleled talents as an impressionist. She captures the physicality of her famous subjects – Angela Merkel and Judi Dench are standouts – as well as their voices, and hats off to Ullman’s prosthetics teams for her remarkable transformations. After an acting stint in last year’s Howards End, Ullman returns to her comfort zone tonight with a second series of the topical sketch comedy show in which she skewers politicians, mostly – although we’ll also be treated to more of Ben Miller’s scene-stealing Rupert Murdoch, with Ullman as Jerry Hall. Although no preview tape was available due to last-minute filming, Ullman was pictured as Michael Gove in promotional material and has also promised impressions of Jeremy Corbyn and Jacob Rees-Mogg. The previous series attracted criticism for weak writing, and some skits do lack bite, but slack should be cut – it’s a notoriously difficult format to pull off. Ullman’s gift for mimicry means she hits the mark often enough for the show to be a welcome bit of light satire to wind up the week. VP Extreme Wales with Richard Parks BBC Two, 7.30pm Tonight’s final episode of Richard Parks’s adventure programme combines extreme sports with lush panoramas of the Welsh landscape. Daredevil Parks takes to the skies on a paramotor – nothing more than a parachute connected to a fan-like motor – to propel him the length of the country. VP The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Fugitive immigrant Taariq Shirazi (Alexander Behrang Keshtkar) makes a desperate bid to flee as the Scandi-noir crime series continues. When Saga (Sofia Helin) and Henrik (Thure Lindhardt) track him down, however, Saga’s inability to tell a lie has serious consequences. VP Friday Night Dinner Channel 4, 10.00pm This sitcom’s family squabbles are more uncomfortably familiar than laugh-out-loud funny in tonight’s penultimate visit to the Goodmans’ home. Writer Robert Popper capitalises on Simon Bird’s musical skills by having his character, Adam, reluctantly play the violin to cheer up Grandma. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm; Ethan Hawke, Toni Collette, Jo Brand and Aidan Turner offer their funniest anecdotes tonight. Plus, Liam Payne continues his post-One Direction solo career with a performance his new single, Familiar. VP The Everly Brothers: Harmonies from Heaven BBC Four, 9.00pm Art Garfunkel, Keith Richards and Graham Nash are among the luminaries paying tribute to Don and Phil Everly in this 2016 documentary, all of them claiming the brothers as an influence. Surviving sibling Don Everly returns to Iowa to recount the brothers’ first appearances, their pivotal move to Nashville and stardom in the late Fifties. Africa: A Journey into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm So much of the music we listen to has its roots in African music. In this new three-part documentary series, London DJ Rita Ray sets off to explore the continent’s influence. Kicking off her journey in Nigeria, Ray stumbles across impromptu drumming ceremonies in the streets as she explores the importance of rhythm in the country’s music and meets its major players. Future episodes take her to Mali and South Africa. VP Crocodile Dundee (1986) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.10pm Mick “Crocodile” Dundee (Paul Hogan), a bushman from northern Australia, is a dab hand at surviving in the Outback. But when he is invited to New York City by Sue Charlton (Linda Kozlowski), a high-class reporter, in this Oscar-nominated comedy drama, he finds life far tougher in the urban jungle. He’s a survivor though: muggers who accost Dundee discover that he has a bigger knife than they do. American Made (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Doug Liman directs Tom Cruise in this lively, madcap real-life tale of pilot, drug smuggler and CIA gun-runner Barry Seal, whose supersonic, if lawless, career path began, according to this script, when he was a bored TWA pilot in 1978 and was approached out of the blue by a CIA handler (Domhnall Gleeson, all greasy persuasion) to conduct reconnaissance flights across the Caribbean. GoodFellas (1990) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm Martin Scorsese’s Mafia masterpiece, adapted from a non-fiction book, has all the qualities of great cinema: it’s thrilling, it’s provocative, it’s stylish, and it’s got a young Robert De Niro in it. Ray Liotta plays the youngster who longs to be a gangster; De Niro and Joe Pesci are in the Mob. Pesci’s mother, meanwhile, reportedly asked him if he had to swear quite so much – the f-word is used 300 times. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: King Lear, Westworld and Peter Kay's Car Share
Monday 28 May King Lear BBC Two, 9.30pm Talk about event TV: After making movie magic in Howards End and The Remains of the Day, Anthony Hopkins and Emma Thompson, are reunited in Shakespeare’s tragedy, King Lear, under the direction of Richard Eyre. Plus they have a stellar supporting cast, that includes Jim Broadbent, Emily Watson and Andrew Scott. Eyre sets this version in a fictional modern-day and moves the action between castles and modern locales, such as a rundown shopping precinct, to keep it contemporary. Hopkins is on great form as Lear – his old king seems to be suffering from dementia from the start, making sense of his rashness in disinheriting youngest daughter Cordelia (Florence Pugh), of him kissing another, Regan (Watson), full on the lips, and of failing to recognise other loved ones. Eyre has cut the play judiciously and brings an interesting take on Lear – that it’s about flawed parenting – that offers some insight into the behaviour of his children. Ultimately, however, it’s about Lear’s tragedy, not theirs, and Hopkins delivers a barnstorming central performance. Having played the role more than 30 years ago at the National Theatre, he’s truly grown into it. VP Richard Osman’s House of Games BBC Two, 6.00pm Pointless’s scene-stealing sidekick Richard Osman gets his moment to shine as quizmaster of this trivia contest, returning for a five-night run with BBC Breakfast’s Naga Munchetty among those competing. It’s followed by a new series of game show Curious Creatures, hosted by Kate Humble. VP Britain’s Got Talent ITV, 7.30pm Declan Donnelly flies solo as host of the semi-finals, airing nightly up to next weekend’s final. Each evening, eight of the 40 acts will perform again in the hope of becoming one of two promoted to the final by the voting public. The results are at 9.30pm. VP Springwatch 2018 BBC Two, 8.00pm Cute footage of hatchlings and deft presenting by Chris Packham and Michaela Strachan provide a winning formula for this three-week wildlife extravaganza. Gillian Burke returns, this time as a roving reporter, with Steve Backshall the first of the guests replacing the much-missed Martin Hughes-Games. VP Peter Kay’s Car Share: The Finale BBC One, 10.00pm Bowing to fan pressure, Peter Kay offers closure with this finale to his charming comedy about supermarket employees sharing the journey to and from work. Laughs and surprises abound on John and Kayleigh’s (Kay and Sian Gibson) last jaunt, but will romance ensue? VP The Vicar of Dibley Gold, 7.40pm Here’s a chance to revisit the last-ever episode of Richard Curtis’s sitcom, which delivers a fairy-tale finale for Geraldine Granger (Dawn French) when she marries Harry (Richard Armitage). Hugh Bonneville makes an amusing cameo as a lovesick vicar in the episode that also showcases French’s chemistry with the late Emma Chambers, who played daft Alice Tinker. VP Nigel Kennedy at the Biggest Weekend BBC Four, 8.30pm The BBC’s music festival welcomes maverick violinist Nigel Kennedy to Coventry’s War Memorial Park. Suzy Klein and Lloyd Coleman present as Kennedy performs his inimitable renditions of Vivaldi and Jimi Hendrix with the BBC Concert Orchestra. VP WestWorld Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm As part of her master plan, Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood) appears to be taking control over Bernard (Jeffrey Wright) in this episode of the futuristic drama and his confusion grows. VP Over the Hedge (2006) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.25am An endearing animated adventure about a group of forest creatures that, on waking after their winter hibernation, discover humans have moved in next door to them. Apprehension gives way to curiosity and excitement as they discover what the humans have to offer. Featuring the voices of Bruce Willis, Steve Carell and Avril Lavigne, among others, it’s an enjoyable movie with a message – but avoids getting too preachy. Sing Street (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Young love is set to an Eighties beat in this delightful coming-of-age tale. As with all of John Carney’s films (i.e. 2006 hit Once), the message is clear: where there is music, there is hope. The film rattles along to a cracking soundtrack – The Jam, Motörhead, The Cure – as young Conor (Ferdia Walsh-Peelo) chaotically tries to put together a band to impress a girl at school. Brideshead Revisited (2008) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.25pm In the light of the 1981 TV version of Evelyn Waugh’s novel, you do have to admire the chutzpah of anyone else giving Brideshead a go. Julian Jarrold’s attempt suffers from a desire to force modern conventions upon a story defined by the mores of upper-class interwar Britain. Hayley Atwell and Ben Whishaw are the Flyte siblings, but Catholicism, the tale’s engine, is only pernicious, never seductive. Tuesday 29 May Arrested Development Grammar Schools: Who Will Get In? BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Few education issues are as contentious in this country as that of grammar schools, with Prime Minister Theresa May among those supporting their return. This thought-provoking three-part documentary focusing on the London borough of Bexley, where each year over 5,000 children sit the selective exam for one of the area’s four grammar schools, could not, therefore, have come at a better time. We hear from both sides of the debate and are shown both the benefits and drawbacks of attending either a grammar or secondary modern school – although, as always, it’s the parents and children who make the most notable contributions. “If you want your child to become better in their future life, it’s good to go to a grammar school,” says one mother, who works long hours for minimum wage and pays £300 a month for a tutor for her daughter. Meanwhile, another, herself the product of a grammar school, despairs of the increasing parental competitiveness. And, for all the film-makers’ admirably even-handed approach, it’s the stress felt by the children that makes the biggest mark, with one youngster noting: “I don’t think grammar school is fair because people are far too young to feel they’ve failed.” SH Emmerdale ITV, 7.00pm Emmerdale confronts the difficult subject of child abuse when Charity Dingle (Emma Atkins) opens up about her past in this special flashback episode. Last November a similar technique was used, to great effect, to shed light on her cousin Cain’s experiences. Mica Proctor, in another triumph of casting, plays the young Charity. SH The Split BBC One, 9.00pm Abi Morgan’s enjoyable family saga comes to a climax with scores settled, decisions made and reconciliations all over the place. It works not least because Morgan never forgets that one person’s happy ending is another’s poisoned chalice, meaning there’s pain amid the laughter. SH The Battle for Britain’s Heroes Channel 4, 9.00pm “Our heroes often have a toxic past,” says Afua Hirsch at the start of this captivating and provocative film. She pulls no punches in her look at the darker side of our history, exploring slavery, racism and colonialism, in a film certain to enrage as many people as it informs. SH 4 Men, 175 Babies: Britain’s Super Sperm Donors Channel 4, 10.00pm This film follows men who donate their sperm for free, via unregulated websites. But why? “Being a sperm donor is like being a Samaritan,” says 61-year-old Clive, who began donating once he retired. SH Arrested Development Netflix, from today For anyone who didn’t watch the patchy fourth series of this popular Emmy-winning comedy about a rich family who lose their wealth, the good news is that you can pick up this new series with no problem. The bad news for those that did watch it is that this opening episode spends ages rehashing past events. Thankfully things do settle down – and become very funny – as we find out what happened after the infamous punch that George Michael (Michael Cera) landed on his father Michael (Jason Bateman). A proper return to form. SH Master of Photography Sky Arts, 8.00pm The international photography contest returns for a third series, with Oliviero Toscani joined on the judging panel by curator Mark Sealy and the New Yorker’s Elisabeth Biondi. Here’s hoping that this series avoids the problems of last year, which saw contestant Souvid Datta accused of plagiarism. SH All Creatures Great and Small (1975) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.45pm Simon Ward and a pre-Silence of the Lambs Anthony Hopkins star as Yorkshire vets James Herriot and Siegfried Farnon in this gentle drama set in the Thirties and based on the first two books of British vet Alf Wight (who wrote under the pseudonym of Herriot). The TV series that followed remains most memorable, but there’s warm-hearted performances here too. Operation Petticoat (1959) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.25pm A beguiling Second World War comedy directed by Blake Edwards and starring Cary Grant as a submarine captain with a strict sense of order and a rule-breaking hustler of a first officer (Tony Curtis). The vessel is bombed by the Japanese, but that’s the least of its worries. Five nurses in distress, a goat and a coating of pink paint all pose challenges for the effortlessly funny crew. The Enforcer (1976) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 11.00pm Clint Eastwood’s Harry Callahan is teamed up with rookie female partner Kate Moore (Tyne Daly) in this entertaining but ultimately disappointing third chapter of the Dirty Harry series. Together they battle violent eco-terrorists who have kidnapped the mayor of San Francisco (John Crawford) while, between the gun battles, cynical Callahan attempts to come to terms with his own male chauvinism. Wednesday 30 May Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt The Big Crash Diet Experiment BBC One, 8.00pm Is it time to rethink our attitude to crash dieting? That’s the question posed by tonight’s revealing documentary, which assesses the health impact of this extreme approach to weight loss. Our guide is Dr Javid Abdelmoneim, who along with a raft of health professionals, aims to challenge orthodox beliefs about what some see as nutritionally inadequate eating regimes with only short-term benefits. Abdelmoneim persuades four obese volunteers to give up the food that they love and opt for a scary-sounding liquid-only intake of soups and shakes, using scans and blood tests to monitor them over nine weeks. Each of the group has their fair share of weight-related issues. Portly Catholic priest Paul, for example, has been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, takeaway fan Rebecca believes that she’s in the grip of a fast-food addiction, and secret binge-eater Yolande already has fatty liver disease. Watching them tackle the programme and shed the pounds is admirable enough, but even more striking is the positive effect that the diet has on their health. In fact, the implications of the results could be a huge money saver for the NHS. TD The Doctor Who Gave Up Drugs BBC One, 9.00pm; Scotland, 10.45pm Dr Chris van Tulleken continues his crusade against the over-medication of children. Tonight, he explores why so many young people are prescribed anti-depressants, and becomes suspicious over the rise in babies diagnosed with cow’s milk allergy. TD Love in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm “The nearest gay scene for me is Belfast,” says cattle farmer Richard, a problem seeing as he lives a three-hour ferry ride away in remote Dumfries and Galloway. Not to be defeated, Richard invites three potential partners to his farm. TD Carry On Brussels Channel 4, 10.00pm More shenanigans from behind the doors of the European Parliament. We meet lone Liberal Democrat MEP Catherine Bearder, whose staunch pro-Europe stance lands her in trouble with Brexit minister David Davis. TD Miranda Barbour: Serial Killer or Liar? BBC One, 10.45pm; Northern Ireland, 11.40pm; Scotland, 11.45pm; Wales, 11.05pm This gripping true crime documentary charts the case of teenage murderer Miranda Barbour. The young mother admitted killing internet date Troy La Ferarra but later confessed to a further 22 murders as part of a Satanic cult. TD Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt Netflix, from today This snappy sitcom about a cult escapee in the big city has proved a delight. A shame, then, that this fourth season is to be its last, with the first six episodes launching today and the remainder to come later this year. Kimmy’s (Ellie Kemper) new job at a tech start-up proves ripe for nerd-baiting satire. TD Big Sky, Big Dreams, Big Art: Made in the USA BBC Four, 9.00pm Presenter Waldemar Januszczak swaps the vastness of the Wild West featured in last week’s episode for the “pulsing, futuristic excitement of the American city”, as his fascinating series on American art continues. He starts out amid the skyscrapers of New York, explaining how the vaulting architecture of the Chrysler Building exemplified the hope and ambition of the burgeoning metropolis. We then move on to the Great Depression, presaged by artists such as Thomas Hart Benton in his restless murals of urban life. TD Great Expectations (1946, b/w) ★★★★★ BBC Two, 12.35pm David Lean’s peerless version of Dickens’s novel is packed with memorable moments, from its opening scenes on the marshes, where Pip first meets the escaped convict Magwitch, to the enduring images of Miss Havisham’s house… not forgetting Pip’s boxing match with Herbert Pocket. John Mills is twice the age of the book’s Pip, but there’s a subtle ingenuousness in his performance. Rebecca (1940, b/w) ★★★★★ Talking Pictures TV, 9.00pm One of Hitchcock’s most disconcerting and finest films was adapted from a Daphne du Maurier story, though he departed from the text in many ways. A bride (Joan Fontaine) is haunted by the memory of her husband’s (Laurence Olivier) dead first wife. The excellent cast (Judith Anderson as formidable housekeeper Mrs Danvers is a particular highlight) adds class to this eerily suspenseful treat. Inglourious Basterds (2009) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 10.00pm It wasn’t quite the masterpiece we were told to expect, but Quentin Tarantino’s pastiche of war films and spaghetti westerns is still rollicking good fun and has all the ingredients of a classic Tarantino film. A celebration of vengeance, it’s an audacious take on the Second World War. Christoph Waltz deservedly won an Oscar for his incendiary turn as the “Jew Hunter”. Brad Pitt also stars. Thursday 31 May Humans Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm This third series of the thoughtful British science-fiction drama continues to benefit from a narrowing of focus; the big-name American actors and slightly strained global perspective have gone, but the thematic ambition has been retained. Less wilfully obscure than Sky Atlantic’s Westworld and considerably more affecting, Humans instead keeps a tight focus on emotion and relationships, whether the characters concerned are flesh and blood or gears and circuits. It can be heavy-handed with the allegories, certainly, but it’s never chilling or humourless – and leading synth performers Gemma Chan, Ivanno Jeremiah and Emily Berrington are as uncanny as ever. Mark Bonnar, too, is proving a handy addition to the cast as Neil, Laura’s (a brilliant Katherine Parkinson) professional antagonist and love interest – Bonnar’s history of playing characters with shifting loyalties comes in handy as Neil first opens his heart and then hardens his stance on the Dryden Commission. Mia (Chan), meanwhile, is on a one-synth mission to demonstrate coexistence is possible by moving into a hostile housing estate, and Leo (Colin Morgan) struggles with the realities of being human. GT Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm This week begins with chocolate puddings, which means the contestants are challenged to rustle up black forest gateaux and a dessert integrating a root vegetable, then aubergines and tofu take centre stage before the elimination round and an oriental classic. GT Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm Hollings and their “British chophouse classics” square up to an Italian-influenced brand serving fresh pasta from a cheese wheel, as Fred Sireix and a group of high-street investors gauge their potential. GT Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm Now with a Bafta award under its belt, this fine series follows the West Midlands Ambulance Service over the last Saturday night before Christmas. An inevitably busy period is made harder by a major traffic accident in central Birmingham – an incident which puts tremendous mental and physical demands on the crews, documented here with the clarity and honesty we’ve come to expect from the series. GT Great Art ITV, 10.50pm; not STV Tim Marlow takes a tour of the Royal Academy’s sell-out exhibition of the Parisian artist’s portraits, in the process assessing the man’s life, work, and reputation as “the father of modern art”. GT Urban Myths: Sex Pistols vs Bill Grundy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This pop cultural landmark, in which punk pioneers Sex Pistols grumbled, swore and generally misbehaved on Bill Grundy’s sleepily complacent regional chat-show, creating a national storm of outrage in the process, arguably received its definitive tribute from Kevin Eldon in 2013. The comedian’s loving reconstruction of the event imagined the Pistols as Amish people and bordered on performance art. Still, this gleefully silly take on the infamous encounter between the jobbing broadcaster (Steve Pemberton) and the Sex Pistols (played by members of the National Youth Theatre) is a lot of fun. GT Barry Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The eponymous depressed hitman (Bill Hader) tries to go it alone, only to be thwarted by his reckless partner Taylor (Dale Pavinski) and ructions among members of his acting class. GT Billion Dollar Brain (1967) ★★★★☆ Film4, 5.00pm Michael Caine returns as the reluctant secret agent Harry Palmer (The Ipcress File, Funeral in Berlin) in this film from Ken Russell, based on the novels by Len Deighton. Having left the British Secret Service to pursue a career as a private investigator, Palmer stumbles into a plot to overthrow Communism with the help of a supercomputer. But who is working for whom? It’s far-fetched but fun. Johnny Mnemonic (1995) ★★☆☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm Fresh from the rubber-burning success of Speed and four short years before The Matrix, Keanu Reeves starred in this high-concept dystopian adventure as the eponymous anti-hero – a 21st-century courier whose augmented brain is used to transport illicit data – that very nearly ruined his career. It’s adapted by cyberpunk godfather William Gibson from his own story. Munich (2005) ★★★☆☆ AMC, 12.50am Eric Bana stars in Steven Spielberg’s audacious, if lengthy, examination of the Israel-Palestine conflict. Set in 1972, it adroitly tackles the aftermath of the massacre of 11 Israeli Olympic athletes at the Munich Olympics. Bana plays a Mossad agent charged with hunting down the extremists who planned the Munich attack. Some of the rhetoric is clumsy, but the film-makers strive to be politically even-handed. Friday 1 June Tracey Breaks the News: Ullman as Michael Gove Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm After losing her to the USA for 30 years, Tracey Ullman’s return to our shores two years ago has reminded us of her unparalleled talents as an impressionist. She captures the physicality of her famous subjects – Angela Merkel and Judi Dench are standouts – as well as their voices, and hats off to Ullman’s prosthetics teams for her remarkable transformations. After an acting stint in last year’s Howards End, Ullman returns to her comfort zone tonight with a second series of the topical sketch comedy show in which she skewers politicians, mostly – although we’ll also be treated to more of Ben Miller’s scene-stealing Rupert Murdoch, with Ullman as Jerry Hall. Although no preview tape was available due to last-minute filming, Ullman was pictured as Michael Gove in promotional material and has also promised impressions of Jeremy Corbyn and Jacob Rees-Mogg. The previous series attracted criticism for weak writing, and some skits do lack bite, but slack should be cut – it’s a notoriously difficult format to pull off. Ullman’s gift for mimicry means she hits the mark often enough for the show to be a welcome bit of light satire to wind up the week. VP Extreme Wales with Richard Parks BBC Two, 7.30pm Tonight’s final episode of Richard Parks’s adventure programme combines extreme sports with lush panoramas of the Welsh landscape. Daredevil Parks takes to the skies on a paramotor – nothing more than a parachute connected to a fan-like motor – to propel him the length of the country. VP The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Fugitive immigrant Taariq Shirazi (Alexander Behrang Keshtkar) makes a desperate bid to flee as the Scandi-noir crime series continues. When Saga (Sofia Helin) and Henrik (Thure Lindhardt) track him down, however, Saga’s inability to tell a lie has serious consequences. VP Friday Night Dinner Channel 4, 10.00pm This sitcom’s family squabbles are more uncomfortably familiar than laugh-out-loud funny in tonight’s penultimate visit to the Goodmans’ home. Writer Robert Popper capitalises on Simon Bird’s musical skills by having his character, Adam, reluctantly play the violin to cheer up Grandma. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm; Ethan Hawke, Toni Collette, Jo Brand and Aidan Turner offer their funniest anecdotes tonight. Plus, Liam Payne continues his post-One Direction solo career with a performance his new single, Familiar. VP The Everly Brothers: Harmonies from Heaven BBC Four, 9.00pm Art Garfunkel, Keith Richards and Graham Nash are among the luminaries paying tribute to Don and Phil Everly in this 2016 documentary, all of them claiming the brothers as an influence. Surviving sibling Don Everly returns to Iowa to recount the brothers’ first appearances, their pivotal move to Nashville and stardom in the late Fifties. Africa: A Journey into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm So much of the music we listen to has its roots in African music. In this new three-part documentary series, London DJ Rita Ray sets off to explore the continent’s influence. Kicking off her journey in Nigeria, Ray stumbles across impromptu drumming ceremonies in the streets as she explores the importance of rhythm in the country’s music and meets its major players. Future episodes take her to Mali and South Africa. VP Crocodile Dundee (1986) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.10pm Mick “Crocodile” Dundee (Paul Hogan), a bushman from northern Australia, is a dab hand at surviving in the Outback. But when he is invited to New York City by Sue Charlton (Linda Kozlowski), a high-class reporter, in this Oscar-nominated comedy drama, he finds life far tougher in the urban jungle. He’s a survivor though: muggers who accost Dundee discover that he has a bigger knife than they do. American Made (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Doug Liman directs Tom Cruise in this lively, madcap real-life tale of pilot, drug smuggler and CIA gun-runner Barry Seal, whose supersonic, if lawless, career path began, according to this script, when he was a bored TWA pilot in 1978 and was approached out of the blue by a CIA handler (Domhnall Gleeson, all greasy persuasion) to conduct reconnaissance flights across the Caribbean. GoodFellas (1990) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm Martin Scorsese’s Mafia masterpiece, adapted from a non-fiction book, has all the qualities of great cinema: it’s thrilling, it’s provocative, it’s stylish, and it’s got a young Robert De Niro in it. Ray Liotta plays the youngster who longs to be a gangster; De Niro and Joe Pesci are in the Mob. Pesci’s mother, meanwhile, reportedly asked him if he had to swear quite so much – the f-word is used 300 times. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
Monday 28 May King Lear BBC Two, 9.30pm Talk about event TV: After making movie magic in Howards End and The Remains of the Day, Anthony Hopkins and Emma Thompson, are reunited in Shakespeare’s tragedy, King Lear, under the direction of Richard Eyre. Plus they have a stellar supporting cast, that includes Jim Broadbent, Emily Watson and Andrew Scott. Eyre sets this version in a fictional modern-day and moves the action between castles and modern locales, such as a rundown shopping precinct, to keep it contemporary. Hopkins is on great form as Lear – his old king seems to be suffering from dementia from the start, making sense of his rashness in disinheriting youngest daughter Cordelia (Florence Pugh), of him kissing another, Regan (Watson), full on the lips, and of failing to recognise other loved ones. Eyre has cut the play judiciously and brings an interesting take on Lear – that it’s about flawed parenting – that offers some insight into the behaviour of his children. Ultimately, however, it’s about Lear’s tragedy, not theirs, and Hopkins delivers a barnstorming central performance. Having played the role more than 30 years ago at the National Theatre, he’s truly grown into it. VP Richard Osman’s House of Games BBC Two, 6.00pm Pointless’s scene-stealing sidekick Richard Osman gets his moment to shine as quizmaster of this trivia contest, returning for a five-night run with BBC Breakfast’s Naga Munchetty among those competing. It’s followed by a new series of game show Curious Creatures, hosted by Kate Humble. VP Britain’s Got Talent ITV, 7.30pm Declan Donnelly flies solo as host of the semi-finals, airing nightly up to next weekend’s final. Each evening, eight of the 40 acts will perform again in the hope of becoming one of two promoted to the final by the voting public. The results are at 9.30pm. VP Springwatch 2018 BBC Two, 8.00pm Cute footage of hatchlings and deft presenting by Chris Packham and Michaela Strachan provide a winning formula for this three-week wildlife extravaganza. Gillian Burke returns, this time as a roving reporter, with Steve Backshall the first of the guests replacing the much-missed Martin Hughes-Games. VP Peter Kay’s Car Share: The Finale BBC One, 10.00pm Bowing to fan pressure, Peter Kay offers closure with this finale to his charming comedy about supermarket employees sharing the journey to and from work. Laughs and surprises abound on John and Kayleigh’s (Kay and Sian Gibson) last jaunt, but will romance ensue? VP The Vicar of Dibley Gold, 7.40pm Here’s a chance to revisit the last-ever episode of Richard Curtis’s sitcom, which delivers a fairy-tale finale for Geraldine Granger (Dawn French) when she marries Harry (Richard Armitage). Hugh Bonneville makes an amusing cameo as a lovesick vicar in the episode that also showcases French’s chemistry with the late Emma Chambers, who played daft Alice Tinker. VP Nigel Kennedy at the Biggest Weekend BBC Four, 8.30pm The BBC’s music festival welcomes maverick violinist Nigel Kennedy to Coventry’s War Memorial Park. Suzy Klein and Lloyd Coleman present as Kennedy performs his inimitable renditions of Vivaldi and Jimi Hendrix with the BBC Concert Orchestra. VP WestWorld Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm As part of her master plan, Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood) appears to be taking control over Bernard (Jeffrey Wright) in this episode of the futuristic drama and his confusion grows. VP Over the Hedge (2006) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.25am An endearing animated adventure about a group of forest creatures that, on waking after their winter hibernation, discover humans have moved in next door to them. Apprehension gives way to curiosity and excitement as they discover what the humans have to offer. Featuring the voices of Bruce Willis, Steve Carell and Avril Lavigne, among others, it’s an enjoyable movie with a message – but avoids getting too preachy. Sing Street (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Young love is set to an Eighties beat in this delightful coming-of-age tale. As with all of John Carney’s films (i.e. 2006 hit Once), the message is clear: where there is music, there is hope. The film rattles along to a cracking soundtrack – The Jam, Motörhead, The Cure – as young Conor (Ferdia Walsh-Peelo) chaotically tries to put together a band to impress a girl at school. Brideshead Revisited (2008) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.25pm In the light of the 1981 TV version of Evelyn Waugh’s novel, you do have to admire the chutzpah of anyone else giving Brideshead a go. Julian Jarrold’s attempt suffers from a desire to force modern conventions upon a story defined by the mores of upper-class interwar Britain. Hayley Atwell and Ben Whishaw are the Flyte siblings, but Catholicism, the tale’s engine, is only pernicious, never seductive. Tuesday 29 May Arrested Development Grammar Schools: Who Will Get In? BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Few education issues are as contentious in this country as that of grammar schools, with Prime Minister Theresa May among those supporting their return. This thought-provoking three-part documentary focusing on the London borough of Bexley, where each year over 5,000 children sit the selective exam for one of the area’s four grammar schools, could not, therefore, have come at a better time. We hear from both sides of the debate and are shown both the benefits and drawbacks of attending either a grammar or secondary modern school – although, as always, it’s the parents and children who make the most notable contributions. “If you want your child to become better in their future life, it’s good to go to a grammar school,” says one mother, who works long hours for minimum wage and pays £300 a month for a tutor for her daughter. Meanwhile, another, herself the product of a grammar school, despairs of the increasing parental competitiveness. And, for all the film-makers’ admirably even-handed approach, it’s the stress felt by the children that makes the biggest mark, with one youngster noting: “I don’t think grammar school is fair because people are far too young to feel they’ve failed.” SH Emmerdale ITV, 7.00pm Emmerdale confronts the difficult subject of child abuse when Charity Dingle (Emma Atkins) opens up about her past in this special flashback episode. Last November a similar technique was used, to great effect, to shed light on her cousin Cain’s experiences. Mica Proctor, in another triumph of casting, plays the young Charity. SH The Split BBC One, 9.00pm Abi Morgan’s enjoyable family saga comes to a climax with scores settled, decisions made and reconciliations all over the place. It works not least because Morgan never forgets that one person’s happy ending is another’s poisoned chalice, meaning there’s pain amid the laughter. SH The Battle for Britain’s Heroes Channel 4, 9.00pm “Our heroes often have a toxic past,” says Afua Hirsch at the start of this captivating and provocative film. She pulls no punches in her look at the darker side of our history, exploring slavery, racism and colonialism, in a film certain to enrage as many people as it informs. SH 4 Men, 175 Babies: Britain’s Super Sperm Donors Channel 4, 10.00pm This film follows men who donate their sperm for free, via unregulated websites. But why? “Being a sperm donor is like being a Samaritan,” says 61-year-old Clive, who began donating once he retired. SH Arrested Development Netflix, from today For anyone who didn’t watch the patchy fourth series of this popular Emmy-winning comedy about a rich family who lose their wealth, the good news is that you can pick up this new series with no problem. The bad news for those that did watch it is that this opening episode spends ages rehashing past events. Thankfully things do settle down – and become very funny – as we find out what happened after the infamous punch that George Michael (Michael Cera) landed on his father Michael (Jason Bateman). A proper return to form. SH Master of Photography Sky Arts, 8.00pm The international photography contest returns for a third series, with Oliviero Toscani joined on the judging panel by curator Mark Sealy and the New Yorker’s Elisabeth Biondi. Here’s hoping that this series avoids the problems of last year, which saw contestant Souvid Datta accused of plagiarism. SH All Creatures Great and Small (1975) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.45pm Simon Ward and a pre-Silence of the Lambs Anthony Hopkins star as Yorkshire vets James Herriot and Siegfried Farnon in this gentle drama set in the Thirties and based on the first two books of British vet Alf Wight (who wrote under the pseudonym of Herriot). The TV series that followed remains most memorable, but there’s warm-hearted performances here too. Operation Petticoat (1959) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.25pm A beguiling Second World War comedy directed by Blake Edwards and starring Cary Grant as a submarine captain with a strict sense of order and a rule-breaking hustler of a first officer (Tony Curtis). The vessel is bombed by the Japanese, but that’s the least of its worries. Five nurses in distress, a goat and a coating of pink paint all pose challenges for the effortlessly funny crew. The Enforcer (1976) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 11.00pm Clint Eastwood’s Harry Callahan is teamed up with rookie female partner Kate Moore (Tyne Daly) in this entertaining but ultimately disappointing third chapter of the Dirty Harry series. Together they battle violent eco-terrorists who have kidnapped the mayor of San Francisco (John Crawford) while, between the gun battles, cynical Callahan attempts to come to terms with his own male chauvinism. Wednesday 30 May Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt The Big Crash Diet Experiment BBC One, 8.00pm Is it time to rethink our attitude to crash dieting? That’s the question posed by tonight’s revealing documentary, which assesses the health impact of this extreme approach to weight loss. Our guide is Dr Javid Abdelmoneim, who along with a raft of health professionals, aims to challenge orthodox beliefs about what some see as nutritionally inadequate eating regimes with only short-term benefits. Abdelmoneim persuades four obese volunteers to give up the food that they love and opt for a scary-sounding liquid-only intake of soups and shakes, using scans and blood tests to monitor them over nine weeks. Each of the group has their fair share of weight-related issues. Portly Catholic priest Paul, for example, has been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, takeaway fan Rebecca believes that she’s in the grip of a fast-food addiction, and secret binge-eater Yolande already has fatty liver disease. Watching them tackle the programme and shed the pounds is admirable enough, but even more striking is the positive effect that the diet has on their health. In fact, the implications of the results could be a huge money saver for the NHS. TD The Doctor Who Gave Up Drugs BBC One, 9.00pm; Scotland, 10.45pm Dr Chris van Tulleken continues his crusade against the over-medication of children. Tonight, he explores why so many young people are prescribed anti-depressants, and becomes suspicious over the rise in babies diagnosed with cow’s milk allergy. TD Love in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm “The nearest gay scene for me is Belfast,” says cattle farmer Richard, a problem seeing as he lives a three-hour ferry ride away in remote Dumfries and Galloway. Not to be defeated, Richard invites three potential partners to his farm. TD Carry On Brussels Channel 4, 10.00pm More shenanigans from behind the doors of the European Parliament. We meet lone Liberal Democrat MEP Catherine Bearder, whose staunch pro-Europe stance lands her in trouble with Brexit minister David Davis. TD Miranda Barbour: Serial Killer or Liar? BBC One, 10.45pm; Northern Ireland, 11.40pm; Scotland, 11.45pm; Wales, 11.05pm This gripping true crime documentary charts the case of teenage murderer Miranda Barbour. The young mother admitted killing internet date Troy La Ferarra but later confessed to a further 22 murders as part of a Satanic cult. TD Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt Netflix, from today This snappy sitcom about a cult escapee in the big city has proved a delight. A shame, then, that this fourth season is to be its last, with the first six episodes launching today and the remainder to come later this year. Kimmy’s (Ellie Kemper) new job at a tech start-up proves ripe for nerd-baiting satire. TD Big Sky, Big Dreams, Big Art: Made in the USA BBC Four, 9.00pm Presenter Waldemar Januszczak swaps the vastness of the Wild West featured in last week’s episode for the “pulsing, futuristic excitement of the American city”, as his fascinating series on American art continues. He starts out amid the skyscrapers of New York, explaining how the vaulting architecture of the Chrysler Building exemplified the hope and ambition of the burgeoning metropolis. We then move on to the Great Depression, presaged by artists such as Thomas Hart Benton in his restless murals of urban life. TD Great Expectations (1946, b/w) ★★★★★ BBC Two, 12.35pm David Lean’s peerless version of Dickens’s novel is packed with memorable moments, from its opening scenes on the marshes, where Pip first meets the escaped convict Magwitch, to the enduring images of Miss Havisham’s house… not forgetting Pip’s boxing match with Herbert Pocket. John Mills is twice the age of the book’s Pip, but there’s a subtle ingenuousness in his performance. Rebecca (1940, b/w) ★★★★★ Talking Pictures TV, 9.00pm One of Hitchcock’s most disconcerting and finest films was adapted from a Daphne du Maurier story, though he departed from the text in many ways. A bride (Joan Fontaine) is haunted by the memory of her husband’s (Laurence Olivier) dead first wife. The excellent cast (Judith Anderson as formidable housekeeper Mrs Danvers is a particular highlight) adds class to this eerily suspenseful treat. Inglourious Basterds (2009) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 10.00pm It wasn’t quite the masterpiece we were told to expect, but Quentin Tarantino’s pastiche of war films and spaghetti westerns is still rollicking good fun and has all the ingredients of a classic Tarantino film. A celebration of vengeance, it’s an audacious take on the Second World War. Christoph Waltz deservedly won an Oscar for his incendiary turn as the “Jew Hunter”. Brad Pitt also stars. Thursday 31 May Humans Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm This third series of the thoughtful British science-fiction drama continues to benefit from a narrowing of focus; the big-name American actors and slightly strained global perspective have gone, but the thematic ambition has been retained. Less wilfully obscure than Sky Atlantic’s Westworld and considerably more affecting, Humans instead keeps a tight focus on emotion and relationships, whether the characters concerned are flesh and blood or gears and circuits. It can be heavy-handed with the allegories, certainly, but it’s never chilling or humourless – and leading synth performers Gemma Chan, Ivanno Jeremiah and Emily Berrington are as uncanny as ever. Mark Bonnar, too, is proving a handy addition to the cast as Neil, Laura’s (a brilliant Katherine Parkinson) professional antagonist and love interest – Bonnar’s history of playing characters with shifting loyalties comes in handy as Neil first opens his heart and then hardens his stance on the Dryden Commission. Mia (Chan), meanwhile, is on a one-synth mission to demonstrate coexistence is possible by moving into a hostile housing estate, and Leo (Colin Morgan) struggles with the realities of being human. GT Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm This week begins with chocolate puddings, which means the contestants are challenged to rustle up black forest gateaux and a dessert integrating a root vegetable, then aubergines and tofu take centre stage before the elimination round and an oriental classic. GT Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm Hollings and their “British chophouse classics” square up to an Italian-influenced brand serving fresh pasta from a cheese wheel, as Fred Sireix and a group of high-street investors gauge their potential. GT Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm Now with a Bafta award under its belt, this fine series follows the West Midlands Ambulance Service over the last Saturday night before Christmas. An inevitably busy period is made harder by a major traffic accident in central Birmingham – an incident which puts tremendous mental and physical demands on the crews, documented here with the clarity and honesty we’ve come to expect from the series. GT Great Art ITV, 10.50pm; not STV Tim Marlow takes a tour of the Royal Academy’s sell-out exhibition of the Parisian artist’s portraits, in the process assessing the man’s life, work, and reputation as “the father of modern art”. GT Urban Myths: Sex Pistols vs Bill Grundy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This pop cultural landmark, in which punk pioneers Sex Pistols grumbled, swore and generally misbehaved on Bill Grundy’s sleepily complacent regional chat-show, creating a national storm of outrage in the process, arguably received its definitive tribute from Kevin Eldon in 2013. The comedian’s loving reconstruction of the event imagined the Pistols as Amish people and bordered on performance art. Still, this gleefully silly take on the infamous encounter between the jobbing broadcaster (Steve Pemberton) and the Sex Pistols (played by members of the National Youth Theatre) is a lot of fun. GT Barry Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The eponymous depressed hitman (Bill Hader) tries to go it alone, only to be thwarted by his reckless partner Taylor (Dale Pavinski) and ructions among members of his acting class. GT Billion Dollar Brain (1967) ★★★★☆ Film4, 5.00pm Michael Caine returns as the reluctant secret agent Harry Palmer (The Ipcress File, Funeral in Berlin) in this film from Ken Russell, based on the novels by Len Deighton. Having left the British Secret Service to pursue a career as a private investigator, Palmer stumbles into a plot to overthrow Communism with the help of a supercomputer. But who is working for whom? It’s far-fetched but fun. Johnny Mnemonic (1995) ★★☆☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm Fresh from the rubber-burning success of Speed and four short years before The Matrix, Keanu Reeves starred in this high-concept dystopian adventure as the eponymous anti-hero – a 21st-century courier whose augmented brain is used to transport illicit data – that very nearly ruined his career. It’s adapted by cyberpunk godfather William Gibson from his own story. Munich (2005) ★★★☆☆ AMC, 12.50am Eric Bana stars in Steven Spielberg’s audacious, if lengthy, examination of the Israel-Palestine conflict. Set in 1972, it adroitly tackles the aftermath of the massacre of 11 Israeli Olympic athletes at the Munich Olympics. Bana plays a Mossad agent charged with hunting down the extremists who planned the Munich attack. Some of the rhetoric is clumsy, but the film-makers strive to be politically even-handed. Friday 1 June Tracey Breaks the News: Ullman as Michael Gove Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm After losing her to the USA for 30 years, Tracey Ullman’s return to our shores two years ago has reminded us of her unparalleled talents as an impressionist. She captures the physicality of her famous subjects – Angela Merkel and Judi Dench are standouts – as well as their voices, and hats off to Ullman’s prosthetics teams for her remarkable transformations. After an acting stint in last year’s Howards End, Ullman returns to her comfort zone tonight with a second series of the topical sketch comedy show in which she skewers politicians, mostly – although we’ll also be treated to more of Ben Miller’s scene-stealing Rupert Murdoch, with Ullman as Jerry Hall. Although no preview tape was available due to last-minute filming, Ullman was pictured as Michael Gove in promotional material and has also promised impressions of Jeremy Corbyn and Jacob Rees-Mogg. The previous series attracted criticism for weak writing, and some skits do lack bite, but slack should be cut – it’s a notoriously difficult format to pull off. Ullman’s gift for mimicry means she hits the mark often enough for the show to be a welcome bit of light satire to wind up the week. VP Extreme Wales with Richard Parks BBC Two, 7.30pm Tonight’s final episode of Richard Parks’s adventure programme combines extreme sports with lush panoramas of the Welsh landscape. Daredevil Parks takes to the skies on a paramotor – nothing more than a parachute connected to a fan-like motor – to propel him the length of the country. VP The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Fugitive immigrant Taariq Shirazi (Alexander Behrang Keshtkar) makes a desperate bid to flee as the Scandi-noir crime series continues. When Saga (Sofia Helin) and Henrik (Thure Lindhardt) track him down, however, Saga’s inability to tell a lie has serious consequences. VP Friday Night Dinner Channel 4, 10.00pm This sitcom’s family squabbles are more uncomfortably familiar than laugh-out-loud funny in tonight’s penultimate visit to the Goodmans’ home. Writer Robert Popper capitalises on Simon Bird’s musical skills by having his character, Adam, reluctantly play the violin to cheer up Grandma. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm; Ethan Hawke, Toni Collette, Jo Brand and Aidan Turner offer their funniest anecdotes tonight. Plus, Liam Payne continues his post-One Direction solo career with a performance his new single, Familiar. VP The Everly Brothers: Harmonies from Heaven BBC Four, 9.00pm Art Garfunkel, Keith Richards and Graham Nash are among the luminaries paying tribute to Don and Phil Everly in this 2016 documentary, all of them claiming the brothers as an influence. Surviving sibling Don Everly returns to Iowa to recount the brothers’ first appearances, their pivotal move to Nashville and stardom in the late Fifties. Africa: A Journey into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm So much of the music we listen to has its roots in African music. In this new three-part documentary series, London DJ Rita Ray sets off to explore the continent’s influence. Kicking off her journey in Nigeria, Ray stumbles across impromptu drumming ceremonies in the streets as she explores the importance of rhythm in the country’s music and meets its major players. Future episodes take her to Mali and South Africa. VP Crocodile Dundee (1986) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.10pm Mick “Crocodile” Dundee (Paul Hogan), a bushman from northern Australia, is a dab hand at surviving in the Outback. But when he is invited to New York City by Sue Charlton (Linda Kozlowski), a high-class reporter, in this Oscar-nominated comedy drama, he finds life far tougher in the urban jungle. He’s a survivor though: muggers who accost Dundee discover that he has a bigger knife than they do. American Made (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Doug Liman directs Tom Cruise in this lively, madcap real-life tale of pilot, drug smuggler and CIA gun-runner Barry Seal, whose supersonic, if lawless, career path began, according to this script, when he was a bored TWA pilot in 1978 and was approached out of the blue by a CIA handler (Domhnall Gleeson, all greasy persuasion) to conduct reconnaissance flights across the Caribbean. GoodFellas (1990) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm Martin Scorsese’s Mafia masterpiece, adapted from a non-fiction book, has all the qualities of great cinema: it’s thrilling, it’s provocative, it’s stylish, and it’s got a young Robert De Niro in it. Ray Liotta plays the youngster who longs to be a gangster; De Niro and Joe Pesci are in the Mob. Pesci’s mother, meanwhile, reportedly asked him if he had to swear quite so much – the f-word is used 300 times. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: King Lear, Westworld and Peter Kay's Car Share
Monday 28 May King Lear BBC Two, 9.30pm Talk about event TV: After making movie magic in Howards End and The Remains of the Day, Anthony Hopkins and Emma Thompson, are reunited in Shakespeare’s tragedy, King Lear, under the direction of Richard Eyre. Plus they have a stellar supporting cast, that includes Jim Broadbent, Emily Watson and Andrew Scott. Eyre sets this version in a fictional modern-day and moves the action between castles and modern locales, such as a rundown shopping precinct, to keep it contemporary. Hopkins is on great form as Lear – his old king seems to be suffering from dementia from the start, making sense of his rashness in disinheriting youngest daughter Cordelia (Florence Pugh), of him kissing another, Regan (Watson), full on the lips, and of failing to recognise other loved ones. Eyre has cut the play judiciously and brings an interesting take on Lear – that it’s about flawed parenting – that offers some insight into the behaviour of his children. Ultimately, however, it’s about Lear’s tragedy, not theirs, and Hopkins delivers a barnstorming central performance. Having played the role more than 30 years ago at the National Theatre, he’s truly grown into it. VP Richard Osman’s House of Games BBC Two, 6.00pm Pointless’s scene-stealing sidekick Richard Osman gets his moment to shine as quizmaster of this trivia contest, returning for a five-night run with BBC Breakfast’s Naga Munchetty among those competing. It’s followed by a new series of game show Curious Creatures, hosted by Kate Humble. VP Britain’s Got Talent ITV, 7.30pm Declan Donnelly flies solo as host of the semi-finals, airing nightly up to next weekend’s final. Each evening, eight of the 40 acts will perform again in the hope of becoming one of two promoted to the final by the voting public. The results are at 9.30pm. VP Springwatch 2018 BBC Two, 8.00pm Cute footage of hatchlings and deft presenting by Chris Packham and Michaela Strachan provide a winning formula for this three-week wildlife extravaganza. Gillian Burke returns, this time as a roving reporter, with Steve Backshall the first of the guests replacing the much-missed Martin Hughes-Games. VP Peter Kay’s Car Share: The Finale BBC One, 10.00pm Bowing to fan pressure, Peter Kay offers closure with this finale to his charming comedy about supermarket employees sharing the journey to and from work. Laughs and surprises abound on John and Kayleigh’s (Kay and Sian Gibson) last jaunt, but will romance ensue? VP The Vicar of Dibley Gold, 7.40pm Here’s a chance to revisit the last-ever episode of Richard Curtis’s sitcom, which delivers a fairy-tale finale for Geraldine Granger (Dawn French) when she marries Harry (Richard Armitage). Hugh Bonneville makes an amusing cameo as a lovesick vicar in the episode that also showcases French’s chemistry with the late Emma Chambers, who played daft Alice Tinker. VP Nigel Kennedy at the Biggest Weekend BBC Four, 8.30pm The BBC’s music festival welcomes maverick violinist Nigel Kennedy to Coventry’s War Memorial Park. Suzy Klein and Lloyd Coleman present as Kennedy performs his inimitable renditions of Vivaldi and Jimi Hendrix with the BBC Concert Orchestra. VP WestWorld Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm As part of her master plan, Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood) appears to be taking control over Bernard (Jeffrey Wright) in this episode of the futuristic drama and his confusion grows. VP Over the Hedge (2006) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.25am An endearing animated adventure about a group of forest creatures that, on waking after their winter hibernation, discover humans have moved in next door to them. Apprehension gives way to curiosity and excitement as they discover what the humans have to offer. Featuring the voices of Bruce Willis, Steve Carell and Avril Lavigne, among others, it’s an enjoyable movie with a message – but avoids getting too preachy. Sing Street (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Young love is set to an Eighties beat in this delightful coming-of-age tale. As with all of John Carney’s films (i.e. 2006 hit Once), the message is clear: where there is music, there is hope. The film rattles along to a cracking soundtrack – The Jam, Motörhead, The Cure – as young Conor (Ferdia Walsh-Peelo) chaotically tries to put together a band to impress a girl at school. Brideshead Revisited (2008) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.25pm In the light of the 1981 TV version of Evelyn Waugh’s novel, you do have to admire the chutzpah of anyone else giving Brideshead a go. Julian Jarrold’s attempt suffers from a desire to force modern conventions upon a story defined by the mores of upper-class interwar Britain. Hayley Atwell and Ben Whishaw are the Flyte siblings, but Catholicism, the tale’s engine, is only pernicious, never seductive. Tuesday 29 May Arrested Development Grammar Schools: Who Will Get In? BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Few education issues are as contentious in this country as that of grammar schools, with Prime Minister Theresa May among those supporting their return. This thought-provoking three-part documentary focusing on the London borough of Bexley, where each year over 5,000 children sit the selective exam for one of the area’s four grammar schools, could not, therefore, have come at a better time. We hear from both sides of the debate and are shown both the benefits and drawbacks of attending either a grammar or secondary modern school – although, as always, it’s the parents and children who make the most notable contributions. “If you want your child to become better in their future life, it’s good to go to a grammar school,” says one mother, who works long hours for minimum wage and pays £300 a month for a tutor for her daughter. Meanwhile, another, herself the product of a grammar school, despairs of the increasing parental competitiveness. And, for all the film-makers’ admirably even-handed approach, it’s the stress felt by the children that makes the biggest mark, with one youngster noting: “I don’t think grammar school is fair because people are far too young to feel they’ve failed.” SH Emmerdale ITV, 7.00pm Emmerdale confronts the difficult subject of child abuse when Charity Dingle (Emma Atkins) opens up about her past in this special flashback episode. Last November a similar technique was used, to great effect, to shed light on her cousin Cain’s experiences. Mica Proctor, in another triumph of casting, plays the young Charity. SH The Split BBC One, 9.00pm Abi Morgan’s enjoyable family saga comes to a climax with scores settled, decisions made and reconciliations all over the place. It works not least because Morgan never forgets that one person’s happy ending is another’s poisoned chalice, meaning there’s pain amid the laughter. SH The Battle for Britain’s Heroes Channel 4, 9.00pm “Our heroes often have a toxic past,” says Afua Hirsch at the start of this captivating and provocative film. She pulls no punches in her look at the darker side of our history, exploring slavery, racism and colonialism, in a film certain to enrage as many people as it informs. SH 4 Men, 175 Babies: Britain’s Super Sperm Donors Channel 4, 10.00pm This film follows men who donate their sperm for free, via unregulated websites. But why? “Being a sperm donor is like being a Samaritan,” says 61-year-old Clive, who began donating once he retired. SH Arrested Development Netflix, from today For anyone who didn’t watch the patchy fourth series of this popular Emmy-winning comedy about a rich family who lose their wealth, the good news is that you can pick up this new series with no problem. The bad news for those that did watch it is that this opening episode spends ages rehashing past events. Thankfully things do settle down – and become very funny – as we find out what happened after the infamous punch that George Michael (Michael Cera) landed on his father Michael (Jason Bateman). A proper return to form. SH Master of Photography Sky Arts, 8.00pm The international photography contest returns for a third series, with Oliviero Toscani joined on the judging panel by curator Mark Sealy and the New Yorker’s Elisabeth Biondi. Here’s hoping that this series avoids the problems of last year, which saw contestant Souvid Datta accused of plagiarism. SH All Creatures Great and Small (1975) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.45pm Simon Ward and a pre-Silence of the Lambs Anthony Hopkins star as Yorkshire vets James Herriot and Siegfried Farnon in this gentle drama set in the Thirties and based on the first two books of British vet Alf Wight (who wrote under the pseudonym of Herriot). The TV series that followed remains most memorable, but there’s warm-hearted performances here too. Operation Petticoat (1959) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.25pm A beguiling Second World War comedy directed by Blake Edwards and starring Cary Grant as a submarine captain with a strict sense of order and a rule-breaking hustler of a first officer (Tony Curtis). The vessel is bombed by the Japanese, but that’s the least of its worries. Five nurses in distress, a goat and a coating of pink paint all pose challenges for the effortlessly funny crew. The Enforcer (1976) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 11.00pm Clint Eastwood’s Harry Callahan is teamed up with rookie female partner Kate Moore (Tyne Daly) in this entertaining but ultimately disappointing third chapter of the Dirty Harry series. Together they battle violent eco-terrorists who have kidnapped the mayor of San Francisco (John Crawford) while, between the gun battles, cynical Callahan attempts to come to terms with his own male chauvinism. Wednesday 30 May Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt The Big Crash Diet Experiment BBC One, 8.00pm Is it time to rethink our attitude to crash dieting? That’s the question posed by tonight’s revealing documentary, which assesses the health impact of this extreme approach to weight loss. Our guide is Dr Javid Abdelmoneim, who along with a raft of health professionals, aims to challenge orthodox beliefs about what some see as nutritionally inadequate eating regimes with only short-term benefits. Abdelmoneim persuades four obese volunteers to give up the food that they love and opt for a scary-sounding liquid-only intake of soups and shakes, using scans and blood tests to monitor them over nine weeks. Each of the group has their fair share of weight-related issues. Portly Catholic priest Paul, for example, has been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, takeaway fan Rebecca believes that she’s in the grip of a fast-food addiction, and secret binge-eater Yolande already has fatty liver disease. Watching them tackle the programme and shed the pounds is admirable enough, but even more striking is the positive effect that the diet has on their health. In fact, the implications of the results could be a huge money saver for the NHS. TD The Doctor Who Gave Up Drugs BBC One, 9.00pm; Scotland, 10.45pm Dr Chris van Tulleken continues his crusade against the over-medication of children. Tonight, he explores why so many young people are prescribed anti-depressants, and becomes suspicious over the rise in babies diagnosed with cow’s milk allergy. TD Love in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm “The nearest gay scene for me is Belfast,” says cattle farmer Richard, a problem seeing as he lives a three-hour ferry ride away in remote Dumfries and Galloway. Not to be defeated, Richard invites three potential partners to his farm. TD Carry On Brussels Channel 4, 10.00pm More shenanigans from behind the doors of the European Parliament. We meet lone Liberal Democrat MEP Catherine Bearder, whose staunch pro-Europe stance lands her in trouble with Brexit minister David Davis. TD Miranda Barbour: Serial Killer or Liar? BBC One, 10.45pm; Northern Ireland, 11.40pm; Scotland, 11.45pm; Wales, 11.05pm This gripping true crime documentary charts the case of teenage murderer Miranda Barbour. The young mother admitted killing internet date Troy La Ferarra but later confessed to a further 22 murders as part of a Satanic cult. TD Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt Netflix, from today This snappy sitcom about a cult escapee in the big city has proved a delight. A shame, then, that this fourth season is to be its last, with the first six episodes launching today and the remainder to come later this year. Kimmy’s (Ellie Kemper) new job at a tech start-up proves ripe for nerd-baiting satire. TD Big Sky, Big Dreams, Big Art: Made in the USA BBC Four, 9.00pm Presenter Waldemar Januszczak swaps the vastness of the Wild West featured in last week’s episode for the “pulsing, futuristic excitement of the American city”, as his fascinating series on American art continues. He starts out amid the skyscrapers of New York, explaining how the vaulting architecture of the Chrysler Building exemplified the hope and ambition of the burgeoning metropolis. We then move on to the Great Depression, presaged by artists such as Thomas Hart Benton in his restless murals of urban life. TD Great Expectations (1946, b/w) ★★★★★ BBC Two, 12.35pm David Lean’s peerless version of Dickens’s novel is packed with memorable moments, from its opening scenes on the marshes, where Pip first meets the escaped convict Magwitch, to the enduring images of Miss Havisham’s house… not forgetting Pip’s boxing match with Herbert Pocket. John Mills is twice the age of the book’s Pip, but there’s a subtle ingenuousness in his performance. Rebecca (1940, b/w) ★★★★★ Talking Pictures TV, 9.00pm One of Hitchcock’s most disconcerting and finest films was adapted from a Daphne du Maurier story, though he departed from the text in many ways. A bride (Joan Fontaine) is haunted by the memory of her husband’s (Laurence Olivier) dead first wife. The excellent cast (Judith Anderson as formidable housekeeper Mrs Danvers is a particular highlight) adds class to this eerily suspenseful treat. Inglourious Basterds (2009) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 10.00pm It wasn’t quite the masterpiece we were told to expect, but Quentin Tarantino’s pastiche of war films and spaghetti westerns is still rollicking good fun and has all the ingredients of a classic Tarantino film. A celebration of vengeance, it’s an audacious take on the Second World War. Christoph Waltz deservedly won an Oscar for his incendiary turn as the “Jew Hunter”. Brad Pitt also stars. Thursday 31 May Humans Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm This third series of the thoughtful British science-fiction drama continues to benefit from a narrowing of focus; the big-name American actors and slightly strained global perspective have gone, but the thematic ambition has been retained. Less wilfully obscure than Sky Atlantic’s Westworld and considerably more affecting, Humans instead keeps a tight focus on emotion and relationships, whether the characters concerned are flesh and blood or gears and circuits. It can be heavy-handed with the allegories, certainly, but it’s never chilling or humourless – and leading synth performers Gemma Chan, Ivanno Jeremiah and Emily Berrington are as uncanny as ever. Mark Bonnar, too, is proving a handy addition to the cast as Neil, Laura’s (a brilliant Katherine Parkinson) professional antagonist and love interest – Bonnar’s history of playing characters with shifting loyalties comes in handy as Neil first opens his heart and then hardens his stance on the Dryden Commission. Mia (Chan), meanwhile, is on a one-synth mission to demonstrate coexistence is possible by moving into a hostile housing estate, and Leo (Colin Morgan) struggles with the realities of being human. GT Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm This week begins with chocolate puddings, which means the contestants are challenged to rustle up black forest gateaux and a dessert integrating a root vegetable, then aubergines and tofu take centre stage before the elimination round and an oriental classic. GT Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm Hollings and their “British chophouse classics” square up to an Italian-influenced brand serving fresh pasta from a cheese wheel, as Fred Sireix and a group of high-street investors gauge their potential. GT Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm Now with a Bafta award under its belt, this fine series follows the West Midlands Ambulance Service over the last Saturday night before Christmas. An inevitably busy period is made harder by a major traffic accident in central Birmingham – an incident which puts tremendous mental and physical demands on the crews, documented here with the clarity and honesty we’ve come to expect from the series. GT Great Art ITV, 10.50pm; not STV Tim Marlow takes a tour of the Royal Academy’s sell-out exhibition of the Parisian artist’s portraits, in the process assessing the man’s life, work, and reputation as “the father of modern art”. GT Urban Myths: Sex Pistols vs Bill Grundy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This pop cultural landmark, in which punk pioneers Sex Pistols grumbled, swore and generally misbehaved on Bill Grundy’s sleepily complacent regional chat-show, creating a national storm of outrage in the process, arguably received its definitive tribute from Kevin Eldon in 2013. The comedian’s loving reconstruction of the event imagined the Pistols as Amish people and bordered on performance art. Still, this gleefully silly take on the infamous encounter between the jobbing broadcaster (Steve Pemberton) and the Sex Pistols (played by members of the National Youth Theatre) is a lot of fun. GT Barry Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The eponymous depressed hitman (Bill Hader) tries to go it alone, only to be thwarted by his reckless partner Taylor (Dale Pavinski) and ructions among members of his acting class. GT Billion Dollar Brain (1967) ★★★★☆ Film4, 5.00pm Michael Caine returns as the reluctant secret agent Harry Palmer (The Ipcress File, Funeral in Berlin) in this film from Ken Russell, based on the novels by Len Deighton. Having left the British Secret Service to pursue a career as a private investigator, Palmer stumbles into a plot to overthrow Communism with the help of a supercomputer. But who is working for whom? It’s far-fetched but fun. Johnny Mnemonic (1995) ★★☆☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm Fresh from the rubber-burning success of Speed and four short years before The Matrix, Keanu Reeves starred in this high-concept dystopian adventure as the eponymous anti-hero – a 21st-century courier whose augmented brain is used to transport illicit data – that very nearly ruined his career. It’s adapted by cyberpunk godfather William Gibson from his own story. Munich (2005) ★★★☆☆ AMC, 12.50am Eric Bana stars in Steven Spielberg’s audacious, if lengthy, examination of the Israel-Palestine conflict. Set in 1972, it adroitly tackles the aftermath of the massacre of 11 Israeli Olympic athletes at the Munich Olympics. Bana plays a Mossad agent charged with hunting down the extremists who planned the Munich attack. Some of the rhetoric is clumsy, but the film-makers strive to be politically even-handed. Friday 1 June Tracey Breaks the News: Ullman as Michael Gove Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm After losing her to the USA for 30 years, Tracey Ullman’s return to our shores two years ago has reminded us of her unparalleled talents as an impressionist. She captures the physicality of her famous subjects – Angela Merkel and Judi Dench are standouts – as well as their voices, and hats off to Ullman’s prosthetics teams for her remarkable transformations. After an acting stint in last year’s Howards End, Ullman returns to her comfort zone tonight with a second series of the topical sketch comedy show in which she skewers politicians, mostly – although we’ll also be treated to more of Ben Miller’s scene-stealing Rupert Murdoch, with Ullman as Jerry Hall. Although no preview tape was available due to last-minute filming, Ullman was pictured as Michael Gove in promotional material and has also promised impressions of Jeremy Corbyn and Jacob Rees-Mogg. The previous series attracted criticism for weak writing, and some skits do lack bite, but slack should be cut – it’s a notoriously difficult format to pull off. Ullman’s gift for mimicry means she hits the mark often enough for the show to be a welcome bit of light satire to wind up the week. VP Extreme Wales with Richard Parks BBC Two, 7.30pm Tonight’s final episode of Richard Parks’s adventure programme combines extreme sports with lush panoramas of the Welsh landscape. Daredevil Parks takes to the skies on a paramotor – nothing more than a parachute connected to a fan-like motor – to propel him the length of the country. VP The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Fugitive immigrant Taariq Shirazi (Alexander Behrang Keshtkar) makes a desperate bid to flee as the Scandi-noir crime series continues. When Saga (Sofia Helin) and Henrik (Thure Lindhardt) track him down, however, Saga’s inability to tell a lie has serious consequences. VP Friday Night Dinner Channel 4, 10.00pm This sitcom’s family squabbles are more uncomfortably familiar than laugh-out-loud funny in tonight’s penultimate visit to the Goodmans’ home. Writer Robert Popper capitalises on Simon Bird’s musical skills by having his character, Adam, reluctantly play the violin to cheer up Grandma. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm; Ethan Hawke, Toni Collette, Jo Brand and Aidan Turner offer their funniest anecdotes tonight. Plus, Liam Payne continues his post-One Direction solo career with a performance his new single, Familiar. VP The Everly Brothers: Harmonies from Heaven BBC Four, 9.00pm Art Garfunkel, Keith Richards and Graham Nash are among the luminaries paying tribute to Don and Phil Everly in this 2016 documentary, all of them claiming the brothers as an influence. Surviving sibling Don Everly returns to Iowa to recount the brothers’ first appearances, their pivotal move to Nashville and stardom in the late Fifties. Africa: A Journey into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm So much of the music we listen to has its roots in African music. In this new three-part documentary series, London DJ Rita Ray sets off to explore the continent’s influence. Kicking off her journey in Nigeria, Ray stumbles across impromptu drumming ceremonies in the streets as she explores the importance of rhythm in the country’s music and meets its major players. Future episodes take her to Mali and South Africa. VP Crocodile Dundee (1986) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.10pm Mick “Crocodile” Dundee (Paul Hogan), a bushman from northern Australia, is a dab hand at surviving in the Outback. But when he is invited to New York City by Sue Charlton (Linda Kozlowski), a high-class reporter, in this Oscar-nominated comedy drama, he finds life far tougher in the urban jungle. He’s a survivor though: muggers who accost Dundee discover that he has a bigger knife than they do. American Made (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Doug Liman directs Tom Cruise in this lively, madcap real-life tale of pilot, drug smuggler and CIA gun-runner Barry Seal, whose supersonic, if lawless, career path began, according to this script, when he was a bored TWA pilot in 1978 and was approached out of the blue by a CIA handler (Domhnall Gleeson, all greasy persuasion) to conduct reconnaissance flights across the Caribbean. GoodFellas (1990) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm Martin Scorsese’s Mafia masterpiece, adapted from a non-fiction book, has all the qualities of great cinema: it’s thrilling, it’s provocative, it’s stylish, and it’s got a young Robert De Niro in it. Ray Liotta plays the youngster who longs to be a gangster; De Niro and Joe Pesci are in the Mob. Pesci’s mother, meanwhile, reportedly asked him if he had to swear quite so much – the f-word is used 300 times. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
Sunday 27 May Imagine… Orhan Pamuk: a Strange Mind BBC One, 10.30pm Although Imagine… covers the panoply of the arts, Alan Yentob always seems most comfortable in the company of authors, which is why this, A Strange Mind, is one of the most rewarding instalments for a while. In being content here to act as audience rather than interrogator, Yentob allows Nobel Prize winner Orhan Pamuk to amble across some fertile intellectual territory. Born into a secular middle-class family, Pamuk dreamt of being an artist or architect, only to turn to writing when he was faced with a likely future of redesigning much of his native Istanbul’s old city (a glance at a sketchbook suggests his talent is far from dormant). The resulting novels, which include Snow and My Name is Red, explore the clashes of ancient and modern, East and West, religious and secular, with a fearlessness that brought Pamuk into conflict with Turkey’s authoritarian government, but also the love of many compatriots. Pamuk is loquacious, generous company and, while this functions well as an autobiographical profile and assessment of his literary achievements, it also does something far harder and more impressive in capturing something of the essence of its subject. GT Countryfile BBC One, 6.30pm As a celebration of 30 years of Countryfile and the 65th anniversary of the Queen’s Coronation, Matt Baker, Anita Rani and John Craven explore the Royal family’s Windsor Estate. Among the topics are the livestock breeding that has saved one equine breed from extinction and the Queen’s own early experiences here. GT The London Palladium: the Greatest Stage on Earth ITV, 8.00pm Bradley Walsh ropes in some heavyweight talent to pay tribute to the venerable theatre in this one-off special. Andrew Lloyd Webber, Jim Dale, Beverley Knight and Stephen Fry are among those recounting their memories of the place in a lavish affair that is worth watching if only for some gorgeous, little-seen archive footage of Morecambe and Wise. GT A Very English Scandal BBC One, 9.00pm Norman Scott (Ben Whishaw) turns the screw on Jeremy Thorpe (Hugh Grant) as the latter’s profile grows – a decision that can only lead to disaster as Russell T Davies’s wonderful miniseries continues. GT The Handmaid’s Tale Channel 4, 9.00pm The Colonies are shaken by a new arrival while Offred (Elisabeth Moss) adjusts to a life in hiding, in a second series of the dystopian drama which, if anything, hits harder than its predecessor. GT The Break with Michelle Wolf Netflix, from today Fresh from her bold but divisive monologue at the White House Correspondents’ Dinner, where she witheringly attacked the Trump administration and humiliated his Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders, comedian Michelle Wolf launches a weekly variety series of stand-up and sketch comedy. GT Jonathan Meades on Jargon BBC Four, 10.30pm Arguably the most provocative and stimulating broadcaster around, Jonathan Meades dissects politics and football commentary, among other areas of public life, for insights into how jargon and slang are used to obfuscate and mislead. Its verbal vivacity, driven by an honestly felt fury at the desecration of the English language, is matched by visual intrigue, unlikely juxtapositions and an admirable willingness of the host to send himself up, all ably helmed by Meades’s regular collaborator Francis Hanly. GT The Goonies (1985) ★★★★☆ Universal TV, 3.00pm A cult favourite, this rollicking adventure follows a group of teenage friends from the “Goon Docks” area of Oregon (played by, among others, Corey Feldman, Josh Brolin and Sean Astin) on the hunt for a hoard of pirate treasure. Blocking their path, however, is a family of criminals, the Fratellis. Steven Spielberg dreamed up the story; Chris Columbus (Home Alone) wrote the screenplay. The Hunger Games: Catching Fire (2013) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 10.10pm This lithe adaptation of the second novel from Suzanne Collins’s trilogy sees Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence) competing once again in a televised fight to the death. But since the last film, Katniss has become an icon of rebellion, and the ruling class wants to bring her down a peg or two. This enormously watchable film blends whip-cracking action, oddball aesthetic and entirely laudable message. The Ides of March (2011) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.35pm George Clooney is the director, co-writer and star of this politically charged thriller about spin, soured idealism and dirty secrets. Mike Morris (Clooney) is a liberal state governor running for the Democratic Party’s presidential nomination. Ryan Gosling steals the show as the campaign’s devoted but ambitious press secretary, whose loyalties are tested to the limit. A gripping film that engages and entertains. Monday 28 May King Lear: Anthony Hopkins King Lear BBC Two, 9.30pm Talk about event TV: After making movie magic in Howards End and The Remains of the Day, Anthony Hopkins and Emma Thompson, are reunited in Shakespeare’s tragedy, King Lear, under the direction of Richard Eyre. Plus they have a stellar supporting cast, that includes Jim Broadbent, Emily Watson and Andrew Scott. Eyre sets this version in a fictional modern-day and moves the action between castles and modern locales, such as a rundown shopping precinct, to keep it contemporary. Hopkins is on great form as Lear – his old king seems to be suffering from dementia from the start, making sense of his rashness in disinheriting youngest daughter Cordelia (Florence Pugh), of him kissing another, Regan (Watson), full on the lips, and of failing to recognise other loved ones. Eyre has cut the play judiciously and brings an interesting take on Lear – that it’s about flawed parenting – that offers some insight into the behaviour of his children. Ultimately, however, it’s about Lear’s tragedy, not theirs, and Hopkins delivers a barnstorming central performance. Having played the role more than 30 years ago at the National Theatre, he’s truly grown into it. VP Richard Osman’s House of Games BBC Two, 6.00pm Pointless’s scene-stealing sidekick Richard Osman gets his moment to shine as quizmaster of this trivia contest, returning for a five-night run with BBC Breakfast’s Naga Munchetty among those competing. It’s followed by a new series of game show Curious Creatures, hosted by Kate Humble. VP Britain’s Got Talent ITV, 7.30pm Declan Donnelly flies solo as host of the semi-finals, airing nightly up to next weekend’s final. Each evening, eight of the 40 acts will perform again in the hope of becoming one of two promoted to the final by the voting public. The results are at 9.30pm. VP Springwatch 2018 BBC Two, 8.00pm Cute footage of hatchlings and deft presenting by Chris Packham and Michaela Strachan provide a winning formula for this three-week wildlife extravaganza. Gillian Burke returns, this time as a roving reporter, with Steve Backshall the first of the guests replacing the much-missed Martin Hughes-Games. VP Peter Kay’s Car Share: The Finale BBC One, 10.00pm Bowing to fan pressure, Peter Kay offers closure with this finale to his charming comedy about supermarket employees sharing the journey to and from work. Laughs and surprises abound on John and Kayleigh’s (Kay and Sian Gibson) last jaunt, but will romance ensue? VP The Vicar of Dibley Gold, 7.40pm Here’s a chance to revisit the last-ever episode of Richard Curtis’s sitcom, which delivers a fairy-tale finale for Geraldine Granger (Dawn French) when she marries Harry (Richard Armitage). Hugh Bonneville makes an amusing cameo as a lovesick vicar in the episode that also showcases French’s chemistry with the late Emma Chambers, who played daft Alice Tinker. VP Nigel Kennedy at the Biggest Weekend BBC Four, 8.30pm The BBC’s music festival welcomes maverick violinist Nigel Kennedy to Coventry’s War Memorial Park. Suzy Klein and Lloyd Coleman present as Kennedy performs his inimitable renditions of Vivaldi and Jimi Hendrix with the BBC Concert Orchestra. VP WestWorld Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm As part of her master plan, Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood) appears to be taking control over Bernard (Jeffrey Wright) in this episode of the futuristic drama and his confusion grows. VP Over the Hedge (2006) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.25am An endearing animated adventure about a group of forest creatures that, on waking after their winter hibernation, discover humans have moved in next door to them. Apprehension gives way to curiosity and excitement as they discover what the humans have to offer. Featuring the voices of Bruce Willis, Steve Carell and Avril Lavigne, among others, it’s an enjoyable movie with a message – but avoids getting too preachy. Sing Street (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Young love is set to an Eighties beat in this delightful coming-of-age tale. As with all of John Carney’s films (i.e. 2006 hit Once), the message is clear: where there is music, there is hope. The film rattles along to a cracking soundtrack – The Jam, Motörhead, The Cure – as young Conor (Ferdia Walsh-Peelo) chaotically tries to put together a band to impress a girl at school. Brideshead Revisited (2008) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.25pm In the light of the 1981 TV version of Evelyn Waugh’s novel, you do have to admire the chutzpah of anyone else giving Brideshead a go. Julian Jarrold’s attempt suffers from a desire to force modern conventions upon a story defined by the mores of upper-class interwar Britain. Hayley Atwell and Ben Whishaw are the Flyte siblings, but Catholicism, the tale’s engine, is only pernicious, never seductive. Tuesday 29 May Arrested Development Grammar Schools: Who Will Get In? BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Few education issues are as contentious in this country as that of grammar schools, with Prime Minister Theresa May among those supporting their return. This thought-provoking three-part documentary focusing on the London borough of Bexley, where each year over 5,000 children sit the selective exam for one of the area’s four grammar schools, could not, therefore, have come at a better time. We hear from both sides of the debate and are shown both the benefits and drawbacks of attending either a grammar or secondary modern school – although, as always, it’s the parents and children who make the most notable contributions. “If you want your child to become better in their future life, it’s good to go to a grammar school,” says one mother, who works long hours for minimum wage and pays £300 a month for a tutor for her daughter. Meanwhile, another, herself the product of a grammar school, despairs of the increasing parental competitiveness. And, for all the film-makers’ admirably even-handed approach, it’s the stress felt by the children that makes the biggest mark, with one youngster noting: “I don’t think grammar school is fair because people are far too young to feel they’ve failed.” SH Emmerdale ITV, 7.00pm Emmerdale confronts the difficult subject of child abuse when Charity Dingle (Emma Atkins) opens up about her past in this special flashback episode. Last November a similar technique was used, to great effect, to shed light on her cousin Cain’s experiences. Mica Proctor, in another triumph of casting, plays the young Charity. SH The Split BBC One, 9.00pm Abi Morgan’s enjoyable family saga comes to a climax with scores settled, decisions made and reconciliations all over the place. It works not least because Morgan never forgets that one person’s happy ending is another’s poisoned chalice, meaning there’s pain amid the laughter. SH The Battle for Britain’s Heroes Channel 4, 9.00pm “Our heroes often have a toxic past,” says Afua Hirsch at the start of this captivating and provocative film. She pulls no punches in her look at the darker side of our history, exploring slavery, racism and colonialism, in a film certain to enrage as many people as it informs. SH 4 Men, 175 Babies: Britain’s Super Sperm Donors Channel 4, 10.00pm This film follows men who donate their sperm for free, via unregulated websites. But why? “Being a sperm donor is like being a Samaritan,” says 61-year-old Clive, who began donating once he retired. SH Arrested Development Netflix, from today For anyone who didn’t watch the patchy fourth series of this popular Emmy-winning comedy about a rich family who lose their wealth, the good news is that you can pick up this new series with no problem. The bad news for those that did watch it is that this opening episode spends ages rehashing past events. Thankfully things do settle down – and become very funny – as we find out what happened after the infamous punch that George Michael (Michael Cera) landed on his father Michael (Jason Bateman). A proper return to form. SH Master of Photography Sky Arts, 8.00pm The international photography contest returns for a third series, with Oliviero Toscani joined on the judging panel by curator Mark Sealy and the New Yorker’s Elisabeth Biondi. Here’s hoping that this series avoids the problems of last year, which saw contestant Souvid Datta accused of plagiarism. SH All Creatures Great and Small (1975) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.45pm Simon Ward and a pre-Silence of the Lambs Anthony Hopkins star as Yorkshire vets James Herriot and Siegfried Farnon in this gentle drama set in the Thirties and based on the first two books of British vet Alf Wight (who wrote under the pseudonym of Herriot). The TV series that followed remains most memorable, but there’s warm-hearted performances here too. Operation Petticoat (1959) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.25pm A beguiling Second World War comedy directed by Blake Edwards and starring Cary Grant as a submarine captain with a strict sense of order and a rule-breaking hustler of a first officer (Tony Curtis). The vessel is bombed by the Japanese, but that’s the least of its worries. Five nurses in distress, a goat and a coating of pink paint all pose challenges for the effortlessly funny crew. The Enforcer (1976) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 11.00pm Clint Eastwood’s Harry Callahan is teamed up with rookie female partner Kate Moore (Tyne Daly) in this entertaining but ultimately disappointing third chapter of the Dirty Harry series. Together they battle violent eco-terrorists who have kidnapped the mayor of San Francisco (John Crawford) while, between the gun battles, cynical Callahan attempts to come to terms with his own male chauvinism. Wednesday 30 May Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt The Big Crash Diet Experiment BBC One, 8.00pm Is it time to rethink our attitude to crash dieting? That’s the question posed by