Charlton Athletic

Charlton Athletic slideshow

Liverpool vs Everton, Premier League: live score updates 

Betfair offer: get Liverpool to beat Everton at 25/1 3:05PM Half-time.  Liverpool go into the break with a 1-0 lead that is deserved after they were the only team attacking.  Salah's goal was superb but the home side may come to waste that possession if Everton manage to get an equaliser in the second-half. 3:03PM 45 + 2 mins  Mane tries to get in on the individual skill as he runs down the left, but he drags his shot wide of the post.  If he had looked up he had three teammates running into the box to join him and Klopp's face suggests he will tell him so at half-time.  3:01PM 45 mins An individual moment gives Liverpool the lead and their first shot on target. Martina had been struggling with Salah for most of the game.  Not content with giving his team the lead he has another shot but Williams heads it over.  2:58PM GOAL! SALAH! The Egyptian breaks the deadlock. Martina loses the ball on the edge of the box, Salah cuts in and his left foot shot sails past Pickford into the far left corner.  2:56PM 41 mins Despite Everton being stuck in their own half the fact they have kept Liverpool quiet should give them confidence going into the second-half.  Gueye gets the second yellow after he tackles Mane from behind. He kind of gets the ball but you can't come through a player's legs like that. 2:52PM 37 mins The first yellow goes to Sigurdsson and to be fair, it was late on Henderson, but I'm not sure if we haven't seen some more physical moments in the opening third of the game.  Red captain is receiving treatment but it doesn't look like anything the magic spray won't fix. 2:50PM 34 mins Rooney lets Mane sail past him and the Red continue their latest attack. It ends with a Robertson shot from the edge of the box that sails over Pickford goal.  Klopp's men lacking any real composure.  2:46PM 31 mins Despite all their possession, Liverpool haven't had a shot on target. Would that still be the case if Coutinho and Firmino were on the pitch? Oxlade-Chamberlain takes a corner and despite keeping possession there is no end result for the reds. As Lovren tries to play in Milner, Rooney goes down the heavy handed defensive route by pushing his former England teammate into the hoardings. By his head... 2:43PM 28 mins Everton actually get into Liverpool's box but Sigurdsson's tame shot is blocked - it was their first real attack which is a positive. But the home side are soon back on the front foot with Oxlade-Chamberlain sending his free-kick towards the far post but it sails out.  2:41PM 25 mins Gomez catches Martina with a knee that is a little bit too close to a certain area and although he is about 1 yard from the linesman there is no further action.  Henderson plays in Gomez whose cross into the box is cut back by Mane but Everton again manage to clear. Somehow. 2:36PM 21 mins Although the home side have had nearly all of the ball and some decent attacks they don't look as penetrative as we are used to seeing.  Everton are just camped out in their own half will have to pay attention if this is what they plan to do for the next 70-odd minutes.  2:34PM 18 mins The Toffees seem to have unstuck their feet and calmed their play slightly, compared to the opening 15 minutes.  Robertson is looking like a serious threat down the left though and Rooney will need to stay alert to help his defense. 2:30PM 15 mins  Martina is having a nightmare with Salah on the right and now Gomez joins the attack before Niasse comes and tackles the young defender. It bounces off the former Charlton man for a goal-kick.  It is all Liverpool at the moment and they have 76% possession. The visitors are riding their luck a little bit.  2:28PM 13 mins Rooney showing why defending has never been his strong point. He loses Robertson on the edge of the box and Kenny comes to the rescue. It is all go at Anfield. Oxlade-Chamberlain sees his shot blocked and Allardyce may want to get that heart monitor back on with all the screaming and shouting he is doing. 2:26PM 11 mins Sigurdsson blocks Milner's shot after Salah loses Martina. The Everton defender could be in for a tricky afternoon.  Mignolet comes rushing out and clears after Niasse latches onto a long ball with only Lovren near the striker. He manages to take the man and the striker. 2:24PM 9 mins All Liverpool at the moment and Henderson plays in Salah who sends a cross into the box for Mane but it's too high for the forward to get to and Pickford takes.  Both teams displaying British youth in the form of Calvert-Lewin, Robertson, Solanke, Gomez and Davies. Williams breaks down an attack on the edge of the box and Rooney tried to get it too Niasse but it's overhit.  Mane looks like he's going to get beyond Holgate but he slips in the box at the crucial moment. 2:21PM 6 mins Kenny takes a free-kick just inside the opposition half but it's too long for Calvert-Lewin to collect. I sense a trend with the Toffees knocking the ball long at every attempt.  Liverpool on the attack and Mane plays in Robertson on his left but his tame effort is easily collected by Pickford.  2:19PM 4 mins Liverpool on the attack and Martina's clearance leave Williams struggling. Lucking for the visitors Henderson sends it over the bar. Allardyce motions for his team to calm down.  2:16PM Kick-off Everton gets the game underway - at the second attempt -  as they go from left to right. Rooney sends it to Holgate, who sends it long and out of play. Is this their gameplan? 2:14PM Derby Day begins It's freezing outside so get comfortable and get those snacks sorted for Liverpool vs Everton. 2:11PM Minutes until kick-off This is a hard one to predict. Will Klopp's rotation defeat Allardyce's lack of changes? It feels like there will be goals with the team sides having conceded 47 between them so far this season. 2:06PM The visiting boss "We want to be committed and passionate but we don't want to lose our cool. " There have been 21 red cards in 50 Merseyside derbies and remember that Everton haven't won at Anfield in 17 Premier League games. The last one was in 1999. 2:00PM 15 minutes until kick-off Here's a reminder of the teams that sees Klopp making six changes and Allardyce making one. The big news is that Coutinho and Firmino are on the bench and Solanke starts only his second Premier League game. Liverpool: Mignolet, Gomez, Klavan, Lovren, Robertson, Milner, Henderson, Mane, Oxlade-Chamberlain, Salah, Solanke. Subs: Karius, Wijnaldum, Firmino, Coutinho, Can, Ings, Alexander-Arnold Everton: Pickford, Kenny, Martina, Holgate, Williams, Gueye, Calvert-Lewin, Davies, Rooney, Sigurdsson, Niasse Subs: Robles, Schneiderlin, Keane, Jagielka, Lennon, Vlasic, Lookman 1:55PM Super Speedo Mick The Everton fan goes to games in his swimming attire for charity.  Speedo Mick continues his charity fundraising Credit: Getty Images 1:51PM We all agree then Even our columnist, Jamie Carragher, is surprised by the home team.  Liverpool teams a big surprise!!!!!!!— Jamie Carragher (@Carra23) December 10, 2017 1:44PM Looking dapper, lads The lads arriving at Anfield... �� pic.twitter.com/3WO6asWGjq— Liverpool FC (@LFC) December 10, 2017 1:43PM When your dog has got skills A Liverpool supporting dog Credit: Action Images 1:40PM Those teams Liverpool: Mignolet, Gomez, Klavan, Lovren, Robertson, Milner, Henderson, Mane, Oxlade-Chamberlain, Salah, Solanke. Subs: Karius, Wijnaldum, Firmino, Coutinho, Can, Ings, Alexander-Arnold Everton: Pickford, Kenny, Martina, Holgate, Williams, Gueye, Calvert-Lewin, Davies, Rooney, Sigurdsson, Niasse Subs: Robles, Schneiderlin, Keane, Jagielka, Lennon, Vlasic, Lookman 1:37PM Just, no I'm not a fan of this phenomenon Half and half scarves Credit: Action Images 1:34PM That's one way to look at it... Henderson and Millner in the midfield. God bless our team.#LIVEVE— Mrinmoy Biswas (@Mrinmoy_sg8) December 10, 2017 1:30PM Sam keeping it steady The visitors have made only one change as Allardyce looks to beat Liverpool with his fourth different club after Crystal palace, West Ham and Bolton.  He got off to a winning start with the 2-0 victory over Hudderfield in the league last weekend and both scorer's - Calvert-Lewin and Sigurdsson - start today.  1:26PM Are we all over that surprise? No Firmino and Coutinho in the starting XI and I think we can safely say that it's a shock. Neither player is injured and they have already scored nine goals between them this season.  Six changes  in contrast to Everton's one seems a lot for a team that has won four of their last five league games. The team scored 15 goals in those four victories. 1:19PM Everton team Not too many surprises for the Toffees... Pickford, Kenny, Martina, Holgate, Williams, Gueye, Calvert-Lewin, Davies, Rooney, Sigurdsson, Niasse Subs:  Robles, Schneiderlin, Keane, Jagielka, Lennon, Vlasic, Lookman 1:17PM Liverpool team The home fans may be a little surprised by this team... Mignolet, Gomez, Klavan, Lovren, Robertson, Milner, Henderson, Mane, Oxlade-Chamberlain, Salah, Solanke. Subs: Karius, Wijnaldum, Firmino, Coutinho, Can, Ings, Alexander-Arnold 1:15PM Good afternoon Hello! It's 'Derby Day' and we're starting with the Merseyside derby. Let's get the teams news.

What's on TV tonight: Attenborough and the Giant Elephant, and Babylon Berlin

Sunday 10 December Attenborough and the Giant Elephant BBC One, 9.00pm Can we ever have too much Attenborough? It seems not, as right in the foaming wake of the fabulous Blue Planet II (which concludes tonight, see preview below) comes this absorbing, bittersweet tale of the world’s first animal superstar – Jumbo the elephant. It’s a sad story, really. Jumbo shot to fame shortly after his arrival at London Zoo as an orphan in around 1861, but he didn’t get much from the deal. As Attenborough says, his captive life was “troubled, fuelled by alcohol, terrifying fits of violence, a near mystical relationship with his keeper and a tragic end that seems hard to believe”. Which is more than enough to hold the attention for an hour as he joins an international team examining Jumbo’s preserved skeleton at New York’s Museum of Natural History. Attenborough also pokes about in archives at London Zoo, sanctuaries in the Maasai Mara and Tennessee, and Ontario where Jumbo met his very sad end, building as complete a picture of this magnificent creature and his global travels as has ever been assembled. All the while it spreads a positive conservationist message and gives thanks that attitudes are more enlightened now than in Victorian times. GO Premier League Football: Liverpool v Everton & Manchester United v Manchester City Sky Sports Main Event, 1.15pm & 4.15pm “Super Sunday” lives up to its hyperbolic billing, with two potentially exhilarating derbies. First up, we’re at Anfield where Liverpool, fresh from their 5-1 demolition of Brighton, host Everton, who found some form last week, following up their 4-0 win at home to West Ham United with a 2-0 victory against Huddersfield. Later, in the 4.30pm kick-off, José Mourinho and Pep Guardiola renew rivalries as second-placed United host leaders City at Old Trafford. Expect it to be tight. PS Britain’s Wildest Weather 2017 Channel 4, 6.30pm This year has not, so far, been as extreme as some but, given the number of smartphone-wielding citizen journalists, there’s plenty of jaw-dropping footage of every extreme weather event that occurred, among them devastating floods, tornadoes and hair-raising lightning strikes. GO  Blue Planet II BBC One, 8.00pm This extraordinary series concludes with an undeniably depressing assessment of mankind’s impact on the marine environment. But David Attenborough, as ever, prefers to put the emphasis on hope. So there’s plenty of uplift too with stories of species brought back from extinction’s brink. GO Coastal Railways with Julie Walters Channel 4, 8.00pm Julie Walters heads for Cornwall on the Great Western route, recalling her childhood holidays in Torquay. She then boards a steam train at Paignton, hears tales of smugglers in Polperro and fills up on cakes in Penzance. GO Leonora Carrington: the Lost Surrealist BBC Four, 9.00pm This fascinating film tells the story of rebellious upper-class British artist Leonora Carrington, who worked alongside Ernst, Breton and Éluard in Paris at the height of the surrealist movement, yet died in 2011 all but forgotten in Mexico. Director Teresa Griffiths mixes interviews and biographical material with experimental animation and tableaux to bring Carrington’s work vividly to life. GO I’m a Celebrity… Get Me Out of Here! ITV, 9.00pm Seventeen series in and the public appetite for watching celebrities endure humiliation and repulsion shows little sign of drying up. This year’s launch pulled in ITV’s biggest audience of 2017. The final will no doubt draw as big a crowd again. GO Babylon Berlin Sky Atlantic, from 9.00pm Three more atmospheric episodes of the gripping crime series set in the bohemian, political Weimar Germany of the late Twenties. Detective Rath’s (Volker Bruch) investigation uncovers dangerous evidence of a shocking military conspiracy. GO The Sky At Night BBC Four, 10.00pm As well as more stargazing from the Royal Observatory, Maggie Aderin-Pocock is in Norway to see the Northern Lights. GO Ben-Hur (1959) ★★★★★ ITV3, 2.45pm A majestic slice of Hollywood history, this Roman-era melodrama directed by William Wyler and starring Charlton Heston won 11 Academy Awards (not equalled until Titanic in 1997). It still makes for magnificent viewing. Set in 26AD, it tells the story of a Jewish prince who clashes with the Roman governor and ends up enslaved, desperately plotting his revenge. The Sorcerer’s Apprentice (2010) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 3.00pm Jerry Bruckheimer gives the famous sequence from Disney’s Fantasia a fun, live-action reboot. Student Dave (Jay Baruchel) inherits Merlin’s powers, placing him in a power struggle between Balthazar (Nicolas Cage) and Horvath (Alfred Molina). Sadly there are just two scenes with broomsticks to link it to the original. Toby Kebbel is amusing as a stage musician co-opted by the forces of evil. Toy Story (1995) ★★★★★ BBC One, 3.35pm The idea of the first fully computer-generated animated film didn’t have those who had been weaned on the hand-drawn delights of Disney jumping for joy. However, with this beautiful tale, Pixar pushed animation to a new level – the premise, pace and emotion are all pitched perfectly. Whether it’s your first or 400th viewing, the story of toy cowboy Woody (Tom Hanks) and plastic spaceman Buzz Lightyear (Tim Allen) is a joy. Monday 11 December Faye Marsa, Sarah Parish and Amara Karan in Bancroft Credit: ITV Bancroft ITV, 9.00pm With so many crime dramas clogging up the television schedules it can be hard for a new series to stand out and at first ITV’s latest four-parter seems unlikely to break the mould. There’s an ambitious female cop with a possibly troubled past (the always reliable Sarah Parish), a striving younger cop who is desperate to move up the ranks (Faye Marsay) and the usual crop of jobsworths and strivers (Charles Babalola is particularly good as the married fellow officer Marsay’s Katherine should be steering well clear of). It’s all perfectly well done with a solid script from Kate Brooke (Mr Selfridge) but it seems like nothing special. Then, three quarters of the way through this first episode, something genuinely interesting happens: Bancroft’s secrets are revealed to be very dark indeed just as Katherine’s cold case involving the break-in and violent murder of a young woman in 1990 starts hotting up. With the stakes suddenly raised Bancroft spins off into a dark tale of the lengths that people go to keep the past buried and the stage is set for an intriguing game of secrets and lies. Smart scheduling sees the rest of the story play out over consecutive nights. SH Street Auction BBC One, 11.00am Paul Martin returns with a new series of the surprisingly addictive show in which people band together to raise funds for a member of their community by auctioning off hidden treasures. The fun comes from the unusual objects unearthed from garages and attics. SH Nigella’s Christmas Table BBC Two, 8.00pm If anything is guaranteed to Nigella put into purring overload it’s Christmas. The food on offer includes roast duck with orange, soy and ginger, but this is really about mood rather than food. SH   Paul Hollywood: A Baker’s Life Channel 4, 8.00pm Episode three of this genial series sees Hollywood looking back over his career and his time spent working at the Cliveden House Hotel in Berkshire. There’s also a festive get-together in Merseyside and some seasonal Danish pastries, which look delicious. SH The Art That Made Mexico: Paradise, Power and Prayers BBC Four, 9.00pm It’s always a pleasure to find a series that sheds new light on a subject, and so it is with artist Alinka Echeverria’s enthralling films about Mexico’s art. Of course, there are the key points: conquest, independence, dictatorship, revolution and figures such as Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo, but what the commentary gives us here is the context for both the history and the artists. This is true of this episode that looks at the relationship between art and power, colonialism and control while examining the enduring power of Kahlo’s work and myth. SH Handmade in Mexico BBC Four, 10.00pm The focus here is on Mexico’s celebrated Tree of Life sculptures, those gaudy, gorgeous interpretations of everything from the creation myth to the resurrection of Christ and the Day of the Dead. It’s a fascinating half-hour in which we see the amount of work and detail that goes into each piece. SH White Right: Meeting the Enemy: Exposure ITV, 10.40pm; STV, 11.05pm; UTV, 11.40pm; Wales, 11.10pm This intriguing-sounding documentary sees the Bafta-nominated Deeyah Khan (Jihad: A Story of the Others) investigate white extremism in the US. Khan visits white nationalist groups, attends a far-right rally and asks why this poisonous ideology is resurgent. SH The Black Swan (1942) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 2.35pm No, this is not the film about the ageing ballet dancer and the young ingénue; this is about high adventure on the seven seas. When Laird Cregar’s Captain Morgan becomes Governor of Jamaica, he promises to put an end to piracy. But things don’t go smoothly, especially when his assistant (Tyrone Power) kidnaps the ex-governor’s beautiful daughter (Maureen O’Hara). This was the final film of silent star Helene Costello. Mamma Mia! (2008) ★★★☆☆ ITV3, 7.50pm This musical comedy, directed by Phyllida Lloyd and set to Abba’s hits, is pure escapism. It’s naff, but that’s its selling point, as stars Meryl Streep, Pierce Brosnan and Julie Walters place tongues firmly in cheeks. At 59, Streep deserved more credit for doing the splits than for her role as a boho mother living on a Greek island whose daughter (Amanda Seyfried) tries to find out who her biological father is. Blood Diamond (2006) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 8.00pm The diamond industry of Sierra Leone is the subject of this striking thriller. Djimon Hounsou stars as a fisherman forced to work in the fields, who finds and hides a rare pink gem. His life is changed when he meets Leonardo DiCaprio’s self-serving mercenary and Jennifer Connelly’s well-meaning journalist. DiCaprio was Oscar-nominated, but lost to Forest Whitaker for The Last King of Scotland. Tuesday 12 December Paul Ready, Diane Morgan and Anna Maxwell-Martin Credit: BBC Motherland BBC Two, 10.00pm Dispensing with the calamitous set pieces of previous episodes and instead documenting the quiet desperation of this ill-starred band of sisters (plus one brother), this superb, exhausting sitcom from a writing supergroup including Graham Linehan and Sharon Horgan has been an exquisitely painful delight. We join Julia (Anna Maxwell Martin) in an unusually good place, with everything running smoothly thanks to her new Australian nanny, Lyndsey (Sarah Kendall). The kids are clean and happy, the school run is easy, the fridge is stocked – but could she be too good to be true? Amanda (Lucy Punch) has gone to ground after the revelation over her threesome, while her hapless confidant, Kevin (Paul Ready), is desperate to avoid having to get a job. And, should all the mugging get too much, there’s deadpan Liz (Diane Morgan), negotiating tricky relations with her dismal ex and his new, pregnant partner. After an orgy of passive aggression and desperate people in denial, the façades crack, just a little. Happily everyone reverts to fundamentally appalling type just in time for the end of the series and a surely inevitable recommission. GT Judd Apatow: the Return Netflix, from today After 25 years away from stand-up, the comedy zelig whose fingerprints are over everything from Knocked Up and Girls to Freaks and Geeks and Bridesmaids returns for a special set in Montreal, recorded in July. GT Masterchef: the Professionals BBC Two, 8.00pm After the hopefuls have tackled an invention test and rustled up a dish dedicated to one of their inspirations, Marcus Wareing, Monica Galletti and Gregg Wallace eliminate another two contenders, leaving only six in the contest. GT The A Word BBC One, 9.00pm Joe’s (brilliant Max Vento) family comes together for an end of year show at his old school – tears, acrimony and reconciliation ensue in the conclusion of Peter Bowker’s finely wrought, well-performed drama. A third series should surely be a formality. GT Invasion! with Sam Willis BBC Four, 9.00pm While not quite attaining Lucy Worsley levels of gonzo history, Dr Sam Willis is an enthusiastic and knowledgeable host not above the odd stunt to prove a point. This second episode of a series documenting the incursions that have shaped our nation and its bloodline examines the differing techniques and goals of the invaders. There are the Barbary Corsaire pirates who settled on Lundy Island, King Louis the Lion, invited to invade and crowned by disgruntled nobles, and the Dutch forces that negotiated the Medway just a year prior to the Glorious Revolution. Further proof, if any were needed, that Britain is a mongrel nation and all the better for it. GT The World’s Most Expensive Presents Channel 4, 9.00pm Eyeball-melting opulence and appalling lack of taste do battle with considerable craftsmanship and class in this startling film featuring everything from gold-plated pushbikes to a poker set in alligator-hide case. GT Sports Personality of the Year 2017: The Contenders BBC One, 10.45pm; Wales, 11.10pm; Scotland, 11.45pm With reigning title-holder Andy Murray’s injury-hit year effectively ruling him out of contention, Anthony Joshua, Chris Froome, Lewis Hamilton, Jo Konta and Mo Farah will be headlining this year’s roster after another 12 months of outstanding achievement in British sport. The runners and riders are introduced tonight. GT Shane (1953) ★★★★☆ Film4, 3.45pm There are few Westerns that examine the depths of human emotions, but this film by George Stevens is one of them and has become a landmark of cinema. Shane (Alan Ladd) is a cowboy who finds himself idolised for the way that he handles himself in the face of a landowner’s heavies. The climax is a face-off between Shane and smiling, whispering, Oscar-nominated Jack Palance, as the original man in black. A must-see. Mr & Mrs Smith (2005) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 9.00pm A daft comedy thriller which is perhaps best remembered for being the film that introduced Brad Pitt to Angelina Jolie. They play a couple whose failing marriage is spiced up dramatically when each discovers that the other secretly works as an assassin. Let down by a weak script, the film is held together by the chemistry between its two leads. Vince Vaughn and Adam Brody co-star. Moonraker (1979) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm The 11th film in the Bond series, and the fourth to star Roger Moore as the dapper MI6 agent, involves the theft of a space shuttle. It’s one of the weaker Bond films and at times seems more of a comedy than a tense action adventure, but it’s enjoyably frivolous. Michael Lonsdale plays resident baddie Hugo Drax who pinches the aforementioned space shuttle to help along his plan to wipe out the world’s population. Wednesday 13 December Barbara Schulz in Vanished by the Lake Credit: Channel 4 Vanished by the Lake Channel 4, 10.00pm This haunting French crime drama centres on a teenage girl who goes missing at a festival. It’s hardly an original set-up, but much like last year’s hit Gallic import The Disappearance, based on an almost identical premise, the mix of youthful promise cut short and fierce small-town intrigue quickly compels. The girl in question is Chloé Delval (Charlie Joirkin), and as news of her disappearance spreads, memories of a similar 15-year-old case in which two other girls vanished at the same celebration are revived. Into the fray steps striking Parisian detective Lise Stocker (Barbara Schulz), who has returned home to look after her ill mother, but is soon swept up by the case as its personal implications begin to unfold. All of the hallmarks of the Nordic noir genre are present, from the evocative setting (here a Broadchurch-style coastal backdrop) to the close-knit neighbours with secrets to hide. Nevertheless, this opening episode is an effective tension builder and the human impact of the mystery – particularly on Chloé’s fracturing parents – is powerfully moving. Once episode one finishes, the full series will be available to watch on All 4. TD Mary Berry’s Country House Secrets BBC One, 8.00pm Mary Berry rounds off her tour of Britain’s stately homes at Goodwood House, where she is suitably gushing over its royal history and grand interiors. Berry is treated to a hair-raising lap of the nearby motor circuit and whips up a four-tier cake for the cricket tea. TD The Secret Life of the Zoo Channel 4, 8.00pm The plight of the endangered Javan green magpie is on the agenda as keepers at Chester Zoo attempt to breed youngster Permata with older bird Netuba. Elsewhere, a zebra battle breaks out when newcomer Okoth arrives. TD Peaky Blinders BBC Two, 9.00pm A burst of gunfire opens the penultimate episode of period gangster antics, as Tommy Shelby (Cillian Murphy) faces off against mafia honcho Luca Changretta (Adrien Brody). An army colonel, meanwhile, questions Ada (Sophie Rundle) about her Communist past. TD The Channel: The World’s Busiest Waterway Channel 4, 9.00pm The fallout from Project Nemo, the new underwater electricity cable being laid between Belgium and Britain, is explored. We follow the Nemo manager struggling to avoid costly delays and the fisherman whose catch is being compromised by the work. TD Royal Academy: Painting the Future Sky Arts, 9.00pm Virtual reality (VR) is predicted to become the go-to place for everything from entertainment to work. The Royal Academy is getting in on the act with a new exhibition which explores the potential of the medium. This film follows the show’s creation with the artists, including sculptor Antony Gormley, portraitist Jonathan Yeo and Turner Prize-nominee Yinka Shonibare, who are producing works that use the technology to trace the history of the body in art. TD David Hockney: Time Reclaimed Sky Arts, 10.30pm This tribute to David Hockney aims to get beyond the glamour that surrounds his reputation, and focus on the personal aspects of his work. Anecdotes, images and analysis of the pictures themselves highlight the individuality expressed in each period of Hockney’s career, suggesting a diverse oeuvre that defies classification. TD Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am George Roy Hill directed two of the most popular films ever: Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969) and The Sting (1973). But this indifferent Julie Andrews musical of the flapper era was first. There’s much to enjoy in the story of a naive woman who leaves her rural roots behind to seek fortune and romance in Twenties New York. James Fox, as a spiffing salesman, is a particular highlight. The Three Musketeers (2011) ★★☆☆☆ E4, 8.00pm Paul W S Anderson’s adaptation of Alexandre Dumas’ novel is faithful in plot – Porthos, Athos and Aramis (Ray Stevenson, Matthew Macfadyen, Luke Evans), and disciple d’Artagnan (Logan Lerman), are sent to retrieve the French Queen’s (Juno Temple) necklace. The tone, however, is half action-pantomime, half candy-coloured steampunk comic – fun but terribly slapdash. Poltergeist (1982) ★★★★☆ TCM, 11.15pm Director Tobe Hooper, who made The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, tones down the gut-churning horror but still ramps up the tension to nightmare levels in this Steven Spielberg-produced chiller. It has one of cinema’s most spine-tinglingly scary moments: “They’re here,” sing-songs a little girl kneeling before the TV. “They” are the spirits, at first playful then increasingly malevolent, who terrorise a suburban family. Thursday 14 December Lord Sugar Credit: BBC The Apprentice: Why I Fired Them BBC One, 8.00pm In the wake of last night’s excoriating interview round, and with this Sunday’s final rapidly approaching to decide who will win a £250,000 investment and the mentoring opportunity of a lifetime, Lord Sugar makes his most personal appearance of the series. Other than those brief to-camera inserts that roll out as taxi cabs ferry freshly defenestrated candidates away from Sugar Towers to forever dream of fortunes that might have been made, this is one of few occasions in each “process” when Lord Sugar appears on screen away from the wannabe tycoons and talking to viewers directly. And he makes the most of it with his trademark witty-gritty line in East End charm, although professionalism usually prevents him from really dishing the behind-the-scenes dirt on why he thought 16 of them worthy only of the tip of his boot. Instead he looks back over this 13th series identifying the key commercial and strategic errors that led to each of his firing finger decisions, and what ultimately marked out the two finalists from the others. It’s a lot to get through in an hour but, as series recaps go, it’s usually a hoot. GO Ashes Cricket: Australia v England BT Sport 1, 1.30am The enduring Ashes Down Under conundrum: wake up early to watch it or stay up late? The third Test, held at the WACA Ground in Perth, gets under way in the early hours of Thursday morning, with England hoping to bounce back from two demoralising defeats. Lose this one and captain Joe Root will have to surrender the urn to the Aussies. PS European Tour Golf: The Indonesian Masters Sky Sports Main Event, 6.00am It’s the opening day of the tournament at the Royale Jakarta Golf Club, where Thailand’s Poom Saksansin won the title last year. Saksansin shot an overall score of 270 to finish on -18, five strokes ahead of joint runners-up Masahiro Kawamura of Japan and fellow Thai players Phachara Khongwatmai and Suradit Yongcharoenchai. PS Amazing Spaces Snow and Ice Special Channel 4, 8.00pm George Clarke and his inventive sidekick Will Hardie travel to Norway’s remoter parts to check out why this small country on the edge of Europe punches above its weight in architecture and design. Could it be something to do with the cold weather, they wonder? GO Love, Lies & Records BBC One, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama about the romance of working at a Leeds registry office delivers on melodrama, if not subtlety. In this penultimate episode Kate (Ashley Jensen) struggles to make a decision after Rob’s (Adrian Bower) surprise proposal. GO Blitz: the Bombs That Changed Britain BBC Two, 9.00pm The final edition looks at the horrific impact of German incendiary bombs, in particular one that set a church ablaze in Bristol in November 1940 and started a firestorm that ravaged the city’s historic centre. GO The Tunnel: Vengeance Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Sky’s award-winning version of The Bridge (its milieu that of British and French police teams linked by the Channel Tunnel) returns for a third and final run. A pity, as Stephen Dillane as spiky detective and Clémence Poésy as his emotionally remote French opposite number make an appealing pair. This first of six episodes packs in plenty of action as the pair set out to find the link between a burnt-out trawler and a maintenance worker attacked by a plague of rats. GO Extraordinary Teens: School of Life and Deaf Channel 4, 10.00pm This absorbing film follows a year in the life of Mary Hare Boarding School for deaf pupils in Berkshire. Seen through the eyes of a 15-year-old about to undergo a potentially life-changing cochlear implant, this film gives a profound sense of the physical and emotional complexities of growing up deaf. GO The Russell Howard Hour Sky One, 10.00pm We’ve reached the penultimate episode of this excellent topical comedy series. It’s little more than an extended version of BBC Three’s (and later BBC Two’s) Good News but that’s exactly what fans (and Sky, who snapped Howard up) wanted and he has delivered, pushing his brand of highly topical, politically aware, positive reinforcement stand-up with aplomb. GO Life (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Daniel Espinosa’s Earth-orbiting suspense flick was released less than two months before Ridley Scott’s new chapter in his Alien franchise, and bears many of the same hallmarks. It’s also a little bit Gravity. Ryan Reynolds is one of a crew of astronauts aboard a space station conducting research into life on Mars. In terms of entertainment, the film does its baseline job of getting you to chew your nails off. There’s Something About Mary (1998) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 9.00pm There are bad taste jokes in abundance in this comedy from the Farrelly Brothers. Ben Stiller stars as Ted, a shy man who realises he’s still in love with Mary (Cameron Diaz, proving her comic abilities), the date he tried to take to prom 13 years ago. So, to track her down, he hires an oily private eye (Matt Dillon) who also fallsin love with her and sets out to keep the pair apart. Gone in 60 Seconds (2000) ★★★☆☆ Universal Channel, 9.00pm Nicolas Cage has top billing in Dominic Sena’s remake of the 1974 cult film – a mind-numbingly testosterone-laced ride. Cage and Angelina Jolie are among a crew of thieves who must steal 50 cars in 72 hours to stop the murder of Cage’s brother. It’s more than serviceable entertainment, plus car aficionados will have fun spotting the Cadillacs and Corvettes. Friday 15 December Paul, Andy, Cynthia and Diana in The Sweet Makers Credit: BBC The Sweet Makers at Christmas BBC Two, 9.00pm Following their enjoyable three-part series earlier this year, BBC Two’s Sweet Makers return for this one-off Christmas special looking at changing treats from Georgian times to the Twenties. As before, the show is a lovely mix of baking and interesting social history with Emma Dabiri and Dr Annie Gray, who fill us in on how each era viewed Christmas and how confectionery changes over time. The show’s highlight comes during the Victorian Era, also known as the moment when Christmas as we know it was invented, as chocolatiers Paul A Young and Diane Short, bespoke cake decorator Cynthia Stroud and sweet consultant Andy Baxendale recreate a Boar’s Head cake. “That’s the most bonkers thing we’ve ever made,” notes Young, looking at the finished result, which is rich in chocolate, beautifully decorated and featuring unnervingly glazed eyes. He’s right but it also looks fabulous, as do the intricate Twelfth Cakes, a speciality in Georgian times. The Twenties brings with it the wonderful news that before Terry’s invented the chocolate orange they introduced the chocolate apple to the world, before looking to the future and the invention of Lord Mackintosh’s Quality Street. SH Jean-Claude Van Johnson Amazon Prime Video, from today This delightfully silly new series sees Jean-Claude Van Damme as a retired action film star with a secret: he’s a special agent and he wants back in the game. It’s inspired mayhem anchored by a winning performance from the laconic Van Damme. SH Trollhunters Netflix, from today Guillermo del Toro’s inventive animation returns for a second series, and it features the voice of the late Anton Yelchin as reluctant hero Jim Lake Jnr. The story continues where the first series left off, and sees Jim adventure deeper into the Troll world to battle the leader of the Darklands. This series also features Mark Hamill and Game of Thrones’s Lena Headey. SH Judge Rinder’s Crown Court ITV, 8.00pm; not STV or UTV; Wales, 11.10pm Judge Rinder’s reboot of classic Seventies series Crown Court might lack the big-name actors of the original but its meld of real-life crime and courtroom drama is just as addictive. Tonight, the jury decides if James Byron (Rupert Young) murdered his wife. SH Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Sarah Millican is a brave guest of Oliver and Doherty – brave because it swiftly transpires that cooking really isn’t her thing. But Oliver manages to bite his tongue while showing her how to cook her favourite microwave meal from scratch. SH Have I Got News for You BBC One, 9.00pm The 54th series of the satirical news quiz comes to an end with the ever-reliable David Tennant in the host’s chair. It has been a patchy series, which was marked by a new low when Jo Brand had to explain why sexual harassment jokes weren’t funny to the male panellists. So let’s hope it goes out on a high. SH Roy Orbison: Love Hurts BBC Four, 9.30pm Roy Orbison’s three sons, Wesley, Roy Jnr and Alex, take centre stage to discuss their father in this emotional documentary. SH The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm Prepare for Star Wars: The Last Jedi overload as John Boyega, Daisy Ridley and Mark Hamill join Norton on the sofa. Don’t expect any spoilers but there’s sure to be some nice eulogies to the late Carrie Fisher. SH Before I Go to Sleep (2014) ★★★☆☆ More4, 9.00pm Nicole Kidman and Colin Firth star in this uninvolving thriller based on SJ Watson’s twisty bestseller. Kidman plays a woman who, after suffering a head injury, has no idea who she is or who the man sleeping next to her might be (it’s Colin Firth, playing her husband). She keeps a daily video diary but starts to notice discrepancies between what she’s recorded and what Firth tells her. The Pledge (2001) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 9.00pm A tense mystery directed by Sean Penn with a fine cast including Jack Nicholson, Helen Mirren, Robin Wright Penn, Aaron Eckhart and Vanessa Redgrave. Nicholson is a detective who has to handle a horrific case on the day of his retirement – the murder of a seven-year-old girl. He promises to bring the killer to justice, only to find that the case is far from straightforward. A powerful, unsettling film. Hyena (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.15pm This violent thriller about corrupt drug-squad officers is very violent indeed, so be prepared to cover your eyes for some parts of writer-director Gerard Johnson’s film. Michael Logan (an intense Peter Ferdinand) is the leader of this special force, assigned to tackle drug trafficking among the Balkan gangs. Stephen Graham, as his dubious boss, is as reliable as ever. Above all, it’s a grisly exploration of the criminal mind. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: Attenborough and the Giant Elephant, and Babylon Berlin

Sunday 10 December Attenborough and the Giant Elephant BBC One, 9.00pm Can we ever have too much Attenborough? It seems not, as right in the foaming wake of the fabulous Blue Planet II (which concludes tonight, see preview below) comes this absorbing, bittersweet tale of the world’s first animal superstar – Jumbo the elephant. It’s a sad story, really. Jumbo shot to fame shortly after his arrival at London Zoo as an orphan in around 1861, but he didn’t get much from the deal. As Attenborough says, his captive life was “troubled, fuelled by alcohol, terrifying fits of violence, a near mystical relationship with his keeper and a tragic end that seems hard to believe”. Which is more than enough to hold the attention for an hour as he joins an international team examining Jumbo’s preserved skeleton at New York’s Museum of Natural History. Attenborough also pokes about in archives at London Zoo, sanctuaries in the Maasai Mara and Tennessee, and Ontario where Jumbo met his very sad end, building as complete a picture of this magnificent creature and his global travels as has ever been assembled. All the while it spreads a positive conservationist message and gives thanks that attitudes are more enlightened now than in Victorian times. GO Premier League Football: Liverpool v Everton & Manchester United v Manchester City Sky Sports Main Event, 1.15pm & 4.15pm “Super Sunday” lives up to its hyperbolic billing, with two potentially exhilarating derbies. First up, we’re at Anfield where Liverpool, fresh from their 5-1 demolition of Brighton, host Everton, who found some form last week, following up their 4-0 win at home to West Ham United with a 2-0 victory against Huddersfield. Later, in the 4.30pm kick-off, José Mourinho and Pep Guardiola renew rivalries as second-placed United host leaders City at Old Trafford. Expect it to be tight. PS Britain’s Wildest Weather 2017 Channel 4, 6.30pm This year has not, so far, been as extreme as some but, given the number of smartphone-wielding citizen journalists, there’s plenty of jaw-dropping footage of every extreme weather event that occurred, among them devastating floods, tornadoes and hair-raising lightning strikes. GO  Blue Planet II BBC One, 8.00pm This extraordinary series concludes with an undeniably depressing assessment of mankind’s impact on the marine environment. But David Attenborough, as ever, prefers to put the emphasis on hope. So there’s plenty of uplift too with stories of species brought back from extinction’s brink. GO Coastal Railways with Julie Walters Channel 4, 8.00pm Julie Walters heads for Cornwall on the Great Western route, recalling her childhood holidays in Torquay. She then boards a steam train at Paignton, hears tales of smugglers in Polperro and fills up on cakes in Penzance. GO Leonora Carrington: the Lost Surrealist BBC Four, 9.00pm This fascinating film tells the story of rebellious upper-class British artist Leonora Carrington, who worked alongside Ernst, Breton and Éluard in Paris at the height of the surrealist movement, yet died in 2011 all but forgotten in Mexico. Director Teresa Griffiths mixes interviews and biographical material with experimental animation and tableaux to bring Carrington’s work vividly to life. GO I’m a Celebrity… Get Me Out of Here! ITV, 9.00pm Seventeen series in and the public appetite for watching celebrities endure humiliation and repulsion shows little sign of drying up. This year’s launch pulled in ITV’s biggest audience of 2017. The final will no doubt draw as big a crowd again. GO Babylon Berlin Sky Atlantic, from 9.00pm Three more atmospheric episodes of the gripping crime series set in the bohemian, political Weimar Germany of the late Twenties. Detective Rath’s (Volker Bruch) investigation uncovers dangerous evidence of a shocking military conspiracy. GO The Sky At Night BBC Four, 10.00pm As well as more stargazing from the Royal Observatory, Maggie Aderin-Pocock is in Norway to see the Northern Lights. GO Ben-Hur (1959) ★★★★★ ITV3, 2.45pm A majestic slice of Hollywood history, this Roman-era melodrama directed by William Wyler and starring Charlton Heston won 11 Academy Awards (not equalled until Titanic in 1997). It still makes for magnificent viewing. Set in 26AD, it tells the story of a Jewish prince who clashes with the Roman governor and ends up enslaved, desperately plotting his revenge. The Sorcerer’s Apprentice (2010) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 3.00pm Jerry Bruckheimer gives the famous sequence from Disney’s Fantasia a fun, live-action reboot. Student Dave (Jay Baruchel) inherits Merlin’s powers, placing him in a power struggle between Balthazar (Nicolas Cage) and Horvath (Alfred Molina). Sadly there are just two scenes with broomsticks to link it to the original. Toby Kebbel is amusing as a stage musician co-opted by the forces of evil. Toy Story (1995) ★★★★★ BBC One, 3.35pm The idea of the first fully computer-generated animated film didn’t have those who had been weaned on the hand-drawn delights of Disney jumping for joy. However, with this beautiful tale, Pixar pushed animation to a new level – the premise, pace and emotion are all pitched perfectly. Whether it’s your first or 400th viewing, the story of toy cowboy Woody (Tom Hanks) and plastic spaceman Buzz Lightyear (Tim Allen) is a joy. Monday 11 December Faye Marsa, Sarah Parish and Amara Karan in Bancroft Credit: ITV Bancroft ITV, 9.00pm With so many crime dramas clogging up the television schedules it can be hard for a new series to stand out and at first ITV’s latest four-parter seems unlikely to break the mould. There’s an ambitious female cop with a possibly troubled past (the always reliable Sarah Parish), a striving younger cop who is desperate to move up the ranks (Faye Marsay) and the usual crop of jobsworths and strivers (Charles Babalola is particularly good as the married fellow officer Marsay’s Katherine should be steering well clear of). It’s all perfectly well done with a solid script from Kate Brooke (Mr Selfridge) but it seems like nothing special. Then, three quarters of the way through this first episode, something genuinely interesting happens: Bancroft’s secrets are revealed to be very dark indeed just as Katherine’s cold case involving the break-in and violent murder of a young woman in 1990 starts hotting up. With the stakes suddenly raised Bancroft spins off into a dark tale of the lengths that people go to keep the past buried and the stage is set for an intriguing game of secrets and lies. Smart scheduling sees the rest of the story play out over consecutive nights. SH Street Auction BBC One, 11.00am Paul Martin returns with a new series of the surprisingly addictive show in which people band together to raise funds for a member of their community by auctioning off hidden treasures. The fun comes from the unusual objects unearthed from garages and attics. SH Nigella’s Christmas Table BBC Two, 8.00pm If anything is guaranteed to Nigella put into purring overload it’s Christmas. The food on offer includes roast duck with orange, soy and ginger, but this is really about mood rather than food. SH   Paul Hollywood: A Baker’s Life Channel 4, 8.00pm Episode three of this genial series sees Hollywood looking back over his career and his time spent working at the Cliveden House Hotel in Berkshire. There’s also a festive get-together in Merseyside and some seasonal Danish pastries, which look delicious. SH The Art That Made Mexico: Paradise, Power and Prayers BBC Four, 9.00pm It’s always a pleasure to find a series that sheds new light on a subject, and so it is with artist Alinka Echeverria’s enthralling films about Mexico’s art. Of course, there are the key points: conquest, independence, dictatorship, revolution and figures such as Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo, but what the commentary gives us here is the context for both the history and the artists. This is true of this episode that looks at the relationship between art and power, colonialism and control while examining the enduring power of Kahlo’s work and myth. SH Handmade in Mexico BBC Four, 10.00pm The focus here is on Mexico’s celebrated Tree of Life sculptures, those gaudy, gorgeous interpretations of everything from the creation myth to the resurrection of Christ and the Day of the Dead. It’s a fascinating half-hour in which we see the amount of work and detail that goes into each piece. SH White Right: Meeting the Enemy: Exposure ITV, 10.40pm; STV, 11.05pm; UTV, 11.40pm; Wales, 11.10pm This intriguing-sounding documentary sees the Bafta-nominated Deeyah Khan (Jihad: A Story of the Others) investigate white extremism in the US. Khan visits white nationalist groups, attends a far-right rally and asks why this poisonous ideology is resurgent. SH The Black Swan (1942) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 2.35pm No, this is not the film about the ageing ballet dancer and the young ingénue; this is about high adventure on the seven seas. When Laird Cregar’s Captain Morgan becomes Governor of Jamaica, he promises to put an end to piracy. But things don’t go smoothly, especially when his assistant (Tyrone Power) kidnaps the ex-governor’s beautiful daughter (Maureen O’Hara). This was the final film of silent star Helene Costello. Mamma Mia! (2008) ★★★☆☆ ITV3, 7.50pm This musical comedy, directed by Phyllida Lloyd and set to Abba’s hits, is pure escapism. It’s naff, but that’s its selling point, as stars Meryl Streep, Pierce Brosnan and Julie Walters place tongues firmly in cheeks. At 59, Streep deserved more credit for doing the splits than for her role as a boho mother living on a Greek island whose daughter (Amanda Seyfried) tries to find out who her biological father is. Blood Diamond (2006) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 8.00pm The diamond industry of Sierra Leone is the subject of this striking thriller. Djimon Hounsou stars as a fisherman forced to work in the fields, who finds and hides a rare pink gem. His life is changed when he meets Leonardo DiCaprio’s self-serving mercenary and Jennifer Connelly’s well-meaning journalist. DiCaprio was Oscar-nominated, but lost to Forest Whitaker for The Last King of Scotland. Tuesday 12 December Paul Ready, Diane Morgan and Anna Maxwell-Martin Credit: BBC Motherland BBC Two, 10.00pm Dispensing with the calamitous set pieces of previous episodes and instead documenting the quiet desperation of this ill-starred band of sisters (plus one brother), this superb, exhausting sitcom from a writing supergroup including Graham Linehan and Sharon Horgan has been an exquisitely painful delight. We join Julia (Anna Maxwell Martin) in an unusually good place, with everything running smoothly thanks to her new Australian nanny, Lyndsey (Sarah Kendall). The kids are clean and happy, the school run is easy, the fridge is stocked – but could she be too good to be true? Amanda (Lucy Punch) has gone to ground after the revelation over her threesome, while her hapless confidant, Kevin (Paul Ready), is desperate to avoid having to get a job. And, should all the mugging get too much, there’s deadpan Liz (Diane Morgan), negotiating tricky relations with her dismal ex and his new, pregnant partner. After an orgy of passive aggression and desperate people in denial, the façades crack, just a little. Happily everyone reverts to fundamentally appalling type just in time for the end of the series and a surely inevitable recommission. GT Judd Apatow: the Return Netflix, from today After 25 years away from stand-up, the comedy zelig whose fingerprints are over everything from Knocked Up and Girls to Freaks and Geeks and Bridesmaids returns for a special set in Montreal, recorded in July. GT Masterchef: the Professionals BBC Two, 8.00pm After the hopefuls have tackled an invention test and rustled up a dish dedicated to one of their inspirations, Marcus Wareing, Monica Galletti and Gregg Wallace eliminate another two contenders, leaving only six in the contest. GT The A Word BBC One, 9.00pm Joe’s (brilliant Max Vento) family comes together for an end of year show at his old school – tears, acrimony and reconciliation ensue in the conclusion of Peter Bowker’s finely wrought, well-performed drama. A third series should surely be a formality. GT Invasion! with Sam Willis BBC Four, 9.00pm While not quite attaining Lucy Worsley levels of gonzo history, Dr Sam Willis is an enthusiastic and knowledgeable host not above the odd stunt to prove a point. This second episode of a series documenting the incursions that have shaped our nation and its bloodline examines the differing techniques and goals of the invaders. There are the Barbary Corsaire pirates who settled on Lundy Island, King Louis the Lion, invited to invade and crowned by disgruntled nobles, and the Dutch forces that negotiated the Medway just a year prior to the Glorious Revolution. Further proof, if any were needed, that Britain is a mongrel nation and all the better for it. GT The World’s Most Expensive Presents Channel 4, 9.00pm Eyeball-melting opulence and appalling lack of taste do battle with considerable craftsmanship and class in this startling film featuring everything from gold-plated pushbikes to a poker set in alligator-hide case. GT Sports Personality of the Year 2017: The Contenders BBC One, 10.45pm; Wales, 11.10pm; Scotland, 11.45pm With reigning title-holder Andy Murray’s injury-hit year effectively ruling him out of contention, Anthony Joshua, Chris Froome, Lewis Hamilton, Jo Konta and Mo Farah will be headlining this year’s roster after another 12 months of outstanding achievement in British sport. The runners and riders are introduced tonight. GT Shane (1953) ★★★★☆ Film4, 3.45pm There are few Westerns that examine the depths of human emotions, but this film by George Stevens is one of them and has become a landmark of cinema. Shane (Alan Ladd) is a cowboy who finds himself idolised for the way that he handles himself in the face of a landowner’s heavies. The climax is a face-off between Shane and smiling, whispering, Oscar-nominated Jack Palance, as the original man in black. A must-see. Mr & Mrs Smith (2005) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 9.00pm A daft comedy thriller which is perhaps best remembered for being the film that introduced Brad Pitt to Angelina Jolie. They play a couple whose failing marriage is spiced up dramatically when each discovers that the other secretly works as an assassin. Let down by a weak script, the film is held together by the chemistry between its two leads. Vince Vaughn and Adam Brody co-star. Moonraker (1979) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm The 11th film in the Bond series, and the fourth to star Roger Moore as the dapper MI6 agent, involves the theft of a space shuttle. It’s one of the weaker Bond films and at times seems more of a comedy than a tense action adventure, but it’s enjoyably frivolous. Michael Lonsdale plays resident baddie Hugo Drax who pinches the aforementioned space shuttle to help along his plan to wipe out the world’s population. Wednesday 13 December Barbara Schulz in Vanished by the Lake Credit: Channel 4 Vanished by the Lake Channel 4, 10.00pm This haunting French crime drama centres on a teenage girl who goes missing at a festival. It’s hardly an original set-up, but much like last year’s hit Gallic import The Disappearance, based on an almost identical premise, the mix of youthful promise cut short and fierce small-town intrigue quickly compels. The girl in question is Chloé Delval (Charlie Joirkin), and as news of her disappearance spreads, memories of a similar 15-year-old case in which two other girls vanished at the same celebration are revived. Into the fray steps striking Parisian detective Lise Stocker (Barbara Schulz), who has returned home to look after her ill mother, but is soon swept up by the case as its personal implications begin to unfold. All of the hallmarks of the Nordic noir genre are present, from the evocative setting (here a Broadchurch-style coastal backdrop) to the close-knit neighbours with secrets to hide. Nevertheless, this opening episode is an effective tension builder and the human impact of the mystery – particularly on Chloé’s fracturing parents – is powerfully moving. Once episode one finishes, the full series will be available to watch on All 4. TD Mary Berry’s Country House Secrets BBC One, 8.00pm Mary Berry rounds off her tour of Britain’s stately homes at Goodwood House, where she is suitably gushing over its royal history and grand interiors. Berry is treated to a hair-raising lap of the nearby motor circuit and whips up a four-tier cake for the cricket tea. TD The Secret Life of the Zoo Channel 4, 8.00pm The plight of the endangered Javan green magpie is on the agenda as keepers at Chester Zoo attempt to breed youngster Permata with older bird Netuba. Elsewhere, a zebra battle breaks out when newcomer Okoth arrives. TD Peaky Blinders BBC Two, 9.00pm A burst of gunfire opens the penultimate episode of period gangster antics, as Tommy Shelby (Cillian Murphy) faces off against mafia honcho Luca Changretta (Adrien Brody). An army colonel, meanwhile, questions Ada (Sophie Rundle) about her Communist past. TD The Channel: The World’s Busiest Waterway Channel 4, 9.00pm The fallout from Project Nemo, the new underwater electricity cable being laid between Belgium and Britain, is explored. We follow the Nemo manager struggling to avoid costly delays and the fisherman whose catch is being compromised by the work. TD Royal Academy: Painting the Future Sky Arts, 9.00pm Virtual reality (VR) is predicted to become the go-to place for everything from entertainment to work. The Royal Academy is getting in on the act with a new exhibition which explores the potential of the medium. This film follows the show’s creation with the artists, including sculptor Antony Gormley, portraitist Jonathan Yeo and Turner Prize-nominee Yinka Shonibare, who are producing works that use the technology to trace the history of the body in art. TD David Hockney: Time Reclaimed Sky Arts, 10.30pm This tribute to David Hockney aims to get beyond the glamour that surrounds his reputation, and focus on the personal aspects of his work. Anecdotes, images and analysis of the pictures themselves highlight the individuality expressed in each period of Hockney’s career, suggesting a diverse oeuvre that defies classification. TD Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am George Roy Hill directed two of the most popular films ever: Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969) and The Sting (1973). But this indifferent Julie Andrews musical of the flapper era was first. There’s much to enjoy in the story of a naive woman who leaves her rural roots behind to seek fortune and romance in Twenties New York. James Fox, as a spiffing salesman, is a particular highlight. The Three Musketeers (2011) ★★☆☆☆ E4, 8.00pm Paul W S Anderson’s adaptation of Alexandre Dumas’ novel is faithful in plot – Porthos, Athos and Aramis (Ray Stevenson, Matthew Macfadyen, Luke Evans), and disciple d’Artagnan (Logan Lerman), are sent to retrieve the French Queen’s (Juno Temple) necklace. The tone, however, is half action-pantomime, half candy-coloured steampunk comic – fun but terribly slapdash. Poltergeist (1982) ★★★★☆ TCM, 11.15pm Director Tobe Hooper, who made The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, tones down the gut-churning horror but still ramps up the tension to nightmare levels in this Steven Spielberg-produced chiller. It has one of cinema’s most spine-tinglingly scary moments: “They’re here,” sing-songs a little girl kneeling before the TV. “They” are the spirits, at first playful then increasingly malevolent, who terrorise a suburban family. Thursday 14 December Lord Sugar Credit: BBC The Apprentice: Why I Fired Them BBC One, 8.00pm In the wake of last night’s excoriating interview round, and with this Sunday’s final rapidly approaching to decide who will win a £250,000 investment and the mentoring opportunity of a lifetime, Lord Sugar makes his most personal appearance of the series. Other than those brief to-camera inserts that roll out as taxi cabs ferry freshly defenestrated candidates away from Sugar Towers to forever dream of fortunes that might have been made, this is one of few occasions in each “process” when Lord Sugar appears on screen away from the wannabe tycoons and talking to viewers directly. And he makes the most of it with his trademark witty-gritty line in East End charm, although professionalism usually prevents him from really dishing the behind-the-scenes dirt on why he thought 16 of them worthy only of the tip of his boot. Instead he looks back over this 13th series identifying the key commercial and strategic errors that led to each of his firing finger decisions, and what ultimately marked out the two finalists from the others. It’s a lot to get through in an hour but, as series recaps go, it’s usually a hoot. GO Ashes Cricket: Australia v England BT Sport 1, 1.30am The enduring Ashes Down Under conundrum: wake up early to watch it or stay up late? The third Test, held at the WACA Ground in Perth, gets under way in the early hours of Thursday morning, with England hoping to bounce back from two demoralising defeats. Lose this one and captain Joe Root will have to surrender the urn to the Aussies. PS European Tour Golf: The Indonesian Masters Sky Sports Main Event, 6.00am It’s the opening day of the tournament at the Royale Jakarta Golf Club, where Thailand’s Poom Saksansin won the title last year. Saksansin shot an overall score of 270 to finish on -18, five strokes ahead of joint runners-up Masahiro Kawamura of Japan and fellow Thai players Phachara Khongwatmai and Suradit Yongcharoenchai. PS Amazing Spaces Snow and Ice Special Channel 4, 8.00pm George Clarke and his inventive sidekick Will Hardie travel to Norway’s remoter parts to check out why this small country on the edge of Europe punches above its weight in architecture and design. Could it be something to do with the cold weather, they wonder? GO Love, Lies & Records BBC One, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama about the romance of working at a Leeds registry office delivers on melodrama, if not subtlety. In this penultimate episode Kate (Ashley Jensen) struggles to make a decision after Rob’s (Adrian Bower) surprise proposal. GO Blitz: the Bombs That Changed Britain BBC Two, 9.00pm The final edition looks at the horrific impact of German incendiary bombs, in particular one that set a church ablaze in Bristol in November 1940 and started a firestorm that ravaged the city’s historic centre. GO The Tunnel: Vengeance Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Sky’s award-winning version of The Bridge (its milieu that of British and French police teams linked by the Channel Tunnel) returns for a third and final run. A pity, as Stephen Dillane as spiky detective and Clémence Poésy as his emotionally remote French opposite number make an appealing pair. This first of six episodes packs in plenty of action as the pair set out to find the link between a burnt-out trawler and a maintenance worker attacked by a plague of rats. GO Extraordinary Teens: School of Life and Deaf Channel 4, 10.00pm This absorbing film follows a year in the life of Mary Hare Boarding School for deaf pupils in Berkshire. Seen through the eyes of a 15-year-old about to undergo a potentially life-changing cochlear implant, this film gives a profound sense of the physical and emotional complexities of growing up deaf. GO The Russell Howard Hour Sky One, 10.00pm We’ve reached the penultimate episode of this excellent topical comedy series. It’s little more than an extended version of BBC Three’s (and later BBC Two’s) Good News but that’s exactly what fans (and Sky, who snapped Howard up) wanted and he has delivered, pushing his brand of highly topical, politically aware, positive reinforcement stand-up with aplomb. GO Life (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Daniel Espinosa’s Earth-orbiting suspense flick was released less than two months before Ridley Scott’s new chapter in his Alien franchise, and bears many of the same hallmarks. It’s also a little bit Gravity. Ryan Reynolds is one of a crew of astronauts aboard a space station conducting research into life on Mars. In terms of entertainment, the film does its baseline job of getting you to chew your nails off. There’s Something About Mary (1998) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 9.00pm There are bad taste jokes in abundance in this comedy from the Farrelly Brothers. Ben Stiller stars as Ted, a shy man who realises he’s still in love with Mary (Cameron Diaz, proving her comic abilities), the date he tried to take to prom 13 years ago. So, to track her down, he hires an oily private eye (Matt Dillon) who also fallsin love with her and sets out to keep the pair apart. Gone in 60 Seconds (2000) ★★★☆☆ Universal Channel, 9.00pm Nicolas Cage has top billing in Dominic Sena’s remake of the 1974 cult film – a mind-numbingly testosterone-laced ride. Cage and Angelina Jolie are among a crew of thieves who must steal 50 cars in 72 hours to stop the murder of Cage’s brother. It’s more than serviceable entertainment, plus car aficionados will have fun spotting the Cadillacs and Corvettes. Friday 15 December Paul, Andy, Cynthia and Diana in The Sweet Makers Credit: BBC The Sweet Makers at Christmas BBC Two, 9.00pm Following their enjoyable three-part series earlier this year, BBC Two’s Sweet Makers return for this one-off Christmas special looking at changing treats from Georgian times to the Twenties. As before, the show is a lovely mix of baking and interesting social history with Emma Dabiri and Dr Annie Gray, who fill us in on how each era viewed Christmas and how confectionery changes over time. The show’s highlight comes during the Victorian Era, also known as the moment when Christmas as we know it was invented, as chocolatiers Paul A Young and Diane Short, bespoke cake decorator Cynthia Stroud and sweet consultant Andy Baxendale recreate a Boar’s Head cake. “That’s the most bonkers thing we’ve ever made,” notes Young, looking at the finished result, which is rich in chocolate, beautifully decorated and featuring unnervingly glazed eyes. He’s right but it also looks fabulous, as do the intricate Twelfth Cakes, a speciality in Georgian times. The Twenties brings with it the wonderful news that before Terry’s invented the chocolate orange they introduced the chocolate apple to the world, before looking to the future and the invention of Lord Mackintosh’s Quality Street. SH Jean-Claude Van Johnson Amazon Prime Video, from today This delightfully silly new series sees Jean-Claude Van Damme as a retired action film star with a secret: he’s a special agent and he wants back in the game. It’s inspired mayhem anchored by a winning performance from the laconic Van Damme. SH Trollhunters Netflix, from today Guillermo del Toro’s inventive animation returns for a second series, and it features the voice of the late Anton Yelchin as reluctant hero Jim Lake Jnr. The story continues where the first series left off, and sees Jim adventure deeper into the Troll world to battle the leader of the Darklands. This series also features Mark Hamill and Game of Thrones’s Lena Headey. SH Judge Rinder’s Crown Court ITV, 8.00pm; not STV or UTV; Wales, 11.10pm Judge Rinder’s reboot of classic Seventies series Crown Court might lack the big-name actors of the original but its meld of real-life crime and courtroom drama is just as addictive. Tonight, the jury decides if James Byron (Rupert Young) murdered his wife. SH Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Sarah Millican is a brave guest of Oliver and Doherty – brave because it swiftly transpires that cooking really isn’t her thing. But Oliver manages to bite his tongue while showing her how to cook her favourite microwave meal from scratch. SH Have I Got News for You BBC One, 9.00pm The 54th series of the satirical news quiz comes to an end with the ever-reliable David Tennant in the host’s chair. It has been a patchy series, which was marked by a new low when Jo Brand had to explain why sexual harassment jokes weren’t funny to the male panellists. So let’s hope it goes out on a high. SH Roy Orbison: Love Hurts BBC Four, 9.30pm Roy Orbison’s three sons, Wesley, Roy Jnr and Alex, take centre stage to discuss their father in this emotional documentary. SH The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm Prepare for Star Wars: The Last Jedi overload as John Boyega, Daisy Ridley and Mark Hamill join Norton on the sofa. Don’t expect any spoilers but there’s sure to be some nice eulogies to the late Carrie Fisher. SH Before I Go to Sleep (2014) ★★★☆☆ More4, 9.00pm Nicole Kidman and Colin Firth star in this uninvolving thriller based on SJ Watson’s twisty bestseller. Kidman plays a woman who, after suffering a head injury, has no idea who she is or who the man sleeping next to her might be (it’s Colin Firth, playing her husband). She keeps a daily video diary but starts to notice discrepancies between what she’s recorded and what Firth tells her. The Pledge (2001) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 9.00pm A tense mystery directed by Sean Penn with a fine cast including Jack Nicholson, Helen Mirren, Robin Wright Penn, Aaron Eckhart and Vanessa Redgrave. Nicholson is a detective who has to handle a horrific case on the day of his retirement – the murder of a seven-year-old girl. He promises to bring the killer to justice, only to find that the case is far from straightforward. A powerful, unsettling film. Hyena (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.15pm This violent thriller about corrupt drug-squad officers is very violent indeed, so be prepared to cover your eyes for some parts of writer-director Gerard Johnson’s film. Michael Logan (an intense Peter Ferdinand) is the leader of this special force, assigned to tackle drug trafficking among the Balkan gangs. Stephen Graham, as his dubious boss, is as reliable as ever. Above all, it’s a grisly exploration of the criminal mind. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: Attenborough and the Giant Elephant, and Babylon Berlin