tonight’s revealing documentary, which assesses the health impact of this extreme approach to weight loss. Our guide is Dr Javid Abdelmoneim, who along with a raft of health professionals, aims to challenge orthodox beliefs about what some see as nutritionally inadequate eating regimes with only short-term benefits. Abdelmoneim persuades four obese volunteers to give up the food that they love and opt for a scary-sounding liquid-only intake of soups and shakes, using scans and blood tests to monitor them over nine weeks. Each of the group has their fair share of weight-related issues. Portly Catholic priest Paul, for example, has been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, takeaway fan Rebecca believes that she’s in the grip of a fast-food addiction, and secret binge-eater Yolande already has fatty liver disease. Watching them tackle the programme and shed the pounds is admirable enough, but even more striking is the positive effect that the diet has on their health. In fact, the implications of the results could be a huge money saver for the NHS. TD The Doctor Who Gave Up Drugs BBC One, 9.00pm; Scotland, 10.45pm Dr Chris van Tulleken continues his crusade against the over-medication of children. Tonight, he explores why so many young people are prescribed anti-depressants, and becomes suspicious over the rise in babies diagnosed with cow’s milk allergy. TD Love in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm “The nearest gay scene for me is Belfast,” says cattle farmer Richard, a problem seeing as he lives a three-hour ferry ride away in remote Dumfries and Galloway. Not to be defeated, Richard invites three potential partners to his farm. TD Carry On Brussels Channel 4, 10.00pm More shenanigans from behind the doors of the European Parliament. We meet lone Liberal Democrat MEP Catherine Bearder, whose staunch pro-Europe stance lands her in trouble with Brexit minister David Davis. TD Miranda Barbour: Serial Killer or Liar? BBC One, 10.45pm; Northern Ireland, 11.40pm; Scotland, 11.45pm; Wales, 11.05pm This gripping true crime documentary charts the case of teenage murderer Miranda Barbour. The young mother admitted killing internet date Troy La Ferarra but later confessed to a further 22 murders as part of a Satanic cult. TD Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt Netflix, from today This snappy sitcom about a cult escapee in the big city has proved a delight. A shame, then, that this fourth season is to be its last, with the first six episodes launching today and the remainder to come later this year. Kimmy’s (Ellie Kemper) new job at a tech start-up proves ripe for nerd-baiting satire. TD Big Sky, Big Dreams, Big Art: Made in the USA BBC Four, 9.00pm Presenter Waldemar Januszczak swaps the vastness of the Wild West featured in last week’s episode for the “pulsing, futuristic excitement of the American city”, as his fascinating series on American art continues. He starts out amid the skyscrapers of New York, explaining how the vaulting architecture of the Chrysler Building exemplified the hope and ambition of the burgeoning metropolis. We then move on to the Great Depression, presaged by artists such as Thomas Hart Benton in his restless murals of urban life. TD Great Expectations (1946, b/w) ★★★★★ BBC Two, 12.35pm David Lean’s peerless version of Dickens’s novel is packed with memorable moments, from its opening scenes on the marshes, where Pip first meets the escaped convict Magwitch, to the enduring images of Miss Havisham’s house… not forgetting Pip’s boxing match with Herbert Pocket. John Mills is twice the age of the book’s Pip, but there’s a subtle ingenuousness in his performance. Rebecca (1940, b/w) ★★★★★ Talking Pictures TV, 9.00pm One of Hitchcock’s most disconcerting and finest films was adapted from a Daphne du Maurier story, though he departed from the text in many ways. A bride (Joan Fontaine) is haunted by the memory of her husband’s (Laurence Olivier) dead first wife. The excellent cast (Judith Anderson as formidable housekeeper Mrs Danvers is a particular highlight) adds class to this eerily suspenseful treat. Inglourious Basterds (2009) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 10.00pm It wasn’t quite the masterpiece we were told to expect, but Quentin Tarantino’s pastiche of war films and spaghetti westerns is still rollicking good fun and has all the ingredients of a classic Tarantino film. A celebration of vengeance, it’s an audacious take on the Second World War. Christoph Waltz deservedly won an Oscar for his incendiary turn as the “Jew Hunter”. Brad Pitt also stars. Thursday 31 May Humans Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm This third series of the thoughtful British science-fiction drama continues to benefit from a narrowing of focus; the big-name American actors and slightly strained global perspective have gone, but the thematic ambition has been retained. Less wilfully obscure than Sky Atlantic’s Westworld and considerably more affecting, Humans instead keeps a tight focus on emotion and relationships, whether the characters concerned are flesh and blood or gears and circuits. It can be heavy-handed with the allegories, certainly, but it’s never chilling or humourless – and leading synth performers Gemma Chan, Ivanno Jeremiah and Emily Berrington are as uncanny as ever. Mark Bonnar, too, is proving a handy addition to the cast as Neil, Laura’s (a brilliant Katherine Parkinson) professional antagonist and love interest – Bonnar’s history of playing characters with shifting loyalties comes in handy as Neil first opens his heart and then hardens his stance on the Dryden Commission. Mia (Chan), meanwhile, is on a one-synth mission to demonstrate coexistence is possible by moving into a hostile housing estate, and Leo (Colin Morgan) struggles with the realities of being human. GT Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm This week begins with chocolate puddings, which means the contestants are challenged to rustle up black forest gateaux and a dessert integrating a root vegetable, then aubergines and tofu take centre stage before the elimination round and an oriental classic. GT Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm Hollings and their “British chophouse classics” square up to an Italian-influenced brand serving fresh pasta from a cheese wheel, as Fred Sireix and a group of high-street investors gauge their potential. GT Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm Now with a Bafta award under its belt, this fine series follows the West Midlands Ambulance Service over the last Saturday night before Christmas. An inevitably busy period is made harder by a major traffic accident in central Birmingham – an incident which puts tremendous mental and physical demands on the crews, documented here with the clarity and honesty we’ve come to expect from the series. GT Great Art ITV, 10.50pm; not STV Tim Marlow takes a tour of the Royal Academy’s sell-out exhibition of the Parisian artist’s portraits, in the process assessing the man’s life, work, and reputation as “the father of modern art”. GT Urban Myths: Sex Pistols vs Bill Grundy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This pop cultural landmark, in which punk pioneers Sex Pistols grumbled, swore and generally misbehaved on Bill Grundy’s sleepily complacent regional chat-show, creating a national storm of outrage in the process, arguably received its definitive tribute from Kevin Eldon in 2013. The comedian’s loving reconstruction of the event imagined the Pistols as Amish people and bordered on performance art. Still, this gleefully silly take on the infamous encounter between the jobbing broadcaster (Steve Pemberton) and the Sex Pistols (played by members of the National Youth Theatre) is a lot of fun. GT Barry Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The eponymous depressed hitman (Bill Hader) tries to go it alone, only to be thwarted by his reckless partner Taylor (Dale Pavinski) and ructions among members of his acting class. GT Billion Dollar Brain (1967) ★★★★☆ Film4, 5.00pm Michael Caine returns as the reluctant secret agent Harry Palmer (The Ipcress File, Funeral in Berlin) in this film from Ken Russell, based on the novels by Len Deighton. Having left the British Secret Service to pursue a career as a private investigator, Palmer stumbles into a plot to overthrow Communism with the help of a supercomputer. But who is working for whom? It’s far-fetched but fun. Johnny Mnemonic (1995) ★★☆☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm Fresh from the rubber-burning success of Speed and four short years before The Matrix, Keanu Reeves starred in this high-concept dystopian adventure as the eponymous anti-hero – a 21st-century courier whose augmented brain is used to transport illicit data – that very nearly ruined his career. It’s adapted by cyberpunk godfather William Gibson from his own story. Munich (2005) ★★★☆☆ AMC, 12.50am Eric Bana stars in Steven Spielberg’s audacious, if lengthy, examination of the Israel-Palestine conflict. Set in 1972, it adroitly tackles the aftermath of the massacre of 11 Israeli Olympic athletes at the Munich Olympics. Bana plays a Mossad agent charged with hunting down the extremists who planned the Munich attack. Some of the rhetoric is clumsy, but the film-makers strive to be politically even-handed. Friday 1 June Tracey Breaks the News: Ullman as Michael Gove Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm After losing her to the USA for 30 years, Tracey Ullman’s return to our shores two years ago has reminded us of her unparalleled talents as an impressionist. She captures the physicality of her famous subjects – Angela Merkel and Judi Dench are standouts – as well as their voices, and hats off to Ullman’s prosthetics teams for her remarkable transformations. After an acting stint in last year’s Howards End, Ullman returns to her comfort zone tonight with a second series of the topical sketch comedy show in which she skewers politicians, mostly – although we’ll also be treated to more of Ben Miller’s scene-stealing Rupert Murdoch, with Ullman as Jerry Hall. Although no preview tape was available due to last-minute filming, Ullman was pictured as Michael Gove in promotional material and has also promised impressions of Jeremy Corbyn and Jacob Rees-Mogg. The previous series attracted criticism for weak writing, and some skits do lack bite, but slack should be cut – it’s a notoriously difficult format to pull off. Ullman’s gift for mimicry means she hits the mark often enough for the show to be a welcome bit of light satire to wind up the week. VP Extreme Wales with Richard Parks BBC Two, 7.30pm Tonight’s final episode of Richard Parks’s adventure programme combines extreme sports with lush panoramas of the Welsh landscape. Daredevil Parks takes to the skies on a paramotor – nothing more than a parachute connected to a fan-like motor – to propel him the length of the country. VP The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Fugitive immigrant Taariq Shirazi (Alexander Behrang Keshtkar) makes a desperate bid to flee as the Scandi-noir crime series continues. When Saga (Sofia Helin) and Henrik (Thure Lindhardt) track him down, however, Saga’s inability to tell a lie has serious consequences. VP Friday Night Dinner Channel 4, 10.00pm This sitcom’s family squabbles are more uncomfortably familiar than laugh-out-loud funny in tonight’s penultimate visit to the Goodmans’ home. Writer Robert Popper capitalises on Simon Bird’s musical skills by having his character, Adam, reluctantly play the violin to cheer up Grandma. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm; Ethan Hawke, Toni Collette, Jo Brand and Aidan Turner offer their funniest anecdotes tonight. Plus, Liam Payne continues his post-One Direction solo career with a performance his new single, Familiar. VP The Everly Brothers: Harmonies from Heaven BBC Four, 9.00pm Art Garfunkel, Keith Richards and Graham Nash are among the luminaries paying tribute to Don and Phil Everly in this 2016 documentary, all of them claiming the brothers as an influence. Surviving sibling Don Everly returns to Iowa to recount the brothers’ first appearances, their pivotal move to Nashville and stardom in the late Fifties. Africa: A Journey into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm So much of the music we listen to has its roots in African music. In this new three-part documentary series, London DJ Rita Ray sets off to explore the continent’s influence. Kicking off her journey in Nigeria, Ray stumbles across impromptu drumming ceremonies in the streets as she explores the importance of rhythm in the country’s music and meets its major players. Future episodes take her to Mali and South Africa. VP Crocodile Dundee (1986) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.10pm Mick “Crocodile” Dundee (Paul Hogan), a bushman from northern Australia, is a dab hand at surviving in the Outback. But when he is invited to New York City by Sue Charlton (Linda Kozlowski), a high-class reporter, in this Oscar-nominated comedy drama, he finds life far tougher in the urban jungle. He’s a survivor though: muggers who accost Dundee discover that he has a bigger knife than they do. American Made (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Doug Liman directs Tom Cruise in this lively, madcap real-life tale of pilot, drug smuggler and CIA gun-runner Barry Seal, whose supersonic, if lawless, career path began, according to this script, when he was a bored TWA pilot in 1978 and was approached out of the blue by a CIA handler (Domhnall Gleeson, all greasy persuasion) to conduct reconnaissance flights across the Caribbean. GoodFellas (1990) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm Martin Scorsese’s Mafia masterpiece, adapted from a non-fiction book, has all the qualities of great cinema: it’s thrilling, it’s provocative, it’s stylish, and it’s got a young Robert De Niro in it. Ray Liotta plays the youngster who longs to be a gangster; De Niro and Joe Pesci are in the Mob. Pesci’s mother, meanwhile, reportedly asked him if he had to swear quite so much – the f-word is used 300 times. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: The Handmaid's Tale, A Very English Scandal and more
Sunday 27 May Imagine… Orhan Pamuk: a Strange Mind BBC One, 10.30pm Although Imagine… covers the panoply of the arts, Alan Yentob always seems most comfortable in the company of authors, which is why this, A Strange Mind, is one of the most rewarding instalments for a while. In being content here to act as audience rather than interrogator, Yentob allows Nobel Prize winner Orhan Pamuk to amble across some fertile intellectual territory. Born into a secular middle-class family, Pamuk dreamt of being an artist or architect, only to turn to writing when he was faced with a likely future of redesigning much of his native Istanbul’s old city (a glance at a sketchbook suggests his talent is far from dormant). The resulting novels, which include Snow and My Name is Red, explore the clashes of ancient and modern, East and West, religious and secular, with a fearlessness that brought Pamuk into conflict with Turkey’s authoritarian government, but also the love of many compatriots. Pamuk is loquacious, generous company and, while this functions well as an autobiographical profile and assessment of his literary achievements, it also does something far harder and more impressive in capturing something of the essence of its subject. GT Countryfile BBC One, 6.30pm As a celebration of 30 years of Countryfile and the 65th anniversary of the Queen’s Coronation, Matt Baker, Anita Rani and John Craven explore the Royal family’s Windsor Estate. Among the topics are the livestock breeding that has saved one equine breed from extinction and the Queen’s own early experiences here. GT The London Palladium: the Greatest Stage on Earth ITV, 8.00pm Bradley Walsh ropes in some heavyweight talent to pay tribute to the venerable theatre in this one-off special. Andrew Lloyd Webber, Jim Dale, Beverley Knight and Stephen Fry are among those recounting their memories of the place in a lavish affair that is worth watching if only for some gorgeous, little-seen archive footage of Morecambe and Wise. GT A Very English Scandal BBC One, 9.00pm Norman Scott (Ben Whishaw) turns the screw on Jeremy Thorpe (Hugh Grant) as the latter’s profile grows – a decision that can only lead to disaster as Russell T Davies’s wonderful miniseries continues. GT The Handmaid’s Tale Channel 4, 9.00pm The Colonies are shaken by a new arrival while Offred (Elisabeth Moss) adjusts to a life in hiding, in a second series of the dystopian drama which, if anything, hits harder than its predecessor. GT The Break with Michelle Wolf Netflix, from today Fresh from her bold but divisive monologue at the White House Correspondents’ Dinner, where she witheringly attacked the Trump administration and humiliated his Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders, comedian Michelle Wolf launches a weekly variety series of stand-up and sketch comedy. GT Jonathan Meades on Jargon BBC Four, 10.30pm Arguably the most provocative and stimulating broadcaster around, Jonathan Meades dissects politics and football commentary, among other areas of public life, for insights into how jargon and slang are used to obfuscate and mislead. Its verbal vivacity, driven by an honestly felt fury at the desecration of the English language, is matched by visual intrigue, unlikely juxtapositions and an admirable willingness of the host to send himself up, all ably helmed by Meades’s regular collaborator Francis Hanly. GT The Goonies (1985) ★★★★☆ Universal TV, 3.00pm A cult favourite, this rollicking adventure follows a group of teenage friends from the “Goon Docks” area of Oregon (played by, among others, Corey Feldman, Josh Brolin and Sean Astin) on the hunt for a hoard of pirate treasure. Blocking their path, however, is a family of criminals, the Fratellis. Steven Spielberg dreamed up the story; Chris Columbus (Home Alone) wrote the screenplay. The Hunger Games: Catching Fire (2013) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 10.10pm This lithe adaptation of the second novel from Suzanne Collins’s trilogy sees Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence) competing once again in a televised fight to the death. But since the last film, Katniss has become an icon of rebellion, and the ruling class wants to bring her down a peg or two. This enormously watchable film blends whip-cracking action, oddball aesthetic and entirely laudable message. The Ides of March (2011) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.35pm George Clooney is the director, co-writer and star of this politically charged thriller about spin, soured idealism and dirty secrets. Mike Morris (Clooney) is a liberal state governor running for the Democratic Party’s presidential nomination. Ryan Gosling steals the show as the campaign’s devoted but ambitious press secretary, whose loyalties are tested to the limit. A gripping film that engages and entertains. Monday 28 May King Lear: Anthony Hopkins King Lear BBC Two, 9.30pm Talk about event TV: After making movie magic in Howards End and The Remains of the Day, Anthony Hopkins and Emma Thompson, are reunited in Shakespeare’s tragedy, King Lear, under the direction of Richard Eyre. Plus they have a stellar supporting cast, that includes Jim Broadbent, Emily Watson and Andrew Scott. Eyre sets this version in a fictional modern-day and moves the action between castles and modern locales, such as a rundown shopping precinct, to keep it contemporary. Hopkins is on great form as Lear – his old king seems to be suffering from dementia from the start, making sense of his rashness in disinheriting youngest daughter Cordelia (Florence Pugh), of him kissing another, Regan (Watson), full on the lips, and of failing to recognise other loved ones. Eyre has cut the play judiciously and brings an interesting take on Lear – that it’s about flawed parenting – that offers some insight into the behaviour of his children. Ultimately, however, it’s about Lear’s tragedy, not theirs, and Hopkins delivers a barnstorming central performance. Having played the role more than 30 years ago at the National Theatre, he’s truly grown into it. VP Richard Osman’s House of Games BBC Two, 6.00pm Pointless’s scene-stealing sidekick Richard Osman gets his moment to shine as quizmaster of this trivia contest, returning for a five-night run with BBC Breakfast’s Naga Munchetty among those competing. It’s followed by a new series of game show Curious Creatures, hosted by Kate Humble. VP Britain’s Got Talent ITV, 7.30pm Declan Donnelly flies solo as host of the semi-finals, airing nightly up to next weekend’s final. Each evening, eight of the 40 acts will perform again in the hope of becoming one of two promoted to the final by the voting public. The results are at 9.30pm. VP Springwatch 2018 BBC Two, 8.00pm Cute footage of hatchlings and deft presenting by Chris Packham and Michaela Strachan provide a winning formula for this three-week wildlife extravaganza. Gillian Burke returns, this time as a roving reporter, with Steve Backshall the first of the guests replacing the much-missed Martin Hughes-Games. VP Peter Kay’s Car Share: The Finale BBC One, 10.00pm Bowing to fan pressure, Peter Kay offers closure with this finale to his charming comedy about supermarket employees sharing the journey to and from work. Laughs and surprises abound on John and Kayleigh’s (Kay and Sian Gibson) last jaunt, but will romance ensue? VP The Vicar of Dibley Gold, 7.40pm Here’s a chance to revisit the last-ever episode of Richard Curtis’s sitcom, which delivers a fairy-tale finale for Geraldine Granger (Dawn French) when she marries Harry (Richard Armitage). Hugh Bonneville makes an amusing cameo as a lovesick vicar in the episode that also showcases French’s chemistry with the late Emma Chambers, who played daft Alice Tinker. VP Nigel Kennedy at the Biggest Weekend BBC Four, 8.30pm The BBC’s music festival welcomes maverick violinist Nigel Kennedy to Coventry’s War Memorial Park. Suzy Klein and Lloyd Coleman present as Kennedy performs his inimitable renditions of Vivaldi and Jimi Hendrix with the BBC Concert Orchestra. VP WestWorld Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm As part of her master plan, Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood) appears to be taking control over Bernard (Jeffrey Wright) in this episode of the futuristic drama and his confusion grows. VP Over the Hedge (2006) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.25am An endearing animated adventure about a group of forest creatures that, on waking after their winter hibernation, discover humans have moved in next door to them. Apprehension gives way to curiosity and excitement as they discover what the humans have to offer. Featuring the voices of Bruce Willis, Steve Carell and Avril Lavigne, among others, it’s an enjoyable movie with a message – but avoids getting too preachy. Sing Street (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Young love is set to an Eighties beat in this delightful coming-of-age tale. As with all of John Carney’s films (i.e. 2006 hit Once), the message is clear: where there is music, there is hope. The film rattles along to a cracking soundtrack – The Jam, Motörhead, The Cure – as young Conor (Ferdia Walsh-Peelo) chaotically tries to put together a band to impress a girl at school. Brideshead Revisited (2008) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.25pm In the light of the 1981 TV version of Evelyn Waugh’s novel, you do have to admire the chutzpah of anyone else giving Brideshead a go. Julian Jarrold’s attempt suffers from a desire to force modern conventions upon a story defined by the mores of upper-class interwar Britain. Hayley Atwell and Ben Whishaw are the Flyte siblings, but Catholicism, the tale’s engine, is only pernicious, never seductive. Tuesday 29 May Arrested Development Grammar Schools: Who Will Get In? BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Few education issues are as contentious in this country as that of grammar schools, with Prime Minister Theresa May among those supporting their return. This thought-provoking three-part documentary focusing on the London borough of Bexley, where each year over 5,000 children sit the selective exam for one of the area’s four grammar schools, could not, therefore, have come at a better time. We hear from both sides of the debate and are shown both the benefits and drawbacks of attending either a grammar or secondary modern school – although, as always, it’s the parents and children who make the most notable contributions. “If you want your child to become better in their future life, it’s good to go to a grammar school,” says one mother, who works long hours for minimum wage and pays £300 a month for a tutor for her daughter. Meanwhile, another, herself the product of a grammar school, despairs of the increasing parental competitiveness. And, for all the film-makers’ admirably even-handed approach, it’s the stress felt by the children that makes the biggest mark, with one youngster noting: “I don’t think grammar school is fair because people are far too young to feel they’ve failed.” SH Emmerdale ITV, 7.00pm Emmerdale confronts the difficult subject of child abuse when Charity Dingle (Emma Atkins) opens up about her past in this special flashback episode. Last November a similar technique was used, to great effect, to shed light on her cousin Cain’s experiences. Mica Proctor, in another triumph of casting, plays the young Charity. SH The Split BBC One, 9.00pm Abi Morgan’s enjoyable family saga comes to a climax with scores settled, decisions made and reconciliations all over the place. It works not least because Morgan never forgets that one person’s happy ending is another’s poisoned chalice, meaning there’s pain amid the laughter. SH The Battle for Britain’s Heroes Channel 4, 9.00pm “Our heroes often have a toxic past,” says Afua Hirsch at the start of this captivating and provocative film. She pulls no punches in her look at the darker side of our history, exploring slavery, racism and colonialism, in a film certain to enrage as many people as it informs. SH 4 Men, 175 Babies: Britain’s Super Sperm Donors Channel 4, 10.00pm This film follows men who donate their sperm for free, via unregulated websites. But why? “Being a sperm donor is like being a Samaritan,” says 61-year-old Clive, who began donating once he retired. SH Arrested Development Netflix, from today For anyone who didn’t watch the patchy fourth series of this popular Emmy-winning comedy about a rich family who lose their wealth, the good news is that you can pick up this new series with no problem. The bad news for those that did watch it is that this opening episode spends ages rehashing past events. Thankfully things do settle down – and become very funny – as we find out what happened after the infamous punch that George Michael (Michael Cera) landed on his father Michael (Jason Bateman). A proper return to form. SH Master of Photography Sky Arts, 8.00pm The international photography contest returns for a third series, with Oliviero Toscani joined on the judging panel by curator Mark Sealy and the New Yorker’s Elisabeth Biondi. Here’s hoping that this series avoids the problems of last year, which saw contestant Souvid Datta accused of plagiarism. SH All Creatures Great and Small (1975) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.45pm Simon Ward and a pre-Silence of the Lambs Anthony Hopkins star as Yorkshire vets James Herriot and Siegfried Farnon in this gentle drama set in the Thirties and based on the first two books of British vet Alf Wight (who wrote under the pseudonym of Herriot). The TV series that followed remains most memorable, but there’s warm-hearted performances here too. Operation Petticoat (1959) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.25pm A beguiling Second World War comedy directed by Blake Edwards and starring Cary Grant as a submarine captain with a strict sense of order and a rule-breaking hustler of a first officer (Tony Curtis). The vessel is bombed by the Japanese, but that’s the least of its worries. Five nurses in distress, a goat and a coating of pink paint all pose challenges for the effortlessly funny crew. The Enforcer (1976) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 11.00pm Clint Eastwood’s Harry Callahan is teamed up with rookie female partner Kate Moore (Tyne Daly) in this entertaining but ultimately disappointing third chapter of the Dirty Harry series. Together they battle violent eco-terrorists who have kidnapped the mayor of San Francisco (John Crawford) while, between the gun battles, cynical Callahan attempts to come to terms with his own male chauvinism. Wednesday 30 May Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt The Big Crash Diet Experiment BBC One, 8.00pm Is it time to rethink our attitude to crash dieting? That’s the question posed by tonight’s revealing documentary, which assesses the health impact of this extreme approach to weight loss. Our guide is Dr Javid Abdelmoneim, who along with a raft of health professionals, aims to challenge orthodox beliefs about what some see as nutritionally inadequate eating regimes with only short-term benefits. Abdelmoneim persuades four obese volunteers to give up the food that they love and opt for a scary-sounding liquid-only intake of soups and shakes, using scans and blood tests to monitor them over nine weeks. Each of the group has their fair share of weight-related issues. Portly Catholic priest Paul, for example, has been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, takeaway fan Rebecca believes that she’s in the grip of a fast-food addiction, and secret binge-eater Yolande already has fatty liver disease. Watching them tackle the programme and shed the pounds is admirable enough, but even more striking is the positive effect that the diet has on their health. In fact, the implications of the results could be a huge money saver for the NHS. TD The Doctor Who Gave Up Drugs BBC One, 9.00pm; Scotland, 10.45pm Dr Chris van Tulleken continues his crusade against the over-medication of children. Tonight, he explores why so many young people are prescribed anti-depressants, and becomes suspicious over the rise in babies diagnosed with cow’s milk allergy. TD Love in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm “The nearest gay scene for me is Belfast,” says cattle farmer Richard, a problem seeing as he lives a three-hour ferry ride away in remote Dumfries and Galloway. Not to be defeated, Richard invites three potential partners to his farm. TD Carry On Brussels Channel 4, 10.00pm More shenanigans from behind the doors of the European Parliament. We meet lone Liberal Democrat MEP Catherine Bearder, whose staunch pro-Europe stance lands her in trouble with Brexit minister David Davis. TD Miranda Barbour: Serial Killer or Liar? BBC One, 10.45pm; Northern Ireland, 11.40pm; Scotland, 11.45pm; Wales, 11.05pm This gripping true crime documentary charts the case of teenage murderer Miranda Barbour. The young mother admitted killing internet date Troy La Ferarra but later confessed to a further 22 murders as part of a Satanic cult. TD Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt Netflix, from today This snappy sitcom about a cult escapee in the big city has proved a delight. A shame, then, that this fourth season is to be its last, with the first six episodes launching today and the remainder to come later this year. Kimmy’s (Ellie Kemper) new job at a tech start-up proves ripe for nerd-baiting satire. TD Big Sky, Big Dreams, Big Art: Made in the USA BBC Four, 9.00pm Presenter Waldemar Januszczak swaps the vastness of the Wild West featured in last week’s episode for the “pulsing, futuristic excitement of the American city”, as his fascinating series on American art continues. He starts out amid the skyscrapers of New York, explaining how the vaulting architecture of the Chrysler Building exemplified the hope and ambition of the burgeoning metropolis. We then move on to the Great Depression, presaged by artists such as Thomas Hart Benton in his restless murals of urban life. TD Great Expectations (1946, b/w) ★★★★★ BBC Two, 12.35pm David Lean’s peerless version of Dickens’s novel is packed with memorable moments, from its opening scenes on the marshes, where Pip first meets the escaped convict Magwitch, to the enduring images of Miss Havisham’s house… not forgetting Pip’s boxing match with Herbert Pocket. John Mills is twice the age of the book’s Pip, but there’s a subtle ingenuousness in his performance. Rebecca (1940, b/w) ★★★★★ Talking Pictures TV, 9.00pm One of Hitchcock’s most disconcerting and finest films was adapted from a Daphne du Maurier story, though he departed from the text in many ways. A bride (Joan Fontaine) is haunted by the memory of her husband’s (Laurence Olivier) dead first wife. The excellent cast (Judith Anderson as formidable housekeeper Mrs Danvers is a particular highlight) adds class to this eerily suspenseful treat. Inglourious Basterds (2009) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 10.00pm It wasn’t quite the masterpiece we were told to expect, but Quentin Tarantino’s pastiche of war films and spaghetti westerns is still rollicking good fun and has all the ingredients of a classic Tarantino film. A celebration of vengeance, it’s an audacious take on the Second World War. Christoph Waltz deservedly won an Oscar for his incendiary turn as the “Jew Hunter”. Brad Pitt also stars. Thursday 31 May Humans Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm This third series of the thoughtful British science-fiction drama continues to benefit from a narrowing of focus; the big-name American actors and slightly strained global perspective have gone, but the thematic ambition has been retained. Less wilfully obscure than Sky Atlantic’s Westworld and considerably more affecting, Humans instead keeps a tight focus on emotion and relationships, whether the characters concerned are flesh and blood or gears and circuits. It can be heavy-handed with the allegories, certainly, but it’s never chilling or humourless – and leading synth performers Gemma Chan, Ivanno Jeremiah and Emily Berrington are as uncanny as ever. Mark Bonnar, too, is proving a handy addition to the cast as Neil, Laura’s (a brilliant Katherine Parkinson) professional antagonist and love interest – Bonnar’s history of playing characters with shifting loyalties comes in handy as Neil first opens his heart and then hardens his stance on the Dryden Commission. Mia (Chan), meanwhile, is on a one-synth mission to demonstrate coexistence is possible by moving into a hostile housing estate, and Leo (Colin Morgan) struggles with the realities of being human. GT Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm This week begins with chocolate puddings, which means the contestants are challenged to rustle up black forest gateaux and a dessert integrating a root vegetable, then aubergines and tofu take centre stage before the elimination round and an oriental classic. GT Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm Hollings and their “British chophouse classics” square up to an Italian-influenced brand serving fresh pasta from a cheese wheel, as Fred Sireix and a group of high-street investors gauge their potential. GT Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm Now with a Bafta award under its belt, this fine series follows the West Midlands Ambulance Service over the last Saturday night before Christmas. An inevitably busy period is made harder by a major traffic accident in central Birmingham – an incident which puts tremendous mental and physical demands on the crews, documented here with the clarity and honesty we’ve come to expect from the series. GT Great Art ITV, 10.50pm; not STV Tim Marlow takes a tour of the Royal Academy’s sell-out exhibition of the Parisian artist’s portraits, in the process assessing the man’s life, work, and reputation as “the father of modern art”. GT Urban Myths: Sex Pistols vs Bill Grundy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This pop cultural landmark, in which punk pioneers Sex Pistols grumbled, swore and generally misbehaved on Bill Grundy’s sleepily complacent regional chat-show, creating a national storm of outrage in the process, arguably received its definitive tribute from Kevin Eldon in 2013. The comedian’s loving reconstruction of the event imagined the Pistols as Amish people and bordered on performance art. Still, this gleefully silly take on the infamous encounter between the jobbing broadcaster (Steve Pemberton) and the Sex Pistols (played by members of the National Youth Theatre) is a lot of fun. GT Barry Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The eponymous depressed hitman (Bill Hader) tries to go it alone, only to be thwarted by his reckless partner Taylor (Dale Pavinski) and ructions among members of his acting class. GT Billion Dollar Brain (1967) ★★★★☆ Film4, 5.00pm Michael Caine returns as the reluctant secret agent Harry Palmer (The Ipcress File, Funeral in Berlin) in this film from Ken Russell, based on the novels by Len Deighton. Having left the British Secret Service to pursue a career as a private investigator, Palmer stumbles into a plot to overthrow Communism with the help of a supercomputer. But who is working for whom? It’s far-fetched but fun. Johnny Mnemonic (1995) ★★☆☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm Fresh from the rubber-burning success of Speed and four short years before The Matrix, Keanu Reeves starred in this high-concept dystopian adventure as the eponymous anti-hero – a 21st-century courier whose augmented brain is used to transport illicit data – that very nearly ruined his career. It’s adapted by cyberpunk godfather William Gibson from his own story. Munich (2005) ★★★☆☆ AMC, 12.50am Eric Bana stars in Steven Spielberg’s audacious, if lengthy, examination of the Israel-Palestine conflict. Set in 1972, it adroitly tackles the aftermath of the massacre of 11 Israeli Olympic athletes at the Munich Olympics. Bana plays a Mossad agent charged with hunting down the extremists who planned the Munich attack. Some of the rhetoric is clumsy, but the film-makers strive to be politically even-handed. Friday 1 June Tracey Breaks the News: Ullman as Michael Gove Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm After losing her to the USA for 30 years, Tracey Ullman’s return to our shores two years ago has reminded us of her unparalleled talents as an impressionist. She captures the physicality of her famous subjects – Angela Merkel and Judi Dench are standouts – as well as their voices, and hats off to Ullman’s prosthetics teams for her remarkable transformations. After an acting stint in last year’s Howards End, Ullman returns to her comfort zone tonight with a second series of the topical sketch comedy show in which she skewers politicians, mostly – although we’ll also be treated to more of Ben Miller’s scene-stealing Rupert Murdoch, with Ullman as Jerry Hall. Although no preview tape was available due to last-minute filming, Ullman was pictured as Michael Gove in promotional material and has also promised impressions of Jeremy Corbyn and Jacob Rees-Mogg. The previous series attracted criticism for weak writing, and some skits do lack bite, but slack should be cut – it’s a notoriously difficult format to pull off. Ullman’s gift for mimicry means she hits the mark often enough for the show to be a welcome bit of light satire to wind up the week. VP Extreme Wales with Richard Parks BBC Two, 7.30pm Tonight’s final episode of Richard Parks’s adventure programme combines extreme sports with lush panoramas of the Welsh landscape. Daredevil Parks takes to the skies on a paramotor – nothing more than a parachute connected to a fan-like motor – to propel him the length of the country. VP The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Fugitive immigrant Taariq Shirazi (Alexander Behrang Keshtkar) makes a desperate bid to flee as the Scandi-noir crime series continues. When Saga (Sofia Helin) and Henrik (Thure Lindhardt) track him down, however, Saga’s inability to tell a lie has serious consequences. VP Friday Night Dinner Channel 4, 10.00pm This sitcom’s family squabbles are more uncomfortably familiar than laugh-out-loud funny in tonight’s penultimate visit to the Goodmans’ home. Writer Robert Popper capitalises on Simon Bird’s musical skills by having his character, Adam, reluctantly play the violin to cheer up Grandma. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm; Ethan Hawke, Toni Collette, Jo Brand and Aidan Turner offer their funniest anecdotes tonight. Plus, Liam Payne continues his post-One Direction solo career with a performance his new single, Familiar. VP The Everly Brothers: Harmonies from Heaven BBC Four, 9.00pm Art Garfunkel, Keith Richards and Graham Nash are among the luminaries paying tribute to Don and Phil Everly in this 2016 documentary, all of them claiming the brothers as an influence. Surviving sibling Don Everly returns to Iowa to recount the brothers’ first appearances, their pivotal move to Nashville and stardom in the late Fifties. Africa: A Journey into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm So much of the music we listen to has its roots in African music. In this new three-part documentary series, London DJ Rita Ray sets off to explore the continent’s influence. Kicking off her journey in Nigeria, Ray stumbles across impromptu drumming ceremonies in the streets as she explores the importance of rhythm in the country’s music and meets its major players. Future episodes take her to Mali and South Africa. VP Crocodile Dundee (1986) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.10pm Mick “Crocodile” Dundee (Paul Hogan), a bushman from northern Australia, is a dab hand at surviving in the Outback. But when he is invited to New York City by Sue Charlton (Linda Kozlowski), a high-class reporter, in this Oscar-nominated comedy drama, he finds life far tougher in the urban jungle. He’s a survivor though: muggers who accost Dundee discover that he has a bigger knife than they do. American Made (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Doug Liman directs Tom Cruise in this lively, madcap real-life tale of pilot, drug smuggler and CIA gun-runner Barry Seal, whose supersonic, if lawless, career path began, according to this script, when he was a bored TWA pilot in 1978 and was approached out of the blue by a CIA handler (Domhnall Gleeson, all greasy persuasion) to conduct reconnaissance flights across the Caribbean. GoodFellas (1990) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm Martin Scorsese’s Mafia masterpiece, adapted from a non-fiction book, has all the qualities of great cinema: it’s thrilling, it’s provocative, it’s stylish, and it’s got a young Robert De Niro in it. Ray Liotta plays the youngster who longs to be a gangster; De Niro and Joe Pesci are in the Mob. Pesci’s mother, meanwhile, reportedly asked him if he had to swear quite so much – the f-word is used 300 times. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