Sunday 10 December Attenborough and the Giant Elephant BBC One, 9.00pm Can we ever have too much Attenborough? It seems not, as right in the foaming wake of the fabulous Blue Planet II (which concludes tonight, see preview below) comes this absorbing, bittersweet tale of the world’s first animal superstar – Jumbo the elephant. It’s a sad story, really. Jumbo shot to fame shortly after his arrival at London Zoo as an orphan in around 1861, but he didn’t get much from the deal. As Attenborough says, his captive life was “troubled, fuelled by alcohol, terrifying fits of violence, a near mystical relationship with his keeper and a tragic end that seems hard to believe”. Which is more than enough to hold the attention for an hour as he joins an international team examining Jumbo’s preserved skeleton at New York’s Museum of Natural History. Attenborough also pokes about in archives at London Zoo, sanctuaries in the Maasai Mara and Tennessee, and Ontario where Jumbo met his very sad end, building as complete a picture of this magnificent creature and his global travels as has ever been assembled. All the while it spreads a positive conservationist message and gives thanks that attitudes are more enlightened now than in Victorian times. GO Premier League Football: Liverpool v Everton & Manchester United v Manchester City Sky Sports Main Event, 1.15pm & 4.15pm “Super Sunday” lives up to its hyperbolic billing, with two potentially exhilarating derbies. First up, we’re at Anfield where Liverpool, fresh from their 5-1 demolition of Brighton, host Everton, who found some form last week, following up their 4-0 win at home to West Ham United with a 2-0 victory against Huddersfield. Later, in the 4.30pm kick-off, José Mourinho and Pep Guardiola renew rivalries as second-placed United host leaders City at Old Trafford. Expect it to be tight. PS Britain’s Wildest Weather 2017 Channel 4, 6.30pm This year has not, so far, been as extreme as some but, given the number of smartphone-wielding citizen journalists, there’s plenty of jaw-dropping footage of every extreme weather event that occurred, among them devastating floods, tornadoes and hair-raising lightning strikes. GO  Blue Planet II BBC One, 8.00pm This extraordinary series concludes with an undeniably depressing assessment of mankind’s impact on the marine environment. But David Attenborough, as ever, prefers to put the emphasis on hope. So there’s plenty of uplift too with stories of species brought back from extinction’s brink. GO Coastal Railways with Julie Walters Channel 4, 8.00pm Julie Walters heads for Cornwall on the Great Western route, recalling her childhood holidays in Torquay. She then boards a steam train at Paignton, hears tales of smugglers in Polperro and fills up on cakes in Penzance. GO Leonora Carrington: the Lost Surrealist BBC Four, 9.00pm This fascinating film tells the story of rebellious upper-class British artist Leonora Carrington, who worked alongside Ernst, Breton and Éluard in Paris at the height of the surrealist movement, yet died in 2011 all but forgotten in Mexico. Director Teresa Griffiths mixes interviews and biographical material with experimental animation and tableaux to bring Carrington’s work vividly to life. GO I’m a Celebrity… Get Me Out of Here! ITV, 9.00pm Seventeen series in and the public appetite for watching celebrities endure humiliation and repulsion shows little sign of drying up. This year’s launch pulled in ITV’s biggest audience of 2017. The final will no doubt draw as big a crowd again. GO Babylon Berlin Sky Atlantic, from 9.00pm Three more atmospheric episodes of the gripping crime series set in the bohemian, political Weimar Germany of the late Twenties. Detective Rath’s (Volker Bruch) investigation uncovers dangerous evidence of a shocking military conspiracy. GO The Sky At Night BBC Four, 10.00pm As well as more stargazing from the Royal Observatory, Maggie Aderin-Pocock is in Norway to see the Northern Lights. GO Ben-Hur (1959) ★★★★★ ITV3, 2.45pm A majestic slice of Hollywood history, this Roman-era melodrama directed by William Wyler and starring Charlton Heston won 11 Academy Awards (not equalled until Titanic in 1997). It still makes for magnificent viewing. Set in 26AD, it tells the story of a Jewish prince who clashes with the Roman governor and ends up enslaved, desperately plotting his revenge. The Sorcerer’s Apprentice (2010) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 3.00pm Jerry Bruckheimer gives the famous sequence from Disney’s Fantasia a fun, live-action reboot. Student Dave (Jay Baruchel) inherits Merlin’s powers, placing him in a power struggle between Balthazar (Nicolas Cage) and Horvath (Alfred Molina). Sadly there are just two scenes with broomsticks to link it to the original. Toby Kebbel is amusing as a stage musician co-opted by the forces of evil. Toy Story (1995) ★★★★★ BBC One, 3.35pm The idea of the first fully computer-generated animated film didn’t have those who had been weaned on the hand-drawn delights of Disney jumping for joy. However, with this beautiful tale, Pixar pushed animation to a new level – the premise, pace and emotion are all pitched perfectly. Whether it’s your first or 400th viewing, the story of toy cowboy Woody (Tom Hanks) and plastic spaceman Buzz Lightyear (Tim Allen) is a joy. Monday 11 December Faye Marsa, Sarah Parish and Amara Karan in Bancroft Credit: ITV Bancroft ITV, 9.00pm With so many crime dramas clogging up the television schedules it can be hard for a new series to stand out and at first ITV’s latest four-parter seems unlikely to break the mould. There’s an ambitious female cop with a possibly troubled past (the always reliable Sarah Parish), a striving younger cop who is desperate to move up the ranks (Faye Marsay) and the usual crop of jobsworths and strivers (Charles Babalola is particularly good as the married fellow officer Marsay’s Katherine should be steering well clear of). It’s all perfectly well done with a solid script from Kate Brooke (Mr Selfridge) but it seems like nothing special. Then, three quarters of the way through this first episode, something genuinely interesting happens: Bancroft’s secrets are revealed to be very dark indeed just as Katherine’s cold case involving the break-in and violent murder of a young woman in 1990 starts hotting up. With the stakes suddenly raised Bancroft spins off into a dark tale of the lengths that people go to keep the past buried and the stage is set for an intriguing game of secrets and lies. Smart scheduling sees the rest of the story play out over consecutive nights. SH Street Auction BBC One, 11.00am Paul Martin returns with a new series of the surprisingly addictive show in which people band together to raise funds for a member of their community by auctioning off hidden treasures. The fun comes from the unusual objects unearthed from garages and attics. SH Nigella’s Christmas Table BBC Two, 8.00pm If anything is guaranteed to Nigella put into purring overload it’s Christmas. The food on offer includes roast duck with orange, soy and ginger, but this is really about mood rather than food. SH   Paul Hollywood: A Baker’s Life Channel 4, 8.00pm Episode three of this genial series sees Hollywood looking back over his career and his time spent working at the Cliveden House Hotel in Berkshire. There’s also a festive get-together in Merseyside and some seasonal Danish pastries, which look delicious. SH The Art That Made Mexico: Paradise, Power and Prayers BBC Four, 9.00pm It’s always a pleasure to find a series that sheds new light on a subject, and so it is with artist Alinka Echeverria’s enthralling films about Mexico’s art. Of course, there are the key points: conquest, independence, dictatorship, revolution and figures such as Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo, but what the commentary gives us here is the context for both the history and the artists. This is true of this episode that looks at the relationship between art and power, colonialism and control while examining the enduring power of Kahlo’s work and myth. SH Handmade in Mexico BBC Four, 10.00pm The focus here is on Mexico’s celebrated Tree of Life sculptures, those gaudy, gorgeous interpretations of everything from the creation myth to the resurrection of Christ and the Day of the Dead. It’s a fascinating half-hour in which we see the amount of work and detail that goes into each piece. SH White Right: Meeting the Enemy: Exposure ITV, 10.40pm; STV, 11.05pm; UTV, 11.40pm; Wales, 11.10pm This intriguing-sounding documentary sees the Bafta-nominated Deeyah Khan (Jihad: A Story of the Others) investigate white extremism in the US. Khan visits white nationalist groups, attends a far-right rally and asks why this poisonous ideology is resurgent. SH The Black Swan (1942) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 2.35pm No, this is not the film about the ageing ballet dancer and the young ingénue; this is about high adventure on the seven seas. When Laird Cregar’s Captain Morgan becomes Governor of Jamaica, he promises to put an end to piracy. But things don’t go smoothly, especially when his assistant (Tyrone Power) kidnaps the ex-governor’s beautiful daughter (Maureen O’Hara). This was the final film of silent star Helene Costello. Mamma Mia! (2008) ★★★☆☆ ITV3, 7.50pm This musical comedy, directed by Phyllida Lloyd and set to Abba’s hits, is pure escapism. It’s naff, but that’s its selling point, as stars Meryl Streep, Pierce Brosnan and Julie Walters place tongues firmly in cheeks. At 59, Streep deserved more credit for doing the splits than for her role as a boho mother living on a Greek island whose daughter (Amanda Seyfried) tries to find out who her biological father is. Blood Diamond (2006) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 8.00pm The diamond industry of Sierra Leone is the subject of this striking thriller. Djimon Hounsou stars as a fisherman forced to work in the fields, who finds and hides a rare pink gem. His life is changed when he meets Leonardo DiCaprio’s self-serving mercenary and Jennifer Connelly’s well-meaning journalist. DiCaprio was Oscar-nominated, but lost to Forest Whitaker for The Last King of Scotland. Tuesday 12 December Paul Ready, Diane Morgan and Anna Maxwell-Martin Credit: BBC Motherland BBC Two, 10.00pm Dispensing with the calamitous set pieces of previous episodes and instead documenting the quiet desperation of this ill-starred band of sisters (plus one brother), this superb, exhausting sitcom from a writing supergroup including Graham Linehan and Sharon Horgan has been an exquisitely painful delight. We join Julia (Anna Maxwell Martin) in an unusually good place, with everything running smoothly thanks to her new Australian nanny, Lyndsey (Sarah Kendall). The kids are clean and happy, the school run is easy, the fridge is stocked – but could she be too good to be true? Amanda (Lucy Punch) has gone to ground after the revelation over her threesome, while her hapless confidant, Kevin (Paul Ready), is desperate to avoid having to get a job. And, should all the mugging get too much, there’s deadpan Liz (Diane Morgan), negotiating tricky relations with her dismal ex and his new, pregnant partner. After an orgy of passive aggression and desperate people in denial, the façades crack, just a little. Happily everyone reverts to fundamentally appalling type just in time for the end of the series and a surely inevitable recommission. GT Judd Apatow: the Return Netflix, from today After 25 years away from stand-up, the comedy zelig whose fingerprints are over everything from Knocked Up and Girls to Freaks and Geeks and Bridesmaids returns for a special set in Montreal, recorded in July. GT Masterchef: the Professionals BBC Two, 8.00pm After the hopefuls have tackled an invention test and rustled up a dish dedicated to one of their inspirations, Marcus Wareing, Monica Galletti and Gregg Wallace eliminate another two contenders, leaving only six in the contest. GT The A Word BBC One, 9.00pm Joe’s (brilliant Max Vento) family comes together for an end of year show at his old school – tears, acrimony and reconciliation ensue in the conclusion of Peter Bowker’s finely wrought, well-performed drama. A third series should surely be a formality. GT Invasion! with Sam Willis BBC Four, 9.00pm While not quite attaining Lucy Worsley levels of gonzo history, Dr Sam Willis is an enthusiastic and knowledgeable host not above the odd stunt to prove a point. This second episode of a series documenting the incursions that have shaped our nation and its bloodline examines the differing techniques and goals of the invaders. There are the Barbary Corsaire pirates who settled on Lundy Island, King Louis the Lion, invited to invade and crowned by disgruntled nobles, and the Dutch forces that negotiated the Medway just a year prior to the Glorious Revolution. Further proof, if any were needed, that Britain is a mongrel nation and all the better for it. GT The World’s Most Expensive Presents Channel 4, 9.00pm Eyeball-melting opulence and appalling lack of taste do battle with considerable craftsmanship and class in this startling film featuring everything from gold-plated pushbikes to a poker set in alligator-hide case. GT Sports Personality of the Year 2017: The Contenders BBC One, 10.45pm; Wales, 11.10pm; Scotland, 11.45pm With reigning title-holder Andy Murray’s injury-hit year effectively ruling him out of contention, Anthony Joshua, Chris Froome, Lewis Hamilton, Jo Konta and Mo Farah will be headlining this year’s roster after another 12 months of outstanding achievement in British sport. The runners and riders are introduced tonight. GT Shane (1953) ★★★★☆ Film4, 3.45pm There are few Westerns that examine the depths of human emotions, but this film by George Stevens is one of them and has become a landmark of cinema. Shane (Alan Ladd) is a cowboy who finds himself idolised for the way that he handles himself in the face of a landowner’s heavies. The climax is a face-off between Shane and smiling, whispering, Oscar-nominated Jack Palance, as the original man in black. A must-see. Mr & Mrs Smith (2005) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 9.00pm A daft comedy thriller which is perhaps best remembered for being the film that introduced Brad Pitt to Angelina Jolie. They play a couple whose failing marriage is spiced up dramatically when each discovers that the other secretly works as an assassin. Let down by a weak script, the film is held together by the chemistry between its two leads. Vince Vaughn and Adam Brody co-star. Moonraker (1979) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm The 11th film in the Bond series, and the fourth to star Roger Moore as the dapper MI6 agent, involves the theft of a space shuttle. It’s one of the weaker Bond films and at times seems more of a comedy than a tense action adventure, but it’s enjoyably frivolous. Michael Lonsdale plays resident baddie Hugo Drax who pinches the aforementioned space shuttle to help along his plan to wipe out the world’s population. Wednesday 13 December Barbara Schulz in Vanished by the Lake Credit: Channel 4 Vanished by the Lake Channel 4, 10.00pm This haunting French crime drama centres on a teenage girl who goes missing at a festival. It’s hardly an original set-up, but much like last year’s hit Gallic import The Disappearance, based on an almost identical premise, the mix of youthful promise cut short and fierce small-town intrigue quickly compels. The girl in question is Chloé Delval (Charlie Joirkin), and as news of her disappearance spreads, memories of a similar 15-year-old case in which two other girls vanished at the same celebration are revived. Into the fray steps striking Parisian detective Lise Stocker (Barbara Schulz), who has returned home to look after her ill mother, but is soon swept up by the case as its personal implications begin to unfold. All of the hallmarks of the Nordic noir genre are present, from the evocative setting (here a Broadchurch-style coastal backdrop) to the close-knit neighbours with secrets to hide. Nevertheless, this opening episode is an effective tension builder and the human impact of the mystery – particularly on Chloé’s fracturing parents – is powerfully moving. Once episode one finishes, the full series will be available to watch on All 4. TD Mary Berry’s Country House Secrets BBC One, 8.00pm Mary Berry rounds off her tour of Britain’s stately homes at Goodwood House, where she is suitably gushing over its royal history and grand interiors. Berry is treated to a hair-raising lap of the nearby motor circuit and whips up a four-tier cake for the cricket tea. TD The Secret Life of the Zoo Channel 4, 8.00pm The plight of the endangered Javan green magpie is on the agenda as keepers at Chester Zoo attempt to breed youngster Permata with older bird Netuba. Elsewhere, a zebra battle breaks out when newcomer Okoth arrives. TD Peaky Blinders BBC Two, 9.00pm A burst of gunfire opens the penultimate episode of period gangster antics, as Tommy Shelby (Cillian Murphy) faces off against mafia honcho Luca Changretta (Adrien Brody). An army colonel, meanwhile, questions Ada (Sophie Rundle) about her Communist past. TD The Channel: The World’s Busiest Waterway Channel 4, 9.00pm The fallout from Project Nemo, the new underwater electricity cable being laid between Belgium and Britain, is explored. We follow the Nemo manager struggling to avoid costly delays and the fisherman whose catch is being compromised by the work. TD Royal Academy: Painting the Future Sky Arts, 9.00pm Virtual reality (VR) is predicted to become the go-to place for everything from entertainment to work. The Royal Academy is getting in on the act with a new exhibition which explores the potential of the medium. This film follows the show’s creation with the artists, including sculptor Antony Gormley, portraitist Jonathan Yeo and Turner Prize-nominee Yinka Shonibare, who are producing works that use the technology to trace the history of the body in art. TD David Hockney: Time Reclaimed Sky Arts, 10.30pm This tribute to David Hockney aims to get beyond the glamour that surrounds his reputation, and focus on the personal aspects of his work. Anecdotes, images and analysis of the pictures themselves highlight the individuality expressed in each period of Hockney’s career, suggesting a diverse oeuvre that defies classification. TD Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am George Roy Hill directed two of the most popular films ever: Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969) and The Sting (1973). But this indifferent Julie Andrews musical of the flapper era was first. There’s much to enjoy in the story of a naive woman who leaves her rural roots behind to seek fortune and romance in Twenties New York. James Fox, as a spiffing salesman, is a particular highlight. The Three Musketeers (2011) ★★☆☆☆ E4, 8.00pm Paul W S Anderson’s adaptation of Alexandre Dumas’ novel is faithful in plot – Porthos, Athos and Aramis (Ray Stevenson, Matthew Macfadyen, Luke Evans), and disciple d’Artagnan (Logan Lerman), are sent to retrieve the French Queen’s (Juno Temple) necklace. The tone, however, is half action-pantomime, half candy-coloured steampunk comic – fun but terribly slapdash. Poltergeist (1982) ★★★★☆ TCM, 11.15pm Director Tobe Hooper, who made The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, tones down the gut-churning horror but still ramps up the tension to nightmare levels in this Steven Spielberg-produced chiller. It has one of cinema’s most spine-tinglingly scary moments: “They’re here,” sing-songs a little girl kneeling before the TV. “They” are the spirits, at first playful then increasingly malevolent, who terrorise a suburban family. Thursday 14 December Lord Sugar Credit: BBC The Apprentice: Why I Fired Them BBC One, 8.00pm In the wake of last night’s excoriating interview round, and with this Sunday’s final rapidly approaching to decide who will win a £250,000 investment and the mentoring opportunity of a lifetime, Lord Sugar makes his most personal appearance of the series. Other than those brief to-camera inserts that roll out as taxi cabs ferry freshly defenestrated candidates away from Sugar Towers to forever dream of fortunes that might have been made, this is one of few occasions in each “process” when Lord Sugar appears on screen away from the wannabe tycoons and talking to viewers directly. And he makes the most of it with his trademark witty-gritty line in East End charm, although professionalism usually prevents him from really dishing the behind-the-scenes dirt on why he thought 16 of them worthy only of the tip of his boot. Instead he looks back over this 13th series identifying the key commercial and strategic errors that led to each of his firing finger decisions, and what ultimately marked out the two finalists from the others. It’s a lot to get through in an hour but, as series recaps go, it’s usually a hoot. GO Ashes Cricket: Australia v England BT Sport 1, 1.30am The enduring Ashes Down Under conundrum: wake up early to watch it or stay up late? The third Test, held at the WACA Ground in Perth, gets under way in the early hours of Thursday morning, with England hoping to bounce back from two demoralising defeats. Lose this one and captain Joe Root will have to surrender the urn to the Aussies. PS European Tour Golf: The Indonesian Masters Sky Sports Main Event, 6.00am It’s the opening day of the tournament at the Royale Jakarta Golf Club, where Thailand’s Poom Saksansin won the title last year. Saksansin shot an overall score of 270 to finish on -18, five strokes ahead of joint runners-up Masahiro Kawamura of Japan and fellow Thai players Phachara Khongwatmai and Suradit Yongcharoenchai. PS Amazing Spaces Snow and Ice Special Channel 4, 8.00pm George Clarke and his inventive sidekick Will Hardie travel to Norway’s remoter parts to check out why this small country on the edge of Europe punches above its weight in architecture and design. Could it be something to do with the cold weather, they wonder? GO Love, Lies & Records BBC One, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama about the romance of working at a Leeds registry office delivers on melodrama, if not subtlety. In this penultimate episode Kate (Ashley Jensen) struggles to make a decision after Rob’s (Adrian Bower) surprise proposal. GO Blitz: the Bombs That Changed Britain BBC Two, 9.00pm The final edition looks at the horrific impact of German incendiary bombs, in particular one that set a church ablaze in Bristol in November 1940 and started a firestorm that ravaged the city’s historic centre. GO The Tunnel: Vengeance Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Sky’s award-winning version of The Bridge (its milieu that of British and French police teams linked by the Channel Tunnel) returns for a third and final run. A pity, as Stephen Dillane as spiky detective and Clémence Poésy as his emotionally remote French opposite number make an appealing pair. This first of six episodes packs in plenty of action as the pair set out to find the link between a burnt-out trawler and a maintenance worker attacked by a plague of rats. GO Extraordinary Teens: School of Life and Deaf Channel 4, 10.00pm This absorbing film follows a year in the life of Mary Hare Boarding School for deaf pupils in Berkshire. Seen through the eyes of a 15-year-old about to undergo a potentially life-changing cochlear implant, this film gives a profound sense of the physical and emotional complexities of growing up deaf. GO The Russell Howard Hour Sky One, 10.00pm We’ve reached the penultimate episode of this excellent topical comedy series. It’s little more than an extended version of BBC Three’s (and later BBC Two’s) Good News but that’s exactly what fans (and Sky, who snapped Howard up) wanted and he has delivered, pushing his brand of highly topical, politically aware, positive reinforcement stand-up with aplomb. GO Life (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Daniel Espinosa’s Earth-orbiting suspense flick was released less than two months before Ridley Scott’s new chapter in his Alien franchise, and bears many of the same hallmarks. It’s also a little bit Gravity. Ryan Reynolds is one of a crew of astronauts aboard a space station conducting research into life on Mars. In terms of entertainment, the film does its baseline job of getting you to chew your nails off. There’s Something About Mary (1998) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 9.00pm There are bad taste jokes in abundance in this comedy from the Farrelly Brothers. Ben Stiller stars as Ted, a shy man who realises he’s still in love with Mary (Cameron Diaz, proving her comic abilities), the date he tried to take to prom 13 years ago. So, to track her down, he hires an oily private eye (Matt Dillon) who also fallsin love with her and sets out to keep the pair apart. Gone in 60 Seconds (2000) ★★★☆☆ Universal Channel, 9.00pm Nicolas Cage has top billing in Dominic Sena’s remake of the 1974 cult film – a mind-numbingly testosterone-laced ride. Cage and Angelina Jolie are among a crew of thieves who must steal 50 cars in 72 hours to stop the murder of Cage’s brother. It’s more than serviceable entertainment, plus car aficionados will have fun spotting the Cadillacs and Corvettes. Friday 15 December Paul, Andy, Cynthia and Diana in The Sweet Makers Credit: BBC The Sweet Makers at Christmas BBC Two, 9.00pm Following their enjoyable three-part series earlier this year, BBC Two’s Sweet Makers return for this one-off Christmas special looking at changing treats from Georgian times to the Twenties. As before, the show is a lovely mix of baking and interesting social history with Emma Dabiri and Dr Annie Gray, who fill us in on how each era viewed Christmas and how confectionery changes over time. The show’s highlight comes during the Victorian Era, also known as the moment when Christmas as we know it was invented, as chocolatiers Paul A Young and Diane Short, bespoke cake decorator Cynthia Stroud and sweet consultant Andy Baxendale recreate a Boar’s Head cake. “That’s the most bonkers thing we’ve ever made,” notes Young, looking at the finished result, which is rich in chocolate, beautifully decorated and featuring unnervingly glazed eyes. He’s right but it also looks fabulous, as do the intricate Twelfth Cakes, a speciality in Georgian times. The Twenties brings with it the wonderful news that before Terry’s invented the chocolate orange they introduced the chocolate apple to the world, before looking to the future and the invention of Lord Mackintosh’s Quality Street. SH Jean-Claude Van Johnson Amazon Prime Video, from today This delightfully silly new series sees Jean-Claude Van Damme as a retired action film star with a secret: he’s a special agent and he wants back in the game. It’s inspired mayhem anchored by a winning performance from the laconic Van Damme. SH Trollhunters Netflix, from today Guillermo del Toro’s inventive animation returns for a second series, and it features the voice of the late Anton Yelchin as reluctant hero Jim Lake Jnr. The story continues where the first series left off, and sees Jim adventure deeper into the Troll world to battle the leader of the Darklands. This series also features Mark Hamill and Game of Thrones’s Lena Headey. SH Judge Rinder’s Crown Court ITV, 8.00pm; not STV or UTV; Wales, 11.10pm Judge Rinder’s reboot of classic Seventies series Crown Court might lack the big-name actors of the original but its meld of real-life crime and courtroom drama is just as addictive. Tonight, the jury decides if James Byron (Rupert Young) murdered his wife. SH Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Sarah Millican is a brave guest of Oliver and Doherty – brave because it swiftly transpires that cooking really isn’t her thing. But Oliver manages to bite his tongue while showing her how to cook her favourite microwave meal from scratch. SH Have I Got News for You BBC One, 9.00pm The 54th series of the satirical news quiz comes to an end with the ever-reliable David Tennant in the host’s chair. It has been a patchy series, which was marked by a new low when Jo Brand had to explain why sexual harassment jokes weren’t funny to the male panellists. So let’s hope it goes out on a high. SH Roy Orbison: Love Hurts BBC Four, 9.30pm Roy Orbison’s three sons, Wesley, Roy Jnr and Alex, take centre stage to discuss their father in this emotional documentary. SH The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm Prepare for Star Wars: The Last Jedi overload as John Boyega, Daisy Ridley and Mark Hamill join Norton on the sofa. Don’t expect any spoilers but there’s sure to be some nice eulogies to the late Carrie Fisher. SH Before I Go to Sleep (2014) ★★★☆☆ More4, 9.00pm Nicole Kidman and Colin Firth star in this uninvolving thriller based on SJ Watson’s twisty bestseller. Kidman plays a woman who, after suffering a head injury, has no idea who she is or who the man sleeping next to her might be (it’s Colin Firth, playing her husband). She keeps a daily video diary but starts to notice discrepancies between what she’s recorded and what Firth tells her. The Pledge (2001) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 9.00pm A tense mystery directed by Sean Penn with a fine cast including Jack Nicholson, Helen Mirren, Robin Wright Penn, Aaron Eckhart and Vanessa Redgrave. Nicholson is a detective who has to handle a horrific case on the day of his retirement – the murder of a seven-year-old girl. He promises to bring the killer to justice, only to find that the case is far from straightforward. A powerful, unsettling film. Hyena (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.15pm This violent thriller about corrupt drug-squad officers is very violent indeed, so be prepared to cover your eyes for some parts of writer-director Gerard Johnson’s film. Michael Logan (an intense Peter Ferdinand) is the leader of this special force, assigned to tackle drug trafficking among the Balkan gangs. Stephen Graham, as his dubious boss, is as reliable as ever. Above all, it’s a grisly exploration of the criminal mind. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: Attenborough and the Giant Elephant, and Babylon Berlin

Sunday 10 December Attenborough and the Giant Elephant BBC One, 9.00pm Can we ever have too much Attenborough? It seems not, as right in the foaming wake of the fabulous Blue Planet II (which concludes tonight, see preview below) comes this absorbing, bittersweet tale of the world’s first animal superstar – Jumbo the elephant. It’s a sad story, really. Jumbo shot to fame shortly after his arrival at London Zoo as an orphan in around 1861, but he didn’t get much from the deal. As Attenborough says, his captive life was “troubled, fuelled by alcohol, terrifying fits of violence, a near mystical relationship with his keeper and a tragic end that seems hard to believe”. Which is more than enough to hold the attention for an hour as he joins an international team examining Jumbo’s preserved skeleton at New York’s Museum of Natural History. Attenborough also pokes about in archives at London Zoo, sanctuaries in the Maasai Mara and Tennessee, and Ontario where Jumbo met his very sad end, building as complete a picture of this magnificent creature and his global travels as has ever been assembled. All the while it spreads a positive conservationist message and gives thanks that attitudes are more enlightened now than in Victorian times. GO Premier League Football: Liverpool v Everton & Manchester United v Manchester City Sky Sports Main Event, 1.15pm & 4.15pm “Super Sunday” lives up to its hyperbolic billing, with two potentially exhilarating derbies. First up, we’re at Anfield where Liverpool, fresh from their 5-1 demolition of Brighton, host Everton, who found some form last week, following up their 4-0 win at home to West Ham United with a 2-0 victory against Huddersfield. Later, in the 4.30pm kick-off, José Mourinho and Pep Guardiola renew rivalries as second-placed United host leaders City at Old Trafford. Expect it to be tight. PS Britain’s Wildest Weather 2017 Channel 4, 6.30pm This year has not, so far, been as extreme as some but, given the number of smartphone-wielding citizen journalists, there’s plenty of jaw-dropping footage of every extreme weather event that occurred, among them devastating floods, tornadoes and hair-raising lightning strikes. GO  Blue Planet II BBC One, 8.00pm This extraordinary series concludes with an undeniably depressing assessment of mankind’s impact on the marine environment. But David Attenborough, as ever, prefers to put the emphasis on hope. So there’s plenty of uplift too with stories of species brought back from extinction’s brink. GO Coastal Railways with Julie Walters Channel 4, 8.00pm Julie Walters heads for Cornwall on the Great Western route, recalling her childhood holidays in Torquay. She then boards a steam train at Paignton, hears tales of smugglers in Polperro and fills up on cakes in Penzance. GO Leonora Carrington: the Lost Surrealist BBC Four, 9.00pm This fascinating film tells the story of rebellious upper-class British artist Leonora Carrington, who worked alongside Ernst, Breton and Éluard in Paris at the height of the surrealist movement, yet died in 2011 all but forgotten in Mexico. Director Teresa Griffiths mixes interviews and biographical material with experimental animation and tableaux to bring Carrington’s work vividly to life. GO I’m a Celebrity… Get Me Out of Here! ITV, 9.00pm Seventeen series in and the public appetite for watching celebrities endure humiliation and repulsion shows little sign of drying up. This year’s launch pulled in ITV’s biggest audience of 2017. The final will no doubt draw as big a crowd again. GO Babylon Berlin Sky Atlantic, from 9.00pm Three more atmospheric episodes of the gripping crime series set in the bohemian, political Weimar Germany of the late Twenties. Detective Rath’s (Volker Bruch) investigation uncovers dangerous evidence of a shocking military conspiracy. GO The Sky At Night BBC Four, 10.00pm As well as more stargazing from the Royal Observatory, Maggie Aderin-Pocock is in Norway to see the Northern Lights. GO Ben-Hur (1959) ★★★★★ ITV3, 2.45pm A majestic slice of Hollywood history, this Roman-era melodrama directed by William Wyler and starring Charlton Heston won 11 Academy Awards (not equalled until Titanic in 1997). It still makes for magnificent viewing. Set in 26AD, it tells the story of a Jewish prince who clashes with the Roman governor and ends up enslaved, desperately plotting his revenge. The Sorcerer’s Apprentice (2010) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 3.00pm Jerry Bruckheimer gives the famous sequence from Disney’s Fantasia a fun, live-action reboot. Student Dave (Jay Baruchel) inherits Merlin’s powers, placing him in a power struggle between Balthazar (Nicolas Cage) and Horvath (Alfred Molina). Sadly there are just two scenes with broomsticks to link it to the original. Toby Kebbel is amusing as a stage musician co-opted by the forces of evil. Toy Story (1995) ★★★★★ BBC One, 3.35pm The idea of the first fully computer-generated animated film didn’t have those who had been weaned on the hand-drawn delights of Disney jumping for joy. However, with this beautiful tale, Pixar pushed animation to a new level – the premise, pace and emotion are all pitched perfectly. Whether it’s your first or 400th viewing, the story of toy cowboy Woody (Tom Hanks) and plastic spaceman Buzz Lightyear (Tim Allen) is a joy. Monday 11 December Faye Marsa, Sarah Parish and Amara Karan in Bancroft Credit: ITV Bancroft ITV, 9.00pm With so many crime dramas clogging up the television schedules it can be hard for a new series to stand out and at first ITV’s latest four-parter seems unlikely to break the mould. There’s an ambitious female cop with a possibly troubled past (the always reliable Sarah Parish), a striving younger cop who is desperate to move up the ranks (Faye Marsay) and the usual crop of jobsworths and strivers (Charles Babalola is particularly good as the married fellow officer Marsay’s Katherine should be steering well clear of). It’s all perfectly well done with a solid script from Kate Brooke (Mr Selfridge) but it seems like nothing special. Then, three quarters of the way through this first episode, something genuinely interesting happens: Bancroft’s secrets are revealed to be very dark indeed just as Katherine’s cold case involving the break-in and violent murder of a young woman in 1990 starts hotting up. With the stakes suddenly raised Bancroft spins off into a dark tale of the lengths that people go to keep the past buried and the stage is set for an intriguing game of secrets and lies. Smart scheduling sees the rest of the story play out over consecutive nights. SH Street Auction BBC One, 11.00am Paul Martin returns with a new series of the surprisingly addictive show in which people band together to raise funds for a member of their community by auctioning off hidden treasures. The fun comes from the unusual objects unearthed from garages and attics. SH Nigella’s Christmas Table BBC Two, 8.00pm If anything is guaranteed to Nigella put into purring overload it’s Christmas. The food on offer includes roast duck with orange, soy and ginger, but this is really about mood rather than food. SH   Paul Hollywood: A Baker’s Life Channel 4, 8.00pm Episode three of this genial series sees Hollywood looking back over his career and his time spent working at the Cliveden House Hotel in Berkshire. There’s also a festive get-together in Merseyside and some seasonal Danish pastries, which look delicious. SH The Art That Made Mexico: Paradise, Power and Prayers BBC Four, 9.00pm It’s always a pleasure to find a series that sheds new light on a subject, and so it is with artist Alinka Echeverria’s enthralling films about Mexico’s art. Of course, there are the key points: conquest, independence, dictatorship, revolution and figures such as Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo, but what the commentary gives us here is the context for both the history and the artists. This is true of this episode that looks at the relationship between art and power, colonialism and control while examining the enduring power of Kahlo’s work and myth. SH Handmade in Mexico BBC Four, 10.00pm The focus here is on Mexico’s celebrated Tree of Life sculptures, those gaudy, gorgeous interpretations of everything from the creation myth to the resurrection of Christ and the Day of the Dead. It’s a fascinating half-hour in which we see the amount of work and detail that goes into each piece. SH White Right: Meeting the Enemy: Exposure ITV, 10.40pm; STV, 11.05pm; UTV, 11.40pm; Wales, 11.10pm This intriguing-sounding documentary sees the Bafta-nominated Deeyah Khan (Jihad: A Story of the Others) investigate white extremism in the US. Khan visits white nationalist groups, attends a far-right rally and asks why this poisonous ideology is resurgent. SH The Black Swan (1942) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 2.35pm No, this is not the film about the ageing ballet dancer and the young ingénue; this is about high adventure on the seven seas. When Laird Cregar’s Captain Morgan becomes Governor of Jamaica, he promises to put an end to piracy. But things don’t go smoothly, especially when his assistant (Tyrone Power) kidnaps the ex-governor’s beautiful daughter (Maureen O’Hara). This was the final film of silent star Helene Costello. Mamma Mia! (2008) ★★★☆☆ ITV3, 7.50pm This musical comedy, directed by Phyllida Lloyd and set to Abba’s hits, is pure escapism. It’s naff, but that’s its selling point, as stars Meryl Streep, Pierce Brosnan and Julie Walters place tongues firmly in cheeks. At 59, Streep deserved more credit for doing the splits than for her role as a boho mother living on a Greek island whose daughter (Amanda Seyfried) tries to find out who her biological father is. Blood Diamond (2006) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 8.00pm The diamond industry of Sierra Leone is the subject of this striking thriller. Djimon Hounsou stars as a fisherman forced to work in the fields, who finds and hides a rare pink gem. His life is changed when he meets Leonardo DiCaprio’s self-serving mercenary and Jennifer Connelly’s well-meaning journalist. DiCaprio was Oscar-nominated, but lost to Forest Whitaker for The Last King of Scotland. Tuesday 12 December Paul Ready, Diane Morgan and Anna Maxwell-Martin Credit: BBC Motherland BBC Two, 10.00pm Dispensing with the calamitous set pieces of previous episodes and instead documenting the quiet desperation of this ill-starred band of sisters (plus one brother), this superb, exhausting sitcom from a writing supergroup including Graham Linehan and Sharon Horgan has been an exquisitely painful delight. We join Julia (Anna Maxwell Martin) in an unusually good place, with everything running smoothly thanks to her new Australian nanny, Lyndsey (Sarah Kendall). The kids are clean and happy, the school run is easy, the fridge is stocked – but could she be too good to be true? Amanda (Lucy Punch) has gone to ground after the revelation over her threesome, while her hapless confidant, Kevin (Paul Ready), is desperate to avoid having to get a job. And, should all the mugging get too much, there’s deadpan Liz (Diane Morgan), negotiating tricky relations with her dismal ex and his new, pregnant partner. After an orgy of passive aggression and desperate people in denial, the façades crack, just a little. Happily everyone reverts to fundamentally appalling type just in time for the end of the series and a surely inevitable recommission. GT Judd Apatow: the Return Netflix, from today After 25 years away from stand-up, the comedy zelig whose fingerprints are over everything from Knocked Up and Girls to Freaks and Geeks and Bridesmaids returns for a special set in Montreal, recorded in July. GT Masterchef: the Professionals BBC Two, 8.00pm After the hopefuls have tackled an invention test and rustled up a dish dedicated to one of their inspirations, Marcus Wareing, Monica Galletti and Gregg Wallace eliminate another two contenders, leaving only six in the contest. GT The A Word BBC One, 9.00pm Joe’s (brilliant Max Vento) family comes together for an end of year show at his old school – tears, acrimony and reconciliation ensue in the conclusion of Peter Bowker’s finely wrought, well-performed drama. A third series should surely be a formality. GT Invasion! with Sam Willis BBC Four, 9.00pm While not quite attaining Lucy Worsley levels of gonzo history, Dr Sam Willis is an enthusiastic and knowledgeable host not above the odd stunt to prove a point. This second episode of a series documenting the incursions that have shaped our nation and its bloodline examines the differing techniques and goals of the invaders. There are the Barbary Corsaire pirates who settled on Lundy Island, King Louis the Lion, invited to invade and crowned by disgruntled nobles, and the Dutch forces that negotiated the Medway just a year prior to the Glorious Revolution. Further proof, if any were needed, that Britain is a mongrel nation and all the better for it. GT The World’s Most Expensive Presents Channel 4, 9.00pm Eyeball-melting opulence and appalling lack of taste do battle with considerable craftsmanship and class in this startling film featuring everything from gold-plated pushbikes to a poker set in alligator-hide case. GT Sports Personality of the Year 2017: The Contenders BBC One, 10.45pm; Wales, 11.10pm; Scotland, 11.45pm With reigning title-holder Andy Murray’s injury-hit year effectively ruling him out of contention, Anthony Joshua, Chris Froome, Lewis Hamilton, Jo Konta and Mo Farah will be headlining this year’s roster after another 12 months of outstanding achievement in British sport. The runners and riders are introduced tonight. GT Shane (1953) ★★★★☆ Film4, 3.45pm There are few Westerns that examine the depths of human emotions, but this film by George Stevens is one of them and has become a landmark of cinema. Shane (Alan Ladd) is a cowboy who finds himself idolised for the way that he handles himself in the face of a landowner’s heavies. The climax is a face-off between Shane and smiling, whispering, Oscar-nominated Jack Palance, as the original man in black. A must-see. Mr & Mrs Smith (2005) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 9.00pm A daft comedy thriller which is perhaps best remembered for being the film that introduced Brad Pitt to Angelina Jolie. They play a couple whose failing marriage is spiced up dramatically when each discovers that the other secretly works as an assassin. Let down by a weak script, the film is held together by the chemistry between its two leads. Vince Vaughn and Adam Brody co-star. Moonraker (1979) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm The 11th film in the Bond series, and the fourth to star Roger Moore as the dapper MI6 agent, involves the theft of a space shuttle. It’s one of the weaker Bond films and at times seems more of a comedy than a tense action adventure, but it’s enjoyably frivolous. Michael Lonsdale plays resident baddie Hugo Drax who pinches the aforementioned space shuttle to help along his plan to wipe out the world’s population. Wednesday 13 December Barbara Schulz in Vanished by the Lake Credit: Channel 4 Vanished by the Lake Channel 4, 10.00pm This haunting French crime drama centres on a teenage girl who goes missing at a festival. It’s hardly an original set-up, but much like last year’s hit Gallic import The Disappearance, based on an almost identical premise, the mix of youthful promise cut short and fierce small-town intrigue quickly compels. The girl in question is Chloé Delval (Charlie Joirkin), and as news of her disappearance spreads, memories of a similar 15-year-old case in which two other girls vanished at the same celebration are revived. Into the fray steps striking Parisian detective Lise Stocker (Barbara Schulz), who has returned home to look after her ill mother, but is soon swept up by the case as its personal implications begin to unfold. All of the hallmarks of the Nordic noir genre are present, from the evocative setting (here a Broadchurch-style coastal backdrop) to the close-knit neighbours with secrets to hide. Nevertheless, this opening episode is an effective tension builder and the human impact of the mystery – particularly on Chloé’s fracturing parents – is powerfully moving. Once episode one finishes, the full series will be available to watch on All 4. TD Mary Berry’s Country House Secrets BBC One, 8.00pm Mary Berry rounds off her tour of Britain’s stately homes at Goodwood House, where she is suitably gushing over its royal history and grand interiors. Berry is treated to a hair-raising lap of the nearby motor circuit and whips up a four-tier cake for the cricket tea. TD The Secret Life of the Zoo Channel 4, 8.00pm The plight of the endangered Javan green magpie is on the agenda as keepers at Chester Zoo attempt to breed youngster Permata with older bird Netuba. Elsewhere, a zebra battle breaks out when newcomer Okoth arrives. TD Peaky Blinders BBC Two, 9.00pm A burst of gunfire opens the penultimate episode of period gangster antics, as Tommy Shelby (Cillian Murphy) faces off against mafia honcho Luca Changretta (Adrien Brody). An army colonel, meanwhile, questions Ada (Sophie Rundle) about her Communist past. TD The Channel: The World’s Busiest Waterway Channel 4, 9.00pm The fallout from Project Nemo, the new underwater electricity cable being laid between Belgium and Britain, is explored. We follow the Nemo manager struggling to avoid costly delays and the fisherman whose catch is being compromised by the work. TD Royal Academy: Painting the Future Sky Arts, 9.00pm Virtual reality (VR) is predicted to become the go-to place for everything from entertainment to work. The Royal Academy is getting in on the act with a new exhibition which explores the potential of the medium. This film follows the show’s creation with the artists, including sculptor Antony Gormley, portraitist Jonathan Yeo and Turner Prize-nominee Yinka Shonibare, who are producing works that use the technology to trace the history of the body in art. TD David Hockney: Time Reclaimed Sky Arts, 10.30pm This tribute to David Hockney aims to get beyond the glamour that surrounds his reputation, and focus on the personal aspects of his work. Anecdotes, images and analysis of the pictures themselves highlight the individuality expressed in each period of Hockney’s career, suggesting a diverse oeuvre that defies classification. TD Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am George Roy Hill directed two of the most popular films ever: Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969) and The Sting (1973). But this indifferent Julie Andrews musical of the flapper era was first. There’s much to enjoy in the story of a naive woman who leaves her rural roots behind to seek fortune and romance in Twenties New York. James Fox, as a spiffing salesman, is a particular highlight. The Three Musketeers (2011) ★★☆☆☆ E4, 8.00pm Paul W S Anderson’s adaptation of Alexandre Dumas’ novel is faithful in plot – Porthos, Athos and Aramis (Ray Stevenson, Matthew Macfadyen, Luke Evans), and disciple d’Artagnan (Logan Lerman), are sent to retrieve the French Queen’s (Juno Temple) necklace. The tone, however, is half action-pantomime, half candy-coloured steampunk comic – fun but terribly slapdash. Poltergeist (1982) ★★★★☆ TCM, 11.15pm Director Tobe Hooper, who made The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, tones down the gut-churning horror but still ramps up the tension to nightmare levels in this Steven Spielberg-produced chiller. It has one of cinema’s most spine-tinglingly scary moments: “They’re here,” sing-songs a little girl kneeling before the TV. “They” are the spirits, at first playful then increasingly malevolent, who terrorise a suburban family. Thursday 14 December Lord Sugar Credit: BBC The Apprentice: Why I Fired Them BBC One, 8.00pm In the wake of last night’s excoriating interview round, and with this Sunday’s final rapidly approaching to decide who will win a £250,000 investment and the mentoring opportunity of a lifetime, Lord Sugar makes his most personal appearance of the series. Other than those brief to-camera inserts that roll out as taxi cabs ferry freshly defenestrated candidates away from Sugar Towers to forever dream of fortunes that might have been made, this is one of few occasions in each “process” when Lord Sugar appears on screen away from the wannabe tycoons and talking to viewers directly. And he makes the most of it with his trademark witty-gritty line in East End charm, although professionalism usually prevents him from really dishing the behind-the-scenes dirt on why he thought 16 of them worthy only of the tip of his boot. Instead he looks back over this 13th series identifying the key commercial and strategic errors that led to each of his firing finger decisions, and what ultimately marked out the two finalists from the others. It’s a lot to get through in an hour but, as series recaps go, it’s usually a hoot. GO Ashes Cricket: Australia v England BT Sport 1, 1.30am The enduring Ashes Down Under conundrum: wake up early to watch it or stay up late? The third Test, held at the WACA Ground in Perth, gets under way in the early hours of Thursday morning, with England hoping to bounce back from two demoralising defeats. Lose this one and captain Joe Root will have to surrender the urn to the Aussies. PS European Tour Golf: The Indonesian Masters Sky Sports Main Event, 6.00am It’s the opening day of the tournament at the Royale Jakarta Golf Club, where Thailand’s Poom Saksansin won the title last year. Saksansin shot an overall score of 270 to finish on -18, five strokes ahead of joint runners-up Masahiro Kawamura of Japan and fellow Thai players Phachara Khongwatmai and Suradit Yongcharoenchai. PS Amazing Spaces Snow and Ice Special Channel 4, 8.00pm George Clarke and his inventive sidekick Will Hardie travel to Norway’s remoter parts to check out why this small country on the edge of Europe punches above its weight in architecture and design. Could it be something to do with the cold weather, they wonder? GO Love, Lies & Records BBC One, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama about the romance of working at a Leeds registry office delivers on melodrama, if not subtlety. In this penultimate episode Kate (Ashley Jensen) struggles to make a decision after Rob’s (Adrian Bower) surprise proposal. GO Blitz: the Bombs That Changed Britain BBC Two, 9.00pm The final edition looks at the horrific impact of German incendiary bombs, in particular one that set a church ablaze in Bristol in November 1940 and started a firestorm that ravaged the city’s historic centre. GO The Tunnel: Vengeance Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Sky’s award-winning version of The Bridge (its milieu that of British and French police teams linked by the Channel Tunnel) returns for a third and final run. A pity, as Stephen Dillane as spiky detective and Clémence Poésy as his emotionally remote French opposite number make an appealing pair. This first of six episodes packs in plenty of action as the pair set out to find the link between a burnt-out trawler and a maintenance worker attacked by a plague of rats. GO Extraordinary Teens: School of Life and Deaf Channel 4, 10.00pm This absorbing film follows a year in the life of Mary Hare Boarding School for deaf pupils in Berkshire. Seen through the eyes of a 15-year-old about to undergo a potentially life-changing cochlear implant, this film gives a profound sense of the physical and emotional complexities of growing up deaf. GO The Russell Howard Hour Sky One, 10.00pm We’ve reached the penultimate episode of this excellent topical comedy series. It’s little more than an extended version of BBC Three’s (and later BBC Two’s) Good News but that’s exactly what fans (and Sky, who snapped Howard up) wanted and he has delivered, pushing his brand of highly topical, politically aware, positive reinforcement stand-up with aplomb. GO Life (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Daniel Espinosa’s Earth-orbiting suspense flick was released less than two months before Ridley Scott’s new chapter in his Alien franchise, and bears many of the same hallmarks. It’s also a little bit Gravity. Ryan Reynolds is one of a crew of astronauts aboard a space station conducting research into life on Mars. In terms of entertainment, the film does its baseline job of getting you to chew your nails off. There’s Something About Mary (1998) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 9.00pm There are bad taste jokes in abundance in this comedy from the Farrelly Brothers. Ben Stiller stars as Ted, a shy man who realises he’s still in love with Mary (Cameron Diaz, proving her comic abilities), the date he tried to take to prom 13 years ago. So, to track her down, he hires an oily private eye (Matt Dillon) who also fallsin love with her and sets out to keep the pair apart. Gone in 60 Seconds (2000) ★★★☆☆ Universal Channel, 9.00pm Nicolas Cage has top billing in Dominic Sena’s remake of the 1974 cult film – a mind-numbingly testosterone-laced ride. Cage and Angelina Jolie are among a crew of thieves who must steal 50 cars in 72 hours to stop the murder of Cage’s brother. It’s more than serviceable entertainment, plus car aficionados will have fun spotting the Cadillacs and Corvettes. Friday 15 December Paul, Andy, Cynthia and Diana in The Sweet Makers Credit: BBC The Sweet Makers at Christmas BBC Two, 9.00pm Following their enjoyable three-part series earlier this year, BBC Two’s Sweet Makers return for this one-off Christmas special looking at changing treats from Georgian times to the Twenties. As before, the show is a lovely mix of baking and interesting social history with Emma Dabiri and Dr Annie Gray, who fill us in on how each era viewed Christmas and how confectionery changes over time. The show’s highlight comes during the Victorian Era, also known as the moment when Christmas as we know it was invented, as chocolatiers Paul A Young and Diane Short, bespoke cake decorator Cynthia Stroud and sweet consultant Andy Baxendale recreate a Boar’s Head cake. “That’s the most bonkers thing we’ve ever made,” notes Young, looking at the finished result, which is rich in chocolate, beautifully decorated and featuring unnervingly glazed eyes. He’s right but it also looks fabulous, as do the intricate Twelfth Cakes, a speciality in Georgian times. The Twenties brings with it the wonderful news that before Terry’s invented the chocolate orange they introduced the chocolate apple to the world, before looking to the future and the invention of Lord Mackintosh’s Quality Street. SH Jean-Claude Van Johnson Amazon Prime Video, from today This delightfully silly new series sees Jean-Claude Van Damme as a retired action film star with a secret: he’s a special agent and he wants back in the game. It’s inspired mayhem anchored by a winning performance from the laconic Van Damme. SH Trollhunters Netflix, from today Guillermo del Toro’s inventive animation returns for a second series, and it features the voice of the late Anton Yelchin as reluctant hero Jim Lake Jnr. The story continues where the first series left off, and sees Jim adventure deeper into the Troll world to battle the leader of the Darklands. This series also features Mark Hamill and Game of Thrones’s Lena Headey. SH Judge Rinder’s Crown Court ITV, 8.00pm; not STV or UTV; Wales, 11.10pm Judge Rinder’s reboot of classic Seventies series Crown Court might lack the big-name actors of the original but its meld of real-life crime and courtroom drama is just as addictive. Tonight, the jury decides if James Byron (Rupert Young) murdered his wife. SH Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Sarah Millican is a brave guest of Oliver and Doherty – brave because it swiftly transpires that cooking really isn’t her thing. But Oliver manages to bite his tongue while showing her how to cook her favourite microwave meal from scratch. SH Have I Got News for You BBC One, 9.00pm The 54th series of the satirical news quiz comes to an end with the ever-reliable David Tennant in the host’s chair. It has been a patchy series, which was marked by a new low when Jo Brand had to explain why sexual harassment jokes weren’t funny to the male panellists. So let’s hope it goes out on a high. SH Roy Orbison: Love Hurts BBC Four, 9.30pm Roy Orbison’s three sons, Wesley, Roy Jnr and Alex, take centre stage to discuss their father in this emotional documentary. SH The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm Prepare for Star Wars: The Last Jedi overload as John Boyega, Daisy Ridley and Mark Hamill join Norton on the sofa. Don’t expect any spoilers but there’s sure to be some nice eulogies to the late Carrie Fisher. SH Before I Go to Sleep (2014) ★★★☆☆ More4, 9.00pm Nicole Kidman and Colin Firth star in this uninvolving thriller based on SJ Watson’s twisty bestseller. Kidman plays a woman who, after suffering a head injury, has no idea who she is or who the man sleeping next to her might be (it’s Colin Firth, playing her husband). She keeps a daily video diary but starts to notice discrepancies between what she’s recorded and what Firth tells her. The Pledge (2001) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 9.00pm A tense mystery directed by Sean Penn with a fine cast including Jack Nicholson, Helen Mirren, Robin Wright Penn, Aaron Eckhart and Vanessa Redgrave. Nicholson is a detective who has to handle a horrific case on the day of his retirement – the murder of a seven-year-old girl. He promises to bring the killer to justice, only to find that the case is far from straightforward. A powerful, unsettling film. Hyena (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.15pm This violent thriller about corrupt drug-squad officers is very violent indeed, so be prepared to cover your eyes for some parts of writer-director Gerard Johnson’s film. Michael Logan (an intense Peter Ferdinand) is the leader of this special force, assigned to tackle drug trafficking among the Balkan gangs. Stephen Graham, as his dubious boss, is as reliable as ever. Above all, it’s a grisly exploration of the criminal mind. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: Attenborough and the Giant Elephant, and Babylon Berlin