Sunday 27 May Imagine… Orhan Pamuk: a Strange Mind BBC One, 10.30pm Although Imagine… covers the panoply of the arts, Alan Yentob always seems most comfortable in the company of authors, which is why this, A Strange Mind, is one of the most rewarding instalments for a while. In being content here to act as audience rather than interrogator, Yentob allows Nobel Prize winner Orhan Pamuk to amble across some fertile intellectual territory. Born into a secular middle-class family, Pamuk dreamt of being an artist or architect, only to turn to writing when he was faced with a likely future of redesigning much of his native Istanbul’s old city (a glance at a sketchbook suggests his talent is far from dormant). The resulting novels, which include Snow and My Name is Red, explore the clashes of ancient and modern, East and West, religious and secular, with a fearlessness that brought Pamuk into conflict with Turkey’s authoritarian government, but also the love of many compatriots. Pamuk is loquacious, generous company and, while this functions well as an autobiographical profile and assessment of his literary achievements, it also does something far harder and more impressive in capturing something of the essence of its subject. GT Countryfile BBC One, 6.30pm As a celebration of 30 years of Countryfile and the 65th anniversary of the Queen’s Coronation, Matt Baker, Anita Rani and John Craven explore the Royal family’s Windsor Estate. Among the topics are the livestock breeding that has saved one equine breed from extinction and the Queen’s own early experiences here. GT The London Palladium: the Greatest Stage on Earth ITV, 8.00pm Bradley Walsh ropes in some heavyweight talent to pay tribute to the venerable theatre in this one-off special. Andrew Lloyd Webber, Jim Dale, Beverley Knight and Stephen Fry are among those recounting their memories of the place in a lavish affair that is worth watching if only for some gorgeous, little-seen archive footage of Morecambe and Wise. GT A Very English Scandal BBC One, 9.00pm Norman Scott (Ben Whishaw) turns the screw on Jeremy Thorpe (Hugh Grant) as the latter’s profile grows – a decision that can only lead to disaster as Russell T Davies’s wonderful miniseries continues. GT The Handmaid’s Tale Channel 4, 9.00pm The Colonies are shaken by a new arrival while Offred (Elisabeth Moss) adjusts to a life in hiding, in a second series of the dystopian drama which, if anything, hits harder than its predecessor. GT The Break with Michelle Wolf Netflix, from today Fresh from her bold but divisive monologue at the White House Correspondents’ Dinner, where she witheringly attacked the Trump administration and humiliated his Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders, comedian Michelle Wolf launches a weekly variety series of stand-up and sketch comedy. GT Jonathan Meades on Jargon BBC Four, 10.30pm Arguably the most provocative and stimulating broadcaster around, Jonathan Meades dissects politics and football commentary, among other areas of public life, for insights into how jargon and slang are used to obfuscate and mislead. Its verbal vivacity, driven by an honestly felt fury at the desecration of the English language, is matched by visual intrigue, unlikely juxtapositions and an admirable willingness of the host to send himself up, all ably helmed by Meades’s regular collaborator Francis Hanly. GT The Goonies (1985) ★★★★☆ Universal TV, 3.00pm A cult favourite, this rollicking adventure follows a group of teenage friends from the “Goon Docks” area of Oregon (played by, among others, Corey Feldman, Josh Brolin and Sean Astin) on the hunt for a hoard of pirate treasure. Blocking their path, however, is a family of criminals, the Fratellis. Steven Spielberg dreamed up the story; Chris Columbus (Home Alone) wrote the screenplay. The Hunger Games: Catching Fire (2013) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 10.10pm This lithe adaptation of the second novel from Suzanne Collins’s trilogy sees Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence) competing once again in a televised fight to the death. But since the last film, Katniss has become an icon of rebellion, and the ruling class wants to bring her down a peg or two. This enormously watchable film blends whip-cracking action, oddball aesthetic and entirely laudable message. The Ides of March (2011) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.35pm George Clooney is the director, co-writer and star of this politically charged thriller about spin, soured idealism and dirty secrets. Mike Morris (Clooney) is a liberal state governor running for the Democratic Party’s presidential nomination. Ryan Gosling steals the show as the campaign’s devoted but ambitious press secretary, whose loyalties are tested to the limit. A gripping film that engages and entertains. Monday 28 May King Lear: Anthony Hopkins King Lear BBC Two, 9.30pm Talk about event TV: After making movie magic in Howards End and The Remains of the Day, Anthony Hopkins and Emma Thompson, are reunited in Shakespeare’s tragedy, King Lear, under the direction of Richard Eyre. Plus they have a stellar supporting cast, that includes Jim Broadbent, Emily Watson and Andrew Scott. Eyre sets this version in a fictional modern-day and moves the action between castles and modern locales, such as a rundown shopping precinct, to keep it contemporary. Hopkins is on great form as Lear – his old king seems to be suffering from dementia from the start, making sense of his rashness in disinheriting youngest daughter Cordelia (Florence Pugh), of him kissing another, Regan (Watson), full on the lips, and of failing to recognise other loved ones. Eyre has cut the play judiciously and brings an interesting take on Lear – that it’s about flawed parenting – that offers some insight into the behaviour of his children. Ultimately, however, it’s about Lear’s tragedy, not theirs, and Hopkins delivers a barnstorming central performance. Having played the role more than 30 years ago at the National Theatre, he’s truly grown into it. VP Richard Osman’s House of Games BBC Two, 6.00pm Pointless’s scene-stealing sidekick Richard Osman gets his moment to shine as quizmaster of this trivia contest, returning for a five-night run with BBC Breakfast’s Naga Munchetty among those competing. It’s followed by a new series of game show Curious Creatures, hosted by Kate Humble. VP Britain’s Got Talent ITV, 7.30pm Declan Donnelly flies solo as host of the semi-finals, airing nightly up to next weekend’s final. Each evening, eight of the 40 acts will perform again in the hope of becoming one of two promoted to the final by the voting public. The results are at 9.30pm. VP Springwatch 2018 BBC Two, 8.00pm Cute footage of hatchlings and deft presenting by Chris Packham and Michaela Strachan provide a winning formula for this three-week wildlife extravaganza. Gillian Burke returns, this time as a roving reporter, with Steve Backshall the first of the guests replacing the much-missed Martin Hughes-Games. VP Peter Kay’s Car Share: The Finale BBC One, 10.00pm Bowing to fan pressure, Peter Kay offers closure with this finale to his charming comedy about supermarket employees sharing the journey to and from work. Laughs and surprises abound on John and Kayleigh’s (Kay and Sian Gibson) last jaunt, but will romance ensue? VP The Vicar of Dibley Gold, 7.40pm Here’s a chance to revisit the last-ever episode of Richard Curtis’s sitcom, which delivers a fairy-tale finale for Geraldine Granger (Dawn French) when she marries Harry (Richard Armitage). Hugh Bonneville makes an amusing cameo as a lovesick vicar in the episode that also showcases French’s chemistry with the late Emma Chambers, who played daft Alice Tinker. VP Nigel Kennedy at the Biggest Weekend BBC Four, 8.30pm The BBC’s music festival welcomes maverick violinist Nigel Kennedy to Coventry’s War Memorial Park. Suzy Klein and Lloyd Coleman present as Kennedy performs his inimitable renditions of Vivaldi and Jimi Hendrix with the BBC Concert Orchestra. VP WestWorld Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm As part of her master plan, Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood) appears to be taking control over Bernard (Jeffrey Wright) in this episode of the futuristic drama and his confusion grows. VP Over the Hedge (2006) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.25am An endearing animated adventure about a group of forest creatures that, on waking after their winter hibernation, discover humans have moved in next door to them. Apprehension gives way to curiosity and excitement as they discover what the humans have to offer. Featuring the voices of Bruce Willis, Steve Carell and Avril Lavigne, among others, it’s an enjoyable movie with a message – but avoids getting too preachy. Sing Street (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Young love is set to an Eighties beat in this delightful coming-of-age tale. As with all of John Carney’s films (i.e. 2006 hit Once), the message is clear: where there is music, there is hope. The film rattles along to a cracking soundtrack – The Jam, Motörhead, The Cure – as young Conor (Ferdia Walsh-Peelo) chaotically tries to put together a band to impress a girl at school. Brideshead Revisited (2008) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.25pm In the light of the 1981 TV version of Evelyn Waugh’s novel, you do have to admire the chutzpah of anyone else giving Brideshead a go. Julian Jarrold’s attempt suffers from a desire to force modern conventions upon a story defined by the mores of upper-class interwar Britain. Hayley Atwell and Ben Whishaw are the Flyte siblings, but Catholicism, the tale’s engine, is only pernicious, never seductive. Tuesday 29 May Arrested Development Grammar Schools: Who Will Get In? BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Few education issues are as contentious in this country as that of grammar schools, with Prime Minister Theresa May among those supporting their return. This thought-provoking three-part documentary focusing on the London borough of Bexley, where each year over 5,000 children sit the selective exam for one of the area’s four grammar schools, could not, therefore, have come at a better time. We hear from both sides of the debate and are shown both the benefits and drawbacks of attending either a grammar or secondary modern school – although, as always, it’s the parents and children who make the most notable contributions. “If you want your child to become better in their future life, it’s good to go to a grammar school,” says one mother, who works long hours for minimum wage and pays £300 a month for a tutor for her daughter. Meanwhile, another, herself the product of a grammar school, despairs of the increasing parental competitiveness. And, for all the film-makers’ admirably even-handed approach, it’s the stress felt by the children that makes the biggest mark, with one youngster noting: “I don’t think grammar school is fair because people are far too young to feel they’ve failed.” SH Emmerdale ITV, 7.00pm Emmerdale confronts the difficult subject of child abuse when Charity Dingle (Emma Atkins) opens up about her past in this special flashback episode. Last November a similar technique was used, to great effect, to shed light on her cousin Cain’s experiences. Mica Proctor, in another triumph of casting, plays the young Charity. SH The Split BBC One, 9.00pm Abi Morgan’s enjoyable family saga comes to a climax with scores settled, decisions made and reconciliations all over the place. It works not least because Morgan never forgets that one person’s happy ending is another’s poisoned chalice, meaning there’s pain amid the laughter. SH The Battle for Britain’s Heroes Channel 4, 9.00pm “Our heroes often have a toxic past,” says Afua Hirsch at the start of this captivating and provocative film. She pulls no punches in her look at the darker side of our history, exploring slavery, racism and colonialism, in a film certain to enrage as many people as it informs. SH 4 Men, 175 Babies: Britain’s Super Sperm Donors Channel 4, 10.00pm This film follows men who donate their sperm for free, via unregulated websites. But why? “Being a sperm donor is like being a Samaritan,” says 61-year-old Clive, who began donating once he retired. SH Arrested Development Netflix, from today For anyone who didn’t watch the patchy fourth series of this popular Emmy-winning comedy about a rich family who lose their wealth, the good news is that you can pick up this new series with no problem. The bad news for those that did watch it is that this opening episode spends ages rehashing past events. Thankfully things do settle down – and become very funny – as we find out what happened after the infamous punch that George Michael (Michael Cera) landed on his father Michael (Jason Bateman). A proper return to form. SH Master of Photography Sky Arts, 8.00pm The international photography contest returns for a third series, with Oliviero Toscani joined on the judging panel by curator Mark Sealy and the New Yorker’s Elisabeth Biondi. Here’s hoping that this series avoids the problems of last year, which saw contestant Souvid Datta accused of plagiarism. SH All Creatures Great and Small (1975) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.45pm Simon Ward and a pre-Silence of the Lambs Anthony Hopkins star as Yorkshire vets James Herriot and Siegfried Farnon in this gentle drama set in the Thirties and based on the first two books of British vet Alf Wight (who wrote under the pseudonym of Herriot). The TV series that followed remains most memorable, but there’s warm-hearted performances here too. Operation Petticoat (1959) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.25pm A beguiling Second World War comedy directed by Blake Edwards and starring Cary Grant as a submarine captain with a strict sense of order and a rule-breaking hustler of a first officer (Tony Curtis). The vessel is bombed by the Japanese, but that’s the least of its worries. Five nurses in distress, a goat and a coating of pink paint all pose challenges for the effortlessly funny crew. The Enforcer (1976) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 11.00pm Clint Eastwood’s Harry Callahan is teamed up with rookie female partner Kate Moore (Tyne Daly) in this entertaining but ultimately disappointing third chapter of the Dirty Harry series. Together they battle violent eco-terrorists who have kidnapped the mayor of San Francisco (John Crawford) while, between the gun battles, cynical Callahan attempts to come to terms with his own male chauvinism. Wednesday 30 May Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt The Big Crash Diet Experiment BBC One, 8.00pm Is it time to rethink our attitude to crash dieting? That’s the question posed by tonight’s revealing documentary, which assesses the health impact of this extreme approach to weight loss. Our guide is Dr Javid Abdelmoneim, who along with a raft of health professionals, aims to challenge orthodox beliefs about what some see as nutritionally inadequate eating regimes with only short-term benefits. Abdelmoneim persuades four obese volunteers to give up the food that they love and opt for a scary-sounding liquid-only intake of soups and shakes, using scans and blood tests to monitor them over nine weeks. Each of the group has their fair share of weight-related issues. Portly Catholic priest Paul, for example, has been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, takeaway fan Rebecca believes that she’s in the grip of a fast-food addiction, and secret binge-eater Yolande already has fatty liver disease. Watching them tackle the programme and shed the pounds is admirable enough, but even more striking is the positive effect that the diet has on their health. In fact, the implications of the results could be a huge money saver for the NHS. TD The Doctor Who Gave Up Drugs BBC One, 9.00pm; Scotland, 10.45pm Dr Chris van Tulleken continues his crusade against the over-medication of children. Tonight, he explores why so many young people are prescribed anti-depressants, and becomes suspicious over the rise in babies diagnosed with cow’s milk allergy. TD Love in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm “The nearest gay scene for me is Belfast,” says cattle farmer Richard, a problem seeing as he lives a three-hour ferry ride away in remote Dumfries and Galloway. Not to be defeated, Richard invites three potential partners to his farm. TD Carry On Brussels Channel 4, 10.00pm More shenanigans from behind the doors of the European Parliament. We meet lone Liberal Democrat MEP Catherine Bearder, whose staunch pro-Europe stance lands her in trouble with Brexit minister David Davis. TD Miranda Barbour: Serial Killer or Liar? BBC One, 10.45pm; Northern Ireland, 11.40pm; Scotland, 11.45pm; Wales, 11.05pm This gripping true crime documentary charts the case of teenage murderer Miranda Barbour. The young mother admitted killing internet date Troy La Ferarra but later confessed to a further 22 murders as part of a Satanic cult. TD Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt Netflix, from today This snappy sitcom about a cult escapee in the big city has proved a delight. A shame, then, that this fourth season is to be its last, with the first six episodes launching today and the remainder to come later this year. Kimmy’s (Ellie Kemper) new job at a tech start-up proves ripe for nerd-baiting satire. TD Big Sky, Big Dreams, Big Art: Made in the USA BBC Four, 9.00pm Presenter Waldemar Januszczak swaps the vastness of the Wild West featured in last week’s episode for the “pulsing, futuristic excitement of the American city”, as his fascinating series on American art continues. He starts out amid the skyscrapers of New York, explaining how the vaulting architecture of the Chrysler Building exemplified the hope and ambition of the burgeoning metropolis. We then move on to the Great Depression, presaged by artists such as Thomas Hart Benton in his restless murals of urban life. TD Great Expectations (1946, b/w) ★★★★★ BBC Two, 12.35pm David Lean’s peerless version of Dickens’s novel is packed with memorable moments, from its opening scenes on the marshes, where Pip first meets the escaped convict Magwitch, to the enduring images of Miss Havisham’s house… not forgetting Pip’s boxing match with Herbert Pocket. John Mills is twice the age of the book’s Pip, but there’s a subtle ingenuousness in his performance. Rebecca (1940, b/w) ★★★★★ Talking Pictures TV, 9.00pm One of Hitchcock’s most disconcerting and finest films was adapted from a Daphne du Maurier story, though he departed from the text in many ways. A bride (Joan Fontaine) is haunted by the memory of her husband’s (Laurence Olivier) dead first wife. The excellent cast (Judith Anderson as formidable housekeeper Mrs Danvers is a particular highlight) adds class to this eerily suspenseful treat. Inglourious Basterds (2009) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 10.00pm It wasn’t quite the masterpiece we were told to expect, but Quentin Tarantino’s pastiche of war films and spaghetti westerns is still rollicking good fun and has all the ingredients of a classic Tarantino film. A celebration of vengeance, it’s an audacious take on the Second World War. Christoph Waltz deservedly won an Oscar for his incendiary turn as the “Jew Hunter”. Brad Pitt also stars. Thursday 31 May Humans Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm This third series of the thoughtful British science-fiction drama continues to benefit from a narrowing of focus; the big-name American actors and slightly strained global perspective have gone, but the thematic ambition has been retained. Less wilfully obscure than Sky Atlantic’s Westworld and considerably more affecting, Humans instead keeps a tight focus on emotion and relationships, whether the characters concerned are flesh and blood or gears and circuits. It can be heavy-handed with the allegories, certainly, but it’s never chilling or humourless – and leading synth performers Gemma Chan, Ivanno Jeremiah and Emily Berrington are as uncanny as ever. Mark Bonnar, too, is proving a handy addition to the cast as Neil, Laura’s (a brilliant Katherine Parkinson) professional antagonist and love interest – Bonnar’s history of playing characters with shifting loyalties comes in handy as Neil first opens his heart and then hardens his stance on the Dryden Commission. Mia (Chan), meanwhile, is on a one-synth mission to demonstrate coexistence is possible by moving into a hostile housing estate, and Leo (Colin Morgan) struggles with the realities of being human. GT Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm This week begins with chocolate puddings, which means the contestants are challenged to rustle up black forest gateaux and a dessert integrating a root vegetable, then aubergines and tofu take centre stage before the elimination round and an oriental classic. GT Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm Hollings and their “British chophouse classics” square up to an Italian-influenced brand serving fresh pasta from a cheese wheel, as Fred Sireix and a group of high-street investors gauge their potential. GT Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm Now with a Bafta award under its belt, this fine series follows the West Midlands Ambulance Service over the last Saturday night before Christmas. An inevitably busy period is made harder by a major traffic accident in central Birmingham – an incident which puts tremendous mental and physical demands on the crews, documented here with the clarity and honesty we’ve come to expect from the series. GT Great Art ITV, 10.50pm; not STV Tim Marlow takes a tour of the Royal Academy’s sell-out exhibition of the Parisian artist’s portraits, in the process assessing the man’s life, work, and reputation as “the father of modern art”. GT Urban Myths: Sex Pistols vs Bill Grundy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This pop cultural landmark, in which punk pioneers Sex Pistols grumbled, swore and generally misbehaved on Bill Grundy’s sleepily complacent regional chat-show, creating a national storm of outrage in the process, arguably received its definitive tribute from Kevin Eldon in 2013. The comedian’s loving reconstruction of the event imagined the Pistols as Amish people and bordered on performance art. Still, this gleefully silly take on the infamous encounter between the jobbing broadcaster (Steve Pemberton) and the Sex Pistols (played by members of the National Youth Theatre) is a lot of fun. GT Barry Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The eponymous depressed hitman (Bill Hader) tries to go it alone, only to be thwarted by his reckless partner Taylor (Dale Pavinski) and ructions among members of his acting class. GT Billion Dollar Brain (1967) ★★★★☆ Film4, 5.00pm Michael Caine returns as the reluctant secret agent Harry Palmer (The Ipcress File, Funeral in Berlin) in this film from Ken Russell, based on the novels by Len Deighton. Having left the British Secret Service to pursue a career as a private investigator, Palmer stumbles into a plot to overthrow Communism with the help of a supercomputer. But who is working for whom? It’s far-fetched but fun. Johnny Mnemonic (1995) ★★☆☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm Fresh from the rubber-burning success of Speed and four short years before The Matrix, Keanu Reeves starred in this high-concept dystopian adventure as the eponymous anti-hero – a 21st-century courier whose augmented brain is used to transport illicit data – that very nearly ruined his career. It’s adapted by cyberpunk godfather William Gibson from his own story. Munich (2005) ★★★☆☆ AMC, 12.50am Eric Bana stars in Steven Spielberg’s audacious, if lengthy, examination of the Israel-Palestine conflict. Set in 1972, it adroitly tackles the aftermath of the massacre of 11 Israeli Olympic athletes at the Munich Olympics. Bana plays a Mossad agent charged with hunting down the extremists who planned the Munich attack. Some of the rhetoric is clumsy, but the film-makers strive to be politically even-handed. Friday 1 June Tracey Breaks the News: Ullman as Michael Gove Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm After losing her to the USA for 30 years, Tracey Ullman’s return to our shores two years ago has reminded us of her unparalleled talents as an impressionist. She captures the physicality of her famous subjects – Angela Merkel and Judi Dench are standouts – as well as their voices, and hats off to Ullman’s prosthetics teams for her remarkable transformations. After an acting stint in last year’s Howards End, Ullman returns to her comfort zone tonight with a second series of the topical sketch comedy show in which she skewers politicians, mostly – although we’ll also be treated to more of Ben Miller’s scene-stealing Rupert Murdoch, with Ullman as Jerry Hall. Although no preview tape was available due to last-minute filming, Ullman was pictured as Michael Gove in promotional material and has also promised impressions of Jeremy Corbyn and Jacob Rees-Mogg. The previous series attracted criticism for weak writing, and some skits do lack bite, but slack should be cut – it’s a notoriously difficult format to pull off. Ullman’s gift for mimicry means she hits the mark often enough for the show to be a welcome bit of light satire to wind up the week. VP Extreme Wales with Richard Parks BBC Two, 7.30pm Tonight’s final episode of Richard Parks’s adventure programme combines extreme sports with lush panoramas of the Welsh landscape. Daredevil Parks takes to the skies on a paramotor – nothing more than a parachute connected to a fan-like motor – to propel him the length of the country. VP The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Fugitive immigrant Taariq Shirazi (Alexander Behrang Keshtkar) makes a desperate bid to flee as the Scandi-noir crime series continues. When Saga (Sofia Helin) and Henrik (Thure Lindhardt) track him down, however, Saga’s inability to tell a lie has serious consequences. VP Friday Night Dinner Channel 4, 10.00pm This sitcom’s family squabbles are more uncomfortably familiar than laugh-out-loud funny in tonight’s penultimate visit to the Goodmans’ home. Writer Robert Popper capitalises on Simon Bird’s musical skills by having his character, Adam, reluctantly play the violin to cheer up Grandma. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm; Ethan Hawke, Toni Collette, Jo Brand and Aidan Turner offer their funniest anecdotes tonight. Plus, Liam Payne continues his post-One Direction solo career with a performance his new single, Familiar. VP The Everly Brothers: Harmonies from Heaven BBC Four, 9.00pm Art Garfunkel, Keith Richards and Graham Nash are among the luminaries paying tribute to Don and Phil Everly in this 2016 documentary, all of them claiming the brothers as an influence. Surviving sibling Don Everly returns to Iowa to recount the brothers’ first appearances, their pivotal move to Nashville and stardom in the late Fifties. Africa: A Journey into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm So much of the music we listen to has its roots in African music. In this new three-part documentary series, London DJ Rita Ray sets off to explore the continent’s influence. Kicking off her journey in Nigeria, Ray stumbles across impromptu drumming ceremonies in the streets as she explores the importance of rhythm in the country’s music and meets its major players. Future episodes take her to Mali and South Africa. VP Crocodile Dundee (1986) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.10pm Mick “Crocodile” Dundee (Paul Hogan), a bushman from northern Australia, is a dab hand at surviving in the Outback. But when he is invited to New York City by Sue Charlton (Linda Kozlowski), a high-class reporter, in this Oscar-nominated comedy drama, he finds life far tougher in the urban jungle. He’s a survivor though: muggers who accost Dundee discover that he has a bigger knife than they do. American Made (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Doug Liman directs Tom Cruise in this lively, madcap real-life tale of pilot, drug smuggler and CIA gun-runner Barry Seal, whose supersonic, if lawless, career path began, according to this script, when he was a bored TWA pilot in 1978 and was approached out of the blue by a CIA handler (Domhnall Gleeson, all greasy persuasion) to conduct reconnaissance flights across the Caribbean. GoodFellas (1990) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm Martin Scorsese’s Mafia masterpiece, adapted from a non-fiction book, has all the qualities of great cinema: it’s thrilling, it’s provocative, it’s stylish, and it’s got a young Robert De Niro in it. Ray Liotta plays the youngster who longs to be a gangster; De Niro and Joe Pesci are in the Mob. Pesci’s mother, meanwhile, reportedly asked him if he had to swear quite so much – the f-word is used 300 times. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: The Handmaid's Tale, A Very English Scandal and more
Sunday 27 May Imagine… Orhan Pamuk: a Strange Mind BBC One, 10.30pm Although Imagine… covers the panoply of the arts, Alan Yentob always seems most comfortable in the company of authors, which is why this, A Strange Mind, is one of the most rewarding instalments for a while. In being content here to act as audience rather than interrogator, Yentob allows Nobel Prize winner Orhan Pamuk to amble across some fertile intellectual territory. Born into a secular middle-class family, Pamuk dreamt of being an artist or architect, only to turn to writing when he was faced with a likely future of redesigning much of his native Istanbul’s old city (a glance at a sketchbook suggests his talent is far from dormant). The resulting novels, which include Snow and My Name is Red, explore the clashes of ancient and modern, East and West, religious and secular, with a fearlessness that brought Pamuk into conflict with Turkey’s authoritarian government, but also the love of many compatriots. Pamuk is loquacious, generous company and, while this functions well as an autobiographical profile and assessment of his literary achievements, it also does something far harder and more impressive in capturing something of the essence of its subject. GT Countryfile BBC One, 6.30pm As a celebration of 30 years of Countryfile and the 65th anniversary of the Queen’s Coronation, Matt Baker, Anita Rani and John Craven explore the Royal family’s Windsor Estate. Among the topics are the livestock breeding that has saved one equine breed from extinction and the Queen’s own early experiences here. GT The London Palladium: the Greatest Stage on Earth ITV, 8.00pm Bradley Walsh ropes in some heavyweight talent to pay tribute to the venerable theatre in this one-off special. Andrew Lloyd Webber, Jim Dale, Beverley Knight and Stephen Fry are among those recounting their memories of the place in a lavish affair that is worth watching if only for some gorgeous, little-seen archive footage of Morecambe and Wise. GT A Very English Scandal BBC One, 9.00pm Norman Scott (Ben Whishaw) turns the screw on Jeremy Thorpe (Hugh Grant) as the latter’s profile grows – a decision that can only lead to disaster as Russell T Davies’s wonderful miniseries continues. GT The Handmaid’s Tale Channel 4, 9.00pm The Colonies are shaken by a new arrival while Offred (Elisabeth Moss) adjusts to a life in hiding, in a second series of the dystopian drama which, if anything, hits harder than its predecessor. GT The Break with Michelle Wolf Netflix, from today Fresh from her bold but divisive monologue at the White House Correspondents’ Dinner, where she witheringly attacked the Trump administration and humiliated his Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders, comedian Michelle Wolf launches a weekly variety series of stand-up and sketch comedy. GT Jonathan Meades on Jargon BBC Four, 10.30pm Arguably the most provocative and stimulating broadcaster around, Jonathan Meades dissects politics and football commentary, among other areas of public life, for insights into how jargon and slang are used to obfuscate and mislead. Its verbal vivacity, driven by an honestly felt fury at the desecration of the English language, is matched by visual intrigue, unlikely juxtapositions and an admirable willingness of the host to send himself up, all ably helmed by Meades’s regular collaborator Francis Hanly. GT The Goonies (1985) ★★★★☆ Universal TV, 3.00pm A cult favourite, this rollicking adventure follows a group of teenage friends from the “Goon Docks” area of Oregon (played by, among others, Corey Feldman, Josh Brolin and Sean Astin) on the hunt for a hoard of pirate treasure. Blocking their path, however, is a family of criminals, the Fratellis. Steven Spielberg dreamed up the story; Chris Columbus (Home Alone) wrote the screenplay. The Hunger Games: Catching Fire (2013) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 10.10pm This lithe adaptation of the second novel from Suzanne Collins’s trilogy sees Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence) competing once again in a televised fight to the death. But since the last film, Katniss has become an icon of rebellion, and the ruling class wants to bring her down a peg or two. This enormously watchable film blends whip-cracking action, oddball aesthetic and entirely laudable message. The Ides of March (2011) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.35pm George Clooney is the director, co-writer and star of this politically charged thriller about spin, soured idealism and dirty secrets. Mike Morris (Clooney) is a liberal state governor running for the Democratic Party’s presidential nomination. Ryan Gosling steals the show as the campaign’s devoted but ambitious press secretary, whose loyalties are tested to the limit. A gripping film that engages and entertains. Monday 28 May King Lear: Anthony Hopkins King Lear BBC Two, 9.30pm Talk about event TV: After making movie magic in Howards End and The Remains of the Day, Anthony Hopkins and Emma Thompson, are reunited in Shakespeare’s tragedy, King Lear, under the direction of Richard Eyre. Plus they have a stellar supporting cast, that includes Jim Broadbent, Emily Watson and Andrew Scott. Eyre sets this version in a fictional modern-day and moves the action between castles and modern locales, such as a rundown shopping precinct, to keep it contemporary. Hopkins is on great form as Lear – his old king seems to be suffering from dementia from the start, making sense of his rashness in disinheriting youngest daughter Cordelia (Florence Pugh), of him kissing another, Regan (Watson), full on the lips, and of failing to recognise other loved ones. Eyre has cut the play judiciously and brings an interesting take on Lear – that it’s about flawed parenting – that offers some insight into the behaviour of his children. Ultimately, however, it’s about Lear’s tragedy, not theirs, and Hopkins delivers a barnstorming central performance. Having played the role more than 30 years ago at the National Theatre, he’s truly grown into it. VP Richard Osman’s House of Games BBC Two, 6.00pm Pointless’s scene-stealing sidekick Richard Osman gets his moment to shine as quizmaster of this trivia contest, returning for a five-night run with BBC Breakfast’s Naga Munchetty among those competing. It’s followed by a new series of game show Curious Creatures, hosted by Kate Humble. VP Britain’s Got Talent ITV, 7.30pm Declan Donnelly flies solo as host of the semi-finals, airing nightly up to next weekend’s final. Each evening, eight of the 40 acts will perform again in the hope of becoming one of two promoted to the final by the voting public. The results are at 9.30pm. VP Springwatch 2018 BBC Two, 8.00pm Cute footage of hatchlings and deft presenting by Chris Packham and Michaela Strachan provide a winning formula for this three-week wildlife extravaganza. Gillian Burke returns, this time as a roving reporter, with Steve Backshall the first of the guests replacing the much-missed Martin Hughes-Games. VP Peter Kay’s Car Share: The Finale BBC One, 10.00pm Bowing to fan pressure, Peter Kay offers closure with this finale to his charming comedy about supermarket employees sharing the journey to and from work. Laughs and surprises abound on John and Kayleigh’s (Kay and Sian Gibson) last jaunt, but will romance ensue? VP The Vicar of Dibley Gold, 7.40pm Here’s a chance to revisit the last-ever episode of Richard Curtis’s sitcom, which delivers a fairy-tale finale for Geraldine Granger (Dawn French) when she marries Harry (Richard Armitage). Hugh Bonneville makes an amusing cameo as a lovesick vicar in the episode that also showcases French’s chemistry with the late Emma Chambers, who played daft Alice Tinker. VP Nigel Kennedy at the Biggest Weekend BBC Four, 8.30pm The BBC’s music festival welcomes maverick violinist Nigel Kennedy to Coventry’s War Memorial Park. Suzy Klein and Lloyd Coleman present as Kennedy performs his inimitable renditions of Vivaldi and Jimi Hendrix with the BBC Concert Orchestra. VP WestWorld Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm As part of her master plan, Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood) appears to be taking control over Bernard (Jeffrey Wright) in this episode of the futuristic drama and his confusion grows. VP Over the Hedge (2006) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.25am An endearing animated adventure about a group of forest creatures that, on waking after their winter hibernation, discover humans have moved in next door to them. Apprehension gives way to curiosity and excitement as they discover what the humans have to offer. Featuring the voices of Bruce Willis, Steve Carell and Avril Lavigne, among others, it’s an enjoyable movie with a message – but avoids getting too preachy. Sing Street (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Young love is set to an Eighties beat in this delightful coming-of-age tale. As with all of John Carney’s films (i.e. 2006 hit Once), the message is clear: where there is music, there is hope. The film rattles along to a cracking soundtrack – The Jam, Motörhead, The Cure – as young Conor (Ferdia Walsh-Peelo) chaotically tries to put together a band to impress a girl at school. Brideshead Revisited (2008) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.25pm In the light of the 1981 TV version of Evelyn Waugh’s novel, you do have to admire the chutzpah of anyone else giving Brideshead a go. Julian Jarrold’s attempt suffers from a desire to force modern conventions upon a story defined by the mores of upper-class interwar Britain. Hayley Atwell and Ben Whishaw are the Flyte siblings, but Catholicism, the tale’s engine, is only pernicious, never seductive. Tuesday 29 May Arrested Development Grammar Schools: Who Will Get In? BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Few education issues are as contentious in this country as that of grammar schools, with Prime Minister Theresa May among those supporting their return. This thought-provoking three-part documentary focusing on the London borough of Bexley, where each year over 5,000 children sit the selective exam for one of the area’s four grammar schools, could not, therefore, have come at a better time. We hear from both sides of the debate and are shown both the benefits and drawbacks of attending either a grammar or secondary modern school – although, as always, it’s the parents and children who make the most notable contributions. “If you want your child to become better in their future life, it’s good to go to a grammar school,” says one mother, who works long hours for minimum wage and pays £300 a month for a tutor for her daughter. Meanwhile, another, herself the product of a grammar school, despairs of the increasing parental competitiveness. And, for all the film-makers’ admirably even-handed approach, it’s the stress felt by the children that makes the biggest mark, with one youngster noting: “I don’t think grammar school is fair because people are far too young to feel they’ve failed.” SH Emmerdale ITV, 7.00pm Emmerdale confronts the difficult subject of child abuse when Charity Dingle (Emma Atkins) opens up about her past in this special flashback episode. Last November a similar technique was used, to great effect, to shed light on her cousin Cain’s experiences. Mica Proctor, in another triumph of casting, plays the young Charity. SH The Split BBC One, 9.00pm Abi Morgan’s enjoyable family saga comes to a climax with scores settled, decisions made and reconciliations all over the place. It works not least because Morgan never forgets that one person’s happy ending is another’s poisoned chalice, meaning there’s pain amid the laughter. SH The Battle for Britain’s Heroes Channel 4, 9.00pm “Our heroes often have a toxic past,” says Afua Hirsch at the start of this captivating and provocative film. She pulls no punches in her look at the darker side of our history, exploring slavery, racism and colonialism, in a film certain to enrage as many people as it informs. SH 4 Men, 175 Babies: Britain’s Super Sperm Donors Channel 4, 10.00pm This film follows men who donate their sperm for free, via unregulated websites. But why? “Being a sperm donor is like being a Samaritan,” says 61-year-old Clive, who began donating once he retired. SH Arrested Development Netflix, from today For anyone who didn’t watch the patchy fourth series of this popular Emmy-winning comedy about a rich family who lose their wealth, the good news is that you can pick up this new series with no problem. The bad news for those that did watch it is that this opening episode spends ages rehashing past events. Thankfully things do settle down – and become very funny – as we find out what happened after the infamous punch that George Michael (Michael Cera) landed on his father Michael (Jason Bateman). A proper return to form. SH Master of Photography Sky Arts, 8.00pm The international photography contest returns for a third series, with Oliviero Toscani joined on the judging panel by curator Mark Sealy and the New Yorker’s Elisabeth Biondi. Here’s hoping that this series avoids the problems of last year, which saw contestant Souvid Datta accused of plagiarism. SH All Creatures Great and Small (1975) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.45pm Simon Ward and a pre-Silence of the Lambs Anthony Hopkins star as Yorkshire vets James Herriot and Siegfried Farnon in this gentle drama set in the Thirties and based on the first two books of British vet Alf Wight (who wrote under the pseudonym of Herriot). The TV series that followed remains most memorable, but there’s warm-hearted performances here too. Operation Petticoat (1959) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.25pm A beguiling Second World War comedy directed by Blake Edwards and starring Cary Grant as a submarine captain with a strict sense of order and a rule-breaking hustler of a first officer (Tony Curtis). The vessel is bombed by the Japanese, but that’s the least of its worries. Five nurses in distress, a goat and a coating of pink paint all pose challenges for the effortlessly funny crew. The Enforcer (1976) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 11.00pm Clint Eastwood’s Harry Callahan is teamed up with rookie female partner Kate Moore (Tyne Daly) in this entertaining but ultimately disappointing third chapter of the Dirty Harry series. Together they battle violent eco-terrorists who have kidnapped the mayor of San Francisco (John Crawford) while, between the gun battles, cynical Callahan attempts to come to terms with his own male chauvinism. Wednesday 30 May Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt The Big Crash Diet Experiment BBC One, 8.00pm Is it time to rethink our attitude to crash dieting? That’s the question posed by tonight’s revealing documentary, which assesses the health impact of this extreme approach to weight loss. Our guide is Dr Javid Abdelmoneim, who along with a raft of health professionals, aims to challenge orthodox beliefs about what some see as nutritionally inadequate eating regimes with only short-term benefits. Abdelmoneim persuades four obese volunteers to give up the food that they love and opt for a scary-sounding liquid-only intake of soups and shakes, using scans and blood tests to monitor them over nine weeks. Each of the group has their fair share of weight-related issues. Portly Catholic priest Paul, for example, has been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, takeaway fan Rebecca believes that she’s in the grip of a fast-food addiction, and secret binge-eater Yolande already has fatty liver disease. Watching them tackle the programme and shed the pounds is admirable enough, but even more striking is the positive effect that the diet has on their health. In fact, the implications of the results could be a huge money saver for the NHS. TD The Doctor Who Gave Up Drugs BBC One, 9.00pm; Scotland, 10.45pm Dr Chris van Tulleken continues his crusade against the over-medication of children. Tonight, he explores why so many young people are prescribed anti-depressants, and becomes suspicious over the rise in babies diagnosed with cow’s milk allergy. TD Love in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm “The nearest gay scene for me is Belfast,” says cattle farmer Richard, a problem seeing as he lives a three-hour ferry ride away in remote Dumfries and Galloway. Not to be defeated, Richard invites three potential partners to his farm. TD Carry On Brussels Channel 4, 10.00pm More shenanigans from behind the doors of the European Parliament. We meet lone Liberal Democrat MEP Catherine Bearder, whose staunch pro-Europe stance lands her in trouble with Brexit minister David Davis. TD Miranda Barbour: Serial Killer or Liar? BBC One, 10.45pm; Northern Ireland, 11.40pm; Scotland, 11.45pm; Wales, 11.05pm This gripping true crime documentary charts the case of teenage murderer Miranda Barbour. The young mother admitted killing internet date Troy La Ferarra but later confessed to a further 22 murders as part of a Satanic cult. TD Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt Netflix, from today This snappy sitcom about a cult escapee in the big city has proved a delight. A shame, then, that this fourth season is to be its last, with the first six episodes launching today and the remainder to come later this year. Kimmy’s (Ellie Kemper) new job at a tech start-up proves ripe for nerd-baiting satire. TD Big Sky, Big Dreams, Big Art: Made in the USA BBC Four, 9.00pm Presenter Waldemar Januszczak swaps the vastness of the Wild West featured in last week’s episode for the “pulsing, futuristic excitement of the American city”, as his fascinating series on American art continues. He starts out amid the skyscrapers of New York, explaining how the vaulting architecture of the Chrysler Building exemplified the hope and ambition of the burgeoning metropolis. We then move on to the Great Depression, presaged by artists such as Thomas Hart Benton in his restless murals of urban life. TD Great Expectations (1946, b/w) ★★★★★ BBC Two, 12.35pm David Lean’s peerless version of Dickens’s novel is packed with memorable moments, from its opening scenes on the marshes, where Pip first meets the escaped convict Magwitch, to the enduring images of Miss Havisham’s house… not forgetting Pip’s boxing match with Herbert Pocket. John Mills is twice the age of the book’s Pip, but there’s a subtle ingenuousness in his performance. Rebecca (1940, b/w) ★★★★★ Talking Pictures TV, 9.00pm One of Hitchcock’s most disconcerting and finest films was adapted from a Daphne du Maurier story, though he departed from the text in many ways. A bride (Joan Fontaine) is haunted by the memory of her husband’s (Laurence Olivier) dead first wife. The excellent cast (Judith Anderson as formidable housekeeper Mrs Danvers is a particular highlight) adds class to this eerily suspenseful treat. Inglourious Basterds (2009) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 10.00pm It wasn’t quite the masterpiece we were told to expect, but Quentin Tarantino’s pastiche of war films and spaghetti westerns is still rollicking good fun and has all the ingredients of a classic Tarantino film. A celebration of vengeance, it’s an audacious take on the Second World War. Christoph Waltz deservedly won an Oscar for his incendiary turn as the “Jew Hunter”. Brad Pitt also stars. Thursday 31 May Humans Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm This third series of the thoughtful British science-fiction drama continues to benefit from a narrowing of focus; the big-name American actors and slightly strained global perspective have gone, but the thematic ambition has been retained. Less wilfully obscure than Sky Atlantic’s Westworld and considerably more affecting, Humans instead keeps a tight focus on emotion and relationships, whether the characters concerned are flesh and blood or gears and circuits. It can be heavy-handed with the allegories, certainly, but it’s never chilling or humourless – and leading synth performers Gemma Chan, Ivanno Jeremiah and Emily Berrington are as uncanny as ever. Mark Bonnar, too, is proving a handy addition to the cast as Neil, Laura’s (a brilliant Katherine Parkinson) professional antagonist and love interest – Bonnar’s history of playing characters with shifting loyalties comes in handy as Neil first opens his heart and then hardens his stance on the Dryden Commission. Mia (Chan), meanwhile, is on a one-synth mission to demonstrate coexistence is possible by moving into a hostile housing estate, and Leo (Colin Morgan) struggles with the realities of being human. GT Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm This week begins with chocolate puddings, which means the contestants are challenged to rustle up black forest gateaux and a dessert integrating a root vegetable, then aubergines and tofu take centre stage before the elimination round and an oriental classic. GT Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm Hollings and their “British chophouse classics” square up to an Italian-influenced brand serving fresh pasta from a cheese wheel, as Fred Sireix and a group of high-street investors gauge their potential. GT Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm Now with a Bafta award under its belt, this fine series follows the West Midlands Ambulance Service over the last Saturday night before Christmas. An inevitably busy period is made harder by a major traffic accident in central Birmingham – an incident which puts tremendous mental and physical demands on the crews, documented here with the clarity and honesty we’ve come to expect from the series. GT Great Art ITV, 10.50pm; not STV Tim Marlow takes a tour of the Royal Academy’s sell-out exhibition of the Parisian artist’s portraits, in the process assessing the man’s life, work, and reputation as “the father of modern art”. GT Urban Myths: Sex Pistols vs Bill Grundy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This pop cultural landmark, in which punk pioneers Sex Pistols grumbled, swore and generally misbehaved on Bill Grundy’s sleepily complacent regional chat-show, creating a national storm of outrage in the process, arguably received its definitive tribute from Kevin Eldon in 2013. The comedian’s loving reconstruction of the event imagined the Pistols as Amish people and bordered on performance art. Still, this gleefully silly take on the infamous encounter between the jobbing broadcaster (Steve Pemberton) and the Sex Pistols (played by members of the National Youth Theatre) is a lot of fun. GT Barry Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The eponymous depressed hitman (Bill Hader) tries to go it alone, only to be thwarted by his reckless partner Taylor (Dale Pavinski) and ructions among members of his acting class. GT Billion Dollar Brain (1967) ★★★★☆ Film4, 5.00pm Michael Caine returns as the reluctant secret agent Harry Palmer (The Ipcress File, Funeral in Berlin) in this film from Ken Russell, based on the novels by Len Deighton. Having left the British Secret Service to pursue a career as a private investigator, Palmer stumbles into a plot to overthrow Communism with the help of a supercomputer. But who is working for whom? It’s far-fetched but fun. Johnny Mnemonic (1995) ★★☆☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm Fresh from the rubber-burning success of Speed and four short years before The Matrix, Keanu Reeves starred in this high-concept dystopian adventure as the eponymous anti-hero – a 21st-century courier whose augmented brain is used to transport illicit data – that very nearly ruined his career. It’s adapted by cyberpunk godfather William Gibson from his own story. Munich (2005) ★★★☆☆ AMC, 12.50am Eric Bana stars in Steven Spielberg’s audacious, if lengthy, examination of the Israel-Palestine conflict. Set in 1972, it adroitly tackles the aftermath of the massacre of 11 Israeli Olympic athletes at the Munich Olympics. Bana plays a Mossad agent charged with hunting down the extremists who planned the Munich attack. Some of the rhetoric is clumsy, but the film-makers strive to be politically even-handed. Friday 1 June Tracey Breaks the News: Ullman as Michael Gove Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm After losing her to the USA for 30 years, Tracey Ullman’s return to our shores two years ago has reminded us of her unparalleled talents as an impressionist. She captures the physicality of her famous subjects – Angela Merkel and Judi Dench are standouts – as well as their voices, and hats off to Ullman’s prosthetics teams for her remarkable transformations. After an acting stint in last year’s Howards End, Ullman returns to her comfort zone tonight with a second series of the topical sketch comedy show in which she skewers politicians, mostly – although we’ll also be treated to more of Ben Miller’s scene-stealing Rupert Murdoch, with Ullman as Jerry Hall. Although no preview tape was available due to last-minute filming, Ullman was pictured as Michael Gove in promotional material and has also promised impressions of Jeremy Corbyn and Jacob Rees-Mogg. The previous series attracted criticism for weak writing, and some skits do lack bite, but slack should be cut – it’s a notoriously difficult format to pull off. Ullman’s gift for mimicry means she hits the mark often enough for the show to be a welcome bit of light satire to wind up the week. VP Extreme Wales with Richard Parks BBC Two, 7.30pm Tonight’s final episode of Richard Parks’s adventure programme combines extreme sports with lush panoramas of the Welsh landscape. Daredevil Parks takes to the skies on a paramotor – nothing more than a parachute connected to a fan-like motor – to propel him the length of the country. VP The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Fugitive immigrant Taariq Shirazi (Alexander Behrang Keshtkar) makes a desperate bid to flee as the Scandi-noir crime series continues. When Saga (Sofia Helin) and Henrik (Thure Lindhardt) track him down, however, Saga’s inability to tell a lie has serious consequences. VP Friday Night Dinner Channel 4, 10.00pm This sitcom’s family squabbles are more uncomfortably familiar than laugh-out-loud funny in tonight’s penultimate visit to the Goodmans’ home. Writer Robert Popper capitalises on Simon Bird’s musical skills by having his character, Adam, reluctantly play the violin to cheer up Grandma. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm; Ethan Hawke, Toni Collette, Jo Brand and Aidan Turner offer their funniest anecdotes tonight. Plus, Liam Payne continues his post-One Direction solo career with a performance his new single, Familiar. VP The Everly Brothers: Harmonies from Heaven BBC Four, 9.00pm Art Garfunkel, Keith Richards and Graham Nash are among the luminaries paying tribute to Don and Phil Everly in this 2016 documentary, all of them claiming the brothers as an influence. Surviving sibling Don Everly returns to Iowa to recount the brothers’ first appearances, their pivotal move to Nashville and stardom in the late Fifties. Africa: A Journey into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm So much of the music we listen to has its roots in African music. In this new three-part documentary series, London DJ Rita Ray sets off to explore the continent’s influence. Kicking off her journey in Nigeria, Ray stumbles across impromptu drumming ceremonies in the streets as she explores the importance of rhythm in the country’s music and meets its major players. Future episodes take her to Mali and South Africa. VP Crocodile Dundee (1986) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.10pm Mick “Crocodile” Dundee (Paul Hogan), a bushman from northern Australia, is a dab hand at surviving in the Outback. But when he is invited to New York City by Sue Charlton (Linda Kozlowski), a high-class reporter, in this Oscar-nominated comedy drama, he finds life far tougher in the urban jungle. He’s a survivor though: muggers who accost Dundee discover that he has a bigger knife than they do. American Made (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Doug Liman directs Tom Cruise in this lively, madcap real-life tale of pilot, drug smuggler and CIA gun-runner Barry Seal, whose supersonic, if lawless, career path began, according to this script, when he was a bored TWA pilot in 1978 and was approached out of the blue by a CIA handler (Domhnall Gleeson, all greasy persuasion) to conduct reconnaissance flights across the Caribbean. GoodFellas (1990) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm Martin Scorsese’s Mafia masterpiece, adapted from a non-fiction book, has all the qualities of great cinema: it’s thrilling, it’s provocative, it’s stylish, and it’s got a young Robert De Niro in it. Ray Liotta plays the youngster who longs to be a gangster; De Niro and Joe Pesci are in the Mob. Pesci’s mother, meanwhile, reportedly asked him if he had to swear quite so much – the f-word is used 300 times. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
The Biggest Weekend Live BBC One, BBC Two and BBC Four from 6.45pm With Glastonbury taking a year off, music fans still have the chance to get their kicks as the BBC provides room in its schedules for The Biggest Weekend, the largest free festival in Europe. This year’s event is taking place over four days across the UK with venues in Belfast, Perth, Swansea and Coventry. So what can eager music fans expect? Things get under way in Swansea, Belfast and Perth, with Coventry joining the party on Sunday. BBC One kicks things off at 6.45pm with highlights from Ed Sheeran’s performance at Singleton Park in Swansea earlier in the day (the busy Sheeran is also playing at Manchester’s Etihad Stadium in the evening), then it’s over to BBC Two for Emeli Sande at Scone Palace in Perth and Clean Bandit in Swansea. At 9pm, Greg James introduces Sam Smith’s headline set at Swansea before Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds round off the BBC Two coverage. Over on BBC Four, Lauren Laverne introduces highlights from Neneh Cherry at the Titanic Slipways, in Belfast, from 7pm before checking in on sets from Simple Minds, Chvrches, Franz Ferdinand and Wolf Alice. The night finishes with Underworld’s closing set from Belfast at 10pm. SH Britain’s Got Talent ITV, 8.00pm The final auditions brings one last chance to impress the judges before next week’s much-anticipated live semi-finals, which begin on Monday. SH The Queen’s Lost Cousin Channel 4, 8.00pm First shown in 2015, this documentary tells the story of the Queen’s cousin, Prince William of Gloucester, who died, aged 30, in a plane crash in 1972. There’s notable contribution from Zsuzsi Starkloff, the Hungarian-born, twice divorced former model who was involved in a contentious relationship with William, and although the story remains intriguing, the film veers into cliché. SH Queen Victoria and Her Tragic Family Channel 5, 9.15pm With this second episode the series moves on to the 1860s and the period following the death of Prince Albert at the age of 42. Mired in grief, Queen Victoria began to struggle, as monarch and mother, until a surprising friendship helped her pull through. SH All Round to Mrs Brown’s BBC One, 9.20pm Freddie Flintoff, Fatima Whitbread and Jonnie Peacock are among those subjecting themselves to interrogation by Irish Mammy Agnes (Brendan O’Carroll’s foul-mouthed matriarch) ushers in a new set of guests. Music is by Clean Bandit; the double entendres are all O’Carroll’s own. SH Queen Night Sky Arts, from 6.00pm Sky Arts celebrates the greatest pomp rockers of them all – Queen. First up is Video Killed the Radio Star in which the band looks back at their best videos. Concerts in Rio and Budapest sandwich The Magic Years, a film about how Brian May, Freddie Mercury, Roger Taylor and John Deacon cemented their place as one of the most influential bands ever. Later, there’s more behind the scenes material in Queen: The Phenomenon. SH How the Young Ones Changed Comedy Gold, from 9.30pm It’s hard to imagine just how different The Young Ones was when it arrived in 1982, but this entertaining film does a good job of trying to explain. Featuring Ade Edmondson, Nigel Planer and Alexei Sayle, this documentary traces the show’s origins (“Our jokes were terrible,” says Edmondson) to TV history. It’s followed by The Young Ones’ University Challenge parody episode; tomorrow, at 9.30pm, is a countdown of the 20 greatest moments. SH Puss in Boots (2011) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 3.45pm DreamWorks Animation’s Shrek spin-off follows Puss in Boots’s life before he became the green ogre’s sidekick. With the help of Kitty Softpaws (voiced by Salma Hayek) and Humpty Dumpty (Zach Galifianakis), the swashbuckling feline (Antonio Banderas) becomes a hero after saving his town. Like the CGI ogre’s last two films, Shrek the Third and Shrek Forever After, the animation is more impressive than the jokes. Kenny (2017) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 10.35pm No footballer has combined brilliance on the field and success in management with such a harrowing proximity to calamities. This edifying film explores Kenny Dalglish’s experiences at Ibrox (66 were killed in 1971), Heysel (he was on the pitch for the tragedy of 1985 in which 39 died) and Hillsborough (he was in the dug-out when 96 Liverpool fans lost their lives at Sheffield Wednesday’s ground in 1989) and revisits his talent in the No 7 shirt. The Hunter (2011) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 12.30am Willem Dafoe excels as a mercenary hired by biotech company Red Leaf to track down the last remaining Tasmanian tiger in the Australian wilderness, arousing suspicion and hostility as he goes. Posing as a university researcher, he lodges with a family and grows close to them, but Red Leaf want the tiger’s blood at any cost. There’s a gripping moral weight to questions of extinction, survival and profiteering. Sunday 27 May The Handmaid's Tale Imagine… Orhan Pamuk: a Strange Mind BBC One, 10.30pm Although Imagine… covers the panoply of the arts, Alan Yentob always seems most comfortable in the company of authors, which is why this, A Strange Mind, is one of the most rewarding instalments for a while. In being content here to act as audience rather than interrogator, Yentob allows Nobel Prize winner Orhan Pamuk to amble across some fertile intellectual territory. Born into a secular middle-class family, Pamuk dreamt of being an artist or architect, only to turn to writing when he was faced with a likely future of redesigning much of his native Istanbul’s old city (a glance at a sketchbook suggests his talent is far from dormant). The resulting novels, which include Snow and My Name is Red, explore the clashes of ancient and modern, East and West, religious and secular, with a fearlessness that brought Pamuk into conflict with Turkey’s authoritarian government, but also the love of many compatriots. Pamuk is loquacious, generous company and, while this functions well as an autobiographical profile and assessment of his literary achievements, it also does something far harder and more impressive in capturing something of the essence of its subject. GT Countryfile BBC One, 6.30pm As a celebration of 30 years of Countryfile and the 65th anniversary of the Queen’s Coronation, Matt Baker, Anita Rani and John Craven explore the Royal family’s Windsor Estate. Among the topics are the livestock breeding that has saved one equine breed from extinction and the Queen’s own early experiences here. GT The London Palladium: the Greatest Stage on Earth ITV, 8.00pm Bradley Walsh ropes in some heavyweight talent to pay tribute to the venerable theatre in this one-off special. Andrew Lloyd Webber, Jim Dale, Beverley Knight and Stephen Fry are among those recounting their memories of the place in a lavish affair that is worth watching if only for some gorgeous, little-seen archive footage of Morecambe and Wise. GT A Very English Scandal BBC One, 9.00pm Norman Scott (Ben Whishaw) turns the screw on Jeremy Thorpe (Hugh Grant) as the latter’s profile grows – a decision that can only lead to disaster as Russell T Davies’s wonderful miniseries continues. GT The Handmaid’s Tale Channel 4, 9.00pm The Colonies are shaken by a new arrival while Offred (Elisabeth Moss) adjusts to a life in hiding, in a second series of the dystopian drama which, if anything, hits harder than its predecessor. GT The Break with Michelle Wolf Netflix, from today Fresh from her bold but divisive monologue at the White House Correspondents’ Dinner, where she witheringly attacked the Trump administration and humiliated his Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders, comedian Michelle Wolf launches a weekly variety series of stand-up and sketch comedy. GT Jonathan Meades on Jargon BBC Four, 10.30pm Arguably the most provocative and stimulating broadcaster around, Jonathan Meades dissects politics and football commentary, among other areas of public life, for insights into how jargon and slang are used to obfuscate and mislead. Its verbal vivacity, driven by an honestly felt fury at the desecration of the English language, is matched by visual intrigue, unlikely juxtapositions and an admirable willingness of the host to send himself up, all ably helmed by Meades’s regular collaborator Francis Hanly. GT The Goonies (1985) ★★★★☆ Universal TV, 3.00pm A cult favourite, this rollicking adventure follows a group of teenage friends from the “Goon Docks” area of Oregon (played by, among others, Corey Feldman, Josh Brolin and Sean Astin) on the hunt for a hoard of pirate treasure. Blocking their path, however, is a family of criminals, the Fratellis. Steven Spielberg dreamed up the story; Chris Columbus (Home Alone) wrote the screenplay. The Hunger Games: Catching Fire (2013) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 10.10pm This lithe adaptation of the second novel from Suzanne Collins’s trilogy sees Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence) competing once again in a televised fight to the death. But since the last film, Katniss has become an icon of rebellion, and the ruling class wants to bring her down a peg or two. This enormously watchable film blends whip-cracking action, oddball aesthetic and entirely laudable message. The Ides of March (2011) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.35pm George Clooney is the director, co-writer and star of this politically charged thriller about spin, soured idealism and dirty secrets. Mike Morris (Clooney) is a liberal state governor running for the Democratic Party’s presidential nomination. Ryan Gosling steals the show as the campaign’s devoted but ambitious press secretary, whose loyalties are tested to the limit. A gripping film that engages and entertains. Monday 28 May King Lear: Anthony Hopkins King Lear BBC Two, 9.30pm Talk about event TV: After making movie magic in Howards End and The Remains of the Day, Anthony Hopkins and Emma Thompson, are reunited in Shakespeare’s tragedy, King Lear, under the direction of Richard Eyre. Plus they have a stellar supporting cast, that includes Jim Broadbent, Emily Watson and Andrew Scott. Eyre sets this version in a fictional modern-day and moves the action between castles and modern locales, such as a rundown shopping precinct, to keep it contemporary. Hopkins is on great form as Lear – his old king seems to be suffering from dementia from the start, making sense of his rashness in disinheriting youngest daughter Cordelia (Florence Pugh), of him kissing another, Regan (Watson), full on the lips, and of failing to recognise other loved ones. Eyre has cut the play judiciously and brings an interesting take on Lear – that it’s about flawed parenting – that offers some insight into the behaviour of his children. Ultimately, however, it’s about Lear’s tragedy, not theirs, and Hopkins delivers a barnstorming central performance. Having played the role more than 30 years ago at the National Theatre, he’s truly grown into it. VP Richard Osman’s House of Games BBC Two, 6.00pm Pointless’s scene-stealing sidekick Richard Osman gets his moment to shine as quizmaster of this trivia contest, returning for a five-night run with BBC Breakfast’s Naga Munchetty among those competing. It’s followed by a new series of game show Curious Creatures, hosted by Kate Humble. VP Britain’s Got Talent ITV, 7.30pm Declan Donnelly flies solo as host of the semi-finals, airing nightly up to next weekend’s final. Each evening, eight of the 40 acts will perform again in the hope of becoming one of two promoted to the final by the voting public. The results are at 9.30pm. VP Springwatch 2018 BBC Two, 8.00pm Cute footage of hatchlings and deft presenting by Chris Packham and Michaela Strachan provide a winning formula for this three-week wildlife extravaganza. Gillian Burke returns, this time as a roving reporter, with Steve Backshall the first of the guests replacing the much-missed Martin Hughes-Games. VP Peter Kay’s Car Share: The Finale BBC One, 10.00pm Bowing to fan pressure, Peter Kay offers closure with this finale to his charming comedy about supermarket employees sharing the journey to and from work. Laughs and surprises abound on John and Kayleigh’s (Kay and Sian Gibson) last jaunt, but will romance ensue? VP The Vicar of Dibley Gold, 7.40pm Here’s a chance to revisit the last-ever episode of Richard Curtis’s sitcom, which delivers a fairy-tale finale for Geraldine Granger (Dawn French) when she marries Harry (Richard Armitage). Hugh Bonneville makes an amusing cameo as a lovesick vicar in the episode that also showcases French’s chemistry with the late Emma Chambers, who played daft Alice Tinker. VP Nigel Kennedy at the Biggest Weekend BBC Four, 8.30pm The BBC’s music festival welcomes maverick violinist Nigel Kennedy to Coventry’s War Memorial Park. Suzy Klein and Lloyd Coleman present as Kennedy performs his inimitable renditions of Vivaldi and Jimi Hendrix with the BBC Concert Orchestra. VP WestWorld Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm As part of her master plan, Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood) appears to be taking control over Bernard (Jeffrey Wright) in this episode of the futuristic drama and his confusion grows. VP Over the Hedge (2006) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.25am An endearing animated adventure about a group of forest creatures that, on waking after their winter hibernation, discover humans have moved in next door to them. Apprehension gives way to curiosity and excitement as they discover what the humans have to offer. Featuring the voices of Bruce Willis, Steve Carell and Avril Lavigne, among others, it’s an enjoyable movie with a message – but avoids getting too preachy. Sing Street (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Young love is set to an Eighties beat in this delightful coming-of-age tale. As with all of John Carney’s films (i.e. 2006 hit Once), the message is clear: where there is music, there is hope. The film rattles along to a cracking soundtrack – The Jam, Motörhead, The Cure – as young Conor (Ferdia Walsh-Peelo) chaotically tries to put together a band to impress a girl at school. Brideshead Revisited (2008) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.25pm In the light of the 1981 TV version of Evelyn Waugh’s novel, you do have to admire the chutzpah of anyone else giving Brideshead a go. Julian Jarrold’s attempt suffers from a desire to force modern conventions upon a story defined by the mores of upper-class interwar Britain. Hayley Atwell and Ben Whishaw are the Flyte siblings, but Catholicism, the tale’s engine, is only pernicious, never seductive. Tuesday 29 May Arrested Development Grammar Schools: Who Will Get In? BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Few education issues are as contentious in this country as that of grammar schools, with Prime Minister Theresa May among those supporting their return. This thought-provoking three-part documentary focusing on the London borough of Bexley, where each year over 5,000 children sit the selective exam for one of the area’s four grammar schools, could not, therefore, have come at a better time. We hear from both sides of the debate and are shown both the benefits and drawbacks of attending either a grammar or secondary modern school – although, as always, it’s the parents and children who make the most notable contributions. “If you want your child to become better in their future life, it’s good to go to a grammar school,” says one mother, who works long hours for minimum wage and pays £300 a month for a tutor for her daughter. Meanwhile, another, herself the product of a grammar school, despairs of the increasing parental competitiveness. And, for all the film-makers’ admirably even-handed approach, it’s the stress felt by the children that makes the biggest mark, with one youngster noting: “I don’t think grammar school is fair because people are far too young to feel they’ve failed.” SH Emmerdale ITV, 7.00pm Emmerdale confronts the difficult subject of child abuse when Charity Dingle (Emma Atkins) opens up about her past in this special flashback episode. Last November a similar technique was used, to great effect, to shed light on her cousin Cain’s experiences. Mica Proctor, in another triumph of casting, plays the young Charity. SH The Split BBC One, 9.00pm Abi Morgan’s enjoyable family saga comes to a climax with scores settled, decisions made and reconciliations all over the place. It works not least because Morgan never forgets that one person’s happy ending is another’s poisoned chalice, meaning there’s pain amid the laughter. SH The Battle for Britain’s Heroes Channel 4, 9.00pm “Our heroes often have a toxic past,” says Afua Hirsch at the start of this captivating and provocative film. She pulls no punches in her look at the darker side of our history, exploring slavery, racism and colonialism, in a film certain to enrage as many people as it informs. SH 4 Men, 175 Babies: Britain’s Super Sperm Donors Channel 4, 10.00pm This film follows men who donate their sperm for free, via unregulated websites. But why? “Being a sperm donor is like being a Samaritan,” says 61-year-old Clive, who began donating once he retired. SH Arrested Development Netflix, from today For anyone who didn’t watch the patchy fourth series of this popular Emmy-winning comedy about a rich family who lose their wealth, the good news is that you can pick up this new series with no problem. The bad news for those that did watch it is that this opening episode spends ages rehashing past events. Thankfully things do settle down – and become very funny – as we find out what happened after the infamous punch that George Michael (Michael Cera) landed on his father Michael (Jason Bateman). A proper return to form. SH Master of Photography Sky Arts, 8.00pm The international photography contest returns for a third series, with Oliviero Toscani joined on the judging panel by curator Mark Sealy and the New Yorker’s Elisabeth Biondi. Here’s hoping that this series avoids the problems of last year, which saw contestant Souvid Datta accused of plagiarism. SH All Creatures Great and Small (1975) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.45pm Simon Ward and a pre-Silence of the Lambs Anthony Hopkins star as Yorkshire vets James Herriot and Siegfried Farnon in this gentle drama set in the Thirties and based on the first two books of British vet Alf Wight (who wrote under the pseudonym of Herriot). The TV series that followed remains most memorable, but there’s warm-hearted performances here too. Operation Petticoat (1959) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.25pm A beguiling Second World War comedy directed by Blake Edwards and starring Cary Grant as a submarine captain with a strict sense of order and a rule-breaking hustler of a first officer (Tony Curtis). The vessel is bombed by the Japanese, but that’s the least of its worries. Five nurses in distress, a goat and a coating of pink paint all pose challenges for the effortlessly funny crew. The Enforcer (1976) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 11.00pm Clint Eastwood’s Harry Callahan is teamed up with rookie female partner Kate Moore (Tyne Daly) in this entertaining but ultimately disappointing third chapter of the Dirty Harry series. Together they battle violent eco-terrorists who have kidnapped the mayor of San Francisco (John Crawford) while, between the gun battles, cynical Callahan attempts to come to terms with his own male chauvinism. Wednesday 30 May Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt The Big Crash Diet Experiment BBC One, 8.00pm Is it time to rethink our attitude to crash dieting? That’s the question posed by tonight’s revealing documentary, which assesses the health impact of this extreme approach to weight loss. Our guide is Dr Javid Abdelmoneim, who along with a raft of health professionals, aims to challenge orthodox beliefs about what some see as nutritionally inadequate eating regimes with only short-term benefits. Abdelmoneim persuades four obese volunteers to give up the food that they love and opt for a scary-sounding liquid-only intake of soups and shakes, using scans and blood tests to monitor them over nine weeks. Each of the group has their fair share of weight-related issues. Portly Catholic priest Paul, for example, has been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, takeaway fan Rebecca believes that she’s in the grip of a fast-food addiction, and secret binge-eater Yolande already has fatty liver disease. Watching them tackle the programme and shed the pounds is admirable enough, but even more striking is the positive effect that the diet has on their health. In fact, the implications of the results could be a huge money saver for the NHS. TD The Doctor Who Gave Up Drugs BBC One, 9.00pm; Scotland, 10.45pm Dr Chris van Tulleken continues his crusade against the over-medication of children. Tonight, he explores why so many young people are prescribed anti-depressants, and becomes suspicious over the rise in babies diagnosed with cow’s milk allergy. TD Love in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm “The nearest gay scene for me is Belfast,” says cattle farmer Richard, a problem seeing as he lives a three-hour ferry ride away in remote Dumfries and Galloway. Not to be defeated, Richard invites three potential partners to his farm. TD Carry On Brussels Channel 4, 10.00pm More shenanigans from behind the doors of the European Parliament. We meet lone Liberal Democrat MEP Catherine Bearder, whose staunch pro-Europe stance lands her in trouble with Brexit minister David Davis. TD Miranda Barbour: Serial Killer or Liar? BBC One, 10.45pm; Northern Ireland, 11.40pm; Scotland, 11.45pm; Wales, 11.05pm This gripping true crime documentary charts the case of teenage murderer Miranda Barbour. The young mother admitted killing internet date Troy La Ferarra but later confessed to a further 22 murders as part of a Satanic cult. TD Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt Netflix, from today This snappy sitcom about a cult escapee in the big city has proved a delight. A shame, then, that this fourth season is to be its last, with the first six episodes launching today and the remainder to come later this year. Kimmy’s (Ellie Kemper) new job at a tech start-up proves ripe for nerd-baiting satire. TD Big Sky, Big Dreams, Big Art: Made in the USA BBC Four, 9.00pm Presenter Waldemar Januszczak swaps the vastness of the Wild West featured in last week’s episode for the “pulsing, futuristic excitement of the American city”, as his fascinating series on American art continues. He starts out amid the skyscrapers of New York, explaining how the vaulting architecture of the Chrysler Building exemplified the hope and ambition of the burgeoning metropolis. We then move on to the Great Depression, presaged by artists such as Thomas Hart Benton in his restless murals of urban life. TD Great Expectations (1946, b/w) ★★★★★ BBC Two, 12.35pm David Lean’s peerless version of Dickens’s novel is packed with memorable moments, from its opening scenes on the marshes, where Pip first meets the escaped convict Magwitch, to the enduring images of Miss Havisham’s house… not forgetting Pip’s boxing match with Herbert Pocket. John Mills is twice the age of the book’s Pip, but there’s a subtle ingenuousness in his performance. Rebecca (1940, b/w) ★★★★★ Talking Pictures TV, 9.00pm One of Hitchcock’s most disconcerting and finest films was adapted from a Daphne du Maurier story, though he departed from the text in many ways. A bride (Joan Fontaine) is haunted by the memory of her husband’s (Laurence Olivier) dead first wife. The excellent cast (Judith Anderson as formidable housekeeper Mrs Danvers is a particular highlight) adds class to this eerily suspenseful treat. Inglourious Basterds (2009) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 10.00pm It wasn’t quite the masterpiece we were told to expect, but Quentin Tarantino’s pastiche of war films and spaghetti westerns is still rollicking good fun and has all the ingredients of a classic Tarantino film. A celebration of vengeance, it’s an audacious take on the Second World War. Christoph Waltz deservedly won an Oscar for his incendiary turn as the “Jew Hunter”. Brad Pitt also stars. Thursday 31 May Humans Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm This third series of the thoughtful British science-fiction drama continues to benefit from a narrowing of focus; the big-name American actors and slightly strained global perspective have gone, but the thematic ambition has been retained. Less wilfully obscure than Sky Atlantic’s Westworld and considerably more affecting, Humans instead keeps a tight focus on emotion and relationships, whether the characters concerned are flesh and blood or gears and circuits. It can be heavy-handed with the allegories, certainly, but it’s never chilling or humourless – and leading synth performers Gemma Chan, Ivanno Jeremiah and Emily Berrington are as uncanny as ever. Mark Bonnar, too, is proving a handy addition to the cast as Neil, Laura’s (a brilliant Katherine Parkinson) professional antagonist and love interest – Bonnar’s history of playing characters with shifting loyalties comes in handy as Neil first opens his heart and then hardens his stance on the Dryden Commission. Mia (Chan), meanwhile, is on a one-synth mission to demonstrate coexistence is possible by moving into a hostile housing estate, and Leo (Colin Morgan) struggles with the realities of being human. GT Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm This week begins with chocolate puddings, which means the contestants are challenged to rustle up black forest gateaux and a dessert integrating a root vegetable, then aubergines and tofu take centre stage before the elimination round and an oriental classic. GT Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm Hollings and their “British chophouse classics” square up to an Italian-influenced brand serving fresh pasta from a cheese wheel, as Fred Sireix and a group of high-street investors gauge their potential. GT Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm Now with a Bafta award under its belt, this fine series follows the West Midlands Ambulance Service over the last Saturday night before Christmas. An inevitably busy period is made harder by a major traffic accident in central Birmingham – an incident which puts tremendous mental and physical demands on the crews, documented here with the clarity and honesty we’ve come to expect from the series. GT Great Art ITV, 10.50pm; not STV Tim Marlow takes a tour of the Royal Academy’s sell-out exhibition of the Parisian artist’s portraits, in the process assessing the man’s life, work, and reputation as “the father of modern art”. GT Urban Myths: Sex Pistols vs Bill Grundy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This pop cultural landmark, in which punk pioneers Sex Pistols grumbled, swore and generally misbehaved on Bill Grundy’s sleepily complacent regional chat-show, creating a national storm of outrage in the process, arguably received its definitive tribute from Kevin Eldon in 2013. The comedian’s loving reconstruction of the event imagined the Pistols as Amish people and bordered on performance art. Still, this gleefully silly take on the infamous encounter between the jobbing broadcaster (Steve Pemberton) and the Sex Pistols (played by members of the National Youth Theatre) is a lot of fun. GT Barry Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The eponymous depressed hitman (Bill Hader) tries to go it alone, only to be thwarted by his reckless partner Taylor (Dale Pavinski) and ructions among members of his acting class. GT Billion Dollar Brain (1967) ★★★★☆ Film4, 5.00pm Michael Caine returns as the reluctant secret agent Harry Palmer (The Ipcress File, Funeral in Berlin) in this film from Ken Russell, based on the novels by Len Deighton. Having left the British Secret Service to pursue a career as a private investigator, Palmer stumbles into a plot to overthrow Communism with the help of a supercomputer. But who is working for whom? It’s far-fetched but fun. Johnny Mnemonic (1995) ★★☆☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm Fresh from the rubber-burning success of Speed and four short years before The Matrix, Keanu Reeves starred in this high-concept dystopian adventure as the eponymous anti-hero – a 21st-century courier whose augmented brain is used to transport illicit data – that very nearly ruined his career. It’s adapted by cyberpunk godfather William Gibson from his own story. Munich (2005) ★★★☆☆ AMC, 12.50am Eric Bana stars in Steven Spielberg’s audacious, if lengthy, examination of the Israel-Palestine conflict. Set in 1972, it adroitly tackles the aftermath of the massacre of 11 Israeli Olympic athletes at the Munich Olympics. Bana plays a Mossad agent charged with hunting down the extremists who planned the Munich attack. Some of the rhetoric is clumsy, but the film-makers strive to be politically even-handed. Friday 1 June Tracey Breaks the News: Ullman as Michael Gove Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm After losing her to the USA for 30 years, Tracey Ullman’s return to our shores two years ago has reminded us of her unparalleled talents as an impressionist. She captures the physicality of her famous subjects – Angela Merkel and Judi Dench are standouts – as well as their voices, and hats off to Ullman’s prosthetics teams for her remarkable transformations. After an acting stint in last year’s Howards End, Ullman returns to her comfort zone tonight with a second series of the topical sketch comedy show in which she skewers politicians, mostly – although we’ll also be treated to more of Ben Miller’s scene-stealing Rupert Murdoch, with Ullman as Jerry Hall. Although no preview tape was available due to last-minute filming, Ullman was pictured as Michael Gove in promotional material and has also promised impressions of Jeremy Corbyn and Jacob Rees-Mogg. The previous series attracted criticism for weak writing, and some skits do lack bite, but slack should be cut – it’s a notoriously difficult format to pull off. Ullman’s gift for mimicry means she hits the mark often enough for the show to be a welcome bit of light satire to wind up the week. VP Extreme Wales with Richard Parks BBC Two, 7.30pm Tonight’s final episode of Richard Parks’s adventure programme combines extreme sports with lush panoramas of the Welsh landscape. Daredevil Parks takes to the skies on a paramotor – nothing more than a parachute connected to a fan-like motor – to propel him the length of the country. VP The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Fugitive immigrant Taariq Shirazi (Alexander Behrang Keshtkar) makes a desperate bid to flee as the Scandi-noir crime series continues. When Saga (Sofia Helin) and Henrik (Thure Lindhardt) track him down, however, Saga’s inability to tell a lie has serious consequences. VP Friday Night Dinner Channel 4, 10.00pm This sitcom’s family squabbles are more uncomfortably familiar than laugh-out-loud funny in tonight’s penultimate visit to the Goodmans’ home. Writer Robert Popper capitalises on Simon Bird’s musical skills by having his character, Adam, reluctantly play the violin to cheer up Grandma. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm; Ethan Hawke, Toni Collette, Jo Brand and Aidan Turner offer their funniest anecdotes tonight. Plus, Liam Payne continues his post-One Direction solo career with a performance his new single, Familiar. VP The Everly Brothers: Harmonies from Heaven BBC Four, 9.00pm Art Garfunkel, Keith Richards and Graham Nash are among the luminaries paying tribute to Don and Phil Everly in this 2016 documentary, all of them claiming the brothers as an influence. Surviving sibling Don Everly returns to Iowa to recount the brothers’ first appearances, their pivotal move to Nashville and stardom in the late Fifties. Africa: A Journey into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm So much of the music we listen to has its roots in African music. In this new three-part documentary series, London DJ Rita Ray sets off to explore the continent’s influence. Kicking off her journey in Nigeria, Ray stumbles across impromptu drumming ceremonies in the streets as she explores the importance of rhythm in the country’s music and meets its major players. Future episodes take her to Mali and South Africa. VP Crocodile Dundee (1986) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.10pm Mick “Crocodile” Dundee (Paul Hogan), a bushman from northern Australia, is a dab hand at surviving in the Outback. But when he is invited to New York City by Sue Charlton (Linda Kozlowski), a high-class reporter, in this Oscar-nominated comedy drama, he finds life far tougher in the urban jungle. He’s a survivor though: muggers who accost Dundee discover that he has a bigger knife than they do. American Made (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Doug Liman directs Tom Cruise in this lively, madcap real-life tale of pilot, drug smuggler and CIA gun-runner Barry Seal, whose supersonic, if lawless, career path began, according to this script, when he was a bored TWA pilot in 1978 and was approached out of the blue by a CIA handler (Domhnall Gleeson, all greasy persuasion) to conduct reconnaissance flights across the Caribbean. GoodFellas (1990) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm Martin Scorsese’s Mafia masterpiece, adapted from a non-fiction book, has all the qualities of great cinema: it’s thrilling, it’s provocative, it’s stylish, and it’s got a young Robert De Niro in it. Ray Liotta plays the youngster who longs to be a gangster; De Niro and Joe Pesci are in the Mob. Pesci’s mother, meanwhile, reportedly asked him if he had to swear quite so much – the f-word is used 300 times. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: The BBC's Biggest Weekend, Britain’s Got Talent and more
The Biggest Weekend Live BBC One, BBC Two and BBC Four from 6.45pm With Glastonbury taking a year off, music fans still have the chance to get their kicks as the BBC provides room in its schedules for The Biggest Weekend, the largest free festival in Europe. This year’s event is taking place over four days across the UK with venues in Belfast, Perth, Swansea and Coventry. So what can eager music fans expect? Things get under way in Swansea, Belfast and Perth, with Coventry joining the party on Sunday. BBC One kicks things off at 6.45pm with highlights from Ed Sheeran’s performance at Singleton Park in Swansea earlier in the day (the busy Sheeran is also playing at Manchester’s Etihad Stadium in the evening), then it’s over to BBC Two for Emeli Sande at Scone Palace in Perth and Clean Bandit in Swansea. At 9pm, Greg James introduces Sam Smith’s headline set at Swansea before Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds round off the BBC Two coverage. Over on BBC Four, Lauren Laverne introduces highlights from Neneh Cherry at the Titanic Slipways, in Belfast, from 7pm before checking in on sets from Simple Minds, Chvrches, Franz Ferdinand and Wolf Alice. The night finishes with Underworld’s closing set from Belfast at 10pm. SH Britain’s Got Talent ITV, 8.00pm The final auditions brings one last chance to impress the judges before next week’s much-anticipated live semi-finals, which begin on Monday. SH The Queen’s Lost Cousin Channel 4, 8.00pm First shown in 2015, this documentary tells the story of the Queen’s cousin, Prince William of Gloucester, who died, aged 30, in a plane crash in 1972. There’s notable contribution from Zsuzsi Starkloff, the Hungarian-born, twice divorced former model who was involved in a contentious relationship with William, and although the story remains intriguing, the film veers into cliché. SH Queen Victoria and Her Tragic Family Channel 5, 9.15pm With this second episode the series moves on to the 1860s and the period following the death of Prince Albert at the age of 42. Mired in grief, Queen Victoria began to struggle, as monarch and mother, until a surprising friendship helped her pull through. SH All Round to Mrs Brown’s BBC One, 9.20pm Freddie Flintoff, Fatima Whitbread and Jonnie Peacock are among those subjecting themselves to interrogation by Irish Mammy Agnes (Brendan O’Carroll’s foul-mouthed matriarch) ushers in a new set of guests. Music is by Clean Bandit; the double entendres are all O’Carroll’s own. SH Queen Night Sky Arts, from 6.00pm Sky Arts celebrates the greatest pomp rockers of them all – Queen. First up is Video Killed the Radio Star in which the band looks back at their best videos. Concerts in Rio and Budapest sandwich The Magic Years, a film about how Brian May, Freddie Mercury, Roger Taylor and John Deacon cemented their place as one of the most influential bands ever. Later, there’s more behind the scenes material in Queen: The Phenomenon. SH How the Young Ones Changed Comedy Gold, from 9.30pm It’s hard to imagine just how different The Young Ones was when it arrived in 1982, but this entertaining film does a good job of trying to explain. Featuring Ade Edmondson, Nigel Planer and Alexei Sayle, this documentary traces the show’s origins (“Our jokes were terrible,” says Edmondson) to TV history. It’s followed by The Young Ones’ University Challenge parody episode; tomorrow, at 9.30pm, is a countdown of the 20 greatest moments. SH Puss in Boots (2011) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 3.45pm DreamWorks Animation’s Shrek spin-off follows Puss in Boots’s life before he became the green ogre’s sidekick. With the help of Kitty Softpaws (voiced by Salma Hayek) and Humpty Dumpty (Zach Galifianakis), the swashbuckling feline (Antonio Banderas) becomes a hero after saving his town. Like the CGI ogre’s last two films, Shrek the Third and Shrek Forever After, the animation is more impressive than the jokes. Kenny (2017) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 10.35pm No footballer has combined brilliance on the field and success in management with such a harrowing proximity to calamities. This edifying film explores Kenny Dalglish’s experiences at Ibrox (66 were killed in 1971), Heysel (he was on the pitch for the tragedy of 1985 in which 39 died) and Hillsborough (he was in the dug-out when 96 Liverpool fans lost their lives at Sheffield Wednesday’s ground in 1989) and revisits his talent in the No 7 shirt. The Hunter (2011) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 12.30am Willem Dafoe excels as a mercenary hired by biotech company Red Leaf to track down the last remaining Tasmanian tiger in the Australian wilderness, arousing suspicion and hostility as he goes. Posing as a university researcher, he lodges with a family and grows close to them, but Red Leaf want the tiger’s blood at any cost. There’s a gripping moral weight to questions of extinction, survival and profiteering. Sunday 27 May The Handmaid's Tale Imagine… Orhan Pamuk: a Strange Mind BBC One, 10.30pm Although Imagine… covers the panoply of the arts, Alan Yentob always seems most comfortable in the company of authors, which is why this, A Strange Mind, is one of the most rewarding instalments for a while. In being content here to act as audience rather than interrogator, Yentob allows Nobel Prize winner Orhan Pamuk to amble across some fertile intellectual territory. Born into a secular middle-class family, Pamuk dreamt of being an artist or architect, only to turn to writing when he was faced with a likely future of redesigning much of his native Istanbul’s old city (a glance at a sketchbook suggests his talent is far from dormant). The resulting novels, which include Snow and My Name is Red, explore the clashes of ancient and modern, East and West, religious and secular, with a fearlessness that brought Pamuk into conflict with Turkey’s authoritarian government, but also the love of many compatriots. Pamuk is loquacious, generous company and, while this functions well as an autobiographical profile and assessment of his literary achievements, it also does something far harder and more impressive in capturing something of the essence of its subject. GT Countryfile BBC One, 6.30pm As a celebration of 30 years of Countryfile and the 65th anniversary of the Queen’s Coronation, Matt Baker, Anita Rani and John Craven explore the Royal family’s Windsor Estate. Among the topics are the livestock breeding that has saved one equine breed from extinction and the Queen’s own early experiences here. GT The London Palladium: the Greatest Stage on Earth ITV, 8.00pm Bradley Walsh ropes in some heavyweight talent to pay tribute to the venerable theatre in this one-off special. Andrew Lloyd Webber, Jim Dale, Beverley Knight and Stephen Fry are among those recounting their memories of the place in a lavish affair that is worth watching if only for some gorgeous, little-seen archive footage of Morecambe and Wise. GT A Very English Scandal BBC One, 9.00pm Norman Scott (Ben Whishaw) turns the screw on Jeremy Thorpe (Hugh Grant) as the latter’s profile grows – a decision that can only lead to disaster as Russell T Davies’s wonderful miniseries continues. GT The Handmaid’s Tale Channel 4, 9.00pm The Colonies are shaken by a new arrival while Offred (Elisabeth Moss) adjusts to a life in hiding, in a second series of the dystopian drama which, if anything, hits harder than its predecessor. GT The Break with Michelle Wolf Netflix, from today Fresh from her bold but divisive monologue at the White House Correspondents’ Dinner, where she witheringly attacked the Trump administration and humiliated his Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders, comedian Michelle Wolf launches a weekly variety series of stand-up and sketch comedy. GT Jonathan Meades on Jargon BBC Four, 10.30pm Arguably the most provocative and stimulating broadcaster around, Jonathan Meades dissects politics and football commentary, among other areas of public life, for insights into how jargon and slang are used to obfuscate and mislead. Its verbal vivacity, driven by an honestly felt fury at the desecration of the English language, is matched by visual intrigue, unlikely juxtapositions and an admirable willingness of the host to send himself up, all ably helmed by Meades’s regular collaborator Francis Hanly. GT The Goonies (1985) ★★★★☆ Universal TV, 3.00pm A cult favourite, this rollicking adventure follows a group of teenage friends from the “Goon Docks” area of Oregon (played by, among others, Corey Feldman, Josh Brolin and Sean Astin) on the hunt for a hoard of pirate treasure. Blocking their path, however, is a family of criminals, the Fratellis. Steven Spielberg dreamed up the story; Chris Columbus (Home Alone) wrote the screenplay. The Hunger Games: Catching Fire (2013) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 10.10pm This lithe adaptation of the second novel from Suzanne Collins’s trilogy sees Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence) competing once again in a televised fight to the death. But since the last film, Katniss has become an icon of rebellion, and the ruling class wants to bring her down a peg or two. This enormously watchable film blends whip-cracking action, oddball aesthetic and entirely laudable message. The Ides of March (2011) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.35pm George Clooney is the director, co-writer and star of this politically charged thriller about spin, soured idealism and dirty secrets. Mike Morris (Clooney) is a liberal state governor running for the Democratic Party’s presidential nomination. Ryan Gosling steals the show as the campaign’s devoted but ambitious press secretary, whose loyalties are tested to the limit. A gripping film that engages and entertains. Monday 28 May King Lear: Anthony Hopkins King Lear BBC Two, 9.30pm Talk about event TV: After making movie magic in Howards End and The Remains of the Day, Anthony Hopkins and Emma Thompson, are reunited in Shakespeare’s tragedy, King Lear, under the direction of Richard Eyre. Plus they have a stellar supporting cast, that includes Jim Broadbent, Emily Watson and Andrew Scott. Eyre sets this version in a fictional modern-day and moves the action between castles and modern locales, such as a rundown shopping precinct, to keep it contemporary. Hopkins is on great form as Lear – his old king seems to be suffering from dementia from the start, making sense of his rashness in disinheriting youngest daughter Cordelia (Florence Pugh), of him kissing another, Regan (Watson), full on the lips, and of failing to recognise other loved ones. Eyre has cut the play judiciously and brings an interesting take on Lear – that it’s about flawed parenting – that offers some insight into the behaviour of his children. Ultimately, however, it’s about Lear’s tragedy, not theirs, and Hopkins delivers a barnstorming central performance. Having played the role more than 30 years ago at the National Theatre, he’s truly grown into it. VP Richard Osman’s House of Games BBC Two, 6.00pm Pointless’s scene-stealing sidekick Richard Osman gets his moment to shine as quizmaster of this trivia contest, returning for a five-night run with BBC Breakfast’s Naga Munchetty among those competing. It’s followed by a new series of game show Curious Creatures, hosted by Kate Humble. VP Britain’s Got Talent ITV, 7.30pm Declan Donnelly flies solo as host of the semi-finals, airing nightly up to next weekend’s final. Each evening, eight of the 40 acts will perform again in the hope of becoming one of two promoted to the final by the voting public. The results are at 9.30pm. VP Springwatch 2018 BBC Two, 8.00pm Cute footage of hatchlings and deft presenting by Chris Packham and Michaela Strachan provide a winning formula for this three-week wildlife extravaganza. Gillian Burke returns, this time as a roving reporter, with Steve Backshall the first of the guests replacing the much-missed Martin Hughes-Games. VP Peter Kay’s Car Share: The Finale BBC One, 10.00pm Bowing to fan pressure, Peter Kay offers closure with this finale to his charming comedy about supermarket employees sharing the journey to and from work. Laughs and surprises abound on John and Kayleigh’s (Kay and Sian Gibson) last jaunt, but will romance ensue? VP The Vicar of Dibley Gold, 7.40pm Here’s a chance to revisit the last-ever episode of Richard Curtis’s sitcom, which delivers a fairy-tale finale for Geraldine Granger (Dawn French) when she marries Harry (Richard Armitage). Hugh Bonneville makes an amusing cameo as a lovesick vicar in the episode that also showcases French’s chemistry with the late Emma Chambers, who played daft Alice Tinker. VP Nigel Kennedy at the Biggest Weekend BBC Four, 8.30pm The BBC’s music festival welcomes maverick violinist Nigel Kennedy to Coventry’s War Memorial Park. Suzy Klein and Lloyd Coleman present as Kennedy performs his inimitable renditions of Vivaldi and Jimi Hendrix with the BBC Concert Orchestra. VP WestWorld Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm As part of her master plan, Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood) appears to be taking control over Bernard (Jeffrey Wright) in this episode of the futuristic drama and his confusion grows. VP Over the Hedge (2006) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.25am An endearing animated adventure about a group of forest creatures that, on waking after their winter hibernation, discover humans have moved in next door to them. Apprehension gives way to curiosity and excitement as they discover what the humans have to offer. Featuring the voices of Bruce Willis, Steve Carell and Avril Lavigne, among others, it’s an enjoyable movie with a message – but avoids getting too preachy. Sing Street (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Young love is set to an Eighties beat in this delightful coming-of-age tale. As with all of John Carney’s films (i.e. 2006 hit Once), the message is clear: where there is music, there is hope. The film rattles along to a cracking soundtrack – The Jam, Motörhead, The Cure – as young Conor (Ferdia Walsh-Peelo) chaotically tries to put together a band to impress a girl at school. Brideshead Revisited (2008) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.25pm In the light of the 1981 TV version of Evelyn Waugh’s novel, you do have to admire the chutzpah of anyone else giving Brideshead a go. Julian Jarrold’s attempt suffers from a desire to force modern conventions upon a story defined by the mores of upper-class interwar Britain. Hayley Atwell and Ben Whishaw are the Flyte siblings, but Catholicism, the tale’s engine, is only pernicious, never seductive. Tuesday 29 May Arrested Development Grammar Schools: Who Will Get In? BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Few education issues are as contentious in this country as that of grammar schools, with Prime Minister Theresa May among those supporting their return. This thought-provoking three-part documentary focusing on the London borough of Bexley, where each year over 5,000 children sit the selective exam for one of the area’s four grammar schools, could not, therefore, have come at a better time. We hear from both sides of the debate and are shown both the benefits and drawbacks of attending either a grammar or secondary modern school – although, as always, it’s the parents and children who make the most notable contributions. “If you want your child to become better in their future life, it’s good to go to a grammar school,” says one mother, who works long hours for minimum wage and pays £300 a month for a tutor for her daughter. Meanwhile, another, herself the product of a grammar school, despairs of the increasing parental competitiveness. And, for all the film-makers’ admirably even-handed approach, it’s the stress felt by the children that makes the biggest mark, with one youngster noting: “I don’t think grammar school is fair because people are far too young to feel they’ve failed.” SH Emmerdale ITV, 7.00pm Emmerdale confronts the difficult subject of child abuse when Charity Dingle (Emma Atkins) opens up about her past in this special flashback episode. Last November a similar technique was used, to great effect, to shed light on her cousin Cain’s experiences. Mica Proctor, in another triumph of casting, plays the young Charity. SH The Split BBC One, 9.00pm Abi Morgan’s enjoyable family saga comes to a climax with scores settled, decisions made and reconciliations all over the place. It works not least because Morgan never forgets that one person’s happy ending is another’s poisoned chalice, meaning there’s pain amid the laughter. SH The Battle for Britain’s Heroes Channel 4, 9.00pm “Our heroes often have a toxic past,” says Afua Hirsch at the start of this captivating and provocative film. She pulls no punches in her look at the darker side of our history, exploring slavery, racism and colonialism, in a film certain to enrage as many people as it informs. SH 4 Men, 175 Babies: Britain’s Super Sperm Donors Channel 4, 10.00pm This film follows men who donate their sperm for free, via unregulated websites. But why? “Being a sperm donor is like being a Samaritan,” says 61-year-old Clive, who began donating once he retired. SH Arrested Development Netflix, from today For anyone who didn’t watch the patchy fourth series of this popular Emmy-winning comedy about a rich family who lose their wealth, the good news is that you can pick up this new series with no problem. The bad news for those that did watch it is that this opening episode spends ages rehashing past events. Thankfully things do settle down – and become very funny – as we find out what happened after the infamous punch that George Michael (Michael Cera) landed on his father Michael (Jason Bateman). A proper return to form. SH Master of Photography Sky Arts, 8.00pm The international photography contest returns for a third series, with Oliviero Toscani joined on the judging panel by curator Mark Sealy and the New Yorker’s Elisabeth Biondi. Here’s hoping that this series avoids the problems of last year, which saw contestant Souvid Datta accused of plagiarism. SH All Creatures Great and Small (1975) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.45pm Simon Ward and a pre-Silence of the Lambs Anthony Hopkins star as Yorkshire vets James Herriot and Siegfried Farnon in this gentle drama set in the Thirties and based on the first two books of British vet Alf Wight (who wrote under the pseudonym of Herriot). The TV series that followed remains most memorable, but there’s warm-hearted performances here too. Operation Petticoat (1959) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.25pm A beguiling Second World War comedy directed by Blake Edwards and starring Cary Grant as a submarine captain with a strict sense of order and a rule-breaking hustler of a first officer (Tony Curtis). The vessel is bombed by the Japanese, but that’s the least of its worries. Five nurses in distress, a goat and a coating of pink paint all pose challenges for the effortlessly funny crew. The Enforcer (1976) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 11.00pm Clint Eastwood’s Harry Callahan is teamed up with rookie female partner Kate Moore (Tyne Daly) in this entertaining but ultimately disappointing third chapter of the Dirty Harry series. Together they battle violent eco-terrorists who have kidnapped the mayor of San Francisco (John Crawford) while, between the gun battles, cynical Callahan attempts to come to terms with his own male chauvinism. Wednesday 30 May Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt The Big Crash Diet Experiment BBC One, 8.00pm Is it time to rethink our attitude to crash dieting? That’s the question posed by tonight’s revealing documentary, which assesses the health impact of this extreme approach to weight loss. Our guide is Dr Javid Abdelmoneim, who along with a raft of health professionals, aims to challenge orthodox beliefs about what some see as nutritionally inadequate eating regimes with only short-term benefits. Abdelmoneim persuades four obese volunteers to give up the food that they love and opt for a scary-sounding liquid-only intake of soups and shakes, using scans and blood tests to monitor them over nine weeks. Each of the group has their fair share of weight-related issues. Portly Catholic priest Paul, for example, has been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, takeaway fan Rebecca believes that she’s in the grip of a fast-food addiction, and secret binge-eater Yolande already has fatty liver disease. Watching them tackle the programme and shed the pounds is admirable enough, but even more striking is the positive effect that the diet has on their health. In fact, the implications of the results could be a huge money saver for the NHS. TD The Doctor Who Gave Up Drugs BBC One, 9.00pm; Scotland, 10.45pm Dr Chris van Tulleken continues his crusade against the over-medication of children. Tonight, he explores why so many young people are prescribed anti-depressants, and becomes suspicious over the rise in babies diagnosed with cow’s milk allergy. TD Love in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm “The nearest gay scene for me is Belfast,” says cattle farmer Richard, a problem seeing as he lives a three-hour ferry ride away in remote Dumfries and Galloway. Not to be defeated, Richard invites three potential partners to his farm. TD Carry On Brussels Channel 4, 10.00pm More shenanigans from behind the doors of the European Parliament. We meet lone Liberal Democrat MEP Catherine Bearder, whose staunch pro-Europe stance lands her in trouble with Brexit minister David Davis. TD Miranda Barbour: Serial Killer or Liar? BBC One, 10.45pm; Northern Ireland, 11.40pm; Scotland, 11.45pm; Wales, 11.05pm This gripping true crime documentary charts the case of teenage murderer Miranda Barbour. The young mother admitted killing internet date Troy La Ferarra but later confessed to a further 22 murders as part of a Satanic cult. TD Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt Netflix, from today This snappy sitcom about a cult escapee in the big city has proved a delight. A shame, then, that this fourth season is to be its last, with the first six episodes launching today and the remainder to come later this year. Kimmy’s (Ellie Kemper) new job at a tech start-up proves ripe for nerd-baiting satire. TD Big Sky, Big Dreams, Big Art: Made in the USA BBC Four, 9.00pm Presenter Waldemar Januszczak swaps the vastness of the Wild West featured in last week’s episode for the “pulsing, futuristic excitement of the American city”, as his fascinating series on American art continues. He starts out amid the skyscrapers of New York, explaining how the vaulting architecture of the Chrysler Building exemplified the hope and ambition of the burgeoning metropolis. We then move on to the Great Depression, presaged by artists such as Thomas Hart Benton in his restless murals of urban life. TD Great Expectations (1946, b/w) ★★★★★ BBC Two, 12.35pm David Lean’s peerless version of Dickens’s novel is packed with memorable moments, from its opening scenes on the marshes, where Pip first meets the escaped convict Magwitch, to the enduring images of Miss Havisham’s house… not forgetting Pip’s boxing match with Herbert Pocket. John Mills is twice the age of the book’s Pip, but there’s a subtle ingenuousness in his performance. Rebecca (1940, b/w) ★★★★★ Talking Pictures TV, 9.00pm One of Hitchcock’s most disconcerting and finest films was adapted from a Daphne du Maurier story, though he departed from the text in many ways. A bride (Joan Fontaine) is haunted by the memory of her husband’s (Laurence Olivier) dead first wife. The excellent cast (Judith Anderson as formidable housekeeper Mrs Danvers is a particular highlight) adds class to this eerily suspenseful treat. Inglourious Basterds (2009) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 10.00pm It wasn’t quite the masterpiece we were told to expect, but Quentin Tarantino’s pastiche of war films and spaghetti westerns is still rollicking good fun and has all the ingredients of a classic Tarantino film. A celebration of vengeance, it’s an audacious take on the Second World War. Christoph Waltz deservedly won an Oscar for his incendiary turn as the “Jew Hunter”. Brad Pitt also stars. Thursday 31 May Humans Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm This third series of the thoughtful British science-fiction drama continues to benefit from a narrowing of focus; the big-name American actors and slightly strained global perspective have gone, but the thematic ambition has been retained. Less wilfully obscure than Sky Atlantic’s Westworld and considerably more affecting, Humans instead keeps a tight focus on emotion and relationships, whether the characters concerned are flesh and blood or gears and circuits. It can be heavy-handed with the allegories, certainly, but it’s never chilling or humourless – and leading synth performers Gemma Chan, Ivanno Jeremiah and Emily Berrington are as uncanny as ever. Mark Bonnar, too, is proving a handy addition to the cast as Neil, Laura’s (a brilliant Katherine Parkinson) professional antagonist and love interest – Bonnar’s history of playing characters with shifting loyalties comes in handy as Neil first opens his heart and then hardens his stance on the Dryden Commission. Mia (Chan), meanwhile, is on a one-synth mission to demonstrate coexistence is possible by moving into a hostile housing estate, and Leo (Colin Morgan) struggles with the realities of being human. GT Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm This week begins with chocolate puddings, which means the contestants are challenged to rustle up black forest gateaux and a dessert integrating a root vegetable, then aubergines and tofu take centre stage before the elimination round and an oriental classic. GT Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm Hollings and their “British chophouse classics” square up to an Italian-influenced brand serving fresh pasta from a cheese wheel, as Fred Sireix and a group of high-street investors gauge their potential. GT Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm Now with a Bafta award under its belt, this fine series follows the West Midlands Ambulance Service over the last Saturday night before Christmas. An inevitably busy period is made harder by a major traffic accident in central Birmingham – an incident which puts tremendous mental and physical demands on the crews, documented here with the clarity and honesty we’ve come to expect from the series. GT Great Art ITV, 10.50pm; not STV Tim Marlow takes a tour of the Royal Academy’s sell-out exhibition of the Parisian artist’s portraits, in the process assessing the man’s life, work, and reputation as “the father of modern art”. GT Urban Myths: Sex Pistols vs Bill Grundy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This pop cultural landmark, in which punk pioneers Sex Pistols grumbled, swore and generally misbehaved on Bill Grundy’s sleepily complacent regional chat-show, creating a national storm of outrage in the process, arguably received its definitive tribute from Kevin Eldon in 2013. The comedian’s loving reconstruction of the event imagined the Pistols as Amish people and bordered on performance art. Still, this gleefully silly take on the infamous encounter between the jobbing broadcaster (Steve Pemberton) and the Sex Pistols (played by members of the National Youth Theatre) is a lot of fun. GT Barry Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The eponymous depressed hitman (Bill Hader) tries to go it alone, only to be thwarted by his reckless partner Taylor (Dale Pavinski) and ructions among members of his acting class. GT Billion Dollar Brain (1967) ★★★★☆ Film4, 5.00pm Michael Caine returns as the reluctant secret agent Harry Palmer (The Ipcress File, Funeral in Berlin) in this film from Ken Russell, based on the novels by Len Deighton. Having left the British Secret Service to pursue a career as a private investigator, Palmer stumbles into a plot to overthrow Communism with the help of a supercomputer. But who is working for whom? It’s far-fetched but fun. Johnny Mnemonic (1995) ★★☆☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm Fresh from the rubber-burning success of Speed and four short years before The Matrix, Keanu Reeves starred in this high-concept dystopian adventure as the eponymous anti-hero – a 21st-century courier whose augmented brain is used to transport illicit data – that very nearly ruined his career. It’s adapted by cyberpunk godfather William Gibson from his own story. Munich (2005) ★★★☆☆ AMC, 12.50am Eric Bana stars in Steven Spielberg’s audacious, if lengthy, examination of the Israel-Palestine conflict. Set in 1972, it adroitly tackles the aftermath of the massacre of 11 Israeli Olympic athletes at the Munich Olympics. Bana plays a Mossad agent charged with hunting down the extremists who planned the Munich attack. Some of the rhetoric is clumsy, but the film-makers strive to be politically even-handed. Friday 1 June Tracey Breaks the News: Ullman as Michael Gove Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm After losing her to the USA for 30 years, Tracey Ullman’s return to our shores two years ago has reminded us of her unparalleled talents as an impressionist. She captures the physicality of her famous subjects – Angela Merkel and Judi Dench are standouts – as well as their voices, and hats off to Ullman’s prosthetics teams for her remarkable transformations. After an acting stint in last year’s Howards End, Ullman returns to her comfort zone tonight with a second series of the topical sketch comedy show in which she skewers politicians, mostly – although we’ll also be treated to more of Ben Miller’s scene-stealing Rupert Murdoch, with Ullman as Jerry Hall. Although no preview tape was available due to last-minute filming, Ullman was pictured as Michael Gove in promotional material and has also promised impressions of Jeremy Corbyn and Jacob Rees-Mogg. The previous series attracted criticism for weak writing, and some skits do lack bite, but slack should be cut – it’s a notoriously difficult format to pull off. Ullman’s gift for mimicry means she hits the mark often enough for the show to be a welcome bit of light satire to wind up the week. VP Extreme Wales with Richard Parks BBC Two, 7.30pm Tonight’s final episode of Richard Parks’s adventure programme combines extreme sports with lush panoramas of the Welsh landscape. Daredevil Parks takes to the skies on a paramotor – nothing more than a parachute connected to a fan-like motor – to propel him the length of the country. VP The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Fugitive immigrant Taariq Shirazi (Alexander Behrang Keshtkar) makes a desperate bid to flee as the Scandi-noir crime series continues. When Saga (Sofia Helin) and Henrik (Thure Lindhardt) track him down, however, Saga’s inability to tell a lie has serious consequences. VP Friday Night Dinner Channel 4, 10.00pm This sitcom’s family squabbles are more uncomfortably familiar than laugh-out-loud funny in tonight’s penultimate visit to the Goodmans’ home. Writer Robert Popper capitalises on Simon Bird’s musical skills by having his character, Adam, reluctantly play the violin to cheer up Grandma. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm; Ethan Hawke, Toni Collette, Jo Brand and Aidan Turner offer their funniest anecdotes tonight. Plus, Liam Payne continues his post-One Direction solo career with a performance his new single, Familiar. VP The Everly Brothers: Harmonies from Heaven BBC Four, 9.00pm Art Garfunkel, Keith Richards and Graham Nash are among the luminaries paying tribute to Don and Phil Everly in this 2016 documentary, all of them claiming the brothers as an influence. Surviving sibling Don Everly returns to Iowa to recount the brothers’ first appearances, their pivotal move to Nashville and stardom in the late Fifties. Africa: A Journey into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm So much of the music we listen to has its roots in African music. In this new three-part documentary series, London DJ Rita Ray sets off to explore the continent’s influence. Kicking off her journey in Nigeria, Ray stumbles across impromptu drumming ceremonies in the streets as she explores the importance of rhythm in the country’s music and meets its major players. Future episodes take her to Mali and South Africa. VP Crocodile Dundee (1986) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.10pm Mick “Crocodile” Dundee (Paul Hogan), a bushman from northern Australia, is a dab hand at surviving in the Outback. But when he is invited to New York City by Sue Charlton (Linda Kozlowski), a high-class reporter, in this Oscar-nominated comedy drama, he finds life far tougher in the urban jungle. He’s a survivor though: muggers who accost Dundee discover that he has a bigger knife than they do. American Made (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Doug Liman directs Tom Cruise in this lively, madcap real-life tale of pilot, drug smuggler and CIA gun-runner Barry Seal, whose supersonic, if lawless, career path began, according to this script, when he was a bored TWA pilot in 1978 and was approached out of the blue by a CIA handler (Domhnall Gleeson, all greasy persuasion) to conduct reconnaissance flights across the Caribbean. GoodFellas (1990) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm Martin Scorsese’s Mafia masterpiece, adapted from a non-fiction book, has all the qualities of great cinema: it’s thrilling, it’s provocative, it’s stylish, and it’s got a young Robert De Niro in it. Ray Liotta plays the youngster who longs to be a gangster; De Niro and Joe Pesci are in the Mob. Pesci’s mother, meanwhile, reportedly asked him if he had to swear quite so much – the f-word is used 300 times. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
The Biggest Weekend Live BBC One, BBC Two and BBC Four from 6.45pm With Glastonbury taking a year off, music fans still have the chance to get their kicks as the BBC provides room in its schedules for The Biggest Weekend, the largest free festival in Europe. This year’s event is taking place over four days across the UK with venues in Belfast, Perth, Swansea and Coventry. So what can eager music fans expect? Things get under way in Swansea, Belfast and Perth, with Coventry joining the party on Sunday. BBC One kicks things off at 6.45pm with highlights from Ed Sheeran’s performance at Singleton Park in Swansea earlier in the day (the busy Sheeran is also playing at Manchester’s Etihad Stadium in the evening), then it’s over to BBC Two for Emeli Sande at Scone Palace in Perth and Clean Bandit in Swansea. At 9pm, Greg James introduces Sam Smith’s headline set at Swansea before Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds round off the BBC Two coverage. Over on BBC Four, Lauren Laverne introduces highlights from Neneh Cherry at the Titanic Slipways, in Belfast, from 7pm before checking in on sets from Simple Minds, Chvrches, Franz Ferdinand and Wolf Alice. The night finishes with Underworld’s closing set from Belfast at 10pm. SH Britain’s Got Talent ITV, 8.00pm The final auditions brings one last chance to impress the judges before next week’s much-anticipated live semi-finals, which begin on Monday. SH The Queen’s Lost Cousin Channel 4, 8.00pm First shown in 2015, this documentary tells the story of the Queen’s cousin, Prince William of Gloucester, who died, aged 30, in a plane crash in 1972. There’s notable contribution from Zsuzsi Starkloff, the Hungarian-born, twice divorced former model who was involved in a contentious relationship with William, and although the story remains intriguing, the film veers into cliché. SH Queen Victoria and Her Tragic Family Channel 5, 9.15pm With this second episode the series moves on to the 1860s and the period following the death of Prince Albert at the age of 42. Mired in grief, Queen Victoria began to struggle, as monarch and mother, until a surprising friendship helped her pull through. SH All Round to Mrs Brown’s BBC One, 9.20pm Freddie Flintoff, Fatima Whitbread and Jonnie Peacock are among those subjecting themselves to interrogation by Irish Mammy Agnes (Brendan O’Carroll’s foul-mouthed matriarch) ushers in a new set of guests. Music is by Clean Bandit; the double entendres are all O’Carroll’s own. SH Queen Night Sky Arts, from 6.00pm Sky Arts celebrates the greatest pomp rockers of them all – Queen. First up is Video Killed the Radio Star in which the band looks back at their best videos. Concerts in Rio and Budapest sandwich The Magic Years, a film about how Brian May, Freddie Mercury, Roger Taylor and John Deacon cemented their place as one of the most influential bands ever. Later, there’s more behind the scenes material in Queen: The Phenomenon. SH How the Young Ones Changed Comedy Gold, from 9.30pm It’s hard to imagine just how different The Young Ones was when it arrived in 1982, but this entertaining film does a good job of trying to explain. Featuring Ade Edmondson, Nigel Planer and Alexei Sayle, this documentary traces the show’s origins (“Our jokes were terrible,” says Edmondson) to TV history. It’s followed by The Young Ones’ University Challenge parody episode; tomorrow, at 9.30pm, is a countdown of the 20 greatest moments. SH Puss in Boots (2011) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 3.45pm DreamWorks Animation’s Shrek spin-off follows Puss in Boots’s life before he became the green ogre’s sidekick. With the help of Kitty Softpaws (voiced by Salma Hayek) and Humpty Dumpty (Zach Galifianakis), the swashbuckling feline (Antonio Banderas) becomes a hero after saving his town. Like the CGI ogre’s last two films, Shrek the Third and Shrek Forever After, the animation is more impressive than the jokes. Kenny (2017) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 10.35pm No footballer has combined brilliance on the field and success in management with such a harrowing proximity to calamities. This edifying film explores Kenny Dalglish’s experiences at Ibrox (66 were killed in 1971), Heysel (he was on the pitch for the tragedy of 1985 in which 39 died) and Hillsborough (he was in the dug-out when 96 Liverpool fans lost their lives at Sheffield Wednesday’s ground in 1989) and revisits his talent in the No 7 shirt. The Hunter (2011) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 12.30am Willem Dafoe excels as a mercenary hired by biotech company Red Leaf to track down the last remaining Tasmanian tiger in the Australian wilderness, arousing suspicion and hostility as he goes. Posing as a university researcher, he lodges with a family and grows close to them, but Red Leaf want the tiger’s blood at any cost. There’s a gripping moral weight to questions of extinction, survival and profiteering. Sunday 27 May The Handmaid's Tale Imagine… Orhan Pamuk: a Strange Mind BBC One, 10.30pm Although Imagine… covers the panoply of the arts, Alan Yentob always seems most comfortable in the company of authors, which is why this, A Strange Mind, is one of the most rewarding instalments for a while. In being content here to act as audience rather than interrogator, Yentob allows Nobel Prize winner Orhan Pamuk to amble across some fertile intellectual territory. Born into a secular middle-class family, Pamuk dreamt of being an artist or architect, only to turn to writing when he was faced with a likely future of redesigning much of his native Istanbul’s old city (a glance at a sketchbook suggests his talent is far from dormant). The resulting novels, which include Snow and My Name is Red, explore the clashes of ancient and modern, East and West, religious and secular, with a fearlessness that brought Pamuk into conflict with Turkey’s authoritarian government, but also the love of many compatriots. Pamuk is loquacious, generous company and, while this functions well as an autobiographical profile and assessment of his literary achievements, it also does something far harder and more impressive in capturing something of the essence of its subject. GT Countryfile BBC One, 6.30pm As a celebration of 30 years of Countryfile and the 65th anniversary of the Queen’s Coronation, Matt Baker, Anita Rani and John Craven explore the Royal family’s Windsor Estate. Among the topics are the livestock breeding that has saved one equine breed from extinction and the Queen’s own early experiences here. GT The London Palladium: the Greatest Stage on Earth ITV, 8.00pm Bradley Walsh ropes in some heavyweight talent to pay tribute to the venerable theatre in this one-off special. Andrew Lloyd Webber, Jim Dale, Beverley Knight and Stephen Fry are among those recounting their memories of the place in a lavish affair that is worth watching if only for some gorgeous, little-seen archive footage of Morecambe and Wise. GT A Very English Scandal BBC One, 9.00pm Norman Scott (Ben Whishaw) turns the screw on Jeremy Thorpe (Hugh Grant) as the latter’s profile grows – a decision that can only lead to disaster as Russell T Davies’s wonderful miniseries continues. GT The Handmaid’s Tale Channel 4, 9.00pm The Colonies are shaken by a new arrival while Offred (Elisabeth Moss) adjusts to a life in hiding, in a second series of the dystopian drama which, if anything, hits harder than its predecessor. GT The Break with Michelle Wolf Netflix, from today Fresh from her bold but divisive monologue at the White House Correspondents’ Dinner, where she witheringly attacked the Trump administration and humiliated his Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders, comedian Michelle Wolf launches a weekly variety series of stand-up and sketch comedy. GT Jonathan Meades on Jargon BBC Four, 10.30pm Arguably the most provocative and stimulating broadcaster around, Jonathan Meades dissects politics and football commentary, among other areas of public life, for insights into how jargon and slang are used to obfuscate and mislead. Its verbal vivacity, driven by an honestly felt fury at the desecration of the English language, is matched by visual intrigue, unlikely juxtapositions and an admirable willingness of the host to send himself up, all ably helmed by Meades’s regular collaborator Francis Hanly. GT The Goonies (1985) ★★★★☆ Universal TV, 3.00pm A cult favourite, this rollicking adventure follows a group of teenage friends from the “Goon Docks” area of Oregon (played by, among others, Corey Feldman, Josh Brolin and Sean Astin) on the hunt for a hoard of pirate treasure. Blocking their path, however, is a family of criminals, the Fratellis. Steven Spielberg dreamed up the story; Chris Columbus (Home Alone) wrote the screenplay. The Hunger Games: Catching Fire (2013) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 10.10pm This lithe adaptation of the second novel from Suzanne Collins’s trilogy sees Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence) competing once again in a televised fight to the death. But since the last film, Katniss has become an icon of rebellion, and the ruling class wants to bring her down a peg or two. This enormously watchable film blends whip-cracking action, oddball aesthetic and entirely laudable message. The Ides of March (2011) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.35pm George Clooney is the director, co-writer and star of this politically charged thriller about spin, soured idealism and dirty secrets. Mike Morris (Clooney) is a liberal state governor running for the Democratic Party’s presidential nomination. Ryan Gosling steals the show as the campaign’s devoted but ambitious press secretary, whose loyalties are tested to the limit. A gripping film that engages and entertains. Monday 28 May King Lear: Anthony Hopkins King Lear BBC Two, 9.30pm Talk about event TV: After making movie magic in Howards End and The Remains of the Day, Anthony Hopkins and Emma Thompson, are reunited in Shakespeare’s tragedy, King Lear, under the direction of Richard Eyre. Plus they have a stellar supporting cast, that includes Jim Broadbent, Emily Watson and Andrew Scott. Eyre sets this version in a fictional modern-day and moves the action between castles and modern locales, such as a rundown shopping precinct, to keep it contemporary. Hopkins is on great form as Lear – his old king seems to be suffering from dementia from the start, making sense of his rashness in disinheriting youngest daughter Cordelia (Florence Pugh), of him kissing another, Regan (Watson), full on the lips, and of failing to recognise other loved ones. Eyre has cut the play judiciously and brings an interesting take on Lear – that it’s about flawed parenting – that offers some insight into the behaviour of his children. Ultimately, however, it’s about Lear’s tragedy, not theirs, and Hopkins delivers a barnstorming central performance. Having played the role more than 30 years ago at the National Theatre, he’s truly grown into it. VP Richard Osman’s House of Games BBC Two, 6.00pm Pointless’s scene-stealing sidekick Richard Osman gets his moment to shine as quizmaster of this trivia contest, returning for a five-night run with BBC Breakfast’s Naga Munchetty among those competing. It’s followed by a new series of game show Curious Creatures, hosted by Kate Humble. VP Britain’s Got Talent ITV, 7.30pm Declan Donnelly flies solo as host of the semi-finals, airing nightly up to next weekend’s final. Each evening, eight of the 40 acts will perform again in the hope of becoming one of two promoted to the final by the voting public. The results are at 9.30pm. VP Springwatch 2018 BBC Two, 8.00pm Cute footage of hatchlings and deft presenting by Chris Packham and Michaela Strachan provide a winning formula for this three-week wildlife extravaganza. Gillian Burke returns, this time as a roving reporter, with Steve Backshall the first of the guests replacing the much-missed Martin Hughes-Games. VP Peter Kay’s Car Share: The Finale BBC One, 10.00pm Bowing to fan pressure, Peter Kay offers closure with this finale to his charming comedy about supermarket employees sharing the journey to and from work. Laughs and surprises abound on John and Kayleigh’s (Kay and Sian Gibson) last jaunt, but will romance ensue? VP The Vicar of Dibley Gold, 7.40pm Here’s a chance to revisit the last-ever episode of Richard Curtis’s sitcom, which delivers a fairy-tale finale for Geraldine Granger (Dawn French) when she marries Harry (Richard Armitage). Hugh Bonneville makes an amusing cameo as a lovesick vicar in the episode that also showcases French’s chemistry with the late Emma Chambers, who played daft Alice Tinker. VP Nigel Kennedy at the Biggest Weekend BBC Four, 8.30pm The BBC’s music festival welcomes maverick violinist Nigel Kennedy to Coventry’s War Memorial Park. Suzy Klein and Lloyd Coleman present as Kennedy performs his inimitable renditions of Vivaldi and Jimi Hendrix with the BBC Concert Orchestra. VP WestWorld Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm As part of her master plan, Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood) appears to be taking control over Bernard (Jeffrey Wright) in this episode of the futuristic drama and his confusion grows. VP Over the Hedge (2006) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.25am An endearing animated adventure about a group of forest creatures that, on waking after their winter hibernation, discover humans have moved in next door to them. Apprehension gives way to curiosity and excitement as they discover what the humans have to offer. Featuring the voices of Bruce Willis, Steve Carell and Avril Lavigne, among others, it’s an enjoyable movie with a message – but avoids getting too preachy. Sing Street (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Young love is set to an Eighties beat in this delightful coming-of-age tale. As with all of John Carney’s films (i.e. 2006 hit Once), the message is clear: where there is music, there is hope. The film rattles along to a cracking soundtrack – The Jam, Motörhead, The Cure – as young Conor (Ferdia Walsh-Peelo) chaotically tries to put together a band to impress a girl at school. Brideshead Revisited (2008) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.25pm In the light of the 1981 TV version of Evelyn Waugh’s novel, you do have to admire the chutzpah of anyone else giving Brideshead a go. Julian Jarrold’s attempt suffers from a desire to force modern conventions upon a story defined by the mores of upper-class interwar Britain. Hayley Atwell and Ben Whishaw are the Flyte siblings, but Catholicism, the tale’s engine, is only