Sunday 10 December Attenborough and the Giant Elephant BBC One, 9.00pm Can we ever have too much Attenborough? It seems not, as right in the foaming wake of the fabulous Blue Planet II (which concludes tonight, see preview below) comes this absorbing, bittersweet tale of the world’s first animal superstar – Jumbo the elephant. It’s a sad story, really. Jumbo shot to fame shortly after his arrival at London Zoo as an orphan in around 1861, but he didn’t get much from the deal. As Attenborough says, his captive life was “troubled, fuelled by alcohol, terrifying fits of violence, a near mystical relationship with his keeper and a tragic end that seems hard to believe”. Which is more than enough to hold the attention for an hour as he joins an international team examining Jumbo’s preserved skeleton at New York’s Museum of Natural History. Attenborough also pokes about in archives at London Zoo, sanctuaries in the Maasai Mara and Tennessee, and Ontario where Jumbo met his very sad end, building as complete a picture of this magnificent creature and his global travels as has ever been assembled. All the while it spreads a positive conservationist message and gives thanks that attitudes are more enlightened now than in Victorian times. GO Premier League Football: Liverpool v Everton & Manchester United v Manchester City Sky Sports Main Event, 1.15pm & 4.15pm “Super Sunday” lives up to its hyperbolic billing, with two potentially exhilarating derbies. First up, we’re at Anfield where Liverpool, fresh from their 5-1 demolition of Brighton, host Everton, who found some form last week, following up their 4-0 win at home to West Ham United with a 2-0 victory against Huddersfield. Later, in the 4.30pm kick-off, José Mourinho and Pep Guardiola renew rivalries as second-placed United host leaders City at Old Trafford. Expect it to be tight. PS Britain’s Wildest Weather 2017 Channel 4, 6.30pm This year has not, so far, been as extreme as some but, given the number of smartphone-wielding citizen journalists, there’s plenty of jaw-dropping footage of every extreme weather event that occurred, among them devastating floods, tornadoes and hair-raising lightning strikes. GO  Blue Planet II BBC One, 8.00pm This extraordinary series concludes with an undeniably depressing assessment of mankind’s impact on the marine environment. But David Attenborough, as ever, prefers to put the emphasis on hope. So there’s plenty of uplift too with stories of species brought back from extinction’s brink. GO Coastal Railways with Julie Walters Channel 4, 8.00pm Julie Walters heads for Cornwall on the Great Western route, recalling her childhood holidays in Torquay. She then boards a steam train at Paignton, hears tales of smugglers in Polperro and fills up on cakes in Penzance. GO Leonora Carrington: the Lost Surrealist BBC Four, 9.00pm This fascinating film tells the story of rebellious upper-class British artist Leonora Carrington, who worked alongside Ernst, Breton and Éluard in Paris at the height of the surrealist movement, yet died in 2011 all but forgotten in Mexico. Director Teresa Griffiths mixes interviews and biographical material with experimental animation and tableaux to bring Carrington’s work vividly to life. GO I’m a Celebrity… Get Me Out of Here! ITV, 9.00pm Seventeen series in and the public appetite for watching celebrities endure humiliation and repulsion shows little sign of drying up. This year’s launch pulled in ITV’s biggest audience of 2017. The final will no doubt draw as big a crowd again. GO Babylon Berlin Sky Atlantic, from 9.00pm Three more atmospheric episodes of the gripping crime series set in the bohemian, political Weimar Germany of the late Twenties. Detective Rath’s (Volker Bruch) investigation uncovers dangerous evidence of a shocking military conspiracy. GO The Sky At Night BBC Four, 10.00pm As well as more stargazing from the Royal Observatory, Maggie Aderin-Pocock is in Norway to see the Northern Lights. GO Ben-Hur (1959) ★★★★★ ITV3, 2.45pm A majestic slice of Hollywood history, this Roman-era melodrama directed by William Wyler and starring Charlton Heston won 11 Academy Awards (not equalled until Titanic in 1997). It still makes for magnificent viewing. Set in 26AD, it tells the story of a Jewish prince who clashes with the Roman governor and ends up enslaved, desperately plotting his revenge. The Sorcerer’s Apprentice (2010) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 3.00pm Jerry Bruckheimer gives the famous sequence from Disney’s Fantasia a fun, live-action reboot. Student Dave (Jay Baruchel) inherits Merlin’s powers, placing him in a power struggle between Balthazar (Nicolas Cage) and Horvath (Alfred Molina). Sadly there are just two scenes with broomsticks to link it to the original. Toby Kebbel is amusing as a stage musician co-opted by the forces of evil. Toy Story (1995) ★★★★★ BBC One, 3.35pm The idea of the first fully computer-generated animated film didn’t have those who had been weaned on the hand-drawn delights of Disney jumping for joy. However, with this beautiful tale, Pixar pushed animation to a new level – the premise, pace and emotion are all pitched perfectly. Whether it’s your first or 400th viewing, the story of toy cowboy Woody (Tom Hanks) and plastic spaceman Buzz Lightyear (Tim Allen) is a joy. Monday 11 December Faye Marsa, Sarah Parish and Amara Karan in Bancroft Credit: ITV Bancroft ITV, 9.00pm With so many crime dramas clogging up the television schedules it can be hard for a new series to stand out and at first ITV’s latest four-parter seems unlikely to break the mould. There’s an ambitious female cop with a possibly troubled past (the always reliable Sarah Parish), a striving younger cop who is desperate to move up the ranks (Faye Marsay) and the usual crop of jobsworths and strivers (Charles Babalola is particularly good as the married fellow officer Marsay’s Katherine should be steering well clear of). It’s all perfectly well done with a solid script from Kate Brooke (Mr Selfridge) but it seems like nothing special. Then, three quarters of the way through this first episode, something genuinely interesting happens: Bancroft’s secrets are revealed to be very dark indeed just as Katherine’s cold case involving the break-in and violent murder of a young woman in 1990 starts hotting up. With the stakes suddenly raised Bancroft spins off into a dark tale of the lengths that people go to keep the past buried and the stage is set for an intriguing game of secrets and lies. Smart scheduling sees the rest of the story play out over consecutive nights. SH Street Auction BBC One, 11.00am Paul Martin returns with a new series of the surprisingly addictive show in which people band together to raise funds for a member of their community by auctioning off hidden treasures. The fun comes from the unusual objects unearthed from garages and attics. SH Nigella’s Christmas Table BBC Two, 8.00pm If anything is guaranteed to Nigella put into purring overload it’s Christmas. The food on offer includes roast duck with orange, soy and ginger, but this is really about mood rather than food. SH   Paul Hollywood: A Baker’s Life Channel 4, 8.00pm Episode three of this genial series sees Hollywood looking back over his career and his time spent working at the Cliveden House Hotel in Berkshire. There’s also a festive get-together in Merseyside and some seasonal Danish pastries, which look delicious. SH The Art That Made Mexico: Paradise, Power and Prayers BBC Four, 9.00pm It’s always a pleasure to find a series that sheds new light on a subject, and so it is with artist Alinka Echeverria’s enthralling films about Mexico’s art. Of course, there are the key points: conquest, independence, dictatorship, revolution and figures such as Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo, but what the commentary gives us here is the context for both the history and the artists. This is true of this episode that looks at the relationship between art and power, colonialism and control while examining the enduring power of Kahlo’s work and myth. SH Handmade in Mexico BBC Four, 10.00pm The focus here is on Mexico’s celebrated Tree of Life sculptures, those gaudy, gorgeous interpretations of everything from the creation myth to the resurrection of Christ and the Day of the Dead. It’s a fascinating half-hour in which we see the amount of work and detail that goes into each piece. SH White Right: Meeting the Enemy: Exposure ITV, 10.40pm; STV, 11.05pm; UTV, 11.40pm; Wales, 11.10pm This intriguing-sounding documentary sees the Bafta-nominated Deeyah Khan (Jihad: A Story of the Others) investigate white extremism in the US. Khan visits white nationalist groups, attends a far-right rally and asks why this poisonous ideology is resurgent. SH The Black Swan (1942) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 2.35pm No, this is not the film about the ageing ballet dancer and the young ingénue; this is about high adventure on the seven seas. When Laird Cregar’s Captain Morgan becomes Governor of Jamaica, he promises to put an end to piracy. But things don’t go smoothly, especially when his assistant (Tyrone Power) kidnaps the ex-governor’s beautiful daughter (Maureen O’Hara). This was the final film of silent star Helene Costello. Mamma Mia! (2008) ★★★☆☆ ITV3, 7.50pm This musical comedy, directed by Phyllida Lloyd and set to Abba’s hits, is pure escapism. It’s naff, but that’s its selling point, as stars Meryl Streep, Pierce Brosnan and Julie Walters place tongues firmly in cheeks. At 59, Streep deserved more credit for doing the splits than for her role as a boho mother living on a Greek island whose daughter (Amanda Seyfried) tries to find out who her biological father is. Blood Diamond (2006) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 8.00pm The diamond industry of Sierra Leone is the subject of this striking thriller. Djimon Hounsou stars as a fisherman forced to work in the fields, who finds and hides a rare pink gem. His life is changed when he meets Leonardo DiCaprio’s self-serving mercenary and Jennifer Connelly’s well-meaning journalist. DiCaprio was Oscar-nominated, but lost to Forest Whitaker for The Last King of Scotland. Tuesday 12 December Paul Ready, Diane Morgan and Anna Maxwell-Martin Credit: BBC Motherland BBC Two, 10.00pm Dispensing with the calamitous set pieces of previous episodes and instead documenting the quiet desperation of this ill-starred band of sisters (plus one brother), this superb, exhausting sitcom from a writing supergroup including Graham Linehan and Sharon Horgan has been an exquisitely painful delight. We join Julia (Anna Maxwell Martin) in an unusually good place, with everything running smoothly thanks to her new Australian nanny, Lyndsey (Sarah Kendall). The kids are clean and happy, the school run is easy, the fridge is stocked – but could she be too good to be true? Amanda (Lucy Punch) has gone to ground after the revelation over her threesome, while her hapless confidant, Kevin (Paul Ready), is desperate to avoid having to get a job. And, should all the mugging get too much, there’s deadpan Liz (Diane Morgan), negotiating tricky relations with her dismal ex and his new, pregnant partner. After an orgy of passive aggression and desperate people in denial, the façades crack, just a little. Happily everyone reverts to fundamentally appalling type just in time for the end of the series and a surely inevitable recommission. GT Judd Apatow: the Return Netflix, from today After 25 years away from stand-up, the comedy zelig whose fingerprints are over everything from Knocked Up and Girls to Freaks and Geeks and Bridesmaids returns for a special set in Montreal, recorded in July. GT Masterchef: the Professionals BBC Two, 8.00pm After the hopefuls have tackled an invention test and rustled up a dish dedicated to one of their inspirations, Marcus Wareing, Monica Galletti and Gregg Wallace eliminate another two contenders, leaving only six in the contest. GT The A Word BBC One, 9.00pm Joe’s (brilliant Max Vento) family comes together for an end of year show at his old school – tears, acrimony and reconciliation ensue in the conclusion of Peter Bowker’s finely wrought, well-performed drama. A third series should surely be a formality. GT Invasion! with Sam Willis BBC Four, 9.00pm While not quite attaining Lucy Worsley levels of gonzo history, Dr Sam Willis is an enthusiastic and knowledgeable host not above the odd stunt to prove a point. This second episode of a series documenting the incursions that have shaped our nation and its bloodline examines the differing techniques and goals of the invaders. There are the Barbary Corsaire pirates who settled on Lundy Island, King Louis the Lion, invited to invade and crowned by disgruntled nobles, and the Dutch forces that negotiated the Medway just a year prior to the Glorious Revolution. Further proof, if any were needed, that Britain is a mongrel nation and all the better for it. GT The World’s Most Expensive Presents Channel 4, 9.00pm Eyeball-melting opulence and appalling lack of taste do battle with considerable craftsmanship and class in this startling film featuring everything from gold-plated pushbikes to a poker set in alligator-hide case. GT Sports Personality of the Year 2017: The Contenders BBC One, 10.45pm; Wales, 11.10pm; Scotland, 11.45pm With reigning title-holder Andy Murray’s injury-hit year effectively ruling him out of contention, Anthony Joshua, Chris Froome, Lewis Hamilton, Jo Konta and Mo Farah will be headlining this year’s roster after another 12 months of outstanding achievement in British sport. The runners and riders are introduced tonight. GT Shane (1953) ★★★★☆ Film4, 3.45pm There are few Westerns that examine the depths of human emotions, but this film by George Stevens is one of them and has become a landmark of cinema. Shane (Alan Ladd) is a cowboy who finds himself idolised for the way that he handles himself in the face of a landowner’s heavies. The climax is a face-off between Shane and smiling, whispering, Oscar-nominated Jack Palance, as the original man in black. A must-see. Mr & Mrs Smith (2005) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 9.00pm A daft comedy thriller which is perhaps best remembered for being the film that introduced Brad Pitt to Angelina Jolie. They play a couple whose failing marriage is spiced up dramatically when each discovers that the other secretly works as an assassin. Let down by a weak script, the film is held together by the chemistry between its two leads. Vince Vaughn and Adam Brody co-star. Moonraker (1979) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm The 11th film in the Bond series, and the fourth to star Roger Moore as the dapper MI6 agent, involves the theft of a space shuttle. It’s one of the weaker Bond films and at times seems more of a comedy than a tense action adventure, but it’s enjoyably frivolous. Michael Lonsdale plays resident baddie Hugo Drax who pinches the aforementioned space shuttle to help along his plan to wipe out the world’s population. Wednesday 13 December Barbara Schulz in Vanished by the Lake Credit: Channel 4 Vanished by the Lake Channel 4, 10.00pm This haunting French crime drama centres on a teenage girl who goes missing at a festival. It’s hardly an original set-up, but much like last year’s hit Gallic import The Disappearance, based on an almost identical premise, the mix of youthful promise cut short and fierce small-town intrigue quickly compels. The girl in question is Chloé Delval (Charlie Joirkin), and as news of her disappearance spreads, memories of a similar 15-year-old case in which two other girls vanished at the same celebration are revived. Into the fray steps striking Parisian detective Lise Stocker (Barbara Schulz), who has returned home to look after her ill mother, but is soon swept up by the case as its personal implications begin to unfold. All of the hallmarks of the Nordic noir genre are present, from the evocative setting (here a Broadchurch-style coastal backdrop) to the close-knit neighbours with secrets to hide. Nevertheless, this opening episode is an effective tension builder and the human impact of the mystery – particularly on Chloé’s fracturing parents – is powerfully moving. Once episode one finishes, the full series will be available to watch on All 4. TD Mary Berry’s Country House Secrets BBC One, 8.00pm Mary Berry rounds off her tour of Britain’s stately homes at Goodwood House, where she is suitably gushing over its royal history and grand interiors. Berry is treated to a hair-raising lap of the nearby motor circuit and whips up a four-tier cake for the cricket tea. TD The Secret Life of the Zoo Channel 4, 8.00pm The plight of the endangered Javan green magpie is on the agenda as keepers at Chester Zoo attempt to breed youngster Permata with older bird Netuba. Elsewhere, a zebra battle breaks out when newcomer Okoth arrives. TD Peaky Blinders BBC Two, 9.00pm A burst of gunfire opens the penultimate episode of period gangster antics, as Tommy Shelby (Cillian Murphy) faces off against mafia honcho Luca Changretta (Adrien Brody). An army colonel, meanwhile, questions Ada (Sophie Rundle) about her Communist past. TD The Channel: The World’s Busiest Waterway Channel 4, 9.00pm The fallout from Project Nemo, the new underwater electricity cable being laid between Belgium and Britain, is explored. We follow the Nemo manager struggling to avoid costly delays and the fisherman whose catch is being compromised by the work. TD Royal Academy: Painting the Future Sky Arts, 9.00pm Virtual reality (VR) is predicted to become the go-to place for everything from entertainment to work. The Royal Academy is getting in on the act with a new exhibition which explores the potential of the medium. This film follows the show’s creation with the artists, including sculptor Antony Gormley, portraitist Jonathan Yeo and Turner Prize-nominee Yinka Shonibare, who are producing works that use the technology to trace the history of the body in art. TD David Hockney: Time Reclaimed Sky Arts, 10.30pm This tribute to David Hockney aims to get beyond the glamour that surrounds his reputation, and focus on the personal aspects of his work. Anecdotes, images and analysis of the pictures themselves highlight the individuality expressed in each period of Hockney’s career, suggesting a diverse oeuvre that defies classification. TD Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am George Roy Hill directed two of the most popular films ever: Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969) and The Sting (1973). But this indifferent Julie Andrews musical of the flapper era was first. There’s much to enjoy in the story of a naive woman who leaves her rural roots behind to seek fortune and romance in Twenties New York. James Fox, as a spiffing salesman, is a particular highlight. The Three Musketeers (2011) ★★☆☆☆ E4, 8.00pm Paul W S Anderson’s adaptation of Alexandre Dumas’ novel is faithful in plot – Porthos, Athos and Aramis (Ray Stevenson, Matthew Macfadyen, Luke Evans), and disciple d’Artagnan (Logan Lerman), are sent to retrieve the French Queen’s (Juno Temple) necklace. The tone, however, is half action-pantomime, half candy-coloured steampunk comic – fun but terribly slapdash. Poltergeist (1982) ★★★★☆ TCM, 11.15pm Director Tobe Hooper, who made The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, tones down the gut-churning horror but still ramps up the tension to nightmare levels in this Steven Spielberg-produced chiller. It has one of cinema’s most spine-tinglingly scary moments: “They’re here,” sing-songs a little girl kneeling before the TV. “They” are the spirits, at first playful then increasingly malevolent, who terrorise a suburban family. Thursday 14 December Lord Sugar Credit: BBC The Apprentice: Why I Fired Them BBC One, 8.00pm In the wake of last night’s excoriating interview round, and with this Sunday’s final rapidly approaching to decide who will win a £250,000 investment and the mentoring opportunity of a lifetime, Lord Sugar makes his most personal appearance of the series. Other than those brief to-camera inserts that roll out as taxi cabs ferry freshly defenestrated candidates away from Sugar Towers to forever dream of fortunes that might have been made, this is one of few occasions in each “process” when Lord Sugar appears on screen away from the wannabe tycoons and talking to viewers directly. And he makes the most of it with his trademark witty-gritty line in East End charm, although professionalism usually prevents him from really dishing the behind-the-scenes dirt on why he thought 16 of them worthy only of the tip of his boot. Instead he looks back over this 13th series identifying the key commercial and strategic errors that led to each of his firing finger decisions, and what ultimately marked out the two finalists from the others. It’s a lot to get through in an hour but, as series recaps go, it’s usually a hoot. GO Ashes Cricket: Australia v England BT Sport 1, 1.30am The enduring Ashes Down Under conundrum: wake up early to watch it or stay up late? The third Test, held at the WACA Ground in Perth, gets under way in the early hours of Thursday morning, with England hoping to bounce back from two demoralising defeats. Lose this one and captain Joe Root will have to surrender the urn to the Aussies. PS European Tour Golf: The Indonesian Masters Sky Sports Main Event, 6.00am It’s the opening day of the tournament at the Royale Jakarta Golf Club, where Thailand’s Poom Saksansin won the title last year. Saksansin shot an overall score of 270 to finish on -18, five strokes ahead of joint runners-up Masahiro Kawamura of Japan and fellow Thai players Phachara Khongwatmai and Suradit Yongcharoenchai. PS Amazing Spaces Snow and Ice Special Channel 4, 8.00pm George Clarke and his inventive sidekick Will Hardie travel to Norway’s remoter parts to check out why this small country on the edge of Europe punches above its weight in architecture and design. Could it be something to do with the cold weather, they wonder? GO Love, Lies & Records BBC One, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama about the romance of working at a Leeds registry office delivers on melodrama, if not subtlety. In this penultimate episode Kate (Ashley Jensen) struggles to make a decision after Rob’s (Adrian Bower) surprise proposal. GO Blitz: the Bombs That Changed Britain BBC Two, 9.00pm The final edition looks at the horrific impact of German incendiary bombs, in particular one that set a church ablaze in Bristol in November 1940 and started a firestorm that ravaged the city’s historic centre. GO The Tunnel: Vengeance Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Sky’s award-winning version of The Bridge (its milieu that of British and French police teams linked by the Channel Tunnel) returns for a third and final run. A pity, as Stephen Dillane as spiky detective and Clémence Poésy as his emotionally remote French opposite number make an appealing pair. This first of six episodes packs in plenty of action as the pair set out to find the link between a burnt-out trawler and a maintenance worker attacked by a plague of rats. GO Extraordinary Teens: School of Life and Deaf Channel 4, 10.00pm This absorbing film follows a year in the life of Mary Hare Boarding School for deaf pupils in Berkshire. Seen through the eyes of a 15-year-old about to undergo a potentially life-changing cochlear implant, this film gives a profound sense of the physical and emotional complexities of growing up deaf. GO The Russell Howard Hour Sky One, 10.00pm We’ve reached the penultimate episode of this excellent topical comedy series. It’s little more than an extended version of BBC Three’s (and later BBC Two’s) Good News but that’s exactly what fans (and Sky, who snapped Howard up) wanted and he has delivered, pushing his brand of highly topical, politically aware, positive reinforcement stand-up with aplomb. GO Life (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Daniel Espinosa’s Earth-orbiting suspense flick was released less than two months before Ridley Scott’s new chapter in his Alien franchise, and bears many of the same hallmarks. It’s also a little bit Gravity. Ryan Reynolds is one of a crew of astronauts aboard a space station conducting research into life on Mars. In terms of entertainment, the film does its baseline job of getting you to chew your nails off. There’s Something About Mary (1998) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 9.00pm There are bad taste jokes in abundance in this comedy from the Farrelly Brothers. Ben Stiller stars as Ted, a shy man who realises he’s still in love with Mary (Cameron Diaz, proving her comic abilities), the date he tried to take to prom 13 years ago. So, to track her down, he hires an oily private eye (Matt Dillon) who also fallsin love with her and sets out to keep the pair apart. Gone in 60 Seconds (2000) ★★★☆☆ Universal Channel, 9.00pm Nicolas Cage has top billing in Dominic Sena’s remake of the 1974 cult film – a mind-numbingly testosterone-laced ride. Cage and Angelina Jolie are among a crew of thieves who must steal 50 cars in 72 hours to stop the murder of Cage’s brother. It’s more than serviceable entertainment, plus car aficionados will have fun spotting the Cadillacs and Corvettes. Friday 15 December Paul, Andy, Cynthia and Diana in The Sweet Makers Credit: BBC The Sweet Makers at Christmas BBC Two, 9.00pm Following their enjoyable three-part series earlier this year, BBC Two’s Sweet Makers return for this one-off Christmas special looking at changing treats from Georgian times to the Twenties. As before, the show is a lovely mix of baking and interesting social history with Emma Dabiri and Dr Annie Gray, who fill us in on how each era viewed Christmas and how confectionery changes over time. The show’s highlight comes during the Victorian Era, also known as the moment when Christmas as we know it was invented, as chocolatiers Paul A Young and Diane Short, bespoke cake decorator Cynthia Stroud and sweet consultant Andy Baxendale recreate a Boar’s Head cake. “That’s the most bonkers thing we’ve ever made,” notes Young, looking at the finished result, which is rich in chocolate, beautifully decorated and featuring unnervingly glazed eyes. He’s right but it also looks fabulous, as do the intricate Twelfth Cakes, a speciality in Georgian times. The Twenties brings with it the wonderful news that before Terry’s invented the chocolate orange they introduced the chocolate apple to the world, before looking to the future and the invention of Lord Mackintosh’s Quality Street. SH Jean-Claude Van Johnson Amazon Prime Video, from today This delightfully silly new series sees Jean-Claude Van Damme as a retired action film star with a secret: he’s a special agent and he wants back in the game. It’s inspired mayhem anchored by a winning performance from the laconic Van Damme. SH Trollhunters Netflix, from today Guillermo del Toro’s inventive animation returns for a second series, and it features the voice of the late Anton Yelchin as reluctant hero Jim Lake Jnr. The story continues where the first series left off, and sees Jim adventure deeper into the Troll world to battle the leader of the Darklands. This series also features Mark Hamill and Game of Thrones’s Lena Headey. SH Judge Rinder’s Crown Court ITV, 8.00pm; not STV or UTV; Wales, 11.10pm Judge Rinder’s reboot of classic Seventies series Crown Court might lack the big-name actors of the original but its meld of real-life crime and courtroom drama is just as addictive. Tonight, the jury decides if James Byron (Rupert Young) murdered his wife. SH Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Sarah Millican is a brave guest of Oliver and Doherty – brave because it swiftly transpires that cooking really isn’t her thing. But Oliver manages to bite his tongue while showing her how to cook her favourite microwave meal from scratch. SH Have I Got News for You BBC One, 9.00pm The 54th series of the satirical news quiz comes to an end with the ever-reliable David Tennant in the host’s chair. It has been a patchy series, which was marked by a new low when Jo Brand had to explain why sexual harassment jokes weren’t funny to the male panellists. So let’s hope it goes out on a high. SH Roy Orbison: Love Hurts BBC Four, 9.30pm Roy Orbison’s three sons, Wesley, Roy Jnr and Alex, take centre stage to discuss their father in this emotional documentary. SH The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm Prepare for Star Wars: The Last Jedi overload as John Boyega, Daisy Ridley and Mark Hamill join Norton on the sofa. Don’t expect any spoilers but there’s sure to be some nice eulogies to the late Carrie Fisher. SH Before I Go to Sleep (2014) ★★★☆☆ More4, 9.00pm Nicole Kidman and Colin Firth star in this uninvolving thriller based on SJ Watson’s twisty bestseller. Kidman plays a woman who, after suffering a head injury, has no idea who she is or who the man sleeping next to her might be (it’s Colin Firth, playing her husband). She keeps a daily video diary but starts to notice discrepancies between what she’s recorded and what Firth tells her. The Pledge (2001) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 9.00pm A tense mystery directed by Sean Penn with a fine cast including Jack Nicholson, Helen Mirren, Robin Wright Penn, Aaron Eckhart and Vanessa Redgrave. Nicholson is a detective who has to handle a horrific case on the day of his retirement – the murder of a seven-year-old girl. He promises to bring the killer to justice, only to find that the case is far from straightforward. A powerful, unsettling film. Hyena (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.15pm This violent thriller about corrupt drug-squad officers is very violent indeed, so be prepared to cover your eyes for some parts of writer-director Gerard Johnson’s film. Michael Logan (an intense Peter Ferdinand) is the leader of this special force, assigned to tackle drug trafficking among the Balkan gangs. Stephen Graham, as his dubious boss, is as reliable as ever. Above all, it’s a grisly exploration of the criminal mind. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: Attenborough and the Giant Elephant, and Babylon Berlin

Sunday 10 December Attenborough and the Giant Elephant BBC One, 9.00pm Can we ever have too much Attenborough? It seems not, as right in the foaming wake of the fabulous Blue Planet II (which concludes tonight, see preview below) comes this absorbing, bittersweet tale of the world’s first animal superstar – Jumbo the elephant. It’s a sad story, really. Jumbo shot to fame shortly after his arrival at London Zoo as an orphan in around 1861, but he didn’t get much from the deal. As Attenborough says, his captive life was “troubled, fuelled by alcohol, terrifying fits of violence, a near mystical relationship with his keeper and a tragic end that seems hard to believe”. Which is more than enough to hold the attention for an hour as he joins an international team examining Jumbo’s preserved skeleton at New York’s Museum of Natural History. Attenborough also pokes about in archives at London Zoo, sanctuaries in the Maasai Mara and Tennessee, and Ontario where Jumbo met his very sad end, building as complete a picture of this magnificent creature and his global travels as has ever been assembled. All the while it spreads a positive conservationist message and gives thanks that attitudes are more enlightened now than in Victorian times. GO Premier League Football: Liverpool v Everton & Manchester United v Manchester City Sky Sports Main Event, 1.15pm & 4.15pm “Super Sunday” lives up to its hyperbolic billing, with two potentially exhilarating derbies. First up, we’re at Anfield where Liverpool, fresh from their 5-1 demolition of Brighton, host Everton, who found some form last week, following up their 4-0 win at home to West Ham United with a 2-0 victory against Huddersfield. Later, in the 4.30pm kick-off, José Mourinho and Pep Guardiola renew rivalries as second-placed United host leaders City at Old Trafford. Expect it to be tight. PS Britain’s Wildest Weather 2017 Channel 4, 6.30pm This year has not, so far, been as extreme as some but, given the number of smartphone-wielding citizen journalists, there’s plenty of jaw-dropping footage of every extreme weather event that occurred, among them devastating floods, tornadoes and hair-raising lightning strikes. GO  Blue Planet II BBC One, 8.00pm This extraordinary series concludes with an undeniably depressing assessment of mankind’s impact on the marine environment. But David Attenborough, as ever, prefers to put the emphasis on hope. So there’s plenty of uplift too with stories of species brought back from extinction’s brink. GO Coastal Railways with Julie Walters Channel 4, 8.00pm Julie Walters heads for Cornwall on the Great Western route, recalling her childhood holidays in Torquay. She then boards a steam train at Paignton, hears tales of smugglers in Polperro and fills up on cakes in Penzance. GO Leonora Carrington: the Lost Surrealist BBC Four, 9.00pm This fascinating film tells the story of rebellious upper-class British artist Leonora Carrington, who worked alongside Ernst, Breton and Éluard in Paris at the height of the surrealist movement, yet died in 2011 all but forgotten in Mexico. Director Teresa Griffiths mixes interviews and biographical material with experimental animation and tableaux to bring Carrington’s work vividly to life. GO I’m a Celebrity… Get Me Out of Here! ITV, 9.00pm Seventeen series in and the public appetite for watching celebrities endure humiliation and repulsion shows little sign of drying up. This year’s launch pulled in ITV’s biggest audience of 2017. The final will no doubt draw as big a crowd again. GO Babylon Berlin Sky Atlantic, from 9.00pm Three more atmospheric episodes of the gripping crime series set in the bohemian, political Weimar Germany of the late Twenties. Detective Rath’s (Volker Bruch) investigation uncovers dangerous evidence of a shocking military conspiracy. GO The Sky At Night BBC Four, 10.00pm As well as more stargazing from the Royal Observatory, Maggie Aderin-Pocock is in Norway to see the Northern Lights. GO Ben-Hur (1959) ★★★★★ ITV3, 2.45pm A majestic slice of Hollywood history, this Roman-era melodrama directed by William Wyler and starring Charlton Heston won 11 Academy Awards (not equalled until Titanic in 1997). It still makes for magnificent viewing. Set in 26AD, it tells the story of a Jewish prince who clashes with the Roman governor and ends up enslaved, desperately plotting his revenge. The Sorcerer’s Apprentice (2010) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 3.00pm Jerry Bruckheimer gives the famous sequence from Disney’s Fantasia a fun, live-action reboot. Student Dave (Jay Baruchel) inherits Merlin’s powers, placing him in a power struggle between Balthazar (Nicolas Cage) and Horvath (Alfred Molina). Sadly there are just two scenes with broomsticks to link it to the original. Toby Kebbel is amusing as a stage musician co-opted by the forces of evil. Toy Story (1995) ★★★★★ BBC One, 3.35pm The idea of the first fully computer-generated animated film didn’t have those who had been weaned on the hand-drawn delights of Disney jumping for joy. However, with this beautiful tale, Pixar pushed animation to a new level – the premise, pace and emotion are all pitched perfectly. Whether it’s your first or 400th viewing, the story of toy cowboy Woody (Tom Hanks) and plastic spaceman Buzz Lightyear (Tim Allen) is a joy. Monday 11 December Faye Marsa, Sarah Parish and Amara Karan in Bancroft Credit: ITV Bancroft ITV, 9.00pm With so many crime dramas clogging up the television schedules it can be hard for a new series to stand out and at first ITV’s latest four-parter seems unlikely to break the mould. There’s an ambitious female cop with a possibly troubled past (the always reliable Sarah Parish), a striving younger cop who is desperate to move up the ranks (Faye Marsay) and the usual crop of jobsworths and strivers (Charles Babalola is particularly good as the married fellow officer Marsay’s Katherine should be steering well clear of). It’s all perfectly well done with a solid script from Kate Brooke (Mr Selfridge) but it seems like nothing special. Then, three quarters of the way through this first episode, something genuinely interesting happens: Bancroft’s secrets are revealed to be very dark indeed just as Katherine’s cold case involving the break-in and violent murder of a young woman in 1990 starts hotting up. With the stakes suddenly raised Bancroft spins off into a dark tale of the lengths that people go to keep the past buried and the stage is set for an intriguing game of secrets and lies. Smart scheduling sees the rest of the story play out over consecutive nights. SH Street Auction BBC One, 11.00am Paul Martin returns with a new series of the surprisingly addictive show in which people band together to raise funds for a member of their community by auctioning off hidden treasures. The fun comes from the unusual objects unearthed from garages and attics. SH Nigella’s Christmas Table BBC Two, 8.00pm If anything is guaranteed to Nigella put into purring overload it’s Christmas. The food on offer includes roast duck with orange, soy and ginger, but this is really about mood rather than food. SH   Paul Hollywood: A Baker’s Life Channel 4, 8.00pm Episode three of this genial series sees Hollywood looking back over his career and his time spent working at the Cliveden House Hotel in Berkshire. There’s also a festive get-together in Merseyside and some seasonal Danish pastries, which look delicious. SH The Art That Made Mexico: Paradise, Power and Prayers BBC Four, 9.00pm It’s always a pleasure to find a series that sheds new light on a subject, and so it is with artist Alinka Echeverria’s enthralling films about Mexico’s art. Of course, there are the key points: conquest, independence, dictatorship, revolution and figures such as Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo, but what the commentary gives us here is the context for both the history and the artists. This is true of this episode that looks at the relationship between art and power, colonialism and control while examining the enduring power of Kahlo’s work and myth. SH Handmade in Mexico BBC Four, 10.00pm The focus here is on Mexico’s celebrated Tree of Life sculptures, those gaudy, gorgeous interpretations of everything from the creation myth to the resurrection of Christ and the Day of the Dead. It’s a fascinating half-hour in which we see the amount of work and detail that goes into each piece. SH White Right: Meeting the Enemy: Exposure ITV, 10.40pm; STV, 11.05pm; UTV, 11.40pm; Wales, 11.10pm This intriguing-sounding documentary sees the Bafta-nominated Deeyah Khan (Jihad: A Story of the Others) investigate white extremism in the US. Khan visits white nationalist groups, attends a far-right rally and asks why this poisonous ideology is resurgent. SH The Black Swan (1942) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 2.35pm No, this is not the film about the ageing ballet dancer and the young ingénue; this is about high adventure on the seven seas. When Laird Cregar’s Captain Morgan becomes Governor of Jamaica, he promises to put an end to piracy. But things don’t go smoothly, especially when his assistant (Tyrone Power) kidnaps the ex-governor’s beautiful daughter (Maureen O’Hara). This was the final film of silent star Helene Costello. Mamma Mia! (2008) ★★★☆☆ ITV3, 7.50pm This musical comedy, directed by Phyllida Lloyd and set to Abba’s hits, is pure escapism. It’s naff, but that’s its selling point, as stars Meryl Streep, Pierce Brosnan and Julie Walters place tongues firmly in cheeks. At 59, Streep deserved more credit for doing the splits than for her role as a boho mother living on a Greek island whose daughter (Amanda Seyfried) tries to find out who her biological father is. Blood Diamond (2006) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 8.00pm The diamond industry of Sierra Leone is the subject of this striking thriller. Djimon Hounsou stars as a fisherman forced to work in the fields, who finds and hides a rare pink gem. His life is changed when he meets Leonardo DiCaprio’s self-serving mercenary and Jennifer Connelly’s well-meaning journalist. DiCaprio was Oscar-nominated, but lost to Forest Whitaker for The Last King of Scotland. Tuesday 12 December Paul Ready, Diane Morgan and Anna Maxwell-Martin Credit: BBC Motherland BBC Two, 10.00pm Dispensing with the calamitous set pieces of previous episodes and instead documenting the quiet desperation of this ill-starred band of sisters (plus one brother), this superb, exhausting sitcom from a writing supergroup including Graham Linehan and Sharon Horgan has been an exquisitely painful delight. We join Julia (Anna Maxwell Martin) in an unusually good place, with everything running smoothly thanks to her new Australian nanny, Lyndsey (Sarah Kendall). The kids are clean and happy, the school run is easy, the fridge is stocked – but could she be too good to be true? Amanda (Lucy Punch) has gone to ground after the revelation over her threesome, while her hapless confidant, Kevin (Paul Ready), is desperate to avoid having to get a job. And, should all the mugging get too much, there’s deadpan Liz (Diane Morgan), negotiating tricky relations with her dismal ex and his new, pregnant partner. After an orgy of passive aggression and desperate people in denial, the façades crack, just a little. Happily everyone reverts to fundamentally appalling type just in time for the end of the series and a surely inevitable recommission. GT Judd Apatow: the Return Netflix, from today After 25 years away from stand-up, the comedy zelig whose fingerprints are over everything from Knocked Up and Girls to Freaks and Geeks and Bridesmaids returns for a special set in Montreal, recorded in July. GT Masterchef: the Professionals BBC Two, 8.00pm After the hopefuls have tackled an invention test and rustled up a dish dedicated to one of their inspirations, Marcus Wareing, Monica Galletti and Gregg Wallace eliminate another two contenders, leaving only six in the contest. GT The A Word BBC One, 9.00pm Joe’s (brilliant Max Vento) family comes together for an end of year show at his old school – tears, acrimony and reconciliation ensue in the conclusion of Peter Bowker’s finely wrought, well-performed drama. A third series should surely be a formality. GT Invasion! with Sam Willis BBC Four, 9.00pm While not quite attaining Lucy Worsley levels of gonzo history, Dr Sam Willis is an enthusiastic and knowledgeable host not above the odd stunt to prove a point. This second episode of a series documenting the incursions that have shaped our nation and its bloodline examines the differing techniques and goals of the invaders. There are the Barbary Corsaire pirates who settled on Lundy Island, King Louis the Lion, invited to invade and crowned by disgruntled nobles, and the Dutch forces that negotiated the Medway just a year prior to the Glorious Revolution. Further proof, if any were needed, that Britain is a mongrel nation and all the better for it. GT The World’s Most Expensive Presents Channel 4, 9.00pm Eyeball-melting opulence and appalling lack of taste do battle with considerable craftsmanship and class in this startling film featuring everything from gold-plated pushbikes to a poker set in alligator-hide case. GT Sports Personality of the Year 2017: The Contenders BBC One, 10.45pm; Wales, 11.10pm; Scotland, 11.45pm With reigning title-holder Andy Murray’s injury-hit year effectively ruling him out of contention, Anthony Joshua, Chris Froome, Lewis Hamilton, Jo Konta and Mo Farah will be headlining this year’s roster after another 12 months of outstanding achievement in British sport. The runners and riders are introduced tonight. GT Shane (1953) ★★★★☆ Film4, 3.45pm There are few Westerns that examine the depths of human emotions, but this film by George Stevens is one of them and has become a landmark of cinema. Shane (Alan Ladd) is a cowboy who finds himself idolised for the way that he handles himself in the face of a landowner’s heavies. The climax is a face-off between Shane and smiling, whispering, Oscar-nominated Jack Palance, as the original man in black. A must-see. Mr & Mrs Smith (2005) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 9.00pm A daft comedy thriller which is perhaps best remembered for being the film that introduced Brad Pitt to Angelina Jolie. They play a couple whose failing marriage is spiced up dramatically when each discovers that the other secretly works as an assassin. Let down by a weak script, the film is held together by the chemistry between its two leads. Vince Vaughn and Adam Brody co-star. Moonraker (1979) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm The 11th film in the Bond series, and the fourth to star Roger Moore as the dapper MI6 agent, involves the theft of a space shuttle. It’s one of the weaker Bond films and at times seems more of a comedy than a tense action adventure, but it’s enjoyably frivolous. Michael Lonsdale plays resident baddie Hugo Drax who pinches the aforementioned space shuttle to help along his plan to wipe out the world’s population. Wednesday 13 December Barbara Schulz in Vanished by the Lake Credit: Channel 4 Vanished by the Lake Channel 4, 10.00pm This haunting French crime drama centres on a teenage girl who goes missing at a festival. It’s hardly an original set-up, but much like last year’s hit Gallic import The Disappearance, based on an almost identical premise, the mix of youthful promise cut short and fierce small-town intrigue quickly compels. The girl in question is Chloé Delval (Charlie Joirkin), and as news of her disappearance spreads, memories of a similar 15-year-old case in which two other girls vanished at the same celebration are revived. Into the fray steps striking Parisian detective Lise Stocker (Barbara Schulz), who has returned home to look after her ill mother, but is soon swept up by the case as its personal implications begin to unfold. All of the hallmarks of the Nordic noir genre are present, from the evocative setting (here a Broadchurch-style coastal backdrop) to the close-knit neighbours with secrets to hide. Nevertheless, this opening episode is an effective tension builder and the human impact of the mystery – particularly on Chloé’s fracturing parents – is powerfully moving. Once episode one finishes, the full series will be available to watch on All 4. TD Mary Berry’s Country House Secrets BBC One, 8.00pm Mary Berry rounds off her tour of Britain’s stately homes at Goodwood House, where she is suitably gushing over its royal history and grand interiors. Berry is treated to a hair-raising lap of the nearby motor circuit and whips up a four-tier cake for the cricket tea. TD The Secret Life of the Zoo Channel 4, 8.00pm The plight of the endangered Javan green magpie is on the agenda as keepers at Chester Zoo attempt to breed youngster Permata with older bird Netuba. Elsewhere, a zebra battle breaks out when newcomer Okoth arrives. TD Peaky Blinders BBC Two, 9.00pm A burst of gunfire opens the penultimate episode of period gangster antics, as Tommy Shelby (Cillian Murphy) faces off against mafia honcho Luca Changretta (Adrien Brody). An army colonel, meanwhile, questions Ada (Sophie Rundle) about her Communist past. TD The Channel: The World’s Busiest Waterway Channel 4, 9.00pm The fallout from Project Nemo, the new underwater electricity cable being laid between Belgium and Britain, is explored. We follow the Nemo manager struggling to avoid costly delays and the fisherman whose catch is being compromised by the work. TD Royal Academy: Painting the Future Sky Arts, 9.00pm Virtual reality (VR) is predicted to become the go-to place for everything from entertainment to work. The Royal Academy is getting in on the act with a new exhibition which explores the potential of the medium. This film follows the show’s creation with the artists, including sculptor Antony Gormley, portraitist Jonathan Yeo and Turner Prize-nominee Yinka Shonibare, who are producing works that use the technology to trace the history of the body in art. TD David Hockney: Time Reclaimed Sky Arts, 10.30pm This tribute to David Hockney aims to get beyond the glamour that surrounds his reputation, and focus on the personal aspects of his work. Anecdotes, images and analysis of the pictures themselves highlight the individuality expressed in each period of Hockney’s career, suggesting a diverse oeuvre that defies classification. TD Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am George Roy Hill directed two of the most popular films ever: Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969) and The Sting (1973). But this indifferent Julie Andrews musical of the flapper era was first. There’s much to enjoy in the story of a naive woman who leaves her rural roots behind to seek fortune and romance in Twenties New York. James Fox, as a spiffing salesman, is a particular highlight. The Three Musketeers (2011) ★★☆☆☆ E4, 8.00pm Paul W S Anderson’s adaptation of Alexandre Dumas’ novel is faithful in plot – Porthos, Athos and Aramis (Ray Stevenson, Matthew Macfadyen, Luke Evans), and disciple d’Artagnan (Logan Lerman), are sent to retrieve the French Queen’s (Juno Temple) necklace. The tone, however, is half action-pantomime, half candy-coloured steampunk comic – fun but terribly slapdash. Poltergeist (1982) ★★★★☆ TCM, 11.15pm Director Tobe Hooper, who made The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, tones down the gut-churning horror but still ramps up the tension to nightmare levels in this Steven Spielberg-produced chiller. It has one of cinema’s most spine-tinglingly scary moments: “They’re here,” sing-songs a little girl kneeling before the TV. “They” are the spirits, at first playful then increasingly malevolent, who terrorise a suburban family. Thursday 14 December Lord Sugar Credit: BBC The Apprentice: Why I Fired Them BBC One, 8.00pm In the wake of last night’s excoriating interview round, and with this Sunday’s final rapidly approaching to decide who will win a £250,000 investment and the mentoring opportunity of a lifetime, Lord Sugar makes his most personal appearance of the series. Other than those brief to-camera inserts that roll out as taxi cabs ferry freshly defenestrated candidates away from Sugar Towers to forever dream of fortunes that might have been made, this is one of few occasions in each “process” when Lord Sugar appears on screen away from the wannabe tycoons and talking to viewers directly. And he makes the most of it with his trademark witty-gritty line in East End charm, although professionalism usually prevents him from really dishing the behind-the-scenes dirt on why he thought 16 of them worthy only of the tip of his boot. Instead he looks back over this 13th series identifying the key commercial and strategic errors that led to each of his firing finger decisions, and what ultimately marked out the two finalists from the others. It’s a lot to get through in an hour but, as series recaps go, it’s usually a hoot. GO Ashes Cricket: Australia v England BT Sport 1, 1.30am The enduring Ashes Down Under conundrum: wake up early to watch it or stay up late? The third Test, held at the WACA Ground in Perth, gets under way in the early hours of Thursday morning, with England hoping to bounce back from two demoralising defeats. Lose this one and captain Joe Root will have to surrender the urn to the Aussies. PS European Tour Golf: The Indonesian Masters Sky Sports Main Event, 6.00am It’s the opening day of the tournament at the Royale Jakarta Golf Club, where Thailand’s Poom Saksansin won the title last year. Saksansin shot an overall score of 270 to finish on -18, five strokes ahead of joint runners-up Masahiro Kawamura of Japan and fellow Thai players Phachara Khongwatmai and Suradit Yongcharoenchai. PS Amazing Spaces Snow and Ice Special Channel 4, 8.00pm George Clarke and his inventive sidekick Will Hardie travel to Norway’s remoter parts to check out why this small country on the edge of Europe punches above its weight in architecture and design. Could it be something to do with the cold weather, they wonder? GO Love, Lies & Records BBC One, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama about the romance of working at a Leeds registry office delivers on melodrama, if not subtlety. In this penultimate episode Kate (Ashley Jensen) struggles to make a decision after Rob’s (Adrian Bower) surprise proposal. GO Blitz: the Bombs That Changed Britain BBC Two, 9.00pm The final edition looks at the horrific impact of German incendiary bombs, in particular one that set a church ablaze in Bristol in November 1940 and started a firestorm that ravaged the city’s historic centre. GO The Tunnel: Vengeance Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Sky’s award-winning version of The Bridge (its milieu that of British and French police teams linked by the Channel Tunnel) returns for a third and final run. A pity, as Stephen Dillane as spiky detective and Clémence Poésy as his emotionally remote French opposite number make an appealing pair. This first of six episodes packs in plenty of action as the pair set out to find the link between a burnt-out trawler and a maintenance worker attacked by a plague of rats. GO Extraordinary Teens: School of Life and Deaf Channel 4, 10.00pm This absorbing film follows a year in the life of Mary Hare Boarding School for deaf pupils in Berkshire. Seen through the eyes of a 15-year-old about to undergo a potentially life-changing cochlear implant, this film gives a profound sense of the physical and emotional complexities of growing up deaf. GO The Russell Howard Hour Sky One, 10.00pm We’ve reached the penultimate episode of this excellent topical comedy series. It’s little more than an extended version of BBC Three’s (and later BBC Two’s) Good News but that’s exactly what fans (and Sky, who snapped Howard up) wanted and he has delivered, pushing his brand of highly topical, politically aware, positive reinforcement stand-up with aplomb. GO Life (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Daniel Espinosa’s Earth-orbiting suspense flick was released less than two months before Ridley Scott’s new chapter in his Alien franchise, and bears many of the same hallmarks. It’s also a little bit Gravity. Ryan Reynolds is one of a crew of astronauts aboard a space station conducting research into life on Mars. In terms of entertainment, the film does its baseline job of getting you to chew your nails off. There’s Something About Mary (1998) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 9.00pm There are bad taste jokes in abundance in this comedy from the Farrelly Brothers. Ben Stiller stars as Ted, a shy man who realises he’s still in love with Mary (Cameron Diaz, proving her comic abilities), the date he tried to take to prom 13 years ago. So, to track her down, he hires an oily private eye (Matt Dillon) who also fallsin love with her and sets out to keep the pair apart. Gone in 60 Seconds (2000) ★★★☆☆ Universal Channel, 9.00pm Nicolas Cage has top billing in Dominic Sena’s remake of the 1974 cult film – a mind-numbingly testosterone-laced ride. Cage and Angelina Jolie are among a crew of thieves who must steal 50 cars in 72 hours to stop the murder of Cage’s brother. It’s more than serviceable entertainment, plus car aficionados will have fun spotting the Cadillacs and Corvettes. Friday 15 December Paul, Andy, Cynthia and Diana in The Sweet Makers Credit: BBC The Sweet Makers at Christmas BBC Two, 9.00pm Following their enjoyable three-part series earlier this year, BBC Two’s Sweet Makers return for this one-off Christmas special looking at changing treats from Georgian times to the Twenties. As before, the show is a lovely mix of baking and interesting social history with Emma Dabiri and Dr Annie Gray, who fill us in on how each era viewed Christmas and how confectionery changes over time. The show’s highlight comes during the Victorian Era, also known as the moment when Christmas as we know it was invented, as chocolatiers Paul A Young and Diane Short, bespoke cake decorator Cynthia Stroud and sweet consultant Andy Baxendale recreate a Boar’s Head cake. “That’s the most bonkers thing we’ve ever made,” notes Young, looking at the finished result, which is rich in chocolate, beautifully decorated and featuring unnervingly glazed eyes. He’s right but it also looks fabulous, as do the intricate Twelfth Cakes, a speciality in Georgian times. The Twenties brings with it the wonderful news that before Terry’s invented the chocolate orange they introduced the chocolate apple to the world, before looking to the future and the invention of Lord Mackintosh’s Quality Street. SH Jean-Claude Van Johnson Amazon Prime Video, from today This delightfully silly new series sees Jean-Claude Van Damme as a retired action film star with a secret: he’s a special agent and he wants back in the game. It’s inspired mayhem anchored by a winning performance from the laconic Van Damme. SH Trollhunters Netflix, from today Guillermo del Toro’s inventive animation returns for a second series, and it features the voice of the late Anton Yelchin as reluctant hero Jim Lake Jnr. The story continues where the first series left off, and sees Jim adventure deeper into the Troll world to battle the leader of the Darklands. This series also features Mark Hamill and Game of Thrones’s Lena Headey. SH Judge Rinder’s Crown Court ITV, 8.00pm; not STV or UTV; Wales, 11.10pm Judge Rinder’s reboot of classic Seventies series Crown Court might lack the big-name actors of the original but its meld of real-life crime and courtroom drama is just as addictive. Tonight, the jury decides if James Byron (Rupert Young) murdered his wife. SH Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Sarah Millican is a brave guest of Oliver and Doherty – brave because it swiftly transpires that cooking really isn’t her thing. But Oliver manages to bite his tongue while showing her how to cook her favourite microwave meal from scratch. SH Have I Got News for You BBC One, 9.00pm The 54th series of the satirical news quiz comes to an end with the ever-reliable David Tennant in the host’s chair. It has been a patchy series, which was marked by a new low when Jo Brand had to explain why sexual harassment jokes weren’t funny to the male panellists. So let’s hope it goes out on a high. SH Roy Orbison: Love Hurts BBC Four, 9.30pm Roy Orbison’s three sons, Wesley, Roy Jnr and Alex, take centre stage to discuss their father in this emotional documentary. SH The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm Prepare for Star Wars: The Last Jedi overload as John Boyega, Daisy Ridley and Mark Hamill join Norton on the sofa. Don’t expect any spoilers but there’s sure to be some nice eulogies to the late Carrie Fisher. SH Before I Go to Sleep (2014) ★★★☆☆ More4, 9.00pm Nicole Kidman and Colin Firth star in this uninvolving thriller based on SJ Watson’s twisty bestseller. Kidman plays a woman who, after suffering a head injury, has no idea who she is or who the man sleeping next to her might be (it’s Colin Firth, playing her husband). She keeps a daily video diary but starts to notice discrepancies between what she’s recorded and what Firth tells her. The Pledge (2001) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 9.00pm A tense mystery directed by Sean Penn with a fine cast including Jack Nicholson, Helen Mirren, Robin Wright Penn, Aaron Eckhart and Vanessa Redgrave. Nicholson is a detective who has to handle a horrific case on the day of his retirement – the murder of a seven-year-old girl. He promises to bring the killer to justice, only to find that the case is far from straightforward. A powerful, unsettling film. Hyena (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.15pm This violent thriller about corrupt drug-squad officers is very violent indeed, so be prepared to cover your eyes for some parts of writer-director Gerard Johnson’s film. Michael Logan (an intense Peter Ferdinand) is the leader of this special force, assigned to tackle drug trafficking among the Balkan gangs. Stephen Graham, as his dubious boss, is as reliable as ever. Above all, it’s a grisly exploration of the criminal mind. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: John Noakes: TV Hero, the Strictly semi-final and more

Saturday 9 December John Noakes: TV Hero BBC Two, 5.30pm One quarter of the definitive Blue Peter foursome, alongside Peter Purves, Valerie Singleton and Shep, John Noakes was both its longest-serving presenter and one of its very finest. A gifted communicator, earnest when he had to be but more often game for anything, whether that be a laugh or a lunatic stunt. This affectionate profile of Noakes, who died in May, aged 83, after many years with Alzheimer’s, pivots on perhaps his two best-loved moments. First, there’s a climb up Nelson’s Column, sans ropes or safety harnesses, that was every bit as daft and dangerous as it looked and ample testament to his dauntlessness. That impish sense of humour is demonstrated by the notorious appearance of Lulu the elephant, who relieved herself on the floor before rampaging across the studio and over Noakes’s foot. Ever the entertainer, he milked both for all they were worth. His relationship with the series was an equivocal one and he reportedly resented his clownish persona, but this tribute skirts any controversy in favour of warm nostalgia, with familiar Blue Peter faces including Biddy Baxter and Lesley Judd recalling the man and his work. GT Premier League Football: West Ham United v Chelsea Sky Sports Main Event, 11.30am Having recovered from a goal down to beat Newcastle 3-1 last Saturday, with Eden Hazard helping himself to a brace, Chelsea travel across London to face West Ham United. The home side, who are currently in the relegation zone, will have taken plenty of positives from their 2-1 defeat at Manchester City last Sunday – namely, their defensive display. A similarly obdurate performance here and new manager David Moyes might get a share of the spoils this time. When these sides met at the London Stadium last season, West Ham lost 2-1. PS European Rugby Champions Cup: Toulon v Bath Sky Sports Main Event, 5.15pm Two wins from two reads the stats for both sides so far in this season’s European Champions Cup – at least one of these 100 per cent records will end at Stade Mayol. Bath come into this match on the back of a 42-29 defeat by Exeter, but before that they’d won four on the bounce, with Freddie Burns impressing at fly-half. After the autumn internationals, director of rugby Todd Blackadder now has an embarrassment of riches from which to pick: most notably, England backs Anthony Watson, Semesa Rokoduguni and Jonathan Joseph. Toulon, meanwhile, ended a three-match losing streak on Saturday when they beat Lyon 39-11. PS Strictly Come Dancing BBC One, 6.45pm The five remaining couples must perform two routines in this semi-final, and with barely a strand of lace between them, expect forensic criticism from the judges. Sunday’s results show will reveal the final four and there will be a performance from Craig David. GT Michael McIntyre’s Big Show BBC One, 8.20pm Wringing his contacts book dry, McIntyre ropes in guests including TV presenters Marvin and Rochelle Humes (taking part in the game Send to All) and pop rock band The Vamps for more fun. GT Witnesses: a Frozen Death BBC Four, 9.00pm and 9.55pm Even in this saturated market for foreign-language thrillers, Witnesses stands out for its lack of gimmicks – though without ever quite scaling the heights of The Bridge or Spiral. Here, Sandra’s (Marie Dompnier) pursuit of the killer takes her into a forest and an orphanage. GT The White Princess Drama, 9.00pm and 10.20pm The excellent Jodie Comer anchors the series to its conclusion tonight with another double bill, as Elizabeth of York (Comer) and Henry VII (Jacob Collins-Levy) struggle to maintain a united front. GT Peter Blake: Pop Art Life Sky Arts, 9.00pm While there is more to Peter Blake’s work than his cover for Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, music has played a crucial role in the development of his art and reputation. This engaging film digs deeply into a mutually fruitful relationship. GT Casualty BBC One, 9.20pm Christmas approaches, bringing annual trauma and discord for the A&E team. Tonight finds Elle’s (Jaye Griffiths) tearaway son Blake (Kai Thorne) going off the rails in response to her suggestion that she spend the festive period with her new boyfriend. Polly (Sophia Di Martino), meanwhile, continues to be unimpressed by Max (Jamie Davis). GT Through the Keyhole: I’m a Celebrity… get me out of here! ITV, 9.50pm The living, breathing definition of an acquired taste, Keith Lemon returns for a fifth series of the show once helmed by David Frost. Guests include Jimmy Carr, Myleene Klass and Tony Blackburn. GT Gremlins 2: The New Batch (1990) ★★★☆☆ Christmas Gold, 9.40pm Whereas Joe Dante’s original monster hit was a deliciously dark horror flick (and staple Christmas hit) with touches of wry humour, this inferior sequel is essentially a straight-up, riotous comedy, replete with in-jokes and movie references. This time, the gremlins run amok in a Manhattan high-rise building called Clamp Tower, owned by John Glover’s Donald Trump-like mogul. The Cider House Rules (1999) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.15pm John Irving’s adaptation of his own 1985 novel features a fine Tobey Maguire and Michael Caine, who won an Oscar (only his second at the time). Irving won one too, for Best Screenplay, and there’s no doubt the story is moving, though this version – about an orphan (Maguire) and a doctor (Caine) who performs illegal abortions – is at times a bit saccharine. Paul Rudd co-stars; Lasse Hallström directs. The Drop (2014) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 11.35pm Tom Hardy anchors this tale of simmering malfeasance as the tender of a Brooklyn bar designated as the drop for ill-gotten gains. Dennis Lehane adapts his own short story Animal Rescue, and makes a perfect team with Belgian director Michaël R Roskam, who gets a tamped-down, shuffling and beautifully calibrated star turn out of Hardy. Sopranos star James Gandolfini adds a burly gravitas in what would be his final movie. Sunday 10 December Jumbo with keeper Matthew Scott in 1882 Credit: BBC Attenborough and the Giant Elephant BBC One, 9.00pm Can we ever have too much Attenborough? It seems not, as right in the foaming wake of the fabulous Blue Planet II (which concludes tonight, see preview below) comes this absorbing, bittersweet tale of the world’s first animal superstar – Jumbo the elephant. It’s a sad story, really. Jumbo shot to fame shortly after his arrival at London Zoo as an orphan in around 1861, but he didn’t get much from the deal. As Attenborough says, his captive life was “troubled, fuelled by alcohol, terrifying fits of violence, a near mystical relationship with his keeper and a tragic end that seems hard to believe”. Which is more than enough to hold the attention for an hour as he joins an international team examining Jumbo’s preserved skeleton at New York’s Museum of Natural History. Attenborough also pokes about in archives at London Zoo, sanctuaries in the Maasai Mara and Tennessee, and Ontario where Jumbo met his very sad end, building as complete a picture of this magnificent creature and his global travels as has ever been assembled. All the while it spreads a positive conservationist message and gives thanks that attitudes are more enlightened now than in Victorian times. GO Premier League Football: Liverpool v Everton & Manchester United v Manchester City Sky Sports Main Event, 1.15pm & 4.15pm “Super Sunday” lives up to its hyperbolic billing, with two potentially exhilarating derbies. First up, we’re at Anfield where Liverpool, fresh from their 5-1 demolition of Brighton, host Everton, who found some form last week, following up their 4-0 win at home to West Ham United with a 2-0 victory against Huddersfield. Later, in the 4.30pm kick-off, José Mourinho and Pep Guardiola renew rivalries as second-placed United host leaders City at Old Trafford. Expect it to be tight. PS Britain’s Wildest Weather 2017 Channel 4, 6.30pm This year has not, so far, been as extreme as some but, given the number of smartphone-wielding citizen journalists, there’s plenty of jaw-dropping footage of every extreme weather event that occurred, among them devastating floods, tornadoes and hair-raising lightning strikes. GO  Blue Planet II BBC One, 8.00pm This extraordinary series concludes with an undeniably depressing assessment of mankind’s impact on the marine environment. But David Attenborough, as ever, prefers to put the emphasis on hope. So there’s plenty of uplift too with stories of species brought back from extinction’s brink. GO Coastal Railways with Julie Walters Channel 4, 8.00pm Julie Walters heads for Cornwall on the Great Western route, recalling her childhood holidays in Torquay. She then boards a steam train at Paignton, hears tales of smugglers in Polperro and fills up on cakes in Penzance. GO Leonora Carrington: the Lost Surrealist BBC Four, 9.00pm This fascinating film tells the story of rebellious upper-class British artist Leonora Carrington, who worked alongside Ernst, Breton and Éluard in Paris at the height of the surrealist movement, yet died in 2011 all but forgotten in Mexico. Director Teresa Griffiths mixes interviews and biographical material with experimental animation and tableaux to bring Carrington’s work vividly to life. GO I’m a Celebrity… Get Me Out of Here! ITV, 9.00pm Seventeen series in and the public appetite for watching celebrities endure humiliation and repulsion shows little sign of drying up. This year’s launch pulled in ITV’s biggest audience of 2017. The final will no doubt draw as big a crowd again. GO Babylon Berlin Sky Atlantic, from 9.00pm Three more atmospheric episodes of the gripping crime series set in the bohemian, political Weimar Germany of the late Twenties. Detective Rath’s (Volker Bruch) investigation uncovers dangerous evidence of a shocking military conspiracy. GO The Sky At Night BBC Four, 10.00pm As well as more stargazing from the Royal Observatory, Maggie Aderin-Pocock is in Norway to see the Northern Lights. GO Ben-Hur (1959) ★★★★★ ITV3, 2.45pm A majestic slice of Hollywood history, this Roman-era melodrama directed by William Wyler and starring Charlton Heston won 11 Academy Awards (not equalled until Titanic in 1997). It still makes for magnificent viewing. Set in 26AD, it tells the story of a Jewish prince who clashes with the Roman governor and ends up enslaved, desperately plotting his revenge. The Sorcerer’s Apprentice (2010) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 3.00pm Jerry Bruckheimer gives the famous sequence from Disney’s Fantasia a fun, live-action reboot. Student Dave (Jay Baruchel) inherits Merlin’s powers, placing him in a power struggle between Balthazar (Nicolas Cage) and Horvath (Alfred Molina). Sadly there are just two scenes with broomsticks to link it to the original. Toby Kebbel is amusing as a stage musician co-opted by the forces of evil. Toy Story (1995) ★★★★★ BBC One, 3.35pm The idea of the first fully computer-generated animated film didn’t have those who had been weaned on the hand-drawn delights of Disney jumping for joy. However, with this beautiful tale, Pixar pushed animation to a new level – the premise, pace and emotion are all pitched perfectly. Whether it’s your first or 400th viewing, the story of toy cowboy Woody (Tom Hanks) and plastic spaceman Buzz Lightyear (Tim Allen) is a joy. Monday 11 December Faye Marsa, Sarah Parish and Amara Karan in Bancroft Credit: ITV Bancroft ITV, 9.00pm With so many crime dramas clogging up the television schedules it can be hard for a new series to stand out and at first ITV’s latest four-parter seems unlikely to break the mould. There’s an ambitious female cop with a possibly troubled past (the always reliable Sarah Parish), a striving younger cop who is desperate to move up the ranks (Faye Marsay) and the usual crop of jobsworths and strivers (Charles Babalola is particularly good as the married fellow officer Marsay’s Katherine should be steering well clear of). It’s all perfectly well done with a solid script from Kate Brooke (Mr Selfridge) but it seems like nothing special. Then, three quarters of the way through this first episode, something genuinely interesting happens: Bancroft’s secrets are revealed to be very dark indeed just as Katherine’s cold case involving the break-in and violent murder of a young woman in 1990 starts hotting up. With the stakes suddenly raised Bancroft spins off into a dark tale of the lengths that people go to keep the past buried and the stage is set for an intriguing game of secrets and lies. Smart scheduling sees the rest of the story play out over consecutive nights. SH Street Auction BBC One, 11.00am Paul Martin returns with a new series of the surprisingly addictive show in which people band together to raise funds for a member of their community by auctioning off hidden treasures. The fun comes from the unusual objects unearthed from garages and attics. SH Nigella’s Christmas Table BBC Two, 8.00pm If anything is guaranteed to Nigella put into purring overload it’s Christmas. The food on offer includes roast duck with orange, soy and ginger, but this is really about mood rather than food. SH   Paul Hollywood: A Baker’s Life Channel 4, 8.00pm Episode three of this genial series sees Hollywood looking back over his career and his time spent working at the Cliveden House Hotel in Berkshire. There’s also a festive get-together in Merseyside and some seasonal Danish pastries, which look delicious. SH The Art That Made Mexico: Paradise, Power and Prayers BBC Four, 9.00pm It’s always a pleasure to find a series that sheds new light on a subject, and so it is with artist Alinka Echeverria’s enthralling films about Mexico’s art. Of course, there are the key points: conquest, independence, dictatorship, revolution and figures such as Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo, but what the commentary gives us here is the context for both the history and the artists. This is true of this episode that looks at the relationship between art and power, colonialism and control while examining the enduring power of Kahlo’s work and myth. SH Handmade in Mexico BBC Four, 10.00pm The focus here is on Mexico’s celebrated Tree of Life sculptures, those gaudy, gorgeous interpretations of everything from the creation myth to the resurrection of Christ and the Day of the Dead. It’s a fascinating half-hour in which we see the amount of work and detail that goes into each piece. SH White Right: Meeting the Enemy: Exposure ITV, 10.40pm; STV, 11.05pm; UTV, 11.40pm; Wales, 11.10pm This intriguing-sounding documentary sees the Bafta-nominated Deeyah Khan (Jihad: A Story of the Others) investigate white extremism in the US. Khan visits white nationalist groups, attends a far-right rally and asks why this poisonous ideology is resurgent. SH The Black Swan (1942) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 2.35pm No, this is not the film about the ageing ballet dancer and the young ingénue; this is about high adventure on the seven seas. When Laird Cregar’s Captain Morgan becomes Governor of Jamaica, he promises to put an end to piracy. But things don’t go smoothly, especially when his assistant (Tyrone Power) kidnaps the ex-governor’s beautiful daughter (Maureen O’Hara). This was the final film of silent star Helene Costello. Mamma Mia! (2008) ★★★☆☆ ITV3, 7.50pm This musical comedy, directed by Phyllida Lloyd and set to Abba’s hits, is pure escapism. It’s naff, but that’s its selling point, as stars Meryl Streep, Pierce Brosnan and Julie Walters place tongues firmly in cheeks. At 59, Streep deserved more credit for doing the splits than for her role as a boho mother living on a Greek island whose daughter (Amanda Seyfried) tries to find out who her biological father is. Blood Diamond (2006) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 8.00pm The diamond industry of Sierra Leone is the subject of this striking thriller. Djimon Hounsou stars as a fisherman forced to work in the fields, who finds and hides a rare pink gem. His life is changed when he meets Leonardo DiCaprio’s self-serving mercenary and Jennifer Connelly’s well-meaning journalist. DiCaprio was Oscar-nominated, but lost to Forest Whitaker for The Last King of Scotland. Tuesday 12 December Paul Ready, Diane Morgan and Anna Maxwell-Martin Credit: BBC Motherland BBC Two, 10.00pm Dispensing with the calamitous set pieces of previous episodes and instead documenting the quiet desperation of this ill-starred band of sisters (plus one brother), this superb, exhausting sitcom from a writing supergroup including Graham Linehan and Sharon Horgan has been an exquisitely painful delight. We join Julia (Anna Maxwell Martin) in an unusually good place, with everything running smoothly thanks to her new Australian nanny, Lyndsey (Sarah Kendall). The kids are clean and happy, the school run is easy, the fridge is stocked – but could she be too good to be true? Amanda (Lucy Punch) has gone to ground after the revelation over her threesome, while her hapless confidant, Kevin (Paul Ready), is desperate to avoid having to get a job. And, should all the mugging get too much, there’s deadpan Liz (Diane Morgan), negotiating tricky relations with her dismal ex and his new, pregnant partner. After an orgy of passive aggression and desperate people in denial, the façades crack, just a little. Happily everyone reverts to fundamentally appalling type just in time for the end of the series and a surely inevitable recommission. GT Judd Apatow: the Return Netflix, from today After 25 years away from stand-up, the comedy zelig whose fingerprints are over everything from Knocked Up and Girls to Freaks and Geeks and Bridesmaids returns for a special set in Montreal, recorded in July. GT Masterchef: the Professionals BBC Two, 8.00pm After the hopefuls have tackled an invention test and rustled up a dish dedicated to one of their inspirations, Marcus Wareing, Monica Galletti and Gregg Wallace eliminate another two contenders, leaving only six in the contest. GT The A Word BBC One, 9.00pm Joe’s (brilliant Max Vento) family comes together for an end of year show at his old school – tears, acrimony and reconciliation ensue in the conclusion of Peter Bowker’s finely wrought, well-performed drama. A third series should surely be a formality. GT Invasion! with Sam Willis BBC Four, 9.00pm While not quite attaining Lucy Worsley levels of gonzo history, Dr Sam Willis is an enthusiastic and knowledgeable host not above the odd stunt to prove a point. This second episode of a series documenting the incursions that have shaped our nation and its bloodline examines the differing techniques and goals of the invaders. There are the Barbary Corsaire pirates who settled on Lundy Island, King Louis the Lion, invited to invade and crowned by disgruntled nobles, and the Dutch forces that negotiated the Medway just a year prior to the Glorious Revolution. Further proof, if any were needed, that Britain is a mongrel nation and all the better for it. GT The World’s Most Expensive Presents Channel 4, 9.00pm Eyeball-melting opulence and appalling lack of taste do battle with considerable craftsmanship and class in this startling film featuring everything from gold-plated pushbikes to a poker set in alligator-hide case. GT Sports Personality of the Year 2017: The Contenders BBC One, 10.45pm; Wales, 11.10pm; Scotland, 11.45pm With reigning title-holder Andy Murray’s injury-hit year effectively ruling him out of contention, Anthony Joshua, Chris Froome, Lewis Hamilton, Jo Konta and Mo Farah will be headlining this year’s roster after another 12 months of outstanding achievement in British sport. The runners and riders are introduced tonight. GT Shane (1953) ★★★★☆ Film4, 3.45pm There are few Westerns that examine the depths of human emotions, but this film by George Stevens is one of them and has become a landmark of cinema. Shane (Alan Ladd) is a cowboy who finds himself idolised for the way that he handles himself in the face of a landowner’s heavies. The climax is a face-off between Shane and smiling, whispering, Oscar-nominated Jack Palance, as the original man in black. A must-see. Mr & Mrs Smith (2005) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 9.00pm A daft comedy thriller which is perhaps best remembered for being the film that introduced Brad Pitt to Angelina Jolie. They play a couple whose failing marriage is spiced up dramatically when each discovers that the other secretly works as an assassin. Let down by a weak script, the film is held together by the chemistry between its two leads. Vince Vaughn and Adam Brody co-star. Moonraker (1979) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm The 11th film in the Bond series, and the fourth to star Roger Moore as the dapper MI6 agent, involves the theft of a space shuttle. It’s one of the weaker Bond films and at times seems more of a comedy than a tense action adventure, but it’s enjoyably frivolous. Michael Lonsdale plays resident baddie Hugo Drax who pinches the aforementioned space shuttle to help along his plan to wipe out the world’s population. Wednesday 13 December Barbara Schulz in Vanished by the Lake Credit: Channel 4 Vanished by the Lake Channel 4, 10.00pm This haunting French crime drama centres on a teenage girl who goes missing at a festival. It’s hardly an original set-up, but much like last year’s hit Gallic import The Disappearance, based on an almost identical premise, the mix of youthful promise cut short and fierce small-town intrigue quickly compels. The girl in question is Chloé Delval (Charlie Joirkin), and as news of her disappearance spreads, memories of a similar 15-year-old case in which two other girls vanished at the same celebration are revived. Into the fray steps striking Parisian detective Lise Stocker (Barbara Schulz), who has returned home to look after her ill mother, but is soon swept up by the case as its personal implications begin to unfold. All of the hallmarks of the Nordic noir genre are present, from the evocative setting (here a Broadchurch-style coastal backdrop) to the close-knit neighbours with secrets to hide. Nevertheless, this opening episode is an effective tension builder and the human impact of the mystery – particularly on Chloé’s fracturing parents – is powerfully moving. Once episode one finishes, the full series will be available to watch on All 4. TD Mary Berry’s Country House Secrets BBC One, 8.00pm Mary Berry rounds off her tour of Britain’s stately homes at Goodwood House, where she is suitably gushing over its royal history and grand interiors. Berry is treated to a hair-raising lap of the nearby motor circuit and whips up a four-tier cake for the cricket tea. TD The Secret Life of the Zoo Channel 4, 8.00pm The plight of the endangered Javan green magpie is on the agenda as keepers at Chester Zoo attempt to breed youngster Permata with older bird Netuba. Elsewhere, a zebra battle breaks out when newcomer Okoth arrives. TD Peaky Blinders BBC Two, 9.00pm A burst of gunfire opens the penultimate episode of period gangster antics, as Tommy Shelby (Cillian Murphy) faces off against mafia honcho Luca Changretta (Adrien Brody). An army colonel, meanwhile, questions Ada (Sophie Rundle) about her Communist past. TD The Channel: The World’s Busiest Waterway Channel 4, 9.00pm The fallout from Project Nemo, the new underwater electricity cable being laid between Belgium and Britain, is explored. We follow the Nemo manager struggling to avoid costly delays and the fisherman whose catch is being compromised by the work. TD Royal Academy: Painting the Future Sky Arts, 9.00pm Virtual reality (VR) is predicted to become the go-to place for everything from entertainment to work. The Royal Academy is getting in on the act with a new exhibition which explores the potential of the medium. This film follows the show’s creation with the artists, including sculptor Antony Gormley, portraitist Jonathan Yeo and Turner Prize-nominee Yinka Shonibare, who are producing works that use the technology to trace the history of the body in art. TD David Hockney: Time Reclaimed Sky Arts, 10.30pm This tribute to David Hockney aims to get beyond the glamour that surrounds his reputation, and focus on the personal aspects of his work. Anecdotes, images and analysis of the pictures themselves highlight the individuality expressed in each period of Hockney’s career, suggesting a diverse oeuvre that defies classification. TD Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am George Roy Hill directed two of the most popular films ever: Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969) and The Sting (1973). But this indifferent Julie Andrews musical of the flapper era was first. There’s much to enjoy in the story of a naive woman who leaves her rural roots behind to seek fortune and romance in Twenties New York. James Fox, as a spiffing salesman, is a particular highlight. The Three Musketeers (2011) ★★☆☆☆ E4, 8.00pm Paul W S Anderson’s adaptation of Alexandre Dumas’ novel is faithful in plot – Porthos, Athos and Aramis (Ray Stevenson, Matthew Macfadyen, Luke Evans), and disciple d’Artagnan (Logan Lerman), are sent to retrieve the French Queen’s (Juno Temple) necklace. The tone, however, is half action-pantomime, half candy-coloured steampunk comic – fun but terribly slapdash. Poltergeist (1982) ★★★★☆ TCM, 11.15pm Director Tobe Hooper, who made The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, tones down the gut-churning horror but still ramps up the tension to nightmare levels in this Steven Spielberg-produced chiller. It has one of cinema’s most spine-tinglingly scary moments: “They’re here,” sing-songs a little girl kneeling before the TV. “They” are the spirits, at first playful then increasingly malevolent, who terrorise a suburban family. Thursday 14 December Lord Sugar Credit: BBC The Apprentice: Why I Fired Them BBC One, 8.00pm In the wake of last night’s excoriating interview round, and with this Sunday’s final rapidly approaching to decide who will win a £250,000 investment and the mentoring opportunity of a lifetime, Lord Sugar makes his most personal appearance of the series. Other than those brief to-camera inserts that roll out as taxi cabs ferry freshly defenestrated candidates away from Sugar Towers to forever dream of fortunes that might have been made, this is one of few occasions in each “process” when Lord Sugar appears on screen away from the wannabe tycoons and talking to viewers directly. And he makes the most of it with his trademark witty-gritty line in East End charm, although professionalism usually prevents him from really dishing the behind-the-scenes dirt on why he thought 16 of them worthy only of the tip of his boot. Instead he looks back over this 13th series identifying the key commercial and strategic errors that led to each of his firing finger decisions, and what ultimately marked out the two finalists from the others. It’s a lot to get through in an hour but, as series recaps go, it’s usually a hoot. GO Ashes Cricket: Australia v England BT Sport 1, 1.30am The enduring Ashes Down Under conundrum: wake up early to watch it or stay up late? The third Test, held at the WACA Ground in Perth, gets under way in the early hours of Thursday morning, with England hoping to bounce back from two demoralising defeats. Lose this one and captain Joe Root will have to surrender the urn to the Aussies. PS European Tour Golf: The Indonesian Masters Sky Sports Main Event, 6.00am It’s the opening day of the tournament at the Royale Jakarta Golf Club, where Thailand’s Poom Saksansin won the title last year. Saksansin shot an overall score of 270 to finish on -18, five strokes ahead of joint runners-up Masahiro Kawamura of Japan and fellow Thai players Phachara Khongwatmai and Suradit Yongcharoenchai. PS Amazing Spaces Snow and Ice Special Channel 4, 8.00pm George Clarke and his inventive sidekick Will Hardie travel to Norway’s remoter parts to check out why this small country on the edge of Europe punches above its weight in architecture and design. Could it be something to do with the cold weather, they wonder? GO Love, Lies & Records BBC One, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama about the romance of working at a Leeds registry office delivers on melodrama, if not subtlety. In this penultimate episode Kate (Ashley Jensen) struggles to make a decision after Rob’s (Adrian Bower) surprise proposal. GO Blitz: the Bombs That Changed Britain BBC Two, 9.00pm The final edition looks at the horrific impact of German incendiary bombs, in particular one that set a church ablaze in Bristol in November 1940 and started a firestorm that ravaged the city’s historic centre. GO The Tunnel: Vengeance Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Sky’s award-winning version of The Bridge (its milieu that of British and French police teams linked by the Channel Tunnel) returns for a third and final run. A pity, as Stephen Dillane as spiky detective and Clémence Poésy as his emotionally remote French opposite number make an appealing pair. This first of six episodes packs in plenty of action as the pair set out to find the link between a burnt-out trawler and a maintenance worker attacked by a plague of rats. GO Extraordinary Teens: School of Life and Deaf Channel 4, 10.00pm This absorbing film follows a year in the life of Mary Hare Boarding School for deaf pupils in Berkshire. Seen through the eyes of a 15-year-old about to undergo a potentially life-changing cochlear implant, this film gives a profound sense of the physical and emotional complexities of growing up deaf. GO The Russell Howard Hour Sky One, 10.00pm We’ve reached the penultimate episode of this excellent topical comedy series. It’s little more than an extended version of BBC Three’s (and later BBC Two’s) Good News but that’s exactly what fans (and Sky, who snapped Howard up) wanted and he has delivered, pushing his brand of highly topical, politically aware, positive reinforcement stand-up with aplomb. GO Life (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Daniel Espinosa’s Earth-orbiting suspense flick was released less than two months before Ridley Scott’s new chapter in his Alien franchise, and bears many of the same hallmarks. It’s also a little bit Gravity. Ryan Reynolds is one of a crew of astronauts aboard a space station conducting research into life on Mars. In terms of entertainment, the film does its baseline job of getting you to chew your nails off. There’s Something About Mary (1998) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 9.00pm There are bad taste jokes in abundance in this comedy from the Farrelly Brothers. Ben Stiller stars as Ted, a shy man who realises he’s still in love with Mary (Cameron Diaz, proving her comic abilities), the date he tried to take to prom 13 years ago. So, to track her down, he hires an oily private eye (Matt Dillon) who also fallsin love with her and sets out to keep the pair apart. Gone in 60 Seconds (2000) ★★★☆☆ Universal Channel, 9.00pm Nicolas Cage has top billing in Dominic Sena’s remake of the 1974 cult film – a mind-numbingly testosterone-laced ride. Cage and Angelina Jolie are among a crew of thieves who must steal 50 cars in 72 hours to stop the murder of Cage’s brother. It’s more than serviceable entertainment, plus car aficionados will have fun spotting the Cadillacs and Corvettes. Friday 15 December Paul, Andy, Cynthia and Diana in The Sweet Makers Credit: BBC The Sweet Makers at Christmas BBC Two, 9.00pm Following their enjoyable three-part series earlier this year, BBC Two’s Sweet Makers return for this one-off Christmas special looking at changing treats from Georgian times to the Twenties. As before, the show is a lovely mix of baking and interesting social history with Emma Dabiri and Dr Annie Gray, who fill us in on how each era viewed Christmas and how confectionery changes over time. The show’s highlight comes during the Victorian Era, also known as the moment when Christmas as we know it was invented, as chocolatiers Paul A Young and Diane Short, bespoke cake decorator Cynthia Stroud and sweet consultant Andy Baxendale recreate a Boar’s Head cake. “That’s the most bonkers thing we’ve ever made,” notes Young, looking at the finished result, which is rich in chocolate, beautifully decorated and featuring unnervingly glazed eyes. He’s right but it also looks fabulous, as do the intricate Twelfth Cakes, a speciality in Georgian times. The Twenties brings with it the wonderful news that before Terry’s invented the chocolate orange they introduced the chocolate apple to the world, before looking to the future and the invention of Lord Mackintosh’s Quality Street. SH Jean-Claude Van Johnson Amazon Prime Video, from today This delightfully silly new series sees Jean-Claude Van Damme as a retired action film star with a secret: he’s a special agent and he wants back in the game. It’s inspired mayhem anchored by a winning performance from the laconic Van Damme. SH Trollhunters Netflix, from today Guillermo del Toro’s inventive animation returns for a second series, and it features the voice of the late Anton Yelchin as reluctant hero Jim Lake Jnr. The story continues where the first series left off, and sees Jim adventure deeper into the Troll world to battle the leader of the Darklands. This series also features Mark Hamill and Game of Thrones’s Lena Headey. SH Judge Rinder’s Crown Court ITV, 8.00pm; not STV or UTV; Wales, 11.10pm Judge Rinder’s reboot of classic Seventies series Crown Court might lack the big-name actors of the original but its meld of real-life crime and courtroom drama is just as addictive. Tonight, the jury decides if James Byron (Rupert Young) murdered his wife. SH Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Sarah Millican is a brave guest of Oliver and Doherty – brave because it swiftly transpires that cooking really isn’t her thing. But Oliver manages to bite his tongue while showing her how to cook her favourite microwave meal from scratch. SH Have I Got News for You BBC One, 9.00pm The 54th series of the satirical news quiz comes to an end with the ever-reliable David Tennant in the host’s chair. It has been a patchy series, which was marked by a new low when Jo Brand had to explain why sexual harassment jokes weren’t funny to the male panellists. So let’s hope it goes out on a high. SH Roy Orbison: Love Hurts BBC Four, 9.30pm Roy Orbison’s three sons, Wesley, Roy Jnr and Alex, take centre stage to discuss their father in this emotional documentary. SH The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm Prepare for Star Wars: The Last Jedi overload as John Boyega, Daisy Ridley and Mark Hamill join Norton on the sofa. Don’t expect any spoilers but there’s sure to be some nice eulogies to the late Carrie Fisher. SH Before I Go to Sleep (2014) ★★★☆☆ More4, 9.00pm Nicole Kidman and Colin Firth star in this uninvolving thriller based on SJ Watson’s twisty bestseller. Kidman plays a woman who, after suffering a head injury, has no idea who she is or who the man sleeping next to her might be (it’s Colin Firth, playing her husband). She keeps a daily video diary but starts to notice discrepancies between what she’s recorded and what Firth tells her. The Pledge (2001) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 9.00pm A tense mystery directed by Sean Penn with a fine cast including Jack Nicholson, Helen Mirren, Robin Wright Penn, Aaron Eckhart and Vanessa Redgrave. Nicholson is a detective who has to handle a horrific case on the day of his retirement – the murder of a seven-year-old girl. He promises to bring the killer to justice, only to find that the case is far from straightforward. A powerful, unsettling film. Hyena (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.15pm This violent thriller about corrupt drug-squad officers is very violent indeed, so be prepared to cover your eyes for some parts of writer-director Gerard Johnson’s film. Michael Logan (an intense Peter Ferdinand) is the leader of this special force, assigned to tackle drug trafficking among the Balkan gangs. Stephen Graham, as his dubious boss, is as reliable as ever. Above all, it’s a grisly exploration of the criminal mind. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: John Noakes: TV Hero, the Strictly semi-final and more

Saturday 9 December John Noakes: TV Hero BBC Two, 5.30pm One quarter of the definitive Blue Peter foursome, alongside Peter Purves, Valerie Singleton and Shep, John Noakes was both its longest-serving presenter and one of its very finest. A gifted communicator, earnest when he had to be but more often game for anything, whether that be a laugh or a lunatic stunt. This affectionate profile of Noakes, who died in May, aged 83, after many years with Alzheimer’s, pivots on perhaps his two best-loved moments. First, there’s a climb up Nelson’s Column, sans ropes or safety harnesses, that was every bit as daft and dangerous as it looked and ample testament to his dauntlessness. That impish sense of humour is demonstrated by the notorious appearance of Lulu the elephant, who relieved herself on the floor before rampaging across the studio and over Noakes’s foot. Ever the entertainer, he milked both for all they were worth. His relationship with the series was an equivocal one and he reportedly resented his clownish persona, but this tribute skirts any controversy in favour of warm nostalgia, with familiar Blue Peter faces including Biddy Baxter and Lesley Judd recalling the man and his work. GT Premier League Football: West Ham United v Chelsea Sky Sports Main Event, 11.30am Having recovered from a goal down to beat Newcastle 3-1 last Saturday, with Eden Hazard helping himself to a brace, Chelsea travel across London to face West Ham United. The home side, who are currently in the relegation zone, will have taken plenty of positives from their 2-1 defeat at Manchester City last Sunday – namely, their defensive display. A similarly obdurate performance here and new manager David Moyes might get a share of the spoils this time. When these sides met at the London Stadium last season, West Ham lost 2-1. PS European Rugby Champions Cup: Toulon v Bath Sky Sports Main Event, 5.15pm Two wins from two reads the stats for both sides so far in this season’s European Champions Cup – at least one of these 100 per cent records will end at Stade Mayol. Bath come into this match on the back of a 42-29 defeat by Exeter, but before that they’d won four on the bounce, with Freddie Burns impressing at fly-half. After the autumn internationals, director of rugby Todd Blackadder now has an embarrassment of riches from which to pick: most notably, England backs Anthony Watson, Semesa Rokoduguni and Jonathan Joseph. Toulon, meanwhile, ended a three-match losing streak on Saturday when they beat Lyon 39-11. PS Strictly Come Dancing BBC One, 6.45pm The five remaining couples must perform two routines in this semi-final, and with barely a strand of lace between them, expect forensic criticism from the judges. Sunday’s results show will reveal the final four and there will be a performance from Craig David. GT Michael McIntyre’s Big Show BBC One, 8.20pm Wringing his contacts book dry, McIntyre ropes in guests including TV presenters Marvin and Rochelle Humes (taking part in the game Send to All) and pop rock band The Vamps for more fun. GT Witnesses: a Frozen Death BBC Four, 9.00pm and 9.55pm Even in this saturated market for foreign-language thrillers, Witnesses stands out for its lack of gimmicks – though without ever quite scaling the heights of The Bridge or Spiral. Here, Sandra’s (Marie Dompnier) pursuit of the killer takes her into a forest and an orphanage. GT The White Princess Drama, 9.00pm and 10.20pm The excellent Jodie Comer anchors the series to its conclusion tonight with another double bill, as Elizabeth of York (Comer) and Henry VII (Jacob Collins-Levy) struggle to maintain a united front. GT Peter Blake: Pop Art Life Sky Arts, 9.00pm While there is more to Peter Blake’s work than his cover for Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, music has played a crucial role in the development of his art and reputation. This engaging film digs deeply into a mutually fruitful relationship. GT Casualty BBC One, 9.20pm Christmas approaches, bringing annual trauma and discord for the A&E team. Tonight finds Elle’s (Jaye Griffiths) tearaway son Blake (Kai Thorne) going off the rails in response to her suggestion that she spend the festive period with her new boyfriend. Polly (Sophia Di Martino), meanwhile, continues to be unimpressed by Max (Jamie Davis). GT Through the Keyhole: I’m a Celebrity… get me out of here! ITV, 9.50pm The living, breathing definition of an acquired taste, Keith Lemon returns for a fifth series of the show once helmed by David Frost. Guests include Jimmy Carr, Myleene Klass and Tony Blackburn. GT Gremlins 2: The New Batch (1990) ★★★☆☆ Christmas Gold, 9.40pm Whereas Joe Dante’s original monster hit was a deliciously dark horror flick (and staple Christmas hit) with touches of wry humour, this inferior sequel is essentially a straight-up, riotous comedy, replete with in-jokes and movie references. This time, the gremlins run amok in a Manhattan high-rise building called Clamp Tower, owned by John Glover’s Donald Trump-like mogul. The Cider House Rules (1999) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.15pm John Irving’s adaptation of his own 1985 novel features a fine Tobey Maguire and Michael Caine, who won an Oscar (only his second at the time). Irving won one too, for Best Screenplay, and there’s no doubt the story is moving, though this version – about an orphan (Maguire) and a doctor (Caine) who performs illegal abortions – is at times a bit saccharine. Paul Rudd co-stars; Lasse Hallström directs. The Drop (2014) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 11.35pm Tom Hardy anchors this tale of simmering malfeasance as the tender of a Brooklyn bar designated as the drop for ill-gotten gains. Dennis Lehane adapts his own short story Animal Rescue, and makes a perfect team with Belgian director Michaël R Roskam, who gets a tamped-down, shuffling and beautifully calibrated star turn out of Hardy. Sopranos star James Gandolfini adds a burly gravitas in what would be his final movie. Sunday 10 December Jumbo with keeper Matthew Scott in 1882 Credit: BBC Attenborough and the Giant Elephant BBC One, 9.00pm Can we ever have too much Attenborough? It seems not, as right in the foaming wake of the fabulous Blue Planet II (which concludes tonight, see preview below) comes this absorbing, bittersweet tale of the world’s first animal superstar – Jumbo the elephant. It’s a sad story, really. Jumbo shot to fame shortly after his arrival at London Zoo as an orphan in around 1861, but he didn’t get much from the deal. As Attenborough says, his captive life was “troubled, fuelled by alcohol, terrifying fits of violence, a near mystical relationship with his keeper and a tragic end that seems hard to believe”. Which is more than enough to hold the attention for an hour as he joins an international team examining Jumbo’s preserved skeleton at New York’s Museum of Natural History. Attenborough also pokes about in archives at London Zoo, sanctuaries in the Maasai Mara and Tennessee, and Ontario where Jumbo met his very sad end, building as complete a picture of this magnificent creature and his global travels as has ever been assembled. All the while it spreads a positive conservationist message and gives thanks that attitudes are more enlightened now than in Victorian times. GO Premier League Football: Liverpool v Everton & Manchester United v Manchester City Sky Sports Main Event, 1.15pm & 4.15pm “Super Sunday” lives up to its hyperbolic billing, with two potentially exhilarating derbies. First up, we’re at Anfield where Liverpool, fresh from their 5-1 demolition of Brighton, host Everton, who found some form last week, following up their 4-0 win at home to West Ham United with a 2-0 victory against Huddersfield. Later, in the 4.30pm kick-off, José Mourinho and Pep Guardiola renew rivalries as second-placed United host leaders City at Old Trafford. Expect it to be tight. PS Britain’s Wildest Weather 2017 Channel 4, 6.30pm This year has not, so far, been as extreme as some but, given the number of smartphone-wielding citizen journalists, there’s plenty of jaw-dropping footage of every extreme weather event that occurred, among them devastating floods, tornadoes and hair-raising lightning strikes. GO  Blue Planet II BBC One, 8.00pm This extraordinary series concludes with an undeniably depressing assessment of mankind’s impact on the marine environment. But David Attenborough, as ever, prefers to put the emphasis on hope. So there’s plenty of uplift too with stories of species brought back from extinction’s brink. GO Coastal Railways with Julie Walters Channel 4, 8.00pm Julie Walters heads for Cornwall on the Great Western route, recalling her childhood holidays in Torquay. She then boards a steam train at Paignton, hears tales of smugglers in Polperro and fills up on cakes in Penzance. GO Leonora Carrington: the Lost Surrealist BBC Four, 9.00pm This fascinating film tells the story of rebellious upper-class British artist Leonora Carrington, who worked alongside Ernst, Breton and Éluard in Paris at the height of the surrealist movement, yet died in 2011 all but forgotten in Mexico. Director Teresa Griffiths mixes interviews and biographical material with experimental animation and tableaux to bring Carrington’s work vividly to life. GO I’m a Celebrity… Get Me Out of Here! ITV, 9.00pm Seventeen series in and the public appetite for watching celebrities endure humiliation and repulsion shows little sign of drying up. This year’s launch pulled in ITV’s biggest audience of 2017. The final will no doubt draw as big a crowd again. GO Babylon Berlin Sky Atlantic, from 9.00pm Three more atmospheric episodes of the gripping crime series set in the bohemian, political Weimar Germany of the late Twenties. Detective Rath’s (Volker Bruch) investigation uncovers dangerous evidence of a shocking military conspiracy. GO The Sky At Night BBC Four, 10.00pm As well as more stargazing from the Royal Observatory, Maggie Aderin-Pocock is in Norway to see the Northern Lights. GO Ben-Hur (1959) ★★★★★ ITV3, 2.45pm A majestic slice of Hollywood history, this Roman-era melodrama directed by William Wyler and starring Charlton Heston won 11 Academy Awards (not equalled until Titanic in 1997). It still makes for magnificent viewing. Set in 26AD, it tells the story of a Jewish prince who clashes with the Roman governor and ends up enslaved, desperately plotting his revenge. The Sorcerer’s Apprentice (2010) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 3.00pm Jerry Bruckheimer gives the famous sequence from Disney’s Fantasia a fun, live-action reboot. Student Dave (Jay Baruchel) inherits Merlin’s powers, placing him in a power struggle between Balthazar (Nicolas Cage) and Horvath (Alfred Molina). Sadly there are just two scenes with broomsticks to link it to the original. Toby Kebbel is amusing as a stage musician co-opted by the forces of evil. Toy Story (1995) ★★★★★ BBC One, 3.35pm The idea of the first fully computer-generated animated film didn’t have those who had been weaned on the hand-drawn delights of Disney jumping for joy. However, with this beautiful tale, Pixar pushed animation to a new level – the premise, pace and emotion are all pitched perfectly. Whether it’s your first or 400th viewing, the story of toy cowboy Woody (Tom Hanks) and plastic spaceman Buzz Lightyear (Tim Allen) is a joy. Monday 11 December Faye Marsa, Sarah Parish and Amara Karan in Bancroft Credit: ITV Bancroft ITV, 9.00pm With so many crime dramas clogging up the television schedules it can be hard for a new series to stand out and at first ITV’s latest four-parter seems unlikely to break the mould. There’s an ambitious female cop with a possibly troubled past (the always reliable Sarah Parish), a striving younger cop who is desperate to move up the ranks (Faye Marsay) and the usual crop of jobsworths and strivers (Charles Babalola is particularly good as the married fellow officer Marsay’s Katherine should be steering well clear of). It’s all perfectly well done with a solid script from Kate Brooke (Mr Selfridge) but it seems like nothing special. Then, three quarters of the way through this first episode, something genuinely interesting happens: Bancroft’s secrets are revealed to be very dark indeed just as Katherine’s cold case involving the break-in and violent murder of a young woman in 1990 starts hotting up. With the stakes suddenly raised Bancroft spins off into a dark tale of the lengths that people go to keep the past buried and the stage is set for an intriguing game of secrets and lies. Smart scheduling sees the rest of the story play out over consecutive nights. SH Street Auction BBC One, 11.00am Paul Martin returns with a new series of the surprisingly addictive show in which people band together to raise funds for a member of their community by auctioning off hidden treasures. The fun comes from the unusual objects unearthed from garages and attics. SH Nigella’s Christmas Table BBC Two, 8.00pm If anything is guaranteed to Nigella put into purring overload it’s Christmas. The food on offer includes roast duck with orange, soy and ginger, but this is really about mood rather than food. SH   Paul Hollywood: A Baker’s Life Channel 4, 8.00pm Episode three of this genial series sees Hollywood looking back over his career and his time spent working at the Cliveden House Hotel in Berkshire. There’s also a festive get-together in Merseyside and some seasonal Danish pastries, which look delicious. SH The Art That Made Mexico: Paradise, Power and Prayers BBC Four, 9.00pm It’s always a pleasure to find a series that sheds new light on a subject, and so it is with artist Alinka Echeverria’s enthralling films about Mexico’s art. Of course, there are the key points: conquest, independence, dictatorship, revolution and figures such as Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo, but what the commentary gives us here is the context for both the history and the artists. This is true of this episode that looks at the relationship between art and power, colonialism and control while examining the enduring power of Kahlo’s work and myth. SH Handmade in Mexico BBC Four, 10.00pm The focus here is on Mexico’s celebrated Tree of Life sculptures, those gaudy, gorgeous interpretations of everything from the creation myth to the resurrection of Christ and the Day of the Dead. It’s a fascinating half-hour in which we see the amount of work and detail that goes into each piece. SH White Right: Meeting the Enemy: Exposure ITV, 10.40pm; STV, 11.05pm; UTV, 11.40pm; Wales, 11.10pm This intriguing-sounding documentary sees the Bafta-nominated Deeyah Khan (Jihad: A Story of the Others) investigate white extremism in the US. Khan visits white nationalist groups, attends a far-right rally and asks why this poisonous ideology is resurgent. SH The Black Swan (1942) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 2.35pm No, this is not the film about the ageing ballet dancer and the young ingénue; this is about high adventure on the seven seas. When Laird Cregar’s Captain Morgan becomes Governor of Jamaica, he promises to put an end to piracy. But things don’t go smoothly, especially when his assistant (Tyrone Power) kidnaps the ex-governor’s beautiful daughter (Maureen O’Hara). This was the final film of silent star Helene Costello. Mamma Mia! (2008) ★★★☆☆ ITV3, 7.50pm This musical comedy, directed by Phyllida Lloyd and set to Abba’s hits, is pure escapism. It’s naff, but that’s its selling point, as stars Meryl Streep, Pierce Brosnan and Julie Walters place tongues firmly in cheeks. At 59, Streep deserved more credit for doing the splits than for her role as a boho mother living on a Greek island whose daughter (Amanda Seyfried) tries to find out who her biological father is. Blood Diamond (2006) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 8.00pm The diamond industry of Sierra Leone is the subject of this striking thriller. Djimon Hounsou stars as a fisherman forced to work in the fields, who finds and hides a rare pink gem. His life is changed when he meets Leonardo DiCaprio’s self-serving mercenary and Jennifer Connelly’s well-meaning journalist. DiCaprio was Oscar-nominated, but lost to Forest Whitaker for The Last King of Scotland. Tuesday 12 December Paul Ready, Diane Morgan and Anna Maxwell-Martin Credit: BBC Motherland BBC Two, 10.00pm Dispensing with the calamitous set pieces of previous episodes and instead documenting the quiet desperation of this ill-starred band of sisters (plus one brother), this superb, exhausting sitcom from a writing supergroup including Graham Linehan and Sharon Horgan has been an exquisitely painful delight. We join Julia (Anna Maxwell Martin) in an unusually good place, with everything running smoothly thanks to her new Australian nanny, Lyndsey (Sarah Kendall). The kids are clean and happy, the school run is easy, the fridge is stocked – but could she be too good to be true? Amanda (Lucy Punch) has gone to ground after the revelation over her threesome, while her hapless confidant, Kevin (Paul Ready), is desperate to avoid having to get a job. And, should all the mugging get too much, there’s deadpan Liz (Diane Morgan), negotiating tricky relations with her dismal ex and his new, pregnant partner. After an orgy of passive aggression and desperate people in denial, the façades crack, just a little. Happily everyone reverts to fundamentally appalling type just in time for the end of the series and a surely inevitable recommission. GT Judd Apatow: the Return Netflix, from today After 25 years away from stand-up, the comedy zelig whose fingerprints are over everything from Knocked Up and Girls to Freaks and Geeks and Bridesmaids returns for a special set in Montreal, recorded in July. GT Masterchef: the Professionals BBC Two, 8.00pm After the hopefuls have tackled an invention test and rustled up a dish dedicated to one of their inspirations, Marcus Wareing, Monica Galletti and Gregg Wallace eliminate another two contenders, leaving only six in the contest. GT The A Word BBC One, 9.00pm Joe’s (brilliant Max Vento) family comes together for an end of year show at his old school – tears, acrimony and reconciliation ensue in the conclusion of Peter Bowker’s finely wrought, well-performed drama. A third series should surely be a formality. GT Invasion! with Sam Willis BBC Four, 9.00pm While not quite attaining Lucy Worsley levels of gonzo history, Dr Sam Willis is an enthusiastic and knowledgeable host not above the odd stunt to prove a point. This second episode of a series documenting the incursions that have shaped our nation and its bloodline examines the differing techniques and goals of the invaders. There are the Barbary Corsaire pirates who settled on Lundy Island, King Louis the Lion, invited to invade and crowned by disgruntled nobles, and the Dutch forces that negotiated the Medway just a year prior to the Glorious Revolution. Further proof, if any were needed, that Britain is a mongrel nation and all the better for it. GT The World’s Most Expensive Presents Channel 4, 9.00pm Eyeball-melting opulence and appalling lack of taste do battle with considerable craftsmanship and class in this startling film featuring everything from gold-plated pushbikes to a poker set in alligator-hide case. GT Sports Personality of the Year 2017: The Contenders BBC One, 10.45pm; Wales, 11.10pm; Scotland, 11.45pm With reigning title-holder Andy Murray’s injury-hit year effectively ruling him out of contention, Anthony Joshua, Chris Froome, Lewis Hamilton, Jo Konta and Mo Farah will be headlining this year’s roster after another 12 months of outstanding achievement in British sport. The runners and riders are introduced tonight. GT Shane (1953) ★★★★☆ Film4, 3.45pm There are few Westerns that examine the depths of human emotions, but this film by George Stevens is one of them and has become a landmark of cinema. Shane (Alan Ladd) is a cowboy who finds himself idolised for the way that he handles himself in the face of a landowner’s heavies. The climax is a face-off between Shane and smiling, whispering, Oscar-nominated Jack Palance, as the original man in black. A must-see. Mr & Mrs Smith (2005) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 9.00pm A daft comedy thriller which is perhaps best remembered for being the film that introduced Brad Pitt to Angelina Jolie. They play a couple whose failing marriage is spiced up dramatically when each discovers that the other secretly works as an assassin. Let down by a weak script, the film is held together by the chemistry between its two leads. Vince Vaughn and Adam Brody co-star. Moonraker (1979) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm The 11th film in the Bond series, and the fourth to star Roger Moore as the dapper MI6 agent, involves the theft of a space shuttle. It’s one of the weaker Bond films and at times seems more of a comedy than a tense action adventure, but it’s enjoyably frivolous. Michael Lonsdale plays resident baddie Hugo Drax who pinches the aforementioned space shuttle to help along his plan to wipe out the world’s population. Wednesday 13 December Barbara Schulz in Vanished by the Lake Credit: Channel 4 Vanished by the Lake Channel 4, 10.00pm This haunting French crime drama centres on a teenage girl who goes missing at a festival. It’s hardly an original set-up, but much like last year’s hit Gallic import The Disappearance, based on an almost identical premise, the mix of youthful promise cut short and fierce small-town intrigue quickly compels. The girl in question is Chloé Delval (Charlie Joirkin), and as news of her disappearance spreads, memories of a similar 15-year-old case in which two other girls vanished at the same celebration are revived. Into the fray steps striking Parisian detective Lise Stocker (Barbara Schulz), who has returned home to look after her ill mother, but is soon swept up by the case as its personal implications begin to unfold. All of the hallmarks of the Nordic noir genre are present, from the evocative setting (here a Broadchurch-style coastal backdrop) to the close-knit neighbours with secrets to hide. Nevertheless, this opening episode is an effective tension builder and the human impact of the mystery – particularly on Chloé’s fracturing parents – is powerfully moving. Once episode one finishes, the full series will be available to watch on All 4. TD Mary Berry’s Country House Secrets BBC One, 8.00pm Mary Berry rounds off her tour of Britain’s stately homes at Goodwood House, where she is suitably gushing over its royal history and grand interiors. Berry is treated to a hair-raising lap of the nearby motor circuit and whips up a four-tier cake for the cricket tea. TD The Secret Life of the Zoo Channel 4, 8.00pm The plight of the endangered Javan green magpie is on the agenda as keepers at Chester Zoo attempt to breed youngster Permata with older bird Netuba. Elsewhere, a zebra battle breaks out when newcomer Okoth arrives. TD Peaky Blinders BBC Two, 9.00pm A burst of gunfire opens the penultimate episode of period gangster antics, as Tommy Shelby (Cillian Murphy) faces off against mafia honcho Luca Changretta (Adrien Brody). An army colonel, meanwhile, questions Ada (Sophie Rundle) about her Communist past. TD The Channel: The World’s Busiest Waterway Channel 4, 9.00pm The fallout from Project Nemo, the new underwater electricity cable being laid between Belgium and Britain, is explored. We follow the Nemo manager struggling to avoid costly delays and the fisherman whose catch is being compromised by the work. TD Royal Academy: Painting the Future Sky Arts, 9.00pm Virtual reality (VR) is predicted to become the go-to place for everything from entertainment to work. The Royal Academy is getting in on the act with a new exhibition which explores the potential of the medium. This film follows the show’s creation with the artists, including sculptor Antony Gormley, portraitist Jonathan Yeo and Turner Prize-nominee Yinka Shonibare, who are producing works that use the technology to trace the history of the body in art. TD David Hockney: Time Reclaimed Sky Arts, 10.30pm This tribute to David Hockney aims to get beyond the glamour that surrounds his reputation, and focus on the personal aspects of his work. Anecdotes, images and analysis of the pictures themselves highlight the individuality expressed in each period of Hockney’s career, suggesting a diverse oeuvre that defies classification. TD Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am George Roy Hill directed two of the most popular films ever: Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969) and The Sting (1973). But this indifferent Julie Andrews musical of the flapper era was first. There’s much to enjoy in the story of a naive woman who leaves her rural roots behind to seek fortune and romance in Twenties New York. James Fox, as a spiffing salesman, is a particular highlight. The Three Musketeers (2011) ★★☆☆☆ E4, 8.00pm Paul W S Anderson’s adaptation of Alexandre Dumas’ novel is faithful in plot – Porthos, Athos and Aramis (Ray Stevenson, Matthew Macfadyen, Luke Evans), and disciple d’Artagnan (Logan Lerman), are sent to retrieve the French Queen’s (Juno Temple) necklace. The tone, however, is half action-pantomime, half candy-coloured steampunk comic – fun but terribly slapdash. Poltergeist (1982) ★★★★☆ TCM, 11.15pm Director Tobe Hooper, who made The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, tones down the gut-churning horror but still ramps up the tension to nightmare levels in this Steven Spielberg-produced chiller. It has one of cinema’s most spine-tinglingly scary moments: “They’re here,” sing-songs a little girl kneeling before the TV. “They” are the spirits, at first playful then increasingly malevolent, who terrorise a suburban family. Thursday 14 December Lord Sugar Credit: BBC The Apprentice: Why I Fired Them BBC One, 8.00pm In the wake of last night’s excoriating interview round, and with this Sunday’s final rapidly approaching to decide who will win a £250,000 investment and the mentoring opportunity of a lifetime, Lord Sugar makes his most personal appearance of the series. Other than those brief to-camera inserts that roll out as taxi cabs ferry freshly defenestrated candidates away from Sugar Towers to forever dream of fortunes that might have been made, this is one of few occasions in each “process” when Lord Sugar appears on screen away from the wannabe tycoons and talking to viewers directly. And he makes the most of it with his trademark witty-gritty line in East End charm, although professionalism usually prevents him from really dishing the behind-the-scenes dirt on why he thought 16 of them worthy only of the tip of his boot. Instead he looks back over this 13th series identifying the key commercial and strategic errors that led to each of his firing finger decisions, and what ultimately marked out the two finalists from the others. It’s a lot to get through in an hour but, as series recaps go, it’s usually a hoot. GO Ashes Cricket: Australia v England BT Sport 1, 1.30am The enduring Ashes Down Under conundrum: wake up early to watch it or stay up late? The third Test, held at the WACA Ground in Perth, gets under way in the early hours of Thursday morning, with England hoping to bounce back from two demoralising defeats. Lose this one and captain Joe Root will have to surrender the urn to the Aussies. PS European Tour Golf: The Indonesian Masters Sky Sports Main Event, 6.00am It’s the opening day of the tournament at the Royale Jakarta Golf Club, where Thailand’s Poom Saksansin won the title last year. Saksansin shot an overall score of 270 to finish on -18, five strokes ahead of joint runners-up Masahiro Kawamura of Japan and fellow Thai players Phachara Khongwatmai and Suradit Yongcharoenchai. PS Amazing Spaces Snow and Ice Special Channel 4, 8.00pm George Clarke and his inventive sidekick Will Hardie travel to Norway’s remoter parts to check out why this small country on the edge of Europe punches above its weight in architecture and design. Could it be something to do with the cold weather, they wonder? GO Love, Lies & Records BBC One, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama about the romance of working at a Leeds registry office delivers on melodrama, if not subtlety. In this penultimate episode Kate (Ashley Jensen) struggles to make a decision after Rob’s (Adrian Bower) surprise proposal. GO Blitz: the Bombs That Changed Britain BBC Two, 9.00pm The final edition looks at the horrific impact of German incendiary bombs, in particular one that set a church ablaze in Bristol in November 1940 and started a firestorm that ravaged the city’s historic centre. GO The Tunnel: Vengeance Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Sky’s award-winning version of The Bridge (its milieu that of British and French police teams linked by the Channel Tunnel) returns for a third and final run. A pity, as Stephen Dillane as spiky detective and Clémence Poésy as his emotionally remote French opposite number make an appealing pair. This first of six episodes packs in plenty of action as the pair set out to find the link between a burnt-out trawler and a maintenance worker attacked by a plague of rats. GO Extraordinary Teens: School of Life and Deaf Channel 4, 10.00pm This absorbing film follows a year in the life of Mary Hare Boarding School for deaf pupils in Berkshire. Seen through the eyes of a 15-year-old about to undergo a potentially life-changing cochlear implant, this film gives a profound sense of the physical and emotional complexities of growing up deaf. GO The Russell Howard Hour Sky One, 10.00pm We’ve reached the penultimate episode of this excellent topical comedy series. It’s little more than an extended version of BBC Three’s (and later BBC Two’s) Good News but that’s exactly what fans (and Sky, who snapped Howard up) wanted and he has delivered, pushing his brand of highly topical, politically aware, positive reinforcement stand-up with aplomb. GO Life (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Daniel Espinosa’s Earth-orbiting suspense flick was released less than two months before Ridley Scott’s new chapter in his Alien franchise, and bears many of the same hallmarks. It’s also a little bit Gravity. Ryan Reynolds is one of a crew of astronauts aboard a space station conducting research into life on Mars. In terms of entertainment, the film does its baseline job of getting you to chew your nails off. There’s Something About Mary (1998) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 9.00pm There are bad taste jokes in abundance in this comedy from the Farrelly Brothers. Ben Stiller stars as Ted, a shy man who realises he’s still in love with Mary (Cameron Diaz, proving her comic abilities), the date he tried to take to prom 13 years ago. So, to track her down, he hires an oily private eye (Matt Dillon) who also fallsin love with her and sets out to keep the pair apart. Gone in 60 Seconds (2000) ★★★☆☆ Universal Channel, 9.00pm Nicolas Cage has top billing in Dominic Sena’s remake of the 1974 cult film – a mind-numbingly testosterone-laced ride. Cage and Angelina Jolie are among a crew of thieves who must steal 50 cars in 72 hours to stop the murder of Cage’s brother. It’s more than serviceable entertainment, plus car aficionados will have fun spotting the Cadillacs and Corvettes. Friday 15 December Paul, Andy, Cynthia and Diana in The Sweet Makers Credit: BBC The Sweet Makers at Christmas BBC Two, 9.00pm Following their enjoyable three-part series earlier this year, BBC Two’s Sweet Makers return for this one-off Christmas special looking at changing treats from Georgian times to the Twenties. As before, the show is a lovely mix of baking and interesting social history with Emma Dabiri and Dr Annie Gray, who fill us in on how each era viewed Christmas and how confectionery changes over time. The show’s highlight comes during the Victorian Era, also known as the moment when Christmas as we know it was invented, as chocolatiers Paul A Young and Diane Short, bespoke cake decorator Cynthia Stroud and sweet consultant Andy Baxendale recreate a Boar’s Head cake. “That’s the most bonkers thing we’ve ever made,” notes Young, looking at the finished result, which is rich in chocolate, beautifully decorated and featuring unnervingly glazed eyes. He’s right but it also looks fabulous, as do the intricate Twelfth Cakes, a speciality in Georgian times. The Twenties brings with it the wonderful news that before Terry’s invented the chocolate orange they introduced the chocolate apple to the world, before looking to the future and the invention of Lord Mackintosh’s Quality Street. SH Jean-Claude Van Johnson Amazon Prime Video, from today This delightfully silly new series sees Jean-Claude Van Damme as a retired action film star with a secret: he’s a special agent and he wants back in the game. It’s inspired mayhem anchored by a winning performance from the laconic Van Damme. SH Trollhunters Netflix, from today Guillermo del Toro’s inventive animation returns for a second series, and it features the voice of the late Anton Yelchin as reluctant hero Jim Lake Jnr. The story continues where the first series left off, and sees Jim adventure deeper into the Troll world to battle the leader of the Darklands. This series also features Mark Hamill and Game of Thrones’s Lena Headey. SH Judge Rinder’s Crown Court ITV, 8.00pm; not STV or UTV; Wales, 11.10pm Judge Rinder’s reboot of classic Seventies series Crown Court might lack the big-name actors of the original but its meld of real-life crime and courtroom drama is just as addictive. Tonight, the jury decides if James Byron (Rupert Young) murdered his wife. SH Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Sarah Millican is a brave guest of Oliver and Doherty – brave because it swiftly transpires that cooking really isn’t her thing. But Oliver manages to bite his tongue while showing her how to cook her favourite microwave meal from scratch. SH Have I Got News for You BBC One, 9.00pm The 54th series of the satirical news quiz comes to an end with the ever-reliable David Tennant in the host’s chair. It has been a patchy series, which was marked by a new low when Jo Brand had to explain why sexual harassment jokes weren’t funny to the male panellists. So let’s hope it goes out on a high. SH Roy Orbison: Love Hurts BBC Four, 9.30pm Roy Orbison’s three sons, Wesley, Roy Jnr and Alex, take centre stage to discuss their father in this emotional documentary. SH The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm Prepare for Star Wars: The Last Jedi overload as John Boyega, Daisy Ridley and Mark Hamill join Norton on the sofa. Don’t expect any spoilers but there’s sure to be some nice eulogies to the late Carrie Fisher. SH Before I Go to Sleep (2014) ★★★☆☆ More4, 9.00pm Nicole Kidman and Colin Firth star in this uninvolving thriller based on SJ Watson’s twisty bestseller. Kidman plays a woman who, after suffering a head injury, has no idea who she is or who the man sleeping next to her might be (it’s Colin Firth, playing her husband). She keeps a daily video diary but starts to notice discrepancies between what she’s recorded and what Firth tells her. The Pledge (2001) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 9.00pm A tense mystery directed by Sean Penn with a fine cast including Jack Nicholson, Helen Mirren, Robin Wright Penn, Aaron Eckhart and Vanessa Redgrave. Nicholson is a detective who has to handle a horrific case on the day of his retirement – the murder of a seven-year-old girl. He promises to bring the killer to justice, only to find that the case is far from straightforward. A powerful, unsettling film. Hyena (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.15pm This violent thriller about corrupt drug-squad officers is very violent indeed, so be prepared to cover your eyes for some parts of writer-director Gerard Johnson’s film. Michael Logan (an intense Peter Ferdinand) is the leader of this special force, assigned to tackle drug trafficking among the Balkan gangs. Stephen Graham, as his dubious boss, is as reliable as ever. Above all, it’s a grisly exploration of the criminal mind. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

Charlton seek a little bit of history repeated as Karl Robinson aims to tap into fan power amid owner turmoil

Charlton seek a little bit of history repeated as Karl Robinson aims to tap into fan power amid owner turmoil

Twenty-five years ago this week, Charlton Athletic returned to The Valley, after a depressing seven-year exile of nomadic ground-sharing, to beat Portsmouth 1-0 in the First Division amid a joyous party atmosphere. On Saturday, in one of those little quirks, they face Portsmouth again. It should be nothing but a cause for celebration, a celebration of what Charlton manager Karl Robinson calls one of the most “iconic moments in football history... what they did 25 years ago, I don’t think that will happen again”. It was, Robinson notes, a testimony to “what fan power can actually do”. For many Charlton supporters that comment touches a raw nerve given the controversial, unhappy ownership of the club by Belgian businessman Roland Duchatelet, who they are still trying to force out. Charlton struggled to recover from Premier League relegation in 2007 but the way the club has been run under Duchatelet has alienated many fans, even if on the field it has improved since Robinson became the eighth manager in three years in November 2016. “When I went into the club I knew how hard it was going to be,” Robinson says. “So I just tried to be me, stick to being the coach and say what I felt.” Karl Robinson (left) argues with Neil Ardley, manager of AFC Wimbledon Credit: GETTY IMAGES That included meeting fans “over a few pints” and navigating the line between hearing their concerns, being respectful of his employer and trying to turn the club around. Charlton are sixth in League One, in the play-off places, and clearly a return to the Championship is a priority. There has been a Robinson resurgence. But there remains an essential sadness that a club that has represented so much in terms of supporter power and a proud, fierce community spirit is in this way. The protest group CARD - the Coalition Against Roland Duchatelet – is working hard for change, although they may be disappointed to hear that Robinson does not think a takeover is imminent. “I think it can be distracting but I have been told that’s not the case and have to take that on face value,” Robinson says. “Listen, I do my job the best I can. I don’t get involved in the politics. It (the dissent) is not as loud but I don’t think it’s quietened down in terms of how people feel about it. I think CARD brought something out a month ago saying they respect what we are trying to do on the pitch and that, for us, was a tremendous testament. Charlton fans protest against owner Roland Duchatelet Credit: GETTY IMAGES “Whether they are part of CARD or not they are still fans and we just hope that one day we can come together and be a much stronger club. I don’t know what makes that happen. We just hope that we can put ourselves in a place where we are all one.” It cannot happen under Duchatelet. Robinson’s concerns are on the pitch but he is well aware of the importance of the Portsmouth match. “Our main objective is to get promoted but there are certain moments where people see the bigger picture and at every football club that is the fans, what they stand for and what they have been through,” he says. “Fundamentally, I want to make people proud of being a Charlton Athletic fan and when they look back at what they did, they should be so proud of themselves.” Food for thought over Newcastle takeover Mike Ashley and Amanda Staveley talked over her proposed takeover of Newcastle United at a London curry house on Wednesday night. As you do. That will give Newcastle fans heart, given the fear that the two parties remain so far apart in their valuation. But there is plenty of food for thought. The fear is the effect this is all having, not least with the growing realisation that if a deal is agreed it will not go through until after the January transfer window closes. Hopefully an outline deal can be secured before then because the club desperately needs a kick-start with new signings after an unhappy summer transfer period. Newcastle are in a dangerous limbo. They have two vital home games in five days: on Saturday they face a revitalised Leicester City, then they host Everton, led by former manager Sam Allardyce. A glance at the table shows how precariously they are pitched. They are 15th, five points outside the relegation places, but are on the slide having lost five of their last six matches, and won once in 10. Not so long ago they were over-achieving, now, while they talk, they are in danger of going under. Wilshere needs more game time Jack Wilshere started the week with an ice skating controversy after being photographed on a rink - not a good thing with his glass ankles – and then helped Arsenal glide past BATE Borisov in the Europa League. He even scored. Cue fresh debate over an England recall. But England do not play again until March. If Wilshere actually starts a Premier League game before then there may be an argument. “You could see he is ready,” Arsene Wenger said afterwards, having recently, unhelpfully, urged Gareth Southgate to pick Wilshere for England. So hopefully Wenger will now play him rather than talk about playing him. Wilshere is brilliantly talented, the best of his generation, but has just 65 minutes in the league so far this season. There is no argument. Awesome foursome Ahead of the Merseyside derby, Liverpool’s ‘Fab Four’ of Mohamed Salah, Roberto Firmino, Philippe Coutinho and Sadio Mane have already scored 46 goals between them in all competitions this season. What is even more remarkable, though, is the frequency of goals the quartet score when they are on the pitch together: one every 23 minutes. Not ideal prep, Pep Manchester City flew to Ukraine on Monday for their Champions League tie away to Shakhtar Donetsk on Wednesday and stayed until Thursday afternoon. Given it was a ‘dead rubber’, given there is the Manchester derby this Sunday and given it was freezing cold, it did not feel like ideal preparation for such a big match.

Charlton seek a little bit of history repeated as Karl Robinson aims to tap into fan power amid owner turmoil

Charlton seek a little bit of history repeated as Karl Robinson aims to tap into fan power amid owner turmoil

Charlton seek a little bit of history repeated as Karl Robinson aims to tap into fan power amid owner turmoil

Twenty-five years ago this week, Charlton Athletic returned to The Valley, after a depressing seven-year exile of nomadic ground-sharing, to beat Portsmouth 1-0 in the First Division amid a joyous party atmosphere. On Saturday, in one of those little quirks, they face Portsmouth again. It should be nothing but a cause for celebration, a celebration of what Charlton manager Karl Robinson calls one of the most “iconic moments in football history... what they did 25 years ago, I don’t think that will happen again”. It was, Robinson notes, a testimony to “what fan power can actually do”. For many Charlton supporters that comment touches a raw nerve given the controversial, unhappy ownership of the club by Belgian businessman Roland Duchatelet, who they are still trying to force out. Charlton struggled to recover from Premier League relegation in 2007 but the way the club has been run under Duchatelet has alienated many fans, even if on the field it has improved since Robinson became the eighth manager in three years in November 2016. “When I went into the club I knew how hard it was going to be,” Robinson says. “So I just tried to be me, stick to being the coach and say what I felt.” Karl Robinson (left) argues with Neil Ardley, manager of AFC Wimbledon Credit: GETTY IMAGES That included meeting fans “over a few pints” and navigating the line between hearing their concerns, being respectful of his employer and trying to turn the club around. Charlton are sixth in League One, in the play-off places, and clearly a return to the Championship is a priority. There has been a Robinson resurgence. But there remains an essential sadness that a club that has represented so much in terms of supporter power and a proud, fierce community spirit is in this way. The protest group CARD - the Coalition Against Roland Duchatelet – is working hard for change, although they may be disappointed to hear that Robinson does not think a takeover is imminent. “I think it can be distracting but I have been told that’s not the case and have to take that on face value,” Robinson says. “Listen, I do my job the best I can. I don’t get involved in the politics. It (the dissent) is not as loud but I don’t think it’s quietened down in terms of how people feel about it. I think CARD brought something out a month ago saying they respect what we are trying to do on the pitch and that, for us, was a tremendous testament. Charlton fans protest against owner Roland Duchatelet Credit: GETTY IMAGES “Whether they are part of CARD or not they are still fans and we just hope that one day we can come together and be a much stronger club. I don’t know what makes that happen. We just hope that we can put ourselves in a place where we are all one.” It cannot happen under Duchatelet. Robinson’s concerns are on the pitch but he is well aware of the importance of the Portsmouth match. “Our main objective is to get promoted but there are certain moments where people see the bigger picture and at every football club that is the fans, what they stand for and what they have been through,” he says. “Fundamentally, I want to make people proud of being a Charlton Athletic fan and when they look back at what they did, they should be so proud of themselves.” Food for thought over Newcastle takeover Mike Ashley and Amanda Staveley talked over her proposed takeover of Newcastle United at a London curry house on Wednesday night. As you do. That will give Newcastle fans heart, given the fear that the two parties remain so far apart in their valuation. But there is plenty of food for thought. The fear is the effect this is all having, not least with the growing realisation that if a deal is agreed it will not go through until after the January transfer window closes. Hopefully an outline deal can be secured before then because the club desperately needs a kick-start with new signings after an unhappy summer transfer period. Newcastle are in a dangerous limbo. They have two vital home games in five days: on Saturday they face a revitalised Leicester City, then they host Everton, led by former manager Sam Allardyce. A glance at the table shows how precariously they are pitched. They are 15th, five points outside the relegation places, but are on the slide having lost five of their last six matches, and won once in 10. Not so long ago they were over-achieving, now, while they talk, they are in danger of going under. Wilshere needs more game time Jack Wilshere started the week with an ice skating controversy after being photographed on a rink - not a good thing with his glass ankles – and then helped Arsenal glide past BATE Borisov in the Europa League. He even scored. Cue fresh debate over an England recall. But England do not play again until March. If Wilshere actually starts a Premier League game before then there may be an argument. “You could see he is ready,” Arsene Wenger said afterwards, having recently, unhelpfully, urged Gareth Southgate to pick Wilshere for England. So hopefully Wenger will now play him rather than talk about playing him. Wilshere is brilliantly talented, the best of his generation, but has just 65 minutes in the league so far this season. There is no argument. Awesome foursome Ahead of the Merseyside derby, Liverpool’s ‘Fab Four’ of Mohamed Salah, Roberto Firmino, Philippe Coutinho and Sadio Mane have already scored 46 goals between them in all competitions this season. What is even more remarkable, though, is the frequency of goals the quartet score when they are on the pitch together: one every 23 minutes. Not ideal prep, Pep Manchester City flew to Ukraine on Monday for their Champions League tie away to Shakhtar Donetsk on Wednesday and stayed until Thursday afternoon. Given it was a ‘dead rubber’, given there is the Manchester derby this Sunday and given it was freezing cold, it did not feel like ideal preparation for such a big match.

Charlton seek a little bit of history repeated as Karl Robinson aims to tap into fan power amid owner turmoil

Twenty-five years ago this week, Charlton Athletic returned to The Valley, after a depressing seven-year exile of nomadic ground-sharing, to beat Portsmouth 1-0 in the First Division amid a joyous party atmosphere. On Saturday, in one of those little quirks, they face Portsmouth again. It should be nothing but a cause for celebration, a celebration of what Charlton manager Karl Robinson calls one of the most “iconic moments in football history... what they did 25 years ago, I don’t think that will happen again”. It was, Robinson notes, a testimony to “what fan power can actually do”. For many Charlton supporters that comment touches a raw nerve given the controversial, unhappy ownership of the club by Belgian businessman Roland Duchatelet, who they are still trying to force out. Charlton struggled to recover from Premier League relegation in 2007 but the way the club has been run under Duchatelet has alienated many fans, even if on the field it has improved since Robinson became the eighth manager in three years in November 2016. “When I went into the club I knew how hard it was going to be,” Robinson says. “So I just tried to be me, stick to being the coach and say what I felt.” Karl Robinson (left) argues with Neil Ardley, manager of AFC Wimbledon Credit: GETTY IMAGES That included meeting fans “over a few pints” and navigating the line between hearing their concerns, being respectful of his employer and trying to turn the club around. Charlton are sixth in League One, in the play-off places, and clearly a return to the Championship is a priority. There has been a Robinson resurgence. But there remains an essential sadness that a club that has represented so much in terms of supporter power and a proud, fierce community spirit is in this way. The protest group CARD - the Coalition Against Roland Duchatelet – is working hard for change, although they may be disappointed to hear that Robinson does not think a takeover is imminent. “I think it can be distracting but I have been told that’s not the case and have to take that on face value,” Robinson says. “Listen, I do my job the best I can. I don’t get involved in the politics. It (the dissent) is not as loud but I don’t think it’s quietened down in terms of how people feel about it. I think CARD brought something out a month ago saying they respect what we are trying to do on the pitch and that, for us, was a tremendous testament. Charlton fans protest against owner Roland Duchatelet Credit: GETTY IMAGES “Whether they are part of CARD or not they are still fans and we just hope that one day we can come together and be a much stronger club. I don’t know what makes that happen. We just hope that we can put ourselves in a place where we are all one.” It cannot happen under Duchatelet. Robinson’s concerns are on the pitch but he is well aware of the importance of the Portsmouth match. “Our main objective is to get promoted but there are certain moments where people see the bigger picture and at every football club that is the fans, what they stand for and what they have been through,” he says. “Fundamentally, I want to make people proud of being a Charlton Athletic fan and when they look back at what they did, they should be so proud of themselves.” Food for thought over Newcastle takeover Mike Ashley and Amanda Staveley talked over her proposed takeover of Newcastle United at a London curry house on Wednesday night. As you do. That will give Newcastle fans heart, given the fear that the two parties remain so far apart in their valuation. But there is plenty of food for thought. The fear is the effect this is all having, not least with the growing realisation that if a deal is agreed it will not go through until after the January transfer window closes. Hopefully an outline deal can be secured before then because the club desperately needs a kick-start with new signings after an unhappy summer transfer period. Newcastle are in a dangerous limbo. They have two vital home games in five days: on Saturday they face a revitalised Leicester City, then they host Everton, led by former manager Sam Allardyce. A glance at the table shows how precariously they are pitched. They are 15th, five points outside the relegation places, but are on the slide having lost five of their last six matches, and won once in 10. Not so long ago they were over-achieving, now, while they talk, they are in danger of going under. Wilshere needs more game time Jack Wilshere started the week with an ice skating controversy after being photographed on a rink - not a good thing with his glass ankles – and then helped Arsenal glide past BATE Borisov in the Europa League. He even scored. Cue fresh debate over an England recall. But England do not play again until March. If Wilshere actually starts a Premier League game before then there may be an argument. “You could see he is ready,” Arsene Wenger said afterwards, having recently, unhelpfully, urged Gareth Southgate to pick Wilshere for England. So hopefully Wenger will now play him rather than talk about playing him. Wilshere is brilliantly talented, the best of his generation, but has just 65 minutes in the league so far this season. There is no argument. Awesome foursome Ahead of the Merseyside derby, Liverpool’s ‘Fab Four’ of Mohamed Salah, Roberto Firmino, Philippe Coutinho and Sadio Mane have already scored 46 goals between them in all competitions this season. What is even more remarkable, though, is the frequency of goals the quartet score when they are on the pitch together: one every 23 minutes. Not ideal prep, Pep Manchester City flew to Ukraine on Monday for their Champions League tie away to Shakhtar Donetsk on Wednesday and stayed until Thursday afternoon. Given it was a ‘dead rubber’, given there is the Manchester derby this Sunday and given it was freezing cold, it did not feel like ideal preparation for such a big match.

Apollon Limassol 0 Everton 3: Ademola Lookman scores twice to finish woeful Europa League campaign on a high

Ademola Lookman's brace ensured a youthful Everton side did not miss Sam Allardyce's presence in Cyprus as they finished their woeful Europa League campaign with a victory. A pre-arranged medical appointment meant new boss Allardyce was not in Nicosia to witness the 3-0 win over Apollon Limassol, the Toffees' first of the group stage, but he will receive a positive assessment of his fringe players and youngsters from stand-in manager Craig Shakespeare. The most glowing review will be reserved for 20-year-old Lookman, who scored two goals in seven first-half minutes, the second of which was a blistering strike from range to cap off a 26-pass move where each Everton player touched the ball, with Nikola Vlasic then adding a third late on. Everton's XI, which featured two debutants - Harry Charsley and Fraser Hornby - was the youngest an English club had selected for a European group-stage fixture in eight years, and Shakespeare also brought on three teenagers for their bows, including 16-year-old Anthony Gordon. The Toffees named a younger starting line-up against BATE Borisov in 2009 when their place in the last 32 had already been assured, and while they selected a youthful team this time because they had already been eliminated, a win meant they at least avoided finishing bottom. Craig Shakespeare took charge in the absence of Sam Allardyce Credit: afp Lookman, who came through at Charlton and was making his 22nd Everton appearance, showed his inexperience when he spurned a great chance in the ninth minute. Davy Klaassen played in the winger and he tricked an Apollon defender by feigning to shoot with his left only to hesitate on his right and allow Tasos Kissas to rush out and block the shot. The visitors went ahead in the 21st minute as an unmarked Lookman dispatched a header into the roof of the net from Vlasic's cross after he had reached the byline via a one-two from Kevin Mirallas. If that featured some good play in the build-up, it was nothing compared to the Toffees' second. Every Everton player touched the ball in the build-up, including goalkeeper Joel Robles, who cleared out to Mirallas on the left flank before the Belgian found Lookman inside. Afforded space and time, he pulled the trigger from distance and his 25-yard attempt was too quick for Kissas. Nikola Vlasic also put his name on the scoresheet Credit: reuters Robles was kept busy before the half ended, saving from Adrian Sardinero and Fotis Papoulis, who flicked home a free-kick only to be adjudged offside as the visitors entered the interval with a two-goal lead. Lookman could have put the game to bed in the 57th minute when he jinked into the box and saw a left-footed try that would have given him a perfect hat-trick stopped by Kissas. Mirallas and Hornby were both denied by Kissas' legs but he would be beaten again eight minutes from time by Vlasic's low finish. The game had long petered out, though, and Shakespeare was able to bring on Nathan Broadhead, Gordon and Alex Denny for maiden senior appearances. None of those will be involved in Sunday's Merseyside derby when Allardyce and Everton's big hitters return, but this was evidence that after a bleak few months, there is cause for optimism about the future at Goodison Park.

Apollon Limassol 0 Everton 3: Ademola Lookman scores twice to finish woeful Europa League campaign on a high

Ademola Lookman's brace ensured a youthful Everton side did not miss Sam Allardyce's presence in Cyprus as they finished their woeful Europa League campaign with a victory. A pre-arranged medical appointment meant new boss Allardyce was not in Nicosia to witness the 3-0 win over Apollon Limassol, the Toffees' first of the group stage, but he will receive a positive assessment of his fringe players and youngsters from stand-in manager Craig Shakespeare. The most glowing review will be reserved for 20-year-old Lookman, who scored two goals in seven first-half minutes, the second of which was a blistering strike from range to cap off a 26-pass move where each Everton player touched the ball, with Nikola Vlasic then adding a third late on. Everton's XI, which featured two debutants - Harry Charsley and Fraser Hornby - was the youngest an English club had selected for a European group-stage fixture in eight years, and Shakespeare also brought on three teenagers for their bows, including 16-year-old Anthony Gordon. The Toffees named a younger starting line-up against BATE Borisov in 2009 when their place in the last 32 had already been assured, and while they selected a youthful team this time because they had already been eliminated, a win meant they at least avoided finishing bottom. Craig Shakespeare took charge in the absence of Sam Allardyce Credit: afp Lookman, who came through at Charlton and was making his 22nd Everton appearance, showed his inexperience when he spurned a great chance in the ninth minute. Davy Klaassen played in the winger and he tricked an Apollon defender by feigning to shoot with his left only to hesitate on his right and allow Tasos Kissas to rush out and block the shot. The visitors went ahead in the 21st minute as an unmarked Lookman dispatched a header into the roof of the net from Vlasic's cross after he had reached the byline via a one-two from Kevin Mirallas. If that featured some good play in the build-up, it was nothing compared to the Toffees' second. Every Everton player touched the ball in the build-up, including goalkeeper Joel Robles, who cleared out to Mirallas on the left flank before the Belgian found Lookman inside. Afforded space and time, he pulled the trigger from distance and his 25-yard attempt was too quick for Kissas. Nikola Vlasic also put his name on the scoresheet Credit: reuters Robles was kept busy before the half ended, saving from Adrian Sardinero and Fotis Papoulis, who flicked home a free-kick only to be adjudged offside as the visitors entered the interval with a two-goal lead. Lookman could have put the game to bed in the 57th minute when he jinked into the box and saw a left-footed try that would have given him a perfect hat-trick stopped by Kissas. Mirallas and Hornby were both denied by Kissas' legs but he would be beaten again eight minutes from time by Vlasic's low finish. The game had long petered out, though, and Shakespeare was able to bring on Nathan Broadhead, Gordon and Alex Denny for maiden senior appearances. None of those will be involved in Sunday's Merseyside derby when Allardyce and Everton's big hitters return, but this was evidence that after a bleak few months, there is cause for optimism about the future at Goodison Park.

Apollon Limassol 0 Everton 3: Ademola Lookman scores twice to finish woeful Europa League campaign on a high

Ademola Lookman's brace ensured a youthful Everton side did not miss Sam Allardyce's presence in Cyprus as they finished their woeful Europa League campaign with a victory. A pre-arranged medical appointment meant new boss Allardyce was not in Nicosia to witness the 3-0 win over Apollon Limassol, the Toffees' first of the group stage, but he will receive a positive assessment of his fringe players and youngsters from stand-in manager Craig Shakespeare. The most glowing review will be reserved for 20-year-old Lookman, who scored two goals in seven first-half minutes, the second of which was a blistering strike from range to cap off a 26-pass move where each Everton player touched the ball, with Nikola Vlasic then adding a third late on. Everton's XI, which featured two debutants - Harry Charsley and Fraser Hornby - was the youngest an English club had selected for a European group-stage fixture in eight years, and Shakespeare also brought on three teenagers for their bows, including 16-year-old Anthony Gordon. The Toffees named a younger starting line-up against BATE Borisov in 2009 when their place in the last 32 had already been assured, and while they selected a youthful team this time because they had already been eliminated, a win meant they at least avoided finishing bottom. Craig Shakespeare took charge in the absence of Sam Allardyce Credit: afp Lookman, who came through at Charlton and was making his 22nd Everton appearance, showed his inexperience when he spurned a great chance in the ninth minute. Davy Klaassen played in the winger and he tricked an Apollon defender by feigning to shoot with his left only to hesitate on his right and allow Tasos Kissas to rush out and block the shot. The visitors went ahead in the 21st minute as an unmarked Lookman dispatched a header into the roof of the net from Vlasic's cross after he had reached the byline via a one-two from Kevin Mirallas. If that featured some good play in the build-up, it was nothing compared to the Toffees' second. Every Everton player touched the ball in the build-up, including goalkeeper Joel Robles, who cleared out to Mirallas on the left flank before the Belgian found Lookman inside. Afforded space and time, he pulled the trigger from distance and his 25-yard attempt was too quick for Kissas. Nikola Vlasic also put his name on the scoresheet Credit: reuters Robles was kept busy before the half ended, saving from Adrian Sardinero and Fotis Papoulis, who flicked home a free-kick only to be adjudged offside as the visitors entered the interval with a two-goal lead. Lookman could have put the game to bed in the 57th minute when he jinked into the box and saw a left-footed try that would have given him a perfect hat-trick stopped by Kissas. Mirallas and Hornby were both denied by Kissas' legs but he would be beaten again eight minutes from time by Vlasic's low finish. The game had long petered out, though, and Shakespeare was able to bring on Nathan Broadhead, Gordon and Alex Denny for maiden senior appearances. None of those will be involved in Sunday's Merseyside derby when Allardyce and Everton's big hitters return, but this was evidence that after a bleak few months, there is cause for optimism about the future at Goodison Park.

What's on TV tonight: Catching a Killer and Love, Lies & Records

Thursday 7 December Catching a Killer: A Bullet Through The Window Channel 4, 9.00pm The most striking thing about Catching a Killer, Channel 4’s ongoing look at how police murder and missing persons investigations work, is the level of access involved. This film follows the fallout from the death of 19-year-old Suhaib Mohammed. It begins with the terrified 999 call stating “My friend just got shot” and ends with the eventual arrest of his killers. Along the way a complex story emerges of a naive teenager who drifted away from his family and whose death was a terrible case of being in the wrong place with the wrong people. It’s Senior Investigating Officer Mike Lynch’s last case before retirement and one he’s therefore doubly determined to solve, but as the investigation continues so his quiet fury over the way in which the dead teenager’s death is dismissed as just another gang death increases. As always though, it is the testimony of the victim’s family which lingers longest. “We knew he’d become more distant, more private, more closed off but I don’t think we realised he was hanging with the wrong people,” says his sister quietly. His devastated father simply notes: “His heart was very soft… he had big dreams.” Sarah Hughes Ross Noble: Off Road Dave, 8.00pm As fans of his previous Dave series (Ross Noble Freewheeling) can tell you, the comedian is a true petrolhead. However, even the enthusiastic Noble might have bitten off more than he can chew this time as he attempts the Scottish Six Days Trial, an event where the world’s best motorbike riders race 100 miles every day across unforgiving terrain. SH Love, Lies & Records BBC One, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s enjoyable drama continues with Judy (Rebecca Front) sending Rob (Adrian Bower) a video of his fiancé Kate’s (Ashley Jensen) “moment of madness” with Rick (Kenny Doughty) – but can Kate get to it first? SH Blitz: The Bombs That Changed Britain BBC Two, 9.00pm This week’s focus is Scotland, where a series of Luftwaffe raids over three nights in March 1941 devastated a community, killing 528 people, including 15 members of the same family. For the tightknit society of shipbuilders and factory workers, the aftermath was devastating; many left Clydebank, never to return. SH Live at the Apollo BBC Two, 10.00pm Our host is the sharp, smart and amiable Nish Kumar. He’s joined by the laid-back Irish comic David O’Doherty and rising star Luisa Omielan, who recently rewrote her whole act in the light of her mother’s death from cancer. SH When Rock Arrived in North Korea: Liberation Day: Storyville BBC Four, 11.00pm This hugely entertaining look at how Slovenian art rockers Laibach became the first Western band to play in North Korea works largely because of the eccentric Norwegian director Morten Traavik’s bureaucrat-wrangling skills. The band themselves prove elusive, although the concert footage hammers home just how odd the occasion was. “There are all kinds of music – now I know there’s this kind of music too,” notes one bemused attendee. SH Born to Be Free: Saving Russia’s Whales Channel 4, 11.25pm No documentary is likely to make you angrier this week than Gayane Petrosyan’s bleak and brilliant film about the trade in Beluga whales. She uncovers the terrible fates of 18 belugas bought to Utrish Marine Station to be sold to aquariums across the world. SH Rugby Union: Varsity Match: Oxford University v Cambridge University Thursday, BBC Two, 2.45pm The 136th staging of the annual contest between the two universities takes place at Twickenham. Cambridge prevailed last year to end Oxford’s record-breaking six-year winning streak, and have the superior head-to-head record with 62 wins to their opponents’ 59. The match kicks off at 3.00pm. SH Austin Powers: The Spy Who S*****d Me (1999) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 9.00pm The successful franchise remains nothing more than daft entertainment, but its puerile jokes and cultural referencing still manage to elicit laughs. The “groovy” spy with the wonky teeth (Mike Myers) has his mojo stolen by his arch nemesis Dr Evil (also Myers) and must travel back in time to the swinging Sixties to get it back. Black Sea (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Written by Dennis Kelly (who co-wrote the musical Matilda) and starring Jude Law, this submarine thriller about a hunt for Nazi gold in a long-lost U-boat is less than the sum of its parts. However, a host of decent character actors – the best of whom, David Threlfall, steals the show – keep things buoyant and the set piece outside the sub, involving aquatic spacesuits and bars of gold, is pulse-pinging. 16 Blocks (2006) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 11.35pm Steered brilliantly by director Richard Donner (Superman, The Goonies) Bruce Willis plays Jack Mosley, a detective who’s assigned to escort prisoner Eddie Bunker (Mos Def) to a Grand Jury hearing in this frantic buddy-action film. This may sound simple, but Mosley’s colleagues don’t want Bunker to make it – because he’s a witness in a police corruption case that could bring their worlds crashing down. Friday 8 December Claire Foy in 'The Crown' The Crown Netflix, from today Expectations could hardly be higher for the return of Netflix’s most lavish series. Although the spectacle and horror of the war have passed, the era of Anthony Eden and Harold McMillan is arguably more intriguing for being less frequently dramatised, and Peter Morgan explores the hypocrisies and compromises inherent in the politics of a nation whose global influence is in decline. Anton Lesser makes a ruthless, discreet McMillan, while Jeremy Northam is once again superb as Eden, a man not low on self-confidence yet forced to face his limitations as the Suez Crisis sees him outmanoeuvred. But the focal point of course is the royal family, and specifically the relationship between Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip: fundamentally solid in its early years, but now subject to considerable stress and strain as the couple drift apart over niggling doubts and suspected betrayals. Claire Foy and Matt Smith are magnificent in the lead roles, rising to the challenges of Morgan’s script to make plausible his educated guesswork and speculations over long-rumoured private affairs. The blend of spectacle and attention to detail remains striking. Gabriel Tate The Grand Tour Amazon Prime Video, from today Jeremy Clarkson, Richard Hammond and James May return for a second go-round of megastar guests, big-budget stunts in exotic locales, and parochial studio chat. The series opens with Ricky Wilson v David Hasselhoff in new segment Celebrity Face Off, and a comparison of a Lamborghini, a hybrid Honda and an electric supercar in a hill-climb race that – as anyone who recalls the headlines from earlier this year will know – goes horribly wrong. GT Judge Rinder’s Crown Court ITV, 8.00pm Two daytime television classics, one ancient and one modern, collide in this bizarre two-parter which sees Judge Robert Rinder, mediator of petty domestic disputes, presiding over a fictional case of arsenic poisoning. As per the original Crown Court, the jurors are members of the public. GT Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm The chefs meet a childhood hero as Mark Hamill, soon to return to cinemas as Luke Skywalker, joins them to learn about making perfect roast beef and Yorkshire puddings, plus a Caesar salad and a seafood feast. GT Brunel: the Man Who Built Britain Channel 5, 8.00pm A giant of the Industrial Revolution, Isambard Kingdom Brunel had a curious private life to match his towering professional achievements. The ever-reliable Rob Bell begins his two-part profile with Brunel’s first major project, the Thames Tunnel. GT The Year in Music 2017 BBC Two, 9.00pm The BBC Music Awards follow in the footsteps of BBC Sports Personality of the Year and incorporate a review of the year into the bargain. Here, Claudia Winkelman and Clara Amfo look back on the past 12 months with contributors including Stormzy, Nile Rodgers and Liam Gallagher. GT Classic Album: American Pie: Don McLean BBC Four, 9.00pm McLean’s sophomore album is these days less venerated than other landmarks of the era (Blue, Tapestry, After the Goldrush); it is perhaps overshadowed by its monumental title song whose allusive, elusive lyrics offered an alternate history of rock ’n’ roll and eulogy for the hippy dream. Yet there was always more to it, as this diligent documentary asserts. GT Prisoners (2013) ★★★☆☆ More4, 9.00pm This drama, which centres on the abduction of two girls, is harrowing but it succeeds in sustaining its tension to the end. Hugh Jackman is cast into darkness when his six-year-old daughter is kidnapped. Jake Gyllenhaal is the detective in charge of the case, and the pair lock horns early on. What we are then presented with is a criminal puzzle and a very committed cast, which also includes Terrence Howard.  Legend (2015) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Tom Hardy gives a solid, convincing performance as east London gangster Reggie Kray but his caricatured portrayal of twin brother Ronnie lets him down, and his inconsistent performance leads to an entertaining though muddled film. Emily Browning, however, gives just the right mix of defiance and despair as Frances Shea, Reggie’s put-upon wife. Watch out for some particularly gory scenes. Dead Calm (1989) ★★★☆☆ W, 9.00pm In her first big film role, Nicole Kidman displays pluck and vulnerability as Rae Ingram, a woman who loses her infant son in a car accident, and consents to a long recovery at sea, on a luxury yacht called the Saracen. Her husband John (Sam Neill) is an experienced naval officer and stand-up guy, and though he knows banishing Rae’s guilt and grief is going to be tough, he has no idea what shock therapy fate has in mind. Saturday 9 December John Noakes and Shep in 1978 Credit: HULTON  John Noakes: TV Hero BBC Two, 5.30pm One quarter of the definitive Blue Peter foursome, alongside Peter Purves, Valerie Singleton and Shep, John Noakes was both its longest-serving presenter and one of its very finest. A gifted communicator, earnest when he had to be but more often game for anything, whether that be a laugh or a lunatic stunt. This affectionate profile of Noakes, who died in May, aged 83, after many years with Alzheimer’s, pivots on perhaps his two best-loved moments. First, there’s a climb up Nelson’s Column, sans ropes or safety harnesses, that was every bit as daft and dangerous as it looked and ample testament to his dauntlessness. That impish sense of humour is demonstrated by the notorious appearance of Lulu the elephant, who relieved herself on the floor before rampaging across the studio and over Noakes’s foot. Ever the entertainer, he milked both for all they were worth. His relationship with the series was an equivocal one and he reportedly resented his clownish persona, but this tribute skirts any controversy in favour of warm nostalgia, with familiar Blue Peter faces including Biddy Baxter and Lesley Judd recalling the man and his work. GT Premier League Football: West Ham United v Chelsea Sky Sports Main Event, 11.30am Having recovered from a goal down to beat Newcastle 3-1 last Saturday, with Eden Hazard helping himself to a brace, Chelsea travel across London to face West Ham United. The home side, who are currently in the relegation zone, will have taken plenty of positives from their 2-1 defeat at Manchester City last Sunday – namely, their defensive display. A similarly obdurate performance here and new manager David Moyes might get a share of the spoils this time. When these sides met at the London Stadium last season, West Ham lost 2-1. PS European Rugby Champions Cup: Toulon v Bath Sky Sports Main Event, 5.15pm Two wins from two reads the stats for both sides so far in this season’s European Champions Cup – at least one of these 100 per cent records will end at Stade Mayol. Bath come into this match on the back of a 42-29 defeat by Exeter, but before that they’d won four on the bounce, with Freddie Burns impressing at fly-half. After the autumn internationals, director of rugby Todd Blackadder now has an embarrassment of riches from which to pick: most notably, England backs Anthony Watson, Semesa Rokoduguni and Jonathan Joseph. Toulon, meanwhile, ended a three-match losing streak on Saturday when they beat Lyon 39-11. PS Strictly Come Dancing BBC One, 6.45pm The five remaining couples must perform two routines in this semi-final, and with barely a strand of lace between them, expect forensic criticism from the judges. Sunday’s results show will reveal the final four and there will be a performance from Craig David. GT Michael McIntyre’s Big Show BBC One, 8.20pm Wringing his contacts book dry, McIntyre ropes in guests including TV presenters Marvin and Rochelle Humes (taking part in the game Send to All) and pop rock band The Vamps for more fun. GT Witnesses: a Frozen Death BBC Four, 9.00pm and 9.55pm Even in this saturated market for foreign-language thrillers, Witnesses stands out for its lack of gimmicks – though without ever quite scaling the heights of The Bridge or Spiral. Here, Sandra’s (Marie Dompnier) pursuit of the killer takes her into a forest and an orphanage. GT The White Princess Drama, 9.00pm and 10.20pm The excellent Jodie Comer anchors the series to its conclusion tonight with another double bill, as Elizabeth of York (Comer) and Henry VII (Jacob Collins-Levy) struggle to maintain a united front. GT Peter Blake: Pop Art Life Sky Arts, 9.00pm While there is more to Peter Blake’s work than his cover for Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, music has played a crucial role in the development of his art and reputation. This engaging film digs deeply into a mutually fruitful relationship. GT Casualty BBC One, 9.20pm Christmas approaches, bringing annual trauma and discord for the A&E team. Tonight finds Elle’s (Jaye Griffiths) tearaway son Blake (Kai Thorne) going off the rails in response to her suggestion that she spend the festive period with her new boyfriend. Polly (Sophia Di Martino), meanwhile, continues to be unimpressed by Max (Jamie Davis). GT Through the Keyhole: I’m a Celebrity… get me out of here! ITV, 9.50pm The living, breathing definition of an acquired taste, Keith Lemon returns for a fifth series of the show once helmed by David Frost. Guests include Jimmy Carr, Myleene Klass and Tony Blackburn. GT Gremlins 2: The New Batch (1990) ★★★☆☆ Christmas Gold, 9.40pm Whereas Joe Dante’s original monster hit was a deliciously dark horror flick (and staple Christmas hit) with touches of wry humour, this inferior sequel is essentially a straight-up, riotous comedy, replete with in-jokes and movie references. This time, the gremlins run amok in a Manhattan high-rise building called Clamp Tower, owned by John Glover’s Donald Trump-like mogul. The Cider House Rules (1999) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.15pm John Irving’s adaptation of his own 1985 novel features a fine Tobey Maguire and Michael Caine, who won an Oscar (only his second at the time). Irving won one too, for Best Screenplay, and there’s no doubt the story is moving, though this version – about an orphan (Maguire) and a doctor (Caine) who performs illegal abortions – is at times a bit saccharine. Paul Rudd co-stars; Lasse Hallström directs. The Drop (2014) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 11.35pm Tom Hardy anchors this tale of simmering malfeasance as the tender of a Brooklyn bar designated as the drop for ill-gotten gains. Dennis Lehane adapts his own short story Animal Rescue, and makes a perfect team with Belgian director Michaël R Roskam, who gets a tamped-down, shuffling and beautifully calibrated star turn out of Hardy. Sopranos star James Gandolfini adds a burly gravitas in what would be his final movie. Sunday 10 December Jumbo with keeper Matthew Scott in 1882 Credit: BBC Attenborough and the Giant Elephant BBC One, 9.00pm Can we ever have too much Attenborough? It seems not, as right in the foaming wake of the fabulous Blue Planet II (which concludes tonight, see preview below) comes this absorbing, bittersweet tale of the world’s first animal superstar – Jumbo the elephant. It’s a sad story, really. Jumbo shot to fame shortly after his arrival at London Zoo as an orphan in around 1861, but he didn’t get much from the deal. As Attenborough says, his captive life was “troubled, fuelled by alcohol, terrifying fits of violence, a near mystical relationship with his keeper and a tragic end that seems hard to believe”. Which is more than enough to hold the attention for an hour as he joins an international team examining Jumbo’s preserved skeleton at New York’s Museum of Natural History. Attenborough also pokes about in archives at London Zoo, sanctuaries in the Maasai Mara and Tennessee, and Ontario where Jumbo met his very sad end, building as complete a picture of this magnificent creature and his global travels as has ever been assembled. All the while it spreads a positive conservationist message and gives thanks that attitudes are more enlightened now than in Victorian times. GO Premier League Football: Liverpool v Everton & Manchester United v Manchester City Sky Sports Main Event, 1.15pm & 4.15pm “Super Sunday” lives up to its hyperbolic billing, with two potentially exhilarating derbies. First up, we’re at Anfield where Liverpool, fresh from their 5-1 demolition of Brighton, host Everton, who found some form last week, following up their 4-0 win at home to West Ham United with a 2-0 victory against Huddersfield. Later, in the 4.30pm kick-off, José Mourinho and Pep Guardiola renew rivalries as second-placed United host leaders City at Old Trafford. Expect it to be tight. PS Britain’s Wildest Weather 2017 Channel 4, 6.30pm This year has not, so far, been as extreme as some but, given the number of smartphone-wielding citizen journalists, there’s plenty of jaw-dropping footage of every extreme weather event that occurred, among them devastating floods, tornadoes and hair-raising lightning strikes. GO  Blue Planet II BBC One, 8.00pm This extraordinary series concludes with an undeniably depressing assessment of mankind’s impact on the marine environment. But David Attenborough, as ever, prefers to put the emphasis on hope. So there’s plenty of uplift too with stories of species brought back from extinction’s brink. GO Coastal Railways with Julie Walters Channel 4, 8.00pm Julie Walters heads for Cornwall on the Great Western route, recalling her childhood holidays in Torquay. She then boards a steam train at Paignton, hears tales of smugglers in Polperro and fills up on cakes in Penzance. GO Leonora Carrington: the Lost Surrealist BBC Four, 9.00pm This fascinating film tells the story of rebellious upper-class British artist Leonora Carrington, who worked alongside Ernst, Breton and Éluard in Paris at the height of the surrealist movement, yet died in 2011 all but forgotten in Mexico. Director Teresa Griffiths mixes interviews and biographical material with experimental animation and tableaux to bring Carrington’s work vividly to life. GO I’m a Celebrity… Get Me Out of Here! ITV, 9.00pm Seventeen series in and the public appetite for watching celebrities endure humiliation and repulsion shows little sign of drying up. This year’s launch pulled in ITV’s biggest audience of 2017. The final will no doubt draw as big a crowd again. GO Babylon Berlin Sky Atlantic, from 9.00pm Three more atmospheric episodes of the gripping crime series set in the bohemian, political Weimar Germany of the late Twenties. Detective Rath’s (Volker Bruch) investigation uncovers dangerous evidence of a shocking military conspiracy. GO The Sky At Night BBC Four, 10.00pm As well as more stargazing from the Royal Observatory, Maggie Aderin-Pocock is in Norway to see the Northern Lights. GO Ben-Hur (1959) ★★★★★ ITV3, 2.45pm A majestic slice of Hollywood history, this Roman-era melodrama directed by William Wyler and starring Charlton Heston won 11 Academy Awards (not equalled until Titanic in 1997). It still makes for magnificent viewing. Set in 26AD, it tells the story of a Jewish prince who clashes with the Roman governor and ends up enslaved, desperately plotting his revenge. The Sorcerer’s Apprentice (2010) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 3.00pm Jerry Bruckheimer gives the famous sequence from Disney’s Fantasia a fun, live-action reboot. Student Dave (Jay Baruchel) inherits Merlin’s powers, placing him in a power struggle between Balthazar (Nicolas Cage) and Horvath (Alfred Molina). Sadly there are just two scenes with broomsticks to link it to the original. Toby Kebbel is amusing as a stage musician co-opted by the forces of evil. Toy Story (1995) ★★★★★ BBC One, 3.35pm The idea of the first fully computer-generated animated film didn’t have those who had been weaned on the hand-drawn delights of Disney jumping for joy. However, with this beautiful tale, Pixar pushed animation to a new level – the premise, pace and emotion are all pitched perfectly. Whether it’s your first or 400th viewing, the story of toy cowboy Woody (Tom Hanks) and plastic spaceman Buzz Lightyear (Tim Allen) is a joy. Monday 11 December Faye Marsa, Sarah Parish and Amara Karan in Bancroft Credit: ITV Bancroft ITV, 9.00pm With so many crime dramas clogging up the television schedules it can be hard for a new series to stand out and at first ITV’s latest four-parter seems unlikely to break the mould. There’s an ambitious female cop with a possibly troubled past (the always reliable Sarah Parish), a striving younger cop who is desperate to move up the ranks (Faye Marsay) and the usual crop of jobsworths and strivers (Charles Babalola is particularly good as the married fellow officer Marsay’s Katherine should be steering well clear of). It’s all perfectly well done with a solid script from Kate Brooke (Mr Selfridge) but it seems like nothing special. Then, three quarters of the way through this first episode, something genuinely interesting happens: Bancroft’s secrets are revealed to be very dark indeed just as Katherine’s cold case involving the break-in and violent murder of a young woman in 1990 starts hotting up. With the stakes suddenly raised Bancroft spins off into a dark tale of the lengths that people go to keep the past buried and the stage is set for an intriguing game of secrets and lies. Smart scheduling sees the rest of the story play out over consecutive nights. SH Street Auction BBC One, 11.00am Paul Martin returns with a new series of the surprisingly addictive show in which people band together to raise funds for a member of their community by auctioning off hidden treasures. The fun comes from the unusual objects unearthed from garages and attics. SH Nigella’s Christmas Table BBC Two, 8.00pm If anything is guaranteed to Nigella put into purring overload it’s Christmas. The food on offer includes roast duck with orange, soy and ginger, but this is really about mood rather than food. SH   Paul Hollywood: A Baker’s Life Channel 4, 8.00pm Episode three of this genial series sees Hollywood looking back over his career and his time spent working at the Cliveden House Hotel in Berkshire. There’s also a festive get-together in Merseyside and some seasonal Danish pastries, which look delicious. SH The Art That Made Mexico: Paradise, Power and Prayers BBC Four, 9.00pm It’s always a pleasure to find a series that sheds new light on a subject, and so it is with artist Alinka Echeverria’s enthralling films about Mexico’s art. Of course, there are the key points: conquest, independence, dictatorship, revolution and figures such as Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo, but what the commentary gives us here is the context for both the history and the artists. This is true of this episode that looks at the relationship between art and power, colonialism and control while examining the enduring power of Kahlo’s work and myth. SH Handmade in Mexico BBC Four, 10.00pm The focus here is on Mexico’s celebrated Tree of Life sculptures, those gaudy, gorgeous interpretations of everything from the creation myth to the resurrection of Christ and the Day of the Dead. It’s a fascinating half-hour in which we see the amount of work and detail that goes into each piece. SH White Right: Meeting the Enemy: Exposure ITV, 10.40pm; STV, 11.05pm; UTV, 11.40pm; Wales, 11.10pm This intriguing-sounding documentary sees the Bafta-nominated Deeyah Khan (Jihad: A Story of the Others) investigate white extremism in the US. Khan visits white nationalist groups, attends a far-right rally and asks why this poisonous ideology is resurgent. SH The Black Swan (1942) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 2.35pm No, this is not the film about the ageing ballet dancer and the young ingénue; this is about high adventure on the seven seas. When Laird Cregar’s Captain Morgan becomes Governor of Jamaica, he promises to put an end to piracy. But things don’t go smoothly, especially when his assistant (Tyrone Power) kidnaps the ex-governor’s beautiful daughter (Maureen O’Hara). This was the final film of silent star Helene Costello. Mamma Mia! (2008) ★★★☆☆ ITV3, 7.50pm This musical comedy, directed by Phyllida Lloyd and set to Abba’s hits, is pure escapism. It’s naff, but that’s its selling point, as stars Meryl Streep, Pierce Brosnan and Julie Walters place tongues firmly in cheeks. At 59, Streep deserved more credit for doing the splits than for her role as a boho mother living on a Greek island whose daughter (Amanda Seyfried) tries to find out who her biological father is. Blood Diamond (2006) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 8.00pm The diamond industry of Sierra Leone is the subject of this striking thriller. Djimon Hounsou stars as a fisherman forced to work in the fields, who finds and hides a rare pink gem. His life is changed when he meets Leonardo DiCaprio’s self-serving mercenary and Jennifer Connelly’s well-meaning journalist. DiCaprio was Oscar-nominated, but lost to Forest Whitaker for The Last King of Scotland. Tuesday 12 December Paul Ready, Diane Morgan and Anna Maxwell-Martin Credit: BBC Motherland BBC Two, 10.00pm Dispensing with the calamitous set pieces of previous episodes and instead documenting the quiet desperation of this ill-starred band of sisters (plus one brother), this superb, exhausting sitcom from a writing supergroup including Graham Linehan and Sharon Horgan has been an exquisitely painful delight. We join Julia (Anna Maxwell Martin) in an unusually good place, with everything running smoothly thanks to her new Australian nanny, Lyndsey (Sarah Kendall). The kids are clean and happy, the school run is easy, the fridge is stocked – but could she be too good to be true? Amanda (Lucy Punch) has gone to ground after the revelation over her threesome, while her hapless confidant, Kevin (Paul Ready), is desperate to avoid having to get a job. And, should all the mugging get too much, there’s deadpan Liz (Diane Morgan), negotiating tricky relations with her dismal ex and his new, pregnant partner. After an orgy of passive aggression and desperate people in denial, the façades crack, just a little. Happily everyone reverts to fundamentally appalling type just in time for the end of the series and a surely inevitable recommission. GT Judd Apatow: the Return Netflix, from today After 25 years away from stand-up, the comedy zelig whose fingerprints are over everything from Knocked Up and Girls to Freaks and Geeks and Bridesmaids returns for a special set in Montreal, recorded in July. GT Masterchef: the Professionals BBC Two, 8.00pm After the hopefuls have tackled an invention test and rustled up a dish dedicated to one of their inspirations, Marcus Wareing, Monica Galletti and Gregg Wallace eliminate another two contenders, leaving only six in the contest. GT The A Word BBC One, 9.00pm Joe’s (brilliant Max Vento) family comes together for an end of year show at his old school – tears, acrimony and reconciliation ensue in the conclusion of Peter Bowker’s finely wrought, well-performed drama. A third series should surely be a formality. GT Invasion! with Sam Willis BBC Four, 9.00pm While not quite attaining Lucy Worsley levels of gonzo history, Dr Sam Willis is an enthusiastic and knowledgeable host not above the odd stunt to prove a point. This second episode of a series documenting the incursions that have shaped our nation and its bloodline examines the differing techniques and goals of the invaders. There are the Barbary Corsaire pirates who settled on Lundy Island, King Louis the Lion, invited to invade and crowned by disgruntled nobles, and the Dutch forces that negotiated the Medway just a year prior to the Glorious Revolution. Further proof, if any were needed, that Britain is a mongrel nation and all the better for it. GT The World’s Most Expensive Presents Channel 4, 9.00pm Eyeball-melting opulence and appalling lack of taste do battle with considerable craftsmanship and class in this startling film featuring everything from gold-plated pushbikes to a poker set in alligator-hide case. GT Sports Personality of the Year 2017: The Contenders BBC One, 10.45pm; Wales, 11.10pm; Scotland, 11.45pm With reigning title-holder Andy Murray’s injury-hit year effectively ruling him out of contention, Anthony Joshua, Chris Froome, Lewis Hamilton, Jo Konta and Mo Farah will be headlining this year’s roster after another 12 months of outstanding achievement in British sport. The runners and riders are introduced tonight. GT Shane (1953) ★★★★☆ Film4, 3.45pm There are few Westerns that examine the depths of human emotions, but this film by George Stevens is one of them and has become a landmark of cinema. Shane (Alan Ladd) is a cowboy who finds himself idolised for the way that he handles himself in the face of a landowner’s heavies. The climax is a face-off between Shane and smiling, whispering, Oscar-nominated Jack Palance, as the original man in black. A must-see. Mr & Mrs Smith (2005) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 9.00pm A daft comedy thriller which is perhaps best remembered for being the film that introduced Brad Pitt to Angelina Jolie. They play a couple whose failing marriage is spiced up dramatically when each discovers that the other secretly works as an assassin. Let down by a weak script, the film is held together by the chemistry between its two leads. Vince Vaughn and Adam Brody co-star. Moonraker (1979) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm The 11th film in the Bond series, and the fourth to star Roger Moore as the dapper MI6 agent, involves the theft of a space shuttle. It’s one of the weaker Bond films and at times seems more of a comedy than a tense action adventure, but it’s enjoyably frivolous. Michael Lonsdale plays resident baddie Hugo Drax who pinches the aforementioned space shuttle to help along his plan to wipe out the world’s population. Wednesday 13 December Barbara Schulz in Vanished by the Lake Credit: Channel 4 Vanished by the Lake Channel 4, 10.00pm This haunting French crime drama centres on a teenage girl who goes missing at a festival. It’s hardly an original set-up, but much like last year’s hit Gallic import The Disappearance, based on an almost identical premise, the mix of youthful promise cut short and fierce small-town intrigue quickly compels. The girl in question is Chloé Delval (Charlie Joirkin), and as news of her disappearance spreads, memories of a similar 15-year-old case in which two other girls vanished at the same celebration are revived. Into the fray steps striking Parisian detective Lise Stocker (Barbara Schulz), who has returned home to look after her ill mother, but is soon swept up by the case as its personal implications begin to unfold. All of the hallmarks of the Nordic noir genre are present, from the evocative setting (here a Broadchurch-style coastal backdrop) to the close-knit neighbours with secrets to hide. Nevertheless, this opening episode is an effective tension builder and the human impact of the mystery – particularly on Chloé’s fracturing parents – is powerfully moving. Once episode one finishes, the full series will be available to watch on All 4. TD Mary Berry’s Country House Secrets BBC One, 8.00pm Mary Berry rounds off her tour of Britain’s stately homes at Goodwood House, where she is suitably gushing over its royal history and grand interiors. Berry is treated to a hair-raising lap of the nearby motor circuit and whips up a four-tier cake for the cricket tea. TD The Secret Life of the Zoo Channel 4, 8.00pm The plight of the endangered Javan green magpie is on the agenda as keepers at Chester Zoo attempt to breed youngster Permata with older bird Netuba. Elsewhere, a zebra battle breaks out when newcomer Okoth arrives. TD Peaky Blinders BBC Two, 9.00pm A burst of gunfire opens the penultimate episode of period gangster antics, as Tommy Shelby (Cillian Murphy) faces off against mafia honcho Luca Changretta (Adrien Brody). An army colonel, meanwhile, questions Ada (Sophie Rundle) about her Communist past. TD The Channel: The World’s Busiest Waterway Channel 4, 9.00pm The fallout from Project Nemo, the new underwater electricity cable being laid between Belgium and Britain, is explored. We follow the Nemo manager struggling to avoid costly delays and the fisherman whose catch is being compromised by the work. TD Royal Academy: Painting the Future Sky Arts, 9.00pm Virtual reality (VR) is predicted to become the go-to place for everything from entertainment to work. The Royal Academy is getting in on the act with a new exhibition which explores the potential of the medium. This film follows the show’s creation with the artists, including sculptor Antony Gormley, portraitist Jonathan Yeo and Turner Prize-nominee Yinka Shonibare, who are producing works that use the technology to trace the history of the body in art. TD David Hockney: Time Reclaimed Sky Arts, 10.30pm This tribute to David Hockney aims to get beyond the glamour that surrounds his reputation, and focus on the personal aspects of his work. Anecdotes, images and analysis of the pictures themselves highlight the individuality expressed in each period of Hockney’s career, suggesting a diverse oeuvre that defies classification. TD Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am George Roy Hill directed two of the most popular films ever: Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969) and The Sting (1973). But this indifferent Julie Andrews musical of the flapper era was first. There’s much to enjoy in the story of a naive woman who leaves her rural roots behind to seek fortune and romance in Twenties New York. James Fox, as a spiffing salesman, is a particular highlight. The Three Musketeers (2011) ★★☆☆☆ E4, 8.00pm Paul W S Anderson’s adaptation of Alexandre Dumas’ novel is faithful in plot – Porthos, Athos and Aramis (Ray Stevenson, Matthew Macfadyen, Luke Evans), and disciple d’Artagnan (Logan Lerman), are sent to retrieve the French Queen’s (Juno Temple) necklace. The tone, however, is half action-pantomime, half candy-coloured steampunk comic – fun but terribly slapdash. Poltergeist (1982) ★★★★☆ TCM, 11.15pm Director Tobe Hooper, who made The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, tones down the gut-churning horror but still ramps up the tension to nightmare levels in this Steven Spielberg-produced chiller. It has one of cinema’s most spine-tinglingly scary moments: “They’re here,” sing-songs a little girl kneeling before the TV. “They” are the spirits, at first playful then increasingly malevolent, who terrorise a suburban family. Thursday 14 December Lord Sugar Credit: BBC The Apprentice: Why I Fired Them BBC One, 8.00pm In the wake of last night’s excoriating interview round, and with this Sunday’s final rapidly approaching to decide who will win a £250,000 investment and the mentoring opportunity of a lifetime, Lord Sugar makes his most personal appearance of the series. Other than those brief to-camera inserts that roll out as taxi cabs ferry freshly defenestrated candidates away from Sugar Towers to forever dream of fortunes that might have been made, this is one of few occasions in each “process” when Lord Sugar appears on screen away from the wannabe tycoons and talking to viewers directly. And he makes the most of it with his trademark witty-gritty line in East End charm, although professionalism usually prevents him from really dishing the behind-the-scenes dirt on why he thought 16 of them worthy only of the tip of his boot. Instead he looks back over this 13th series identifying the key commercial and strategic errors that led to each of his firing finger decisions, and what ultimately marked out the two finalists from the others. It’s a lot to get through in an hour but, as series recaps go, it’s usually a hoot. GO Ashes Cricket: Australia v England BT Sport 1, 1.30am The enduring Ashes Down Under conundrum: wake up early to watch it or stay up late? The third Test, held at the WACA Ground in Perth, gets under way in the early hours of Thursday morning, with England hoping to bounce back from two demoralising defeats. Lose this one and captain Joe Root will have to surrender the urn to the Aussies. PS European Tour Golf: The Indonesian Masters Sky Sports Main Event, 6.00am It’s the opening day of the tournament at the Royale Jakarta Golf Club, where Thailand’s Poom Saksansin won the title last year. Saksansin shot an overall score of 270 to finish on -18, five strokes ahead of joint runners-up Masahiro Kawamura of Japan and fellow Thai players Phachara Khongwatmai and Suradit Yongcharoenchai. PS Amazing Spaces Snow and Ice Special Channel 4, 8.00pm George Clarke and his inventive sidekick Will Hardie travel to Norway’s remoter parts to check out why this small country on the edge of Europe punches above its weight in architecture and design. Could it be something to do with the cold weather, they wonder? GO Love, Lies & Records BBC One, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama about the romance of working at a Leeds registry office delivers on melodrama, if not subtlety. In this penultimate episode Kate (Ashley Jensen) struggles to make a decision after Rob’s (Adrian Bower) surprise proposal. GO Blitz: the Bombs That Changed Britain BBC Two, 9.00pm The final edition looks at the horrific impact of German incendiary bombs, in particular one that set a church ablaze in Bristol in November 1940 and started a firestorm that ravaged the city’s historic centre. GO The Tunnel: Vengeance Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Sky’s award-winning version of The Bridge (its milieu that of British and French police teams linked by the Channel Tunnel) returns for a third and final run. A pity, as Stephen Dillane as spiky detective and Clémence Poésy as his emotionally remote French opposite number make an appealing pair. This first of six episodes packs in plenty of action as the pair set out to find the link between a burnt-out trawler and a maintenance worker attacked by a plague of rats. GO Extraordinary Teens: School of Life and Deaf Channel 4, 10.00pm This absorbing film follows a year in the life of Mary Hare Boarding School for deaf pupils in Berkshire. Seen through the eyes of a 15-year-old about to undergo a potentially life-changing cochlear implant, this film gives a profound sense of the physical and emotional complexities of growing up deaf. GO The Russell Howard Hour Sky One, 10.00pm We’ve reached the penultimate episode of this excellent topical comedy series. It’s little more than an extended version of BBC Three’s (and later BBC Two’s) Good News but that’s exactly what fans (and Sky, who snapped Howard up) wanted and he has delivered, pushing his brand of highly topical, politically aware, positive reinforcement stand-up with aplomb. GO Life (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Daniel Espinosa’s Earth-orbiting suspense flick was released less than two months before Ridley Scott’s new chapter in his Alien franchise, and bears many of the same hallmarks. It’s also a little bit Gravity. Ryan Reynolds is one of a crew of astronauts aboard a space station conducting research into life on Mars. In terms of entertainment, the film does its baseline job of getting you to chew your nails off. There’s Something About Mary (1998) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 9.00pm There are bad taste jokes in abundance in this comedy from the Farrelly Brothers. Ben Stiller stars as Ted, a shy man who realises he’s still in love with Mary (Cameron Diaz, proving her comic abilities), the date he tried to take to prom 13 years ago. So, to track her down, he hires an oily private eye (Matt Dillon) who also fallsin love with her and sets out to keep the pair apart. Gone in 60 Seconds (2000) ★★★☆☆ Universal Channel, 9.00pm Nicolas Cage has top billing in Dominic Sena’s remake of the 1974 cult film – a mind-numbingly testosterone-laced ride. Cage and Angelina Jolie are among a crew of thieves who must steal 50 cars in 72 hours to stop the murder of Cage’s brother. It’s more than serviceable entertainment, plus car aficionados will have fun spotting the Cadillacs and Corvettes. Friday 15 December Paul, Andy, Cynthia and Diana in The Sweet Makers Credit: BBC The Sweet Makers at Christmas BBC Two, 9.00pm Following their enjoyable three-part series earlier this year, BBC Two’s Sweet Makers return for this one-off Christmas special looking at changing treats from Georgian times to the Twenties. As before, the show is a lovely mix of baking and interesting social history with Emma Dabiri and Dr Annie Gray, who fill us in on how each era viewed Christmas and how confectionery changes over time. The show’s highlight comes during the Victorian Era, also known as the moment when Christmas as we know it was invented, as chocolatiers Paul A Young and Diane Short, bespoke cake decorator Cynthia Stroud and sweet consultant Andy Baxendale recreate a Boar’s Head cake. “That’s the most bonkers thing we’ve ever made,” notes Young, looking at the finished result, which is rich in chocolate, beautifully decorated and featuring unnervingly glazed eyes. He’s right but it also looks fabulous, as do the intricate Twelfth Cakes, a speciality in Georgian times. The Twenties brings with it the wonderful news that before Terry’s invented the chocolate orange they introduced the chocolate apple to the world, before looking to the future and the invention of Lord Mackintosh’s Quality Street. SH Jean-Claude Van Johnson Amazon Prime Video, from today This delightfully silly new series sees Jean-Claude Van Damme as a retired action film star with a secret: he’s a special agent and he wants back in the game. It’s inspired mayhem anchored by a winning performance from the laconic Van Damme. SH Trollhunters Netflix, from today Guillermo del Toro’s inventive animation returns for a second series, and it features the voice of the late Anton Yelchin as reluctant hero Jim Lake Jnr. The story continues where the first series left off, and sees Jim adventure deeper into the Troll world to battle the leader of the Darklands. This series also features Mark Hamill and Game of Thrones’s Lena Headey. SH Judge Rinder’s Crown Court ITV, 8.00pm; not STV or UTV; Wales, 11.10pm Judge Rinder’s reboot of classic Seventies series Crown Court might lack the big-name actors of the original but its meld of real-life crime and courtroom drama is just as addictive. Tonight, the jury decides if James Byron (Rupert Young) murdered his wife. SH Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Sarah Millican is a brave guest of Oliver and Doherty – brave because it swiftly transpires that cooking really isn’t her thing. But Oliver manages to bite his tongue while showing her how to cook her favourite microwave meal from scratch. SH Have I Got News for You BBC One, 9.00pm The 54th series of the satirical news quiz comes to an end with the ever-reliable David Tennant in the host’s chair. It has been a patchy series, which was marked by a new low when Jo Brand had to explain why sexual harassment jokes weren’t funny to the male panellists. So let’s hope it goes out on a high. SH Roy Orbison: Love Hurts BBC Four, 9.30pm Roy Orbison’s three sons, Wesley, Roy Jnr and Alex, take centre stage to discuss their father in this emotional documentary. SH The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm Prepare for Star Wars: The Last Jedi overload as John Boyega, Daisy Ridley and Mark Hamill join Norton on the sofa. Don’t expect any spoilers but there’s sure to be some nice eulogies to the late Carrie Fisher. SH Before I Go to Sleep (2014) ★★★☆☆ More4, 9.00pm Nicole Kidman and Colin Firth star in this uninvolving thriller based on SJ Watson’s twisty bestseller. Kidman plays a woman who, after suffering a head injury, has no idea who she is or who the man sleeping next to her might be (it’s Colin Firth, playing her husband). She keeps a daily video diary but starts to notice discrepancies between what she’s recorded and what Firth tells her. The Pledge (2001) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 9.00pm A tense mystery directed by Sean Penn with a fine cast including Jack Nicholson, Helen Mirren, Robin Wright Penn, Aaron Eckhart and Vanessa Redgrave. Nicholson is a detective who has to handle a horrific case on the day of his retirement – the murder of a seven-year-old girl. He promises to bring the killer to justice, only to find that the case is far from straightforward. A powerful, unsettling film. Hyena (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.15pm This violent thriller about corrupt drug-squad officers is very violent indeed, so be prepared to cover your eyes for some parts of writer-director Gerard Johnson’s film. Michael Logan (an intense Peter Ferdinand) is the leader of this special force, assigned to tackle drug trafficking among the Balkan gangs. Stephen Graham, as his dubious boss, is as reliable as ever. Above all, it’s a grisly exploration of the criminal mind. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: Catching a Killer and Love, Lies & Records

Thursday 7 December Catching a Killer: A Bullet Through The Window Channel 4, 9.00pm The most striking thing about Catching a Killer, Channel 4’s ongoing look at how police murder and missing persons investigations work, is the level of access involved. This film follows the fallout from the death of 19-year-old Suhaib Mohammed. It begins with the terrified 999 call stating “My friend just got shot” and ends with the eventual arrest of his killers. Along the way a complex story emerges of a naive teenager who drifted away from his family and whose death was a terrible case of being in the wrong place with the wrong people. It’s Senior Investigating Officer Mike Lynch’s last case before retirement and one he’s therefore doubly determined to solve, but as the investigation continues so his quiet fury over the way in which the dead teenager’s death is dismissed as just another gang death increases. As always though, it is the testimony of the victim’s family which lingers longest. “We knew he’d become more distant, more private, more closed off but I don’t think we realised he was hanging with the wrong people,” says his sister quietly. His devastated father simply notes: “His heart was very soft… he had big dreams.” Sarah Hughes Ross Noble: Off Road Dave, 8.00pm As fans of his previous Dave series (Ross Noble Freewheeling) can tell you, the comedian is a true petrolhead. However, even the enthusiastic Noble might have bitten off more than he can chew this time as he attempts the Scottish Six Days Trial, an event where the world’s best motorbike riders race 100 miles every day across unforgiving terrain. SH Love, Lies & Records BBC One, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s enjoyable drama continues with Judy (Rebecca Front) sending Rob (Adrian Bower) a video of his fiancé Kate’s (Ashley Jensen) “moment of madness” with Rick (Kenny Doughty) – but can Kate get to it first? SH Blitz: The Bombs That Changed Britain BBC Two, 9.00pm This week’s focus is Scotland, where a series of Luftwaffe raids over three nights in March 1941 devastated a community, killing 528 people, including 15 members of the same family. For the tightknit society of shipbuilders and factory workers, the aftermath was devastating; many left Clydebank, never to return. SH Live at the Apollo BBC Two, 10.00pm Our host is the sharp, smart and amiable Nish Kumar. He’s joined by the laid-back Irish comic David O’Doherty and rising star Luisa Omielan, who recently rewrote her whole act in the light of her mother’s death from cancer. SH When Rock Arrived in North Korea: Liberation Day: Storyville BBC Four, 11.00pm This hugely entertaining look at how Slovenian art rockers Laibach became the first Western band to play in North Korea works largely because of the eccentric Norwegian director Morten Traavik’s bureaucrat-wrangling skills. The band themselves prove elusive, although the concert footage hammers home just how odd the occasion was. “There are all kinds of music – now I know there’s this kind of music too,” notes one bemused attendee. SH Born to Be Free: Saving Russia’s Whales Channel 4, 11.25pm No documentary is likely to make you angrier this week than Gayane Petrosyan’s bleak and brilliant film about the trade in Beluga whales. She uncovers the terrible fates of 18 belugas bought to Utrish Marine Station to be sold to aquariums across the world. SH Rugby Union: Varsity Match: Oxford University v Cambridge University Thursday, BBC Two, 2.45pm The 136th staging of the annual contest between the two universities takes place at Twickenham. Cambridge prevailed last year to end Oxford’s record-breaking six-year winning streak, and have the superior head-to-head record with 62 wins to their opponents’ 59. The match kicks off at 3.00pm. SH Austin Powers: The Spy Who S*****d Me (1999) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 9.00pm The successful franchise remains nothing more than daft entertainment, but its puerile jokes and cultural referencing still manage to elicit laughs. The “groovy” spy with the wonky teeth (Mike Myers) has his mojo stolen by his arch nemesis Dr Evil (also Myers) and must travel back in time to the swinging Sixties to get it back. Black Sea (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Written by Dennis Kelly (who co-wrote the musical Matilda) and starring Jude Law, this submarine thriller about a hunt for Nazi gold in a long-lost U-boat is less than the sum of its parts. However, a host of decent character actors – the best of whom, David Threlfall, steals the show – keep things buoyant and the set piece outside the sub, involving aquatic spacesuits and bars of gold, is pulse-pinging. 16 Blocks (2006) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 11.35pm Steered brilliantly by director Richard Donner (Superman, The Goonies) Bruce Willis plays Jack Mosley, a detective who’s assigned to escort prisoner Eddie Bunker (Mos Def) to a Grand Jury hearing in this frantic buddy-action film. This may sound simple, but Mosley’s colleagues don’t want Bunker to make it – because he’s a witness in a police corruption case that could bring their worlds crashing down. Friday 8 December Claire Foy in 'The Crown' The Crown Netflix, from today Expectations could hardly be higher for the return of Netflix’s most lavish series. Although the spectacle and horror of the war have passed, the era of Anthony Eden and Harold McMillan is arguably more intriguing for being less frequently dramatised, and Peter Morgan explores the hypocrisies and compromises inherent in the politics of a nation whose global influence is in decline. Anton Lesser makes a ruthless, discreet McMillan, while Jeremy Northam is once again superb as Eden, a man not low on self-confidence yet forced to face his limitations as the Suez Crisis sees him outmanoeuvred. But the focal point of course is the royal family, and specifically the relationship between Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip: fundamentally solid in its early years, but now subject to considerable stress and strain as the couple drift apart over niggling doubts and suspected betrayals. Claire Foy and Matt Smith are magnificent in the lead roles, rising to the challenges of Morgan’s script to make plausible his educated guesswork and speculations over long-rumoured private affairs. The blend of spectacle and attention to detail remains striking. Gabriel Tate The Grand Tour Amazon Prime Video, from today Jeremy Clarkson, Richard Hammond and James May return for a second go-round of megastar guests, big-budget stunts in exotic locales, and parochial studio chat. The series opens with Ricky Wilson v David Hasselhoff in new segment Celebrity Face Off, and a comparison of a Lamborghini, a hybrid Honda and an electric supercar in a hill-climb race that – as anyone who recalls the headlines from earlier this year will know – goes horribly wrong. GT Judge Rinder’s Crown Court ITV, 8.00pm Two daytime television classics, one ancient and one modern, collide in this bizarre two-parter which sees Judge Robert Rinder, mediator of petty domestic disputes, presiding over a fictional case of arsenic poisoning. As per the original Crown Court, the jurors are members of the public. GT Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm The chefs meet a childhood hero as Mark Hamill, soon to return to cinemas as Luke Skywalker, joins them to learn about making perfect roast beef and Yorkshire puddings, plus a Caesar salad and a seafood feast. GT Brunel: the Man Who Built Britain Channel 5, 8.00pm A giant of the Industrial Revolution, Isambard Kingdom Brunel had a curious private life to match his towering professional achievements. The ever-reliable Rob Bell begins his two-part profile with Brunel’s first major project, the Thames Tunnel. GT The Year in Music 2017 BBC Two, 9.00pm The BBC Music Awards follow in the footsteps of BBC Sports Personality of the Year and incorporate a review of the year into the bargain. Here, Claudia Winkelman and Clara Amfo look back on the past 12 months with contributors including Stormzy, Nile Rodgers and Liam Gallagher. GT Classic Album: American Pie: Don McLean BBC Four, 9.00pm McLean’s sophomore album is these days less venerated than other landmarks of the era (Blue, Tapestry, After the Goldrush); it is perhaps overshadowed by its monumental title song whose allusive, elusive lyrics offered an alternate history of rock ’n’ roll and eulogy for the hippy dream. Yet there was always more to it, as this diligent documentary asserts. GT Prisoners (2013) ★★★☆☆ More4, 9.00pm This drama, which centres on the abduction of two girls, is harrowing but it succeeds in sustaining its tension to the end. Hugh Jackman is cast into darkness when his six-year-old daughter is kidnapped. Jake Gyllenhaal is the detective in charge of the case, and the pair lock horns early on. What we are then presented with is a criminal puzzle and a very committed cast, which also includes Terrence Howard.  Legend (2015) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Tom Hardy gives a solid, convincing performance as east London gangster Reggie Kray but his caricatured portrayal of twin brother Ronnie lets him down, and his inconsistent performance leads to an entertaining though muddled film. Emily Browning, however, gives just the right mix of defiance and despair as Frances Shea, Reggie’s put-upon wife. Watch out for some particularly gory scenes. Dead Calm (1989) ★★★☆☆ W, 9.00pm In her first big film role, Nicole Kidman displays pluck and vulnerability as Rae Ingram, a woman who loses her infant son in a car accident, and consents to a long recovery at sea, on a luxury yacht called the Saracen. Her husband John (Sam Neill) is an experienced naval officer and stand-up guy, and though he knows banishing Rae’s guilt and grief is going to be tough, he has no idea what shock therapy fate has in mind. Saturday 9 December John Noakes and Shep in 1978 Credit: HULTON  John Noakes: TV Hero BBC Two, 5.30pm One quarter of the definitive Blue Peter foursome, alongside Peter Purves, Valerie Singleton and Shep, John Noakes was both its longest-serving presenter and one of its very finest. A gifted communicator, earnest when he had to be but more often game for anything, whether that be a laugh or a lunatic stunt. This affectionate profile of Noakes, who died in May, aged 83, after many years with Alzheimer’s, pivots on perhaps his two best-loved moments. First, there’s a climb up Nelson’s Column, sans ropes or safety harnesses, that was every bit as daft and dangerous as it looked and ample testament to his dauntlessness. That impish sense of humour is demonstrated by the notorious appearance of Lulu the elephant, who relieved herself on the floor before rampaging across the studio and over Noakes’s foot. Ever the entertainer, he milked both for all they were worth. His relationship with the series was an equivocal one and he reportedly resented his clownish persona, but this tribute skirts any controversy in favour of warm nostalgia, with familiar Blue Peter faces including Biddy Baxter and Lesley Judd recalling the man and his work. GT Premier League Football: West Ham United v Chelsea Sky Sports Main Event, 11.30am Having recovered from a goal down to beat Newcastle 3-1 last Saturday, with Eden Hazard helping himself to a brace, Chelsea travel across London to face West Ham United. The home side, who are currently in the relegation zone, will have taken plenty of positives from their 2-1 defeat at Manchester City last Sunday – namely, their defensive display. A similarly obdurate performance here and new manager David Moyes might get a share of the spoils this time. When these sides met at the London Stadium last season, West Ham lost 2-1. PS European Rugby Champions Cup: Toulon v Bath Sky Sports Main Event, 5.15pm Two wins from two reads the stats for both sides so far in this season’s European Champions Cup – at least one of these 100 per cent records will end at Stade Mayol. Bath come into this match on the back of a 42-29 defeat by Exeter, but before that they’d won four on the bounce, with Freddie Burns impressing at fly-half. After the autumn internationals, director of rugby Todd Blackadder now has an embarrassment of riches from which to pick: most notably, England backs Anthony Watson, Semesa Rokoduguni and Jonathan Joseph. Toulon, meanwhile, ended a three-match losing streak on Saturday when they beat Lyon 39-11. PS Strictly Come Dancing BBC One, 6.45pm The five remaining couples must perform two routines in this semi-final, and with barely a strand of lace between them, expect forensic criticism from the judges. Sunday’s results show will reveal the final four and there will be a performance from Craig David. GT Michael McIntyre’s Big Show BBC One, 8.20pm Wringing his contacts book dry, McIntyre ropes in guests including TV presenters Marvin and Rochelle Humes (taking part in the game Send to All) and pop rock band The Vamps for more fun. GT Witnesses: a Frozen Death BBC Four, 9.00pm and 9.55pm Even in this saturated market for foreign-language thrillers, Witnesses stands out for its lack of gimmicks – though without ever quite scaling the heights of The Bridge or Spiral. Here, Sandra’s (Marie Dompnier) pursuit of the killer takes her into a forest and an orphanage. GT The White Princess Drama, 9.00pm and 10.20pm The excellent Jodie Comer anchors the series to its conclusion tonight with another double bill, as Elizabeth of York (Comer) and Henry VII (Jacob Collins-Levy) struggle to maintain a united front. GT Peter Blake: Pop Art Life Sky Arts, 9.00pm While there is more to Peter Blake’s work than his cover for Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, music has played a crucial role in the development of his art and reputation. This engaging film digs deeply into a mutually fruitful relationship. GT Casualty BBC One, 9.20pm Christmas approaches, bringing annual trauma and discord for the A&E team. Tonight finds Elle’s (Jaye Griffiths) tearaway son Blake (Kai Thorne) going off the rails in response to her suggestion that she spend the festive period with her new boyfriend. Polly (Sophia Di Martino), meanwhile, continues to be unimpressed by Max (Jamie Davis). GT Through the Keyhole: I’m a Celebrity… get me out of here! ITV, 9.50pm The living, breathing definition of an acquired taste, Keith Lemon returns for a fifth series of the show once helmed by David Frost. Guests include Jimmy Carr, Myleene Klass and Tony Blackburn. GT Gremlins 2: The New Batch (1990) ★★★☆☆ Christmas Gold, 9.40pm Whereas Joe Dante’s original monster hit was a deliciously dark horror flick (and staple Christmas hit) with touches of wry humour, this inferior sequel is essentially a straight-up, riotous comedy, replete with in-jokes and movie references. This time, the gremlins run amok in a Manhattan high-rise building called Clamp Tower, owned by John Glover’s Donald Trump-like mogul. The Cider House Rules (1999) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.15pm John Irving’s adaptation of his own 1985 novel features a fine Tobey Maguire and Michael Caine, who won an Oscar (only his second at the time). Irving won one too, for Best Screenplay, and there’s no doubt the story is moving, though this version – about an orphan (Maguire) and a doctor (Caine) who performs illegal abortions – is at times a bit saccharine. Paul Rudd co-stars; Lasse Hallström directs. The Drop (2014) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 11.35pm Tom Hardy anchors this tale of simmering malfeasance as the tender of a Brooklyn bar designated as the drop for ill-gotten gains. Dennis Lehane adapts his own short story Animal Rescue, and makes a perfect team with Belgian director Michaël R Roskam, who gets a tamped-down, shuffling and beautifully calibrated star turn out of Hardy. Sopranos star James Gandolfini adds a burly gravitas in what would be his final movie. Sunday 10 December Jumbo with keeper Matthew Scott in 1882 Credit: BBC Attenborough and the Giant Elephant BBC One, 9.00pm Can we ever have too much Attenborough? It seems not, as right in the foaming wake of the fabulous Blue Planet II (which concludes tonight, see preview below) comes this absorbing, bittersweet tale of the world’s first animal superstar – Jumbo the elephant. It’s a sad story, really. Jumbo shot to fame shortly after his arrival at London Zoo as an orphan in around 1861, but he didn’t get much from the deal. As Attenborough says, his captive life was “troubled, fuelled by alcohol, terrifying fits of violence, a near mystical relationship with his keeper and a tragic end that seems hard to believe”. Which is more than enough to hold the attention for an hour as he joins an international team examining Jumbo’s preserved skeleton at New York’s Museum of Natural History. Attenborough also pokes about in archives at London Zoo, sanctuaries in the Maasai Mara and Tennessee, and Ontario where Jumbo met his very sad end, building as complete a picture of this magnificent creature and his global travels as has ever been assembled. All the while it spreads a positive conservationist message and gives thanks that attitudes are more enlightened now than in Victorian times. GO Premier League Football: Liverpool v Everton & Manchester United v Manchester City Sky Sports Main Event, 1.15pm & 4.15pm “Super Sunday” lives up to its hyperbolic billing, with two potentially exhilarating derbies. First up, we’re at Anfield where Liverpool, fresh from their 5-1 demolition of Brighton, host Everton, who found some form last week, following up their 4-0 win at home to West Ham United with a 2-0 victory against Huddersfield. Later, in the 4.30pm kick-off, José Mourinho and Pep Guardiola renew rivalries as second-placed United host leaders City at Old Trafford. Expect it to be tight. PS Britain’s Wildest Weather 2017 Channel 4, 6.30pm This year has not, so far, been as extreme as some but, given the number of smartphone-wielding citizen journalists, there’s plenty of jaw-dropping footage of every extreme weather event that occurred, among them devastating floods, tornadoes and hair-raising lightning strikes. GO  Blue Planet II BBC One, 8.00pm This extraordinary series concludes with an undeniably depressing assessment of mankind’s impact on the marine environment. But David Attenborough, as ever, prefers to put the emphasis on hope. So there’s plenty of uplift too with stories of species brought back from extinction’s brink. GO Coastal Railways with Julie Walters Channel 4, 8.00pm Julie Walters heads for Cornwall on the Great Western route, recalling her childhood holidays in Torquay. She then boards a steam train at Paignton, hears tales of smugglers in Polperro and fills up on cakes in Penzance. GO Leonora Carrington: the Lost Surrealist BBC Four, 9.00pm This fascinating film tells the story of rebellious upper-class British artist Leonora Carrington, who worked alongside Ernst, Breton and Éluard in Paris at the height of the surrealist movement, yet died in 2011 all but forgotten in Mexico. Director Teresa Griffiths mixes interviews and biographical material with experimental animation and tableaux to bring Carrington’s work vividly to life. GO I’m a Celebrity… Get Me Out of Here! ITV, 9.00pm Seventeen series in and the public appetite for watching celebrities endure humiliation and repulsion shows little sign of drying up. This year’s launch pulled in ITV’s biggest audience of 2017. The final will no doubt draw as big a crowd again. GO Babylon Berlin Sky Atlantic, from 9.00pm Three more atmospheric episodes of the gripping crime series set in the bohemian, political Weimar Germany of the late Twenties. Detective Rath’s (Volker Bruch) investigation uncovers dangerous evidence of a shocking military conspiracy. GO The Sky At Night BBC Four, 10.00pm As well as more stargazing from the Royal Observatory, Maggie Aderin-Pocock is in Norway to see the Northern Lights. GO Ben-Hur (1959) ★★★★★ ITV3, 2.45pm A majestic slice of Hollywood history, this Roman-era melodrama directed by William Wyler and starring Charlton Heston won 11 Academy Awards (not equalled until Titanic in 1997). It still makes for magnificent viewing. Set in 26AD, it tells the story of a Jewish prince who clashes with the Roman governor and ends up enslaved, desperately plotting his revenge. The Sorcerer’s Apprentice (2010) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 3.00pm Jerry Bruckheimer gives the famous sequence from Disney’s Fantasia a fun, live-action reboot. Student Dave (Jay Baruchel) inherits Merlin’s powers, placing him in a power struggle between Balthazar (Nicolas Cage) and Horvath (Alfred Molina). Sadly there are just two scenes with broomsticks to link it to the original. Toby Kebbel is amusing as a stage musician co-opted by the forces of evil. Toy Story (1995) ★★★★★ BBC One, 3.35pm The idea of the first fully computer-generated animated film didn’t have those who had been weaned on the hand-drawn delights of Disney jumping for joy. However, with this beautiful tale, Pixar pushed animation to a new level – the premise, pace and emotion are all pitched perfectly. Whether it’s your first or 400th viewing, the story of toy cowboy Woody (Tom Hanks) and plastic spaceman Buzz Lightyear (Tim Allen) is a joy. Monday 11 December Faye Marsa, Sarah Parish and Amara Karan in Bancroft Credit: ITV Bancroft ITV, 9.00pm With so many crime dramas clogging up the television schedules it can be hard for a new series to stand out and at first ITV’s latest four-parter seems unlikely to break the mould. There’s an ambitious female cop with a possibly troubled past (the always reliable Sarah Parish), a striving younger cop who is desperate to move up the ranks (Faye Marsay) and the usual crop of jobsworths and strivers (Charles Babalola is particularly good as the married fellow officer Marsay’s Katherine should be steering well clear of). It’s all perfectly well done with a solid script from Kate Brooke (Mr Selfridge) but it seems like nothing special. Then, three quarters of the way through this first episode, something genuinely interesting happens: Bancroft’s secrets are revealed to be very dark indeed just as Katherine’s cold case involving the break-in and violent murder of a young woman in 1990 starts hotting up. With the stakes suddenly raised Bancroft spins off into a dark tale of the lengths that people go to keep the past buried and the stage is set for an intriguing game of secrets and lies. Smart scheduling sees the rest of the story play out over consecutive nights. SH Street Auction BBC One, 11.00am Paul Martin returns with a new series of the surprisingly addictive show in which people band together to raise funds for a member of their community by auctioning off hidden treasures. The fun comes from the unusual objects unearthed from garages and attics. SH Nigella’s Christmas Table BBC Two, 8.00pm If anything is guaranteed to Nigella put into purring overload it’s Christmas. The food on offer includes roast duck with orange, soy and ginger, but this is really about mood rather than food. SH   Paul Hollywood: A Baker’s Life Channel 4, 8.00pm Episode three of this genial series sees Hollywood looking back over his career and his time spent working at the Cliveden House Hotel in Berkshire. There’s also a festive get-together in Merseyside and some seasonal Danish pastries, which look delicious. SH The Art That Made Mexico: Paradise, Power and Prayers BBC Four, 9.00pm It’s always a pleasure to find a series that sheds new light on a subject, and so it is with artist Alinka Echeverria’s enthralling films about Mexico’s art. Of course, there are the key points: conquest, independence, dictatorship, revolution and figures such as Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo, but what the commentary gives us here is the context for both the history and the artists. This is true of this episode that looks at the relationship between art and power, colonialism and control while examining the enduring power of Kahlo’s work and myth. SH Handmade in Mexico BBC Four, 10.00pm The focus here is on Mexico’s celebrated Tree of Life sculptures, those gaudy, gorgeous interpretations of everything from the creation myth to the resurrection of Christ and the Day of the Dead. It’s a fascinating half-hour in which we see the amount of work and detail that goes into each piece. SH White Right: Meeting the Enemy: Exposure ITV, 10.40pm; STV, 11.05pm; UTV, 11.40pm; Wales, 11.10pm This intriguing-sounding documentary sees the Bafta-nominated Deeyah Khan (Jihad: A Story of the Others) investigate white extremism in the US. Khan visits white nationalist groups, attends a far-right rally and asks why this poisonous ideology is resurgent. SH The Black Swan (1942) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 2.35pm No, this is not the film about the ageing ballet dancer and the young ingénue; this is about high adventure on the seven seas. When Laird Cregar’s Captain Morgan becomes Governor of Jamaica, he promises to put an end to piracy. But things don’t go smoothly, especially when his assistant (Tyrone Power) kidnaps the ex-governor’s beautiful daughter (Maureen O’Hara). This was the final film of silent star Helene Costello. Mamma Mia! (2008) ★★★☆☆ ITV3, 7.50pm This musical comedy, directed by Phyllida Lloyd and set to Abba’s hits, is pure escapism. It’s naff, but that’s its selling point, as stars Meryl Streep, Pierce Brosnan and Julie Walters place tongues firmly in cheeks. At 59, Streep deserved more credit for doing the splits than for her role as a boho mother living on a Greek island whose daughter (Amanda Seyfried) tries to find out who her biological father is. Blood Diamond (2006) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 8.00pm The diamond industry of Sierra Leone is the subject of this striking thriller. Djimon Hounsou stars as a fisherman forced to work in the fields, who finds and hides a rare pink gem. His life is changed when he meets Leonardo DiCaprio’s self-serving mercenary and Jennifer Connelly’s well-meaning journalist. DiCaprio was Oscar-nominated, but lost to Forest Whitaker for The Last King of Scotland. Tuesday 12 December Paul Ready, Diane Morgan and Anna Maxwell-Martin Credit: BBC Motherland BBC Two, 10.00pm Dispensing with the calamitous set pieces of previous episodes and instead documenting the quiet desperation of this ill-starred band of sisters (plus one brother), this superb, exhausting sitcom from a writing supergroup including Graham Linehan and Sharon Horgan has been an exquisitely painful delight. We join Julia (Anna Maxwell Martin) in an unusually good place, with everything running smoothly thanks to her new Australian nanny, Lyndsey (Sarah Kendall). The kids are clean and happy, the school run is easy, the fridge is stocked – but could she be too good to be true? Amanda (Lucy Punch) has gone to ground after the revelation over her threesome, while her hapless confidant, Kevin (Paul Ready), is desperate to avoid having to get a job. And, should all the mugging get too much, there’s deadpan Liz (Diane Morgan), negotiating tricky relations with her dismal ex and his new, pregnant partner. After an orgy of passive aggression and desperate people in denial, the façades crack, just a little. Happily everyone reverts to fundamentally appalling type just in time for the end of the series and a surely inevitable recommission. GT Judd Apatow: the Return Netflix, from today After 25 years away from stand-up, the comedy zelig whose fingerprints are over everything from Knocked Up and Girls to Freaks and Geeks and Bridesmaids returns for a special set in Montreal, recorded in July. GT Masterchef: the Professionals BBC Two, 8.00pm After the hopefuls have tackled an invention test and rustled up a dish dedicated to one of their inspirations, Marcus Wareing, Monica Galletti and Gregg Wallace eliminate another two contenders, leaving only six in the contest. GT The A Word BBC One, 9.00pm Joe’s (brilliant Max Vento) family comes together for an end of year show at his old school – tears, acrimony and reconciliation ensue in the conclusion of Peter Bowker’s finely wrought, well-performed drama. A third series should surely be a formality. GT Invasion! with Sam Willis BBC Four, 9.00pm While not quite attaining Lucy Worsley levels of gonzo history, Dr Sam Willis is an enthusiastic and knowledgeable host not above the odd stunt to prove a point. This second episode of a series documenting the incursions that have shaped our nation and its bloodline examines the differing techniques and goals of the invaders. There are the Barbary Corsaire pirates who settled on Lundy Island, King Louis the Lion, invited to invade and crowned by disgruntled nobles, and the Dutch forces that negotiated the Medway just a year prior to the Glorious Revolution. Further proof, if any were needed, that Britain is a mongrel nation and all the better for it. GT The World’s Most Expensive Presents Channel 4, 9.00pm Eyeball-melting opulence and appalling lack of taste do battle with considerable craftsmanship and class in this startling film featuring everything from gold-plated pushbikes to a poker set in alligator-hide case. GT Sports Personality of the Year 2017: The Contenders BBC One, 10.45pm; Wales, 11.10pm; Scotland, 11.45pm With reigning title-holder Andy Murray’s injury-hit year effectively ruling him out of contention, Anthony Joshua, Chris Froome, Lewis Hamilton, Jo Konta and Mo Farah will be headlining this year’s roster after another 12 months of outstanding achievement in British sport. The runners and riders are introduced tonight. GT Shane (1953) ★★★★☆ Film4, 3.45pm There are few Westerns that examine the depths of human emotions, but this film by George Stevens is one of them and has become a landmark of cinema. Shane (Alan Ladd) is a cowboy who finds himself idolised for the way that he handles himself in the face of a landowner’s heavies. The climax is a face-off between Shane and smiling, whispering, Oscar-nominated Jack Palance, as the original man in black. A must-see. Mr & Mrs Smith (2005) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 9.00pm A daft comedy thriller which is perhaps best remembered for being the film that introduced Brad Pitt to Angelina Jolie. They play a couple whose failing marriage is spiced up dramatically when each discovers that the other secretly works as an assassin. Let down by a weak script, the film is held together by the chemistry between its two leads. Vince Vaughn and Adam Brody co-star. Moonraker (1979) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm The 11th film in the Bond series, and the fourth to star Roger Moore as the dapper MI6 agent, involves the theft of a space shuttle. It’s one of the weaker Bond films and at times seems more of a comedy than a tense action adventure, but it’s enjoyably frivolous. Michael Lonsdale plays resident baddie Hugo Drax who pinches the aforementioned space shuttle to help along his plan to wipe out the world’s population. Wednesday 13 December Barbara Schulz in Vanished by the Lake Credit: Channel 4 Vanished by the Lake Channel 4, 10.00pm This haunting French crime drama centres on a teenage girl who goes missing at a festival. It’s hardly an original set-up, but much like last year’s hit Gallic import The Disappearance, based on an almost identical premise, the mix of youthful promise cut short and fierce small-town intrigue quickly compels. The girl in question is Chloé Delval (Charlie Joirkin), and as news of her disappearance spreads, memories of a similar 15-year-old case in which two other girls vanished at the same celebration are revived. Into the fray steps striking Parisian detective Lise Stocker (Barbara Schulz), who has returned home to look after her ill mother, but is soon swept up by the case as its personal implications begin to unfold. All of the hallmarks of the Nordic noir genre are present, from the evocative setting (here a Broadchurch-style coastal backdrop) to the close-knit neighbours with secrets to hide. Nevertheless, this opening episode is an effective tension builder and the human impact of the mystery – particularly on Chloé’s fracturing parents – is powerfully moving. Once episode one finishes, the full series will be available to watch on All 4. TD Mary Berry’s Country House Secrets BBC One, 8.00pm Mary Berry rounds off her tour of Britain’s stately homes at Goodwood House, where she is suitably gushing over its royal history and grand interiors. Berry is treated to a hair-raising lap of the nearby motor circuit and whips up a four-tier cake for the cricket tea. TD The Secret Life of the Zoo Channel 4, 8.00pm The plight of the endangered Javan green magpie is on the agenda as keepers at Chester Zoo attempt to breed youngster Permata with older bird Netuba. Elsewhere, a zebra battle breaks out when newcomer Okoth arrives. TD Peaky Blinders BBC Two, 9.00pm A burst of gunfire opens the penultimate episode of period gangster antics, as Tommy Shelby (Cillian Murphy) faces off against mafia honcho Luca Changretta (Adrien Brody). An army colonel, meanwhile, questions Ada (Sophie Rundle) about her Communist past. TD The Channel: The World’s Busiest Waterway Channel 4, 9.00pm The fallout from Project Nemo, the new underwater electricity cable being laid between Belgium and Britain, is explored. We follow the Nemo manager struggling to avoid costly delays and the fisherman whose catch is being compromised by the work. TD Royal Academy: Painting the Future Sky Arts, 9.00pm Virtual reality (VR) is predicted to become the go-to place for everything from entertainment to work. The Royal Academy is getting in on the act with a new exhibition which explores the potential of the medium. This film follows the show’s creation with the artists, including sculptor Antony Gormley, portraitist Jonathan Yeo and Turner Prize-nominee Yinka Shonibare, who are producing works that use the technology to trace the history of the body in art. TD David Hockney: Time Reclaimed Sky Arts, 10.30pm This tribute to David Hockney aims to get beyond the glamour that surrounds his reputation, and focus on the personal aspects of his work. Anecdotes, images and analysis of the pictures themselves highlight the individuality expressed in each period of Hockney’s career, suggesting a diverse oeuvre that defies classification. TD Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am George Roy Hill directed two of the most popular films ever: Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969) and The Sting (1973). But this indifferent Julie Andrews musical of the flapper era was first. There’s much to enjoy in the story of a naive woman who leaves her rural roots behind to seek fortune and romance in Twenties New York. James Fox, as a spiffing salesman, is a particular highlight. The Three Musketeers (2011) ★★☆☆☆ E4, 8.00pm Paul W S Anderson’s adaptation of Alexandre Dumas’ novel is faithful in plot – Porthos, Athos and Aramis (Ray Stevenson, Matthew Macfadyen, Luke Evans), and disciple d’Artagnan (Logan Lerman), are sent to retrieve the French Queen’s (Juno Temple) necklace. The tone, however, is half action-pantomime, half candy-coloured steampunk comic – fun but terribly slapdash. Poltergeist (1982) ★★★★☆ TCM, 11.15pm Director Tobe Hooper, who made The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, tones down the gut-churning horror but still ramps up the tension to nightmare levels in this Steven Spielberg-produced chiller. It has one of cinema’s most spine-tinglingly scary moments: “They’re here,” sing-songs a little girl kneeling before the TV. “They” are the spirits, at first playful then increasingly malevolent, who terrorise a suburban family. Thursday 14 December Lord Sugar Credit: BBC The Apprentice: Why I Fired Them BBC One, 8.00pm In the wake of last night’s excoriating interview round, and with this Sunday’s final rapidly approaching to decide who will win a £250,000 investment and the mentoring opportunity of a lifetime, Lord Sugar makes his most personal appearance of the series. Other than those brief to-camera inserts that roll out as taxi cabs ferry freshly defenestrated candidates away from Sugar Towers to forever dream of fortunes that might have been made, this is one of few occasions in each “process” when Lord Sugar appears on screen away from the wannabe tycoons and talking to viewers directly. And he makes the most of it with his trademark witty-gritty line in East End charm, although professionalism usually prevents him from really dishing the behind-the-scenes dirt on why he thought 16 of them worthy only of the tip of his boot. Instead he looks back over this 13th series identifying the key commercial and strategic errors that led to each of his firing finger decisions, and what ultimately marked out the two finalists from the others. It’s a lot to get through in an hour but, as series recaps go, it’s usually a hoot. GO Ashes Cricket: Australia v England BT Sport 1, 1.30am The enduring Ashes Down Under conundrum: wake up early to watch it or stay up late? The third Test, held at the WACA Ground in Perth, gets under way in the early hours of Thursday morning, with England hoping to bounce back from two demoralising defeats. Lose this one and captain Joe Root will have to surrender the urn to the Aussies. PS European Tour Golf: The Indonesian Masters Sky Sports Main Event, 6.00am It’s the opening day of the tournament at the Royale Jakarta Golf Club, where Thailand’s Poom Saksansin won the title last year. Saksansin shot an overall score of 270 to finish on -18, five strokes ahead of joint runners-up Masahiro Kawamura of Japan and fellow Thai players Phachara Khongwatmai and Suradit Yongcharoenchai. PS Amazing Spaces Snow and Ice Special Channel 4, 8.00pm George Clarke and his inventive sidekick Will Hardie travel to Norway’s remoter parts to check out why this small country on the edge of Europe punches above its weight in architecture and design. Could it be something to do with the cold weather, they wonder? GO Love, Lies & Records BBC One, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama about the romance of working at a Leeds registry office delivers on melodrama, if not subtlety. In this penultimate episode Kate (Ashley Jensen) struggles to make a decision after Rob’s (Adrian Bower) surprise proposal. GO Blitz: the Bombs That Changed Britain BBC Two, 9.00pm The final edition looks at the horrific impact of German incendiary bombs, in particular one that set a church ablaze in Bristol in November 1940 and started a firestorm that ravaged the city’s historic centre. GO The Tunnel: Vengeance Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Sky’s award-winning version of The Bridge (its milieu that of British and French police teams linked by the Channel Tunnel) returns for a third and final run. A pity, as Stephen Dillane as spiky detective and Clémence Poésy as his emotionally remote French opposite number make an appealing pair. This first of six episodes packs in plenty of action as the pair set out to find the link between a burnt-out trawler and a maintenance worker attacked by a plague of rats. GO Extraordinary Teens: School of Life and Deaf Channel 4, 10.00pm This absorbing film follows a year in the life of Mary Hare Boarding School for deaf pupils in Berkshire. Seen through the eyes of a 15-year-old about to undergo a potentially life-changing cochlear implant, this film gives a profound sense of the physical and emotional complexities of growing up deaf. GO The Russell Howard Hour Sky One, 10.00pm We’ve reached the penultimate episode of this excellent topical comedy series. It’s little more than an extended version of BBC Three’s (and later BBC Two’s) Good News but that’s exactly what fans (and Sky, who snapped Howard up) wanted and he has delivered, pushing his brand of highly topical, politically aware, positive reinforcement stand-up with aplomb. GO Life (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Daniel Espinosa’s Earth-orbiting suspense flick was released less than two months before Ridley Scott’s new chapter in his Alien franchise, and bears many of the same hallmarks. It’s also a little bit Gravity. Ryan Reynolds is one of a crew of astronauts aboard a space station conducting research into life on Mars. In terms of entertainment, the film does its baseline job of getting you to chew your nails off. There’s Something About Mary (1998) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 9.00pm There are bad taste jokes in abundance in this comedy from the Farrelly Brothers. Ben Stiller stars as Ted, a shy man who realises he’s still in love with Mary (Cameron Diaz, proving her comic abilities), the date he tried to take to prom 13 years ago. So, to track her down, he hires an oily private eye (Matt Dillon) who also fallsin love with her and sets out to keep the pair apart. Gone in 60 Seconds (2000) ★★★☆☆ Universal Channel, 9.00pm Nicolas Cage has top billing in Dominic Sena’s remake of the 1974 cult film – a mind-numbingly testosterone-laced ride. Cage and Angelina Jolie are among a crew of thieves who must steal 50 cars in 72 hours to stop the murder of Cage’s brother. It’s more than serviceable entertainment, plus car aficionados will have fun spotting the Cadillacs and Corvettes. Friday 15 December Paul, Andy, Cynthia and Diana in The Sweet Makers Credit: BBC The Sweet Makers at Christmas BBC Two, 9.00pm Following their enjoyable three-part series earlier this year, BBC Two’s Sweet Makers return for this one-off Christmas special looking at changing treats from Georgian times to the Twenties. As before, the show is a lovely mix of baking and interesting social history with Emma Dabiri and Dr Annie Gray, who fill us in on how each era viewed Christmas and how confectionery changes over time. The show’s highlight comes during the Victorian Era, also known as the moment when Christmas as we know it was invented, as chocolatiers Paul A Young and Diane Short, bespoke cake decorator Cynthia Stroud and sweet consultant Andy Baxendale recreate a Boar’s Head cake. “That’s the most bonkers thing we’ve ever made,” notes Young, looking at the finished result, which is rich in chocolate, beautifully decorated and featuring unnervingly glazed eyes. He’s right but it also looks fabulous, as do the intricate Twelfth Cakes, a speciality in Georgian times. The Twenties brings with it the wonderful news that before Terry’s invented the chocolate orange they introduced the chocolate apple to the world, before looking to the future and the invention of Lord Mackintosh’s Quality Street. SH Jean-Claude Van Johnson Amazon Prime Video, from today This delightfully silly new series sees Jean-Claude Van Damme as a retired action film star with a secret: he’s a special agent and he wants back in the game. It’s inspired mayhem anchored by a winning performance from the laconic Van Damme. SH Trollhunters Netflix, from today Guillermo del Toro’s inventive animation returns for a second series, and it features the voice of the late Anton Yelchin as reluctant hero Jim Lake Jnr. The story continues where the first series left off, and sees Jim adventure deeper into the Troll world to battle the leader of the Darklands. This series also features Mark Hamill and Game of Thrones’s Lena Headey. SH Judge Rinder’s Crown Court ITV, 8.00pm; not STV or UTV; Wales, 11.10pm Judge Rinder’s reboot of classic Seventies series Crown Court might lack the big-name actors of the original but its meld of real-life crime and courtroom drama is just as addictive. Tonight, the jury decides if James Byron (Rupert Young) murdered his wife. SH Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Sarah Millican is a brave guest of Oliver and Doherty – brave because it swiftly transpires that cooking really isn’t her thing. But Oliver manages to bite his tongue while showing her how to cook her favourite microwave meal from scratch. SH Have I Got News for You BBC One, 9.00pm The 54th series of the satirical news quiz comes to an end with the ever-reliable David Tennant in the host’s chair. It has been a patchy series, which was marked by a new low when Jo Brand had to explain why sexual harassment jokes weren’t funny to the male panellists. So let’s hope it goes out on a high. SH Roy Orbison: Love Hurts BBC Four, 9.30pm Roy Orbison’s three sons, Wesley, Roy Jnr and Alex, take centre stage to discuss their father in this emotional documentary. SH The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm Prepare for Star Wars: The Last Jedi overload as John Boyega, Daisy Ridley and Mark Hamill join Norton on the sofa. Don’t expect any spoilers but there’s sure to be some nice eulogies to the late Carrie Fisher. SH Before I Go to Sleep (2014) ★★★☆☆ More4, 9.00pm Nicole Kidman and Colin Firth star in this uninvolving thriller based on SJ Watson’s twisty bestseller. Kidman plays a woman who, after suffering a head injury, has no idea who she is or who the man sleeping next to her might be (it’s Colin Firth, playing her husband). She keeps a daily video diary but starts to notice discrepancies between what she’s recorded and what Firth tells her. The Pledge (2001) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 9.00pm A tense mystery directed by Sean Penn with a fine cast including Jack Nicholson, Helen Mirren, Robin Wright Penn, Aaron Eckhart and Vanessa Redgrave. Nicholson is a detective who has to handle a horrific case on the day of his retirement – the murder of a seven-year-old girl. He promises to bring the killer to justice, only to find that the case is far from straightforward. A powerful, unsettling film. Hyena (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.15pm This violent thriller about corrupt drug-squad officers is very violent indeed, so be prepared to cover your eyes for some parts of writer-director Gerard Johnson’s film. Michael Logan (an intense Peter Ferdinand) is the leader of this special force, assigned to tackle drug trafficking among the Balkan gangs. Stephen Graham, as his dubious boss, is as reliable as ever. Above all, it’s a grisly exploration of the criminal mind. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: Catching a Killer and Love, Lies & Records

Thursday 7 December Catching a Killer: A Bullet Through The Window Channel 4, 9.00pm The most striking thing about Catching a Killer, Channel 4’s ongoing look at how police murder and missing persons investigations work, is the level of access involved. This film follows the fallout from the death of 19-year-old Suhaib Mohammed. It begins with the terrified 999 call stating “My friend just got shot” and ends with the eventual arrest of his killers. Along the way a complex story emerges of a naive teenager who drifted away from his family and whose death was a terrible case of being in the wrong place with the wrong people. It’s Senior Investigating Officer Mike Lynch’s last case before retirement and one he’s therefore doubly determined to solve, but as the investigation continues so his quiet fury over the way in which the dead teenager’s death is dismissed as just another gang death increases. As always though, it is the testimony of the victim’s family which lingers longest. “We knew he’d become more distant, more private, more closed off but I don’t think we realised he was hanging with the wrong people,” says his sister quietly. His devastated father simply notes: “His heart was very soft… he had big dreams.” Sarah Hughes Ross Noble: Off Road Dave, 8.00pm As fans of his previous Dave series (Ross Noble Freewheeling) can tell you, the comedian is a true petrolhead. However, even the enthusiastic Noble might have bitten off more than he can chew this time as he attempts the Scottish Six Days Trial, an event where the world’s best motorbike riders race 100 miles every day across unforgiving terrain. SH Love, Lies & Records BBC One, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s enjoyable drama continues with Judy (Rebecca Front) sending Rob (Adrian Bower) a video of his fiancé Kate’s (Ashley Jensen) “moment of madness” with Rick (Kenny Doughty) – but can Kate get to it first? SH Blitz: The Bombs That Changed Britain BBC Two, 9.00pm This week’s focus is Scotland, where a series of Luftwaffe raids over three nights in March 1941 devastated a community, killing 528 people, including 15 members of the same family. For the tightknit society of shipbuilders and factory workers, the aftermath was devastating; many left Clydebank, never to return. SH Live at the Apollo BBC Two, 10.00pm Our host is the sharp, smart and amiable Nish Kumar. He’s joined by the laid-back Irish comic David O’Doherty and rising star Luisa Omielan, who recently rewrote her whole act in the light of her mother’s death from cancer. SH When Rock Arrived in North Korea: Liberation Day: Storyville BBC Four, 11.00pm This hugely entertaining look at how Slovenian art rockers Laibach became the first Western band to play in North Korea works largely because of the eccentric Norwegian director Morten Traavik’s bureaucrat-wrangling skills. The band themselves prove elusive, although the concert footage hammers home just how odd the occasion was. “There are all kinds of music – now I know there’s this kind of music too,” notes one bemused attendee. SH Born to Be Free: Saving Russia’s Whales Channel 4, 11.25pm No documentary is likely to make you angrier this week than Gayane Petrosyan’s bleak and brilliant film about the trade in Beluga whales. She uncovers the terrible fates of 18 belugas bought to Utrish Marine Station to be sold to aquariums across the world. SH Rugby Union: Varsity Match: Oxford University v Cambridge University Thursday, BBC Two, 2.45pm The 136th staging of the annual contest between the two universities takes place at Twickenham. Cambridge prevailed last year to end Oxford’s record-breaking six-year winning streak, and have the superior head-to-head record with 62 wins to their opponents’ 59. The match kicks off at 3.00pm. SH Austin Powers: The Spy Who S*****d Me (1999) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 9.00pm The successful franchise remains nothing more than daft entertainment, but its puerile jokes and cultural referencing still manage to elicit laughs. The “groovy” spy with the wonky teeth (Mike Myers) has his mojo stolen by his arch nemesis Dr Evil (also Myers) and must travel back in time to the swinging Sixties to get it back. Black Sea (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Written by Dennis Kelly (who co-wrote the musical Matilda) and starring Jude Law, this submarine thriller about a hunt for Nazi gold in a long-lost U-boat is less than the sum of its parts. However, a host of decent character actors – the best of whom, David Threlfall, steals the show – keep things buoyant and the set piece outside the sub, involving aquatic spacesuits and bars of gold, is pulse-pinging. 16 Blocks (2006) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 11.35pm Steered brilliantly by director Richard Donner (Superman, The Goonies) Bruce Willis plays Jack Mosley, a detective who’s assigned to escort prisoner Eddie Bunker (Mos Def) to a Grand Jury hearing in this frantic buddy-action film. This may sound simple, but Mosley’s colleagues don’t want Bunker to make it – because he’s a witness in a police corruption case that could bring their worlds crashing down. Friday 8 December Claire Foy in 'The Crown' The Crown Netflix, from today Expectations could hardly be higher for the return of Netflix’s most lavish series. Although the spectacle and horror of the war have passed, the era of Anthony Eden and Harold McMillan is arguably more intriguing for being less frequently dramatised, and Peter Morgan explores the hypocrisies and compromises inherent in the politics of a nation whose global influence is in decline. Anton Lesser makes a ruthless, discreet McMillan, while Jeremy Northam is once again superb as Eden, a man not low on self-confidence yet forced to face his limitations as the Suez Crisis sees him outmanoeuvred. But the focal point of course is the royal family, and specifically the relationship between Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip: fundamentally solid in its early years, but now subject to considerable stress and strain as the couple drift apart over niggling doubts and suspected betrayals. Claire Foy and Matt Smith are magnificent in the lead roles, rising to the challenges of Morgan’s script to make plausible his educated guesswork and speculations over long-rumoured private affairs. The blend of spectacle and attention to detail remains striking. Gabriel Tate The Grand Tour Amazon Prime Video, from today Jeremy Clarkson, Richard Hammond and James May return for a second go-round of megastar guests, big-budget stunts in exotic locales, and parochial studio chat. The series opens with Ricky Wilson v David Hasselhoff in new segment Celebrity Face Off, and a comparison of a Lamborghini, a hybrid Honda and an electric supercar in a hill-climb race that – as anyone who recalls the headlines from earlier this year will know – goes horribly wrong. GT Judge Rinder’s Crown Court ITV, 8.00pm Two daytime television classics, one ancient and one modern, collide in this bizarre two-parter which sees Judge Robert Rinder, mediator of petty domestic disputes, presiding over a fictional case of arsenic poisoning. As per the original Crown Court, the jurors are members of the public. GT Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm The chefs meet a childhood hero as Mark Hamill, soon to return to cinemas as Luke Skywalker, joins them to learn about making perfect roast beef and Yorkshire puddings, plus a Caesar salad and a seafood feast. GT Brunel: the Man Who Built Britain Channel 5, 8.00pm A giant of the Industrial Revolution, Isambard Kingdom Brunel had a curious private life to match his towering professional achievements. The ever-reliable Rob Bell begins his two-part profile with Brunel’s first major project, the Thames Tunnel. GT The Year in Music 2017 BBC Two, 9.00pm The BBC Music Awards follow in the footsteps of BBC Sports Personality of the Year and incorporate a review of the year into the bargain. Here, Claudia Winkelman and Clara Amfo look back on the past 12 months with contributors including Stormzy, Nile Rodgers and Liam Gallagher. GT Classic Album: American Pie: Don McLean BBC Four, 9.00pm McLean’s sophomore album is these days less venerated than other landmarks of the era (Blue, Tapestry, After the Goldrush); it is perhaps overshadowed by its monumental title song whose allusive, elusive lyrics offered an alternate history of rock ’n’ roll and eulogy for the hippy dream. Yet there was always more to it, as this diligent documentary asserts. GT Prisoners (2013) ★★★☆☆ More4, 9.00pm This drama, which centres on the abduction of two girls, is harrowing but it succeeds in sustaining its tension to the end. Hugh Jackman is cast into darkness when his six-year-old daughter is kidnapped. Jake Gyllenhaal is the detective in charge of the case, and the pair lock horns early on. What we are then presented with is a criminal puzzle and a very committed cast, which also includes Terrence Howard.  Legend (2015) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Tom Hardy gives a solid, convincing performance as east London gangster Reggie Kray but his caricatured portrayal of twin brother Ronnie lets him down, and his inconsistent performance leads to an entertaining though muddled film. Emily Browning, however, gives just the right mix of defiance and despair as Frances Shea, Reggie’s put-upon wife. Watch out for some particularly gory scenes. Dead Calm (1989) ★★★☆☆ W, 9.00pm In her first big film role, Nicole Kidman displays pluck and vulnerability as Rae Ingram, a woman who loses her infant son in a car accident, and consents to a long recovery at sea, on a luxury yacht called the Saracen. Her husband John (Sam Neill) is an experienced naval officer and stand-up guy, and though he knows banishing Rae’s guilt and grief is going to be tough, he has no idea what shock therapy fate has in mind. Saturday 9 December John Noakes and Shep in 1978 Credit: HULTON  John Noakes: TV Hero BBC Two, 5.30pm One quarter of the definitive Blue Peter foursome, alongside Peter Purves, Valerie Singleton and Shep, John Noakes was both its longest-serving presenter and one of its very finest. A gifted communicator, earnest when he had to be but more often game for anything, whether that be a laugh or a lunatic stunt. This affectionate profile of Noakes, who died in May, aged 83, after many years with Alzheimer’s, pivots on perhaps his two best-loved moments. First, there’s a climb up Nelson’s Column, sans ropes or safety harnesses, that was every bit as daft and dangerous as it looked and ample testament to his dauntlessness. That impish sense of humour is demonstrated by the notorious appearance of Lulu the elephant, who relieved herself on the floor before rampaging across the studio and over Noakes’s foot. Ever the entertainer, he milked both for all they were worth. His relationship with the series was an equivocal one and he reportedly resented his clownish persona, but this tribute skirts any controversy in favour of warm nostalgia, with familiar Blue Peter faces including Biddy Baxter and Lesley Judd recalling the man and his work. GT Premier League Football: West Ham United v Chelsea Sky Sports Main Event, 11.30am Having recovered from a goal down to beat Newcastle 3-1 last Saturday, with Eden Hazard helping himself to a brace, Chelsea travel across London to face West Ham United. The home side, who are currently in the relegation zone, will have taken plenty of positives from their 2-1 defeat at Manchester City last Sunday – namely, their defensive display. A similarly obdurate performance here and new manager David Moyes might get a share of the spoils this time. When these sides met at the London Stadium last season, West Ham lost 2-1. PS European Rugby Champions Cup: Toulon v Bath Sky Sports Main Event, 5.15pm Two wins from two reads the stats for both sides so far in this season’s European Champions Cup – at least one of these 100 per cent records will end at Stade Mayol. Bath come into this match on the back of a 42-29 defeat by Exeter, but before that they’d won four on the bounce, with Freddie Burns impressing at fly-half. After the autumn internationals, director of rugby Todd Blackadder now has an embarrassment of riches from which to pick: most notably, England backs Anthony Watson, Semesa Rokoduguni and Jonathan Joseph. Toulon, meanwhile, ended a three-match losing streak on Saturday when they beat Lyon 39-11. PS Strictly Come Dancing BBC One, 6.45pm The five remaining couples must perform two routines in this semi-final, and with barely a strand of lace between them, expect forensic criticism from the judges. Sunday’s results show will reveal the final four and there will be a performance from Craig David. GT Michael McIntyre’s Big Show BBC One, 8.20pm Wringing his contacts book dry, McIntyre ropes in guests including TV presenters Marvin and Rochelle Humes (taking part in the game Send to All) and pop rock band The Vamps for more fun. GT Witnesses: a Frozen Death BBC Four, 9.00pm and 9.55pm Even in this saturated market for foreign-language thrillers, Witnesses stands out for its lack of gimmicks – though without ever quite scaling the heights of The Bridge or Spiral. Here, Sandra’s (Marie Dompnier) pursuit of the killer takes her into a forest and an orphanage. GT The White Princess Drama, 9.00pm and 10.20pm The excellent Jodie Comer anchors the series to its conclusion tonight with another double bill, as Elizabeth of York (Comer) and Henry VII (Jacob Collins-Levy) struggle to maintain a united front. GT Peter Blake: Pop Art Life Sky Arts, 9.00pm While there is more to Peter Blake’s work than his cover for Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, music has played a crucial role in the development of his art and reputation. This engaging film digs deeply into a mutually fruitful relationship. GT Casualty BBC One, 9.20pm Christmas approaches, bringing annual trauma and discord for the A&E team. Tonight finds Elle’s (Jaye Griffiths) tearaway son Blake (Kai Thorne) going off the rails in response to her suggestion that she spend the festive period with her new boyfriend. Polly (Sophia Di Martino), meanwhile, continues to be unimpressed by Max (Jamie Davis). GT Through the Keyhole: I’m a Celebrity… get me out of here! ITV, 9.50pm The living, breathing definition of an acquired taste, Keith Lemon returns for a fifth series of the show once helmed by David Frost. Guests include Jimmy Carr, Myleene Klass and Tony Blackburn. GT Gremlins 2: The New Batch (1990) ★★★☆☆ Christmas Gold, 9.40pm Whereas Joe Dante’s original monster hit was a deliciously dark horror flick (and staple Christmas hit) with touches of wry humour, this inferior sequel is essentially a straight-up, riotous comedy, replete with in-jokes and movie references. This time, the gremlins run amok in a Manhattan high-rise building called Clamp Tower, owned by John Glover’s Donald Trump-like mogul. The Cider House Rules (1999) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.15pm John Irving’s adaptation of his own 1985 novel features a fine Tobey Maguire and Michael Caine, who won an Oscar (only his second at the time). Irving won one too, for Best Screenplay, and there’s no doubt the story is moving, though this version – about an orphan (Maguire) and a doctor (Caine) who performs illegal abortions – is at times a bit saccharine. Paul Rudd co-stars; Lasse Hallström directs. The Drop (2014) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 11.35pm Tom Hardy anchors this tale of simmering malfeasance as the tender of a Brooklyn bar designated as the drop for ill-gotten gains. Dennis Lehane adapts his own short story Animal Rescue, and makes a perfect team with Belgian director Michaël R Roskam, who gets a tamped-down, shuffling and beautifully calibrated star turn out of Hardy. Sopranos star James Gandolfini adds a burly gravitas in what would be his final movie. Sunday 10 December Jumbo with keeper Matthew Scott in 1882 Credit: BBC Attenborough and the Giant Elephant BBC One, 9.00pm Can we ever have too much Attenborough? It seems not, as right in the foaming wake of the fabulous Blue Planet II (which concludes tonight, see preview below) comes this absorbing, bittersweet tale of the world’s first animal superstar – Jumbo the elephant. It’s a sad story, really. Jumbo shot to fame shortly after his arrival at London Zoo as an orphan in around 1861, but he didn’t get much from the deal. As Attenborough says, his captive life was “troubled, fuelled by alcohol, terrifying fits of violence, a near mystical relationship with his keeper and a tragic end that seems hard to believe”. Which is more than enough to hold the attention for an hour as he joins an international team examining Jumbo’s preserved skeleton at New York’s Museum of Natural History. Attenborough also pokes about in archives at London Zoo, sanctuaries in the Maasai Mara and Tennessee, and Ontario where Jumbo met his very sad end, building as complete a picture of this magnificent creature and his global travels as has ever been assembled. All the while it spreads a positive conservationist message and gives thanks that attitudes are more enlightened now than in Victorian times. GO Premier League Football: Liverpool v Everton & Manchester United v Manchester City Sky Sports Main Event, 1.15pm & 4.15pm “Super Sunday” lives up to its hyperbolic billing, with two potentially exhilarating derbies. First up, we’re at Anfield where Liverpool, fresh from their 5-1 demolition of Brighton, host Everton, who found some form last week, following up their 4-0 win at home to West Ham United with a 2-0 victory against Huddersfield. Later, in the 4.30pm kick-off, José Mourinho and Pep Guardiola renew rivalries as second-placed United host leaders City at Old Trafford. Expect it to be tight. PS Britain’s Wildest Weather 2017 Channel 4, 6.30pm This year has not, so far, been as extreme as some but, given the number of smartphone-wielding citizen journalists, there’s plenty of jaw-dropping footage of every extreme weather event that occurred, among them devastating floods, tornadoes and hair-raising lightning strikes. GO  Blue Planet II BBC One, 8.00pm This extraordinary series concludes with an undeniably depressing assessment of mankind’s impact on the marine environment. But David Attenborough, as ever, prefers to put the emphasis on hope. So there’s plenty of uplift too with stories of species brought back from extinction’s brink. GO Coastal Railways with Julie Walters Channel 4, 8.00pm Julie Walters heads for Cornwall on the Great Western route, recalling her childhood holidays in Torquay. She then boards a steam train at Paignton, hears tales of smugglers in Polperro and fills up on cakes in Penzance. GO Leonora Carrington: the Lost Surrealist BBC Four, 9.00pm This fascinating film tells the story of rebellious upper-class British artist Leonora Carrington, who worked alongside Ernst, Breton and Éluard in Paris at the height of the surrealist movement, yet died in 2011 all but forgotten in Mexico. Director Teresa Griffiths mixes interviews and biographical material with experimental animation and tableaux to bring Carrington’s work vividly to life. GO I’m a Celebrity… Get Me Out of Here! ITV, 9.00pm Seventeen series in and the public appetite for watching celebrities endure humiliation and repulsion shows little sign of drying up. This year’s launch pulled in ITV’s biggest audience of 2017. The final will no doubt draw as big a crowd again. GO Babylon Berlin Sky Atlantic, from 9.00pm Three more atmospheric episodes of the gripping crime series set in the bohemian, political Weimar Germany of the late Twenties. Detective Rath’s (Volker Bruch) investigation uncovers dangerous evidence of a shocking military conspiracy. GO The Sky At Night BBC Four, 10.00pm As well as more stargazing from the Royal Observatory, Maggie Aderin-Pocock is in Norway to see the Northern Lights. GO Ben-Hur (1959) ★★★★★ ITV3, 2.45pm A majestic slice of Hollywood history, this Roman-era melodrama directed by William Wyler and starring Charlton Heston won 11 Academy Awards (not equalled until Titanic in 1997). It still makes for magnificent viewing. Set in 26AD, it tells the story of a Jewish prince who clashes with the Roman governor and ends up enslaved, desperately plotting his revenge. The Sorcerer’s Apprentice (2010) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 3.00pm Jerry Bruckheimer gives the famous sequence from Disney’s Fantasia a fun, live-action reboot. Student Dave (Jay Baruchel) inherits Merlin’s powers, placing him in a power struggle between Balthazar (Nicolas Cage) and Horvath (Alfred Molina). Sadly there are just two scenes with broomsticks to link it to the original. Toby Kebbel is amusing as a stage musician co-opted by the forces of evil. Toy Story (1995) ★★★★★ BBC One, 3.35pm The idea of the first fully computer-generated animated film didn’t have those who had been weaned on the hand-drawn delights of Disney jumping for joy. However, with this beautiful tale, Pixar pushed animation to a new level – the premise, pace and emotion are all pitched perfectly. Whether it’s your first or 400th viewing, the story of toy cowboy Woody (Tom Hanks) and plastic spaceman Buzz Lightyear (Tim Allen) is a joy. Monday 11 December Faye Marsa, Sarah Parish and Amara Karan in Bancroft Credit: ITV Bancroft ITV, 9.00pm With so many crime dramas clogging up the television schedules it can be hard for a new series to stand out and at first ITV’s latest four-parter seems unlikely to break the mould. There’s an ambitious female cop with a possibly troubled past (the always reliable Sarah Parish), a striving younger cop who is desperate to move up the ranks (Faye Marsay) and the usual crop of jobsworths and strivers (Charles Babalola is particularly good as the married fellow officer Marsay’s Katherine should be steering well clear of). It’s all perfectly well done with a solid script from Kate Brooke (Mr Selfridge) but it seems like nothing special. Then, three quarters of the way through this first episode, something genuinely interesting happens: Bancroft’s secrets are revealed to be very dark indeed just as Katherine’s cold case involving the break-in and violent murder of a young woman in 1990 starts hotting up. With the stakes suddenly raised Bancroft spins off into a dark tale of the lengths that people go to keep the past buried and the stage is set for an intriguing game of secrets and lies. Smart scheduling sees the rest of the story play out over consecutive nights. SH Street Auction BBC One, 11.00am Paul Martin returns with a new series of the surprisingly addictive show in which people band together to raise funds for a member of their community by auctioning off hidden treasures. The fun comes from the unusual objects unearthed from garages and attics. SH Nigella’s Christmas Table BBC Two, 8.00pm If anything is guaranteed to Nigella put into purring overload it’s Christmas. The food on offer includes roast duck with orange, soy and ginger, but this is really about mood rather than food. SH   Paul Hollywood: A Baker’s Life Channel 4, 8.00pm Episode three of this genial series sees Hollywood looking back over his career and his time spent working at the Cliveden House Hotel in Berkshire. There’s also a festive get-together in Merseyside and some seasonal Danish pastries, which look delicious. SH The Art That Made Mexico: Paradise, Power and Prayers BBC Four, 9.00pm It’s always a pleasure to find a series that sheds new light on a subject, and so it is with artist Alinka Echeverria’s enthralling films about Mexico’s art. Of course, there are the key points: conquest, independence, dictatorship, revolution and figures such as Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo, but what the commentary gives us here is the context for both the history and the artists. This is true of this episode that looks at the relationship between art and power, colonialism and control while examining the enduring power of Kahlo’s work and myth. SH Handmade in Mexico BBC Four, 10.00pm The focus here is on Mexico’s celebrated Tree of Life sculptures, those gaudy, gorgeous interpretations of everything from the creation myth to the resurrection of Christ and the Day of the Dead. It’s a fascinating half-hour in which we see the amount of work and detail that goes into each piece. SH White Right: Meeting the Enemy: Exposure ITV, 10.40pm; STV, 11.05pm; UTV, 11.40pm; Wales, 11.10pm This intriguing-sounding documentary sees the Bafta-nominated Deeyah Khan (Jihad: A Story of the Others) investigate white extremism in the US. Khan visits white nationalist groups, attends a far-right rally and asks why this poisonous ideology is resurgent. SH The Black Swan (1942) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 2.35pm No, this is not the film about the ageing ballet dancer and the young ingénue; this is about high adventure on the seven seas. When Laird Cregar’s Captain Morgan becomes Governor of Jamaica, he promises to put an end to piracy. But things don’t go smoothly, especially when his assistant (Tyrone Power) kidnaps the ex-governor’s beautiful daughter (Maureen O’Hara). This was the final film of silent star Helene Costello. Mamma Mia! (2008) ★★★☆☆ ITV3, 7.50pm This musical comedy, directed by Phyllida Lloyd and set to Abba’s hits, is pure escapism. It’s naff, but that’s its selling point, as stars Meryl Streep, Pierce Brosnan and Julie Walters place tongues firmly in cheeks. At 59, Streep deserved more credit for doing the splits than for her role as a boho mother living on a Greek island whose daughter (Amanda Seyfried) tries to find out who her biological father is. Blood Diamond (2006) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 8.00pm The diamond industry of Sierra Leone is the subject of this striking thriller. Djimon Hounsou stars as a fisherman forced to work in the fields, who finds and hides a rare pink gem. His life is changed when he meets Leonardo DiCaprio’s self-serving mercenary and Jennifer Connelly’s well-meaning journalist. DiCaprio was Oscar-nominated, but lost to Forest Whitaker for The Last King of Scotland. Tuesday 12 December Paul Ready, Diane Morgan and Anna Maxwell-Martin Credit: BBC Motherland BBC Two, 10.00pm Dispensing with the calamitous set pieces of previous episodes and instead documenting the quiet desperation of this ill-starred band of sisters (plus one brother), this superb, exhausting sitcom from a writing supergroup including Graham Linehan and Sharon Horgan has been an exquisitely painful delight. We join Julia (Anna Maxwell Martin) in an unusually good place, with everything running smoothly thanks to her new Australian nanny, Lyndsey (Sarah Kendall). The kids are clean and happy, the school run is easy, the fridge is stocked – but could she be too good to be true? Amanda (Lucy Punch) has gone to ground after the revelation over her threesome, while her hapless confidant, Kevin (Paul Ready), is desperate to avoid having to get a job. And, should all the mugging get too much, there’s deadpan Liz (Diane Morgan), negotiating tricky relations with her dismal ex and his new, pregnant partner. After an orgy of passive aggression and desperate people in denial, the façades crack, just a little. Happily everyone reverts to fundamentally appalling type just in time for the end of the series and a surely inevitable recommission. GT Judd Apatow: the Return Netflix, from today After 25 years away from stand-up, the comedy zelig whose fingerprints are over everything from Knocked Up and Girls to Freaks and Geeks and Bridesmaids returns for a special set in Montreal, recorded in July. GT Masterchef: the Professionals BBC Two, 8.00pm After the hopefuls have tackled an invention test and rustled up a dish dedicated to one of their inspirations, Marcus Wareing, Monica Galletti and Gregg Wallace eliminate another two contenders, leaving only six in the contest. GT The A Word BBC One, 9.00pm Joe’s (brilliant Max Vento) family comes together for an end of year show at his old school – tears, acrimony and reconciliation ensue in the conclusion of Peter Bowker’s finely wrought, well-performed drama. A third series should surely be a formality. GT Invasion! with Sam Willis BBC Four, 9.00pm While not quite attaining Lucy Worsley levels of gonzo history, Dr Sam Willis is an enthusiastic and knowledgeable host not above the odd stunt to prove a point. This second episode of a series documenting the incursions that have shaped our nation and its bloodline examines the differing techniques and goals of the invaders. There are the Barbary Corsaire pirates who settled on Lundy Island, King Louis the Lion, invited to invade and crowned by disgruntled nobles, and the Dutch forces that negotiated the Medway just a year prior to the Glorious Revolution. Further proof, if any were needed, that Britain is a mongrel nation and all the better for it. GT The World’s Most Expensive Presents Channel 4, 9.00pm Eyeball-melting opulence and appalling lack of taste do battle with considerable craftsmanship and class in this startling film featuring everything from gold-plated pushbikes to a poker set in alligator-hide case. GT Sports Personality of the Year 2017: The Contenders BBC One, 10.45pm; Wales, 11.10pm; Scotland, 11.45pm With reigning title-holder Andy Murray’s injury-hit year effectively ruling him out of contention, Anthony Joshua, Chris Froome, Lewis Hamilton, Jo Konta and Mo Farah will be headlining this year’s roster after another 12 months of outstanding achievement in British sport. The runners and riders are introduced tonight. GT Shane (1953) ★★★★☆ Film4, 3.45pm There are few Westerns that examine the depths of human emotions, but this film by George Stevens is one of them and has become a landmark of cinema. Shane (Alan Ladd) is a cowboy who finds himself idolised for the way that he handles himself in the face of a landowner’s heavies. The climax is a face-off between Shane and smiling, whispering, Oscar-nominated Jack Palance, as the original man in black. A must-see. Mr & Mrs Smith (2005) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 9.00pm A daft comedy thriller which is perhaps best remembered for being the film that introduced Brad Pitt to Angelina Jolie. They play a couple whose failing marriage is spiced up dramatically when each discovers that the other secretly works as an assassin. Let down by a weak script, the film is held together by the chemistry between its two leads. Vince Vaughn and Adam Brody co-star. Moonraker (1979) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm The 11th film in the Bond series, and the fourth to star Roger Moore as the dapper MI6 agent, involves the theft of a space shuttle. It’s one of the weaker Bond films and at times seems more of a comedy than a tense action adventure, but it’s enjoyably frivolous. Michael Lonsdale plays resident baddie Hugo Drax who pinches the aforementioned space shuttle to help along his plan to wipe out the world’s population. Wednesday 13 December Barbara Schulz in Vanished by the Lake Credit: Channel 4 Vanished by the Lake Channel 4, 10.00pm This haunting French crime drama centres on a teenage girl who goes missing at a festival. It’s hardly an original set-up, but much like last year’s hit Gallic import The Disappearance, based on an almost identical premise, the mix of youthful promise cut short and fierce small-town intrigue quickly compels. The girl in question is Chloé Delval (Charlie Joirkin), and as news of her disappearance spreads, memories of a similar 15-year-old case in which two other girls vanished at the same celebration are revived. Into the fray steps striking Parisian detective Lise Stocker (Barbara Schulz), who has returned home to look after her ill mother, but is soon swept up by the case as its personal implications begin to unfold. All of the hallmarks of the Nordic noir genre are present, from the evocative setting (here a Broadchurch-style coastal backdrop) to the close-knit neighbours with secrets to hide. Nevertheless, this opening episode is an effective tension builder and the human impact of the mystery – particularly on Chloé’s fracturing parents – is powerfully moving. Once episode one finishes, the full series will be available to watch on All 4. TD Mary Berry’s Country House Secrets BBC One, 8.00pm Mary Berry rounds off her tour of Britain’s stately homes at Goodwood House, where she is suitably gushing over its royal history and grand interiors. Berry is treated to a hair-raising lap of the nearby motor circuit and whips up a four-tier cake for the cricket tea. TD The Secret Life of the Zoo Channel 4, 8.00pm The plight of the endangered Javan green magpie is on the agenda as keepers at Chester Zoo attempt to breed youngster Permata with older bird Netuba. Elsewhere, a zebra battle breaks out when newcomer Okoth arrives. TD Peaky Blinders BBC Two, 9.00pm A burst of gunfire opens the penultimate episode of period gangster antics, as Tommy Shelby (Cillian Murphy) faces off against mafia honcho Luca Changretta (Adrien Brody). An army colonel, meanwhile, questions Ada (Sophie Rundle) about her Communist past. TD The Channel: The World’s Busiest Waterway Channel 4, 9.00pm The fallout from Project Nemo, the new underwater electricity cable being laid between Belgium and Britain, is explored. We follow the Nemo manager struggling to avoid costly delays and the fisherman whose catch is being compromised by the work. TD Royal Academy: Painting the Future Sky Arts, 9.00pm Virtual reality (VR) is predicted to become the go-to place for everything from entertainment to work. The Royal Academy is getting in on the act with a new exhibition which explores the potential of the medium. This film follows the show’s creation with the artists, including sculptor Antony Gormley, portraitist Jonathan Yeo and Turner Prize-nominee Yinka Shonibare, who are producing works that use the technology to trace the history of the body in art. TD David Hockney: Time Reclaimed Sky Arts, 10.30pm This tribute to David Hockney aims to get beyond the glamour that surrounds his reputation, and focus on the personal aspects of his work. Anecdotes, images and analysis of the pictures themselves highlight the individuality expressed in each period of Hockney’s career, suggesting a diverse oeuvre that defies classification. TD Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am George Roy Hill directed two of the most popular films ever: Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969) and The Sting (1973). But this indifferent Julie Andrews musical of the flapper era was first. There’s much to enjoy in the story of a naive woman who leaves her rural roots behind to seek fortune and romance in Twenties New York. James Fox, as a spiffing salesman, is a particular highlight. The Three Musketeers (2011) ★★☆☆☆ E4, 8.00pm Paul W S Anderson’s adaptation of Alexandre Dumas’ novel is faithful in plot – Porthos, Athos and Aramis (Ray Stevenson, Matthew Macfadyen, Luke Evans), and disciple d’Artagnan (Logan Lerman), are sent to retrieve the French Queen’s (Juno Temple) necklace. The tone, however, is half action-pantomime, half candy-coloured steampunk comic – fun but terribly slapdash. Poltergeist (1982) ★★★★☆ TCM, 11.15pm Director Tobe Hooper, who made The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, tones down the gut-churning horror but still ramps up the tension to nightmare levels in this Steven Spielberg-produced chiller. It has one of cinema’s most spine-tinglingly scary moments: “They’re here,” sing-songs a little girl kneeling before the TV. “They” are the spirits, at first playful then increasingly malevolent, who terrorise a suburban family. Thursday 14 December Lord Sugar Credit: BBC The Apprentice: Why I Fired Them BBC One, 8.00pm In the wake of last night’s excoriating interview round, and with this Sunday’s final rapidly approaching to decide who will win a £250,000 investment and the mentoring opportunity of a lifetime, Lord Sugar makes his most personal appearance of the series. Other than those brief to-camera inserts that roll out as taxi cabs ferry freshly defenestrated candidates away from Sugar Towers to forever dream of fortunes that might have been made, this is one of few occasions in each “process” when Lord Sugar appears on screen away from the wannabe tycoons and talking to viewers directly. And he makes the most of it with his trademark witty-gritty line in East End charm, although professionalism usually prevents him from really dishing the behind-the-scenes dirt on why he thought 16 of them worthy only of the tip of his boot. Instead he looks back over this 13th series identifying the key commercial and strategic errors that led to each of his firing finger decisions, and what ultimately marked out the two finalists from the others. It’s a lot to get through in an hour but, as series recaps go, it’s usually a hoot. GO Ashes Cricket: Australia v England BT Sport 1, 1.30am The enduring Ashes Down Under conundrum: wake up early to watch it or stay up late? The third Test, held at the WACA Ground in Perth, gets under way in the early hours of Thursday morning, with England hoping to bounce back from two demoralising defeats. Lose this one and captain Joe Root will have to surrender the urn to the Aussies. PS European Tour Golf: The Indonesian Masters Sky Sports Main Event, 6.00am It’s the opening day of the tournament at the Royale Jakarta Golf Club, where Thailand’s Poom Saksansin won the title last year. Saksansin shot an overall score of 270 to finish on -18, five strokes ahead of joint runners-up Masahiro Kawamura of Japan and fellow Thai players Phachara Khongwatmai and Suradit Yongcharoenchai. PS Amazing Spaces Snow and Ice Special Channel 4, 8.00pm George Clarke and his inventive sidekick Will Hardie travel to Norway’s remoter parts to check out why this small country on the edge of Europe punches above its weight in architecture and design. Could it be something to do with the cold weather, they wonder? GO Love, Lies & Records BBC One, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama about the romance of working at a Leeds registry office delivers on melodrama, if not subtlety. In this penultimate episode Kate (Ashley Jensen) struggles to make a decision after Rob’s (Adrian Bower) surprise proposal. GO Blitz: the Bombs That Changed Britain BBC Two, 9.00pm The final edition looks at the horrific impact of German incendiary bombs, in particular one that set a church ablaze in Bristol in November 1940 and started a firestorm that ravaged the city’s historic centre. GO The Tunnel: Vengeance Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Sky’s award-winning version of The Bridge (its milieu that of British and French police teams linked by the Channel Tunnel) returns for a third and final run. A pity, as Stephen Dillane as spiky detective and Clémence Poésy as his emotionally remote French opposite number make an appealing pair. This first of six episodes packs in plenty of action as the pair set out to find the link between a burnt-out trawler and a maintenance worker attacked by a plague of rats. GO Extraordinary Teens: School of Life and Deaf Channel 4, 10.00pm This absorbing film follows a year in the life of Mary Hare Boarding School for deaf pupils in Berkshire. Seen through the eyes of a 15-year-old about to undergo a potentially life-changing cochlear implant, this film gives a profound sense of the physical and emotional complexities of growing up deaf. GO The Russell Howard Hour Sky One, 10.00pm We’ve reached the penultimate episode of this excellent topical comedy series. It’s little more than an extended version of BBC Three’s (and later BBC Two’s) Good News but that’s exactly what fans (and Sky, who snapped Howard up) wanted and he has delivered, pushing his brand of highly topical, politically aware, positive reinforcement stand-up with aplomb. GO Life (2017) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Daniel Espinosa’s Earth-orbiting suspense flick was released less than two months before Ridley Scott’s new chapter in his Alien franchise, and bears many of the same hallmarks. It’s also a little bit Gravity. Ryan Reynolds is one of a crew of astronauts aboard a space station conducting research into life on Mars. In terms of entertainment, the film does its baseline job of getting you to chew your nails off. There’s Something About Mary (1998) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 9.00pm There are bad taste jokes in abundance in this comedy from the Farrelly Brothers. Ben Stiller stars as Ted, a shy man who realises he’s still in love with Mary (Cameron Diaz, proving her comic abilities), the date he tried to take to prom 13 years ago. So, to track her down, he hires an oily private eye (Matt Dillon) who also fallsin love with her and sets out to keep the pair apart. Gone in 60 Seconds (2000) ★★★☆☆ Universal Channel, 9.00pm Nicolas Cage has top billing in Dominic Sena’s remake of the 1974 cult film – a mind-numbingly testosterone-laced ride. Cage and Angelina Jolie are among a crew of thieves who must steal 50 cars in 72 hours to stop the murder of Cage’s brother. It’s more than serviceable entertainment, plus car aficionados will have fun spotting the Cadillacs and Corvettes. Friday 15 December Paul, Andy, Cynthia and Diana in The Sweet Makers Credit: BBC The Sweet Makers at Christmas BBC Two, 9.00pm Following their enjoyable three-part series earlier this year, BBC Two’s Sweet Makers return for this one-off Christmas special looking at changing treats from Georgian times to the Twenties. As before, the show is a lovely mix of baking and interesting social history with Emma Dabiri and Dr Annie Gray, who fill us in on how each era viewed Christmas and how confectionery changes over time. The show’s highlight comes during the Victorian Era, also known as the moment when Christmas as we know it was invented, as chocolatiers Paul A Young and Diane Short, bespoke cake decorator Cynthia Stroud and sweet consultant Andy Baxendale recreate a Boar’s Head cake. “That’s the most bonkers thing we’ve ever made,” notes Young, looking at the finished result, which is rich in chocolate, beautifully decorated and featuring unnervingly glazed eyes. He’s right but it also looks fabulous, as do the intricate Twelfth Cakes, a speciality in Georgian times. The Twenties brings with it the wonderful news that before Terry’s invented the chocolate orange they introduced the chocolate apple to the world, before looking to the future and the invention of Lord Mackintosh’s Quality Street. SH Jean-Claude Van Johnson Amazon Prime Video, from today This delightfully silly new series sees Jean-Claude Van Damme as a retired action film star with a secret: he’s a special agent and he wants back in the game. It’s inspired mayhem anchored by a winning performance from the laconic Van Damme. SH Trollhunters Netflix, from today Guillermo del Toro’s inventive animation returns for a second series, and it features the voice of the late Anton Yelchin as reluctant hero Jim Lake Jnr. The story continues where the first series left off, and sees Jim adventure deeper into the Troll world to battle the leader of the Darklands. This series also features Mark Hamill and Game of Thrones’s Lena Headey. SH Judge Rinder’s Crown Court ITV, 8.00pm; not STV or UTV; Wales, 11.10pm Judge Rinder’s reboot of classic Seventies series Crown Court might lack the big-name actors of the original but its meld of real-life crime and courtroom drama is just as addictive. Tonight, the jury decides if James Byron (Rupert Young) murdered his wife. SH Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Sarah Millican is a brave guest of Oliver and Doherty – brave because it swiftly transpires that cooking really isn’t her thing. But Oliver manages to bite his tongue while showing her how to cook her favourite microwave meal from scratch. SH Have I Got News for You BBC One, 9.00pm The 54th series of the satirical news quiz comes to an end with the ever-reliable David Tennant in the host’s chair. It has been a patchy series, which was marked by a new low when Jo Brand had to explain why sexual harassment jokes weren’t funny to the male panellists. So let’s hope it goes out on a high. SH Roy Orbison: Love Hurts BBC Four, 9.30pm Roy Orbison’s three sons, Wesley, Roy Jnr and Alex, take centre stage to discuss their father in this emotional documentary. SH The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm; NI, 11.05pm Prepare for Star Wars: The Last Jedi overload as John Boyega, Daisy Ridley and Mark Hamill join Norton on the sofa. Don’t expect any spoilers but there’s sure to be some nice eulogies to the late Carrie Fisher. SH Before I Go to Sleep (2014) ★★★☆☆ More4, 9.00pm Nicole Kidman and Colin Firth star in this uninvolving thriller based on SJ Watson’s twisty bestseller. Kidman plays a woman who, after suffering a head injury, has no idea who she is or who the man sleeping next to her might be (it’s Colin Firth, playing her husband). She keeps a daily video diary but starts to notice discrepancies between what she’s recorded and what Firth tells her. The Pledge (2001) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 9.00pm A tense mystery directed by Sean Penn with a fine cast including Jack Nicholson, Helen Mirren, Robin Wright Penn, Aaron Eckhart and Vanessa Redgrave. Nicholson is a detective who has to handle a horrific case on the day of his retirement – the murder of a seven-year-old girl. He promises to bring the killer to justice, only to find that the case is far from straightforward. A powerful, unsettling film. Hyena (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.15pm This violent thriller about corrupt drug-squad officers is very violent indeed, so be prepared to cover your eyes for some parts of writer-director Gerard Johnson’s film. Michael Logan (an intense Peter Ferdinand) is the leader of this special force, assigned to tackle drug trafficking among the Balkan gangs. Stephen Graham, as his dubious boss, is as reliable as ever. Above all, it’s a grisly exploration of the criminal mind. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

The world's greatest hotel groups, according to you

The world's best hotel group? Almost 90,000 readers had their say in the 2017 Telegraph Travel Awards, and the results are in. Top of the pile was Oberoi, which saw off the challenge of Belmond Hotels and Taj Hotels to take the top spot. Last year's winner, Six Senses, slipped to ninth overall.  An Oberoi hotel in Udaipur Your 20 favourite hotel operators Oberoi Hotels & Resorts (+3) Belmond (+5) Taj Hotels Resorts and Palaces (+2) Shangri-La (-2) RIU (-2) Relais & Châteaux (+2) Aman (+3) Mandarin Oriental (-3) Six Senses (-8) Anantara Hotels (+3) Lime Wood Groups (+4) One&Only Resorts (-3) Jumeirah Group (+12) LUX* Resorts and Hotels (-9) Peninsula (+12) Wilderness Collection (-4) Sandals (N/A) Four Seasons (+1) Soho House & Co (-3) Firmdale Hotels (-3) What makes Oberoi so special? By Gill Charlton The best hotels are often family affairs, run by people who care passionately about every little detail and who treat guests like esteemed friends even if they rarely visit. Nowhere is this more true than at the 31 properties owned by Oberoi Hotels & Resorts which has been voted the World’s Best Hotel Group 2017 by Telegraph readers. The Oberoi, Mauritius It is a richly deserved award. I remember my own first stay in an Oberoi property, the Grand Hotel in Kolkata. At the end of a long, tiring tour of northern India, I arrived dusty and dishevelled to be swept up by the caring and warmth of the staff. It wasn’t the building that made my stay special, it was the people working in it. At a glance | Oberoi Hotels and Resorts Staff are trained to note down a guest’s likes and dislikes for future reference and to anticipate their needs in a discreet way. Best of all, there’s none of that annoying hovering and fawning found in so many of India’s five-star hotels. So it’s no surprise that visitors to India - especially first-timers - seeking a consistent level of excellence in all areas design their tour around Oberoi properties. The group’s founder Mohan Singh Oberoi began as a desk clerk at the colonial Cecil Hotel in Shimla and set up Oberoi Hotels in 1934. His son PRS Oberoi, now in his eighties, remains an active chairman and two of his grandsons, Vikram and Arjun Oberoi, are joint managing directors. The Oberoi Sukhvilas Resort & Spa, New Chandigarh While most Oberoi hotels are found in India, there are also properties in Dubai, Indonesia and Mauritius. Early next year, the group’s first hotel opens in Morocco: a luxury spa resort outside Marrakesh built to Oberoi’s own exacting design using top craftsmen to create a modern palace fit for a king. Set in a 25-acre citrus orchard, the villas will have private heated pools and views over the snow-capped Atlas Mountains. Its much-loved Oberoi New Delhi also reopens on January 1 after a major facelift that includes the latest clean-air technology to cope with Delhi’s infamous smogs. EMBARGO - DO NOT USE Previous winners | Telegraph Travel Awards 2011-2017 Runner up is Belmond Hotels, which runs 35 of the world’s great classic hotels, from the Cipriani in Venice to Sanctuary Lodge in Machu Picchu. In third place is another well-loved India-focused brand, Taj Hotels, which took third position. Its eagerly awaited Taj Exotica Spa and Resort in the Andaman Islands opens in January.     

The world's greatest hotel groups, according to you

The world's best hotel group? Almost 90,000 readers had their say in the 2017 Telegraph Travel Awards, and the results are in. Top of the pile was Oberoi, which saw off the challenge of Belmond Hotels and Taj Hotels to take the top spot. Last year's winner, Six Senses, slipped to ninth overall.  An Oberoi hotel in Udaipur Your 20 favourite hotel operators Oberoi Hotels & Resorts (+3) Belmond (+5) Taj Hotels Resorts and Palaces (+2) Shangri-La (-2) RIU (-2) Relais & Châteaux (+2) Aman (+3) Mandarin Oriental (-3) Six Senses (-8) Anantara Hotels (+3) Lime Wood Groups (+4) One&Only Resorts (-3) Jumeirah Group (+12) LUX* Resorts and Hotels (-9) Peninsula (+12) Wilderness Collection (-4) Sandals (N/A) Four Seasons (+1) Soho House & Co (-3) Firmdale Hotels (-3) What makes Oberoi so special? By Gill Charlton The best hotels are often family affairs, run by people who care passionately about every little detail and who treat guests like esteemed friends even if they rarely visit. Nowhere is this more true than at the 31 properties owned by Oberoi Hotels & Resorts which has been voted the World’s Best Hotel Group 2017 by Telegraph readers. The Oberoi, Mauritius It is a richly deserved award. I remember my own first stay in an Oberoi property, the Grand Hotel in Kolkata. At the end of a long, tiring tour of northern India, I arrived dusty and dishevelled to be swept up by the caring and warmth of the staff. It wasn’t the building that made my stay special, it was the people working in it. At a glance | Oberoi Hotels and Resorts Staff are trained to note down a guest’s likes and dislikes for future reference and to anticipate their needs in a discreet way. Best of all, there’s none of that annoying hovering and fawning found in so many of India’s five-star hotels. So it’s no surprise that visitors to India - especially first-timers - seeking a consistent level of excellence in all areas design their tour around Oberoi properties. The group’s founder Mohan Singh Oberoi began as a desk clerk at the colonial Cecil Hotel in Shimla and set up Oberoi Hotels in 1934. His son PRS Oberoi, now in his eighties, remains an active chairman and two of his grandsons, Vikram and Arjun Oberoi, are joint managing directors. The Oberoi Sukhvilas Resort & Spa, New Chandigarh While most Oberoi hotels are found in India, there are also properties in Dubai, Indonesia and Mauritius. Early next year, the group’s first hotel opens in Morocco: a luxury spa resort outside Marrakesh built to Oberoi’s own exacting design using top craftsmen to create a modern palace fit for a king. Set in a 25-acre citrus orchard, the villas will have private heated pools and views over the snow-capped Atlas Mountains. Its much-loved Oberoi New Delhi also reopens on January 1 after a major facelift that includes the latest clean-air technology to cope with Delhi’s infamous smogs. EMBARGO - DO NOT USE Previous winners | Telegraph Travel Awards 2011-2017 Runner up is Belmond Hotels, which runs 35 of the world’s great classic hotels, from the Cipriani in Venice to Sanctuary Lodge in Machu Picchu. In third place is another well-loved India-focused brand, Taj Hotels, which took third position. Its eagerly awaited Taj Exotica Spa and Resort in the Andaman Islands opens in January.     

The world's greatest hotel groups, according to you

The world's best hotel group? Almost 90,000 readers had their say in the 2017 Telegraph Travel Awards, and the results are in. Top of the pile was Oberoi, which saw off the challenge of Belmond Hotels and Taj Hotels to take the top spot. Last year's winner, Six Senses, slipped to ninth overall.  An Oberoi hotel in Udaipur Your 20 favourite hotel operators Oberoi Hotels & Resorts (+3) Belmond (+5) Taj Hotels Resorts and Palaces (+2) Shangri-La (-2) RIU (-2) Relais & Châteaux (+2) Aman (+3) Mandarin Oriental (-3) Six Senses (-8) Anantara Hotels (+3) Lime Wood Groups (+4) One&Only Resorts (-3) Jumeirah Group (+12) LUX* Resorts and Hotels (-9) Peninsula (+12) Wilderness Collection (-4) Sandals (N/A) Four Seasons (+1) Soho House & Co (-3) Firmdale Hotels (-3) What makes Oberoi so special? By Gill Charlton The best hotels are often family affairs, run by people who care passionately about every little detail and who treat guests like esteemed friends even if they rarely visit. Nowhere is this more true than at the 31 properties owned by Oberoi Hotels & Resorts which has been voted the World’s Best Hotel Group 2017 by Telegraph readers. The Oberoi, Mauritius It is a richly deserved award. I remember my own first stay in an Oberoi property, the Grand Hotel in Kolkata. At the end of a long, tiring tour of northern India, I arrived dusty and dishevelled to be swept up by the caring and warmth of the staff. It wasn’t the building that made my stay special, it was the people working in it. At a glance | Oberoi Hotels and Resorts Staff are trained to note down a guest’s likes and dislikes for future reference and to anticipate their needs in a discreet way. Best of all, there’s none of that annoying hovering and fawning found in so many of India’s five-star hotels. So it’s no surprise that visitors to India - especially first-timers - seeking a consistent level of excellence in all areas design their tour around Oberoi properties. The group’s founder Mohan Singh Oberoi began as a desk clerk at the colonial Cecil Hotel in Shimla and set up Oberoi Hotels in 1934. His son PRS Oberoi, now in his eighties, remains an active chairman and two of his grandsons, Vikram and Arjun Oberoi, are joint managing directors. The Oberoi Sukhvilas Resort & Spa, New Chandigarh While most Oberoi hotels are found in India, there are also properties in Dubai, Indonesia and Mauritius. Early next year, the group’s first hotel opens in Morocco: a luxury spa resort outside Marrakesh built to Oberoi’s own exacting design using top craftsmen to create a modern palace fit for a king. Set in a 25-acre citrus orchard, the villas will have private heated pools and views over the snow-capped Atlas Mountains. Its much-loved Oberoi New Delhi also reopens on January 1 after a major facelift that includes the latest clean-air technology to cope with Delhi’s infamous smogs. EMBARGO - DO NOT USE Previous winners | Telegraph Travel Awards 2011-2017 Runner up is Belmond Hotels, which runs 35 of the world’s great classic hotels, from the Cipriani in Venice to Sanctuary Lodge in Machu Picchu. In third place is another well-loved India-focused brand, Taj Hotels, which took third position. Its eagerly awaited Taj Exotica Spa and Resort in the Andaman Islands opens in January.     

Charlton's Karlan Ahearne-Grant relieved by 'crazy' late equaliser against Peterborough

Charlton's Karlan Ahearne-Grant relieved by 'crazy' late equaliser against Peterborough

Charlton's Karlan Ahearne-Grant relieved by 'crazy' late equaliser against Peterborough

Charlton's Karlan Ahearne-Grant relieved by 'crazy' late equaliser against Peterborough

Exclusive interview: How Burnley goalkeeper Nick Pope went from outcast to England's top stopper

It has been a remarkable journey for Nick Pope: from no longer enjoying football and almost feeling relief at being released by the Ipswich Town academy, through eight loan spells and being roughed up in non-League games such as the “big” Kent derby between Welling United and Dartford, to making his debut in the Premier League, where he now tops the charts as having the highest save percentage of any goalkeeper. Better than David de Gea, even. “It’s crazy,” Pope chuckles when told that no goalkeeper has more impressive statistics than him, including three successive clean sheets. The next stage of the journey comes on Saturday when seventh-placed Burnley host sixth-placed Arsenal. “To come this far is a long journey and something I could never have pictured back then.”  The “back then” was when he was 16. He was called into a meeting at Ipswich and told it was over. “Looking back it was the best thing that happened,” Pope states. “It gave me a jolt and forced a change in my life that I probably needed. And in my football, as well. It has worked out but I was devastated at the time.  “It wasn’t a surprise. I had seen it coming. I was low on confidence, didn’t think I was good enough. I remember the games. I wasn’t playing well, wasn’t playing good football and I was called in to a meeting. I was waiting for the bad news, really.” Did he think it was the end of his football career? “I probably did to be honest but being out of the academy system I didn’t really have to think about it,” Pope says. “I didn’t have to worry about whether I was going to get the next contract or the next scholarship or whether I would make it. “It was over. It was all out of the window and I just started to enjoy my football again. I was leaving that system where it’s the very controlled and high-pressure environment of academy football. To come out of it was something that was actually a breath of fresh air.” Still, it was tough. “I was an Ipswich fan [and season ticket-holder]. So it was nothing I felt could ever walk away from because if they allowed me to train with them it was like it was a massive honour,” Pope says.  Pope forced to stretch for the save as he maintains three successive clean sheets for Burnley  Credit: Reuters “I wasn’t massively enjoying it but had no other option until they told me, ‘We don’t want you here any more’. It’s hard. After you’ve been in a system for a few years and are used to it, the tag of being in an academy. In a school you might be the only one in there who is in an academy, and to lose that and to stop is a big blow and some find it hard to recover from and find another route.” So Pope had to think about life away from football. “I studied marketing for two years and a year of sports science,” he says, although there was an alternative. “My old man is a farmer [in Suffolk] so I could have gone in to that, maybe. But I wasn’t that worried about football. I was out of it for 18 months, two years and there was talk of being offered trials but nothing ever came up, so I had stopped getting excited.” Instead he went to college and played non-League “men’s football”, firstly with Bury Town in Suffolk. “You meet some people, you really do,” Pope says. “You go to some grounds that are not the best. You have people behind the goals abusing you – and you don’t get that in the academy!  “I quite enjoyed it because it’s so far from what you know. To encounter that so young was something else new and you had to get used to it. It’s considered a level below the academy but it was just what I needed really.” Pope earned a place at Nottingham University but then a contract was offered – by Charlton Athletic – which was followed by a raft of loan spells: to Harrow Borough and Welling, where he remembers playing the “derby” against Dartford twice in four days, to Aldershot – “a tough one for me,” he admits – to York City and so on. “I went from the Conference South to Charlton in the Championship, and that’s not a step any goalkeeper would realistically make,” Pope says, which is why he then went on loan so often. Every time you have to prove yourself. It’s  like being on trial even though you have the Charlton name as a Championship club, it itself won’t take you.” Pope made an impression, though, and so much so that he had a big decision to make: stay at Charlton, who had just been relegated to League One, or move to Burnley as third-choice goalkeeper. “At that point I could have stayed at Charlton and played, probably,” Pope, now 25, says. “But I thought that for me to grow as a player I would be better off coming to Burnley under this management set-up and this goalkeeping coach [Billy Mercer] and these players. I thought training here every day would make me better and give me the chance to play at the highest level I could.” That chance came when first-choice – and club captain – Tom Heaton dislocated his shoulder in the first-half of the Premier League match at home to Crystal Palace in early September. Suddenly Pope was on. “It’s a jolt, like ‘here it is’,” he recalls, although he was also determined to “enjoy it”.  Pope gathers the ball away from Newcastle's Christian Atsu in their recent Premier League match at Turf Moor  Credit: Getty Images  Which he has done. However, given the taste, it will be hard for him, he admits, to return to the bench if Heaton resumes his place, while there is a collective buzz at Burnley’s season so far. “There is probably a bit of a [long-ball] label around the team since it came back into the Premier League but we take it on the chin, really,” Pope says. “We know what we are, on the inside. We know what we are about. We might score from a set-piece or we might score with 10 passes.” The latter was evident in the flowing move that led to a goal in the win against Swansea City last weekend. “If you saw Man City do that then you would have every analysis of what kind of goal it was. That’s how good it was,” Pope says. “Are we in a realistic position? We are four points clear of eighth so it’s no fluke so far. We have started the season really well and built the foundation and I think where we are is just a good start, that’s all it is.” Pope feels the same about his own Premier League career.

Exclusive interview: How Burnley goalkeeper Nick Pope went from outcast to England's top stopper

It has been a remarkable journey for Nick Pope: from no longer enjoying football and almost feeling relief at being released by the Ipswich Town academy, through eight loan spells and being roughed up in non-League games such as the “big” Kent derby between Welling United and Dartford, to making his debut in the Premier League, where he now tops the charts as having the highest save percentage of any goalkeeper. Better than David de Gea, even. “It’s crazy,” Pope chuckles when told that no goalkeeper has more impressive statistics than him, including three successive clean sheets. The next stage of the journey comes on Saturday when seventh-placed Burnley host sixth-placed Arsenal. “To come this far is a long journey and something I could never have pictured back then.”  The “back then” was when he was 16. He was called into a meeting at Ipswich and told it was over. “Looking back it was the best thing that happened,” Pope states. “It gave me a jolt and forced a change in my life that I probably needed. And in my football, as well. It has worked out but I was devastated at the time.  “It wasn’t a surprise. I had seen it coming. I was low on confidence, didn’t think I was good enough. I remember the games. I wasn’t playing well, wasn’t playing good football and I was called in to a meeting. I was waiting for the bad news, really.” Did he think it was the end of his football career? “I probably did to be honest but being out of the academy system I didn’t really have to think about it,” Pope says. “I didn’t have to worry about whether I was going to get the next contract or the next scholarship or whether I would make it. “It was over. It was all out of the window and I just started to enjoy my football again. I was leaving that system where it’s the very controlled and high-pressure environment of academy football. To come out of it was something that was actually a breath of fresh air.” Still, it was tough. “I was an Ipswich fan [and season ticket-holder]. So it was nothing I felt could ever walk away from because if they allowed me to train with them it was like it was a massive honour,” Pope says.  Pope forced to stretch for the save as he maintains three successive clean sheets for Burnley  Credit: Reuters “I wasn’t massively enjoying it but had no other option until they told me, ‘We don’t want you here any more’. It’s hard. After you’ve been in a system for a few years and are used to it, the tag of being in an academy. In a school you might be the only one in there who is in an academy, and to lose that and to stop is a big blow and some find it hard to recover from and find another route.” So Pope had to think about life away from football. “I studied marketing for two years and a year of sports science,” he says, although there was an alternative. “My old man is a farmer [in Suffolk] so I could have gone in to that, maybe. But I wasn’t that worried about football. I was out of it for 18 months, two years and there was talk of being offered trials but nothing ever came up, so I had stopped getting excited.” Instead he went to college and played non-League “men’s football”, firstly with Bury Town in Suffolk. “You meet some people, you really do,” Pope says. “You go to some grounds that are not the best. You have people behind the goals abusing you – and you don’t get that in the academy!  “I quite enjoyed it because it’s so far from what you know. To encounter that so young was something else new and you had to get used to it. It’s considered a level below the academy but it was just what I needed really.” Pope earned a place at Nottingham University but then a contract was offered – by Charlton Athletic – which was followed by a raft of loan spells: to Harrow Borough and Welling, where he remembers playing the “derby” against Dartford twice in four days, to Aldershot – “a tough one for me,” he admits – to York City and so on. “I went from the Conference South to Charlton in the Championship, and that’s not a step any goalkeeper would realistically make,” Pope says, which is why he then went on loan so often. Every time you have to prove yourself. It’s  like being on trial even though you have the Charlton name as a Championship club, it itself won’t take you.” Pope made an impression, though, and so much so that he had a big decision to make: stay at Charlton, who had just been relegated to League One, or move to Burnley as third-choice goalkeeper. “At that point I could have stayed at Charlton and played, probably,” Pope, now 25, says. “But I thought that for me to grow as a player I would be better off coming to Burnley under this management set-up and this goalkeeping coach [Billy Mercer] and these players. I thought training here every day would make me better and give me the chance to play at the highest level I could.” That chance came when first-choice – and club captain – Tom Heaton dislocated his shoulder in the first-half of the Premier League match at home to Crystal Palace in early September. Suddenly Pope was on. “It’s a jolt, like ‘here it is’,” he recalls, although he was also determined to “enjoy it”.  Pope gathers the ball away from Newcastle's Christian Atsu in their recent Premier League match at Turf Moor  Credit: Getty Images  Which he has done. However, given the taste, it will be hard for him, he admits, to return to the bench if Heaton resumes his place, while there is a collective buzz at Burnley’s season so far. “There is probably a bit of a [long-ball] label around the team since it came back into the Premier League but we take it on the chin, really,” Pope says. “We know what we are, on the inside. We know what we are about. We might score from a set-piece or we might score with 10 passes.” The latter was evident in the flowing move that led to a goal in the win against Swansea City last weekend. “If you saw Man City do that then you would have every analysis of what kind of goal it was. That’s how good it was,” Pope says. “Are we in a realistic position? We are four points clear of eighth so it’s no fluke so far. We have started the season really well and built the foundation and I think where we are is just a good start, that’s all it is.” Pope feels the same about his own Premier League career.

Exclusive interview: How Burnley goalkeeper Nick Pope went from outcast to England's top stopper

It has been a remarkable journey for Nick Pope: from no longer enjoying football and almost feeling relief at being released by the Ipswich Town academy, through eight loan spells and being roughed up in non-League games such as the “big” Kent derby between Welling United and Dartford, to making his debut in the Premier League, where he now tops the charts as having the highest save percentage of any goalkeeper. Better than David de Gea, even. “It’s crazy,” Pope chuckles when told that no goalkeeper has more impressive statistics than him, including three successive clean sheets. The next stage of the journey comes on Saturday when seventh-placed Burnley host sixth-placed Arsenal. “To come this far is a long journey and something I could never have pictured back then.”  The “back then” was when he was 16. He was called into a meeting at Ipswich and told it was over. “Looking back it was the best thing that happened,” Pope states. “It gave me a jolt and forced a change in my life that I probably needed. And in my football, as well. It has worked out but I was devastated at the time.  “It wasn’t a surprise. I had seen it coming. I was low on confidence, didn’t think I was good enough. I remember the games. I wasn’t playing well, wasn’t playing good football and I was called in to a meeting. I was waiting for the bad news, really.” Did he think it was the end of his football career? “I probably did to be honest but being out of the academy system I didn’t really have to think about it,” Pope says. “I didn’t have to worry about whether I was going to get the next contract or the next scholarship or whether I would make it. “It was over. It was all out of the window and I just started to enjoy my football again. I was leaving that system where it’s the very controlled and high-pressure environment of academy football. To come out of it was something that was actually a breath of fresh air.” Still, it was tough. “I was an Ipswich fan [and season ticket-holder]. So it was nothing I felt could ever walk away from because if they allowed me to train with them it was like it was a massive honour,” Pope says.  Pope forced to stretch for the save as he maintains three successive clean sheets for Burnley  Credit: Reuters “I wasn’t massively enjoying it but had no other option until they told me, ‘We don’t want you here any more’. It’s hard. After you’ve been in a system for a few years and are used to it, the tag of being in an academy. In a school you might be the only one in there who is in an academy, and to lose that and to stop is a big blow and some find it hard to recover from and find another route.” So Pope had to think about life away from football. “I studied marketing for two years and a year of sports science,” he says, although there was an alternative. “My old man is a farmer [in Suffolk] so I could have gone in to that, maybe. But I wasn’t that worried about football. I was out of it for 18 months, two years and there was talk of being offered trials but nothing ever came up, so I had stopped getting excited.” Instead he went to college and played non-League “men’s football”, firstly with Bury Town in Suffolk. “You meet some people, you really do,” Pope says. “You go to some grounds that are not the best. You have people behind the goals abusing you – and you don’t get that in the academy!  “I quite enjoyed it because it’s so far from what you know. To encounter that so young was something else new and you had to get used to it. It’s considered a level below the academy but it was just what I needed really.” Pope earned a place at Nottingham University but then a contract was offered – by Charlton Athletic – which was followed by a raft of loan spells: to Harrow Borough and Welling, where he remembers playing the “derby” against Dartford twice in four days, to Aldershot – “a tough one for me,” he admits – to York City and so on. “I went from the Conference South to Charlton in the Championship, and that’s not a step any goalkeeper would realistically make,” Pope says, which is why he then went on loan so often. Every time you have to prove yourself. It’s  like being on trial even though you have the Charlton name as a Championship club, it itself won’t take you.” Pope made an impression, though, and so much so that he had a big decision to make: stay at Charlton, who had just been relegated to League One, or move to Burnley as third-choice goalkeeper. “At that point I could have stayed at Charlton and played, probably,” Pope, now 25, says. “But I thought that for me to grow as a player I would be better off coming to Burnley under this management set-up and this goalkeeping coach [Billy Mercer] and these players. I thought training here every day would make me better and give me the chance to play at the highest level I could.” That chance came when first-choice – and club captain – Tom Heaton dislocated his shoulder in the first-half of the Premier League match at home to Crystal Palace in early September. Suddenly Pope was on. “It’s a jolt, like ‘here it is’,” he recalls, although he was also determined to “enjoy it”.  Pope gathers the ball away from Newcastle's Christian Atsu in their recent Premier League match at Turf Moor  Credit: Getty Images  Which he has done. However, given the taste, it will be hard for him, he admits, to return to the bench if Heaton resumes his place, while there is a collective buzz at Burnley’s season so far. “There is probably a bit of a [long-ball] label around the team since it came back into the Premier League but we take it on the chin, really,” Pope says. “We know what we are, on the inside. We know what we are about. We might score from a set-piece or we might score with 10 passes.” The latter was evident in the flowing move that led to a goal in the win against Swansea City last weekend. “If you saw Man City do that then you would have every analysis of what kind of goal it was. That’s how good it was,” Pope says. “Are we in a realistic position? We are four points clear of eighth so it’s no fluke so far. We have started the season really well and built the foundation and I think where we are is just a good start, that’s all it is.” Pope feels the same about his own Premier League career.

Alan Pardew emerging as serious contender to take over at West Brom after Tony Pulis sacking

Alan Pardew is emerging as a serious contender to take over at West Bromwich Albion, after the sacking of Tony Pulis. Pardew has been added to Albion's shortlist of targets and the club is expected to hold talks with the former Crystal Palace manager later this week. The 56 year-old has been out of work since his dismissal from Palace last December but fits the criteria for West Brom as he has vast experience of the Premier League after spells with West Ham, Charlton Athletic and Newcastle. Sam Allardyce is understood to be cool on the prospect of taking charge at the Hawthorns while club sources have dismissed any interest in Michael O'Neill, the Northern Ireland manager. Pardew is now thought to be a strong candidate to replace Pulis, with West Brom likely to interview him in the next 48 hours. Nick Hammond, West Brom's technical director, worked with Pardew at Reading between 1999 and 2003. Gary Megson, Pulis' former assistant, has been placed in caretaker charge and has distanced himself from the post, ahead of Saturday's game at Tottenham Hotspur. He said: “I’m not daft enough to think I would be at West Brom without Tony Pulis. “We’ve still got the sadness of Tony not being here, but the club has got to be kept going. “I’ve taken 650 games, I’ve taken thousands of training sessions, they’ve decided that I take over for however long it’s going to be, be it 24 hours or more.” Pulis, meanwhile, will be presented with an award by the League Managers' Association on December 7. The LMA are honouring Pulis after he passed 1,000 games last season at an awards dinner in London. Peter Coates, the Stoke City chairman, is expected to attend as Pulis' guest. Pulis was sacked by West Brom on Monday, six weeks short of his three-year anniversary.

West Brom's Tony Pulis dilemma unlikely to get easier after Chelsea visit

The Hawthorns has been a managerial graveyard for Chelsea with both Andre Villas-Boas and Roberto Di Matteo lost their jobs following fixtures there. With the title secured in 2015, Jose Mourinho's side were defeated 3-0, a portent of the the following season's unravelling. Antonio Conte bucked the trend by winning the league in West Bromwich last year. Few expect him to be at Chelsea next season although defeat on Saturday will not spell the end for him. Not yet. But it could for the man in the home dug-out.  No matter the faith in any manager, two wins in 20 league games puts him under severe pressure but what makes it far worse for Tony Pulis is that he is facing the triple whammy of poor results, disappointing performances and fan disenchantment. So a heavy loss to Chelsea with – almost more significantly – a poor showing and a mutinous atmosphere among the supporters will place him in peril with an away trip to Tottenham Hotspur to come. It seems, not for the first time, that ‘Pulis-ball’ is the problem and there is a real issue about style of football that many Premier League clubs face: if you play the percentages then what are you left with when the points are not forthcoming? Take away the wins and it is wan. If Albion were to sack Pulis then they may want to turn to a manager with a proven track record of keeping teams up, of winning relegation battles and of creating the kind of solid side that is rarely in trouble. Yes, a Tony Pulis-type. Or (and would it be possible if Pulis goes?) Sam Allardyce. But there also comes a time when the fans, often more than the owners, want a bit more. When mere survival is not enough. What is the point of being in the Premier League if the football is boring? Staying there, yes. But when that status is in jeopardy there is not a lot left. Losing without entertaining is just losing. This will all grate on Pulis. He has never endured relegation and not just as a manager. In four decades as a player, coach or manager it never happened. Even Conte, his opponent, has suffered that failure. The argument for keeping Pulis is not just his track record and his acumen but that old chestnut: be careful what you wish for which can, alternatively, be known (by me at least) as the ‘Curbishley conundrum’ after what happened next when Alan Curbishley quit Charlton Athletic in 2006. Publically it was about needing a new challenge but really it was a shared disenchantment with manager and fans no longer seeing eye to eye. Curbishley, the fans thought, was not the man to take the then Premier League club to the next level. Unfortunately Charlton are now in League One and have endured a miserable decade. It does not mean the time was not right for Curbishley to go and Pulis’s links with Albion are nowhere near as deep. So it would not be such a wrench. But there are other examples. More recently there is Crystal Palace who went from Allardyce to Frank de Boer, wanting to progress, but he only lasted four games are they now in a desperate fight against relegation under former Albion manager, Roy Hodgson. It is a dilemma. There is nothing wrong with ambition. But it is stating the obvious to say the right decisions must be made. Liverpool look forward to glimpse of one that got away Southampton face Liverpool and the focus at Anfield will be on Virgil Van Dijk, the one who got away from Jurgen Klopp amid accusations of tapping-up, a public apology, a transfer request – and a potential £60million fee that would have made the Dutch international the world’s most expensive defender. It may still happen - and as early as January. Liverpool still want the player, he still wants to go, and Klopp probably feels a debt of loyalty while relations between the clubs have improved. Southampton’s stance was understandable. But while Liverpool, with the sixth worst defensive record in the Premier League, are definitely suffering from not signing Van Dijk Southampton are hardly significantly better for keeping him. Without Van Dijk this season they conceded a goal every 107 minutes. With him they have conceded every 75 minutes while his return meant he replaced £15million Wesley Hoedt who was proving an adequate substitute. Furthermore Southampton’s problems under former Liverpool defender Mauricio Pellegrino have not been conceding goals but scoring them, just as last season. They lack creativity. They lack a goal-scorer. It begs the question if they might not have been better cashing in and investing elsewhere. Credit: REUTERS Kane on verge of another record Harry Kane is the type of player who knows the significance of every goal he scores, every record he breaks. It is one of the things that motivate him. So the Tottenham Hotspur striker will be well aware of the fact that if he finds the net against Arsenal in the north London derby he will become the first player to score in six consecutive league matches against an Arsene Wenger side. At present Kane is level with former Chelsea striker Jimmy Floyd Hasselbaink who struck in five games in a rowbetween 1997 and 2000 – although Hasselbaink could justifiably argue it was a little harder to score against Arsenal in those days. Nevertheless Kane’s record against Arsenal is already even more impressive having scored 20 goals in 24 games. No Ney, Jose When the word is that players are find the manager’s video sessions and drills too long and boring then his future is in doubt. When that club is Paris Saint-Germain with Neymar, Thiago Silva etc. then it is unlikely that coach, Unai Emery, will last long. Even so PSG have zero interest in Jose Mourinho. "Friends" reuinted The feud between Rafael Benitez and Jose Mourinho has been one of the most sulphurous in recent memory. The pair meet at Old Trafford, with Manchester United hosting Newcastle United. Remarkably, though, it will be the first time they have faced each other since Aug 2007. Will time have mellowed them? Doubt it.

West Brom's Tony Pulis dilemma unlikely to get easier after Chelsea visit

The Hawthorns has been a managerial graveyard for Chelsea with both Andre Villas-Boas and Roberto Di Matteo lost their jobs following fixtures there. With the title secured in 2015, Jose Mourinho's side were defeated 3-0, a portent of the the following season's unravelling. Antonio Conte bucked the trend by winning the league in West Bromwich last year. Few expect him to be at Chelsea next season although defeat on Saturday will not spell the end for him. Not yet. But it could for the man in the home dug-out.  No matter the faith in any manager, two wins in 20 league games puts him under severe pressure but what makes it far worse for Tony Pulis is that he is facing the triple whammy of poor results, disappointing performances and fan disenchantment. So a heavy loss to Chelsea with – almost more significantly – a poor showing and a mutinous atmosphere among the supporters will place him in peril with an away trip to Tottenham Hotspur to come. It seems, not for the first time, that ‘Pulis-ball’ is the problem and there is a real issue about style of football that many Premier League clubs face: if you play the percentages then what are you left with when the points are not forthcoming? Take away the wins and it is wan. If Albion were to sack Pulis then they may want to turn to a manager with a proven track record of keeping teams up, of winning relegation battles and of creating the kind of solid side that is rarely in trouble. Yes, a Tony Pulis-type. Or (and would it be possible if Pulis goes?) Sam Allardyce. But there also comes a time when the fans, often more than the owners, want a bit more. When mere survival is not enough. What is the point of being in the Premier League if the football is boring? Staying there, yes. But when that status is in jeopardy there is not a lot left. Losing without entertaining is just losing. This will all grate on Pulis. He has never endured relegation and not just as a manager. In four decades as a player, coach or manager it never happened. Even Conte, his opponent, has suffered that failure. The argument for keeping Pulis is not just his track record and his acumen but that old chestnut: be careful what you wish for which can, alternatively, be known (by me at least) as the ‘Curbishley conundrum’ after what happened next when Alan Curbishley quit Charlton Athletic in 2006. Publically it was about needing a new challenge but really it was a shared disenchantment with manager and fans no longer seeing eye to eye. Curbishley, the fans thought, was not the man to take the then Premier League club to the next level. Unfortunately Charlton are now in League One and have endured a miserable decade. It does not mean the time was not right for Curbishley to go and Pulis’s links with Albion are nowhere near as deep. So it would not be such a wrench. But there are other examples. More recently there is Crystal Palace who went from Allardyce to Frank de Boer, wanting to progress, but he only lasted four games are they now in a desperate fight against relegation under former Albion manager, Roy Hodgson. It is a dilemma. There is nothing wrong with ambition. But it is stating the obvious to say the right decisions must be made. Liverpool look forward to glimpse of one that got away Southampton face Liverpool and the focus at Anfield will be on Virgil Van Dijk, the one who got away from Jurgen Klopp amid accusations of tapping-up, a public apology, a transfer request – and a potential £60million fee that would have made the Dutch international the world’s most expensive defender. It may still happen - and as early as January. Liverpool still want the player, he still wants to go, and Klopp probably feels a debt of loyalty while relations between the clubs have improved. Southampton’s stance was understandable. But while Liverpool, with the sixth worst defensive record in the Premier League, are definitely suffering from not signing Van Dijk Southampton are hardly significantly better for keeping him. Without Van Dijk this season they conceded a goal every 107 minutes. With him they have conceded every 75 minutes while his return meant he replaced £15million Wesley Hoedt who was proving an adequate substitute. Furthermore Southampton’s problems under former Liverpool defender Mauricio Pellegrino have not been conceding goals but scoring them, just as last season. They lack creativity. They lack a goal-scorer. It begs the question if they might not have been better cashing in and investing elsewhere. Credit: REUTERS Kane on verge of another record Harry Kane is the type of player who knows the significance of every goal he scores, every record he breaks. It is one of the things that motivate him. So the Tottenham Hotspur striker will be well aware of the fact that if he finds the net against Arsenal in the north London derby he will become the first player to score in six consecutive league matches against an Arsene Wenger side. At present Kane is level with former Chelsea striker Jimmy Floyd Hasselbaink who struck in five games in a rowbetween 1997 and 2000 – although Hasselbaink could justifiably argue it was a little harder to score against Arsenal in those days. Nevertheless Kane’s record against Arsenal is already even more impressive having scored 20 goals in 24 games. No Ney, Jose When the word is that players are find the manager’s video sessions and drills too long and boring then his future is in doubt. When that club is Paris Saint-Germain with Neymar, Thiago Silva etc. then it is unlikely that coach, Unai Emery, will last long. Even so PSG have zero interest in Jose Mourinho. "Friends" reuinted The feud between Rafael Benitez and Jose Mourinho has been one of the most sulphurous in recent memory. The pair meet at Old Trafford, with Manchester United hosting Newcastle United. Remarkably, though, it will be the first time they have faced each other since Aug 2007. Will time have mellowed them? Doubt it.

Why do rail firms treat passengers as guilty until proven innocent?

Gill Charlton, Telegraph Travel's consumer guru, responds to a reader who was fined for losing his rail ticket – despite having a seat reservation and proof of purchase.  Peter Brooks writes I booked a return rail ticket from London Euston to Birkdale online with Virgin Trains. As Virgin only provides e-tickets for mainline journeys, I had to go to my local railway station and pick up four tickets for the journey.  On the return journey, I presented my ticket to staff at Birkdale to board the Merseyrail train to Liverpool Central, where I think I left the ticket in the exit machine. In any event, when I arrived at Liverpool Lime Street to board the London train, I no longer had it.  But I did have my seat reservation ticket, a printout of the original booking confirmation and the credit card used to purchase the ticket.  I noticed that the train manager was aggressive in his approach to ticket inspection with other passengers. He had already made a detailed announcement over the PA system saying that anyone without the correct ticket should get off at Crewe and get on the right train or buy a new ticket. Liverpool Lime Street Credit: GETTY I showed the train manager my seat reservation ticket and proof of purchase, but he was very dismissive. I was asked to pay the fare of £159. I said calmly that I had already paid for it and had no intention of paying again. He then told me that I would be treated as a fare dodger and stomped off.  At Euston I was met by three Virgin security guards and not allowed to leave the station without signing an unpaid fare notice.  I have lost an appeal against the charge. Virgin Trains says that its terms say that the actual paper ticket must be shown. But the Unpaid Fare Notice says it’s issued if the passenger “could not produce a valid ticket or authority to travel when requested”.  But I could produce authority to travel – the purchase receipt. Why is this outdated ticket issuing system being used to penalise genuine customers who have genuinely mislaid a ticket and can prove this? Secrets to saving on UK train fares Gill Charlton replies Before taking this up with Virgin Trains, I asked for an opinion from Transport Focus, the independent watchdog for rail users. “It is right that train companies should take steps to stop those who try to evade paying fares,” says its passenger director, David Sidebottom. “But those who have made an innocent mistake and been caught out by the many rules and restrictions should be treated with understanding and not immediately assumed to be guilty.” I put this to Virgin Trains but it wouldn’t budge on its decision. “Proof of purchase such as an email receipt isn’t enough since the actual ticket may be sold on or refunded,” says a spokesman for Virgin Rail. The company claims it can be hard to spot fare dodgers and says it must treat everyone without the correct ticket in a similar way.  I travel regularly on GWR and find train managers vary in their approach to mislaid tickets. Some give the passenger the benefit of the doubt, others will insist on charging for a new ticket. Mobile ticketing – m-tickets that are held on a smartphone – is slowly being rolled out across Britain. According to National Rail’s website (nationalrail.co.uk), 230 stations accept m-tickets but not all rail operating companies using a station may sell m-tickets.  road or rail?

Why do rail firms treat passengers as guilty until proven innocent?

Gill Charlton, Telegraph Travel's consumer guru, responds to a reader who was fined for losing his rail ticket – despite having a seat reservation and proof of purchase.  Peter Brooks writes I booked a return rail ticket from London Euston to Birkdale online with Virgin Trains. As Virgin only provides e-tickets for mainline journeys, I had to go to my local railway station and pick up four tickets for the journey.  On the return journey, I presented my ticket to staff at Birkdale to board the Merseyrail train to Liverpool Central, where I think I left the ticket in the exit machine. In any event, when I arrived at Liverpool Lime Street to board the London train, I no longer had it.  But I did have my seat reservation ticket, a printout of the original booking confirmation and the credit card used to purchase the ticket.  I noticed that the train manager was aggressive in his approach to ticket inspection with other passengers. He had already made a detailed announcement over the PA system saying that anyone without the correct ticket should get off at Crewe and get on the right train or buy a new ticket. Liverpool Lime Street Credit: GETTY I showed the train manager my seat reservation ticket and proof of purchase, but he was very dismissive. I was asked to pay the fare of £159. I said calmly that I had already paid for it and had no intention of paying again. He then told me that I would be treated as a fare dodger and stomped off.  At Euston I was met by three Virgin security guards and not allowed to leave the station without signing an unpaid fare notice.  I have lost an appeal against the charge. Virgin Trains says that its terms say that the actual paper ticket must be shown. But the Unpaid Fare Notice says it’s issued if the passenger “could not produce a valid ticket or authority to travel when requested”.  But I could produce authority to travel – the purchase receipt. Why is this outdated ticket issuing system being used to penalise genuine customers who have genuinely mislaid a ticket and can prove this? Secrets to saving on UK train fares Gill Charlton replies Before taking this up with Virgin Trains, I asked for an opinion from Transport Focus, the independent watchdog for rail users. “It is right that train companies should take steps to stop those who try to evade paying fares,” says its passenger director, David Sidebottom. “But those who have made an innocent mistake and been caught out by the many rules and restrictions should be treated with understanding and not immediately assumed to be guilty.” I put this to Virgin Trains but it wouldn’t budge on its decision. “Proof of purchase such as an email receipt isn’t enough since the actual ticket may be sold on or refunded,” says a spokesman for Virgin Rail. The company claims it can be hard to spot fare dodgers and says it must treat everyone without the correct ticket in a similar way.  I travel regularly on GWR and find train managers vary in their approach to mislaid tickets. Some give the passenger the benefit of the doubt, others will insist on charging for a new ticket. Mobile ticketing – m-tickets that are held on a smartphone – is slowly being rolled out across Britain. According to National Rail’s website (nationalrail.co.uk), 230 stations accept m-tickets but not all rail operating companies using a station may sell m-tickets.  road or rail?

Joe Gomez proving a Liverpool bargain after adding Neymar to list of players he kept under wraps

As the world’s most expensive footballer found out at Wembley on Tuesday night, Joe Gomez enjoys a challenge. Aged just 20, Liverpool defender Gomez has already faced a number of potentially career-defining decisions and his long-term thinking could yet land him a place in England’s World Cup squad. He could have joined Chelsea as a 15-year-old with his best friend Kasey Palmer, but chose to stay at Charlton Athletic. There were sleepless nights wondering if he had made the right decision as Palmer became a Uefa Youth League winner at Stamford Bridge, but Gomez wanted first-team football. Charlton’s former academy manager Paul Hart promoted Gomez to the Under-18s when he was still aged 13 and helped to convince him to turn down a switch to Chelsea. “We didn’t want to hold him back, but we explained we thought it would be beneficial to stay longer, learn his trade and try to get in the first team, and then go,” said Hart. “We had his mum and dad, and his agent along and they listened to what we said, trusted us and bought into it.” A former defender himself, Hart brought through Jonathan Woodgate at Leeds United and Michael Dawson at Nottingham Forest, and also managed Des Walker at the City Ground. “You try not to have favourites, but I was always very impressed with Joe,” said Hart. “But he wasn’t the finished article and to play as a centre-back, aerially he had to get better. You can be as good as you like, but you have to win your headers. Charlton’s former academy manager Paul Hart also helped develop Jonathan Woodgate Credit: getty images “I remember telling Joe about Jonathan Woodgate, who missed a header from a corner in a game and I shouted ‘if you miss the next one, you’ll come and stand with me’. He smashed into the next header, got knocked out and had to go to hospital. I went with him and the first thing Jonathan asked when he came round was ‘did I head it?’ That physical and mental toughness is what I wanted to get into Joe and he took it on board.” Bob Peeters was the Charlton manager who rewarded Gomez with his first-team debut as a 17-year-old and he went on to make 24 appearances for the Addicks by the end of the 2014/15 season, a full year before Palmer was named as an unused substitute by Chelsea for the first time. The Blues were among the clubs, along with Arsenal, Red Bull Leipzig and Hoffenheim, who were battling to sign Gomez in the summer of 2015, but he opted for Liverpool because he was convinced he would receive first-team opportunities at Anfield. But a cruciate ligament injury, suffered while playing for England’s Under-21s, and a change of manager during his first four months at Liverpool meant that it was a full year before Jurgen Klopp could even watch Gomez train. Gomez has admitted there were dark days while he was out, particularly when he when he suffered a setback with his Achilles, but he finally played for Klopp 15 months after his initial injury against Plymouth Argyle in the FA Cup in January this year. Gomez chose Liverpool over Arsenal because he saw a clearer path to the first team Credit: Reuters Having played twice more in the FA Cup last season, in the replay with Plymouth and the defeat to Wolverhampton Wanderers, Gomez was asked to be part of Aidy Boothroyd’s England squad for this summer’s Under-21 European Championships. But Gomez again put his long-term ambitions ahead of short-term gain and decided that he would be better served to spend an entire pre-season at Liverpool working with Klopp and trying to win a first-team place at his club. He started in the Premier League for the first time under Klopp in August in a 1-0 victory over Crystal Palace and then helped Liverpool to a thumping 4-0 win against Arsenal – keeping Alexis Sanchez quiet. Just as Sanchez only lasted around an hour against Gomez before being taken off, Antony Martial was substituted after 65 fruitless minutes against the youngster in Liverpool’s goalless draw with Manchester United. Sanchez, Martial and Neymar is not a bad list of forwards to have frustrated just 22 appearances into his Reds career and the £3.5million fee Liverpool paid for Gomez, thanks to a release clause in his contract, already looks like one of the biggest bargains of recent times. Liverpool only had to fork out an extra £250,000 to Charlton as a result of Gomez’s first England start, which will not have bothered anyone watching him keep Brazil’s £200m star in his back pocket. Hart, who is now assistant manager at League Two Luton Town, watched Gomez’s Wembley performance from his home in Nottingham. Gomez kept Neymar quiet at Wembley on Tuesday Credit: PA “I’m just so impressed with the way he has coped with the injury and has come back even stronger,” said Hart. “He has always had a good head on his shoulders and has wanted to learn. “With his ability, together with the way his character and how he handles himself, I can’t imagine any problems for Joe. I just think he will get better and better.” Gomez stayed late into the night at Wembley to talk to those who had come to watch him, including family members, and thank those who have supported him. He was also quick to recognise the fact that England manager Gareth Southgate had taken a chance on the likes of him and Ruben Loftus-Cheek in the friendlies against Germany and Brazil. “I had a relationship with Gareth from when he was the Under-21s coach and I know how good he is as a manager,” said Gomez. “He is great for young players like me, you can see how many opportunities he has given in just this squad alone so it has been great. “I’m learning from all the backroom staff. It is a great effort that is put together to try and produce performances and now we have just got to try and build on it and keep the momentum going into the World Cup.” Gomez certainly has momentum on his side.

Joe Gomez proving a Liverpool bargain after adding Neymar to list of players he kept under wraps

As the world’s most expensive footballer found out at Wembley on Tuesday night, Joe Gomez enjoys a challenge. Aged just 20, Liverpool defender Gomez has already faced a number of potentially career-defining decisions and his long-term thinking could yet land him a place in England’s World Cup squad. He could have joined Chelsea as a 15-year-old with his best friend Kasey Palmer, but chose to stay at Charlton Athletic. There were sleepless nights wondering if he had made the right decision as Palmer became a Uefa Youth League winner at Stamford Bridge, but Gomez wanted first-team football. Charlton’s former academy manager Paul Hart promoted Gomez to the Under-18s when he was still aged 13 and helped to convince him to turn down a switch to Chelsea. “We didn’t want to hold him back, but we explained we thought it would be beneficial to stay longer, learn his trade and try to get in the first team, and then go,” said Hart. “We had his mum and dad, and his agent along and they listened to what we said, trusted us and bought into it.” A former defender himself, Hart brought through Jonathan Woodgate at Leeds United and Michael Dawson at Nottingham Forest, and also managed Des Walker at the City Ground. “You try not to have favourites, but I was always very impressed with Joe,” said Hart. “But he wasn’t the finished article and to play as a centre-back, aerially he had to get better. You can be as good as you like, but you have to win your headers. Charlton’s former academy manager Paul Hart also helped develop Jonathan Woodgate Credit: getty images “I remember telling Joe about Jonathan Woodgate, who missed a header from a corner in a game and I shouted ‘if you miss the next one, you’ll come and stand with me’. He smashed into the next header, got knocked out and had to go to hospital. I went with him and the first thing Jonathan asked when he came round was ‘did I head it?’ That physical and mental toughness is what I wanted to get into Joe and he took it on board.” Bob Peeters was the Charlton manager who rewarded Gomez with his first-team debut as a 17-year-old and he went on to make 24 appearances for the Addicks by the end of the 2014/15 season, a full year before Palmer was named as an unused substitute by Chelsea for the first time. The Blues were among the clubs, along with Arsenal, Red Bull Leipzig and Hoffenheim, who were battling to sign Gomez in the summer of 2015, but he opted for Liverpool because he was convinced he would receive first-team opportunities at Anfield. But a cruciate ligament injury, suffered while playing for England’s Under-21s, and a change of manager during his first four months at Liverpool meant that it was a full year before Jurgen Klopp could even watch Gomez train. Gomez has admitted there were dark days while he was out, particularly when he when he suffered a setback with his Achilles, but he finally played for Klopp 15 months after his initial injury against Plymouth Argyle in the FA Cup in January this year. Gomez chose Liverpool over Arsenal because he saw a clearer path to the first team Credit: Reuters Having played twice more in the FA Cup last season, in the replay with Plymouth and the defeat to Wolverhampton Wanderers, Gomez was asked to be part of Aidy Boothroyd’s England squad for this summer’s Under-21 European Championships. But Gomez again put his long-term ambitions ahead of short-term gain and decided that he would be better served to spend an entire pre-season at Liverpool working with Klopp and trying to win a first-team place at his club. He started in the Premier League for the first time under Klopp in August in a 1-0 victory over Crystal Palace and then helped Liverpool to a thumping 4-0 win against Arsenal – keeping Alexis Sanchez quiet. Just as Sanchez only lasted around an hour against Gomez before being taken off, Antony Martial was substituted after 65 fruitless minutes against the youngster in Liverpool’s goalless draw with Manchester United. Sanchez, Martial and Neymar is not a bad list of forwards to have frustrated just 22 appearances into his Reds career and the £3.5million fee Liverpool paid for Gomez, thanks to a release clause in his contract, already looks like one of the biggest bargains of recent times. Liverpool only had to fork out an extra £250,000 to Charlton as a result of Gomez’s first England start, which will not have bothered anyone watching him keep Brazil’s £200m star in his back pocket. Hart, who is now assistant manager at League Two Luton Town, watched Gomez’s Wembley performance from his home in Nottingham. Gomez kept Neymar quiet at Wembley on Tuesday Credit: PA “I’m just so impressed with the way he has coped with the injury and has come back even stronger,” said Hart. “He has always had a good head on his shoulders and has wanted to learn. “With his ability, together with the way his character and how he handles himself, I can’t imagine any problems for Joe. I just think he will get better and better.” Gomez stayed late into the night at Wembley to talk to those who had come to watch him, including family members, and thank those who have supported him. He was also quick to recognise the fact that England manager Gareth Southgate had taken a chance on the likes of him and Ruben Loftus-Cheek in the friendlies against Germany and Brazil. “I had a relationship with Gareth from when he was the Under-21s coach and I know how good he is as a manager,” said Gomez. “He is great for young players like me, you can see how many opportunities he has given in just this squad alone so it has been great. “I’m learning from all the backroom staff. It is a great effort that is put together to try and produce performances and now we have just got to try and build on it and keep the momentum going into the World Cup.” Gomez certainly has momentum on his side.

Joe Gomez proving a Liverpool bargain after adding Neymar to list of players he kept under wraps

As the world’s most expensive footballer found out at Wembley on Tuesday night, Joe Gomez enjoys a challenge. Aged just 20, Liverpool defender Gomez has already faced a number of potentially career-defining decisions and his long-term thinking could yet land him a place in England’s World Cup squad. He could have joined Chelsea as a 15-year-old with his best friend Kasey Palmer, but chose to stay at Charlton Athletic. There were sleepless nights wondering if he had made the right decision as Palmer became a Uefa Youth League winner at Stamford Bridge, but Gomez wanted first-team football. Charlton’s former academy manager Paul Hart promoted Gomez to the Under-18s when he was still aged 13 and helped to convince him to turn down a switch to Chelsea. “We didn’t want to hold him back, but we explained we thought it would be beneficial to stay longer, learn his trade and try to get in the first team, and then go,” said Hart. “We had his mum and dad, and his agent along and they listened to what we said, trusted us and bought into it.” A former defender himself, Hart brought through Jonathan Woodgate at Leeds United and Michael Dawson at Nottingham Forest, and also managed Des Walker at the City Ground. “You try not to have favourites, but I was always very impressed with Joe,” said Hart. “But he wasn’t the finished article and to play as a centre-back, aerially he had to get better. You can be as good as you like, but you have to win your headers. Charlton’s former academy manager Paul Hart also helped develop Jonathan Woodgate Credit: getty images “I remember telling Joe about Jonathan Woodgate, who missed a header from a corner in a game and I shouted ‘if you miss the next one, you’ll come and stand with me’. He smashed into the next header, got knocked out and had to go to hospital. I went with him and the first thing Jonathan asked when he came round was ‘did I head it?’ That physical and mental toughness is what I wanted to get into Joe and he took it on board.” Bob Peeters was the Charlton manager who rewarded Gomez with his first-team debut as a 17-year-old and he went on to make 24 appearances for the Addicks by the end of the 2014/15 season, a full year before Palmer was named as an unused substitute by Chelsea for the first time. The Blues were among the clubs, along with Arsenal, Red Bull Leipzig and Hoffenheim, who were battling to sign Gomez in the summer of 2015, but he opted for Liverpool because he was convinced he would receive first-team opportunities at Anfield. But a cruciate ligament injury, suffered while playing for England’s Under-21s, and a change of manager during his first four months at Liverpool meant that it was a full year before Jurgen Klopp could even watch Gomez train. Gomez has admitted there were dark days while he was out, particularly when he when he suffered a setback with his Achilles, but he finally played for Klopp 15 months after his initial injury against Plymouth Argyle in the FA Cup in January this year. Gomez chose Liverpool over Arsenal because he saw a clearer path to the first team Credit: Reuters Having played twice more in the FA Cup last season, in the replay with Plymouth and the defeat to Wolverhampton Wanderers, Gomez was asked to be part of Aidy Boothroyd’s England squad for this summer’s Under-21 European Championships. But Gomez again put his long-term ambitions ahead of short-term gain and decided that he would be better served to spend an entire pre-season at Liverpool working with Klopp and trying to win a first-team place at his club. He started in the Premier League for the first time under Klopp in August in a 1-0 victory over Crystal Palace and then helped Liverpool to a thumping 4-0 win against Arsenal – keeping Alexis Sanchez quiet. Just as Sanchez only lasted around an hour against Gomez before being taken off, Antony Martial was substituted after 65 fruitless minutes against the youngster in Liverpool’s goalless draw with Manchester United. Sanchez, Martial and Neymar is not a bad list of forwards to have frustrated just 22 appearances into his Reds career and the £3.5million fee Liverpool paid for Gomez, thanks to a release clause in his contract, already looks like one of the biggest bargains of recent times. Liverpool only had to fork out an extra £250,000 to Charlton as a result of Gomez’s first England start, which will not have bothered anyone watching him keep Brazil’s £200m star in his back pocket. Hart, who is now assistant manager at League Two Luton Town, watched Gomez’s Wembley performance from his home in Nottingham. Gomez kept Neymar quiet at Wembley on Tuesday Credit: PA “I’m just so impressed with the way he has coped with the injury and has come back even stronger,” said Hart. “He has always had a good head on his shoulders and has wanted to learn. “With his ability, together with the way his character and how he handles himself, I can’t imagine any problems for Joe. I just think he will get better and better.” Gomez stayed late into the night at Wembley to talk to those who had come to watch him, including family members, and thank those who have supported him. He was also quick to recognise the fact that England manager Gareth Southgate had taken a chance on the likes of him and Ruben Loftus-Cheek in the friendlies against Germany and Brazil. “I had a relationship with Gareth from when he was the Under-21s coach and I know how good he is as a manager,” said Gomez. “He is great for young players like me, you can see how many opportunities he has given in just this squad alone so it has been great. “I’m learning from all the backroom staff. It is a great effort that is put together to try and produce performances and now we have just got to try and build on it and keep the momentum going into the World Cup.” Gomez certainly has momentum on his side.

England 0 Germany 0: Gareth Southgate vindicated as young guns hold their own

This was a goalless draw but so many goals were met by England: ­Ruben Loftus-Cheek with his ­swagger and, well, cheek in ­midfield, where he filled the No 10 shirt, John Stones with his graceful assuredness in defence and Jordan Pickford with his commanding ­authority in goal.  And two of those three were making their debuts. Against the world champions, Germany, there were glimpses of a brave new world for England under Gareth Southgate as the manager begins to stamp his authority both with formation and personnel.  It is not the time to get carried away, that has happened too often before, while there was always that lingering suspicion that Germany, orchestrated from a deeper role by Mesut Ozil, yes him, were performing at half-capacity at best and even then still struck the crossbar, had a shot cleared off the line, cut England open on occasions and were denied by Pickford’s fine saves.  It was the first time in 14 matches that Germany had failed to score. But England had their chances, with Germany goalkeeper Marc-Andre ter Stegen also excelling in what was an open, entertaining friendly as both nations began their preparations for next summer’s World Cup. The holders will be among the favourites, while England are decidedly a work in progress. But one now making strides. So much is made of the Football Association buzzword – pathway – and here was a route forward, surely, although that also had to be viewed through the prism of a match when England were denied eight players through injury and Germany could not call on a host of first-choices, either.  Ozil orchestrated waves of Germany attacks Credit: REUTERS/Hannah McKay But if the purpose of such fixtures is not the scoreline but the lessons learnt, the goals met, then this was a significant result for England, with Germany coach Joachim Low talking up the “young, ­dynamic players” his team faced.  More of those, Tammy Abraham and, more so, Joe Gomez also did well on their debuts, with Gomez replacing Phil Jones in the first half when the Manchester United ­defender limped off injured. There may be repercussions with Jones’s club over that episode and not least because he was already wearing a heavy strapping on his thigh.  “He seems fine,” Southgate said before suggesting he might be ­released back to United.  Harry Maguire underhit a backpass in the first minute but recovered to put in a fine performance Credit: LYN KIRK/AFP/Getty Images England knew they would not hog possession, even that they would be chasing shadows at times in their dark blue kit, but they stuck to the task with a belief that bodes well for the future. That future has to factor in Loftus-Cheek who, like Harry Winks before him recently, looks at home at this level.  This was only Loftus-Cheek’s 21st start of his senior career and the 21-year-old has that look about him that suggests he belongs. He was increasingly impressive in possession, with a barrel of skill that was quickly evident when he ­executed a double nutmeg – foxing both Leroy Sane, then Germany’s one debutant, Marcel Halstenberg, before Antonio Rudiger – Loftus-Cheek’s Chelsea team-mate, albeit with the midfielder on loan to Crystal Palace – had enough and brought him down. Such trickery is not something normally evident in a Three Lions shirt.  And to think it had all started shakily for the most inexperienced England team to take to the field for 37 years – with just 101 caps between them before kick-off. The previous least capped? That was in 1980 against Australia, a team with only 57 appearances, but this was a different calibre of opposition.  It showed. There were nerves with Harry Maguire under-hitting a back-pass in the first minute and Pickford fortunate when his intervention cannoned off the onrushing Timo Werner before spinning away to safety.  Loftus-Cheek turns away from Gundogan Credit: Rob Newell - CameraSport But Germany were also vulnerable and, immediately after, the tireless, perennially threatening Jamie Vardy arced a trademark run to take the ball. He crossed low, Abraham took a swipe but missed, with the ball running to Kieran Trippier, who slammed it first-time into the side-netting. He should have cut it back to Loftus-Cheek, who was left holding his head as he would have had the simple task of passing into the unguarded net.  England had lined up in a 3-5-2, which Southgate is committed to now and which can morph into a 3-4-3, and looked the better for it. But they were almost undone when Sane collected possession, weighed up a shot and sent the ball crashing against the bar from the edge of the penalty area. It bounced to safety.  That was a let-off and then there was another with Ozil countering and slicing England open with a ball through to Werner, whose low shot was parried by Pickford, only for it to fall to Sane who waited, picked his spot but Jones stooped to head it off the line. Even then it dropped to Julian Draxler, who blazed over.  Jordan Pickford made an accomplished debut in goal Credit: TOBY MELVILLE/REUTERS It was Jones’s last ­contribution and it seemed England were being over-run when Werner was again put through, this time from Joshua Kimmich, only for Pickford to once more parry his low shot.  Encouragingly, England hit back. Abraham turned Rudiger, with his snapshot deflecting off Mats Hummels and, with Ter Stegen wrong-footed, it grazed the outside of a post. Vardy then latched onto a through ball, lifted it over the goalkeeper, only to see it scrambled away for a corner.  Well played, @rubey_lcheek �� pic.twitter.com/WfHnXR6GaQ— England (@England) November 10, 2017 Vardy went even closer in the second half as he met Trippier’s cross and, this time, Ter Stegen superbly shovelled his header away.  The game drifted, playing itself out with a flurry of changes, ­although England, certainly, pushed for a goal in the final ­moments as substitute Jesse Lingard fired wastefully over from Maguire’s header with the last kick of the game. The goal did not come but England had their win in other ways. And the kids did all right.  10:14PM Southgate speaks briefly [Lingard's miss] was a set play we’d been working on, and I think it wouldn’t have been an unfair scoreline. First half, a couple of really good saves from Jordan but we also created a couple of really good chances. Room for improvement but a really good performance.Our use of the ball was excellent throughout the game. A really healthy performance. [On Loftus-Cheek]. He did everything I know he can do. It took him 10 minutes to realise he was OK here, that he could do it and he can because he can do anything. He needs that confidence because he’s capable of anything. He’s got the physical attributes and he can handle the ball. He'll gain huge confidence from that.  9:59PM Full time Very encouraging performance from England tonight against this scratch Germany side. Mercifully, they played pretty well for once and Loftus-Cheek demonstrated why so many great players rate him so highly. There's certainly something about him - pluck and skill.  Stones and Maguire played very well, too, Trippier made some excellent runs and put in three fine crosses and Pickford should have moved ahead of Joe Hart with that debut. Still causes for concern with being overrun in central midfield and being sucked into shortening the pitch with 10 men behind the ball but far better than anything we've seen from them for quite a while.  9:55PM 90+3 min England free-kick on the left when Lingard made an astute run and Hummels ran out to stop him by foul means not fair. Rashford crosses to the far post, Maguire wins it and heads it back into the centre. Lingard meets it on the half-volley by the six-yard line and spoons it over. What a chance to win it with the last kick of the match. But he horsed it.  9:53PM 90+2 min Another good intervention from Maguire. He's set the bar high for Cahill tonight.  9:51PM 90+1 min The first of three minutes begin with Cork looking for Rashford's run but the Man Utd forward, for once, doesn't make it easy for his team-mate, straying too close to Ginter.  9:50PM 89 min There are 0-0 draws ... and this has been far more entertaining than many an England game I've been lumbered withhad the privilege of reporting.  Glenn Hoddle praises Stones and Maguire but says he has to give the man of the match to Ruben Loftus-Cheek.  9:49PM 88 min Walker and Cork combine on the right and switch it to the left where Bertrand and Rashford try to wriggle into the box. No way through but Lingard fancies his chances, makes five yards until he tries to gull Hummels who is not buying it and blocks his path.  9:47PM 87 min  Jack Cork's entry makes it five debutants for England.  9:47PM 86 min Double, double sub: Vardy and Livermore off, Cork and Lingard on for England. Gundogan and Sane depart for Germany. On come Seb Rudy and Julian Brandt.  9:45PM 85 min England corner earned by Walker's drive and commitment. Bertrand takes an inswinger with his left foot and again hits the near-post sentry.  9:45PM 84 min Another impressive run from Maguire who draws Ginter out to him and plays in Rashford but the prodigy's first touch betrays him and the ball skips safely towards Hummels.  9:43PM 83 min Bertrand combines well with Maguire again and is found by the Leicester centre-half's pass that puts him round the back. The cross, however, hits the defender at the front post.   Loftus-Cheek spins Gundogan Credit: Rob Newell - CameraSport   9:41PM 82 min Stones pushes up high to pin Germany back as they try to play out from the back and he gives England the initiative momentarily.  9:40PM 81 min No paper aeroplanes yet but it is Mexican wave time.  9:40PM 80 min And England are forced to start back in their own box when the ball is cleared easily.  9:39PM 78 min It's a dreadful free kick, though.  9:39PM 77 min Nice spin by Rashford out by the left touchline, he loses it but Loftus-Cheek makes a second sally and provokes Ozil into a foul with close control and clever shielding.  9:37PM 75 min More Germany possession at the back. As Hoddle says - there's treasure amidst the trash - Vardy needs to push up to give Hummels something to worry about instead of getting behind the ball with his nine outfield colleagues.  9:34PM 73 min The keeper rolls it to Maguire who bursts forward and slides a good pass out to the left for Bertrand. The left-back makes it to the byline to drill a cross that Germany defend in numbers and without panic.   9:33PM 72 min Walker turns on the turbo boost to power past Halstenberg but only to win a throw-in  that wends its way back to Pickford.  9:31PM 71 min England double substitution: Walker on for Trippier; Champions League winner Bertrand on.  9:31PM 70 min Ozil tries the pass from outside right to inside right for Sane's run but Rose is there and it's his last touch.  9:30PM 68 min Germany are trying to manipulate England out of position with quick passes and movement but England maintain their discipline and Maguire and Stone block off the near post at the expense of a corner.  9:28PM 67 min Can coming on, says Hoddle, means 'Ozil can go deeper in his deep role'. Well, indeed. Rose wreaks his revenge on Kimmich with a turbo-nudge/shove. Free kick.  9:27PM 66 min Germany sub: Emre Can on for Julian Draxler.  9:26PM 65 min Gomez tries a long ball up front for Vardy's run but it's too heavy and the crowd starts a chorus of 'What the f------ h--- was that?' Sympathetic bunch.  9:24PM 62 min We don't have the usual 'Roboblogger' tools available for a friendly, I'm afraid. But if it was here it would show you that Germany have had 73% of possession so far this half. England, though, are carving out chances.  9:22PM 60 min England substitution: Abraham goes off, Marcus Rashford comes on.  9:21PM 59 min Excellent run from Dier into the box and Loftus-Cheek plays him in with a clever pass but Hummels gets in the block. Corner, Germany break swiftly and Livermore has to thwart a break with a cynical foul. Into the book he goes.  9:19PM 57 min Loftus-Cheek robs Gundogan in midfield, passes it up to Livermore who hits a fine reverse left-footed pass to Abraham. Vardy splits off to the left to give Abraham a run at Hummels but he tries to round the Germany captain and gives him a sniff of the ball by taking it too close to him. Hummels, the wily old fox, gets a toe on it to knock it away.  9:17PM 56 min Pickford spots Abraham haring upfield and tries a quick punt that he overclubs and sends skidding through to Ter Stegen.  9:16PM 55 min Gundogan hits it straight at Rose after poncing about for a minute before he took it. Corner that England defend and Pickford snaffles the cross from the second ball.  9:15PM 53 mins Germany free kick on the right out by the touchline.  9:13PM 51 min A band is playing. Is that England's or Germany's? England fizz some passes around midfield until Maguire threads a good pass for Vardy out on the left but his fellow Fox, his fleeter Fox, had just stepped off-side.  9:11PM 49 min The full-back advances and hits one of his customarily terrific crosses, whipping it towards the penalty spot. Vardy meets it and tries to steer it towards the inside of the left post. He meets it sweetly but can't direct it into the corner but it's still a fine header. Unfortunately for him Ter Stegen's save is even better, swooping low to his right to palm it away.  9:09PM 48 min Germany were passing the ball around crisply until Trippier  stepped up to whip the ball off Halstenberg. He moves it inside and bombs on. Loftus-Cheek takes the ball infield spins and England work it out to Trippier.  9:07PM 46 min Rose is floored by Draxler and England have a free kick.  8:52PM Half time By Jove, I think they've got it. Yes, Germany have had a few too many chances and are flooding central midfield at times. But England have looked very good going forward, aren't repeatedly giving the ball away and Trippier and Loftus-Cheek, in particular, are playing very well. Vardy and Abraham are moving with vibrancy and intelligence and Dier is playing some neat passes. Stones has saved England once, Jones twice and Pickford has made three eye-catching saves.  Credit: John Patrick Fletcher/Action Plus via Getty Images   8:49PM 45 min Loftus-Cheek gets back on to the credit side with a lovely hooked pass up for Vardy as Ter Stegen tries to close him down. Vardy misreads the spin of the floated pass and tries to lob the keeper with his laces but misjudges the angle and power required.  8:47PM 44 min Two chances - Livermore cuts in on his left but can't find any power with his swinger and squirts his shot wide. Then Dier plays a cute pass up the inside right that Loftus-Cheek uncharacteristically fails to control in the box as it skips ahead of him, too close to Ter Stegen.  8:46PM 43 min Abraham's feint and turn almost beats Rudiger on the 18-yard line when he cushions a pass from Vardy. Rudiger recovers to get his tow on to Abraham's shot, sticking out his left leg in a desperate lunge, that sends the ball up and round the post.  Rudiger blocks Abraham's shot Credit: REUTERS/Hannah McKay   8:44PM 41 min Draxler goes flying under Trippier's challenge in the box, Trippier diligently filling in for Stones who had gone out wide with Werner. Nothing sinister in it, though. A meeting of shoulders and a dramatic pratfall from Draxler.  Trippier tells Draxler to get up Credit:  Mike Hewitt/Bongarts/Getty Images   8:42PM 39 min Rose inadvertently plays Werner onside by tracking back Sane instead of letting him go. Werner, 20 yards out, has a headstart on the back three and is through. He lifts his head and sweeps a low shot as he's closed down by Gomez but Pickford saves it smartly.  8:41PM 37 min Vardy gets across Rudiger and slows a fraction, provoking the defender into a shove. Free kick on the right, 40 yards out. Rose latches on to the knock down to try a volley but doesn't meet it with crispness or precision. England are certainly passing the ball far better than they did against Slovenia.  8:38PM 35 min  Stones has taken Jones' place in the middle and Gomez is on the right of the three. Good intervention from Stones again wins the ball and sets England off up the right. Trippier's cross is booted clear. No doubt Stones' reading of the game has improved this season exponentially.  Phil Jones has to withdraw Credit: ction Images via Reuters/Carl Recine   8:35PM 32 min Too many near post runs mean the corner ends in confusion in an attacking sense and Germany break. Stones concedes a corner at the other end with a sturdy block tackle.  8:34PM 30 min Very heavy pass up the left from Livermore but the hare Rose gets there to cross with the ball, I think past the whitewash. The ref doesn't think so and gives England a corner when his cross is sliced behind. Hummels gives the ref a flea in his ear and is censured.  8:33PM 28 min England move the ball forward and up to Loftus-Cheek by the 18-yard line. He stuns the pass and tries to dribble and feint his way through but is tackled. The ball breaks out to Trippier who whips in an excellent cross to the back post but just beyond Abraham's diagonal run. Kimmich  chests it back to Ter Stegen.   8:30PM 27 min Rudiger spoons a long shot at Pickford.  8:29PM 25 min That was Jones' final contribution. He lifts up his shorts to show off the heavy strapping on his left thigh, sits on the grass and makes the universal substitution rolling hands gesture. Joe Gomez comes on for his debut.  Apologies for the description at 21 mins (now corrected) - Sane hit the bar not the post. I heard it but didn't see it as my screen momentarily froze.  8:27PM 23 min Double save from Pickford and Jones. England were opened up by a gorgeous Ozil curling pass from right to left for Werner. Jones tracks him all the way and does enough to put Werner a milimetre off his stride. He shoots and Pickford saves with a locked wrist and then Jones gets back on the line to head away Sane's rebound.  8:24PM 21 min And Sane, who has started very brightly, finds the space on the other side to flash a shot on to the bar.  Credit: AP Photo/Matt Dunham   8:23PM 20 min Ter Stegen slaps the free-kick clear and England try to bring it back without a great deal of conviction or pace, Germany show them how it's done through Werner who flies up the right but screws his shot too close to Pickford.  8:21PM 18 min Ah, that/s grand by Loftus-Cheek - he nutmegs Hastenberg then channels Cruyff with an exquisite turn. You can see right there why Ruud Gullit thinks him England's greatest prospect. Rudiger brings his tricky charge to an end with a lunge. Free kick on the right.  8:20PM 17 min Werner is playing on Maguire's shoulder, Draxler pulling right and Sane left. They're trying to drag the three centre-backs out of position, make them lose their bearings, to open channels for Ozil and Gundogan.  8:18PM 15 min Lay-off from Abraham back to Loftus-Cheek but it's back to the bad old shonky Wembley pitch of 2007-2011. The ball kicks up and Loftus-Cheek is made to look a goof with his air volley from 18 yards on the right-angle of the box when the ball skips over his swish.  8:16PM 14 min Germany have the ball at the back. Hummels in  the middle is taking the bottom point in a V with Ginter and Rudiger. They shift the ball up the left and switch it to the inside-right position to Ozil. Draxler splits right, Sane left and Ozil curls a pass just beyond Sane's clever run into the box.  Ozil bends an exquisite pass Credit: Matt Dunham/AP   8:14PM 12 min Trippier sticks to his task when Hastenberg turns him one way but can't then burst past him on the inside because the full-back covers and recovers well to block the cross.  8:13PM 11 min Keane is warming up. Jones is trying to run off his sprain/knock etc. Credit: Matthias Hangst/Bongarts/Getty Images   8:12PM 9 min Sane has  a run up the left, stretching his legs when found by another Rudiger long pass. He turns Jones but drills his left-foot shot into the well-positioned Stones. Jones is limping.  8:11PM 7 min Jones hits a weak left foot pass that Sane gobbles up and takes the opportunity to pile a short-backlift drive into the side-netting. Entertaining so far.  8:10PM 6 min Kimmich is caught by Livermore. Free-kick. It's squared to Rudiger who dinks a long chip up the left for Halstenberg who centres it, arrowing a cross to the near post. Stones gets on front of the returned Werner to intercept and Jones did the rest.  8:08PM 4 min Werner is still down and off the field after that episode with Pickford in the first minute. Dier hits a good diagonal out to Trippier but Rudiger closes him down. Maguire's bobbling first-minute backpass caused the collision between Werner and Pickford when the keeper raced out to block.  8:06PM 2 min End to end start - England chip a long ball up the left after Pickford was startled by Werner's run. Vardy takes it to the byline, comfortably outstripping Ginter, and cuts back a cross through the six-yard box. All it needs is a touch but it fizzes past Abraham. Trippier is beyond the back post and slams a shot into the side netting. There was an easy pull back for Abraham but he went for it himself.  8:04PM 1 min We're off, England are in navy, Glenn Hoddle is the co-commentator and all is for the best in this best of  all possible worlds. 8:00PM Now for a minute's remembrance In recognition of Armistice Day tomorrow. We have representatives from each of the three services of both nations to lay poppies in the centre circle. Now it's the last post.   7:54PM The teams are out for the anthems Seems to be a decent crowd at least in the lowest tier.  #FootballRemembershttps://t.co/3wKwfLyb5P— England (@England) November 10, 2017   7:54PM Here are the two managers What's going on with the waistcoat revival. It's a terrible look unless you're Francis Rossi. When Gareth met Jogi Credit: Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images   7:38PM The teams in black and white England Pickford, Trippier, Rose, Jones, Stones, Maguire,  Livermore, Dier, Loftus-Cheek, Vardy, Abraham. Substitutes Hart, Walker, Bertrand, Gomez, Keane, Cork, Young, Rashford, Lingard,  Cahill.  Dearie me Credit: Mike Egerton/PA Germany Ter Stegen, Kimmich, Rudiger, Hummels, Ginter,  Gundogan, Ozil, Halstenberg, Draxler, Werner, Sane. Substitutes Trapp,  Boateng, Brandt, Can, Gotze, Khedira, Plattenhardt, Rudy,  Stindl, Sule, Wagner, Leno.  7:26PM A word from the sponsors Best-priced accumulators | New customer offers   7:24PM Still waiting For Germany's substitutes to be officially announced. I'm forced to watch Emmerdale Farm waiting for coverage on ITV to begin. There doesn't seem to be a great deal of agriculture going on, (despite Brexit). Most scenes are in the pub but Amos and Mr Wilks must have a relief licensee in place because I haven't clocked them yet.  7:07PM England name three debutants Jordan Pickford, Ruben Loftus-Cheek and Tammy Abraham take the number of new caps under Gareth Southgate to 11 in 13 matches. Eric Dier, grandson of Ted Croker (I can't tell you how hard it was to type that name without adding some Leeds-based vitriol), becomes his sixth captain.  7:01PM Germany will line up in a 3-4-3 Unsere Startelf: ter Stegen - Ginter, Hummels (C), Rüdiger - Kimmich, Gündogan, Özil, Halstenberg - Draxler, Werner, Sané. #ENGGER ������ pic.twitter.com/CYTOmUQf2J— Die Mannschaft (@DFB_Team) 10 November 2017   6:54PM Today also marks a very sad anniversary It's eight years since the death of Robert Enke and Die Maanschaft are paying tribute to their comrade.  Wir werden dich nie vergessen, Robert �������� #InGedENKEn#DieMannschaftpic.twitter.com/PJtx8RIfxr— Die Mannschaft (@DFB_Team) 10 November 2017  Here is Sam Wallace's interview with Teresa Enke from last August.  6:50PM England go for 3-4-1-2 Here's how the #ThreeLions will line up against Germany �� pic.twitter.com/dvT0Fr9BlX— England (@England) November 10, 2017   6:41PM Good evening And welcome to coverage of England vs Germany, the first of four friendlies before the immediate World Cup build-up begins in late May. It used to be a prized fixture but in the past 10 years has become somewhat routine. As well as the 2010 World Cup meeting - when Germany played like greyhounds racing 10 Suffolk Punches (plus David James) and felt like a nadir (how little we knew!) - tonight will be the sixth friendly and third in 20 months. England have won two of the five - both away - but more than a victory tonight England need some sparkle, some energy, some belief, some wit and some judgment.  Wembley tonight Credit: Nick Potts/PA Because without it England are very close to alienating a dwindling audience that still wishes international football well and wants these players - many of whom show genuine promise or shine playing with better players at their clubs and more experienced managers - not to be reduced to angst-riven strugglers. Banishing caution and anxiety does not mean boneheaded, attacking gusto. It's about having the confidence to innovate, to try things, to take the initiative and expect a team-mate to read your intentions. Germany have it because, apart from being world champions, they have a well-established pattern of play. So, although they will be diminished by withdrawals, just like England, and a demonstrable falling away since Philipp Lahm's retirement, they will play with their heads up and an understanding of their own and each other's thinking and movement. It's the target England to which England aspire and one hopes it begins here: They said therefore unto Gareth, what sign shewest thou then, that we may see, and believe thee? What dost thou work? 6:16PM Pre-match digest What is it? It's England vs Germany, the first of two friendlies for Gareth Southgate's side in this international break. When is it? It's on Friday November 10 - ie today. What time is kick-off? It's an 8pm GMT start at Wembley. What TV channel is it on? You can watch this one on ITV. Mark Pougatch will be joined by Lee Dixon, Ryan Giggs and Ian Wright from 7.30pm. Alternatively, you can follow the match here throughout with Rob Bagchi. What is the team news? England: Ruben Loftus-Cheek is set to make his England debut in Friday's friendly against Germany, Press Association Sport understands. The 21-year-old midfielder, currently on loan at Crystal Palace from Chelsea, earned his first senior call-up for the upcoming friendlies along with Tammy Abraham and Joe Gomez. Gareth Southgate's men kick-off their World Cup preparations against Germany on Friday, when it is understood Loftus-Cheek will be handed a starting role. Brazil arrive at Wembley next Tuesday for the final match of 2017 - a year the Three Lions end without a string of key players. Harry Kane, Dele Alli and Harry Winks have all pulled out of the squad through injury, as have Raheem Sterling, Jordan Henderson and Fabian Delph. Ruben Loftus-Cheek looks likely to start  Credit: Action Images via Reuters Furthermore, Gary Cahill is a doubt for injury-hit England after missing training on the eve of the friendly with a back complaint. Such are the lack of options that Chelsea's Jay Dasilva, on loan at Charlton, and Fulham's Tayo Edun - members of the triumphant European Under-19 squad - trained with the senior squad on Thursday. On Wednesday, Tottenham midfielder Marcus Edwards and Jake Clarke-Salter of Chelsea trained with Southgate's side. Burnley's Jack Cork, who has been called up by the senior team for the first time, was among those training at St George's Park. Predicted team: Pickford; Rose, Maguire, Stones, Jones, Trippier; Loftus-Cheek, Dier, Livermore; Abraham, Vardy  Germany: Germany defender Jerome Boateng has been ruled out of Friday's friendly against England because of muscular problems, and Toni Kroos' participation is in doubt. The German soccer federation says Boateng's omission is a "precaution" cleared with coach Joachim Loew, and that the Bayern Munich defender may yet play in the team's friendly against France in Cologne the following Tuesday. The 29-year-old Boateng played one season in England for Manchester City before joining Bayern in 2011. Kroos also missed training on Wednesday, because of a stomach bug, while goalkeeper Kevin Trapp skipped it because of a respiratory tract infection and Mats Hummels completed individual exercises in the team hotel.  Predicted team: Ter Stegen; Halstenberg, Hummels, Rudiger, Kimmich; Gundogan, Ozil, Can; Sane, Wagner, Drazx What are they saying? Gareth Southgate on Jack Wilshere: "Jack played as a number 10 all of last season... ," Southgate told reporters. "That is not the way we are playing. When we have played with a 10, we have had Dele (Alli) and (Adam) Lallana. "I don't think Jack is a 10. I think he is a deeper player, but he is not playing deeper. "But I want to be clear: I really like Jack Wilshere as a player. I think he is a talent and I really respect him as an individual. And I'm hoping that we are in a position in March where we can pick him." Best-priced accumulators | New customer offers What are the odds? England - 13/5 Germany - 21/20 Draw - 12/5 England to win at 33/1 with Coral. Sign up now >> Sign up to Free Bet Lottery for a chance to win a £100 free bet ahead of England v Germany. It's completely free and there's one given away every day. What's our prediction? England's makeshift side will have a difficult night against a strong Germany XI, so expect a narrow defeat. Perhaps 0-1.

England 0 Germany 0: Gareth Southgate vindicated as young guns hold their own

This was a goalless draw but so many goals were met by England: ­Ruben Loftus-Cheek with his ­swagger and, well, cheek in ­midfield, where he filled the No 10 shirt, John Stones with his graceful assuredness in defence and Jordan Pickford with his commanding ­authority in goal.  And two of those three were making their debuts. Against the world champions, Germany, there were glimpses of a brave new world for England under Gareth Southgate as the manager begins to stamp his authority both with formation and personnel.  It is not the time to get carried away, that has happened too often before, while there was always that lingering suspicion that Germany, orchestrated from a deeper role by Mesut Ozil, yes him, were performing at half-capacity at best and even then still struck the crossbar, had a shot cleared off the line, cut England open on occasions and were denied by Pickford’s fine saves.  It was the first time in 14 matches that Germany had failed to score. But England had their chances, with Germany goalkeeper Marc-Andre ter Stegen also excelling in what was an open, entertaining friendly as both nations began their preparations for next summer’s World Cup. The holders will be among the favourites, while England are decidedly a work in progress. But one now making strides. So much is made of the Football Association buzzword – pathway – and here was a route forward, surely, although that also had to be viewed through the prism of a match when England were denied eight players through injury and Germany could not call on a host of first-choices, either.  Ozil orchestrated waves of Germany attacks Credit: REUTERS/Hannah McKay But if the purpose of such fixtures is not the scoreline but the lessons learnt, the goals met, then this was a significant result for England, with Germany coach Joachim Low talking up the “young, ­dynamic players” his team faced.  More of those, Tammy Abraham and, more so, Joe Gomez also did well on their debuts, with Gomez replacing Phil Jones in the first half when the Manchester United ­defender limped off injured. There may be repercussions with Jones’s club over that episode and not least because he was already wearing a heavy strapping on his thigh.  “He seems fine,” Southgate said before suggesting he might be ­released back to United.  Harry Maguire underhit a backpass in the first minute but recovered to put in a fine performance Credit: LYN KIRK/AFP/Getty Images England knew they would not hog possession, even that they would be chasing shadows at times in their dark blue kit, but they stuck to the task with a belief that bodes well for the future. That future has to factor in Loftus-Cheek who, like Harry Winks before him recently, looks at home at this level.  This was only Loftus-Cheek’s 21st start of his senior career and the 21-year-old has that look about him that suggests he belongs. He was increasingly impressive in possession, with a barrel of skill that was quickly evident when he ­executed a double nutmeg – foxing both Leroy Sane, then Germany’s one debutant, Marcel Halstenberg, before Antonio Rudiger – Loftus-Cheek’s Chelsea team-mate, albeit with the midfielder on loan to Crystal Palace – had enough and brought him down. Such trickery is not something normally evident in a Three Lions shirt.  And to think it had all started shakily for the most inexperienced England team to take to the field for 37 years – with just 101 caps between them before kick-off. The previous least capped? That was in 1980 against Australia, a team with only 57 appearances, but this was a different calibre of opposition.  It showed. There were nerves with Harry Maguire under-hitting a back-pass in the first minute and Pickford fortunate when his intervention cannoned off the onrushing Timo Werner before spinning away to safety.  Loftus-Cheek turns away from Gundogan Credit: Rob Newell - CameraSport But Germany were also vulnerable and, immediately after, the tireless, perennially threatening Jamie Vardy arced a trademark run to take the ball. He crossed low, Abraham took a swipe but missed, with the ball running to Kieran Trippier, who slammed it first-time into the side-netting. He should have cut it back to Loftus-Cheek, who was left holding his head as he would have had the simple task of passing into the unguarded net.  England had lined up in a 3-5-2, which Southgate is committed to now and which can morph into a 3-4-3, and looked the better for it. But they were almost undone when Sane collected possession, weighed up a shot and sent the ball crashing against the bar from the edge of the penalty area. It bounced to safety.  That was a let-off and then there was another with Ozil countering and slicing England open with a ball through to Werner, whose low shot was parried by Pickford, only for it to fall to Sane who waited, picked his spot but Jones stooped to head it off the line. Even then it dropped to Julian Draxler, who blazed over.  Jordan Pickford made an accomplished debut in goal Credit: TOBY MELVILLE/REUTERS It was Jones’s last ­contribution and it seemed England were being over-run when Werner was again put through, this time from Joshua Kimmich, only for Pickford to once more parry his low shot.  Encouragingly, England hit back. Abraham turned Rudiger, with his snapshot deflecting off Mats Hummels and, with Ter Stegen wrong-footed, it grazed the outside of a post. Vardy then latched onto a through ball, lifted it over the goalkeeper, only to see it scrambled away for a corner.  Well played, @rubey_lcheek �� pic.twitter.com/WfHnXR6GaQ— England (@England) November 10, 2017 Vardy went even closer in the second half as he met Trippier’s cross and, this time, Ter Stegen superbly shovelled his header away.  The game drifted, playing itself out with a flurry of changes, ­although England, certainly, pushed for a goal in the final ­moments as substitute Jesse Lingard fired wastefully over from Maguire’s header with the last kick of the game. The goal did not come but England had their win in other ways. And the kids did all right.  10:14PM Southgate speaks briefly [Lingard's miss] was a set play we’d been working on, and I think it wouldn’t have been an unfair scoreline. First half, a couple of really good saves from Jordan but we also created a couple of really good chances. Room for improvement but a really good performance.Our use of the ball was excellent throughout the game. A really healthy performance. [On Loftus-Cheek]. He did everything I know he can do. It took him 10 minutes to realise he was OK here, that he could do it and he can because he can do anything. He needs that confidence because he’s capable of anything. He’s got the physical attributes and he can handle the ball. He'll gain huge confidence from that.  9:59PM Full time Very encouraging performance from England tonight against this scratch Germany side. Mercifully, they played pretty well for once and Loftus-Cheek demonstrated why so many great players rate him so highly. There's certainly something about him - pluck and skill.  Stones and Maguire played very well, too, Trippier made some excellent runs and put in three fine crosses and Pickford should have moved ahead of Joe Hart with that debut. Still causes for concern with being overrun in central midfield and being sucked into shortening the pitch with 10 men behind the ball but far better than anything we've seen from them for quite a while.  9:55PM 90+3 min England free-kick on the left when Lingard made an astute run and Hummels ran out to stop him by foul means not fair. Rashford crosses to the far post, Maguire wins it and heads it back into the centre. Lingard meets it on the half-volley by the six-yard line and spoons it over. What a chance to win it with the last kick of the match. But he horsed it.  9:53PM 90+2 min Another good intervention from Maguire. He's set the bar high for Cahill tonight.  9:51PM 90+1 min The first of three minutes begin with Cork looking for Rashford's run but the Man Utd forward, for once, doesn't make it easy for his team-mate, straying too close to Ginter.  9:50PM 89 min There are 0-0 draws ... and this has been far more entertaining than many an England game I've been lumbered withhad the privilege of reporting.  Glenn Hoddle praises Stones and Maguire but says he has to give the man of the match to Ruben Loftus-Cheek.  9:49PM 88 min Walker and Cork combine on the right and switch it to the left where Bertrand and Rashford try to wriggle into the box. No way through but Lingard fancies his chances, makes five yards until he tries to gull Hummels who is not buying it and blocks his path.  9:47PM 87 min  Jack Cork's entry makes it five debutants for England.  9:47PM 86 min Double, double sub: Vardy and Livermore off, Cork and Lingard on for England. Gundogan and Sane depart for Germany. On come Seb Rudy and Julian Brandt.  9:45PM 85 min England corner earned by Walker's drive and commitment. Bertrand takes an inswinger with his left foot and again hits the near-post sentry.  9:45PM 84 min Another impressive run from Maguire who draws Ginter out to him and plays in Rashford but the prodigy's first touch betrays him and the ball skips safely towards Hummels.  9:43PM 83 min Bertrand combines well with Maguire again and is found by the Leicester centre-half's pass that puts him round the back. The cross, however, hits the defender at the front post.   Loftus-Cheek spins Gundogan Credit: Rob Newell - CameraSport   9:41PM 82 min Stones pushes up high to pin Germany back as they try to play out from the back and he gives England the initiative momentarily.  9:40PM 81 min No paper aeroplanes yet but it is Mexican wave time.  9:40PM 80 min And England are forced to start back in their own box when the ball is cleared easily.  9:39PM 78 min It's a dreadful free kick, though.  9:39PM 77 min Nice spin by Rashford out by the left touchline, he loses it but Loftus-Cheek makes a second sally and provokes Ozil into a foul with close control and clever shielding.  9:37PM 75 min More Germany possession at the back. As Hoddle says - there's treasure amidst the trash - Vardy needs to push up to give Hummels something to worry about instead of getting behind the ball with his nine outfield colleagues.  9:34PM 73 min The keeper rolls it to Maguire who bursts forward and slides a good pass out to the left for Bertrand. The left-back makes it to the byline to drill a cross that Germany defend in numbers and without panic.   9:33PM 72 min Walker turns on the turbo boost to power past Halstenberg but only to win a throw-in  that wends its way back to Pickford.  9:31PM 71 min England double substitution: Walker on for Trippier; Champions League winner Bertrand on.  9:31PM 70 min Ozil tries the pass from outside right to inside right for Sane's run but Rose is there and it's his last touch.  9:30PM 68 min Germany are trying to manipulate England out of position with quick passes and movement but England maintain their discipline and Maguire and Stone block off the near post at the expense of a corner.  9:28PM 67 min Can coming on, says Hoddle, means 'Ozil can go deeper in his deep role'. Well, indeed. Rose wreaks his revenge on Kimmich with a turbo-nudge/shove. Free kick.  9:27PM 66 min Germany sub: Emre Can on for Julian Draxler.  9:26PM 65 min Gomez tries a long ball up front for Vardy's run but it's too heavy and the crowd starts a chorus of 'What the f------ h--- was that?' Sympathetic bunch.  9:24PM 62 min We don't have the usual 'Roboblogger' tools available for a friendly, I'm afraid. But if it was here it would show you that Germany have had 73% of possession so far this half. England, though, are carving out chances.  9:22PM 60 min England substitution: Abraham goes off, Marcus Rashford comes on.  9:21PM 59 min Excellent run from Dier into the box and Loftus-Cheek plays him in with a clever pass but Hummels gets in the block. Corner, Germany break swiftly and Livermore has to thwart a break with a cynical foul. Into the book he goes.  9:19PM 57 min Loftus-Cheek robs Gundogan in midfield, passes it up to Livermore who hits a fine reverse left-footed pass to Abraham. Vardy splits off to the left to give Abraham a run at Hummels but he tries to round the Germany captain and gives him a sniff of the ball by taking it too close to him. Hummels, the wily old fox, gets a toe on it to knock it away.  9:17PM 56 min Pickford spots Abraham haring upfield and tries a quick punt that he overclubs and sends skidding through to Ter Stegen.  9:16PM 55 min Gundogan hits it straight at Rose after poncing about for a minute before he took it. Corner that England defend and Pickford snaffles the cross from the second ball.  9:15PM 53 mins Germany free kick on the right out by the touchline.  9:13PM 51 min A band is playing. Is that England's or Germany's? England fizz some passes around midfield until Maguire threads a good pass for Vardy out on the left but his fellow Fox, his fleeter Fox, had just stepped off-side.  9:11PM 49 min The full-back advances and hits one of his customarily terrific crosses, whipping it towards the penalty spot. Vardy meets it and tries to steer it towards the inside of the left post. He meets it sweetly but can't direct it into the corner but it's still a fine header. Unfortunately for him Ter Stegen's save is even better, swooping low to his right to palm it away.  9:09PM 48 min Germany were passing the ball around crisply until Trippier  stepped up to whip the ball off Halstenberg. He moves it inside and bombs on. Loftus-Cheek takes the ball infield spins and England work it out to Trippier.  9:07PM 46 min Rose is floored by Draxler and England have a free kick.  8:52PM Half time By Jove, I think they've got it. Yes, Germany have had a few too many chances and are flooding central midfield at times. But England have looked very good going forward, aren't repeatedly giving the ball away and Trippier and Loftus-Cheek, in particular, are playing very well. Vardy and Abraham are moving with vibrancy and intelligence and Dier is playing some neat passes. Stones has saved England once, Jones twice and Pickford has made three eye-catching saves.  Credit: John Patrick Fletcher/Action Plus via Getty Images   8:49PM 45 min Loftus-Cheek gets back on to the credit side with a lovely hooked pass up for Vardy as Ter Stegen tries to close him down. Vardy misreads the spin of the floated pass and tries to lob the keeper with his laces but misjudges the angle and power required.  8:47PM 44 min Two chances - Livermore cuts in on his left but can't find any power with his swinger and squirts his shot wide. Then Dier plays a cute pass up the inside right that Loftus-Cheek uncharacteristically fails to control in the box as it skips ahead of him, too close to Ter Stegen.  8:46PM 43 min Abraham's feint and turn almost beats Rudiger on the 18-yard line when he cushions a pass from Vardy. Rudiger recovers to get his tow on to Abraham's shot, sticking out his left leg in a desperate lunge, that sends the ball up and round the post.  Rudiger blocks Abraham's shot Credit: REUTERS/Hannah McKay   8:44PM 41 min Draxler goes flying under Trippier's challenge in the box, Trippier diligently filling in for Stones who had gone out wide with Werner. Nothing sinister in it, though. A meeting of shoulders and a dramatic pratfall from Draxler.  Trippier tells Draxler to get up Credit:  Mike Hewitt/Bongarts/Getty Images   8:42PM 39 min Rose inadvertently plays Werner onside by tracking back Sane instead of letting him go. Werner, 20 yards out, has a headstart on the back three and is through. He lifts his head and sweeps a low shot as he's closed down by Gomez but Pickford saves it smartly.  8:41PM 37 min Vardy gets across Rudiger and slows a fraction, provoking the defender into a shove. Free kick on the right, 40 yards out. Rose latches on to the knock down to try a volley but doesn't meet it with crispness or precision. England are certainly passing the ball far better than they did against Slovenia.  8:38PM 35 min  Stones has taken Jones' place in the middle and Gomez is on the right of the three. Good intervention from Stones again wins the ball and sets England off up the right. Trippier's cross is booted clear. No doubt Stones' reading of the game has improved this season exponentially.  Phil Jones has to withdraw Credit: ction Images via Reuters/Carl Recine   8:35PM 32 min Too many near post runs mean the corner ends in confusion in an attacking sense and Germany break. Stones concedes a corner at the other end with a sturdy block tackle.  8:34PM 30 min Very heavy pass up the left from Livermore but the hare Rose gets there to cross with the ball, I think past the whitewash. The ref doesn't think so and gives England a corner when his cross is sliced behind. Hummels gives the ref a flea in his ear and is censured.  8:33PM 28 min England move the ball forward and up to Loftus-Cheek by the 18-yard line. He stuns the pass and tries to dribble and feint his way through but is tackled. The ball breaks out to Trippier who whips in an excellent cross to the back post but just beyond Abraham's diagonal run. Kimmich  chests it back to Ter Stegen.   8:30PM 27 min Rudiger spoons a long shot at Pickford.  8:29PM 25 min That was Jones' final contribution. He lifts up his shorts to show off the heavy strapping on his left thigh, sits on the grass and makes the universal substitution rolling hands gesture. Joe Gomez comes on for his debut.  Apologies for the description at 21 mins (now corrected) - Sane hit the bar not the post. I heard it but didn't see it as my screen momentarily froze.  8:27PM 23 min Double save from Pickford and Jones. England were opened up by a gorgeous Ozil curling pass from right to left for Werner. Jones tracks him all the way and does enough to put Werner a milimetre off his stride. He shoots and Pickford saves with a locked wrist and then Jones gets back on the line to head away Sane's rebound.  8:24PM 21 min And Sane, who has started very brightly, finds the space on the other side to flash a shot on to the bar.  Credit: AP Photo/Matt Dunham   8:23PM 20 min Ter Stegen slaps the free-kick clear and England try to bring it back without a great deal of conviction or pace, Germany show them how it's done through Werner who flies up the right but screws his shot too close to Pickford.  8:21PM 18 min Ah, that/s grand by Loftus-Cheek - he nutmegs Hastenberg then channels Cruyff with an exquisite turn. You can see right there why Ruud Gullit thinks him England's greatest prospect. Rudiger brings his tricky charge to an end with a lunge. Free kick on the right.  8:20PM 17 min Werner is playing on Maguire's shoulder, Draxler pulling right and Sane left. They're trying to drag the three centre-backs out of position, make them lose their bearings, to open channels for Ozil and Gundogan.  8:18PM 15 min Lay-off from Abraham back to Loftus-Cheek but it's back to the bad old shonky Wembley pitch of 2007-2011. The ball kicks up and Loftus-Cheek is made to look a goof with his air volley from 18 yards on the right-angle of the box when the ball skips over his swish.  8:16PM 14 min Germany have the ball at the back. Hummels in  the middle is taking the bottom point in a V with Ginter and Rudiger. They shift the ball up the left and switch it to the inside-right position to Ozil. Draxler splits right, Sane left and Ozil curls a pass just beyond Sane's clever run into the box.  Ozil bends an exquisite pass Credit: Matt Dunham/AP   8:14PM 12 min Trippier sticks to his task when Hastenberg turns him one way but can't then burst past him on the inside because the full-back covers and recovers well to block the cross.  8:13PM 11 min Keane is warming up. Jones is trying to run off his sprain/knock etc. Credit: Matthias Hangst/Bongarts/Getty Images   8:12PM 9 min Sane has  a run up the left, stretching his legs when found by another Rudiger long pass. He turns Jones but drills his left-foot shot into the well-positioned Stones. Jones is limping.  8:11PM 7 min Jones hits a weak left foot pass that Sane gobbles up and takes the opportunity to pile a short-backlift drive into the side-netting. Entertaining so far.  8:10PM 6 min Kimmich is caught by Livermore. Free-kick. It's squared to Rudiger who dinks a long chip up the left for Halstenberg who centres it, arrowing a cross to the near post. Stones gets on front of the returned Werner to intercept and Jones did the rest.  8:08PM 4 min Werner is still down and off the field after that episode with Pickford in the first minute. Dier hits a good diagonal out to Trippier but Rudiger closes him down. Maguire's bobbling first-minute backpass caused the collision between Werner and Pickford when the keeper raced out to block.  8:06PM 2 min End to end start - England chip a long ball up the left after Pickford was startled by Werner's run. Vardy takes it to the byline, comfortably outstripping Ginter, and cuts back a cross through the six-yard box. All it needs is a touch but it fizzes past Abraham. Trippier is beyond the back post and slams a shot into the side netting. There was an easy pull back for Abraham but he went for it himself.  8:04PM 1 min We're off, England are in navy, Glenn Hoddle is the co-commentator and all is for the best in this best of  all possible worlds. 8:00PM Now for a minute's remembrance In recognition of Armistice Day tomorrow. We have representatives from each of the three services of both nations to lay poppies in the centre circle. Now it's the last post.   7:54PM The teams are out for the anthems Seems to be a decent crowd at least in the lowest tier.  #FootballRemembershttps://t.co/3wKwfLyb5P— England (@England) November 10, 2017   7:54PM Here are the two managers What's going on with the waistcoat revival. It's a terrible look unless you're Francis Rossi. When Gareth met Jogi Credit: Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images   7:38PM The teams in black and white England Pickford, Trippier, Rose, Jones, Stones, Maguire,  Livermore, Dier, Loftus-Cheek, Vardy, Abraham. Substitutes Hart, Walker, Bertrand, Gomez, Keane, Cork, Young, Rashford, Lingard,  Cahill.  Dearie me Credit: Mike Egerton/PA Germany Ter Stegen, Kimmich, Rudiger, Hummels, Ginter,  Gundogan, Ozil, Halstenberg, Draxler, Werner, Sane. Substitutes Trapp,  Boateng, Brandt, Can, Gotze, Khedira, Plattenhardt, Rudy,  Stindl, Sule, Wagner, Leno.  7:26PM A word from the sponsors Best-priced accumulators | New customer offers   7:24PM Still waiting For Germany's substitutes to be officially announced. I'm forced to watch Emmerdale Farm waiting for coverage on ITV to begin. There doesn't seem to be a great deal of agriculture going on, (despite Brexit). Most scenes are in the pub but Amos and Mr Wilks must have a relief licensee in place because I haven't clocked them yet.  7:07PM England name three debutants Jordan Pickford, Ruben Loftus-Cheek and Tammy Abraham take the number of new caps under Gareth Southgate to 11 in 13 matches. Eric Dier, grandson of Ted Croker (I can't tell you how hard it was to type that name without adding some Leeds-based vitriol), becomes his sixth captain.  7:01PM Germany will line up in a 3-4-3 Unsere Startelf: ter Stegen - Ginter, Hummels (C), Rüdiger - Kimmich, Gündogan, Özil, Halstenberg - Draxler, Werner, Sané. #ENGGER ������ pic.twitter.com/CYTOmUQf2J— Die Mannschaft (@DFB_Team) 10 November 2017   6:54PM Today also marks a very sad anniversary It's eight years since the death of Robert Enke and Die Maanschaft are paying tribute to their comrade.  Wir werden dich nie vergessen, Robert �������� #InGedENKEn#DieMannschaftpic.twitter.com/PJtx8RIfxr— Die Mannschaft (@DFB_Team) 10 November 2017  Here is Sam Wallace's interview with Teresa Enke from last August.  6:50PM England go for 3-4-1-2 Here's how the #ThreeLions will line up against Germany �� pic.twitter.com/dvT0Fr9BlX— England (@England) November 10, 2017   6:41PM Good evening And welcome to coverage of England vs Germany, the first of four friendlies before the immediate World Cup build-up begins in late May. It used to be a prized fixture but in the past 10 years has become somewhat routine. As well as the 2010 World Cup meeting - when Germany played like greyhounds racing 10 Suffolk Punches (plus David James) and felt like a nadir (how little we knew!) - tonight will be the sixth friendly and third in 20 months. England have won two of the five - both away - but more than a victory tonight England need some sparkle, some energy, some belief, some wit and some judgment.  Wembley tonight Credit: Nick Potts/PA Because without it England are very close to alienating a dwindling audience that still wishes international football well and wants these players - many of whom show genuine promise or shine playing with better players at their clubs and more experienced managers - not to be reduced to angst-riven strugglers. Banishing caution and anxiety does not mean boneheaded, attacking gusto. It's about having the confidence to innovate, to try things, to take the initiative and expect a team-mate to read your intentions. Germany have it because, apart from being world champions, they have a well-established pattern of play. So, although they will be diminished by withdrawals, just like England, and a demonstrable falling away since Philipp Lahm's retirement, they will play with their heads up and an understanding of their own and each other's thinking and movement. It's the target England to which England aspire and one hopes it begins here: They said therefore unto Gareth, what sign shewest thou then, that we may see, and believe thee? What dost thou work? 6:16PM Pre-match digest What is it? It's England vs Germany, the first of two friendlies for Gareth Southgate's side in this international break. When is it? It's on Friday November 10 - ie today. What time is kick-off? It's an 8pm GMT start at Wembley. What TV channel is it on? You can watch this one on ITV. Mark Pougatch will be joined by Lee Dixon, Ryan Giggs and Ian Wright from 7.30pm. Alternatively, you can follow the match here throughout with Rob Bagchi. What is the team news? England: Ruben Loftus-Cheek is set to make his England debut in Friday's friendly against Germany, Press Association Sport understands. The 21-year-old midfielder, currently on loan at Crystal Palace from Chelsea, earned his first senior call-up for the upcoming friendlies along with Tammy Abraham and Joe Gomez. Gareth Southgate's men kick-off their World Cup preparations against Germany on Friday, when it is understood Loftus-Cheek will be handed a starting role. Brazil arrive at Wembley next Tuesday for the final match of 2017 - a year the Three Lions end without a string of key players. Harry Kane, Dele Alli and Harry Winks have all pulled out of the squad through injury, as have Raheem Sterling, Jordan Henderson and Fabian Delph. Ruben Loftus-Cheek looks likely to start  Credit: Action Images via Reuters Furthermore, Gary Cahill is a doubt for injury-hit England after missing training on the eve of the friendly with a back complaint. Such are the lack of options that Chelsea's Jay Dasilva, on loan at Charlton, and Fulham's Tayo Edun - members of the triumphant European Under-19 squad - trained with the senior squad on Thursday. On Wednesday, Tottenham midfielder Marcus Edwards and Jake Clarke-Salter of Chelsea trained with Southgate's side. Burnley's Jack Cork, who has been called up by the senior team for the first time, was among those training at St George's Park. Predicted team: Pickford; Rose, Maguire, Stones, Jones, Trippier; Loftus-Cheek, Dier, Livermore; Abraham, Vardy  Germany: Germany defender Jerome Boateng has been ruled out of Friday's friendly against England because of muscular problems, and Toni Kroos' participation is in doubt. The German soccer federation says Boateng's omission is a "precaution" cleared with coach Joachim Loew, and that the Bayern Munich defender may yet play in the team's friendly against France in Cologne the following Tuesday. The 29-year-old Boateng played one season in England for Manchester City before joining Bayern in 2011. Kroos also missed training on Wednesday, because of a stomach bug, while goalkeeper Kevin Trapp skipped it because of a respiratory tract infection and Mats Hummels completed individual exercises in the team hotel.  Predicted team: Ter Stegen; Halstenberg, Hummels, Rudiger, Kimmich; Gundogan, Ozil, Can; Sane, Wagner, Drazx What are they saying? Gareth Southgate on Jack Wilshere: "Jack played as a number 10 all of last season... ," Southgate told reporters. "That is not the way we are playing. When we have played with a 10, we have had Dele (Alli) and (Adam) Lallana. "I don't think Jack is a 10. I think he is a deeper player, but he is not playing deeper. "But I want to be clear: I really like Jack Wilshere as a player. I think he is a talent and I really respect him as an individual. And I'm hoping that we are in a position in March where we can pick him." Best-priced accumulators | New customer offers What are the odds? England - 13/5 Germany - 21/20 Draw - 12/5 England to win at 33/1 with Coral. Sign up now >> Sign up to Free Bet Lottery for a chance to win a £100 free bet ahead of England v Germany. It's completely free and there's one given away every day. What's our prediction? England's makeshift side will have a difficult night against a strong Germany XI, so expect a narrow defeat. Perhaps 0-1.

England 0 Germany 0: Gareth Southgate vindicated as young guns hold their own

This was a goalless draw but so many goals were met by England: ­Ruben Loftus-Cheek with his ­swagger and, well, cheek in ­midfield, where he filled the No 10 shirt, John Stones with his graceful assuredness in defence and Jordan Pickford with his commanding ­authority in goal.  And two of those three were making their debuts. Against the world champions, Germany, there were glimpses of a brave new world for England under Gareth Southgate as the manager begins to stamp his authority both with formation and personnel.  It is not the time to get carried away, that has happened too often before, while there was always that lingering suspicion that Germany, orchestrated from a deeper role by Mesut Ozil, yes him, were performing at half-capacity at best and even then still struck the crossbar, had a shot cleared off the line, cut England open on occasions and were denied by Pickford’s fine saves.  It was the first time in 14 matches that Germany had failed to score. But England had their chances, with Germany goalkeeper Marc-Andre ter Stegen also excelling in what was an open, entertaining friendly as both nations began their preparations for next summer’s World Cup. The holders will be among the favourites, while England are decidedly a work in progress. But one now making strides. So much is made of the Football Association buzzword – pathway – and here was a route forward, surely, although that also had to be viewed through the prism of a match when England were denied eight players through injury and Germany could not call on a host of first-choices, either.  Ozil orchestrated waves of Germany attacks Credit: REUTERS/Hannah McKay But if the purpose of such fixtures is not the scoreline but the lessons learnt, the goals met, then this was a significant result for England, with Germany coach Joachim Low talking up the “young, ­dynamic players” his team faced.  More of those, Tammy Abraham and, more so, Joe Gomez also did well on their debuts, with Gomez replacing Phil Jones in the first half when the Manchester United ­defender limped off injured. There may be repercussions with Jones’s club over that episode and not least because he was already wearing a heavy strapping on his thigh.  “He seems fine,” Southgate said before suggesting he might be ­released back to United.  Harry Maguire underhit a backpass in the first minute but recovered to put in a fine performance Credit: LYN KIRK/AFP/Getty Images England knew they would not hog possession, even that they would be chasing shadows at times in their dark blue kit, but they stuck to the task with a belief that bodes well for the future. That future has to factor in Loftus-Cheek who, like Harry Winks before him recently, looks at home at this level.  This was only Loftus-Cheek’s 21st start of his senior career and the 21-year-old has that look about him that suggests he belongs. He was increasingly impressive in possession, with a barrel of skill that was quickly evident when he ­executed a double nutmeg – foxing both Leroy Sane, then Germany’s one debutant, Marcel Halstenberg, before Antonio Rudiger – Loftus-Cheek’s Chelsea team-mate, albeit with the midfielder on loan to Crystal Palace – had enough and brought him down. Such trickery is not something normally evident in a Three Lions shirt.  And to think it had all started shakily for the most inexperienced England team to take to the field for 37 years – with just 101 caps between them before kick-off. The previous least capped? That was in 1980 against Australia, a team with only 57 appearances, but this was a different calibre of opposition.  It showed. There were nerves with Harry Maguire under-hitting a back-pass in the first minute and Pickford fortunate when his intervention cannoned off the onrushing Timo Werner before spinning away to safety.  Loftus-Cheek turns away from Gundogan Credit: Rob Newell - CameraSport But Germany were also vulnerable and, immediately after, the tireless, perennially threatening Jamie Vardy arced a trademark run to take the ball. He crossed low, Abraham took a swipe but missed, with the ball running to Kieran Trippier, who slammed it first-time into the side-netting. He should have cut it back to Loftus-Cheek, who was left holding his head as he would have had the simple task of passing into the unguarded net.  England had lined up in a 3-5-2, which Southgate is committed to now and which can morph into a 3-4-3, and looked the better for it. But they were almost undone when Sane collected possession, weighed up a shot and sent the ball crashing against the bar from the edge of the penalty area. It bounced to safety.  That was a let-off and then there was another with Ozil countering and slicing England open with a ball through to Werner, whose low shot was parried by Pickford, only for it to fall to Sane who waited, picked his spot but Jones stooped to head it off the line. Even then it dropped to Julian Draxler, who blazed over.  Jordan Pickford made an accomplished debut in goal Credit: TOBY MELVILLE/REUTERS It was Jones’s last ­contribution and it seemed England were being over-run when Werner was again put through, this time from Joshua Kimmich, only for Pickford to once more parry his low shot.  Encouragingly, England hit back. Abraham turned Rudiger, with his snapshot deflecting off Mats Hummels and, with Ter Stegen wrong-footed, it grazed the outside of a post. Vardy then latched onto a through ball, lifted it over the goalkeeper, only to see it scrambled away for a corner.  Well played, @rubey_lcheek �� pic.twitter.com/WfHnXR6GaQ— England (@England) November 10, 2017 Vardy went even closer in the second half as he met Trippier’s cross and, this time, Ter Stegen superbly shovelled his header away.  The game drifted, playing itself out with a flurry of changes, ­although England, certainly, pushed for a goal in the final ­moments as substitute Jesse Lingard fired wastefully over from Maguire’s header with the last kick of the game. The goal did not come but England had their win in other ways. And the kids did all right.  10:14PM Southgate speaks briefly [Lingard's miss] was a set play we’d been working on, and I think it wouldn’t have been an unfair scoreline. First half, a couple of really good saves from Jordan but we also created a couple of really good chances. Room for improvement but a really good performance.Our use of the ball was excellent throughout the game. A really healthy performance. [On Loftus-Cheek]. He did everything I know he can do. It took him 10 minutes to realise he was OK here, that he could do it and he can because he can do anything. He needs that confidence because he’s capable of anything. He’s got the physical attributes and he can handle the ball. He'll gain huge confidence from that.  9:59PM Full time Very encouraging performance from England tonight against this scratch Germany side. Mercifully, they played pretty well for once and Loftus-Cheek demonstrated why so many great players rate him so highly. There's certainly something about him - pluck and skill.  Stones and Maguire played very well, too, Trippier made some excellent runs and put in three fine crosses and Pickford should have moved ahead of Joe Hart with that debut. Still causes for concern with being overrun in central midfield and being sucked into shortening the pitch with 10 men behind the ball but far better than anything we've seen from them for quite a while.  9:55PM 90+3 min England free-kick on the left when Lingard made an astute run and Hummels ran out to stop him by foul means not fair. Rashford crosses to the far post, Maguire wins it and heads it back into the centre. Lingard meets it on the half-volley by the six-yard line and spoons it over. What a chance to win it with the last kick of the match. But he horsed it.  9:53PM 90+2 min Another good intervention from Maguire. He's set the bar high for Cahill tonight.  9:51PM 90+1 min The first of three minutes begin with Cork looking for Rashford's run but the Man Utd forward, for once, doesn't make it easy for his team-mate, straying too close to Ginter.  9:50PM 89 min There are 0-0 draws ... and this has been far more entertaining than many an England game I've been lumbered withhad the privilege of reporting.  Glenn Hoddle praises Stones and Maguire but says he has to give the man of the match to Ruben Loftus-Cheek.  9:49PM 88 min Walker and Cork combine on the right and switch it to the left where Bertrand and Rashford try to wriggle into the box. No way through but Lingard fancies his chances, makes five yards until he tries to gull Hummels who is not buying it and blocks his path.  9:47PM 87 min  Jack Cork's entry makes it five debutants for England.  9:47PM 86 min Double, double sub: Vardy and Livermore off, Cork and Lingard on for England. Gundogan and Sane depart for Germany. On come Seb Rudy and Julian Brandt.  9:45PM 85 min England corner earned by Walker's drive and commitment. Bertrand takes an inswinger with his left foot and again hits the near-post sentry.  9:45PM 84 min Another impressive run from Maguire who draws Ginter out to him and plays in Rashford but the prodigy's first touch betrays him and the ball skips safely towards Hummels.  9:43PM 83 min Bertrand combines well with Maguire again and is found by the Leicester centre-half's pass that puts him round the back. The cross, however, hits the defender at the front post.   Loftus-Cheek spins Gundogan Credit: Rob Newell - CameraSport   9:41PM 82 min Stones pushes up high to pin Germany back as they try to play out from the back and he gives England the initiative momentarily.  9:40PM 81 min No paper aeroplanes yet but it is Mexican wave time.  9:40PM 80 min And England are forced to start back in their own box when the ball is cleared easily.  9:39PM 78 min It's a dreadful free kick, though.  9:39PM 77 min Nice spin by Rashford out by the left touchline, he loses it but Loftus-Cheek makes a second sally and provokes Ozil into a foul with close control and clever shielding.  9:37PM 75 min More Germany possession at the back. As Hoddle says - there's treasure amidst the trash - Vardy needs to push up to give Hummels something to worry about instead of getting behind the ball with his nine outfield colleagues.  9:34PM 73 min The keeper rolls it to Maguire who bursts forward and slides a good pass out to the left for Bertrand. The left-back makes it to the byline to drill a cross that Germany defend in numbers and without panic.   9:33PM 72 min Walker turns on the turbo boost to power past Halstenberg but only to win a throw-in  that wends its way back to Pickford.  9:31PM 71 min England double substitution: Walker on for Trippier; Champions League winner Bertrand on.  9:31PM 70 min Ozil tries the pass from outside right to inside right for Sane's run but Rose is there and it's his last touch.  9:30PM 68 min Germany are trying to manipulate England out of position with quick passes and movement but England maintain their discipline and Maguire and Stone block off the near post at the expense of a corner.  9:28PM 67 min Can coming on, says Hoddle, means 'Ozil can go deeper in his deep role'. Well, indeed. Rose wreaks his revenge on Kimmich with a turbo-nudge/shove. Free kick.  9:27PM 66 min Germany sub: Emre Can on for Julian Draxler.  9:26PM 65 min Gomez tries a long ball up front for Vardy's run but it's too heavy and the crowd starts a chorus of 'What the f------ h--- was that?' Sympathetic bunch.  9:24PM 62 min We don't have the usual 'Roboblogger' tools available for a friendly, I'm afraid. But if it was here it would show you that Germany have had 73% of possession so far this half. England, though, are carving out chances.  9:22PM 60 min England substitution: Abraham goes off, Marcus Rashford comes on.  9:21PM 59 min Excellent run from Dier into the box and Loftus-Cheek plays him in with a clever pass but Hummels gets in the block. Corner, Germany break swiftly and Livermore has to thwart a break with a cynical foul. Into the book he goes.  9:19PM 57 min Loftus-Cheek robs Gundogan in midfield, passes it up to Livermore who hits a fine reverse left-footed pass to Abraham. Vardy splits off to the left to give Abraham a run at Hummels but he tries to round the Germany captain and gives him a sniff of the ball by taking it too close to him. Hummels, the wily old fox, gets a toe on it to knock it away.  9:17PM 56 min Pickford spots Abraham haring upfield and tries a quick punt that he overclubs and sends skidding through to Ter Stegen.  9:16PM 55 min Gundogan hits it straight at Rose after poncing about for a minute before he took it. Corner that England defend and Pickford snaffles the cross from the second ball.  9:15PM 53 mins Germany free kick on the right out by the touchline.  9:13PM 51 min A band is playing. Is that England's or Germany's? England fizz some passes around midfield until Maguire threads a good pass for Vardy out on the left but his fellow Fox, his fleeter Fox, had just stepped off-side.  9:11PM 49 min The full-back advances and hits one of his customarily terrific crosses, whipping it towards the penalty spot. Vardy meets it and tries to steer it towards the inside of the left post. He meets it sweetly but can't direct it into the corner but it's still a fine header. Unfortunately for him Ter Stegen's save is even better, swooping low to his right to palm it away.  9:09PM 48 min Germany were passing the ball around crisply until Trippier  stepped up to whip the ball off Halstenberg. He moves it inside and bombs on. Loftus-Cheek takes the ball infield spins and England work it out to Trippier.  9:07PM 46 min Rose is floored by Draxler and England have a free kick.  8:52PM Half time By Jove, I think they've got it. Yes, Germany have had a few too many chances and are flooding central midfield at times. But England have looked very good going forward, aren't repeatedly giving the ball away and Trippier and Loftus-Cheek, in particular, are playing very well. Vardy and Abraham are moving with vibrancy and intelligence and Dier is playing some neat passes. Stones has saved England once, Jones twice and Pickford has made three eye-catching saves.  Credit: John Patrick Fletcher/Action Plus via Getty Images   8:49PM 45 min Loftus-Cheek gets back on to the credit side with a lovely hooked pass up for Vardy as Ter Stegen tries to close him down. Vardy misreads the spin of the floated pass and tries to lob the keeper with his laces but misjudges the angle and power required.  8:47PM 44 min Two chances - Livermore cuts in on his left but can't find any power with his swinger and squirts his shot wide. Then Dier plays a cute pass up the inside right that Loftus-Cheek uncharacteristically fails to control in the box as it skips ahead of him, too close to Ter Stegen.  8:46PM 43 min Abraham's feint and turn almost beats Rudiger on the 18-yard line when he cushions a pass from Vardy. Rudiger recovers to get his tow on to Abraham's shot, sticking out his left leg in a desperate lunge, that sends the ball up and round the post.  Rudiger blocks Abraham's shot Credit: REUTERS/Hannah McKay   8:44PM 41 min Draxler goes flying under Trippier's challenge in the box, Trippier diligently filling in for Stones who had gone out wide with Werner. Nothing sinister in it, though. A meeting of shoulders and a dramatic pratfall from Draxler.  Trippier tells Draxler to get up Credit:  Mike Hewitt/Bongarts/Getty Images   8:42PM 39 min Rose inadvertently plays Werner onside by tracking back Sane instead of letting him go. Werner, 20 yards out, has a headstart on the back three and is through. He lifts his head and sweeps a low shot as he's closed down by Gomez but Pickford saves it smartly.  8:41PM 37 min Vardy gets across Rudiger and slows a fraction, provoking the defender into a shove. Free kick on the right, 40 yards out. Rose latches on to the knock down to try a volley but doesn't meet it with crispness or precision. England are certainly passing the ball far better than they did against Slovenia.  8:38PM 35 min  Stones has taken Jones' place in the middle and Gomez is on the right of the three. Good intervention from Stones again wins the ball and sets England off up the right. Trippier's cross is booted clear. No doubt Stones' reading of the game has improved this season exponentially.  Phil Jones has to withdraw Credit: ction Images via Reuters/Carl Recine   8:35PM 32 min Too many near post runs mean the corner ends in confusion in an attacking sense and Germany break. Stones concedes a corner at the other end with a sturdy block tackle.  8:34PM 30 min Very heavy pass up the left from Livermore but the hare Rose gets there to cross with the ball, I think past the whitewash. The ref doesn't think so and gives England a corner when his cross is sliced behind. Hummels gives the ref a flea in his ear and is censured.  8:33PM 28 min England move the ball forward and up to Loftus-Cheek by the 18-yard line. He stuns the pass and tries to dribble and feint his way through but is tackled. The ball breaks out to Trippier who whips in an excellent cross to the back post but just beyond Abraham's diagonal run. Kimmich  chests it back to Ter Stegen.   8:30PM 27 min Rudiger spoons a long shot at Pickford.  8:29PM 25 min That was Jones' final contribution. He lifts up his shorts to show off the heavy strapping on his left thigh, sits on the grass and makes the universal substitution rolling hands gesture. Joe Gomez comes on for his debut.  Apologies for the description at 21 mins (now corrected) - Sane hit the bar not the post. I heard it but didn't see it as my screen momentarily froze.  8:27PM 23 min Double save from Pickford and Jones. England were opened up by a gorgeous Ozil curling pass from right to left for Werner. Jones tracks him all the way and does enough to put Werner a milimetre off his stride. He shoots and Pickford saves with a locked wrist and then Jones gets back on the line to head away Sane's rebound.  8:24PM 21 min And Sane, who has started very brightly, finds the space on the other side to flash a shot on to the bar.  Credit: AP Photo/Matt Dunham   8:23PM 20 min Ter Stegen slaps the free-kick clear and England try to bring it back without a great deal of conviction or pace, Germany show them how it's done through Werner who flies up the right but screws his shot too close to Pickford.  8:21PM 18 min Ah, that/s grand by Loftus-Cheek - he nutmegs Hastenberg then channels Cruyff with an exquisite turn. You can see right there why Ruud Gullit thinks him England's greatest prospect. Rudiger brings his tricky charge to an end with a lunge. Free kick on the right.  8:20PM 17 min Werner is playing on Maguire's shoulder, Draxler pulling right and Sane left. They're trying to drag the three centre-backs out of position, make them lose their bearings, to open channels for Ozil and Gundogan.  8:18PM 15 min Lay-off from Abraham back to Loftus-Cheek but it's back to the bad old shonky Wembley pitch of 2007-2011. The ball kicks up and Loftus-Cheek is made to look a goof with his air volley from 18 yards on the right-angle of the box when the ball skips over his swish.  8:16PM 14 min Germany have the ball at the back. Hummels in  the middle is taking the bottom point in a V with Ginter and Rudiger. They shift the ball up the left and switch it to the inside-right position to Ozil. Draxler splits right, Sane left and Ozil curls a pass just beyond Sane's clever run into the box.  Ozil bends an exquisite pass Credit: Matt Dunham/AP   8:14PM 12 min Trippier sticks to his task when Hastenberg turns him one way but can't then burst past him on the inside because the full-back covers and recovers well to block the cross.  8:13PM 11 min Keane is warming up. Jones is trying to run off his sprain/knock etc. Credit: Matthias Hangst/Bongarts/Getty Images   8:12PM 9 min Sane has  a run up the left, stretching his legs when found by another Rudiger long pass. He turns Jones but drills his left-foot shot into the well-positioned Stones. Jones is limping.  8:11PM 7 min Jones hits a weak left foot pass that Sane gobbles up and takes the opportunity to pile a short-backlift drive into the side-netting. Entertaining so far.  8:10PM 6 min Kimmich is caught by Livermore. Free-kick. It's squared to Rudiger who dinks a long chip up the left for Halstenberg who centres it, arrowing a cross to the near post. Stones gets on front of the returned Werner to intercept and Jones did the rest.  8:08PM 4 min Werner is still down and off the field after that episode with Pickford in the first minute. Dier hits a good diagonal out to Trippier but Rudiger closes him down. Maguire's bobbling first-minute backpass caused the collision between Werner and Pickford when the keeper raced out to block.  8:06PM 2 min End to end start - England chip a long ball up the left after Pickford was startled by Werner's run. Vardy takes it to the byline, comfortably outstripping Ginter, and cuts back a cross through the six-yard box. All it needs is a touch but it fizzes past Abraham. Trippier is beyond the back post and slams a shot into the side netting. There was an easy pull back for Abraham but he went for it himself.  8:04PM 1 min We're off, England are in navy, Glenn Hoddle is the co-commentator and all is for the best in this best of  all possible worlds. 8:00PM Now for a minute's remembrance In recognition of Armistice Day tomorrow. We have representatives from each of the three services of both nations to lay poppies in the centre circle. Now it's the last post.   7:54PM The teams are out for the anthems Seems to be a decent crowd at least in the lowest tier.  #FootballRemembershttps://t.co/3wKwfLyb5P— England (@England) November 10, 2017   7:54PM Here are the two managers What's going on with the waistcoat revival. It's a terrible look unless you're Francis Rossi. When Gareth met Jogi Credit: Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images   7:38PM The teams in black and white England Pickford, Trippier, Rose, Jones, Stones, Maguire,  Livermore, Dier, Loftus-Cheek, Vardy, Abraham. Substitutes Hart, Walker, Bertrand, Gomez, Keane, Cork, Young, Rashford, Lingard,  Cahill.  Dearie me Credit: Mike Egerton/PA Germany Ter Stegen, Kimmich, Rudiger, Hummels, Ginter,  Gundogan, Ozil, Halstenberg, Draxler, Werner, Sane. Substitutes Trapp,  Boateng, Brandt, Can, Gotze, Khedira, Plattenhardt, Rudy,  Stindl, Sule, Wagner, Leno.  7:26PM A word from the sponsors Best-priced accumulators | New customer offers   7:24PM Still waiting For Germany's substitutes to be officially announced. I'm forced to watch Emmerdale Farm waiting for coverage on ITV to begin. There doesn't seem to be a great deal of agriculture going on, (despite Brexit). Most scenes are in the pub but Amos and Mr Wilks must have a relief licensee in place because I haven't clocked them yet.  7:07PM England name three debutants Jordan Pickford, Ruben Loftus-Cheek and Tammy Abraham take the number of new caps under Gareth Southgate to 11 in 13 matches. Eric Dier, grandson of Ted Croker (I can't tell you how hard it was to type that name without adding some Leeds-based vitriol), becomes his sixth captain.  7:01PM Germany will line up in a 3-4-3 Unsere Startelf: ter Stegen - Ginter, Hummels (C), Rüdiger - Kimmich, Gündogan, Özil, Halstenberg - Draxler, Werner, Sané. #ENGGER ������ pic.twitter.com/CYTOmUQf2J— Die Mannschaft (@DFB_Team) 10 November 2017   6:54PM Today also marks a very sad anniversary It's eight years since the death of Robert Enke and Die Maanschaft are paying tribute to their comrade.  Wir werden dich nie vergessen, Robert �������� #InGedENKEn#DieMannschaftpic.twitter.com/PJtx8RIfxr— Die Mannschaft (@DFB_Team) 10 November 2017  Here is Sam Wallace's interview with Teresa Enke from last August.  6:50PM England go for 3-4-1-2 Here's how the #ThreeLions will line up against Germany �� pic.twitter.com/dvT0Fr9BlX— England (@England) November 10, 2017   6:41PM Good evening And welcome to coverage of England vs Germany, the first of four friendlies before the immediate World Cup build-up begins in late May. It used to be a prized fixture but in the past 10 years has become somewhat routine. As well as the 2010 World Cup meeting - when Germany played like greyhounds racing 10 Suffolk Punches (plus David James) and felt like a nadir (how little we knew!) - tonight will be the sixth friendly and third in 20 months. England have won two of the five - both away - but more than a victory tonight England need some sparkle, some energy, some belief, some wit and some judgment.  Wembley tonight Credit: Nick Potts/PA Because without it England are very close to alienating a dwindling audience that still wishes international football well and wants these players - many of whom show genuine promise or shine playing with better players at their clubs and more experienced managers - not to be reduced to angst-riven strugglers. Banishing caution and anxiety does not mean boneheaded, attacking gusto. It's about having the confidence to innovate, to try things, to take the initiative and expect a team-mate to read your intentions. Germany have it because, apart from being world champions, they have a well-established pattern of play. So, although they will be diminished by withdrawals, just like England, and a demonstrable falling away since Philipp Lahm's retirement, they will play with their heads up and an understanding of their own and each other's thinking and movement. It's the target England to which England aspire and one hopes it begins here: They said therefore unto Gareth, what sign shewest thou then, that we may see, and believe thee? What dost thou work? 6:16PM Pre-match digest What is it? It's England vs Germany, the first of two friendlies for Gareth Southgate's side in this international break. When is it? It's on Friday November 10 - ie today. What time is kick-off? It's an 8pm GMT start at Wembley. What TV channel is it on? You can watch this one on ITV. Mark Pougatch will be joined by Lee Dixon, Ryan Giggs and Ian Wright from 7.30pm. Alternatively, you can follow the match here throughout with Rob Bagchi. What is the team news? England: Ruben Loftus-Cheek is set to make his England debut in Friday's friendly against Germany, Press Association Sport understands. The 21-year-old midfielder, currently on loan at Crystal Palace from Chelsea, earned his first senior call-up for the upcoming friendlies along with Tammy Abraham and Joe Gomez. Gareth Southgate's men kick-off their World Cup preparations against Germany on Friday, when it is understood Loftus-Cheek will be handed a starting role. Brazil arrive at Wembley next Tuesday for the final match of 2017 - a year the Three Lions end without a string of key players. Harry Kane, Dele Alli and Harry Winks have all pulled out of the squad through injury, as have Raheem Sterling, Jordan Henderson and Fabian Delph. Ruben Loftus-Cheek looks likely to start  Credit: Action Images via Reuters Furthermore, Gary Cahill is a doubt for injury-hit England after missing training on the eve of the friendly with a back complaint. Such are the lack of options that Chelsea's Jay Dasilva, on loan at Charlton, and Fulham's Tayo Edun - members of the triumphant European Under-19 squad - trained with the senior squad on Thursday. On Wednesday, Tottenham midfielder Marcus Edwards and Jake Clarke-Salter of Chelsea trained with Southgate's side. Burnley's Jack Cork, who has been called up by the senior team for the first time, was among those training at St George's Park. Predicted team: Pickford; Rose, Maguire, Stones, Jones, Trippier; Loftus-Cheek, Dier, Livermore; Abraham, Vardy  Germany: Germany defender Jerome Boateng has been ruled out of Friday's friendly against England because of muscular problems, and Toni Kroos' participation is in doubt. The German soccer federation says Boateng's omission is a "precaution" cleared with coach Joachim Loew, and that the Bayern Munich defender may yet play in the team's friendly against France in Cologne the following Tuesday. The 29-year-old Boateng played one season in England for Manchester City before joining Bayern in 2011. Kroos also missed training on Wednesday, because of a stomach bug, while goalkeeper Kevin Trapp skipped it because of a respiratory tract infection and Mats Hummels completed individual exercises in the team hotel.  Predicted team: Ter Stegen; Halstenberg, Hummels, Rudiger, Kimmich; Gundogan, Ozil, Can; Sane, Wagner, Drazx What are they saying? Gareth Southgate on Jack Wilshere: "Jack played as a number 10 all of last season... ," Southgate told reporters. "That is not the way we are playing. When we have played with a 10, we have had Dele (Alli) and (Adam) Lallana. "I don't think Jack is a 10. I think he is a deeper player, but he is not playing deeper. "But I want to be clear: I really like Jack Wilshere as a player. I think he is a talent and I really respect him as an individual. And I'm hoping that we are in a position in March where we can pick him." Best-priced accumulators | New customer offers What are the odds? England - 13/5 Germany - 21/20 Draw - 12/5 England to win at 33/1 with Coral. Sign up now >> Sign up to Free Bet Lottery for a chance to win a £100 free bet ahead of England v Germany. It's completely free and there's one given away every day. What's our prediction? England's makeshift side will have a difficult night against a strong Germany XI, so expect a narrow defeat. Perhaps 0-1.

What to read next

By using Yahoo you agree that Yahoo and partners may use Cookies for personalisation and other purposes