pernicious, never seductive. Tuesday 29 May Arrested Development Grammar Schools: Who Will Get In? BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Few education issues are as contentious in this country as that of grammar schools, with Prime Minister Theresa May among those supporting their return. This thought-provoking three-part documentary focusing on the London borough of Bexley, where each year over 5,000 children sit the selective exam for one of the area’s four grammar schools, could not, therefore, have come at a better time. We hear from both sides of the debate and are shown both the benefits and drawbacks of attending either a grammar or secondary modern school – although, as always, it’s the parents and children who make the most notable contributions. “If you want your child to become better in their future life, it’s good to go to a grammar school,” says one mother, who works long hours for minimum wage and pays £300 a month for a tutor for her daughter. Meanwhile, another, herself the product of a grammar school, despairs of the increasing parental competitiveness. And, for all the film-makers’ admirably even-handed approach, it’s the stress felt by the children that makes the biggest mark, with one youngster noting: “I don’t think grammar school is fair because people are far too young to feel they’ve failed.” SH Emmerdale ITV, 7.00pm Emmerdale confronts the difficult subject of child abuse when Charity Dingle (Emma Atkins) opens up about her past in this special flashback episode. Last November a similar technique was used, to great effect, to shed light on her cousin Cain’s experiences. Mica Proctor, in another triumph of casting, plays the young Charity. SH The Split BBC One, 9.00pm Abi Morgan’s enjoyable family saga comes to a climax with scores settled, decisions made and reconciliations all over the place. It works not least because Morgan never forgets that one person’s happy ending is another’s poisoned chalice, meaning there’s pain amid the laughter. SH The Battle for Britain’s Heroes Channel 4, 9.00pm “Our heroes often have a toxic past,” says Afua Hirsch at the start of this captivating and provocative film. She pulls no punches in her look at the darker side of our history, exploring slavery, racism and colonialism, in a film certain to enrage as many people as it informs. SH 4 Men, 175 Babies: Britain’s Super Sperm Donors Channel 4, 10.00pm This film follows men who donate their sperm for free, via unregulated websites. But why? “Being a sperm donor is like being a Samaritan,” says 61-year-old Clive, who began donating once he retired. SH Arrested Development Netflix, from today For anyone who didn’t watch the patchy fourth series of this popular Emmy-winning comedy about a rich family who lose their wealth, the good news is that you can pick up this new series with no problem. The bad news for those that did watch it is that this opening episode spends ages rehashing past events. Thankfully things do settle down – and become very funny – as we find out what happened after the infamous punch that George Michael (Michael Cera) landed on his father Michael (Jason Bateman). A proper return to form. SH Master of Photography Sky Arts, 8.00pm The international photography contest returns for a third series, with Oliviero Toscani joined on the judging panel by curator Mark Sealy and the New Yorker’s Elisabeth Biondi. Here’s hoping that this series avoids the problems of last year, which saw contestant Souvid Datta accused of plagiarism. SH All Creatures Great and Small (1975) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.45pm Simon Ward and a pre-Silence of the Lambs Anthony Hopkins star as Yorkshire vets James Herriot and Siegfried Farnon in this gentle drama set in the Thirties and based on the first two books of British vet Alf Wight (who wrote under the pseudonym of Herriot). The TV series that followed remains most memorable, but there’s warm-hearted performances here too. Operation Petticoat (1959) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.25pm A beguiling Second World War comedy directed by Blake Edwards and starring Cary Grant as a submarine captain with a strict sense of order and a rule-breaking hustler of a first officer (Tony Curtis). The vessel is bombed by the Japanese, but that’s the least of its worries. Five nurses in distress, a goat and a coating of pink paint all pose challenges for the effortlessly funny crew. The Enforcer (1976) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 11.00pm Clint Eastwood’s Harry Callahan is teamed up with rookie female partner Kate Moore (Tyne Daly) in this entertaining but ultimately disappointing third chapter of the Dirty Harry series. Together they battle violent eco-terrorists who have kidnapped the mayor of San Francisco (John Crawford) while, between the gun battles, cynical Callahan attempts to come to terms with his own male chauvinism. Wednesday 30 May Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt The Big Crash Diet Experiment BBC One, 8.00pm Is it time to rethink our attitude to crash dieting? That’s the question posed by tonight’s revealing documentary, which assesses the health impact of this extreme approach to weight loss. Our guide is Dr Javid Abdelmoneim, who along with a raft of health professionals, aims to challenge orthodox beliefs about what some see as nutritionally inadequate eating regimes with only short-term benefits. Abdelmoneim persuades four obese volunteers to give up the food that they love and opt for a scary-sounding liquid-only intake of soups and shakes, using scans and blood tests to monitor them over nine weeks. Each of the group has their fair share of weight-related issues. Portly Catholic priest Paul, for example, has been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, takeaway fan Rebecca believes that she’s in the grip of a fast-food addiction, and secret binge-eater Yolande already has fatty liver disease. Watching them tackle the programme and shed the pounds is admirable enough, but even more striking is the positive effect that the diet has on their health. In fact, the implications of the results could be a huge money saver for the NHS. TD The Doctor Who Gave Up Drugs BBC One, 9.00pm; Scotland, 10.45pm Dr Chris van Tulleken continues his crusade against the over-medication of children. Tonight, he explores why so many young people are prescribed anti-depressants, and becomes suspicious over the rise in babies diagnosed with cow’s milk allergy. TD Love in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm “The nearest gay scene for me is Belfast,” says cattle farmer Richard, a problem seeing as he lives a three-hour ferry ride away in remote Dumfries and Galloway. Not to be defeated, Richard invites three potential partners to his farm. TD Carry On Brussels Channel 4, 10.00pm More shenanigans from behind the doors of the European Parliament. We meet lone Liberal Democrat MEP Catherine Bearder, whose staunch pro-Europe stance lands her in trouble with Brexit minister David Davis. TD Miranda Barbour: Serial Killer or Liar? BBC One, 10.45pm; Northern Ireland, 11.40pm; Scotland, 11.45pm; Wales, 11.05pm This gripping true crime documentary charts the case of teenage murderer Miranda Barbour. The young mother admitted killing internet date Troy La Ferarra but later confessed to a further 22 murders as part of a Satanic cult. TD Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt Netflix, from today This snappy sitcom about a cult escapee in the big city has proved a delight. A shame, then, that this fourth season is to be its last, with the first six episodes launching today and the remainder to come later this year. Kimmy’s (Ellie Kemper) new job at a tech start-up proves ripe for nerd-baiting satire. TD Big Sky, Big Dreams, Big Art: Made in the USA BBC Four, 9.00pm Presenter Waldemar Januszczak swaps the vastness of the Wild West featured in last week’s episode for the “pulsing, futuristic excitement of the American city”, as his fascinating series on American art continues. He starts out amid the skyscrapers of New York, explaining how the vaulting architecture of the Chrysler Building exemplified the hope and ambition of the burgeoning metropolis. We then move on to the Great Depression, presaged by artists such as Thomas Hart Benton in his restless murals of urban life. TD Great Expectations (1946, b/w) ★★★★★ BBC Two, 12.35pm David Lean’s peerless version of Dickens’s novel is packed with memorable moments, from its opening scenes on the marshes, where Pip first meets the escaped convict Magwitch, to the enduring images of Miss Havisham’s house… not forgetting Pip’s boxing match with Herbert Pocket. John Mills is twice the age of the book’s Pip, but there’s a subtle ingenuousness in his performance. Rebecca (1940, b/w) ★★★★★ Talking Pictures TV, 9.00pm One of Hitchcock’s most disconcerting and finest films was adapted from a Daphne du Maurier story, though he departed from the text in many ways. A bride (Joan Fontaine) is haunted by the memory of her husband’s (Laurence Olivier) dead first wife. The excellent cast (Judith Anderson as formidable housekeeper Mrs Danvers is a particular highlight) adds class to this eerily suspenseful treat. Inglourious Basterds (2009) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 10.00pm It wasn’t quite the masterpiece we were told to expect, but Quentin Tarantino’s pastiche of war films and spaghetti westerns is still rollicking good fun and has all the ingredients of a classic Tarantino film. A celebration of vengeance, it’s an audacious take on the Second World War. Christoph Waltz deservedly won an Oscar for his incendiary turn as the “Jew Hunter”. Brad Pitt also stars. Thursday 31 May Humans Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm This third series of the thoughtful British science-fiction drama continues to benefit from a narrowing of focus; the big-name American actors and slightly strained global perspective have gone, but the thematic ambition has been retained. Less wilfully obscure than Sky Atlantic’s Westworld and considerably more affecting, Humans instead keeps a tight focus on emotion and relationships, whether the characters concerned are flesh and blood or gears and circuits. It can be heavy-handed with the allegories, certainly, but it’s never chilling or humourless – and leading synth performers Gemma Chan, Ivanno Jeremiah and Emily Berrington are as uncanny as ever. Mark Bonnar, too, is proving a handy addition to the cast as Neil, Laura’s (a brilliant Katherine Parkinson) professional antagonist and love interest – Bonnar’s history of playing characters with shifting loyalties comes in handy as Neil first opens his heart and then hardens his stance on the Dryden Commission. Mia (Chan), meanwhile, is on a one-synth mission to demonstrate coexistence is possible by moving into a hostile housing estate, and Leo (Colin Morgan) struggles with the realities of being human. GT Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm This week begins with chocolate puddings, which means the contestants are challenged to rustle up black forest gateaux and a dessert integrating a root vegetable, then aubergines and tofu take centre stage before the elimination round and an oriental classic. GT Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm Hollings and their “British chophouse classics” square up to an Italian-influenced brand serving fresh pasta from a cheese wheel, as Fred Sireix and a group of high-street investors gauge their potential. GT Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm Now with a Bafta award under its belt, this fine series follows the West Midlands Ambulance Service over the last Saturday night before Christmas. An inevitably busy period is made harder by a major traffic accident in central Birmingham – an incident which puts tremendous mental and physical demands on the crews, documented here with the clarity and honesty we’ve come to expect from the series. GT Great Art ITV, 10.50pm; not STV Tim Marlow takes a tour of the Royal Academy’s sell-out exhibition of the Parisian artist’s portraits, in the process assessing the man’s life, work, and reputation as “the father of modern art”. GT Urban Myths: Sex Pistols vs Bill Grundy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This pop cultural landmark, in which punk pioneers Sex Pistols grumbled, swore and generally misbehaved on Bill Grundy’s sleepily complacent regional chat-show, creating a national storm of outrage in the process, arguably received its definitive tribute from Kevin Eldon in 2013. The comedian’s loving reconstruction of the event imagined the Pistols as Amish people and bordered on performance art. Still, this gleefully silly take on the infamous encounter between the jobbing broadcaster (Steve Pemberton) and the Sex Pistols (played by members of the National Youth Theatre) is a lot of fun. GT Barry Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The eponymous depressed hitman (Bill Hader) tries to go it alone, only to be thwarted by his reckless partner Taylor (Dale Pavinski) and ructions among members of his acting class. GT Billion Dollar Brain (1967) ★★★★☆ Film4, 5.00pm Michael Caine returns as the reluctant secret agent Harry Palmer (The Ipcress File, Funeral in Berlin) in this film from Ken Russell, based on the novels by Len Deighton. Having left the British Secret Service to pursue a career as a private investigator, Palmer stumbles into a plot to overthrow Communism with the help of a supercomputer. But who is working for whom? It’s far-fetched but fun. Johnny Mnemonic (1995) ★★☆☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm Fresh from the rubber-burning success of Speed and four short years before The Matrix, Keanu Reeves starred in this high-concept dystopian adventure as the eponymous anti-hero – a 21st-century courier whose augmented brain is used to transport illicit data – that very nearly ruined his career. It’s adapted by cyberpunk godfather William Gibson from his own story. Munich (2005) ★★★☆☆ AMC, 12.50am Eric Bana stars in Steven Spielberg’s audacious, if lengthy, examination of the Israel-Palestine conflict. Set in 1972, it adroitly tackles the aftermath of the massacre of 11 Israeli Olympic athletes at the Munich Olympics. Bana plays a Mossad agent charged with hunting down the extremists who planned the Munich attack. Some of the rhetoric is clumsy, but the film-makers strive to be politically even-handed. Friday 1 June Tracey Breaks the News: Ullman as Michael Gove Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm After losing her to the USA for 30 years, Tracey Ullman’s return to our shores two years ago has reminded us of her unparalleled talents as an impressionist. She captures the physicality of her famous subjects – Angela Merkel and Judi Dench are standouts – as well as their voices, and hats off to Ullman’s prosthetics teams for her remarkable transformations. After an acting stint in last year’s Howards End, Ullman returns to her comfort zone tonight with a second series of the topical sketch comedy show in which she skewers politicians, mostly – although we’ll also be treated to more of Ben Miller’s scene-stealing Rupert Murdoch, with Ullman as Jerry Hall. Although no preview tape was available due to last-minute filming, Ullman was pictured as Michael Gove in promotional material and has also promised impressions of Jeremy Corbyn and Jacob Rees-Mogg. The previous series attracted criticism for weak writing, and some skits do lack bite, but slack should be cut – it’s a notoriously difficult format to pull off. Ullman’s gift for mimicry means she hits the mark often enough for the show to be a welcome bit of light satire to wind up the week. VP Extreme Wales with Richard Parks BBC Two, 7.30pm Tonight’s final episode of Richard Parks’s adventure programme combines extreme sports with lush panoramas of the Welsh landscape. Daredevil Parks takes to the skies on a paramotor – nothing more than a parachute connected to a fan-like motor – to propel him the length of the country. VP The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Fugitive immigrant Taariq Shirazi (Alexander Behrang Keshtkar) makes a desperate bid to flee as the Scandi-noir crime series continues. When Saga (Sofia Helin) and Henrik (Thure Lindhardt) track him down, however, Saga’s inability to tell a lie has serious consequences. VP Friday Night Dinner Channel 4, 10.00pm This sitcom’s family squabbles are more uncomfortably familiar than laugh-out-loud funny in tonight’s penultimate visit to the Goodmans’ home. Writer Robert Popper capitalises on Simon Bird’s musical skills by having his character, Adam, reluctantly play the violin to cheer up Grandma. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm; Ethan Hawke, Toni Collette, Jo Brand and Aidan Turner offer their funniest anecdotes tonight. Plus, Liam Payne continues his post-One Direction solo career with a performance his new single, Familiar. VP The Everly Brothers: Harmonies from Heaven BBC Four, 9.00pm Art Garfunkel, Keith Richards and Graham Nash are among the luminaries paying tribute to Don and Phil Everly in this 2016 documentary, all of them claiming the brothers as an influence. Surviving sibling Don Everly returns to Iowa to recount the brothers’ first appearances, their pivotal move to Nashville and stardom in the late Fifties. Africa: A Journey into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm So much of the music we listen to has its roots in African music. In this new three-part documentary series, London DJ Rita Ray sets off to explore the continent’s influence. Kicking off her journey in Nigeria, Ray stumbles across impromptu drumming ceremonies in the streets as she explores the importance of rhythm in the country’s music and meets its major players. Future episodes take her to Mali and South Africa. VP Crocodile Dundee (1986) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.10pm Mick “Crocodile” Dundee (Paul Hogan), a bushman from northern Australia, is a dab hand at surviving in the Outback. But when he is invited to New York City by Sue Charlton (Linda Kozlowski), a high-class reporter, in this Oscar-nominated comedy drama, he finds life far tougher in the urban jungle. He’s a survivor though: muggers who accost Dundee discover that he has a bigger knife than they do. American Made (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Doug Liman directs Tom Cruise in this lively, madcap real-life tale of pilot, drug smuggler and CIA gun-runner Barry Seal, whose supersonic, if lawless, career path began, according to this script, when he was a bored TWA pilot in 1978 and was approached out of the blue by a CIA handler (Domhnall Gleeson, all greasy persuasion) to conduct reconnaissance flights across the Caribbean. GoodFellas (1990) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm Martin Scorsese’s Mafia masterpiece, adapted from a non-fiction book, has all the qualities of great cinema: it’s thrilling, it’s provocative, it’s stylish, and it’s got a young Robert De Niro in it. Ray Liotta plays the youngster who longs to be a gangster; De Niro and Joe Pesci are in the Mob. Pesci’s mother, meanwhile, reportedly asked him if he had to swear quite so much – the f-word is used 300 times. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: The BBC's Biggest Weekend, Britain’s Got Talent and more
The Biggest Weekend Live BBC One, BBC Two and BBC Four from 6.45pm With Glastonbury taking a year off, music fans still have the chance to get their kicks as the BBC provides room in its schedules for The Biggest Weekend, the largest free festival in Europe. This year’s event is taking place over four days across the UK with venues in Belfast, Perth, Swansea and Coventry. So what can eager music fans expect? Things get under way in Swansea, Belfast and Perth, with Coventry joining the party on Sunday. BBC One kicks things off at 6.45pm with highlights from Ed Sheeran’s performance at Singleton Park in Swansea earlier in the day (the busy Sheeran is also playing at Manchester’s Etihad Stadium in the evening), then it’s over to BBC Two for Emeli Sande at Scone Palace in Perth and Clean Bandit in Swansea. At 9pm, Greg James introduces Sam Smith’s headline set at Swansea before Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds round off the BBC Two coverage. Over on BBC Four, Lauren Laverne introduces highlights from Neneh Cherry at the Titanic Slipways, in Belfast, from 7pm before checking in on sets from Simple Minds, Chvrches, Franz Ferdinand and Wolf Alice. The night finishes with Underworld’s closing set from Belfast at 10pm. SH Britain’s Got Talent ITV, 8.00pm The final auditions brings one last chance to impress the judges before next week’s much-anticipated live semi-finals, which begin on Monday. SH The Queen’s Lost Cousin Channel 4, 8.00pm First shown in 2015, this documentary tells the story of the Queen’s cousin, Prince William of Gloucester, who died, aged 30, in a plane crash in 1972. There’s notable contribution from Zsuzsi Starkloff, the Hungarian-born, twice divorced former model who was involved in a contentious relationship with William, and although the story remains intriguing, the film veers into cliché. SH Queen Victoria and Her Tragic Family Channel 5, 9.15pm With this second episode the series moves on to the 1860s and the period following the death of Prince Albert at the age of 42. Mired in grief, Queen Victoria began to struggle, as monarch and mother, until a surprising friendship helped her pull through. SH All Round to Mrs Brown’s BBC One, 9.20pm Freddie Flintoff, Fatima Whitbread and Jonnie Peacock are among those subjecting themselves to interrogation by Irish Mammy Agnes (Brendan O’Carroll’s foul-mouthed matriarch) ushers in a new set of guests. Music is by Clean Bandit; the double entendres are all O’Carroll’s own. SH Queen Night Sky Arts, from 6.00pm Sky Arts celebrates the greatest pomp rockers of them all – Queen. First up is Video Killed the Radio Star in which the band looks back at their best videos. Concerts in Rio and Budapest sandwich The Magic Years, a film about how Brian May, Freddie Mercury, Roger Taylor and John Deacon cemented their place as one of the most influential bands ever. Later, there’s more behind the scenes material in Queen: The Phenomenon. SH How the Young Ones Changed Comedy Gold, from 9.30pm It’s hard to imagine just how different The Young Ones was when it arrived in 1982, but this entertaining film does a good job of trying to explain. Featuring Ade Edmondson, Nigel Planer and Alexei Sayle, this documentary traces the show’s origins (“Our jokes were terrible,” says Edmondson) to TV history. It’s followed by The Young Ones’ University Challenge parody episode; tomorrow, at 9.30pm, is a countdown of the 20 greatest moments. SH Puss in Boots (2011) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 3.45pm DreamWorks Animation’s Shrek spin-off follows Puss in Boots’s life before he became the green ogre’s sidekick. With the help of Kitty Softpaws (voiced by Salma Hayek) and Humpty Dumpty (Zach Galifianakis), the swashbuckling feline (Antonio Banderas) becomes a hero after saving his town. Like the CGI ogre’s last two films, Shrek the Third and Shrek Forever After, the animation is more impressive than the jokes. Kenny (2017) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 10.35pm No footballer has combined brilliance on the field and success in management with such a harrowing proximity to calamities. This edifying film explores Kenny Dalglish’s experiences at Ibrox (66 were killed in 1971), Heysel (he was on the pitch for the tragedy of 1985 in which 39 died) and Hillsborough (he was in the dug-out when 96 Liverpool fans lost their lives at Sheffield Wednesday’s ground in 1989) and revisits his talent in the No 7 shirt. The Hunter (2011) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 12.30am Willem Dafoe excels as a mercenary hired by biotech company Red Leaf to track down the last remaining Tasmanian tiger in the Australian wilderness, arousing suspicion and hostility as he goes. Posing as a university researcher, he lodges with a family and grows close to them, but Red Leaf want the tiger’s blood at any cost. There’s a gripping moral weight to questions of extinction, survival and profiteering. Sunday 27 May The Handmaid's Tale Imagine… Orhan Pamuk: a Strange Mind BBC One, 10.30pm Although Imagine… covers the panoply of the arts, Alan Yentob always seems most comfortable in the company of authors, which is why this, A Strange Mind, is one of the most rewarding instalments for a while. In being content here to act as audience rather than interrogator, Yentob allows Nobel Prize winner Orhan Pamuk to amble across some fertile intellectual territory. Born into a secular middle-class family, Pamuk dreamt of being an artist or architect, only to turn to writing when he was faced with a likely future of redesigning much of his native Istanbul’s old city (a glance at a sketchbook suggests his talent is far from dormant). The resulting novels, which include Snow and My Name is Red, explore the clashes of ancient and modern, East and West, religious and secular, with a fearlessness that brought Pamuk into conflict with Turkey’s authoritarian government, but also the love of many compatriots. Pamuk is loquacious, generous company and, while this functions well as an autobiographical profile and assessment of his literary achievements, it also does something far harder and more impressive in capturing something of the essence of its subject. GT Countryfile BBC One, 6.30pm As a celebration of 30 years of Countryfile and the 65th anniversary of the Queen’s Coronation, Matt Baker, Anita Rani and John Craven explore the Royal family’s Windsor Estate. Among the topics are the livestock breeding that has saved one equine breed from extinction and the Queen’s own early experiences here. GT The London Palladium: the Greatest Stage on Earth ITV, 8.00pm Bradley Walsh ropes in some heavyweight talent to pay tribute to the venerable theatre in this one-off special. Andrew Lloyd Webber, Jim Dale, Beverley Knight and Stephen Fry are among those recounting their memories of the place in a lavish affair that is worth watching if only for some gorgeous, little-seen archive footage of Morecambe and Wise. GT A Very English Scandal BBC One, 9.00pm Norman Scott (Ben Whishaw) turns the screw on Jeremy Thorpe (Hugh Grant) as the latter’s profile grows – a decision that can only lead to disaster as Russell T Davies’s wonderful miniseries continues. GT The Handmaid’s Tale Channel 4, 9.00pm The Colonies are shaken by a new arrival while Offred (Elisabeth Moss) adjusts to a life in hiding, in a second series of the dystopian drama which, if anything, hits harder than its predecessor. GT The Break with Michelle Wolf Netflix, from today Fresh from her bold but divisive monologue at the White House Correspondents’ Dinner, where she witheringly attacked the Trump administration and humiliated his Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders, comedian Michelle Wolf launches a weekly variety series of stand-up and sketch comedy. GT Jonathan Meades on Jargon BBC Four, 10.30pm Arguably the most provocative and stimulating broadcaster around, Jonathan Meades dissects politics and football commentary, among other areas of public life, for insights into how jargon and slang are used to obfuscate and mislead. Its verbal vivacity, driven by an honestly felt fury at the desecration of the English language, is matched by visual intrigue, unlikely juxtapositions and an admirable willingness of the host to send himself up, all ably helmed by Meades’s regular collaborator Francis Hanly. GT The Goonies (1985) ★★★★☆ Universal TV, 3.00pm A cult favourite, this rollicking adventure follows a group of teenage friends from the “Goon Docks” area of Oregon (played by, among others, Corey Feldman, Josh Brolin and Sean Astin) on the hunt for a hoard of pirate treasure. Blocking their path, however, is a family of criminals, the Fratellis. Steven Spielberg dreamed up the story; Chris Columbus (Home Alone) wrote the screenplay. The Hunger Games: Catching Fire (2013) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 10.10pm This lithe adaptation of the second novel from Suzanne Collins’s trilogy sees Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence) competing once again in a televised fight to the death. But since the last film, Katniss has become an icon of rebellion, and the ruling class wants to bring her down a peg or two. This enormously watchable film blends whip-cracking action, oddball aesthetic and entirely laudable message. The Ides of March (2011) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.35pm George Clooney is the director, co-writer and star of this politically charged thriller about spin, soured idealism and dirty secrets. Mike Morris (Clooney) is a liberal state governor running for the Democratic Party’s presidential nomination. Ryan Gosling steals the show as the campaign’s devoted but ambitious press secretary, whose loyalties are tested to the limit. A gripping film that engages and entertains. Monday 28 May King Lear: Anthony Hopkins King Lear BBC Two, 9.30pm Talk about event TV: After making movie magic in Howards End and The Remains of the Day, Anthony Hopkins and Emma Thompson, are reunited in Shakespeare’s tragedy, King Lear, under the direction of Richard Eyre. Plus they have a stellar supporting cast, that includes Jim Broadbent, Emily Watson and Andrew Scott. Eyre sets this version in a fictional modern-day and moves the action between castles and modern locales, such as a rundown shopping precinct, to keep it contemporary. Hopkins is on great form as Lear – his old king seems to be suffering from dementia from the start, making sense of his rashness in disinheriting youngest daughter Cordelia (Florence Pugh), of him kissing another, Regan (Watson), full on the lips, and of failing to recognise other loved ones. Eyre has cut the play judiciously and brings an interesting take on Lear – that it’s about flawed parenting – that offers some insight into the behaviour of his children. Ultimately, however, it’s about Lear’s tragedy, not theirs, and Hopkins delivers a barnstorming central performance. Having played the role more than 30 years ago at the National Theatre, he’s truly grown into it. VP Richard Osman’s House of Games BBC Two, 6.00pm Pointless’s scene-stealing sidekick Richard Osman gets his moment to shine as quizmaster of this trivia contest, returning for a five-night run with BBC Breakfast’s Naga Munchetty among those competing. It’s followed by a new series of game show Curious Creatures, hosted by Kate Humble. VP Britain’s Got Talent ITV, 7.30pm Declan Donnelly flies solo as host of the semi-finals, airing nightly up to next weekend’s final. Each evening, eight of the 40 acts will perform again in the hope of becoming one of two promoted to the final by the voting public. The results are at 9.30pm. VP Springwatch 2018 BBC Two, 8.00pm Cute footage of hatchlings and deft presenting by Chris Packham and Michaela Strachan provide a winning formula for this three-week wildlife extravaganza. Gillian Burke returns, this time as a roving reporter, with Steve Backshall the first of the guests replacing the much-missed Martin Hughes-Games. VP Peter Kay’s Car Share: The Finale BBC One, 10.00pm Bowing to fan pressure, Peter Kay offers closure with this finale to his charming comedy about supermarket employees sharing the journey to and from work. Laughs and surprises abound on John and Kayleigh’s (Kay and Sian Gibson) last jaunt, but will romance ensue? VP The Vicar of Dibley Gold, 7.40pm Here’s a chance to revisit the last-ever episode of Richard Curtis’s sitcom, which delivers a fairy-tale finale for Geraldine Granger (Dawn French) when she marries Harry (Richard Armitage). Hugh Bonneville makes an amusing cameo as a lovesick vicar in the episode that also showcases French’s chemistry with the late Emma Chambers, who played daft Alice Tinker. VP Nigel Kennedy at the Biggest Weekend BBC Four, 8.30pm The BBC’s music festival welcomes maverick violinist Nigel Kennedy to Coventry’s War Memorial Park. Suzy Klein and Lloyd Coleman present as Kennedy performs his inimitable renditions of Vivaldi and Jimi Hendrix with the BBC Concert Orchestra. VP WestWorld Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm As part of her master plan, Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood) appears to be taking control over Bernard (Jeffrey Wright) in this episode of the futuristic drama and his confusion grows. VP Over the Hedge (2006) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.25am An endearing animated adventure about a group of forest creatures that, on waking after their winter hibernation, discover humans have moved in next door to them. Apprehension gives way to curiosity and excitement as they discover what the humans have to offer. Featuring the voices of Bruce Willis, Steve Carell and Avril Lavigne, among others, it’s an enjoyable movie with a message – but avoids getting too preachy. Sing Street (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Young love is set to an Eighties beat in this delightful coming-of-age tale. As with all of John Carney’s films (i.e. 2006 hit Once), the message is clear: where there is music, there is hope. The film rattles along to a cracking soundtrack – The Jam, Motörhead, The Cure – as young Conor (Ferdia Walsh-Peelo) chaotically tries to put together a band to impress a girl at school. Brideshead Revisited (2008) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.25pm In the light of the 1981 TV version of Evelyn Waugh’s novel, you do have to admire the chutzpah of anyone else giving Brideshead a go. Julian Jarrold’s attempt suffers from a desire to force modern conventions upon a story defined by the mores of upper-class interwar Britain. Hayley Atwell and Ben Whishaw are the Flyte siblings, but Catholicism, the tale’s engine, is only pernicious, never seductive. Tuesday 29 May Arrested Development Grammar Schools: Who Will Get In? BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Few education issues are as contentious in this country as that of grammar schools, with Prime Minister Theresa May among those supporting their return. This thought-provoking three-part documentary focusing on the London borough of Bexley, where each year over 5,000 children sit the selective exam for one of the area’s four grammar schools, could not, therefore, have come at a better time. We hear from both sides of the debate and are shown both the benefits and drawbacks of attending either a grammar or secondary modern school – although, as always, it’s the parents and children who make the most notable contributions. “If you want your child to become better in their future life, it’s good to go to a grammar school,” says one mother, who works long hours for minimum wage and pays £300 a month for a tutor for her daughter. Meanwhile, another, herself the product of a grammar school, despairs of the increasing parental competitiveness. And, for all the film-makers’ admirably even-handed approach, it’s the stress felt by the children that makes the biggest mark, with one youngster noting: “I don’t think grammar school is fair because people are far too young to feel they’ve failed.” SH Emmerdale ITV, 7.00pm Emmerdale confronts the difficult subject of child abuse when Charity Dingle (Emma Atkins) opens up about her past in this special flashback episode. Last November a similar technique was used, to great effect, to shed light on her cousin Cain’s experiences. Mica Proctor, in another triumph of casting, plays the young Charity. SH The Split BBC One, 9.00pm Abi Morgan’s enjoyable family saga comes to a climax with scores settled, decisions made and reconciliations all over the place. It works not least because Morgan never forgets that one person’s happy ending is another’s poisoned chalice, meaning there’s pain amid the laughter. SH The Battle for Britain’s Heroes Channel 4, 9.00pm “Our heroes often have a toxic past,” says Afua Hirsch at the start of this captivating and provocative film. She pulls no punches in her look at the darker side of our history, exploring slavery, racism and colonialism, in a film certain to enrage as many people as it informs. SH 4 Men, 175 Babies: Britain’s Super Sperm Donors Channel 4, 10.00pm This film follows men who donate their sperm for free, via unregulated websites. But why? “Being a sperm donor is like being a Samaritan,” says 61-year-old Clive, who began donating once he retired. SH Arrested Development Netflix, from today For anyone who didn’t watch the patchy fourth series of this popular Emmy-winning comedy about a rich family who lose their wealth, the good news is that you can pick up this new series with no problem. The bad news for those that did watch it is that this opening episode spends ages rehashing past events. Thankfully things do settle down – and become very funny – as we find out what happened after the infamous punch that George Michael (Michael Cera) landed on his father Michael (Jason Bateman). A proper return to form. SH Master of Photography Sky Arts, 8.00pm The international photography contest returns for a third series, with Oliviero Toscani joined on the judging panel by curator Mark Sealy and the New Yorker’s Elisabeth Biondi. Here’s hoping that this series avoids the problems of last year, which saw contestant Souvid Datta accused of plagiarism. SH All Creatures Great and Small (1975) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.45pm Simon Ward and a pre-Silence of the Lambs Anthony Hopkins star as Yorkshire vets James Herriot and Siegfried Farnon in this gentle drama set in the Thirties and based on the first two books of British vet Alf Wight (who wrote under the pseudonym of Herriot). The TV series that followed remains most memorable, but there’s warm-hearted performances here too. Operation Petticoat (1959) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.25pm A beguiling Second World War comedy directed by Blake Edwards and starring Cary Grant as a submarine captain with a strict sense of order and a rule-breaking hustler of a first officer (Tony Curtis). The vessel is bombed by the Japanese, but that’s the least of its worries. Five nurses in distress, a goat and a coating of pink paint all pose challenges for the effortlessly funny crew. The Enforcer (1976) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 11.00pm Clint Eastwood’s Harry Callahan is teamed up with rookie female partner Kate Moore (Tyne Daly) in this entertaining but ultimately disappointing third chapter of the Dirty Harry series. Together they battle violent eco-terrorists who have kidnapped the mayor of San Francisco (John Crawford) while, between the gun battles, cynical Callahan attempts to come to terms with his own male chauvinism. Wednesday 30 May Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt The Big Crash Diet Experiment BBC One, 8.00pm Is it time to rethink our attitude to crash dieting? That’s the question posed by tonight’s revealing documentary, which assesses the health impact of this extreme approach to weight loss. Our guide is Dr Javid Abdelmoneim, who along with a raft of health professionals, aims to challenge orthodox beliefs about what some see as nutritionally inadequate eating regimes with only short-term benefits. Abdelmoneim persuades four obese volunteers to give up the food that they love and opt for a scary-sounding liquid-only intake of soups and shakes, using scans and blood tests to monitor them over nine weeks. Each of the group has their fair share of weight-related issues. Portly Catholic priest Paul, for example, has been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, takeaway fan Rebecca believes that she’s in the grip of a fast-food addiction, and secret binge-eater Yolande already has fatty liver disease. Watching them tackle the programme and shed the pounds is admirable enough, but even more striking is the positive effect that the diet has on their health. In fact, the implications of the results could be a huge money saver for the NHS. TD The Doctor Who Gave Up Drugs BBC One, 9.00pm; Scotland, 10.45pm Dr Chris van Tulleken continues his crusade against the over-medication of children. Tonight, he explores why so many young people are prescribed anti-depressants, and becomes suspicious over the rise in babies diagnosed with cow’s milk allergy. TD Love in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm “The nearest gay scene for me is Belfast,” says cattle farmer Richard, a problem seeing as he lives a three-hour ferry ride away in remote Dumfries and Galloway. Not to be defeated, Richard invites three potential partners to his farm. TD Carry On Brussels Channel 4, 10.00pm More shenanigans from behind the doors of the European Parliament. We meet lone Liberal Democrat MEP Catherine Bearder, whose staunch pro-Europe stance lands her in trouble with Brexit minister David Davis. TD Miranda Barbour: Serial Killer or Liar? BBC One, 10.45pm; Northern Ireland, 11.40pm; Scotland, 11.45pm; Wales, 11.05pm This gripping true crime documentary charts the case of teenage murderer Miranda Barbour. The young mother admitted killing internet date Troy La Ferarra but later confessed to a further 22 murders as part of a Satanic cult. TD Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt Netflix, from today This snappy sitcom about a cult escapee in the big city has proved a delight. A shame, then, that this fourth season is to be its last, with the first six episodes launching today and the remainder to come later this year. Kimmy’s (Ellie Kemper) new job at a tech start-up proves ripe for nerd-baiting satire. TD Big Sky, Big Dreams, Big Art: Made in the USA BBC Four, 9.00pm Presenter Waldemar Januszczak swaps the vastness of the Wild West featured in last week’s episode for the “pulsing, futuristic excitement of the American city”, as his fascinating series on American art continues. He starts out amid the skyscrapers of New York, explaining how the vaulting architecture of the Chrysler Building exemplified the hope and ambition of the burgeoning metropolis. We then move on to the Great Depression, presaged by artists such as Thomas Hart Benton in his restless murals of urban life. TD Great Expectations (1946, b/w) ★★★★★ BBC Two, 12.35pm David Lean’s peerless version of Dickens’s novel is packed with memorable moments, from its opening scenes on the marshes, where Pip first meets the escaped convict Magwitch, to the enduring images of Miss Havisham’s house… not forgetting Pip’s boxing match with Herbert Pocket. John Mills is twice the age of the book’s Pip, but there’s a subtle ingenuousness in his performance. Rebecca (1940, b/w) ★★★★★ Talking Pictures TV, 9.00pm One of Hitchcock’s most disconcerting and finest films was adapted from a Daphne du Maurier story, though he departed from the text in many ways. A bride (Joan Fontaine) is haunted by the memory of her husband’s (Laurence Olivier) dead first wife. The excellent cast (Judith Anderson as formidable housekeeper Mrs Danvers is a particular highlight) adds class to this eerily suspenseful treat. Inglourious Basterds (2009) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 10.00pm It wasn’t quite the masterpiece we were told to expect, but Quentin Tarantino’s pastiche of war films and spaghetti westerns is still rollicking good fun and has all the ingredients of a classic Tarantino film. A celebration of vengeance, it’s an audacious take on the Second World War. Christoph Waltz deservedly won an Oscar for his incendiary turn as the “Jew Hunter”. Brad Pitt also stars. Thursday 31 May Humans Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm This third series of the thoughtful British science-fiction drama continues to benefit from a narrowing of focus; the big-name American actors and slightly strained global perspective have gone, but the thematic ambition has been retained. Less wilfully obscure than Sky Atlantic’s Westworld and considerably more affecting, Humans instead keeps a tight focus on emotion and relationships, whether the characters concerned are flesh and blood or gears and circuits. It can be heavy-handed with the allegories, certainly, but it’s never chilling or humourless – and leading synth performers Gemma Chan, Ivanno Jeremiah and Emily Berrington are as uncanny as ever. Mark Bonnar, too, is proving a handy addition to the cast as Neil, Laura’s (a brilliant Katherine Parkinson) professional antagonist and love interest – Bonnar’s history of playing characters with shifting loyalties comes in handy as Neil first opens his heart and then hardens his stance on the Dryden Commission. Mia (Chan), meanwhile, is on a one-synth mission to demonstrate coexistence is possible by moving into a hostile housing estate, and Leo (Colin Morgan) struggles with the realities of being human. GT Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm This week begins with chocolate puddings, which means the contestants are challenged to rustle up black forest gateaux and a dessert integrating a root vegetable, then aubergines and tofu take centre stage before the elimination round and an oriental classic. GT Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm Hollings and their “British chophouse classics” square up to an Italian-influenced brand serving fresh pasta from a cheese wheel, as Fred Sireix and a group of high-street investors gauge their potential. GT Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm Now with a Bafta award under its belt, this fine series follows the West Midlands Ambulance Service over the last Saturday night before Christmas. An inevitably busy period is made harder by a major traffic accident in central Birmingham – an incident which puts tremendous mental and physical demands on the crews, documented here with the clarity and honesty we’ve come to expect from the series. GT Great Art ITV, 10.50pm; not STV Tim Marlow takes a tour of the Royal Academy’s sell-out exhibition of the Parisian artist’s portraits, in the process assessing the man’s life, work, and reputation as “the father of modern art”. GT Urban Myths: Sex Pistols vs Bill Grundy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This pop cultural landmark, in which punk pioneers Sex Pistols grumbled, swore and generally misbehaved on Bill Grundy’s sleepily complacent regional chat-show, creating a national storm of outrage in the process, arguably received its definitive tribute from Kevin Eldon in 2013. The comedian’s loving reconstruction of the event imagined the Pistols as Amish people and bordered on performance art. Still, this gleefully silly take on the infamous encounter between the jobbing broadcaster (Steve Pemberton) and the Sex Pistols (played by members of the National Youth Theatre) is a lot of fun. GT Barry Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The eponymous depressed hitman (Bill Hader) tries to go it alone, only to be thwarted by his reckless partner Taylor (Dale Pavinski) and ructions among members of his acting class. GT Billion Dollar Brain (1967) ★★★★☆ Film4, 5.00pm Michael Caine returns as the reluctant secret agent Harry Palmer (The Ipcress File, Funeral in Berlin) in this film from Ken Russell, based on the novels by Len Deighton. Having left the British Secret Service to pursue a career as a private investigator, Palmer stumbles into a plot to overthrow Communism with the help of a supercomputer. But who is working for whom? It’s far-fetched but fun. Johnny Mnemonic (1995) ★★☆☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm Fresh from the rubber-burning success of Speed and four short years before The Matrix, Keanu Reeves starred in this high-concept dystopian adventure as the eponymous anti-hero – a 21st-century courier whose augmented brain is used to transport illicit data – that very nearly ruined his career. It’s adapted by cyberpunk godfather William Gibson from his own story. Munich (2005) ★★★☆☆ AMC, 12.50am Eric Bana stars in Steven Spielberg’s audacious, if lengthy, examination of the Israel-Palestine conflict. Set in 1972, it adroitly tackles the aftermath of the massacre of 11 Israeli Olympic athletes at the Munich Olympics. Bana plays a Mossad agent charged with hunting down the extremists who planned the Munich attack. Some of the rhetoric is clumsy, but the film-makers strive to be politically even-handed. Friday 1 June Tracey Breaks the News: Ullman as Michael Gove Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm After losing her to the USA for 30 years, Tracey Ullman’s return to our shores two years ago has reminded us of her unparalleled talents as an impressionist. She captures the physicality of her famous subjects – Angela Merkel and Judi Dench are standouts – as well as their voices, and hats off to Ullman’s prosthetics teams for her remarkable transformations. After an acting stint in last year’s Howards End, Ullman returns to her comfort zone tonight with a second series of the topical sketch comedy show in which she skewers politicians, mostly – although we’ll also be treated to more of Ben Miller’s scene-stealing Rupert Murdoch, with Ullman as Jerry Hall. Although no preview tape was available due to last-minute filming, Ullman was pictured as Michael Gove in promotional material and has also promised impressions of Jeremy Corbyn and Jacob Rees-Mogg. The previous series attracted criticism for weak writing, and some skits do lack bite, but slack should be cut – it’s a notoriously difficult format to pull off. Ullman’s gift for mimicry means she hits the mark often enough for the show to be a welcome bit of light satire to wind up the week. VP Extreme Wales with Richard Parks BBC Two, 7.30pm Tonight’s final episode of Richard Parks’s adventure programme combines extreme sports with lush panoramas of the Welsh landscape. Daredevil Parks takes to the skies on a paramotor – nothing more than a parachute connected to a fan-like motor – to propel him the length of the country. VP The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Fugitive immigrant Taariq Shirazi (Alexander Behrang Keshtkar) makes a desperate bid to flee as the Scandi-noir crime series continues. When Saga (Sofia Helin) and Henrik (Thure Lindhardt) track him down, however, Saga’s inability to tell a lie has serious consequences. VP Friday Night Dinner Channel 4, 10.00pm This sitcom’s family squabbles are more uncomfortably familiar than laugh-out-loud funny in tonight’s penultimate visit to the Goodmans’ home. Writer Robert Popper capitalises on Simon Bird’s musical skills by having his character, Adam, reluctantly play the violin to cheer up Grandma. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm; Ethan Hawke, Toni Collette, Jo Brand and Aidan Turner offer their funniest anecdotes tonight. Plus, Liam Payne continues his post-One Direction solo career with a performance his new single, Familiar. VP The Everly Brothers: Harmonies from Heaven BBC Four, 9.00pm Art Garfunkel, Keith Richards and Graham Nash are among the luminaries paying tribute to Don and Phil Everly in this 2016 documentary, all of them claiming the brothers as an influence. Surviving sibling Don Everly returns to Iowa to recount the brothers’ first appearances, their pivotal move to Nashville and stardom in the late Fifties. Africa: A Journey into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm So much of the music we listen to has its roots in African music. In this new three-part documentary series, London DJ Rita Ray sets off to explore the continent’s influence. Kicking off her journey in Nigeria, Ray stumbles across impromptu drumming ceremonies in the streets as she explores the importance of rhythm in the country’s music and meets its major players. Future episodes take her to Mali and South Africa. VP Crocodile Dundee (1986) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.10pm Mick “Crocodile” Dundee (Paul Hogan), a bushman from northern Australia, is a dab hand at surviving in the Outback. But when he is invited to New York City by Sue Charlton (Linda Kozlowski), a high-class reporter, in this Oscar-nominated comedy drama, he finds life far tougher in the urban jungle. He’s a survivor though: muggers who accost Dundee discover that he has a bigger knife than they do. American Made (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Doug Liman directs Tom Cruise in this lively, madcap real-life tale of pilot, drug smuggler and CIA gun-runner Barry Seal, whose supersonic, if lawless, career path began, according to this script, when he was a bored TWA pilot in 1978 and was approached out of the blue by a CIA handler (Domhnall Gleeson, all greasy persuasion) to conduct reconnaissance flights across the Caribbean. GoodFellas (1990) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm Martin Scorsese’s Mafia masterpiece, adapted from a non-fiction book, has all the qualities of great cinema: it’s thrilling, it’s provocative, it’s stylish, and it’s got a young Robert De Niro in it. Ray Liotta plays the youngster who longs to be a gangster; De Niro and Joe Pesci are in the Mob. Pesci’s mother, meanwhile, reportedly asked him if he had to swear quite so much – the f-word is used 300 times. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
Friday 25 May Unreported World Channel 4, 7.30pm The last episode in what has been a typically excellent series of Unreported World sees Ade Adepitan heading to Rio de Janeiro’s favelas. “I never expected to wear a flak jacket in a city… I always thought it would be in a war zone,” he admits. Of course, Rio’s favelas are a war zone in their own way, as recent events – including the assassination of local politician Marielle Franco – make devastatingly clear. Adepitan’s focus is with the young reporters of Voz Das Comunidades, a local newspaper run entirely from within the favela, whose founder Rene Silva, now 24, started at the age of 11 “to report the stories not covered by the media”. Today, Voz, which covers everything from the terrible living conditions in the favela to the increased violence between criminal gangs and police, is a vital media presence. It’s not all smooth sailing, however. While the team are determined to cover the detrimental effects that the gangs and police have on their community, they are also wary of reporting on the actual crimes, with Silva admitting: “I’ve never been stopped [by gangs] from writing about it but I prefer not to because it’s a great risk to myself and my family.” SH Wild Escapes BBC Two, 7.00pm How do you make a holiday programme stand out? The answer, according to Anita Rani and JJ Chalmers, is by heading off the beaten track. First up: Italy’s Dolomite Mountains, where the pair are buried in hay, trek through peaks and learn a very peculiar dance. SH The Biggest Weekend BBC Four, from 7.30pm Lauren Laverne and Colin Murray guide audiences through the opening night of BBC Music’s Biggest Weekend festival, with tonight’s action coming from the Titanic Slipways in Belfast. The Manic Street Preachers, Beck and Orbital are among the performers. SH The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm She’s taken on criminals, murderers and even her own mother but tonight the indominable Saga Noren faces something much worse: therapy. The result is a blackly comic scene in which our heroine explains just why she might be suffering from PTSD. Elsewhere, Henrik (Thure Lindhardt) continues to dig into Red October. SH The Story of Cliff Richard Channel 5, 9.00pm A straight-forward profile of the singer from his early days as a cinema heartthrob to the sing-along at Wimbledon. It’s followed by a repeat of An Audience with Cliff Richard, in which the singer performs his greatest hits in front of a celebrity audience. SH Home from Home BBC One, 9.30pm The comedy comes to a suitably sweet-natured conclusion with an episode themed around new love and old, as Robert (Adam James) and Penny (Emilia Fox) put their house on the market – much to Neil’s (Johnny Vegas) initial joy. SH Hip Hop Evolution Sky Arts, 9.00pm A new series tracing the rise of hip hop from its early days in the Bronx to its current global dominance. Episode one takes us back to Seventies New York. SH Generation Grime Sky Arts, 10.00pm This enthralling documentary covers everything you need to know about grime, from raw beginnings to chart-topping omnipresence. Everyone from Wiley to Skepta contributes, and there are some fascinating insights, chief among them the notion that the genre’s popularity comes from the musicians’ refusal to bow to anyone, including their famous US rap counterparts. SH Funeral in Berlin (1966) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.15pm Michael Caine stars in this spy film as Harry Palmer, who’s sent to Berlin to help smuggle a Soviet intelligence officer out of East Germany. When he arrives, it becomes clear that the Communist agent may not be quite so set on defecting. It’s the second of three Harry Palmer films from the Sixties that were based on novels of Len Deighton. Caine shines in the role as an anti-Bond with a sharp tongue. War for the Planet of the Apes (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Following Rise of (2011) and Dawn of (2014), the series moved to War for, which was galling for those of us who’d hoped for Breakfast at. This mesmerising new chapter modulates between revenge western and historical epic via Vietnam meltdown as Caesar (Andy Serkis) and his apes are forced into conflict with an army of humans led by a ruthless Woody Harrelson. Lucky Them (2013) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 12.25am; N Ireland, 12.55am Superb performances from Toni Collette and Thomas Haden Church elevate this flimsy comedy-drama into something fleetingly brilliant. Collette’s Ellie is a fortysomething music journalist on the verge of a serious crisis, when, accompanied by an eccentric amateur film-maker (Church), she begins to search for her ex-boyfriend, a missing, presumed dead, rock star. Saturday 26 May Emile Sande performs The Biggest Weekend Live BBC One, BBC Two and BBC Four from 6.45pm With Glastonbury taking a year off, music fans still have the chance to get their kicks as the BBC provides room in its schedules for The Biggest Weekend, the largest free festival in Europe. This year’s event is taking place over four days across the UK with venues in Belfast, Perth, Swansea and Coventry. So what can eager music fans expect? Things get under way in Swansea, Belfast and Perth, with Coventry joining the party on Sunday. BBC One kicks things off at 6.45pm with highlights from Ed Sheeran’s performance at Singleton Park in Swansea earlier in the day (the busy Sheeran is also playing at Manchester’s Etihad Stadium in the evening), then it’s over to BBC Two for Emeli Sande at Scone Palace in Perth and Clean Bandit in Swansea. At 9pm, Greg James introduces Sam Smith’s headline set at Swansea before Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds round off the BBC Two coverage. Over on BBC Four, Lauren Laverne introduces highlights from Neneh Cherry at the Titanic Slipways, in Belfast, from 7pm before checking in on sets from Simple Minds, Chvrches, Franz Ferdinand and Wolf Alice. The night finishes with Underworld’s closing set from Belfast at 10pm. SH Britain’s Got Talent ITV, 8.00pm The final auditions brings one last chance to impress the judges before next week’s much-anticipated live semi-finals, which begin on Monday. SH The Queen’s Lost Cousin Channel 4, 8.00pm First shown in 2015, this documentary tells the story of the Queen’s cousin, Prince William of Gloucester, who died, aged 30, in a plane crash in 1972. There’s notable contribution from Zsuzsi Starkloff, the Hungarian-born, twice divorced former model who was involved in a contentious relationship with William, and although the story remains intriguing, the film veers into cliché. SH Queen Victoria and Her Tragic Family Channel 5, 9.15pm With this second episode the series moves on to the 1860s and the period following the death of Prince Albert at the age of 42. Mired in grief, Queen Victoria began to struggle, as monarch and mother, until a surprising friendship helped her pull through. SH All Round to Mrs Brown’s BBC One, 9.20pm Freddie Flintoff, Fatima Whitbread and Jonnie Peacock are among those subjecting themselves to interrogation by Irish Mammy Agnes (Brendan O’Carroll’s foul-mouthed matriarch) ushers in a new set of guests. Music is by Clean Bandit; the double entendres are all O’Carroll’s own. SH Queen Night Sky Arts, from 6.00pm Sky Arts celebrates the greatest pomp rockers of them all – Queen. First up is Video Killed the Radio Star in which the band looks back at their best videos. Concerts in Rio and Budapest sandwich The Magic Years, a film about how Brian May, Freddie Mercury, Roger Taylor and John Deacon cemented their place as one of the most influential bands ever. Later, there’s more behind the scenes material in Queen: The Phenomenon. SH How the Young Ones Changed Comedy Gold, from 9.30pm It’s hard to imagine just how different The Young Ones was when it arrived in 1982, but this entertaining film does a good job of trying to explain. Featuring Ade Edmondson, Nigel Planer and Alexei Sayle, this documentary traces the show’s origins (“Our jokes were terrible,” says Edmondson) to TV history. It’s followed by The Young Ones’ University Challenge parody episode; tomorrow, at 9.30pm, is a countdown of the 20 greatest moments. SH Puss in Boots (2011) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 3.45pm DreamWorks Animation’s Shrek spin-off follows Puss in Boots’s life before he became the green ogre’s sidekick. With the help of Kitty Softpaws (voiced by Salma Hayek) and Humpty Dumpty (Zach Galifianakis), the swashbuckling feline (Antonio Banderas) becomes a hero after saving his town. Like the CGI ogre’s last two films, Shrek the Third and Shrek Forever After, the animation is more impressive than the jokes. Kenny (2017) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 10.35pm No footballer has combined brilliance on the field and success in management with such a harrowing proximity to calamities. This edifying film explores Kenny Dalglish’s experiences at Ibrox (66 were killed in 1971), Heysel (he was on the pitch for the tragedy of 1985 in which 39 died) and Hillsborough (he was in the dug-out when 96 Liverpool fans lost their lives at Sheffield Wednesday’s ground in 1989) and revisits his talent in the No 7 shirt. The Hunter (2011) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 12.30am Willem Dafoe excels as a mercenary hired by biotech company Red Leaf to track down the last remaining Tasmanian tiger in the Australian wilderness, arousing suspicion and hostility as he goes. Posing as a university researcher, he lodges with a family and grows close to them, but Red Leaf want the tiger’s blood at any cost. There’s a gripping moral weight to questions of extinction, survival and profiteering. Sunday 27 May The Handmaid's Tale Imagine… Orhan Pamuk: a Strange Mind BBC One, 10.30pm Although Imagine… covers the panoply of the arts, Alan Yentob always seems most comfortable in the company of authors, which is why this, A Strange Mind, is one of the most rewarding instalments for a while. In being content here to act as audience rather than interrogator, Yentob allows Nobel Prize winner Orhan Pamuk to amble across some fertile intellectual territory. Born into a secular middle-class family, Pamuk dreamt of being an artist or architect, only to turn to writing when he was faced with a likely future of redesigning much of his native Istanbul’s old city (a glance at a sketchbook suggests his talent is far from dormant). The resulting novels, which include Snow and My Name is Red, explore the clashes of ancient and modern, East and West, religious and secular, with a fearlessness that brought Pamuk into conflict with Turkey’s authoritarian government, but also the love of many compatriots. Pamuk is loquacious, generous company and, while this functions well as an autobiographical profile and assessment of his literary achievements, it also does something far harder and more impressive in capturing something of the essence of its subject. GT Countryfile BBC One, 6.30pm As a celebration of 30 years of Countryfile and the 65th anniversary of the Queen’s Coronation, Matt Baker, Anita Rani and John Craven explore the Royal family’s Windsor Estate. Among the topics are the livestock breeding that has saved one equine breed from extinction and the Queen’s own early experiences here. GT The London Palladium: the Greatest Stage on Earth ITV, 8.00pm Bradley Walsh ropes in some heavyweight talent to pay tribute to the venerable theatre in this one-off special. Andrew Lloyd Webber, Jim Dale, Beverley Knight and Stephen Fry are among those recounting their memories of the place in a lavish affair that is worth watching if only for some gorgeous, little-seen archive footage of Morecambe and Wise. GT A Very English Scandal BBC One, 9.00pm Norman Scott (Ben Whishaw) turns the screw on Jeremy Thorpe (Hugh Grant) as the latter’s profile grows – a decision that can only lead to disaster as Russell T Davies’s wonderful miniseries continues. GT The Handmaid’s Tale Channel 4, 9.00pm The Colonies are shaken by a new arrival while Offred (Elisabeth Moss) adjusts to a life in hiding, in a second series of the dystopian drama which, if anything, hits harder than its predecessor. GT The Break with Michelle Wolf Netflix, from today Fresh from her bold but divisive monologue at the White House Correspondents’ Dinner, where she witheringly attacked the Trump administration and humiliated his Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders, comedian Michelle Wolf launches a weekly variety series of stand-up and sketch comedy. GT Jonathan Meades on Jargon BBC Four, 10.30pm Arguably the most provocative and stimulating broadcaster around, Jonathan Meades dissects politics and football commentary, among other areas of public life, for insights into how jargon and slang are used to obfuscate and mislead. Its verbal vivacity, driven by an honestly felt fury at the desecration of the English language, is matched by visual intrigue, unlikely juxtapositions and an admirable willingness of the host to send himself up, all ably helmed by Meades’s regular collaborator Francis Hanly. GT The Goonies (1985) ★★★★☆ Universal TV, 3.00pm A cult favourite, this rollicking adventure follows a group of teenage friends from the “Goon Docks” area of Oregon (played by, among others, Corey Feldman, Josh Brolin and Sean Astin) on the hunt for a hoard of pirate treasure. Blocking their path, however, is a family of criminals, the Fratellis. Steven Spielberg dreamed up the story; Chris Columbus (Home Alone) wrote the screenplay. The Hunger Games: Catching Fire (2013) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 10.10pm This lithe adaptation of the second novel from Suzanne Collins’s trilogy sees Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence) competing once again in a televised fight to the death. But since the last film, Katniss has become an icon of rebellion, and the ruling class wants to bring her down a peg or two. This enormously watchable film blends whip-cracking action, oddball aesthetic and entirely laudable message. The Ides of March (2011) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.35pm George Clooney is the director, co-writer and star of this politically charged thriller about spin, soured idealism and dirty secrets. Mike Morris (Clooney) is a liberal state governor running for the Democratic Party’s presidential nomination. Ryan Gosling steals the show as the campaign’s devoted but ambitious press secretary, whose loyalties are tested to the limit. A gripping film that engages and entertains. Monday 28 May King Lear: Anthony Hopkins King Lear BBC Two, 9.30pm Talk about event TV: After making movie magic in Howards End and The Remains of the Day, Anthony Hopkins and Emma Thompson, are reunited in Shakespeare’s tragedy, King Lear, under the direction of Richard Eyre. Plus they have a stellar supporting cast, that includes Jim Broadbent, Emily Watson and Andrew Scott. Eyre sets this version in a fictional modern-day and moves the action between castles and modern locales, such as a rundown shopping precinct, to keep it contemporary. Hopkins is on great form as Lear – his old king seems to be suffering from dementia from the start, making sense of his rashness in disinheriting youngest daughter Cordelia (Florence Pugh), of him kissing another, Regan (Watson), full on the lips, and of failing to recognise other loved ones. Eyre has cut the play judiciously and brings an interesting take on Lear – that it’s about flawed parenting – that offers some insight into the behaviour of his children. Ultimately, however, it’s about Lear’s tragedy, not theirs, and Hopkins delivers a barnstorming central performance. Having played the role more than 30 years ago at the National Theatre, he’s truly grown into it. VP Richard Osman’s House of Games BBC Two, 6.00pm Pointless’s scene-stealing sidekick Richard Osman gets his moment to shine as quizmaster of this trivia contest, returning for a five-night run with BBC Breakfast’s Naga Munchetty among those competing. It’s followed by a new series of game show Curious Creatures, hosted by Kate Humble. VP Britain’s Got Talent ITV, 7.30pm Declan Donnelly flies solo as host of the semi-finals, airing nightly up to next weekend’s final. Each evening, eight of the 40 acts will perform again in the hope of becoming one of two promoted to the final by the voting public. The results are at 9.30pm. VP Springwatch 2018 BBC Two, 8.00pm Cute footage of hatchlings and deft presenting by Chris Packham and Michaela Strachan provide a winning formula for this three-week wildlife extravaganza. Gillian Burke returns, this time as a roving reporter, with Steve Backshall the first of the guests replacing the much-missed Martin Hughes-Games. VP Peter Kay’s Car Share: The Finale BBC One, 10.00pm Bowing to fan pressure, Peter Kay offers closure with this finale to his charming comedy about supermarket employees sharing the journey to and from work. Laughs and surprises abound on John and Kayleigh’s (Kay and Sian Gibson) last jaunt, but will romance ensue? VP The Vicar of Dibley Gold, 7.40pm Here’s a chance to revisit the last-ever episode of Richard Curtis’s sitcom, which delivers a fairy-tale finale for Geraldine Granger (Dawn French) when she marries Harry (Richard Armitage). Hugh Bonneville makes an amusing cameo as a lovesick vicar in the episode that also showcases French’s chemistry with the late Emma Chambers, who played daft Alice Tinker. VP Nigel Kennedy at the Biggest Weekend BBC Four, 8.30pm The BBC’s music festival welcomes maverick violinist Nigel Kennedy to Coventry’s War Memorial Park. Suzy Klein and Lloyd Coleman present as Kennedy performs his inimitable renditions of Vivaldi and Jimi Hendrix with the BBC Concert Orchestra. VP WestWorld Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm As part of her master plan, Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood) appears to be taking control over Bernard (Jeffrey Wright) in this episode of the futuristic drama and his confusion grows. VP Over the Hedge (2006) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.25am An endearing animated adventure about a group of forest creatures that, on waking after their winter hibernation, discover humans have moved in next door to them. Apprehension gives way to curiosity and excitement as they discover what the humans have to offer. Featuring the voices of Bruce Willis, Steve Carell and Avril Lavigne, among others, it’s an enjoyable movie with a message – but avoids getting too preachy. Sing Street (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Young love is set to an Eighties beat in this delightful coming-of-age tale. As with all of John Carney’s films (i.e. 2006 hit Once), the message is clear: where there is music, there is hope. The film rattles along to a cracking soundtrack – The Jam, Motörhead, The Cure – as young Conor (Ferdia Walsh-Peelo) chaotically tries to put together a band to impress a girl at school. Brideshead Revisited (2008) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.25pm In the light of the 1981 TV version of Evelyn Waugh’s novel, you do have to admire the chutzpah of anyone else giving Brideshead a go. Julian Jarrold’s attempt suffers from a desire to force modern conventions upon a story defined by the mores of upper-class interwar Britain. Hayley Atwell and Ben Whishaw are the Flyte siblings, but Catholicism, the tale’s engine, is only pernicious, never seductive. Tuesday 29 May Arrested Development Grammar Schools: Who Will Get In? BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Few education issues are as contentious in this country as that of grammar schools, with Prime Minister Theresa May among those supporting their return. This thought-provoking three-part documentary focusing on the London borough of Bexley, where each year over 5,000 children sit the selective exam for one of the area’s four grammar schools, could not, therefore, have come at a better time. We hear from both sides of the debate and are shown both the benefits and drawbacks of attending either a grammar or secondary modern school – although, as always, it’s the parents and children who make the most notable contributions. “If you want your child to become better in their future life, it’s good to go to a grammar school,” says one mother, who works long hours for minimum wage and pays £300 a month for a tutor for her daughter. Meanwhile, another, herself the product of a grammar school, despairs of the increasing parental competitiveness. And, for all the film-makers’ admirably even-handed approach, it’s the stress felt by the children that makes the biggest mark, with one youngster noting: “I don’t think grammar school is fair because people are far too young to feel they’ve failed.” SH Emmerdale ITV, 7.00pm Emmerdale confronts the difficult subject of child abuse when Charity Dingle (Emma Atkins) opens up about her past in this special flashback episode. Last November a similar technique was used, to great effect, to shed light on her cousin Cain’s experiences. Mica Proctor, in another triumph of casting, plays the young Charity. SH The Split BBC One, 9.00pm Abi Morgan’s enjoyable family saga comes to a climax with scores settled, decisions made and reconciliations all over the place. It works not least because Morgan never forgets that one person’s happy ending is another’s poisoned chalice, meaning there’s pain amid the laughter. SH The Battle for Britain’s Heroes Channel 4, 9.00pm “Our heroes often have a toxic past,” says Afua Hirsch at the start of this captivating and provocative film. She pulls no punches in her look at the darker side of our history, exploring slavery, racism and colonialism, in a film certain to enrage as many people as it informs. SH 4 Men, 175 Babies: Britain’s Super Sperm Donors Channel 4, 10.00pm This film follows men who donate their sperm for free, via unregulated websites. But why? “Being a sperm donor is like being a Samaritan,” says 61-year-old Clive, who began donating once he retired. SH Arrested Development Netflix, from today For anyone who didn’t watch the patchy fourth series of this popular Emmy-winning comedy about a rich family who lose their wealth, the good news is that you can pick up this new series with no problem. The bad news for those that did watch it is that this opening episode spends ages rehashing past events. Thankfully things do settle down – and become very funny – as we find out what happened after the infamous punch that George Michael (Michael Cera) landed on his father Michael (Jason Bateman). A proper return to form. SH Master of Photography Sky Arts, 8.00pm The international photography contest returns for a third series, with Oliviero Toscani joined on the judging panel by curator Mark Sealy and the New Yorker’s Elisabeth Biondi. Here’s hoping that this series avoids the problems of last year, which saw contestant Souvid Datta accused of plagiarism. SH All Creatures Great and Small (1975) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.45pm Simon Ward and a pre-Silence of the Lambs Anthony Hopkins star as Yorkshire vets James Herriot and Siegfried Farnon in this gentle drama set in the Thirties and based on the first two books of British vet Alf Wight (who wrote under the pseudonym of Herriot). The TV series that followed remains most memorable, but there’s warm-hearted performances here too. Operation Petticoat (1959) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.25pm A beguiling Second World War comedy directed by Blake Edwards and starring Cary Grant as a submarine captain with a strict sense of order and a rule-breaking hustler of a first officer (Tony Curtis). The vessel is bombed by the Japanese, but that’s the least of its worries. Five nurses in distress, a goat and a coating of pink paint all pose challenges for the effortlessly funny crew. The Enforcer (1976) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 11.00pm Clint Eastwood’s Harry Callahan is teamed up with rookie female partner Kate Moore (Tyne Daly) in this entertaining but ultimately disappointing third chapter of the Dirty Harry series. Together they battle violent eco-terrorists who have kidnapped the mayor of San Francisco (John Crawford) while, between the gun battles, cynical Callahan attempts to come to terms with his own male chauvinism. Wednesday 30 May Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt The Big Crash Diet Experiment BBC One, 8.00pm Is it time to rethink our attitude to crash dieting? That’s the question posed by tonight’s revealing documentary, which assesses the health impact of this extreme approach to weight loss. Our guide is Dr Javid Abdelmoneim, who along with a raft of health professionals, aims to challenge orthodox beliefs about what some see as nutritionally inadequate eating regimes with only short-term benefits. Abdelmoneim persuades four obese volunteers to give up the food that they love and opt for a scary-sounding liquid-only intake of soups and shakes, using scans and blood tests to monitor them over nine weeks. Each of the group has their fair share of weight-related issues. Portly Catholic priest Paul, for example, has been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, takeaway fan Rebecca believes that she’s in the grip of a fast-food addiction, and secret binge-eater Yolande already has fatty liver disease. Watching them tackle the programme and shed the pounds is admirable enough, but even more striking is the positive effect that the diet has on their health. In fact, the implications of the results could be a huge money saver for the NHS. TD The Doctor Who Gave Up Drugs BBC One, 9.00pm; Scotland, 10.45pm Dr Chris van Tulleken continues his crusade against the over-medication of children. Tonight, he explores why so many young people are prescribed anti-depressants, and becomes suspicious over the rise in babies diagnosed with cow’s milk allergy. TD Love in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm “The nearest gay scene for me is Belfast,” says cattle farmer Richard, a problem seeing as he lives a three-hour ferry ride away in remote Dumfries and Galloway. Not to be defeated, Richard invites three potential partners to his farm. TD Carry On Brussels Channel 4, 10.00pm More shenanigans from behind the doors of the European Parliament. We meet lone Liberal Democrat MEP Catherine Bearder, whose staunch pro-Europe stance lands her in trouble with Brexit minister David Davis. TD Miranda Barbour: Serial Killer or Liar? BBC One, 10.45pm; Northern Ireland, 11.40pm; Scotland, 11.45pm; Wales, 11.05pm This gripping true crime documentary charts the case of teenage murderer Miranda Barbour. The young mother admitted killing internet date Troy La Ferarra but later confessed to a further 22 murders as part of a Satanic cult. TD Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt Netflix, from today This snappy sitcom about a cult escapee in the big city has proved a delight. A shame, then, that this fourth season is to be its last, with the first six episodes launching today and the remainder to come later this year. Kimmy’s (Ellie Kemper) new job at a tech start-up proves ripe for nerd-baiting satire. TD Big Sky, Big Dreams, Big Art: Made in the USA BBC Four, 9.00pm Presenter Waldemar Januszczak swaps the vastness of the Wild West featured in last week’s episode for the “pulsing, futuristic excitement of the American city”, as his fascinating series on American art continues. He starts out amid the skyscrapers of New York, explaining how the vaulting architecture of the Chrysler Building exemplified the hope and ambition of the burgeoning metropolis. We then move on to the Great Depression, presaged by artists such as Thomas Hart Benton in his restless murals of urban life. TD Great Expectations (1946, b/w) ★★★★★ BBC Two, 12.35pm David Lean’s peerless version of Dickens’s novel is packed with memorable moments, from its opening scenes on the marshes, where Pip first meets the escaped convict Magwitch, to the enduring images of Miss Havisham’s house… not forgetting Pip’s boxing match with Herbert Pocket. John Mills is twice the age of the book’s Pip, but there’s a subtle ingenuousness in his performance. Rebecca (1940, b/w) ★★★★★ Talking Pictures TV, 9.00pm One of Hitchcock’s most disconcerting and finest films was adapted from a Daphne du Maurier story, though he departed from the text in many ways. A bride (Joan Fontaine) is haunted by the memory of her husband’s (Laurence Olivier) dead first wife. The excellent cast (Judith Anderson as formidable housekeeper Mrs Danvers is a particular highlight) adds class to this eerily suspenseful treat. Inglourious Basterds (2009) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 10.00pm It wasn’t quite the masterpiece we were told to expect, but Quentin Tarantino’s pastiche of war films and spaghetti westerns is still rollicking good fun and has all the ingredients of a classic Tarantino film. A celebration of vengeance, it’s an audacious take on the Second World War. Christoph Waltz deservedly won an Oscar for his incendiary turn as the “Jew Hunter”. Brad Pitt also stars. Thursday 31 May Humans Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm This third series of the thoughtful British science-fiction drama continues to benefit from a narrowing of focus; the big-name American actors and slightly strained global perspective have gone, but the thematic ambition has been retained. Less wilfully obscure than Sky Atlantic’s Westworld and considerably more affecting, Humans instead keeps a tight focus on emotion and relationships, whether the characters concerned are flesh and blood or gears and circuits. It can be heavy-handed with the allegories, certainly, but it’s never chilling or humourless – and leading synth performers Gemma Chan, Ivanno Jeremiah and Emily Berrington are as uncanny as ever. Mark Bonnar, too, is proving a handy addition to the cast as Neil, Laura’s (a brilliant Katherine Parkinson) professional antagonist and love interest – Bonnar’s history of playing characters with shifting loyalties comes in handy as Neil first opens his heart and then hardens his stance on the Dryden Commission. Mia (Chan), meanwhile, is on a one-synth mission to demonstrate coexistence is possible by moving into a hostile housing estate, and Leo (Colin Morgan) struggles with the realities of being human. GT Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm This week begins with chocolate puddings, which means the contestants are challenged to rustle up black forest gateaux and a dessert integrating a root vegetable, then aubergines and tofu take centre stage before the elimination round and an oriental classic. GT Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm Hollings and their “British chophouse classics” square up to an Italian-influenced brand serving fresh pasta from a cheese wheel, as Fred Sireix and a group of high-street investors gauge their potential. GT Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm Now with a Bafta award under its belt, this fine series follows the West Midlands Ambulance Service over the last Saturday night before Christmas. An inevitably busy period is made harder by a major traffic accident in central Birmingham – an incident which puts tremendous mental and physical demands on the crews, documented here with the clarity and honesty we’ve come to expect from the series. GT Great Art ITV, 10.50pm; not STV Tim Marlow takes a tour of the Royal Academy’s sell-out exhibition of the Parisian artist’s portraits, in the process assessing the man’s life, work, and reputation as “the father of modern art”. GT Urban Myths: Sex Pistols vs Bill Grundy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This pop cultural landmark, in which punk pioneers Sex Pistols grumbled, swore and generally misbehaved on Bill Grundy’s sleepily complacent regional chat-show, creating a national storm of outrage in the process, arguably received its definitive tribute from Kevin Eldon in 2013. The comedian’s loving reconstruction of the event imagined the Pistols as Amish people and bordered on performance art. Still, this gleefully silly take on the infamous encounter between the jobbing broadcaster (Steve Pemberton) and the Sex Pistols (played by members of the National Youth Theatre) is a lot of fun. GT Barry Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The eponymous depressed hitman (Bill Hader) tries to go it alone, only to be thwarted by his reckless partner Taylor (Dale Pavinski) and ructions among members of his acting class. GT Billion Dollar Brain (1967) ★★★★☆ Film4, 5.00pm Michael Caine returns as the reluctant secret agent Harry Palmer (The Ipcress File, Funeral in Berlin) in this film from Ken Russell, based on the novels by Len Deighton. Having left the British Secret Service to pursue a career as a private investigator, Palmer stumbles into a plot to overthrow Communism with the help of a supercomputer. But who is working for whom? It’s far-fetched but fun. Johnny Mnemonic (1995) ★★☆☆☆ Horror Channel, 9.00pm Fresh from the rubber-burning success of Speed and four short years before The Matrix, Keanu Reeves starred in this high-concept dystopian adventure as the eponymous anti-hero – a 21st-century courier whose augmented brain is used to transport illicit data – that very nearly ruined his career. It’s adapted by cyberpunk godfather William Gibson from his own story. Munich (2005) ★★★☆☆ AMC, 12.50am Eric Bana stars in Steven Spielberg’s audacious, if lengthy, examination of the Israel-Palestine conflict. Set in 1972, it adroitly tackles the aftermath of the massacre of 11 Israeli Olympic athletes at the Munich Olympics. Bana plays a Mossad agent charged with hunting down the extremists who planned the Munich attack. Some of the rhetoric is clumsy, but the film-makers strive to be politically even-handed. Friday 1 June Tracey Breaks the News: Ullman as Michael Gove Tracey Breaks the News BBC One, 9.30pm After losing her to the USA for 30 years, Tracey Ullman’s return to our shores two years ago has reminded us of her unparalleled talents as an impressionist. She captures the physicality of her famous subjects – Angela Merkel and Judi Dench are standouts – as well as their voices, and hats off to Ullman’s prosthetics teams for her remarkable transformations. After an acting stint in last year’s Howards End, Ullman returns to her comfort zone tonight with a second series of the topical sketch comedy show in which she skewers politicians, mostly – although we’ll also be treated to more of Ben Miller’s scene-stealing Rupert Murdoch, with Ullman as Jerry Hall. Although no preview tape was available due to last-minute filming, Ullman was pictured as Michael Gove in promotional material and has also promised impressions of Jeremy Corbyn and Jacob Rees-Mogg. The previous series attracted criticism for weak writing, and some skits do lack bite, but slack should be cut – it’s a notoriously difficult format to pull off. Ullman’s gift for mimicry means she hits the mark often enough for the show to be a welcome bit of light satire to wind up the week. VP Extreme Wales with Richard Parks BBC Two, 7.30pm Tonight’s final episode of Richard Parks’s adventure programme combines extreme sports with lush panoramas of the Welsh landscape. Daredevil Parks takes to the skies on a paramotor – nothing more than a parachute connected to a fan-like motor – to propel him the length of the country. VP The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm Fugitive immigrant Taariq Shirazi (Alexander Behrang Keshtkar) makes a desperate bid to flee as the Scandi-noir crime series continues. When Saga (Sofia Helin) and Henrik (Thure Lindhardt) track him down, however, Saga’s inability to tell a lie has serious consequences. VP Friday Night Dinner Channel 4, 10.00pm This sitcom’s family squabbles are more uncomfortably familiar than laugh-out-loud funny in tonight’s penultimate visit to the Goodmans’ home. Writer Robert Popper capitalises on Simon Bird’s musical skills by having his character, Adam, reluctantly play the violin to cheer up Grandma. VP The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm; Ethan Hawke, Toni Collette, Jo Brand and Aidan Turner offer their funniest anecdotes tonight. Plus, Liam Payne continues his post-One Direction solo career with a performance his new single, Familiar. VP The Everly Brothers: Harmonies from Heaven BBC Four, 9.00pm Art Garfunkel, Keith Richards and Graham Nash are among the luminaries paying tribute to Don and Phil Everly in this 2016 documentary, all of them claiming the brothers as an influence. Surviving sibling Don Everly returns to Iowa to recount the brothers’ first appearances, their pivotal move to Nashville and stardom in the late Fifties. Africa: A Journey into Music BBC Four, 10.00pm So much of the music we listen to has its roots in African music. In this new three-part documentary series, London DJ Rita Ray sets off to explore the continent’s influence. Kicking off her journey in Nigeria, Ray stumbles across impromptu drumming ceremonies in the streets as she explores the importance of rhythm in the country’s music and meets its major players. Future episodes take her to Mali and South Africa. VP Crocodile Dundee (1986) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.10pm Mick “Crocodile” Dundee (Paul Hogan), a bushman from northern Australia, is a dab hand at surviving in the Outback. But when he is invited to New York City by Sue Charlton (Linda Kozlowski), a high-class reporter, in this Oscar-nominated comedy drama, he finds life far tougher in the urban jungle. He’s a survivor though: muggers who accost Dundee discover that he has a bigger knife than they do. American Made (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Doug Liman directs Tom Cruise in this lively, madcap real-life tale of pilot, drug smuggler and CIA gun-runner Barry Seal, whose supersonic, if lawless, career path began, according to this script, when he was a bored TWA pilot in 1978 and was approached out of the blue by a CIA handler (Domhnall Gleeson, all greasy persuasion) to conduct reconnaissance flights across the Caribbean. GoodFellas (1990) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm Martin Scorsese’s Mafia masterpiece, adapted from a non-fiction book, has all the qualities of great cinema: it’s thrilling, it’s provocative, it’s stylish, and it’s got a young Robert De Niro in it. Ray Liotta plays the youngster who longs to be a gangster; De Niro and Joe Pesci are in the Mob. Pesci’s mother, meanwhile, reportedly asked him if he had to swear quite so much – the f-word is used 300 times. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate