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Crewe Alexandra have been warned to conduct a proper investigation into what they knew about paedophile coach Barry Bennell or else face one being imposed upon them. It can be revealed that the head of the independent inquiry into child abuse in football, Clive Sheldon QC, has demanded a ‘structured report’ from some of the clubs at the centre of the scandal into the accusations and revelations to have engulfed them. Among them are Crewe, who reneged on a promise to launch an independent inquiry into their seven-year association with Bennell after he was jailed for 31 years last month and branded the “devil incarnate” for abusing 12 boys as young as eight. It is feared his victims may number more than 100. The Football Association, which in 2016 commissioned an independent probe of its own into what chairman Greg Clarke admitted was the biggest crisis he could recall the game facing, has empowered Sheldon to step in if any of the clubs in question fail to produce an adequate structured report. That would include him being able to summon officials and order the disclosure of documents with the threat of FA sanctions for anyone refusing to cooperate. Crewe provoked outrage earlier this month by announcing they would no longer be launching a planned internal review after claiming there was no need to “duplicate the thorough enquiries” of Cheshire Police, which they said had found no evidence anyone at the club knew about Bennell’s offending. Laura Smith, the Crewe MP, Damian Collins, the chairman of the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport select committee, and Simon Yates, the leader of Crewe Town council, all condemned the move and urged the League Two side to reconsider. Two of the approximately dozen clubs on which Sheldon’s inquiry has focused - Manchester City and Chelsea - have long been conducting their own QC-led investigations, with which he is able to liaise. It is 18 months since former Crewe defender Andy Woodward first spoke out Credit: PA Several others have carried out either external or internal probes or been asked to provide structured reports, with these given a deadline of around the start of the World Cup to submit their findings to Sheldon and his team. That is not the primary reason why it can also be revealed that there has been another delay to the conclusion of his £1 million-plus inquiry, which had previously been extended until at least Easter. Sheldon is now not expected to submit his final report to the FA until the end of September, almost two years since former Crewe defender Andy Woodward’s revelation he had been a victim of Bennell triggered the current scandal. The sheer scale of the task facing Sheldon and his team is being blamed for what will end up a delay of almost nine months to an inquiry focusing on what the FA and clubs knew and did about child abuse in the game between 1970-2005. Paralegals have been forced to open a third of 9,000 boxes stored in a poorly-indexed FA archive estimated to contain up to five million documents of up to 2,000 pages. Almost a third of those opened were found to contain potentially-relevant material, from which around half a million pages have now been digitised. More than 350 highly-relevant documents have been identified for Sheldon to examine personally, of which he has still to view more than half. He is also keen to meet around a dozen more survivors of abuse - having already interviewed more than two dozen to date - in order to produce a report planned to focus on 10-12 case studies. That report will name and shame clubs and individuals if it is determined they did not take the correct steps when informed of abuse allegations and could also recommend potential sanctions to the FA.
Crewe Alexandra told to start investigation into child abuse scandal or face being subject of one themselves
Crewe Alexandra have been warned to conduct a proper investigation into what they knew about paedophile coach Barry Bennell or else face one being imposed upon them. It can be revealed that the head of the independent inquiry into child abuse in football, Clive Sheldon QC, has demanded a ‘structured report’ from some of the clubs at the centre of the scandal into the accusations and revelations to have engulfed them. Among them are Crewe, who reneged on a promise to launch an independent inquiry into their seven-year association with Bennell after he was jailed for 31 years last month and branded the “devil incarnate” for abusing 12 boys as young as eight. It is feared his victims may number more than 100. The Football Association, which in 2016 commissioned an independent probe of its own into what chairman Greg Clarke admitted was the biggest crisis he could recall the game facing, has empowered Sheldon to step in if any of the clubs in question fail to produce an adequate structured report. That would include him being able to summon officials and order the disclosure of documents with the threat of FA sanctions for anyone refusing to cooperate. Crewe provoked outrage earlier this month by announcing they would no longer be launching a planned internal review after claiming there was no need to “duplicate the thorough enquiries” of Cheshire Police, which they said had found no evidence anyone at the club knew about Bennell’s offending. Laura Smith, the Crewe MP, Damian Collins, the chairman of the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport select committee, and Simon Yates, the leader of Crewe Town council, all condemned the move and urged the League Two side to reconsider. Two of the approximately dozen clubs on which Sheldon’s inquiry has focused - Manchester City and Chelsea - have long been conducting their own QC-led investigations, with which he is able to liaise. It is 18 months since former Crewe defender Andy Woodward first spoke out Credit: PA Several others have carried out either external or internal probes or been asked to provide structured reports, with these given a deadline of around the start of the World Cup to submit their findings to Sheldon and his team. That is not the primary reason why it can also be revealed that there has been another delay to the conclusion of his £1 million-plus inquiry, which had previously been extended until at least Easter. Sheldon is now not expected to submit his final report to the FA until the end of September, almost two years since former Crewe defender Andy Woodward’s revelation he had been a victim of Bennell triggered the current scandal. The sheer scale of the task facing Sheldon and his team is being blamed for what will end up a delay of almost nine months to an inquiry focusing on what the FA and clubs knew and did about child abuse in the game between 1970-2005. Paralegals have been forced to open a third of 9,000 boxes stored in a poorly-indexed FA archive estimated to contain up to five million documents of up to 2,000 pages. Almost a third of those opened were found to contain potentially-relevant material, from which around half a million pages have now been digitised. More than 350 highly-relevant documents have been identified for Sheldon to examine personally, of which he has still to view more than half. He is also keen to meet around a dozen more survivors of abuse - having already interviewed more than two dozen to date - in order to produce a report planned to focus on 10-12 case studies. That report will name and shame clubs and individuals if it is determined they did not take the correct steps when informed of abuse allegations and could also recommend potential sanctions to the FA.
Crewe Alexandra have been warned to conduct a proper investigation into what they knew about paedophile coach Barry Bennell or else face one being imposed upon them. It can be revealed that the head of the independent inquiry into child abuse in football, Clive Sheldon QC, has demanded a ‘structured report’ from some of the clubs at the centre of the scandal into the accusations and revelations to have engulfed them. Among them are Crewe, who reneged on a promise to launch an independent inquiry into their seven-year association with Bennell after he was jailed for 31 years last month and branded the “devil incarnate” for abusing 12 boys as young as eight. It is feared his victims may number more than 100. The Football Association, which in 2016 commissioned an independent probe of its own into what chairman Greg Clarke admitted was the biggest crisis he could recall the game facing, has empowered Sheldon to step in if any of the clubs in question fail to produce an adequate structured report. That would include him being able to summon officials and order the disclosure of documents with the threat of FA sanctions for anyone refusing to cooperate. Crewe provoked outrage earlier this month by announcing they would no longer be launching a planned internal review after claiming there was no need to “duplicate the thorough enquiries” of Cheshire Police, which they said had found no evidence anyone at the club knew about Bennell’s offending. Laura Smith, the Crewe MP, Damian Collins, the chairman of the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport select committee, and Simon Yates, the leader of Crewe Town council, all condemned the move and urged the League Two side to reconsider. Two of the approximately dozen clubs on which Sheldon’s inquiry has focused - Manchester City and Chelsea - have long been conducting their own QC-led investigations, with which he is able to liaise. It is 18 months since former Crewe defender Andy Woodward first spoke out Credit: PA Several others have carried out either external or internal probes or been asked to provide structured reports, with these given a deadline of around the start of the World Cup to submit their findings to Sheldon and his team. That is not the primary reason why it can also be revealed that there has been another delay to the conclusion of his £1 million-plus inquiry, which had previously been extended until at least Easter. Sheldon is now not expected to submit his final report to the FA until the end of September, almost two years since former Crewe defender Andy Woodward’s revelation he had been a victim of Bennell triggered the current scandal. The sheer scale of the task facing Sheldon and his team is being blamed for what will end up a delay of almost nine months to an inquiry focusing on what the FA and clubs knew and did about child abuse in the game between 1970-2005. Paralegals have been forced to open a third of 9,000 boxes stored in a poorly-indexed FA archive estimated to contain up to five million documents of up to 2,000 pages. Almost a third of those opened were found to contain potentially-relevant material, from which around half a million pages have now been digitised. More than 350 highly-relevant documents have been identified for Sheldon to examine personally, of which he has still to view more than half. He is also keen to meet around a dozen more survivors of abuse - having already interviewed more than two dozen to date - in order to produce a report planned to focus on 10-12 case studies. That report will name and shame clubs and individuals if it is determined they did not take the correct steps when informed of abuse allegations and could also recommend potential sanctions to the FA.
Crewe Alexandra told to start investigation into child abuse scandal or face being subject of one themselves
Crewe Alexandra have been warned to conduct a proper investigation into what they knew about paedophile coach Barry Bennell or else face one being imposed upon them. It can be revealed that the head of the independent inquiry into child abuse in football, Clive Sheldon QC, has demanded a ‘structured report’ from some of the clubs at the centre of the scandal into the accusations and revelations to have engulfed them. Among them are Crewe, who reneged on a promise to launch an independent inquiry into their seven-year association with Bennell after he was jailed for 31 years last month and branded the “devil incarnate” for abusing 12 boys as young as eight. It is feared his victims may number more than 100. The Football Association, which in 2016 commissioned an independent probe of its own into what chairman Greg Clarke admitted was the biggest crisis he could recall the game facing, has empowered Sheldon to step in if any of the clubs in question fail to produce an adequate structured report. That would include him being able to summon officials and order the disclosure of documents with the threat of FA sanctions for anyone refusing to cooperate. Crewe provoked outrage earlier this month by announcing they would no longer be launching a planned internal review after claiming there was no need to “duplicate the thorough enquiries” of Cheshire Police, which they said had found no evidence anyone at the club knew about Bennell’s offending. Laura Smith, the Crewe MP, Damian Collins, the chairman of the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport select committee, and Simon Yates, the leader of Crewe Town council, all condemned the move and urged the League Two side to reconsider. Two of the approximately dozen clubs on which Sheldon’s inquiry has focused - Manchester City and Chelsea - have long been conducting their own QC-led investigations, with which he is able to liaise. It is 18 months since former Crewe defender Andy Woodward first spoke out Credit: PA Several others have carried out either external or internal probes or been asked to provide structured reports, with these given a deadline of around the start of the World Cup to submit their findings to Sheldon and his team. That is not the primary reason why it can also be revealed that there has been another delay to the conclusion of his £1 million-plus inquiry, which had previously been extended until at least Easter. Sheldon is now not expected to submit his final report to the FA until the end of September, almost two years since former Crewe defender Andy Woodward’s revelation he had been a victim of Bennell triggered the current scandal. The sheer scale of the task facing Sheldon and his team is being blamed for what will end up a delay of almost nine months to an inquiry focusing on what the FA and clubs knew and did about child abuse in the game between 1970-2005. Paralegals have been forced to open a third of 9,000 boxes stored in a poorly-indexed FA archive estimated to contain up to five million documents of up to 2,000 pages. Almost a third of those opened were found to contain potentially-relevant material, from which around half a million pages have now been digitised. More than 350 highly-relevant documents have been identified for Sheldon to examine personally, of which he has still to view more than half. He is also keen to meet around a dozen more survivors of abuse - having already interviewed more than two dozen to date - in order to produce a report planned to focus on 10-12 case studies. That report will name and shame clubs and individuals if it is determined they did not take the correct steps when informed of abuse allegations and could also recommend potential sanctions to the FA.
Crewe Alexandra told to start investigation into child abuse scandal or face being subject of one themselves
Crewe Alexandra told to start investigation into child abuse scandal or face being subject of one themselves
Crewe Alexandra told to start investigation into child abuse scandal or face being subject of one themselves
Crewe Alexandra told to start investigation into child abuse scandal or face being subject of one themselves
Crewe Alexandra told to start investigation into child abuse scandal or face being subject of one themselves
Crewe Alexandra told to start investigation into child abuse scandal or face being subject of one themselves
Crewe Alexandra’s main sponsor has vowed to stand by the club despite the backlash that has greeted their decision to renege on the promise of an independent investigation into the Barry Bennell child abuse scandal. Laura Smith, the Crewe MP, Damian Collins, the chairman of the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport select committee, and Simon Yates, the leader of Crewe Town council, have all condemned the move and urged the League Two club to reconsider its stance over its former coach. Victims of the serial paedophile, who was sentenced last month to 30 years in prison after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse throughout the 1980s, reacted angrily to the news and the club have also been expelled from the North West Football Awards over their handling of arguably the worst scandal in English football history. But Mornflake, Crewe’s shirt sponsor with whom they have involved for over a decade, have said they intend to continue their association with the club. The Crewe based producer of oat and oat-based breakfast cereals said there had not been any discussions with the club to date over the matter but said they felt they would be “punishing” the club’s next generation of players and their families if they withdrew their sponsorship. In a statement, Mornflake - who are a prominent sponsor of companies and organisations in South Cheshire - told Telegraph Sport: “Firstly and most importantly, we extend our deepest sympathies to the victims involved in these horrific events – we are utterly appalled by what has happened and our thoughts are with everybody affected. “In this dreadful situation, both as sponsors and as a Crewe business, we also feel that we have a responsibility to support our local football team and do not want to punish the next generation of rising young stars or the families that look forward to watching their team play each week. Andy Woodward, one of Bennell's victims, says Crewe are burying their heads in the sand Credit: Peter Byrne/PA Wire “We were not involved with Crewe Alexandra Football Club in any way during these unspeakable events and our sponsorship of the football team for over the last ten years is one of the many local community initiatives we support.” Crewe announced earlier this month that they would no longer be launching a planned internal review after claiming there was no need to “duplicate the thorough enquiries” of Cheshire Police, whom they said had found no evidence that anyone at Crewe knew about Bennell’s offending.
Sponsor vows to stand by Crewe Alexandra despite club reneging on Barry Bennell investigation
Crewe Alexandra’s main sponsor has vowed to stand by the club despite the backlash that has greeted their decision to renege on the promise of an independent investigation into the Barry Bennell child abuse scandal. Laura Smith, the Crewe MP, Damian Collins, the chairman of the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport select committee, and Simon Yates, the leader of Crewe Town council, have all condemned the move and urged the League Two club to reconsider its stance over its former coach. Victims of the serial paedophile, who was sentenced last month to 30 years in prison after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse throughout the 1980s, reacted angrily to the news and the club have also been expelled from the North West Football Awards over their handling of arguably the worst scandal in English football history. But Mornflake, Crewe’s shirt sponsor with whom they have involved for over a decade, have said they intend to continue their association with the club. The Crewe based producer of oat and oat-based breakfast cereals said there had not been any discussions with the club to date over the matter but said they felt they would be “punishing” the club’s next generation of players and their families if they withdrew their sponsorship. In a statement, Mornflake - who are a prominent sponsor of companies and organisations in South Cheshire - told Telegraph Sport: “Firstly and most importantly, we extend our deepest sympathies to the victims involved in these horrific events – we are utterly appalled by what has happened and our thoughts are with everybody affected. “In this dreadful situation, both as sponsors and as a Crewe business, we also feel that we have a responsibility to support our local football team and do not want to punish the next generation of rising young stars or the families that look forward to watching their team play each week. Andy Woodward, one of Bennell's victims, says Crewe are burying their heads in the sand Credit: Peter Byrne/PA Wire “We were not involved with Crewe Alexandra Football Club in any way during these unspeakable events and our sponsorship of the football team for over the last ten years is one of the many local community initiatives we support.” Crewe announced earlier this month that they would no longer be launching a planned internal review after claiming there was no need to “duplicate the thorough enquiries” of Cheshire Police, whom they said had found no evidence that anyone at Crewe knew about Bennell’s offending.
Sponsor vows to stand by Crewe Alexandra despite club reneging on Barry Bennell investigation
Sponsor vows to stand by Crewe Alexandra despite club reneging on Barry Bennell investigation
Sponsor vows to stand by Crewe Alexandra despite club reneging on Barry Bennell investigation
Crewe Alexandra are under mounting pressure to launch an independent investigation into the Barry Bennell child abuse scandal after the chairman of the culture, media and sport select committee joined the chorus of condemnation over the club’s decision to renege on their promise of an internal review. Damian Collins also warned that Crewe’s handling of the situation had generated such a “lack of trust” that, if the League Two club was shamed into an about-turn, the Football Association should intervene to ensure any review process was properly conducted. Failing that, Collins insisted it was imperative the FA’s own independent inquiry into child abuse in football, led by Clive Sheldon QC, thoroughly investigates Crewe and other clubs. The Conservative MP has also called on the FA to explain the reasons behind Dario Gradi’s suspension as Crewe’s director of football, 15 months after he was barred from all football related activity, or provide a clear time frame for when that will happen. Victims of Bennell – a former youth coach at Crewe, among other clubs, who was jailed for 30 years last month after being convicted of 43 counts of child sexual abuse throughout the 1980s – and Laura Smith, the Labour MP for Crewe, have already hit out at the club for abandoning plans to conduct their own inquiry. Damian Collins also warned that Crewe's handling of the situation had generated a "lack of trust" Credit: GETTY IMAGES Crewe claimed they felt no need to “duplicate the thorough enquiries” of Cheshire Police, whom they said had found no evidence that anyone at the club knew about Bennell’s offending. But Smith told The Daily Telegraph last week that a criminal investigation was “limited in its scope” and “no substitute” for a thorough, transparent independent investigation that left “no stone unturned.” Now Collins has voiced his dismay at Crewe’s stance, branding their decision as “totally unacceptable” and suggesting it raises serious concerns about “the values of the club” that could lead people to avoid future association with it. “It is totally unacceptable because it needs to be done and they promised they would do it but it can’t be left there,” Collins told The Daily Telegraph. “The FA were clear when they set up the Sheldon inquiry that it has the power to go into clubs as well. So the FA should say that they will expect to conduct their own inquiry, through Clive Sheldon, or separately if need be, as part of this process and within that club. It would be better for Crewe and the victims to conduct their own inquiry but if they won’t, the FA should require it. But I also think the FA have got a responsibility, if Crewe do their own inquiry, to make sure it’s being done properly. What the club should do is bring in someone independent of themselves to run the inquiry and give them full access to all documents, information and people that they need. “There will be a lack of trust now because of the way the club has behaved. That’s why, even if Crewe do end up doing one themselves, the FA should check how they are doing it. If Crewe, and other clubs, don’t respond to this by treating it seriously and making sure there is a proper investigation, I think the way people will judge them is by saying, ‘This says something about the values of the club and those are values I don’t want to be associated with’.” The FA has yet to explain why Gradi – who was Crewe’s manager throughout the seven years Bennell worked for the club – was suspended in November 2016, shortly after an interview in The Guardian newspaper with one of Bennell’s victims at Crewe, Andy Woodward, sparked a mass of revelations into arguably the biggest scandal in English football history. But Collins believes it is time the FA speak up about that matter and explain the reasons behind Gradi’s suspension since the governing body has still to divulge what it relates to. “It would be helpful for them to do that,” Collins said. “I don’t know the issues behind it but it would be helpful to explain now why that suspension is there. Or, if the FA can’t explain now, then say when they will be able to talk about it. That would be helpful for all concerned.” Gradi has always denied any knowledge of Bennell’s offending. His suspension from the FA came amid claims he, as assistant manager of Chelsea, “smoothed over” a complaint of sex assault by a Chelsea scout, Eddie Heath, on a 15-year-old former youth team player in the 1970s. Gradi insisted he did nothing wrong and would assist in the FA’s review. Collins said it was imperative “for the credibility” of the Sheldon inquiry that there is “full disclosure” once the independent investigation is complete. “The test for people having confidence in the report is that Sheldon is free to publish in full and that the only redactions needed might be names of victims who need to be protected but otherwise there should be full disclosure,” Collins said. “In some ways, the best [outcome] would be for Clive Sheldon to publish the report himself, with the full support of the FA. For it to be an independent report, even though the FA have commissioned it, the author needs to be able to speak freely about what he has found.”
Crewe's refusal to conduct internal Barry Bennell inquiry is 'totally unacceptable', says Damian Collins
Crewe Alexandra are under mounting pressure to launch an independent investigation into the Barry Bennell child abuse scandal after the chairman of the culture, media and sport select committee joined the chorus of condemnation over the club’s decision to renege on their promise of an internal review. Damian Collins also warned that Crewe’s handling of the situation had generated such a “lack of trust” that, if the League Two club was shamed into an about-turn, the Football Association should intervene to ensure any review process was properly conducted. Failing that, Collins insisted it was imperative the FA’s own independent inquiry into child abuse in football, led by Clive Sheldon QC, thoroughly investigates Crewe and other clubs. The Conservative MP has also called on the FA to explain the reasons behind Dario Gradi’s suspension as Crewe’s director of football, 15 months after he was barred from all football related activity, or provide a clear time frame for when that will happen. Victims of Bennell – a former youth coach at Crewe, among other clubs, who was jailed for 30 years last month after being convicted of 43 counts of child sexual abuse throughout the 1980s – and Laura Smith, the Labour MP for Crewe, have already hit out at the club for abandoning plans to conduct their own inquiry. Damian Collins also warned that Crewe's handling of the situation had generated a "lack of trust" Credit: GETTY IMAGES Crewe claimed they felt no need to “duplicate the thorough enquiries” of Cheshire Police, whom they said had found no evidence that anyone at the club knew about Bennell’s offending. But Smith told The Daily Telegraph last week that a criminal investigation was “limited in its scope” and “no substitute” for a thorough, transparent independent investigation that left “no stone unturned.” Now Collins has voiced his dismay at Crewe’s stance, branding their decision as “totally unacceptable” and suggesting it raises serious concerns about “the values of the club” that could lead people to avoid future association with it. “It is totally unacceptable because it needs to be done and they promised they would do it but it can’t be left there,” Collins told The Daily Telegraph. “The FA were clear when they set up the Sheldon inquiry that it has the power to go into clubs as well. So the FA should say that they will expect to conduct their own inquiry, through Clive Sheldon, or separately if need be, as part of this process and within that club. It would be better for Crewe and the victims to conduct their own inquiry but if they won’t, the FA should require it. But I also think the FA have got a responsibility, if Crewe do their own inquiry, to make sure it’s being done properly. What the club should do is bring in someone independent of themselves to run the inquiry and give them full access to all documents, information and people that they need. “There will be a lack of trust now because of the way the club has behaved. That’s why, even if Crewe do end up doing one themselves, the FA should check how they are doing it. If Crewe, and other clubs, don’t respond to this by treating it seriously and making sure there is a proper investigation, I think the way people will judge them is by saying, ‘This says something about the values of the club and those are values I don’t want to be associated with’.” The FA has yet to explain why Gradi – who was Crewe’s manager throughout the seven years Bennell worked for the club – was suspended in November 2016, shortly after an interview in The Guardian newspaper with one of Bennell’s victims at Crewe, Andy Woodward, sparked a mass of revelations into arguably the biggest scandal in English football history. But Collins believes it is time the FA speak up about that matter and explain the reasons behind Gradi’s suspension since the governing body has still to divulge what it relates to. “It would be helpful for them to do that,” Collins said. “I don’t know the issues behind it but it would be helpful to explain now why that suspension is there. Or, if the FA can’t explain now, then say when they will be able to talk about it. That would be helpful for all concerned.” Gradi has always denied any knowledge of Bennell’s offending. His suspension from the FA came amid claims he, as assistant manager of Chelsea, “smoothed over” a complaint of sex assault by a Chelsea scout, Eddie Heath, on a 15-year-old former youth team player in the 1970s. Gradi insisted he did nothing wrong and would assist in the FA’s review. Collins said it was imperative “for the credibility” of the Sheldon inquiry that there is “full disclosure” once the independent investigation is complete. “The test for people having confidence in the report is that Sheldon is free to publish in full and that the only redactions needed might be names of victims who need to be protected but otherwise there should be full disclosure,” Collins said. “In some ways, the best [outcome] would be for Clive Sheldon to publish the report himself, with the full support of the FA. For it to be an independent report, even though the FA have commissioned it, the author needs to be able to speak freely about what he has found.”
Crewe Alexandra are under mounting pressure to launch an independent investigation into the Barry Bennell child abuse scandal after the chairman of the culture, media and sport select committee joined the chorus of condemnation over the club’s decision to renege on their promise of an internal review. Damian Collins also warned that Crewe’s handling of the situation had generated such a “lack of trust” that, if the League Two club was shamed into an about-turn, the Football Association should intervene to ensure any review process was properly conducted. Failing that, Collins insisted it was imperative the FA’s own independent inquiry into child abuse in football, led by Clive Sheldon QC, thoroughly investigates Crewe and other clubs. The Conservative MP has also called on the FA to explain the reasons behind Dario Gradi’s suspension as Crewe’s director of football, 15 months after he was barred from all football related activity, or provide a clear time frame for when that will happen. Victims of Bennell – a former youth coach at Crewe, among other clubs, who was jailed for 30 years last month after being convicted of 43 counts of child sexual abuse throughout the 1980s – and Laura Smith, the Labour MP for Crewe, have already hit out at the club for abandoning plans to conduct their own inquiry. Damian Collins also warned that Crewe's handling of the situation had generated a "lack of trust" Credit: GETTY IMAGES Crewe claimed they felt no need to “duplicate the thorough enquiries” of Cheshire Police, whom they said had found no evidence that anyone at the club knew about Bennell’s offending. But Smith told The Daily Telegraph last week that a criminal investigation was “limited in its scope” and “no substitute” for a thorough, transparent independent investigation that left “no stone unturned.” Now Collins has voiced his dismay at Crewe’s stance, branding their decision as “totally unacceptable” and suggesting it raises serious concerns about “the values of the club” that could lead people to avoid future association with it. “It is totally unacceptable because it needs to be done and they promised they would do it but it can’t be left there,” Collins told The Daily Telegraph. “The FA were clear when they set up the Sheldon inquiry that it has the power to go into clubs as well. So the FA should say that they will expect to conduct their own inquiry, through Clive Sheldon, or separately if need be, as part of this process and within that club. It would be better for Crewe and the victims to conduct their own inquiry but if they won’t, the FA should require it. But I also think the FA have got a responsibility, if Crewe do their own inquiry, to make sure it’s being done properly. What the club should do is bring in someone independent of themselves to run the inquiry and give them full access to all documents, information and people that they need. “There will be a lack of trust now because of the way the club has behaved. That’s why, even if Crewe do end up doing one themselves, the FA should check how they are doing it. If Crewe, and other clubs, don’t respond to this by treating it seriously and making sure there is a proper investigation, I think the way people will judge them is by saying, ‘This says something about the values of the club and those are values I don’t want to be associated with’.” The FA has yet to explain why Gradi – who was Crewe’s manager throughout the seven years Bennell worked for the club – was suspended in November 2016, shortly after an interview in The Guardian newspaper with one of Bennell’s victims at Crewe, Andy Woodward, sparked a mass of revelations into arguably the biggest scandal in English football history. But Collins believes it is time the FA speak up about that matter and explain the reasons behind Gradi’s suspension since the governing body has still to divulge what it relates to. “It would be helpful for them to do that,” Collins said. “I don’t know the issues behind it but it would be helpful to explain now why that suspension is there. Or, if the FA can’t explain now, then say when they will be able to talk about it. That would be helpful for all concerned.” Gradi has always denied any knowledge of Bennell’s offending. His suspension from the FA came amid claims he, as assistant manager of Chelsea, “smoothed over” a complaint of sex assault by a Chelsea scout, Eddie Heath, on a 15-year-old former youth team player in the 1970s. Gradi insisted he did nothing wrong and would assist in the FA’s review. Collins said it was imperative “for the credibility” of the Sheldon inquiry that there is “full disclosure” once the independent investigation is complete. “The test for people having confidence in the report is that Sheldon is free to publish in full and that the only redactions needed might be names of victims who need to be protected but otherwise there should be full disclosure,” Collins said. “In some ways, the best [outcome] would be for Clive Sheldon to publish the report himself, with the full support of the FA. For it to be an independent report, even though the FA have commissioned it, the author needs to be able to speak freely about what he has found.”
Crewe's refusal to conduct internal Barry Bennell inquiry is 'totally unacceptable', says Damian Collins
Crewe Alexandra are under mounting pressure to launch an independent investigation into the Barry Bennell child abuse scandal after the chairman of the culture, media and sport select committee joined the chorus of condemnation over the club’s decision to renege on their promise of an internal review. Damian Collins also warned that Crewe’s handling of the situation had generated such a “lack of trust” that, if the League Two club was shamed into an about-turn, the Football Association should intervene to ensure any review process was properly conducted. Failing that, Collins insisted it was imperative the FA’s own independent inquiry into child abuse in football, led by Clive Sheldon QC, thoroughly investigates Crewe and other clubs. The Conservative MP has also called on the FA to explain the reasons behind Dario Gradi’s suspension as Crewe’s director of football, 15 months after he was barred from all football related activity, or provide a clear time frame for when that will happen. Victims of Bennell – a former youth coach at Crewe, among other clubs, who was jailed for 30 years last month after being convicted of 43 counts of child sexual abuse throughout the 1980s – and Laura Smith, the Labour MP for Crewe, have already hit out at the club for abandoning plans to conduct their own inquiry. Damian Collins also warned that Crewe's handling of the situation had generated a "lack of trust" Credit: GETTY IMAGES Crewe claimed they felt no need to “duplicate the thorough enquiries” of Cheshire Police, whom they said had found no evidence that anyone at the club knew about Bennell’s offending. But Smith told The Daily Telegraph last week that a criminal investigation was “limited in its scope” and “no substitute” for a thorough, transparent independent investigation that left “no stone unturned.” Now Collins has voiced his dismay at Crewe’s stance, branding their decision as “totally unacceptable” and suggesting it raises serious concerns about “the values of the club” that could lead people to avoid future association with it. “It is totally unacceptable because it needs to be done and they promised they would do it but it can’t be left there,” Collins told The Daily Telegraph. “The FA were clear when they set up the Sheldon inquiry that it has the power to go into clubs as well. So the FA should say that they will expect to conduct their own inquiry, through Clive Sheldon, or separately if need be, as part of this process and within that club. It would be better for Crewe and the victims to conduct their own inquiry but if they won’t, the FA should require it. But I also think the FA have got a responsibility, if Crewe do their own inquiry, to make sure it’s being done properly. What the club should do is bring in someone independent of themselves to run the inquiry and give them full access to all documents, information and people that they need. “There will be a lack of trust now because of the way the club has behaved. That’s why, even if Crewe do end up doing one themselves, the FA should check how they are doing it. If Crewe, and other clubs, don’t respond to this by treating it seriously and making sure there is a proper investigation, I think the way people will judge them is by saying, ‘This says something about the values of the club and those are values I don’t want to be associated with’.” The FA has yet to explain why Gradi – who was Crewe’s manager throughout the seven years Bennell worked for the club – was suspended in November 2016, shortly after an interview in The Guardian newspaper with one of Bennell’s victims at Crewe, Andy Woodward, sparked a mass of revelations into arguably the biggest scandal in English football history. But Collins believes it is time the FA speak up about that matter and explain the reasons behind Gradi’s suspension since the governing body has still to divulge what it relates to. “It would be helpful for them to do that,” Collins said. “I don’t know the issues behind it but it would be helpful to explain now why that suspension is there. Or, if the FA can’t explain now, then say when they will be able to talk about it. That would be helpful for all concerned.” Gradi has always denied any knowledge of Bennell’s offending. His suspension from the FA came amid claims he, as assistant manager of Chelsea, “smoothed over” a complaint of sex assault by a Chelsea scout, Eddie Heath, on a 15-year-old former youth team player in the 1970s. Gradi insisted he did nothing wrong and would assist in the FA’s review. Collins said it was imperative “for the credibility” of the Sheldon inquiry that there is “full disclosure” once the independent investigation is complete. “The test for people having confidence in the report is that Sheldon is free to publish in full and that the only redactions needed might be names of victims who need to be protected but otherwise there should be full disclosure,” Collins said. “In some ways, the best [outcome] would be for Clive Sheldon to publish the report himself, with the full support of the FA. For it to be an independent report, even though the FA have commissioned it, the author needs to be able to speak freely about what he has found.”
Crewe Alexandra have been told they owe the victims of serial paedophile Barry Bennell “nothing less than a thorough investigation” into the failings that allowed the club’s former coach to sexually abuse dozens of young boys. Laura Smith, the Labour MP for Crewe and Nantwich, has criticised the League Two club’s decision to renege on its promise of an internal review into one of the worst scandals in the history of English football. Smith, the daughter of Hamilton Smith, the former Crewe managing director who claims his warnings about Bennell in the late 1980s were ignored by the club, has urged Crewe’s directors to reconsider its decision. Crewe said in a statement last Friday that there was no need to “duplicate the thorough inquiries” of Cheshire Police, whom they said had found no evidence that anyone at Crewe knew about Bennell’s offending. But Smith, a former teacher, believes any criminal investigation is “limited in its scope” and was “not a substitute for a wider independent investigation” that could examine why Bennell’s crimes were able to go unreported for so long and potentially provide answers she feels the victims deserve. Bennell was described in court as a “child molester on an industrial scale” and “the devil incarnate” when sentenced last month to 30 years in prison after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse throughout the 1980s. Another 86 people have since come forward to make complaints of abuse against him. Bennell had previously been convicted in 1995, 1998 and 2015 of sexually abusing young boys. “The victims of this horrific abuse deserve nothing less than a thorough investigation into every aspect of the awful events that occurred during this time,” Smith said. “That investigation should be transparent and leave no stone unturned. “My understanding is that any criminal investigation will be limited in its scope by its very nature and is therefore not a substitute for a wider independent investigation. “It is regrettable that the club has now decided to renege on the Board’s original promise to commission an independent investigation and I would urge the club to reconsider its decision.” Bennell has been sentenced to 31 years for his multiple convictions Credit: BBC Smith’s calls come only 24 hours after her father, Hamilton, called on the club to be “honest about the past” after expressing his shock and deep disappointment at Crewe’s attempts to discredit him. Crewe had claimed in their statement last Friday that nobody at the club had any recollection of their former managing director airing his concerns about Bennell’s behaviour. But Hamilton Smith, standing by his accusations, responded by questioning how people could believe “that cultures and attitudes have changed” at Crewe “or that the future is one that puts safeguarding first” if the club was “not prepared to be honest about the past”. He said that, during his time as manager director between May 1987 and February 1990, he was “made aware of concerns about Barry Bennell’s relationship with the boys at the club” and raised them at a meeting he called at the house of then chairman, Norman Rowlinson, which he said was attended by several directors, including current chairman John Bowler. “I am shocked to hear that other individuals have denied any recollection of these events and it is a shame that police have been unable to find any other evidence of this meeting, which took place almost 30 years ago,” he told the BBC on Wednesday. “I think it is important that those who held positions of authority have a duty to be honest about what happened. It is the least we can do now for those victims who have suffered the most horrific abuse whilst at the club. I have given my honest account.”
Crewe MP tells club they owe Barry Bennell victims a thorough investigation
Crewe Alexandra have been told they owe the victims of serial paedophile Barry Bennell “nothing less than a thorough investigation” into the failings that allowed the club’s former coach to sexually abuse dozens of young boys. Laura Smith, the Labour MP for Crewe and Nantwich, has criticised the League Two club’s decision to renege on its promise of an internal review into one of the worst scandals in the history of English football. Smith, the daughter of Hamilton Smith, the former Crewe managing director who claims his warnings about Bennell in the late 1980s were ignored by the club, has urged Crewe’s directors to reconsider its decision. Crewe said in a statement last Friday that there was no need to “duplicate the thorough inquiries” of Cheshire Police, whom they said had found no evidence that anyone at Crewe knew about Bennell’s offending. But Smith, a former teacher, believes any criminal investigation is “limited in its scope” and was “not a substitute for a wider independent investigation” that could examine why Bennell’s crimes were able to go unreported for so long and potentially provide answers she feels the victims deserve. Bennell was described in court as a “child molester on an industrial scale” and “the devil incarnate” when sentenced last month to 30 years in prison after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse throughout the 1980s. Another 86 people have since come forward to make complaints of abuse against him. Bennell had previously been convicted in 1995, 1998 and 2015 of sexually abusing young boys. “The victims of this horrific abuse deserve nothing less than a thorough investigation into every aspect of the awful events that occurred during this time,” Smith said. “That investigation should be transparent and leave no stone unturned. “My understanding is that any criminal investigation will be limited in its scope by its very nature and is therefore not a substitute for a wider independent investigation. “It is regrettable that the club has now decided to renege on the Board’s original promise to commission an independent investigation and I would urge the club to reconsider its decision.” Bennell has been sentenced to 31 years for his multiple convictions Credit: BBC Smith’s calls come only 24 hours after her father, Hamilton, called on the club to be “honest about the past” after expressing his shock and deep disappointment at Crewe’s attempts to discredit him. Crewe had claimed in their statement last Friday that nobody at the club had any recollection of their former managing director airing his concerns about Bennell’s behaviour. But Hamilton Smith, standing by his accusations, responded by questioning how people could believe “that cultures and attitudes have changed” at Crewe “or that the future is one that puts safeguarding first” if the club was “not prepared to be honest about the past”. He said that, during his time as manager director between May 1987 and February 1990, he was “made aware of concerns about Barry Bennell’s relationship with the boys at the club” and raised them at a meeting he called at the house of then chairman, Norman Rowlinson, which he said was attended by several directors, including current chairman John Bowler. “I am shocked to hear that other individuals have denied any recollection of these events and it is a shame that police have been unable to find any other evidence of this meeting, which took place almost 30 years ago,” he told the BBC on Wednesday. “I think it is important that those who held positions of authority have a duty to be honest about what happened. It is the least we can do now for those victims who have suffered the most horrific abuse whilst at the club. I have given my honest account.”
Crewe Alexandra have been told they owe the victims of serial paedophile Barry Bennell “nothing less than a thorough investigation” into the failings that allowed the club’s former coach to sexually abuse dozens of young boys. Laura Smith, the Labour MP for Crewe and Nantwich, has criticised the League Two club’s decision to renege on its promise of an internal review into one of the worst scandals in the history of English football. Smith, the daughter of Hamilton Smith, the former Crewe managing director who claims his warnings about Bennell in the late 1980s were ignored by the club, has urged Crewe’s directors to reconsider its decision. Crewe said in a statement last Friday that there was no need to “duplicate the thorough inquiries” of Cheshire Police, whom they said had found no evidence that anyone at Crewe knew about Bennell’s offending. But Smith, a former teacher, believes any criminal investigation is “limited in its scope” and was “not a substitute for a wider independent investigation” that could examine why Bennell’s crimes were able to go unreported for so long and potentially provide answers she feels the victims deserve. Bennell was described in court as a “child molester on an industrial scale” and “the devil incarnate” when sentenced last month to 30 years in prison after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse throughout the 1980s. Another 86 people have since come forward to make complaints of abuse against him. Bennell had previously been convicted in 1995, 1998 and 2015 of sexually abusing young boys. “The victims of this horrific abuse deserve nothing less than a thorough investigation into every aspect of the awful events that occurred during this time,” Smith said. “That investigation should be transparent and leave no stone unturned. “My understanding is that any criminal investigation will be limited in its scope by its very nature and is therefore not a substitute for a wider independent investigation. “It is regrettable that the club has now decided to renege on the Board’s original promise to commission an independent investigation and I would urge the club to reconsider its decision.” Bennell has been sentenced to 31 years for his multiple convictions Credit: BBC Smith’s calls come only 24 hours after her father, Hamilton, called on the club to be “honest about the past” after expressing his shock and deep disappointment at Crewe’s attempts to discredit him. Crewe had claimed in their statement last Friday that nobody at the club had any recollection of their former managing director airing his concerns about Bennell’s behaviour. But Hamilton Smith, standing by his accusations, responded by questioning how people could believe “that cultures and attitudes have changed” at Crewe “or that the future is one that puts safeguarding first” if the club was “not prepared to be honest about the past”. He said that, during his time as manager director between May 1987 and February 1990, he was “made aware of concerns about Barry Bennell’s relationship with the boys at the club” and raised them at a meeting he called at the house of then chairman, Norman Rowlinson, which he said was attended by several directors, including current chairman John Bowler. “I am shocked to hear that other individuals have denied any recollection of these events and it is a shame that police have been unable to find any other evidence of this meeting, which took place almost 30 years ago,” he told the BBC on Wednesday. “I think it is important that those who held positions of authority have a duty to be honest about what happened. It is the least we can do now for those victims who have suffered the most horrific abuse whilst at the club. I have given my honest account.”
Crewe MP tells club they owe Barry Bennell victims a thorough investigation
Crewe Alexandra have been told they owe the victims of serial paedophile Barry Bennell “nothing less than a thorough investigation” into the failings that allowed the club’s former coach to sexually abuse dozens of young boys. Laura Smith, the Labour MP for Crewe and Nantwich, has criticised the League Two club’s decision to renege on its promise of an internal review into one of the worst scandals in the history of English football. Smith, the daughter of Hamilton Smith, the former Crewe managing director who claims his warnings about Bennell in the late 1980s were ignored by the club, has urged Crewe’s directors to reconsider its decision. Crewe said in a statement last Friday that there was no need to “duplicate the thorough inquiries” of Cheshire Police, whom they said had found no evidence that anyone at Crewe knew about Bennell’s offending. But Smith, a former teacher, believes any criminal investigation is “limited in its scope” and was “not a substitute for a wider independent investigation” that could examine why Bennell’s crimes were able to go unreported for so long and potentially provide answers she feels the victims deserve. Bennell was described in court as a “child molester on an industrial scale” and “the devil incarnate” when sentenced last month to 30 years in prison after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse throughout the 1980s. Another 86 people have since come forward to make complaints of abuse against him. Bennell had previously been convicted in 1995, 1998 and 2015 of sexually abusing young boys. “The victims of this horrific abuse deserve nothing less than a thorough investigation into every aspect of the awful events that occurred during this time,” Smith said. “That investigation should be transparent and leave no stone unturned. “My understanding is that any criminal investigation will be limited in its scope by its very nature and is therefore not a substitute for a wider independent investigation. “It is regrettable that the club has now decided to renege on the Board’s original promise to commission an independent investigation and I would urge the club to reconsider its decision.” Bennell has been sentenced to 31 years for his multiple convictions Credit: BBC Smith’s calls come only 24 hours after her father, Hamilton, called on the club to be “honest about the past” after expressing his shock and deep disappointment at Crewe’s attempts to discredit him. Crewe had claimed in their statement last Friday that nobody at the club had any recollection of their former managing director airing his concerns about Bennell’s behaviour. But Hamilton Smith, standing by his accusations, responded by questioning how people could believe “that cultures and attitudes have changed” at Crewe “or that the future is one that puts safeguarding first” if the club was “not prepared to be honest about the past”. He said that, during his time as manager director between May 1987 and February 1990, he was “made aware of concerns about Barry Bennell’s relationship with the boys at the club” and raised them at a meeting he called at the house of then chairman, Norman Rowlinson, which he said was attended by several directors, including current chairman John Bowler. “I am shocked to hear that other individuals have denied any recollection of these events and it is a shame that police have been unable to find any other evidence of this meeting, which took place almost 30 years ago,” he told the BBC on Wednesday. “I think it is important that those who held positions of authority have a duty to be honest about what happened. It is the least we can do now for those victims who have suffered the most horrific abuse whilst at the club. I have given my honest account.”
The former managing director of Crewe Alexandra who claims his warnings about Barry Bennell 30 years ago were ignored by the board has called on the club to “honest about the past” after expressing shock and deep disappointment at attempts to discredit him. Hamilton Smith has stood by his accusations of a cover-up at Crewe after the League Two club released a statement last Friday in which they claimed nobody at the club had any recollection of their former managing director airing his concerns about Bennell’s behaviour. Smith responded to the statement on Wednesday by questioning how people could believe “that cultures and attitudes have changed” at Crewe “or that the future is one that puts safeguarding first” if the club was “not prepared to be honest about the past”. In the statement, Crewe reneged on a promise to conduct an internal inquiry into the failures that allowed their former coach’s crimes to go unreported after claiming they was no need to “duplicate the thorough enquiries” of Cheshire Police, whom they said had found no evidence that anyone at Crewe knew about Bennell’s offending. “I was deeply disappointed when I read the statement by Crewe Alex last week,” Smith added. Crewe have been heavily criticised for their handling of the situation Credit: Getty Images Smith said he had never received a complaint about Bennell, who sentenced to 30 years in prison last month after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse through the 1980s, from a victim or from a parent of a victim. But he insisted that, during his time as manager director between May 1987 and February 1990, he was “made aware of concerns about Barry Bennell’s relationship with the boys at the club” and raised them at a meeting he called at the house of then chairman, Norman Rowlinson. “Several directors were present including the then vice chairman John Bowler [now Crewe’s chairman],” said Smith. “I stand by the account that I have given publicly and to the police,” Smith told the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire programme. “I am shocked to hear that other individuals have denied any recollection of these events and it is a shame that police have been unable to find any other evidence of this meeting, which took place almost 30 years ago. “I think it is important that those who held positions of authority have a duty to be honest about what happened. It is the least we can do now for those victims who have suffered the most horrific abuse whilst at the club. I have given my honest account.” Smith has previously claimed that, after leaving Crewe in 1990, he went to see Bowler years later after being alarmed that Crewe were maintaining they had never received any warnings about Bennell, who was in jail at the time following his first convictions for abusing children. Smith said Bowler denied then that their conversation ever took place. “I knew immediately this was a cover up and I said [to Bowler], ‘You’re a lying b------“ Smith told the Channel 4 documentary Football’s Wall of Silence that aired last month. Crewe said in their statement last week that they were “concerned to note” why Smith did not report “his knowledge of Mr Bennell’s offending in 1988” to the police until 2016 or the Football Association until 2001. Smith responded by saying: “To be absolutely clear, I had received no complaint from a victim or from a parent of any of the victims. Had I had any evidence that these despicable acts were being committed against boys at the club, I would have provided the police with the evidence at the time.” Smith insisted Crewe “could have done more to protect” the boys who were raped, molested and psychologically scarred by Bennell, who was described as “the devil incarnate” in court, and said he did not “discount myself in that.” “If we are not prepared to be honest about the past, how can we expect people to believe that cultures and attitudes have changed or that the future is one that puts safeguarding first?” Smith said.
Former Crewe director whose Barry Bennell warnings were ignored calls on club to be 'honest about the past'
The former managing director of Crewe Alexandra who claims his warnings about Barry Bennell 30 years ago were ignored by the board has called on the club to “honest about the past” after expressing shock and deep disappointment at attempts to discredit him. Hamilton Smith has stood by his accusations of a cover-up at Crewe after the League Two club released a statement last Friday in which they claimed nobody at the club had any recollection of their former managing director airing his concerns about Bennell’s behaviour. Smith responded to the statement on Wednesday by questioning how people could believe “that cultures and attitudes have changed” at Crewe “or that the future is one that puts safeguarding first” if the club was “not prepared to be honest about the past”. In the statement, Crewe reneged on a promise to conduct an internal inquiry into the failures that allowed their former coach’s crimes to go unreported after claiming they was no need to “duplicate the thorough enquiries” of Cheshire Police, whom they said had found no evidence that anyone at Crewe knew about Bennell’s offending. “I was deeply disappointed when I read the statement by Crewe Alex last week,” Smith added. Crewe have been heavily criticised for their handling of the situation Credit: Getty Images Smith said he had never received a complaint about Bennell, who sentenced to 30 years in prison last month after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse through the 1980s, from a victim or from a parent of a victim. But he insisted that, during his time as manager director between May 1987 and February 1990, he was “made aware of concerns about Barry Bennell’s relationship with the boys at the club” and raised them at a meeting he called at the house of then chairman, Norman Rowlinson. “Several directors were present including the then vice chairman John Bowler [now Crewe’s chairman],” said Smith. “I stand by the account that I have given publicly and to the police,” Smith told the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire programme. “I am shocked to hear that other individuals have denied any recollection of these events and it is a shame that police have been unable to find any other evidence of this meeting, which took place almost 30 years ago. “I think it is important that those who held positions of authority have a duty to be honest about what happened. It is the least we can do now for those victims who have suffered the most horrific abuse whilst at the club. I have given my honest account.” Smith has previously claimed that, after leaving Crewe in 1990, he went to see Bowler years later after being alarmed that Crewe were maintaining they had never received any warnings about Bennell, who was in jail at the time following his first convictions for abusing children. Smith said Bowler denied then that their conversation ever took place. “I knew immediately this was a cover up and I said [to Bowler], ‘You’re a lying b------“ Smith told the Channel 4 documentary Football’s Wall of Silence that aired last month. Crewe said in their statement last week that they were “concerned to note” why Smith did not report “his knowledge of Mr Bennell’s offending in 1988” to the police until 2016 or the Football Association until 2001. Smith responded by saying: “To be absolutely clear, I had received no complaint from a victim or from a parent of any of the victims. Had I had any evidence that these despicable acts were being committed against boys at the club, I would have provided the police with the evidence at the time.” Smith insisted Crewe “could have done more to protect” the boys who were raped, molested and psychologically scarred by Bennell, who was described as “the devil incarnate” in court, and said he did not “discount myself in that.” “If we are not prepared to be honest about the past, how can we expect people to believe that cultures and attitudes have changed or that the future is one that puts safeguarding first?” Smith said.
The former managing director of Crewe Alexandra who claims his warnings about Barry Bennell 30 years ago were ignored by the board has called on the club to “honest about the past” after expressing shock and deep disappointment at attempts to discredit him. Hamilton Smith has stood by his accusations of a cover-up at Crewe after the League Two club released a statement last Friday in which they claimed nobody at the club had any recollection of their former managing director airing his concerns about Bennell’s behaviour. Smith responded to the statement on Wednesday by questioning how people could believe “that cultures and attitudes have changed” at Crewe “or that the future is one that puts safeguarding first” if the club was “not prepared to be honest about the past”. In the statement, Crewe reneged on a promise to conduct an internal inquiry into the failures that allowed their former coach’s crimes to go unreported after claiming they was no need to “duplicate the thorough enquiries” of Cheshire Police, whom they said had found no evidence that anyone at Crewe knew about Bennell’s offending. “I was deeply disappointed when I read the statement by Crewe Alex last week,” Smith added. Crewe have been heavily criticised for their handling of the situation Credit: Getty Images Smith said he had never received a complaint about Bennell, who sentenced to 30 years in prison last month after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse through the 1980s, from a victim or from a parent of a victim. But he insisted that, during his time as manager director between May 1987 and February 1990, he was “made aware of concerns about Barry Bennell’s relationship with the boys at the club” and raised them at a meeting he called at the house of then chairman, Norman Rowlinson. “Several directors were present including the then vice chairman John Bowler [now Crewe’s chairman],” said Smith. “I stand by the account that I have given publicly and to the police,” Smith told the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire programme. “I am shocked to hear that other individuals have denied any recollection of these events and it is a shame that police have been unable to find any other evidence of this meeting, which took place almost 30 years ago. “I think it is important that those who held positions of authority have a duty to be honest about what happened. It is the least we can do now for those victims who have suffered the most horrific abuse whilst at the club. I have given my honest account.” Smith has previously claimed that, after leaving Crewe in 1990, he went to see Bowler years later after being alarmed that Crewe were maintaining they had never received any warnings about Bennell, who was in jail at the time following his first convictions for abusing children. Smith said Bowler denied then that their conversation ever took place. “I knew immediately this was a cover up and I said [to Bowler], ‘You’re a lying b------“ Smith told the Channel 4 documentary Football’s Wall of Silence that aired last month. Crewe said in their statement last week that they were “concerned to note” why Smith did not report “his knowledge of Mr Bennell’s offending in 1988” to the police until 2016 or the Football Association until 2001. Smith responded by saying: “To be absolutely clear, I had received no complaint from a victim or from a parent of any of the victims. Had I had any evidence that these despicable acts were being committed against boys at the club, I would have provided the police with the evidence at the time.” Smith insisted Crewe “could have done more to protect” the boys who were raped, molested and psychologically scarred by Bennell, who was described as “the devil incarnate” in court, and said he did not “discount myself in that.” “If we are not prepared to be honest about the past, how can we expect people to believe that cultures and attitudes have changed or that the future is one that puts safeguarding first?” Smith said.
Former Crewe director whose Barry Bennell warnings were ignored calls on club to be 'honest about the past'
The former managing director of Crewe Alexandra who claims his warnings about Barry Bennell 30 years ago were ignored by the board has called on the club to “honest about the past” after expressing shock and deep disappointment at attempts to discredit him. Hamilton Smith has stood by his accusations of a cover-up at Crewe after the League Two club released a statement last Friday in which they claimed nobody at the club had any recollection of their former managing director airing his concerns about Bennell’s behaviour. Smith responded to the statement on Wednesday by questioning how people could believe “that cultures and attitudes have changed” at Crewe “or that the future is one that puts safeguarding first” if the club was “not prepared to be honest about the past”. In the statement, Crewe reneged on a promise to conduct an internal inquiry into the failures that allowed their former coach’s crimes to go unreported after claiming they was no need to “duplicate the thorough enquiries” of Cheshire Police, whom they said had found no evidence that anyone at Crewe knew about Bennell’s offending. “I was deeply disappointed when I read the statement by Crewe Alex last week,” Smith added. Crewe have been heavily criticised for their handling of the situation Credit: Getty Images Smith said he had never received a complaint about Bennell, who sentenced to 30 years in prison last month after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse through the 1980s, from a victim or from a parent of a victim. But he insisted that, during his time as manager director between May 1987 and February 1990, he was “made aware of concerns about Barry Bennell’s relationship with the boys at the club” and raised them at a meeting he called at the house of then chairman, Norman Rowlinson. “Several directors were present including the then vice chairman John Bowler [now Crewe’s chairman],” said Smith. “I stand by the account that I have given publicly and to the police,” Smith told the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire programme. “I am shocked to hear that other individuals have denied any recollection of these events and it is a shame that police have been unable to find any other evidence of this meeting, which took place almost 30 years ago. “I think it is important that those who held positions of authority have a duty to be honest about what happened. It is the least we can do now for those victims who have suffered the most horrific abuse whilst at the club. I have given my honest account.” Smith has previously claimed that, after leaving Crewe in 1990, he went to see Bowler years later after being alarmed that Crewe were maintaining they had never received any warnings about Bennell, who was in jail at the time following his first convictions for abusing children. Smith said Bowler denied then that their conversation ever took place. “I knew immediately this was a cover up and I said [to Bowler], ‘You’re a lying b------“ Smith told the Channel 4 documentary Football’s Wall of Silence that aired last month. Crewe said in their statement last week that they were “concerned to note” why Smith did not report “his knowledge of Mr Bennell’s offending in 1988” to the police until 2016 or the Football Association until 2001. Smith responded by saying: “To be absolutely clear, I had received no complaint from a victim or from a parent of any of the victims. Had I had any evidence that these despicable acts were being committed against boys at the club, I would have provided the police with the evidence at the time.” Smith insisted Crewe “could have done more to protect” the boys who were raped, molested and psychologically scarred by Bennell, who was described as “the devil incarnate” in court, and said he did not “discount myself in that.” “If we are not prepared to be honest about the past, how can we expect people to believe that cultures and attitudes have changed or that the future is one that puts safeguarding first?” Smith said.
Victims of Barry Bennell have accused Crewe Alexandra of “burying their heads in the sand” after the club reneged on their promise to conduct an independent inquiry into child sexual abuse by its jailed youth football coach. The League Two club issued a 925-word statement on Friday afternoon in which they said they would no longer be launching a planned internal review after claiming there was no need to “duplicate the thorough inquiries” of Cheshire Police, whom they said had found no evidence that anyone at Crewe knew about Bennell’s offending. Crewe also appeared to question the veracity of claims by the club’s former managing director, Hamilton Smith, that he had reported a complaint of abuse by Bennell in the late 1980s by saying nobody at the club, including current chairman John Bowler and director of football Dario Gradi, had any recollections of Smith ever raising the matter. In a further move to discredit Smith, the club also questioned why he waited until 2016 to report his concerns to the police, and 2001 to the Football Association, by which time Bennell had already been convicted of offences. The former Crewe and Manchester City coach was described as a “child molester on an industrial scale” and “the devil incarnate” when sentenced last month to 30 years in prison after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse throughout the 1980s. Another 86 people have since come forward to make complaints of abuse against him. It was alleged this week that Bennell was fired by Crewe in January 1992 shortly after he was confronted by parents about his behaviour, rumours of which were claimed to be widespread at the time. Andy Woodward, one of Bennell's victims, said Crewe were buying their heads in the sand Credit: Peter Byrne/PA Wire But Crewe said the police investigation “concluded that there was no suggestion that Bennell was dismissed by the club for anything other than football-related reasons” and added that an “extremely thorough” investigation by Cheshire Police had persuaded them to pull the plug on the independent review they promised in November 2016. By contrast, Manchester City are more than a year into their own internal review. One of Bennell’s victims, Andy Woodward, whose interview with The Guardian at that time gave others the strength to come forward and triggered a wave of allegations that culminated in the coach’s trial at Liverpool Crown Court, reacted furiously to Crewe’s statement and accused the club of hiding behind the police. The statement also made no comments on allegations by the BBC this week that a Crewe employee was asked to remove pornography from the home computer of then manager Gradi in 2001. Gradi has always denied any wrongdoing. “This statement speaks for itself,” Woodward said. “Once again the victims come last, after the reputation of the club. What has happened has ruined mine, my family and many, many others that played for the club as vulnerable children. I’m bitterly disappointed with their response, but I’d rather focus my energy on driving change, so no club can let this happen again, than dwell on the past. “Crewe had a moral responsibility to investigate their own failings. Instead they seem to want to bury their heads in the sand and, if nothing else, at least people can now see the way the club operate. “As far as I know, they have not asked to speak to any of the former players from this harrowing court case to learn about how this scandal happened and what could have been done to prevent it. A police investigation, looking for possible crimes, is entirely different to an independent inquiry being set up to investigate what went wrong and make sure it never happens again. For the many victims, this is just another kick in the teeth but, as shocking as it is, nothing should really surprise us about Crewe any more.” Woodward’s sentiments were echoed in a statement by The Offside Trust, the charity set up by some of Bennell’s victims to support survivors of child sexual abuse in sport. “We believe that these clubs have a moral responsibility to open their doors to a truly independent investigation,” the trust said. “If clubs having nothing to hide, they should not shirk from this duty. “The healing process for survivors will not be easy. But it is made more difficult when individuals and institutions refuse to properly address the past and fail to demonstrate any empathy and remorse. We sincerely hope that clubs will acknowledge this and agree to appropriate independent scrutiny.”
Crewe 'burying heads in sand' after reneging on promise to conduct independent inquiry into Barry Bennell's crimes
Victims of Barry Bennell have accused Crewe Alexandra of “burying their heads in the sand” after the club reneged on their promise to conduct an independent inquiry into child sexual abuse by its jailed youth football coach. The League Two club issued a 925-word statement on Friday afternoon in which they said they would no longer be launching a planned internal review after claiming there was no need to “duplicate the thorough inquiries” of Cheshire Police, whom they said had found no evidence that anyone at Crewe knew about Bennell’s offending. Crewe also appeared to question the veracity of claims by the club’s former managing director, Hamilton Smith, that he had reported a complaint of abuse by Bennell in the late 1980s by saying nobody at the club, including current chairman John Bowler and director of football Dario Gradi, had any recollections of Smith ever raising the matter. In a further move to discredit Smith, the club also questioned why he waited until 2016 to report his concerns to the police, and 2001 to the Football Association, by which time Bennell had already been convicted of offences. The former Crewe and Manchester City coach was described as a “child molester on an industrial scale” and “the devil incarnate” when sentenced last month to 30 years in prison after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse throughout the 1980s. Another 86 people have since come forward to make complaints of abuse against him. It was alleged this week that Bennell was fired by Crewe in January 1992 shortly after he was confronted by parents about his behaviour, rumours of which were claimed to be widespread at the time. Andy Woodward, one of Bennell's victims, said Crewe were buying their heads in the sand Credit: Peter Byrne/PA Wire But Crewe said the police investigation “concluded that there was no suggestion that Bennell was dismissed by the club for anything other than football-related reasons” and added that an “extremely thorough” investigation by Cheshire Police had persuaded them to pull the plug on the independent review they promised in November 2016. By contrast, Manchester City are more than a year into their own internal review. One of Bennell’s victims, Andy Woodward, whose interview with The Guardian at that time gave others the strength to come forward and triggered a wave of allegations that culminated in the coach’s trial at Liverpool Crown Court, reacted furiously to Crewe’s statement and accused the club of hiding behind the police. The statement also made no comments on allegations by the BBC this week that a Crewe employee was asked to remove pornography from the home computer of then manager Gradi in 2001. Gradi has always denied any wrongdoing. “This statement speaks for itself,” Woodward said. “Once again the victims come last, after the reputation of the club. What has happened has ruined mine, my family and many, many others that played for the club as vulnerable children. I’m bitterly disappointed with their response, but I’d rather focus my energy on driving change, so no club can let this happen again, than dwell on the past. “Crewe had a moral responsibility to investigate their own failings. Instead they seem to want to bury their heads in the sand and, if nothing else, at least people can now see the way the club operate. “As far as I know, they have not asked to speak to any of the former players from this harrowing court case to learn about how this scandal happened and what could have been done to prevent it. A police investigation, looking for possible crimes, is entirely different to an independent inquiry being set up to investigate what went wrong and make sure it never happens again. For the many victims, this is just another kick in the teeth but, as shocking as it is, nothing should really surprise us about Crewe any more.” Woodward’s sentiments were echoed in a statement by The Offside Trust, the charity set up by some of Bennell’s victims to support survivors of child sexual abuse in sport. “We believe that these clubs have a moral responsibility to open their doors to a truly independent investigation,” the trust said. “If clubs having nothing to hide, they should not shirk from this duty. “The healing process for survivors will not be easy. But it is made more difficult when individuals and institutions refuse to properly address the past and fail to demonstrate any empathy and remorse. We sincerely hope that clubs will acknowledge this and agree to appropriate independent scrutiny.”
Crewe Alexandra said it would not ‘duplicate the thorough inquiries’ carried out by the police.
Crewe reject calls for inquiry into Barry Bennell sexual abuse
Crewe Alexandra said it would not ‘duplicate the thorough inquiries’ carried out by the police.
Crewe Alexandra said it would not ‘duplicate the thorough inquiries’ carried out by the police.
Crewe reject calls for inquiry into Barry Bennell sexual abuse
Crewe Alexandra said it would not ‘duplicate the thorough inquiries’ carried out by the police.
After former youth coach Barry Bennell was sentenced to 31 years for child sexual abuse crimes, Crewe Alexandra denied a cover-up.
Crewe deny Barry Bennell cover-up but will not hold investigation
After former youth coach Barry Bennell was sentenced to 31 years for child sexual abuse crimes, Crewe Alexandra denied a cover-up.
Crewe Alexandra director of football Dario Gradi had to 'delete pornography on home computer'
Crewe Alexandra director of football Dario Gradi had to 'delete pornography on home computer'
Crewe Alexandra director of football Dario Gradi had to 'delete pornography on home computer'
Dario Gradi, the Crewe Alexandra director of football who is currently suspended by the Football Association, had to have pornography wiped off his home computer in 2001, it has been alleged. A former Crewe employee has claimed he was asked by a senior official at the club to help remove the material from the computer. According to a statement given to the NSPCC in 2011, the man was told that Gradi, at the time Crewe’s manager, had been hosting a group of young Irish Under-13 players at his house and they had been viewing the pornography on his computer. The revelations were made by the BBC on Tuesday with the man – who asked not to be named – claiming he was “amazed” that Gradi was allowed to host boys “in this manner” given the history of Crewe’s former youth coach, Barry Bennell. Bennell had been convicted of child sex crimes in 1994 and 1998. The serial paedophile was sentenced to 30 years this month after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse. Barry Bennell was sentenced to 30 years this month after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse Credit: BBC The man, now aged 47, told the NSPCC it “all seemed odd” and spoke to Cheshire police as well as raising his concerns with the Crewe chairman, John Bowler, who reputedly dismissed the behaviour as “quirky and nothing more”. In November 2016, after fresh allegations were made against Bennell, the former employee contacted the NSPCC and police for a second time. In a statement, Cheshire Police said: “In December 2012 Cheshire Police received reports regarding concerns about material on a computer. Following enquiries, it was established that no criminal activity had taken place. The person who made the report was updated at the time.” The BBC said on Tuesday that Crewe had declined to comment when asked what steps to safeguard young players had been taken after Bennell’s two convictions in the 1990s. The Telegraph has also contacted Crewe for comment. Gradi was suspended by the FA in late 2016. He and Crewe have always maintained they did not know about any abuse by Bennell and did not receive a complaint of sexual abuse by him. It was also alleged on Tuesday by one of Bennell’s former players and his mother – both of whom asked not to be named by the BBC - that Bennell was sacked by Crewe in January 1992 shortly after parents reputedly confronted him about his behaviour. Crewe have previously said Bennell left for football related reasons. The club declined to comment on that allegation on Tuesday.
Crewe Alexandra director of football Dario Gradi had to 'delete pornography on home computer'
Dario Gradi, the Crewe Alexandra director of football who is currently suspended by the Football Association, had to have pornography wiped off his home computer in 2001, it has been alleged. A former Crewe employee has claimed he was asked by a senior official at the club to help remove the material from the computer. According to a statement given to the NSPCC in 2011, the man was told that Gradi, at the time Crewe’s manager, had been hosting a group of young Irish Under-13 players at his house and they had been viewing the pornography on his computer. The revelations were made by the BBC on Tuesday with the man – who asked not to be named – claiming he was “amazed” that Gradi was allowed to host boys “in this manner” given the history of Crewe’s former youth coach, Barry Bennell. Bennell had been convicted of child sex crimes in 1994 and 1998. The serial paedophile was sentenced to 30 years this month after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse. Barry Bennell was sentenced to 30 years this month after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse Credit: BBC The man, now aged 47, told the NSPCC it “all seemed odd” and spoke to Cheshire police as well as raising his concerns with the Crewe chairman, John Bowler, who reputedly dismissed the behaviour as “quirky and nothing more”. In November 2016, after fresh allegations were made against Bennell, the former employee contacted the NSPCC and police for a second time. In a statement, Cheshire Police said: “In December 2012 Cheshire Police received reports regarding concerns about material on a computer. Following enquiries, it was established that no criminal activity had taken place. The person who made the report was updated at the time.” The BBC said on Tuesday that Crewe had declined to comment when asked what steps to safeguard young players had been taken after Bennell’s two convictions in the 1990s. The Telegraph has also contacted Crewe for comment. Gradi was suspended by the FA in late 2016. He and Crewe have always maintained they did not know about any abuse by Bennell and did not receive a complaint of sexual abuse by him. It was also alleged on Tuesday by one of Bennell’s former players and his mother – both of whom asked not to be named by the BBC - that Bennell was sacked by Crewe in January 1992 shortly after parents reputedly confronted him about his behaviour. Crewe have previously said Bennell left for football related reasons. The club declined to comment on that allegation on Tuesday.
Crewe Alexandra director of football Dario Gradi had to 'delete pornography on home computer'
Crewe Alexandra director of football Dario Gradi had to 'delete pornography on home computer'
Crewe Alexandra director of football Dario Gradi had to 'delete pornography on home computer'
Dario Gradi, the Crewe Alexandra director of football who is currently suspended by the Football Association, had to have pornography wiped off his home computer in 2001, it has been alleged. A former Crewe employee has claimed he was asked by a senior official at the club to help remove the material from the computer. According to a statement given to the NSPCC in 2011, the man was told that Gradi, at the time Crewe’s manager, had been hosting a group of young Irish Under-13 players at his house and they had been viewing the pornography on his computer. The revelations were made by the BBC on Tuesday with the man – who asked not to be named – claiming he was “amazed” that Gradi was allowed to host boys “in this manner” given the history of Crewe’s former youth coach, Barry Bennell. Bennell had been convicted of child sex crimes in 1994 and 1998. The serial paedophile was sentenced to 30 years this month after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse. Barry Bennell was sentenced to 30 years this month after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse Credit: BBC The man, now aged 47, told the NSPCC it “all seemed odd” and spoke to Cheshire police as well as raising his concerns with the Crewe chairman, John Bowler, who reputedly dismissed the behaviour as “quirky and nothing more”. In November 2016, after fresh allegations were made against Bennell, the former employee contacted the NSPCC and police for a second time. In a statement, Cheshire Police said: “In December 2012 Cheshire Police received reports regarding concerns about material on a computer. Following enquiries, it was established that no criminal activity had taken place. The person who made the report was updated at the time.” The BBC said on Tuesday that Crewe had declined to comment when asked what steps to safeguard young players had been taken after Bennell’s two convictions in the 1990s. The Telegraph has also contacted Crewe for comment. Gradi was suspended by the FA in late 2016. He and Crewe have always maintained they did not know about any abuse by Bennell and did not receive a complaint of sexual abuse by him. It was also alleged on Tuesday by one of Bennell’s former players and his mother – both of whom asked not to be named by the BBC - that Bennell was sacked by Crewe in January 1992 shortly after parents reputedly confronted him about his behaviour. Crewe have previously said Bennell left for football related reasons. The club declined to comment on that allegation on Tuesday.
Crewe Alexandra director of football Dario Gradi had to 'delete pornography on home computer'
Dario Gradi, the Crewe Alexandra director of football who is currently suspended by the Football Association, had to have pornography wiped off his home computer in 2001, it has been alleged. A former Crewe employee has claimed he was asked by a senior official at the club to help remove the material from the computer. According to a statement given to the NSPCC in 2011, the man was told that Gradi, at the time Crewe’s manager, had been hosting a group of young Irish Under-13 players at his house and they had been viewing the pornography on his computer. The revelations were made by the BBC on Tuesday with the man – who asked not to be named – claiming he was “amazed” that Gradi was allowed to host boys “in this manner” given the history of Crewe’s former youth coach, Barry Bennell. Bennell had been convicted of child sex crimes in 1994 and 1998. The serial paedophile was sentenced to 30 years this month after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse. Barry Bennell was sentenced to 30 years this month after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse Credit: BBC The man, now aged 47, told the NSPCC it “all seemed odd” and spoke to Cheshire police as well as raising his concerns with the Crewe chairman, John Bowler, who reputedly dismissed the behaviour as “quirky and nothing more”. In November 2016, after fresh allegations were made against Bennell, the former employee contacted the NSPCC and police for a second time. In a statement, Cheshire Police said: “In December 2012 Cheshire Police received reports regarding concerns about material on a computer. Following enquiries, it was established that no criminal activity had taken place. The person who made the report was updated at the time.” The BBC said on Tuesday that Crewe had declined to comment when asked what steps to safeguard young players had been taken after Bennell’s two convictions in the 1990s. The Telegraph has also contacted Crewe for comment. Gradi was suspended by the FA in late 2016. He and Crewe have always maintained they did not know about any abuse by Bennell and did not receive a complaint of sexual abuse by him. It was also alleged on Tuesday by one of Bennell’s former players and his mother – both of whom asked not to be named by the BBC - that Bennell was sacked by Crewe in January 1992 shortly after parents reputedly confronted him about his behaviour. Crewe have previously said Bennell left for football related reasons. The club declined to comment on that allegation on Tuesday.
Dario Gradi is facing further scrutiny over his time in charge of Crewe Alexandra after computer pornography allegations were made against him. The former boss and current director of football of the League Two side, who were embroiled in the Barry Bennell child sex abuse case, is at the centre of more accusations over wrongdoing from a former Crewe employee. ​BBC Sport understands that the unnamed individual was asked to wipe pornography off Gradi's computer back in 2001 after Gradi hosted a...
Ex-Crewe Boss Gradi Embroiled in Online Pornography Storm as Fallout From Bennell Case Continues
Dario Gradi is facing further scrutiny over his time in charge of Crewe Alexandra after computer pornography allegations were made against him. The former boss and current director of football of the League Two side, who were embroiled in the Barry Bennell child sex abuse case, is at the centre of more accusations over wrongdoing from a former Crewe employee. ​BBC Sport understands that the unnamed individual was asked to wipe pornography off Gradi's computer back in 2001 after Gradi hosted a...
Dario Gradi is facing further scrutiny over his time in charge of Crewe Alexandra after computer pornography allegations were made against him. The former boss and current director of football of the League Two side, who were embroiled in the Barry Bennell child sex abuse case, is at the centre of more accusations over wrongdoing from a former Crewe employee. ​BBC Sport understands that the unnamed individual was asked to wipe pornography off Gradi's computer back in 2001 after Gradi hosted a...
Ex-Crewe Boss Gradi Embroiled in Online Pornography Storm as Fallout From Bennell Case Continues
Dario Gradi is facing further scrutiny over his time in charge of Crewe Alexandra after computer pornography allegations were made against him. The former boss and current director of football of the League Two side, who were embroiled in the Barry Bennell child sex abuse case, is at the centre of more accusations over wrongdoing from a former Crewe employee. ​BBC Sport understands that the unnamed individual was asked to wipe pornography off Gradi's computer back in 2001 after Gradi hosted a...
Barry Bennell, the convicted serial paedophile, was allegedly sacked as Crewe Alexandra’s youth coach shortly after parents reputedly confronted him about his behaviour. One of Bennell’s former players and his mother have claimed Bennell was challenged by a group of parents a short time before the then coach abruptly left Crewe in January 1992. It is alleged the parents threatened to report Bennell to the police and that he was later sacked by Crewe, according to the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire programme. Bennell was replaced days later by Steve Holland, now Gareth Southgate’s assistant with England. Crewe declined to comment on whether Bennell was sacked when approached by the BBC. The club has previously said Bennell – who was sentenced to 30 years this month after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse - left in January 1992 for football related reasons. The former Crewe youth player, who is now in his late 30s, said: “There was a group of parents who confronted Barry because there were rumours. One of the dads in the group had said that his son had gone to him and he’d been touching his son.” Bennell was sentenced to 30 years in prison earlier this month Credit: PA Both the player and his mother claimed the parents had threatened to report Bennell to the police but were unaware if any concerns were raised with the club or then manager Dario Gradi. In May 1992, four months after Bennell left Crewe, Gradi wrote to the player asking him to continue at the club’s centre of excellence and asked that he did not attend any other coaching sessions or games organised by Bennell. The former player said he had not been abused by Bennell but did not want to be named in order to protect his family’s privacy. According to the BBC, the letter from Gradi said: “I do not want any of the boys who attended the centre to go to other coaching sessions or games organised by our former youth coach Barry Bennell. If this is going to cause you a problem then I will be pleased to talk to you about it personally.” After leaving Crewe, Bennell is believed to have flown to Atlanta in the US where he ran a video rental store before returning to the UK. Crewe issued a statement this month insisting the club was not aware of any sexual abuse by Bennell and did not receive a complaint about sexual abuse by him. The latest accusations surrounding Bennell came as it emerged a number of Crewe fans applauded John Bowler, the club’s chairman since 1987, at a fans’ forum on Monday night when asked to comment on former director Hamilton Smith’s claims the club ignored his warnings about Bennell. Bennell's victims outside court last week following the verdict Credit: AFP Crewe said the fans’ forum was intended for supporters and was a ticket only event that had been sold out. People with a ticket for the event were granted access. When asked by one supporter about the Bennell case, Bowler said: “In view of ongoing legal action it would be inappropriate to talk about that further or for us to make further comment upon it. When we have more comments to make you can be sure the club will issue a statement. And therefore tonight we're talking football.” Bowler’s comments were followed by applause from people in the room. When pressed on Smith’s allegations by the BBC’s Graham McGarry, who has commented on Crewe for 25 years, Bowler added: “No, none at all.” That comment was also followed by applause from the room.
Barry Bennell was allegedly sacked by Crewe after parents confronted him about his behaviour
Barry Bennell, the convicted serial paedophile, was allegedly sacked as Crewe Alexandra’s youth coach shortly after parents reputedly confronted him about his behaviour. One of Bennell’s former players and his mother have claimed Bennell was challenged by a group of parents a short time before the then coach abruptly left Crewe in January 1992. It is alleged the parents threatened to report Bennell to the police and that he was later sacked by Crewe, according to the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire programme. Bennell was replaced days later by Steve Holland, now Gareth Southgate’s assistant with England. Crewe declined to comment on whether Bennell was sacked when approached by the BBC. The club has previously said Bennell – who was sentenced to 30 years this month after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse - left in January 1992 for football related reasons. The former Crewe youth player, who is now in his late 30s, said: “There was a group of parents who confronted Barry because there were rumours. One of the dads in the group had said that his son had gone to him and he’d been touching his son.” Bennell was sentenced to 30 years in prison earlier this month Credit: PA Both the player and his mother claimed the parents had threatened to report Bennell to the police but were unaware if any concerns were raised with the club or then manager Dario Gradi. In May 1992, four months after Bennell left Crewe, Gradi wrote to the player asking him to continue at the club’s centre of excellence and asked that he did not attend any other coaching sessions or games organised by Bennell. The former player said he had not been abused by Bennell but did not want to be named in order to protect his family’s privacy. According to the BBC, the letter from Gradi said: “I do not want any of the boys who attended the centre to go to other coaching sessions or games organised by our former youth coach Barry Bennell. If this is going to cause you a problem then I will be pleased to talk to you about it personally.” After leaving Crewe, Bennell is believed to have flown to Atlanta in the US where he ran a video rental store before returning to the UK. Crewe issued a statement this month insisting the club was not aware of any sexual abuse by Bennell and did not receive a complaint about sexual abuse by him. The latest accusations surrounding Bennell came as it emerged a number of Crewe fans applauded John Bowler, the club’s chairman since 1987, at a fans’ forum on Monday night when asked to comment on former director Hamilton Smith’s claims the club ignored his warnings about Bennell. Bennell's victims outside court last week following the verdict Credit: AFP Crewe said the fans’ forum was intended for supporters and was a ticket only event that had been sold out. People with a ticket for the event were granted access. When asked by one supporter about the Bennell case, Bowler said: “In view of ongoing legal action it would be inappropriate to talk about that further or for us to make further comment upon it. When we have more comments to make you can be sure the club will issue a statement. And therefore tonight we're talking football.” Bowler’s comments were followed by applause from people in the room. When pressed on Smith’s allegations by the BBC’s Graham McGarry, who has commented on Crewe for 25 years, Bowler added: “No, none at all.” That comment was also followed by applause from the room.
Barry Bennell, the convicted serial paedophile, was allegedly sacked as Crewe Alexandra’s youth coach shortly after parents reputedly confronted him about his behaviour. One of Bennell’s former players and his mother have claimed Bennell was challenged by a group of parents a short time before the then coach abruptly left Crewe in January 1992. It is alleged the parents threatened to report Bennell to the police and that he was later sacked by Crewe, according to the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire programme. Bennell was replaced days later by Steve Holland, now Gareth Southgate’s assistant with England. Crewe declined to comment on whether Bennell was sacked when approached by the BBC. The club has previously said Bennell – who was sentenced to 30 years this month after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse - left in January 1992 for football related reasons. The former Crewe youth player, who is now in his late 30s, said: “There was a group of parents who confronted Barry because there were rumours. One of the dads in the group had said that his son had gone to him and he’d been touching his son.” Bennell was sentenced to 30 years in prison earlier this month Credit: PA Both the player and his mother claimed the parents had threatened to report Bennell to the police but were unaware if any concerns were raised with the club or then manager Dario Gradi. In May 1992, four months after Bennell left Crewe, Gradi wrote to the player asking him to continue at the club’s centre of excellence and asked that he did not attend any other coaching sessions or games organised by Bennell. The former player said he had not been abused by Bennell but did not want to be named in order to protect his family’s privacy. According to the BBC, the letter from Gradi said: “I do not want any of the boys who attended the centre to go to other coaching sessions or games organised by our former youth coach Barry Bennell. If this is going to cause you a problem then I will be pleased to talk to you about it personally.” After leaving Crewe, Bennell is believed to have flown to Atlanta in the US where he ran a video rental store before returning to the UK. Crewe issued a statement this month insisting the club was not aware of any sexual abuse by Bennell and did not receive a complaint about sexual abuse by him. The latest accusations surrounding Bennell came as it emerged a number of Crewe fans applauded John Bowler, the club’s chairman since 1987, at a fans’ forum on Monday night when asked to comment on former director Hamilton Smith’s claims the club ignored his warnings about Bennell. Bennell's victims outside court last week following the verdict Credit: AFP Crewe said the fans’ forum was intended for supporters and was a ticket only event that had been sold out. People with a ticket for the event were granted access. When asked by one supporter about the Bennell case, Bowler said: “In view of ongoing legal action it would be inappropriate to talk about that further or for us to make further comment upon it. When we have more comments to make you can be sure the club will issue a statement. And therefore tonight we're talking football.” Bowler’s comments were followed by applause from people in the room. When pressed on Smith’s allegations by the BBC’s Graham McGarry, who has commented on Crewe for 25 years, Bowler added: “No, none at all.” That comment was also followed by applause from the room.
Barry Bennell was allegedly sacked by Crewe after parents confronted him about his behaviour
Barry Bennell, the convicted serial paedophile, was allegedly sacked as Crewe Alexandra’s youth coach shortly after parents reputedly confronted him about his behaviour. One of Bennell’s former players and his mother have claimed Bennell was challenged by a group of parents a short time before the then coach abruptly left Crewe in January 1992. It is alleged the parents threatened to report Bennell to the police and that he was later sacked by Crewe, according to the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire programme. Bennell was replaced days later by Steve Holland, now Gareth Southgate’s assistant with England. Crewe declined to comment on whether Bennell was sacked when approached by the BBC. The club has previously said Bennell – who was sentenced to 30 years this month after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse - left in January 1992 for football related reasons. The former Crewe youth player, who is now in his late 30s, said: “There was a group of parents who confronted Barry because there were rumours. One of the dads in the group had said that his son had gone to him and he’d been touching his son.” Bennell was sentenced to 30 years in prison earlier this month Credit: PA Both the player and his mother claimed the parents had threatened to report Bennell to the police but were unaware if any concerns were raised with the club or then manager Dario Gradi. In May 1992, four months after Bennell left Crewe, Gradi wrote to the player asking him to continue at the club’s centre of excellence and asked that he did not attend any other coaching sessions or games organised by Bennell. The former player said he had not been abused by Bennell but did not want to be named in order to protect his family’s privacy. According to the BBC, the letter from Gradi said: “I do not want any of the boys who attended the centre to go to other coaching sessions or games organised by our former youth coach Barry Bennell. If this is going to cause you a problem then I will be pleased to talk to you about it personally.” After leaving Crewe, Bennell is believed to have flown to Atlanta in the US where he ran a video rental store before returning to the UK. Crewe issued a statement this month insisting the club was not aware of any sexual abuse by Bennell and did not receive a complaint about sexual abuse by him. The latest accusations surrounding Bennell came as it emerged a number of Crewe fans applauded John Bowler, the club’s chairman since 1987, at a fans’ forum on Monday night when asked to comment on former director Hamilton Smith’s claims the club ignored his warnings about Bennell. Bennell's victims outside court last week following the verdict Credit: AFP Crewe said the fans’ forum was intended for supporters and was a ticket only event that had been sold out. People with a ticket for the event were granted access. When asked by one supporter about the Bennell case, Bowler said: “In view of ongoing legal action it would be inappropriate to talk about that further or for us to make further comment upon it. When we have more comments to make you can be sure the club will issue a statement. And therefore tonight we're talking football.” Bowler’s comments were followed by applause from people in the room. When pressed on Smith’s allegations by the BBC’s Graham McGarry, who has commented on Crewe for 25 years, Bowler added: “No, none at all.” That comment was also followed by applause from the room.
Barry Bennell, the convicted serial paedophile, was allegedly sacked as Crewe Alexandra’s youth coach shortly after parents reputedly confronted him about his behaviour. One of Bennell’s former players and his mother have claimed Bennell was challenged by a group of parents a short time before the then coach abruptly left Crewe in January 1992. It is alleged the parents threatened to report Bennell to the police and that he was later sacked by Crewe, according to the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire programme. Bennell was replaced days later by Steve Holland, now Gareth Southgate’s assistant with England. Crewe declined to comment on whether Bennell was sacked when approached by the BBC. The club has previously said Bennell – who was sentenced to 30 years this month after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse - left in January 1992 for football related reasons. The former Crewe youth player, who is now in his late 30s, said: “There was a group of parents who confronted Barry because there were rumours. One of the dads in the group had said that his son had gone to him and he’d been touching his son.” Bennell was sentenced to 30 years in prison earlier this month Credit: PA Both the player and his mother claimed the parents had threatened to report Bennell to the police but were unaware if any concerns were raised with the club or then manager Dario Gradi. In May 1992, four months after Bennell left Crewe, Gradi wrote to the player asking him to continue at the club’s centre of excellence and asked that he did not attend any other coaching sessions or games organised by Bennell. The former player said he had not been abused by Bennell but did not want to be named in order to protect his family’s privacy. According to the BBC, the letter from Gradi said: “I do not want any of the boys who attended the centre to go to other coaching sessions or games organised by our former youth coach Barry Bennell. If this is going to cause you a problem then I will be pleased to talk to you about it personally.” After leaving Crewe, Bennell is believed to have flown to Atlanta in the US where he ran a video rental store before returning to the UK. Crewe issued a statement this month insisting the club was not aware of any sexual abuse by Bennell and did not receive a complaint about sexual abuse by him. The latest accusations surrounding Bennell came as it emerged a number of Crewe fans applauded John Bowler, the club’s chairman since 1987, at a fans’ forum on Monday night when asked to comment on former director Hamilton Smith’s claims the club ignored his warnings about Bennell. Bennell's victims outside court last week following the verdict Credit: AFP Crewe said the fans’ forum was intended for supporters and was a ticket only event that had been sold out. People with a ticket for the event were granted access. When asked by one supporter about the Bennell case, Bowler said: “In view of ongoing legal action it would be inappropriate to talk about that further or for us to make further comment upon it. When we have more comments to make you can be sure the club will issue a statement. And therefore tonight we're talking football.” Bowler’s comments were followed by applause from people in the room. When pressed on Smith’s allegations by the BBC’s Graham McGarry, who has commented on Crewe for 25 years, Bowler added: “No, none at all.” That comment was also followed by applause from the room.
Barry Bennell was allegedly sacked by Crewe after parents confronted him about his behaviour
Barry Bennell, the convicted serial paedophile, was allegedly sacked as Crewe Alexandra’s youth coach shortly after parents reputedly confronted him about his behaviour. One of Bennell’s former players and his mother have claimed Bennell was challenged by a group of parents a short time before the then coach abruptly left Crewe in January 1992. It is alleged the parents threatened to report Bennell to the police and that he was later sacked by Crewe, according to the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire programme. Bennell was replaced days later by Steve Holland, now Gareth Southgate’s assistant with England. Crewe declined to comment on whether Bennell was sacked when approached by the BBC. The club has previously said Bennell – who was sentenced to 30 years this month after being found guilty of 43 charges of child sexual abuse - left in January 1992 for football related reasons. The former Crewe youth player, who is now in his late 30s, said: “There was a group of parents who confronted Barry because there were rumours. One of the dads in the group had said that his son had gone to him and he’d been touching his son.” Bennell was sentenced to 30 years in prison earlier this month Credit: PA Both the player and his mother claimed the parents had threatened to report Bennell to the police but were unaware if any concerns were raised with the club or then manager Dario Gradi. In May 1992, four months after Bennell left Crewe, Gradi wrote to the player asking him to continue at the club’s centre of excellence and asked that he did not attend any other coaching sessions or games organised by Bennell. The former player said he had not been abused by Bennell but did not want to be named in order to protect his family’s privacy. According to the BBC, the letter from Gradi said: “I do not want any of the boys who attended the centre to go to other coaching sessions or games organised by our former youth coach Barry Bennell. If this is going to cause you a problem then I will be pleased to talk to you about it personally.” After leaving Crewe, Bennell is believed to have flown to Atlanta in the US where he ran a video rental store before returning to the UK. Crewe issued a statement this month insisting the club was not aware of any sexual abuse by Bennell and did not receive a complaint about sexual abuse by him. The latest accusations surrounding Bennell came as it emerged a number of Crewe fans applauded John Bowler, the club’s chairman since 1987, at a fans’ forum on Monday night when asked to comment on former director Hamilton Smith’s claims the club ignored his warnings about Bennell. Bennell's victims outside court last week following the verdict Credit: AFP Crewe said the fans’ forum was intended for supporters and was a ticket only event that had been sold out. People with a ticket for the event were granted access. When asked by one supporter about the Bennell case, Bowler said: “In view of ongoing legal action it would be inappropriate to talk about that further or for us to make further comment upon it. When we have more comments to make you can be sure the club will issue a statement. And therefore tonight we're talking football.” Bowler’s comments were followed by applause from people in the room. When pressed on Smith’s allegations by the BBC’s Graham McGarry, who has commented on Crewe for 25 years, Bowler added: “No, none at all.” That comment was also followed by applause from the room.
One of the beauties of sport is that it populates its landscape with young people dreaming of making it into the big time. Among its darkest aspects is the violation of those dreams by predators who see aspiration as a vulnerability they can exploit. From the depravity of Barry Bennell right down to the spiv who tries to get rich on the back of a child’s talent, young people are in need of protection by families, institutions, vigilant individuals and of course the rule of law, which has caught up with Bennell – jailed at Liverpool Crown Court for 30 years for abusing 12 young footballers between 1979 and 1991. Those protective structures failed abysmally for a generation of children who were defenceless against Bennell’s brazen and routine sex crimes, which, as the court heard, occurred on an “industrial scale.” As we know from the Jimmy Savile case and others, this level of sexual criminality is not possible unless those with the power to stop it are blinded by the perpetrator or place their own self-interest first. In this case, parts of the Football Association, Manchester City and Crewe Alexandra – in that period – refused or failed to see Bennell’s interest in scouting and coaching was incidental to his main reason for working in football. His chief purpose was to gain access to children. He played a double game to satisfy his appetites, conning the clubs into thinking he was a talent-spotter par excellence and the children and their families into believing he held the key to a future in the game. The NSPCC’s statement after sentencing pointed out that Bennell “ruthlessly preyed on the hopes and aspirations of young footballers who believed he held the key to their dreams”. Procedures are much tighter in football now. Awareness has improved exponentially since the Seventies, Eighties and Nineties. Yet, as the many recent welfare-in-sport scandals have demonstrated, there is still a phase in which young people are vulnerable if they have not attained full adulthood or the power that comes with success. That stage of life, where children are most open to being exploited, is the one that requires the most careful policing, because sex offenders are drawn to professions in which they have access to, and can exploit the ambitions of, young people. Thus it falls not only to governing bodies but also coaches, parents – all of us, in fact – to recognise the danger signs and intervene, as opposed to merely muttering our concerns. From Bennell’s perspective, reptilian deceit was effective. One member of City’s staff called him “the star-maker”. Concerns raised by Len Davies at City and Hamilton Smith at Crewe gained no real traction. Now, a further 86 alleged victims have reportedly come forward, which accentuates one of the truly shocking features of this tragedy: the impunity with which Bennell abused children, and the breadth of his crimes, in homes, holiday camps, football clubs and even on the pitch at Maine Road. The FA have a responsibility to show negligence and complicity have consequences Only the victims who came forward to testify can know how long the “relief” will last. And relief was certainly the most conspicuous first response. No quest for justice – even one so obviously grounded in fact – guarantees the kind of outcome that exposed Bennell’s sadism and perversion. The first emotion, one assumes, is one of vindication. The lie has been broken. An expectation now, however, is that thoughts will turn quickly to those who excused Bennell’s paedophilia, looked the other way, or facilitated it in ways that require them to be held to account. Lord Carlile, one of the country’s leading legal figures, has said Bennell’s behaviour was “brushed under the carpet” by Crewe. These failures, where they existed, cannot be marked down as unfortunate accidents. The victims are entitled to justice from football as well as the legal system. The FA bear a responsibility in their forthcoming report to show that negligence and complicity have consequences, not least for the FA of that time. The societal nature of this crime was grimly apparent when a “Cambridge-educated” geophysicist from a “privileged” background, Matthew Falder, was jailed for 32 years at Birmingham Crown Court after admitting 137 offences including blackmail, voyeurism, encouraging child rape and sharing indecent images – on the same day Bennell began his latest prison sentence. Football is not uniquely blighted by child sex abuse, and its safeguards now are better. But in all cases it needs to think first of child protection, of child welfare, and punish those who have failed in that duty.
Why it is all our duty to prioritise child safety
One of the beauties of sport is that it populates its landscape with young people dreaming of making it into the big time. Among its darkest aspects is the violation of those dreams by predators who see aspiration as a vulnerability they can exploit. From the depravity of Barry Bennell right down to the spiv who tries to get rich on the back of a child’s talent, young people are in need of protection by families, institutions, vigilant individuals and of course the rule of law, which has caught up with Bennell – jailed at Liverpool Crown Court for 30 years for abusing 12 young footballers between 1979 and 1991. Those protective structures failed abysmally for a generation of children who were defenceless against Bennell’s brazen and routine sex crimes, which, as the court heard, occurred on an “industrial scale.” As we know from the Jimmy Savile case and others, this level of sexual criminality is not possible unless those with the power to stop it are blinded by the perpetrator or place their own self-interest first. In this case, parts of the Football Association, Manchester City and Crewe Alexandra – in that period – refused or failed to see Bennell’s interest in scouting and coaching was incidental to his main reason for working in football. His chief purpose was to gain access to children. He played a double game to satisfy his appetites, conning the clubs into thinking he was a talent-spotter par excellence and the children and their families into believing he held the key to a future in the game. The NSPCC’s statement after sentencing pointed out that Bennell “ruthlessly preyed on the hopes and aspirations of young footballers who believed he held the key to their dreams”. Procedures are much tighter in football now. Awareness has improved exponentially since the Seventies, Eighties and Nineties. Yet, as the many recent welfare-in-sport scandals have demonstrated, there is still a phase in which young people are vulnerable if they have not attained full adulthood or the power that comes with success. That stage of life, where children are most open to being exploited, is the one that requires the most careful policing, because sex offenders are drawn to professions in which they have access to, and can exploit the ambitions of, young people. Thus it falls not only to governing bodies but also coaches, parents – all of us, in fact – to recognise the danger signs and intervene, as opposed to merely muttering our concerns. From Bennell’s perspective, reptilian deceit was effective. One member of City’s staff called him “the star-maker”. Concerns raised by Len Davies at City and Hamilton Smith at Crewe gained no real traction. Now, a further 86 alleged victims have reportedly come forward, which accentuates one of the truly shocking features of this tragedy: the impunity with which Bennell abused children, and the breadth of his crimes, in homes, holiday camps, football clubs and even on the pitch at Maine Road. The FA have a responsibility to show negligence and complicity have consequences Only the victims who came forward to testify can know how long the “relief” will last. And relief was certainly the most conspicuous first response. No quest for justice – even one so obviously grounded in fact – guarantees the kind of outcome that exposed Bennell’s sadism and perversion. The first emotion, one assumes, is one of vindication. The lie has been broken. An expectation now, however, is that thoughts will turn quickly to those who excused Bennell’s paedophilia, looked the other way, or facilitated it in ways that require them to be held to account. Lord Carlile, one of the country’s leading legal figures, has said Bennell’s behaviour was “brushed under the carpet” by Crewe. These failures, where they existed, cannot be marked down as unfortunate accidents. The victims are entitled to justice from football as well as the legal system. The FA bear a responsibility in their forthcoming report to show that negligence and complicity have consequences, not least for the FA of that time. The societal nature of this crime was grimly apparent when a “Cambridge-educated” geophysicist from a “privileged” background, Matthew Falder, was jailed for 32 years at Birmingham Crown Court after admitting 137 offences including blackmail, voyeurism, encouraging child rape and sharing indecent images – on the same day Bennell began his latest prison sentence. Football is not uniquely blighted by child sex abuse, and its safeguards now are better. But in all cases it needs to think first of child protection, of child welfare, and punish those who have failed in that duty.
A judge at Liverpool Crown Court branded the ex-Manchester City and Crewe Alexandra youth coach "sheer evil" as he announced his punishment
Ex-football coach Bennell labelled 'devil incarnate' and sentenced to 31 years
A judge at Liverpool Crown Court branded the ex-Manchester City and Crewe Alexandra youth coach "sheer evil" as he announced his punishment
Manchester City and Crewe Alexandra are under mounting pressure to make public apologies to Barry Bennell’s victims amid further accusations they failed to stop him sexually abusing countless boys. One of the lawyers representing survivors of serial paedophile Bennell, who was convicted on Thursday of a total of 43 child sexual abuse offences, condemned the two clubs’ responses to this week’s guilty verdicts. City and Crewe, the professional teams with whom Bennell has been most closely linked, both issued statements following the conclusion of a trial that has brought further shame on the game. But, despite the emergence of fresh allegations they ignored warnings about a man described as football’s Jimmy Savile, neither club admitted any responsibility for his crimes as they braced themselves for a wave of compensation claims from his victims. Dino Nocivelli, one of the country's leading lawyers representing child abuse survivors - including a substantial number of ex-footballers - told The Daily Telegraph that City and Crewe’s responses were “just not good enough”. Andy Woodward, the man who blew the whistle on football's paedophile scandal, speaks to the press Credit: PA “I would have hoped for City and Crewe to have admitted some element of blame for their close connections to Bennell,” he said. “It’s not about them; it’s about survivors. They need to admit their failings.” Andy Woodward, the man who blew the whistle on football’s paedophile scandal 15 months ago, has also demanded apologies from the clubs involved. City declined to expand on the statement they issued on Thursday in which they expressed their “heartfelt sympathy” to Bennell’s victims, who they said were “entitled to expect full protection from the kind of harm they endured”. The club was expected to say more following the conclusion of a QC-led review it commissioned into allegations of child sexual abuse there. Manager Pep Guardiola did discuss the outcome of Bennell’s trial at a press conference on Friday to preview the club’s FA Cup tie at Wigan Athletic. Pep Guardiola discusses the outcome of Barry Bennell’s trial at a press conference Credit: GETTY IMAGES He said: “All the people in this room know it’s a terrible history, so my feelings and thoughts are for the victims. “Hopefully, everyone can learn from that, society can learn from that because I’m a father. So, when you see what has happened, it can happen with my sons and daughters. “The authorities and judges have to decide in a better way to try to make a good example for the future so it doesn't happen again.” Crewe declined to expand on the statement they issued on Thursday in which they expressed their “deepest sympathies” to Bennell’s victims as well as denying being aware of any sexual abuse by him or receiving any such complaint about him. Invited to apologise on Friday, chairman John Bowl replied: “No comment.” City’s statement also revealed their review had identified a second alleged child abuser with potential connections to the club, John Broome. An early TV interview with Barry Bennell Credit: BBC Broome, who the club said was deceased, was manager of a junior side thought to be a feeder team for City in the 1960s, Whitehill FC. The Manchester Evening News published an interview with a former player at the now-defunct club who said he had been abused by Broome. “Twice, I was in his house and he grabbed my groin,” he recalled. “He used to try ways of getting you into his house, like saying, ‘The new kit has arrived, come and have a look’. “Even on match days, you would see him trying to grope other boys that were on the touchline, pretending he was larking around. “I would get invites to his house to try on the new kit he had for the next cup final that we were in. I always refused.”
Man City and Crewe under mounting pressure to make public apologies to Barry Bennell victims
Manchester City and Crewe Alexandra are under mounting pressure to make public apologies to Barry Bennell’s victims amid further accusations they failed to stop him sexually abusing countless boys. One of the lawyers representing survivors of serial paedophile Bennell, who was convicted on Thursday of a total of 43 child sexual abuse offences, condemned the two clubs’ responses to this week’s guilty verdicts. City and Crewe, the professional teams with whom Bennell has been most closely linked, both issued statements following the conclusion of a trial that has brought further shame on the game. But, despite the emergence of fresh allegations they ignored warnings about a man described as football’s Jimmy Savile, neither club admitted any responsibility for his crimes as they braced themselves for a wave of compensation claims from his victims. Dino Nocivelli, one of the country's leading lawyers representing child abuse survivors - including a substantial number of ex-footballers - told The Daily Telegraph that City and Crewe’s responses were “just not good enough”. Andy Woodward, the man who blew the whistle on football's paedophile scandal, speaks to the press Credit: PA “I would have hoped for City and Crewe to have admitted some element of blame for their close connections to Bennell,” he said. “It’s not about them; it’s about survivors. They need to admit their failings.” Andy Woodward, the man who blew the whistle on football’s paedophile scandal 15 months ago, has also demanded apologies from the clubs involved. City declined to expand on the statement they issued on Thursday in which they expressed their “heartfelt sympathy” to Bennell’s victims, who they said were “entitled to expect full protection from the kind of harm they endured”. The club was expected to say more following the conclusion of a QC-led review it commissioned into allegations of child sexual abuse there. Manager Pep Guardiola did discuss the outcome of Bennell’s trial at a press conference on Friday to preview the club’s FA Cup tie at Wigan Athletic. Pep Guardiola discusses the outcome of Barry Bennell’s trial at a press conference Credit: GETTY IMAGES He said: “All the people in this room know it’s a terrible history, so my feelings and thoughts are for the victims. “Hopefully, everyone can learn from that, society can learn from that because I’m a father. So, when you see what has happened, it can happen with my sons and daughters. “The authorities and judges have to decide in a better way to try to make a good example for the future so it doesn't happen again.” Crewe declined to expand on the statement they issued on Thursday in which they expressed their “deepest sympathies” to Bennell’s victims as well as denying being aware of any sexual abuse by him or receiving any such complaint about him. Invited to apologise on Friday, chairman John Bowl replied: “No comment.” City’s statement also revealed their review had identified a second alleged child abuser with potential connections to the club, John Broome. An early TV interview with Barry Bennell Credit: BBC Broome, who the club said was deceased, was manager of a junior side thought to be a feeder team for City in the 1960s, Whitehill FC. The Manchester Evening News published an interview with a former player at the now-defunct club who said he had been abused by Broome. “Twice, I was in his house and he grabbed my groin,” he recalled. “He used to try ways of getting you into his house, like saying, ‘The new kit has arrived, come and have a look’. “Even on match days, you would see him trying to grope other boys that were on the touchline, pretending he was larking around. “I would get invites to his house to try on the new kit he had for the next cup final that we were in. I always refused.”
Manchester City and Crewe Alexandra are under mounting pressure to make public apologies to Barry Bennell’s victims amid further accusations they failed to stop him sexually abusing countless boys. One of the lawyers representing survivors of serial paedophile Bennell, who was convicted on Thursday of a total of 43 child sexual abuse offences, condemned the two clubs’ responses to this week’s guilty verdicts. City and Crewe, the professional teams with whom Bennell has been most closely linked, both issued statements following the conclusion of a trial that has brought further shame on the game. But, despite the emergence of fresh allegations they ignored warnings about a man described as football’s Jimmy Savile, neither club admitted any responsibility for his crimes as they braced themselves for a wave of compensation claims from his victims. Dino Nocivelli, one of the country's leading lawyers representing child abuse survivors - including a substantial number of ex-footballers - told The Daily Telegraph that City and Crewe’s responses were “just not good enough”. Andy Woodward, the man who blew the whistle on football's paedophile scandal, speaks to the press Credit: PA “I would have hoped for City and Crewe to have admitted some element of blame for their close connections to Bennell,” he said. “It’s not about them; it’s about survivors. They need to admit their failings.” Andy Woodward, the man who blew the whistle on football’s paedophile scandal 15 months ago, has also demanded apologies from the clubs involved. City declined to expand on the statement they issued on Thursday in which they expressed their “heartfelt sympathy” to Bennell’s victims, who they said were “entitled to expect full protection from the kind of harm they endured”. The club was expected to say more following the conclusion of a QC-led review it commissioned into allegations of child sexual abuse there. Manager Pep Guardiola did discuss the outcome of Bennell’s trial at a press conference on Friday to preview the club’s FA Cup tie at Wigan Athletic. Pep Guardiola discusses the outcome of Barry Bennell’s trial at a press conference Credit: GETTY IMAGES He said: “All the people in this room know it’s a terrible history, so my feelings and thoughts are for the victims. “Hopefully, everyone can learn from that, society can learn from that because I’m a father. So, when you see what has happened, it can happen with my sons and daughters. “The authorities and judges have to decide in a better way to try to make a good example for the future so it doesn't happen again.” Crewe declined to expand on the statement they issued on Thursday in which they expressed their “deepest sympathies” to Bennell’s victims as well as denying being aware of any sexual abuse by him or receiving any such complaint about him. Invited to apologise on Friday, chairman John Bowl replied: “No comment.” City’s statement also revealed their review had identified a second alleged child abuser with potential connections to the club, John Broome. An early TV interview with Barry Bennell Credit: BBC Broome, who the club said was deceased, was manager of a junior side thought to be a feeder team for City in the 1960s, Whitehill FC. The Manchester Evening News published an interview with a former player at the now-defunct club who said he had been abused by Broome. “Twice, I was in his house and he grabbed my groin,” he recalled. “He used to try ways of getting you into his house, like saying, ‘The new kit has arrived, come and have a look’. “Even on match days, you would see him trying to grope other boys that were on the touchline, pretending he was larking around. “I would get invites to his house to try on the new kit he had for the next cup final that we were in. I always refused.”
Man City and Crewe under mounting pressure to make public apologies to Barry Bennell victims
Manchester City and Crewe Alexandra are under mounting pressure to make public apologies to Barry Bennell’s victims amid further accusations they failed to stop him sexually abusing countless boys. One of the lawyers representing survivors of serial paedophile Bennell, who was convicted on Thursday of a total of 43 child sexual abuse offences, condemned the two clubs’ responses to this week’s guilty verdicts. City and Crewe, the professional teams with whom Bennell has been most closely linked, both issued statements following the conclusion of a trial that has brought further shame on the game. But, despite the emergence of fresh allegations they ignored warnings about a man described as football’s Jimmy Savile, neither club admitted any responsibility for his crimes as they braced themselves for a wave of compensation claims from his victims. Dino Nocivelli, one of the country's leading lawyers representing child abuse survivors - including a substantial number of ex-footballers - told The Daily Telegraph that City and Crewe’s responses were “just not good enough”. Andy Woodward, the man who blew the whistle on football's paedophile scandal, speaks to the press Credit: PA “I would have hoped for City and Crewe to have admitted some element of blame for their close connections to Bennell,” he said. “It’s not about them; it’s about survivors. They need to admit their failings.” Andy Woodward, the man who blew the whistle on football’s paedophile scandal 15 months ago, has also demanded apologies from the clubs involved. City declined to expand on the statement they issued on Thursday in which they expressed their “heartfelt sympathy” to Bennell’s victims, who they said were “entitled to expect full protection from the kind of harm they endured”. The club was expected to say more following the conclusion of a QC-led review it commissioned into allegations of child sexual abuse there. Manager Pep Guardiola did discuss the outcome of Bennell’s trial at a press conference on Friday to preview the club’s FA Cup tie at Wigan Athletic. Pep Guardiola discusses the outcome of Barry Bennell’s trial at a press conference Credit: GETTY IMAGES He said: “All the people in this room know it’s a terrible history, so my feelings and thoughts are for the victims. “Hopefully, everyone can learn from that, society can learn from that because I’m a father. So, when you see what has happened, it can happen with my sons and daughters. “The authorities and judges have to decide in a better way to try to make a good example for the future so it doesn't happen again.” Crewe declined to expand on the statement they issued on Thursday in which they expressed their “deepest sympathies” to Bennell’s victims as well as denying being aware of any sexual abuse by him or receiving any such complaint about him. Invited to apologise on Friday, chairman John Bowl replied: “No comment.” City’s statement also revealed their review had identified a second alleged child abuser with potential connections to the club, John Broome. An early TV interview with Barry Bennell Credit: BBC Broome, who the club said was deceased, was manager of a junior side thought to be a feeder team for City in the 1960s, Whitehill FC. The Manchester Evening News published an interview with a former player at the now-defunct club who said he had been abused by Broome. “Twice, I was in his house and he grabbed my groin,” he recalled. “He used to try ways of getting you into his house, like saying, ‘The new kit has arrived, come and have a look’. “Even on match days, you would see him trying to grope other boys that were on the touchline, pretending he was larking around. “I would get invites to his house to try on the new kit he had for the next cup final that we were in. I always refused.”
Manchester City and Crewe Alexandra are under mounting pressure to make public apologies to Barry Bennell’s victims amid further accusations they failed to stop him sexually abusing countless boys. One of the lawyers representing survivors of serial paedophile Bennell, who was convicted on Thursday of a total of 43 child sexual abuse offences, condemned the two clubs’ responses to this week’s guilty verdicts. City and Crewe, the professional teams with whom Bennell has been most closely linked, both issued statements following the conclusion of a trial that has brought further shame on the game. But, despite the emergence of fresh allegations they ignored warnings about a man described as football’s Jimmy Savile, neither club admitted any responsibility for his crimes as they braced themselves for a wave of compensation claims from his victims. Dino Nocivelli, one of the country's leading lawyers representing child abuse survivors - including a substantial number of ex-footballers - told The Daily Telegraph that City and Crewe’s responses were “just not good enough”. Andy Woodward, the man who blew the whistle on football's paedophile scandal, speaks to the press Credit: PA “I would have hoped for City and Crewe to have admitted some element of blame for their close connections to Bennell,” he said. “It’s not about them; it’s about survivors. They need to admit their failings.” Andy Woodward, the man who blew the whistle on football’s paedophile scandal 15 months ago, has also demanded apologies from the clubs involved. City declined to expand on the statement they issued on Thursday in which they expressed their “heartfelt sympathy” to Bennell’s victims, who they said were “entitled to expect full protection from the kind of harm they endured”. The club was expected to say more following the conclusion of a QC-led review it commissioned into allegations of child sexual abuse there. Manager Pep Guardiola did discuss the outcome of Bennell’s trial at a press conference on Friday to preview the club’s FA Cup tie at Wigan Athletic. Pep Guardiola discusses the outcome of Barry Bennell’s trial at a press conference Credit: GETTY IMAGES He said: “All the people in this room know it’s a terrible history, so my feelings and thoughts are for the victims. “Hopefully, everyone can learn from that, society can learn from that because I’m a father. So, when you see what has happened, it can happen with my sons and daughters. “The authorities and judges have to decide in a better way to try to make a good example for the future so it doesn't happen again.” Crewe declined to expand on the statement they issued on Thursday in which they expressed their “deepest sympathies” to Bennell’s victims as well as denying being aware of any sexual abuse by him or receiving any such complaint about him. Invited to apologise on Friday, chairman John Bowl replied: “No comment.” City’s statement also revealed their review had identified a second alleged child abuser with potential connections to the club, John Broome. An early TV interview with Barry Bennell Credit: BBC Broome, who the club said was deceased, was manager of a junior side thought to be a feeder team for City in the 1960s, Whitehill FC. The Manchester Evening News published an interview with a former player at the now-defunct club who said he had been abused by Broome. “Twice, I was in his house and he grabbed my groin,” he recalled. “He used to try ways of getting you into his house, like saying, ‘The new kit has arrived, come and have a look’. “Even on match days, you would see him trying to grope other boys that were on the touchline, pretending he was larking around. “I would get invites to his house to try on the new kit he had for the next cup final that we were in. I always refused.”
Man City and Crewe under mounting pressure to make public apologies to Barry Bennell victims
Manchester City and Crewe Alexandra are under mounting pressure to make public apologies to Barry Bennell’s victims amid further accusations they failed to stop him sexually abusing countless boys. One of the lawyers representing survivors of serial paedophile Bennell, who was convicted on Thursday of a total of 43 child sexual abuse offences, condemned the two clubs’ responses to this week’s guilty verdicts. City and Crewe, the professional teams with whom Bennell has been most closely linked, both issued statements following the conclusion of a trial that has brought further shame on the game. But, despite the emergence of fresh allegations they ignored warnings about a man described as football’s Jimmy Savile, neither club admitted any responsibility for his crimes as they braced themselves for a wave of compensation claims from his victims. Dino Nocivelli, one of the country's leading lawyers representing child abuse survivors - including a substantial number of ex-footballers - told The Daily Telegraph that City and Crewe’s responses were “just not good enough”. Andy Woodward, the man who blew the whistle on football's paedophile scandal, speaks to the press Credit: PA “I would have hoped for City and Crewe to have admitted some element of blame for their close connections to Bennell,” he said. “It’s not about them; it’s about survivors. They need to admit their failings.” Andy Woodward, the man who blew the whistle on football’s paedophile scandal 15 months ago, has also demanded apologies from the clubs involved. City declined to expand on the statement they issued on Thursday in which they expressed their “heartfelt sympathy” to Bennell’s victims, who they said were “entitled to expect full protection from the kind of harm they endured”. The club was expected to say more following the conclusion of a QC-led review it commissioned into allegations of child sexual abuse there. Manager Pep Guardiola did discuss the outcome of Bennell’s trial at a press conference on Friday to preview the club’s FA Cup tie at Wigan Athletic. Pep Guardiola discusses the outcome of Barry Bennell’s trial at a press conference Credit: GETTY IMAGES He said: “All the people in this room know it’s a terrible history, so my feelings and thoughts are for the victims. “Hopefully, everyone can learn from that, society can learn from that because I’m a father. So, when you see what has happened, it can happen with my sons and daughters. “The authorities and judges have to decide in a better way to try to make a good example for the future so it doesn't happen again.” Crewe declined to expand on the statement they issued on Thursday in which they expressed their “deepest sympathies” to Bennell’s victims as well as denying being aware of any sexual abuse by him or receiving any such complaint about him. Invited to apologise on Friday, chairman John Bowl replied: “No comment.” City’s statement also revealed their review had identified a second alleged child abuser with potential connections to the club, John Broome. An early TV interview with Barry Bennell Credit: BBC Broome, who the club said was deceased, was manager of a junior side thought to be a feeder team for City in the 1960s, Whitehill FC. The Manchester Evening News published an interview with a former player at the now-defunct club who said he had been abused by Broome. “Twice, I was in his house and he grabbed my groin,” he recalled. “He used to try ways of getting you into his house, like saying, ‘The new kit has arrived, come and have a look’. “Even on match days, you would see him trying to grope other boys that were on the touchline, pretending he was larking around. “I would get invites to his house to try on the new kit he had for the next cup final that we were in. I always refused.”
Manchester City and Crewe Alexandra are under mounting pressure to make public apologies to Barry Bennell’s victims amid further accusations they failed to stop him sexually abusing countless boys. One of the lawyers representing survivors of serial paedophile Bennell, who was convicted on Thursday of a total of 43 child sexual abuse offences, condemned the two clubs’ responses to this week’s guilty verdicts. City and Crewe, the professional teams with whom Bennell has been most closely linked, both issued statements following the conclusion of a trial that has brought further shame on the game. But, despite the emergence of fresh allegations they ignored warnings about a man described as football’s Jimmy Savile, neither club admitted any responsibility for his crimes as they braced themselves for a wave of compensation claims from his victims. Dino Nocivelli, one of the country's leading lawyers representing child abuse survivors - including a substantial number of ex-footballers - told The Daily Telegraph that City and Crewe’s responses were “just not good enough”. Andy Woodward, the man who blew the whistle on football's paedophile scandal, speaks to the press Credit: PA “I would have hoped for City and Crewe to have admitted some element of blame for their close connections to Bennell,” he said. “It’s not about them; it’s about survivors. They need to admit their failings.” Andy Woodward, the man who blew the whistle on football’s paedophile scandal 15 months ago, has also demanded apologies from the clubs involved. City declined to expand on the statement they issued on Thursday in which they expressed their “heartfelt sympathy” to Bennell’s victims, who they said were “entitled to expect full protection from the kind of harm they endured”. The club was expected to say more following the conclusion of a QC-led review it commissioned into allegations of child sexual abuse there. Manager Pep Guardiola did discuss the outcome of Bennell’s trial at a press conference on Friday to preview the club’s FA Cup tie at Wigan Athletic. Pep Guardiola discusses the outcome of Barry Bennell’s trial at a press conference Credit: GETTY IMAGES He said: “All the people in this room know it’s a terrible history, so my feelings and thoughts are for the victims. “Hopefully, everyone can learn from that, society can learn from that because I’m a father. So, when you see what has happened, it can happen with my sons and daughters. “The authorities and judges have to decide in a better way to try to make a good example for the future so it doesn't happen again.” Crewe declined to expand on the statement they issued on Thursday in which they expressed their “deepest sympathies” to Bennell’s victims as well as denying being aware of any sexual abuse by him or receiving any such complaint about him. Invited to apologise on Friday, chairman John Bowl replied: “No comment.” City’s statement also revealed their review had identified a second alleged child abuser with potential connections to the club, John Broome. An early TV interview with Barry Bennell Credit: BBC Broome, who the club said was deceased, was manager of a junior side thought to be a feeder team for City in the 1960s, Whitehill FC. The Manchester Evening News published an interview with a former player at the now-defunct club who said he had been abused by Broome. “Twice, I was in his house and he grabbed my groin,” he recalled. “He used to try ways of getting you into his house, like saying, ‘The new kit has arrived, come and have a look’. “Even on match days, you would see him trying to grope other boys that were on the touchline, pretending he was larking around. “I would get invites to his house to try on the new kit he had for the next cup final that we were in. I always refused.”
Man City and Crewe under mounting pressure to make public apologies to Barry Bennell victims
Manchester City and Crewe Alexandra are under mounting pressure to make public apologies to Barry Bennell’s victims amid further accusations they failed to stop him sexually abusing countless boys. One of the lawyers representing survivors of serial paedophile Bennell, who was convicted on Thursday of a total of 43 child sexual abuse offences, condemned the two clubs’ responses to this week’s guilty verdicts. City and Crewe, the professional teams with whom Bennell has been most closely linked, both issued statements following the conclusion of a trial that has brought further shame on the game. But, despite the emergence of fresh allegations they ignored warnings about a man described as football’s Jimmy Savile, neither club admitted any responsibility for his crimes as they braced themselves for a wave of compensation claims from his victims. Dino Nocivelli, one of the country's leading lawyers representing child abuse survivors - including a substantial number of ex-footballers - told The Daily Telegraph that City and Crewe’s responses were “just not good enough”. Andy Woodward, the man who blew the whistle on football's paedophile scandal, speaks to the press Credit: PA “I would have hoped for City and Crewe to have admitted some element of blame for their close connections to Bennell,” he said. “It’s not about them; it’s about survivors. They need to admit their failings.” Andy Woodward, the man who blew the whistle on football’s paedophile scandal 15 months ago, has also demanded apologies from the clubs involved. City declined to expand on the statement they issued on Thursday in which they expressed their “heartfelt sympathy” to Bennell’s victims, who they said were “entitled to expect full protection from the kind of harm they endured”. The club was expected to say more following the conclusion of a QC-led review it commissioned into allegations of child sexual abuse there. Manager Pep Guardiola did discuss the outcome of Bennell’s trial at a press conference on Friday to preview the club’s FA Cup tie at Wigan Athletic. Pep Guardiola discusses the outcome of Barry Bennell’s trial at a press conference Credit: GETTY IMAGES He said: “All the people in this room know it’s a terrible history, so my feelings and thoughts are for the victims. “Hopefully, everyone can learn from that, society can learn from that because I’m a father. So, when you see what has happened, it can happen with my sons and daughters. “The authorities and judges have to decide in a better way to try to make a good example for the future so it doesn't happen again.” Crewe declined to expand on the statement they issued on Thursday in which they expressed their “deepest sympathies” to Bennell’s victims as well as denying being aware of any sexual abuse by him or receiving any such complaint about him. Invited to apologise on Friday, chairman John Bowl replied: “No comment.” City’s statement also revealed their review had identified a second alleged child abuser with potential connections to the club, John Broome. An early TV interview with Barry Bennell Credit: BBC Broome, who the club said was deceased, was manager of a junior side thought to be a feeder team for City in the 1960s, Whitehill FC. The Manchester Evening News published an interview with a former player at the now-defunct club who said he had been abused by Broome. “Twice, I was in his house and he grabbed my groin,” he recalled. “He used to try ways of getting you into his house, like saying, ‘The new kit has arrived, come and have a look’. “Even on match days, you would see him trying to grope other boys that were on the touchline, pretending he was larking around. “I would get invites to his house to try on the new kit he had for the next cup final that we were in. I always refused.”
Manchester City and Crewe Alexandra are facing the prospect of large-scale legal action and compensation bills running into millions of pounds from victims of the serial paedophile Barry Bennell. Bennell, who worked as a youth coach and scout for City and Crewe among others, was found guilty at Liverpool Crown Court on Thursday of 43 counts of child sexual abuse against 11 victims as the horrifying scale of his crimes begins to emerge. It is understood the number of victims assaulted by Bennell – who is still under police investigation – could easily exceed 100 after 86 more people came forward to report abuse by him. Bennell, 64, described at the trial as a “child molester on an industrial scale”, had already been convicted of abusing 15 boys in the UK and one in the United States. Bennell will be sentenced on Monday. City and Crewe are two of the clubs most seriously implicated and could be the subject of a civil group action from victims. The court heard three former junior footballers are already suing City after civil cases were lodged in March 2016 while one is planning to sue Crewe and the FA for damages. Three other complainants in the current trial have sought legal ­advice on a potential compensation claim and it is believed others could follow. Dino Nocivelli, one of the country’s leading lawyers for child abuse victims who is representing a substantial number of victims in this case, said: “They have got quite a large-scale problem on their hands.” Three of Bennell's victims talk to the media outside court on Thursday Credit: PA City have been accused of putting hundreds of boys in danger after it emerged one of their coaches, Steve Fleet, had warned in the Seventies that it was “general knowledge” Bennell was a risk to children, long before he joined Crewe in 1985. “People would say he [Bennell] was ‘dodgy’ and if his name was brought up everyone would shake their heads,” said Fleet. One of Bennell’s victims, Gary Cliffe, who was at City when he was abused between the ages of 11 and 15, told how Bennell even once abused them on the club’s Maine Road pitch. “If those in positions of responsibility had challenged Bennell, hundreds of wrecked lives could have been saved,” Cliffe, 47, told The Guardian. One of Bennell’s victims told ­Liverpool Crown Court he was targeted “straight away” in Bennell’s Mercedes when he started to give him lifts to and from City’s then training ground at Platt Lane. Bennell was said by another complainant to have been treated like “God” at Maine Road. Jurors also heard from a third complainant that he thought City officials Ken Barnes and Mike Grimsley had known Bennell was targeting boys. One City director at the time of Bennell’s association with the club, Simon Cussons, was interviewed by the BBC last year, although he died before City had been able to conduct their own interview with him. It is understood City were scheduled to interview Cussons. In Channel 4’s Dispatches documentary in 1997, Chris Muir, a City director at the time, was asked about one parent writing to City to complain Bennell had boys in his room late at night on trips away and explained “football allowed him to stay because he was producing the goods”. An artist's sketch of Bennell in court Credit: PA Yet it has emerged police had interviewed Barnes and Muir, in addition to Fleet and another member of City’s youth team staff, Terry Farrell, when Bennell was arrested in Florida in 1994. A Dispatches documentary Football’s Wall of Silence, which aired on Channel 4 last night, reported detectives investigating that 1994 case said Barnes was “very cagey”. City began their QC-led inquiry 15 months ago and said on Thursday they had identified another alleged paedophile, John Broome, now deceased, with whom they have “potential historic connections”. City added Broome was “not believed to be linked to Bennell”. City are thought to have taken more than 100 statements from victims, family members, coaches, former employees and other figures and dedicated around 5,000 hours to a review that has so far cost in excess of £1 million. Crewe expressed its “deepest sympathies to the victims of Barry Bennell” but insisted it was “not aware of any sexual abuse by Mr Bennell, nor did it receive any complaint about sexual abuse by him. CLUB STATEMENT: Barry Bennell #CreweAlexhttps://t.co/nKXRpwko49pic.twitter.com/gYhmBYB6JC— Crewe Alexandra F.C. (@crewealexfc) February 15, 2018 “The club wishes to make it absolutely clear that had it had any suspicion or belief that Mr Bennell was committing acts of abuse... the club would have informed the police.” Lord Carlile, the eminent barrister who prosecuted Bennell in 1998, claimed the scandal was “brushed under the carpet” by Crewe, whom he accused of “institutional failure” over their former youth coach. It has also emerged that former Crewe manager Dario Gradi, the club’s director of football who has been suspended by the FA pending an investigation into sexual abuse in football, wrote a letter to a court in Jacksonville, Florida, in 1994 in support of Bennell, who was facing six charges of child abuse to which he later pleaded guilty. Gradi is expected to face fresh scrutiny after praising Bennell for his “great ability to communicate with kids.”
Man City and Crewe could face paying millions in compensation to Barry Bennell's victims
Manchester City and Crewe Alexandra are facing the prospect of large-scale legal action and compensation bills running into millions of pounds from victims of the serial paedophile Barry Bennell. Bennell, who worked as a youth coach and scout for City and Crewe among others, was found guilty at Liverpool Crown Court on Thursday of 43 counts of child sexual abuse against 11 victims as the horrifying scale of his crimes begins to emerge. It is understood the number of victims assaulted by Bennell – who is still under police investigation – could easily exceed 100 after 86 more people came forward to report abuse by him. Bennell, 64, described at the trial as a “child molester on an industrial scale”, had already been convicted of abusing 15 boys in the UK and one in the United States. Bennell will be sentenced on Monday. City and Crewe are two of the clubs most seriously implicated and could be the subject of a civil group action from victims. The court heard three former junior footballers are already suing City after civil cases were lodged in March 2016 while one is planning to sue Crewe and the FA for damages. Three other complainants in the current trial have sought legal ­advice on a potential compensation claim and it is believed others could follow. Dino Nocivelli, one of the country’s leading lawyers for child abuse victims who is representing a substantial number of victims in this case, said: “They have got quite a large-scale problem on their hands.” Three of Bennell's victims talk to the media outside court on Thursday Credit: PA City have been accused of putting hundreds of boys in danger after it emerged one of their coaches, Steve Fleet, had warned in the Seventies that it was “general knowledge” Bennell was a risk to children, long before he joined Crewe in 1985. “People would say he [Bennell] was ‘dodgy’ and if his name was brought up everyone would shake their heads,” said Fleet. One of Bennell’s victims, Gary Cliffe, who was at City when he was abused between the ages of 11 and 15, told how Bennell even once abused them on the club’s Maine Road pitch. “If those in positions of responsibility had challenged Bennell, hundreds of wrecked lives could have been saved,” Cliffe, 47, told The Guardian. One of Bennell’s victims told ­Liverpool Crown Court he was targeted “straight away” in Bennell’s Mercedes when he started to give him lifts to and from City’s then training ground at Platt Lane. Bennell was said by another complainant to have been treated like “God” at Maine Road. Jurors also heard from a third complainant that he thought City officials Ken Barnes and Mike Grimsley had known Bennell was targeting boys. One City director at the time of Bennell’s association with the club, Simon Cussons, was interviewed by the BBC last year, although he died before City had been able to conduct their own interview with him. It is understood City were scheduled to interview Cussons. In Channel 4’s Dispatches documentary in 1997, Chris Muir, a City director at the time, was asked about one parent writing to City to complain Bennell had boys in his room late at night on trips away and explained “football allowed him to stay because he was producing the goods”. An artist's sketch of Bennell in court Credit: PA Yet it has emerged police had interviewed Barnes and Muir, in addition to Fleet and another member of City’s youth team staff, Terry Farrell, when Bennell was arrested in Florida in 1994. A Dispatches documentary Football’s Wall of Silence, which aired on Channel 4 last night, reported detectives investigating that 1994 case said Barnes was “very cagey”. City began their QC-led inquiry 15 months ago and said on Thursday they had identified another alleged paedophile, John Broome, now deceased, with whom they have “potential historic connections”. City added Broome was “not believed to be linked to Bennell”. City are thought to have taken more than 100 statements from victims, family members, coaches, former employees and other figures and dedicated around 5,000 hours to a review that has so far cost in excess of £1 million. Crewe expressed its “deepest sympathies to the victims of Barry Bennell” but insisted it was “not aware of any sexual abuse by Mr Bennell, nor did it receive any complaint about sexual abuse by him. CLUB STATEMENT: Barry Bennell #CreweAlexhttps://t.co/nKXRpwko49pic.twitter.com/gYhmBYB6JC— Crewe Alexandra F.C. (@crewealexfc) February 15, 2018 “The club wishes to make it absolutely clear that had it had any suspicion or belief that Mr Bennell was committing acts of abuse... the club would have informed the police.” Lord Carlile, the eminent barrister who prosecuted Bennell in 1998, claimed the scandal was “brushed under the carpet” by Crewe, whom he accused of “institutional failure” over their former youth coach. It has also emerged that former Crewe manager Dario Gradi, the club’s director of football who has been suspended by the FA pending an investigation into sexual abuse in football, wrote a letter to a court in Jacksonville, Florida, in 1994 in support of Bennell, who was facing six charges of child abuse to which he later pleaded guilty. Gradi is expected to face fresh scrutiny after praising Bennell for his “great ability to communicate with kids.”
Manchester City and Crewe Alexandra are facing the prospect of large-scale legal action and compensation bills running into millions of pounds from victims of the serial paedophile Barry Bennell. Bennell, who worked as a youth coach and scout for City and Crewe among others, was found guilty at Liverpool Crown Court on Thursday of 43 counts of child sexual abuse against 11 victims as the horrifying scale of his crimes begins to emerge. It is understood the number of victims assaulted by Bennell – who is still under police investigation – could easily exceed 100 after 86 more people came forward to report abuse by him. Bennell, 64, described at the trial as a “child molester on an industrial scale”, had already been convicted of abusing 15 boys in the UK and one in the United States. Bennell will be sentenced on Monday. City and Crewe are two of the clubs most seriously implicated and could be the subject of a civil group action from victims. The court heard three former junior footballers are already suing City after civil cases were lodged in March 2016 while one is planning to sue Crewe and the FA for damages. Three other complainants in the current trial have sought legal ­advice on a potential compensation claim and it is believed others could follow. Dino Nocivelli, one of the country’s leading lawyers for child abuse victims who is representing a substantial number of victims in this case, said: “They have got quite a large-scale problem on their hands.” Three of Bennell's victims talk to the media outside court on Thursday Credit: PA City have been accused of putting hundreds of boys in danger after it emerged one of their coaches, Steve Fleet, had warned in the Seventies that it was “general knowledge” Bennell was a risk to children, long before he joined Crewe in 1985. “People would say he [Bennell] was ‘dodgy’ and if his name was brought up everyone would shake their heads,” said Fleet. One of Bennell’s victims, Gary Cliffe, who was at City when he was abused between the ages of 11 and 15, told how Bennell even once abused them on the club’s Maine Road pitch. “If those in positions of responsibility had challenged Bennell, hundreds of wrecked lives could have been saved,” Cliffe, 47, told The Guardian. One of Bennell’s victims told ­Liverpool Crown Court he was targeted “straight away” in Bennell’s Mercedes when he started to give him lifts to and from City’s then training ground at Platt Lane. Bennell was said by another complainant to have been treated like “God” at Maine Road. Jurors also heard from a third complainant that he thought City officials Ken Barnes and Mike Grimsley had known Bennell was targeting boys. One City director at the time of Bennell’s association with the club, Simon Cussons, was interviewed by the BBC last year, although he died before City had been able to conduct their own interview with him. It is understood City were scheduled to interview Cussons. In Channel 4’s Dispatches documentary in 1997, Chris Muir, a City director at the time, was asked about one parent writing to City to complain Bennell had boys in his room late at night on trips away and explained “football allowed him to stay because he was producing the goods”. An artist's sketch of Bennell in court Credit: PA Yet it has emerged police had interviewed Barnes and Muir, in addition to Fleet and another member of City’s youth team staff, Terry Farrell, when Bennell was arrested in Florida in 1994. A Dispatches documentary Football’s Wall of Silence, which aired on Channel 4 last night, reported detectives investigating that 1994 case said Barnes was “very cagey”. City began their QC-led inquiry 15 months ago and said on Thursday they had identified another alleged paedophile, John Broome, now deceased, with whom they have “potential historic connections”. City added Broome was “not believed to be linked to Bennell”. City are thought to have taken more than 100 statements from victims, family members, coaches, former employees and other figures and dedicated around 5,000 hours to a review that has so far cost in excess of £1 million. Crewe expressed its “deepest sympathies to the victims of Barry Bennell” but insisted it was “not aware of any sexual abuse by Mr Bennell, nor did it receive any complaint about sexual abuse by him. CLUB STATEMENT: Barry Bennell #CreweAlexhttps://t.co/nKXRpwko49pic.twitter.com/gYhmBYB6JC— Crewe Alexandra F.C. (@crewealexfc) February 15, 2018 “The club wishes to make it absolutely clear that had it had any suspicion or belief that Mr Bennell was committing acts of abuse... the club would have informed the police.” Lord Carlile, the eminent barrister who prosecuted Bennell in 1998, claimed the scandal was “brushed under the carpet” by Crewe, whom he accused of “institutional failure” over their former youth coach. It has also emerged that former Crewe manager Dario Gradi, the club’s director of football who has been suspended by the FA pending an investigation into sexual abuse in football, wrote a letter to a court in Jacksonville, Florida, in 1994 in support of Bennell, who was facing six charges of child abuse to which he later pleaded guilty. Gradi is expected to face fresh scrutiny after praising Bennell for his “great ability to communicate with kids.”
Man City and Crewe could face paying millions in compensation to Barry Bennell's victims
Manchester City and Crewe Alexandra are facing the prospect of large-scale legal action and compensation bills running into millions of pounds from victims of the serial paedophile Barry Bennell. Bennell, who worked as a youth coach and scout for City and Crewe among others, was found guilty at Liverpool Crown Court on Thursday of 43 counts of child sexual abuse against 11 victims as the horrifying scale of his crimes begins to emerge. It is understood the number of victims assaulted by Bennell – who is still under police investigation – could easily exceed 100 after 86 more people came forward to report abuse by him. Bennell, 64, described at the trial as a “child molester on an industrial scale”, had already been convicted of abusing 15 boys in the UK and one in the United States. Bennell will be sentenced on Monday. City and Crewe are two of the clubs most seriously implicated and could be the subject of a civil group action from victims. The court heard three former junior footballers are already suing City after civil cases were lodged in March 2016 while one is planning to sue Crewe and the FA for damages. Three other complainants in the current trial have sought legal ­advice on a potential compensation claim and it is believed others could follow. Dino Nocivelli, one of the country’s leading lawyers for child abuse victims who is representing a substantial number of victims in this case, said: “They have got quite a large-scale problem on their hands.” Three of Bennell's victims talk to the media outside court on Thursday Credit: PA City have been accused of putting hundreds of boys in danger after it emerged one of their coaches, Steve Fleet, had warned in the Seventies that it was “general knowledge” Bennell was a risk to children, long before he joined Crewe in 1985. “People would say he [Bennell] was ‘dodgy’ and if his name was brought up everyone would shake their heads,” said Fleet. One of Bennell’s victims, Gary Cliffe, who was at City when he was abused between the ages of 11 and 15, told how Bennell even once abused them on the club’s Maine Road pitch. “If those in positions of responsibility had challenged Bennell, hundreds of wrecked lives could have been saved,” Cliffe, 47, told The Guardian. One of Bennell’s victims told ­Liverpool Crown Court he was targeted “straight away” in Bennell’s Mercedes when he started to give him lifts to and from City’s then training ground at Platt Lane. Bennell was said by another complainant to have been treated like “God” at Maine Road. Jurors also heard from a third complainant that he thought City officials Ken Barnes and Mike Grimsley had known Bennell was targeting boys. One City director at the time of Bennell’s association with the club, Simon Cussons, was interviewed by the BBC last year, although he died before City had been able to conduct their own interview with him. It is understood City were scheduled to interview Cussons. In Channel 4’s Dispatches documentary in 1997, Chris Muir, a City director at the time, was asked about one parent writing to City to complain Bennell had boys in his room late at night on trips away and explained “football allowed him to stay because he was producing the goods”. An artist's sketch of Bennell in court Credit: PA Yet it has emerged police had interviewed Barnes and Muir, in addition to Fleet and another member of City’s youth team staff, Terry Farrell, when Bennell was arrested in Florida in 1994. A Dispatches documentary Football’s Wall of Silence, which aired on Channel 4 last night, reported detectives investigating that 1994 case said Barnes was “very cagey”. City began their QC-led inquiry 15 months ago and said on Thursday they had identified another alleged paedophile, John Broome, now deceased, with whom they have “potential historic connections”. City added Broome was “not believed to be linked to Bennell”. City are thought to have taken more than 100 statements from victims, family members, coaches, former employees and other figures and dedicated around 5,000 hours to a review that has so far cost in excess of £1 million. Crewe expressed its “deepest sympathies to the victims of Barry Bennell” but insisted it was “not aware of any sexual abuse by Mr Bennell, nor did it receive any complaint about sexual abuse by him. CLUB STATEMENT: Barry Bennell #CreweAlexhttps://t.co/nKXRpwko49pic.twitter.com/gYhmBYB6JC— Crewe Alexandra F.C. (@crewealexfc) February 15, 2018 “The club wishes to make it absolutely clear that had it had any suspicion or belief that Mr Bennell was committing acts of abuse... the club would have informed the police.” Lord Carlile, the eminent barrister who prosecuted Bennell in 1998, claimed the scandal was “brushed under the carpet” by Crewe, whom he accused of “institutional failure” over their former youth coach. It has also emerged that former Crewe manager Dario Gradi, the club’s director of football who has been suspended by the FA pending an investigation into sexual abuse in football, wrote a letter to a court in Jacksonville, Florida, in 1994 in support of Bennell, who was facing six charges of child abuse to which he later pleaded guilty. Gradi is expected to face fresh scrutiny after praising Bennell for his “great ability to communicate with kids.”
Barry Bennell, the former Crewe Alexandra coach and Manchester City scout, has been found guilty of seven further offences against boys.
Former youth coach Bennell guilty of seven more sex assaults
Barry Bennell, the former Crewe Alexandra coach and Manchester City scout, has been found guilty of seven further offences against boys.
Alexis Sanchez and Henrikh Mkhitaryan completed their swap deal between Manchester United and Arsenal on Monday, treading a well-worn path of transfers between the two clubs over the years. Here, we look back at 14 players who switched sides and how they got on. Paddy Sloan Manchester United: 1938-1939 (0 apps; 0 goals); Arsenal: 1946-48 (33 apps, 1 goal) Irish footballer who left Manchester United for Tranmere before the Second World War without making an appearance. After, he decided to join Arsenal where he established himself as a first-team regular in the 1946-47 season before losing his place and moving to Italy. Among footballers who played for both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland national teams. Verdict: [Performed better for] Arsenal David Herd Arsenal: 1954-1961 (166 apps, 99 goals); Manchester United: 1961-1968 (265 apps, 145 goals) Herd enjoyed fruitful spells at both clubs, acquiring strike-rates that bettered a goal every two games. After helping Arsenal to third place in the league 1959, Sir Matt Busby swooped for the former Stockport player in 1961. Herd went on to score two goals in a victorious FA Cup final for United against Leicester City in 1963 before becoming Division One champions in 1965. Verdict: Manchester United Ian Ure Arsenal: 1963-1969 (202 apps, 2 goals); Manchester United: 1969-1971 (65 apps, 1 goal) Arsenal manager Billy Wright moved hastily to bring the Scottish defender to London following an impressive spell at Dundee. However, Ure struggled with his move south of the border culminating in a shocking display in the 1969 League Cup final against Swindon. He departed for United that summer where he stayed for just two seasons before moving to Motherwell. Verdict: Neither George Graham Arsenal: 1966-1972 (308 apps, 77 goals); Manchester United: 1972-1974 (46 apps, 2 goals) As a midfielder or forward Graham’s playing career at the London club was impressive. He was a pivotal creative figure as Arsenal achieved the First Division and FA Cup double in 1971. He crossed to United in 1972 following the arrival of Alan Ball at Highbury but stayed for just under two years. The Scot would go on to win two First Division titles with Arsenal (1989 and 1991), the Uefa Cup (1994), the FA Cup (1993), two League Cups (1987 and 1993) in a nine-year spell. Verdict: Arsenal Graham won two First Division titles with Arsenal Credit: Getty Images Jimmy Rimmer Manchester United: 1965-1974 (46 apps, 0 goals); Arsenal: 1974-1977 (apps, 146, 0 goals) After spending nine years as understudy to Alex Stepney, Rimmer’s impressive loan spell at Swansea was enough to convince Bertie Mee that he could succeed as No1 at Highbury. By the following season Rimmer had become Arsenal's first-choice 'keeper. In 1975, he won Arsenal’s Player of the Year award and an England cap followed a year later. Verdict: Arsenal Brian Kidd Manchester United 1967-1974 (264 apps, 70 goals); Arsenal 1974-1976 (90 apps, 34 goals) The forward’s time at United was one of immense highs and lows. From scoring in United’s European Cup final triumph over Benfica in 1968, he suffered relegation with the same club six years later. He was top goal-scorer for Arsenal in his first season at the club, but failed to leave a lasting impact on the club. Verdict: Manchester United Kidd, here playing in the 1968 European Cup final at Wembley Credit: Getty/ALLSPORT Frank Stapleton Arsenal: 1971-1981 (300 apps, 108 goals); Manchester United: 1981-1987 (288 apps, 78 goals) The original RVP, Stapleton’s time at Arsenal was one of disappointment due to a lack of team success. He participated in three successive FA Cup finals, two of which ended in defeat. A familiar tale of Arsenal finishing fourth and failing to sign star players frustrated Stapleton. In 1981 he moved to the more ambitious United where he claimed two FA Cup winners’ medals in 1983 and 1985. Verdict: Manchester United Viv Anderson Arsenal: 1984-1987 (150 apps, 15 goals); Manchester United: 1987-1991 (64 apps, 4 goals) Widely known for being the first black footballer to represent England in a full international, defender Anderson was part of the Arsenal side that claimed the League Cup in 1987 and famously scored against Tottenham in the semi-final. Shortly afterwards, however, Anderson moved up north, achieving the rather impressive title of being Sir Alex Ferguson’s first signing at Manchester United. Verdict: Arsenal Leighton moved to Arsenal but did not feature for the club Credit: Getty Images Jim Leighton Manchester United 1988-1991 (94 caps); Arsenal 1991 (0 apps) After following Sir Alex Ferguson to Manchester from Aberdeen, Scottish goalkeeper Leighton struggled to hold down a position in the first team. His loan spell at Arsenal proved even more difficult to secure game-time, he never made a senior appearance for the north Londoners. Verdict: Manchester United David Platt Manchester United 1982-1985 (0 apps); Arsenal 1995-1998 (108 apps, 15 goals) Platt signed his first professional contract at Manchester United but moved on to Crewe Alexandra after failing to break in to the first team at Old Trafford. The dynamic midfielder fared much better at Arsenal, later in his career after successful stints in Italy with Juventus and Sampdoria. In his first season with Arsenal, Platt helped the Gunners secure Uefa Cup football with a fifth-placed finish. A Premier League triumph followed in 1998 in Platt’s final season at the club. Verdict: Arsenal Cole won the treble with Manchester United Credit: Andrew Budd/Action Images Andy Cole Arsenal: 1989-1992 (2 apps, 0 goals); Manchester United: 1995-2001 (195 apps, 93 goals) The striker began a peripatetic journey across a variety of top-division clubs at Arsenal, having graduated from the academy, but never managed to start a game for the Gunners, appearing twice as off the subs' bench. It was quite a different story at United however. After a £7million move from Newcastle in 1995, Cole won three Premier League titles at Old Trafford, including one as part of the stunning Treble winning season of 1998/1999. Verdict: Manchester United Mikael Silvestre Manchester United 1999-2008 (361 apps, 10 goals); Arsenal 2008-2010 (46 apps, 6 goals) French international defender Silvestre enjoyed vast success during his time at Old Trafford. The Frenchman earned four Premier League titles, one Champions League winners’ medal and FA Cup and League Cup triumphs before Sir Alex Ferguson deemed him surplus to requirements. A move to Arsenal followed in 2008 by which time his peak had passed. Verdict: Manchester United Robin van Persie and Danny Welbeck were more successful at Manchester United Credit: Getty Images Robin van Persie Arsenal: 2004-2012 (279 apps, 132 goals); Manchester United: 2012-2015 (105 apps, 58 goals) A player that has best epitomised the difference between the two clubs in recent times, the Dutch striker was captain when he departed the Emirates Stadium in 2012 to hunt trophies under Sir Alex Ferguson. It worked, securing the Premier League title in his first season at Old Trafford while also being the top scorer in the division. Verdict: Manchester United Alexis Sanchez-Henrikh Mkhitarayan swap deal | All you need to know around the big football transfer Danny Welbeck Manchester United: 2008-2014 (142 apps, 29 goals); Arsenal: 2014-present (91 apps, 22 goals) Left Manchester United for Arsenal in 2014 after a promising, though short of fulfilling, spell in the first-team, featuring 27 times in Manchester United's 2012-13 title-winning season. His time at the Emirates has been hampered by injury, while he has only featured four times for England in the last three seasons. Verdict: Manchester United
14 players who featured for both Arsenal and Manchester United – and where they performed best
Alexis Sanchez and Henrikh Mkhitaryan completed their swap deal between Manchester United and Arsenal on Monday, treading a well-worn path of transfers between the two clubs over the years. Here, we look back at 14 players who switched sides and how they got on. Paddy Sloan Manchester United: 1938-1939 (0 apps; 0 goals); Arsenal: 1946-48 (33 apps, 1 goal) Irish footballer who left Manchester United for Tranmere before the Second World War without making an appearance. After, he decided to join Arsenal where he established himself as a first-team regular in the 1946-47 season before losing his place and moving to Italy. Among footballers who played for both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland national teams. Verdict: [Performed better for] Arsenal David Herd Arsenal: 1954-1961 (166 apps, 99 goals); Manchester United: 1961-1968 (265 apps, 145 goals) Herd enjoyed fruitful spells at both clubs, acquiring strike-rates that bettered a goal every two games. After helping Arsenal to third place in the league 1959, Sir Matt Busby swooped for the former Stockport player in 1961. Herd went on to score two goals in a victorious FA Cup final for United against Leicester City in 1963 before becoming Division One champions in 1965. Verdict: Manchester United Ian Ure Arsenal: 1963-1969 (202 apps, 2 goals); Manchester United: 1969-1971 (65 apps, 1 goal) Arsenal manager Billy Wright moved hastily to bring the Scottish defender to London following an impressive spell at Dundee. However, Ure struggled with his move south of the border culminating in a shocking display in the 1969 League Cup final against Swindon. He departed for United that summer where he stayed for just two seasons before moving to Motherwell. Verdict: Neither George Graham Arsenal: 1966-1972 (308 apps, 77 goals); Manchester United: 1972-1974 (46 apps, 2 goals) As a midfielder or forward Graham’s playing career at the London club was impressive. He was a pivotal creative figure as Arsenal achieved the First Division and FA Cup double in 1971. He crossed to United in 1972 following the arrival of Alan Ball at Highbury but stayed for just under two years. The Scot would go on to win two First Division titles with Arsenal (1989 and 1991), the Uefa Cup (1994), the FA Cup (1993), two League Cups (1987 and 1993) in a nine-year spell. Verdict: Arsenal Graham won two First Division titles with Arsenal Credit: Getty Images Jimmy Rimmer Manchester United: 1965-1974 (46 apps, 0 goals); Arsenal: 1974-1977 (apps, 146, 0 goals) After spending nine years as understudy to Alex Stepney, Rimmer’s impressive loan spell at Swansea was enough to convince Bertie Mee that he could succeed as No1 at Highbury. By the following season Rimmer had become Arsenal's first-choice 'keeper. In 1975, he won Arsenal’s Player of the Year award and an England cap followed a year later. Verdict: Arsenal Brian Kidd Manchester United 1967-1974 (264 apps, 70 goals); Arsenal 1974-1976 (90 apps, 34 goals) The forward’s time at United was one of immense highs and lows. From scoring in United’s European Cup final triumph over Benfica in 1968, he suffered relegation with the same club six years later. He was top goal-scorer for Arsenal in his first season at the club, but failed to leave a lasting impact on the club. Verdict: Manchester United Kidd, here playing in the 1968 European Cup final at Wembley Credit: Getty/ALLSPORT Frank Stapleton Arsenal: 1971-1981 (300 apps, 108 goals); Manchester United: 1981-1987 (288 apps, 78 goals) The original RVP, Stapleton’s time at Arsenal was one of disappointment due to a lack of team success. He participated in three successive FA Cup finals, two of which ended in defeat. A familiar tale of Arsenal finishing fourth and failing to sign star players frustrated Stapleton. In 1981 he moved to the more ambitious United where he claimed two FA Cup winners’ medals in 1983 and 1985. Verdict: Manchester United Viv Anderson Arsenal: 1984-1987 (150 apps, 15 goals); Manchester United: 1987-1991 (64 apps, 4 goals) Widely known for being the first black footballer to represent England in a full international, defender Anderson was part of the Arsenal side that claimed the League Cup in 1987 and famously scored against Tottenham in the semi-final. Shortly afterwards, however, Anderson moved up north, achieving the rather impressive title of being Sir Alex Ferguson’s first signing at Manchester United. Verdict: Arsenal Leighton moved to Arsenal but did not feature for the club Credit: Getty Images Jim Leighton Manchester United 1988-1991 (94 caps); Arsenal 1991 (0 apps) After following Sir Alex Ferguson to Manchester from Aberdeen, Scottish goalkeeper Leighton struggled to hold down a position in the first team. His loan spell at Arsenal proved even more difficult to secure game-time, he never made a senior appearance for the north Londoners. Verdict: Manchester United David Platt Manchester United 1982-1985 (0 apps); Arsenal 1995-1998 (108 apps, 15 goals) Platt signed his first professional contract at Manchester United but moved on to Crewe Alexandra after failing to break in to the first team at Old Trafford. The dynamic midfielder fared much better at Arsenal, later in his career after successful stints in Italy with Juventus and Sampdoria. In his first season with Arsenal, Platt helped the Gunners secure Uefa Cup football with a fifth-placed finish. A Premier League triumph followed in 1998 in Platt’s final season at the club. Verdict: Arsenal Cole won the treble with Manchester United Credit: Andrew Budd/Action Images Andy Cole Arsenal: 1989-1992 (2 apps, 0 goals); Manchester United: 1995-2001 (195 apps, 93 goals) The striker began a peripatetic journey across a variety of top-division clubs at Arsenal, having graduated from the academy, but never managed to start a game for the Gunners, appearing twice as off the subs' bench. It was quite a different story at United however. After a £7million move from Newcastle in 1995, Cole won three Premier League titles at Old Trafford, including one as part of the stunning Treble winning season of 1998/1999. Verdict: Manchester United Mikael Silvestre Manchester United 1999-2008 (361 apps, 10 goals); Arsenal 2008-2010 (46 apps, 6 goals) French international defender Silvestre enjoyed vast success during his time at Old Trafford. The Frenchman earned four Premier League titles, one Champions League winners’ medal and FA Cup and League Cup triumphs before Sir Alex Ferguson deemed him surplus to requirements. A move to Arsenal followed in 2008 by which time his peak had passed. Verdict: Manchester United Robin van Persie and Danny Welbeck were more successful at Manchester United Credit: Getty Images Robin van Persie Arsenal: 2004-2012 (279 apps, 132 goals); Manchester United: 2012-2015 (105 apps, 58 goals) A player that has best epitomised the difference between the two clubs in recent times, the Dutch striker was captain when he departed the Emirates Stadium in 2012 to hunt trophies under Sir Alex Ferguson. It worked, securing the Premier League title in his first season at Old Trafford while also being the top scorer in the division. Verdict: Manchester United Alexis Sanchez-Henrikh Mkhitarayan swap deal | All you need to know around the big football transfer Danny Welbeck Manchester United: 2008-2014 (142 apps, 29 goals); Arsenal: 2014-present (91 apps, 22 goals) Left Manchester United for Arsenal in 2014 after a promising, though short of fulfilling, spell in the first-team, featuring 27 times in Manchester United's 2012-13 title-winning season. His time at the Emirates has been hampered by injury, while he has only featured four times for England in the last three seasons. Verdict: Manchester United
Alexis Sanchez and Henrikh Mkhitaryan completed their swap deal between Manchester United and Arsenal on Monday, treading a well-worn path of transfers between the two clubs over the years. Here, we look back at 14 players who switched sides and how they got on. Paddy Sloan Manchester United: 1938-1939 (0 apps; 0 goals); Arsenal: 1946-48 (33 apps, 1 goal) Irish footballer who left Manchester United for Tranmere before the Second World War without making an appearance. After, he decided to join Arsenal where he established himself as a first-team regular in the 1946-47 season before losing his place and moving to Italy. Among footballers who played for both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland national teams. Verdict: [Performed better for] Arsenal David Herd Arsenal: 1954-1961 (166 apps, 99 goals); Manchester United: 1961-1968 (265 apps, 145 goals) Herd enjoyed fruitful spells at both clubs, acquiring strike-rates that bettered a goal every two games. After helping Arsenal to third place in the league 1959, Sir Matt Busby swooped for the former Stockport player in 1961. Herd went on to score two goals in a victorious FA Cup final for United against Leicester City in 1963 before becoming Division One champions in 1965. Verdict: Manchester United Ian Ure Arsenal: 1963-1969 (202 apps, 2 goals); Manchester United: 1969-1971 (65 apps, 1 goal) Arsenal manager Billy Wright moved hastily to bring the Scottish defender to London following an impressive spell at Dundee. However, Ure struggled with his move south of the border culminating in a shocking display in the 1969 League Cup final against Swindon. He departed for United that summer where he stayed for just two seasons before moving to Motherwell. Verdict: Neither George Graham Arsenal: 1966-1972 (308 apps, 77 goals); Manchester United: 1972-1974 (46 apps, 2 goals) As a midfielder or forward Graham’s playing career at the London club was impressive. He was a pivotal creative figure as Arsenal achieved the First Division and FA Cup double in 1971. He crossed to United in 1972 following the arrival of Alan Ball at Highbury but stayed for just under two years. The Scot would go on to win two First Division titles with Arsenal (1989 and 1991), the Uefa Cup (1994), the FA Cup (1993), two League Cups (1987 and 1993) in a nine-year spell. Verdict: Arsenal Graham won two First Division titles with Arsenal Credit: Getty Images Jimmy Rimmer Manchester United: 1965-1974 (46 apps, 0 goals); Arsenal: 1974-1977 (apps, 146, 0 goals) After spending nine years as understudy to Alex Stepney, Rimmer’s impressive loan spell at Swansea was enough to convince Bertie Mee that he could succeed as No1 at Highbury. By the following season Rimmer had become Arsenal's first-choice 'keeper. In 1975, he won Arsenal’s Player of the Year award and an England cap followed a year later. Verdict: Arsenal Brian Kidd Manchester United 1967-1974 (264 apps, 70 goals); Arsenal 1974-1976 (90 apps, 34 goals) The forward’s time at United was one of immense highs and lows. From scoring in United’s European Cup final triumph over Benfica in 1968, he suffered relegation with the same club six years later. He was top goal-scorer for Arsenal in his first season at the club, but failed to leave a lasting impact on the club. Verdict: Manchester United Kidd, here playing in the 1968 European Cup final at Wembley Credit: Getty/ALLSPORT Frank Stapleton Arsenal: 1971-1981 (300 apps, 108 goals); Manchester United: 1981-1987 (288 apps, 78 goals) The original RVP, Stapleton’s time at Arsenal was one of disappointment due to a lack of team success. He participated in three successive FA Cup finals, two of which ended in defeat. A familiar tale of Arsenal finishing fourth and failing to sign star players frustrated Stapleton. In 1981 he moved to the more ambitious United where he claimed two FA Cup winners’ medals in 1983 and 1985. Verdict: Manchester United Viv Anderson Arsenal: 1984-1987 (150 apps, 15 goals); Manchester United: 1987-1991 (64 apps, 4 goals) Widely known for being the first black footballer to represent England in a full international, defender Anderson was part of the Arsenal side that claimed the League Cup in 1987 and famously scored against Tottenham in the semi-final. Shortly afterwards, however, Anderson moved up north, achieving the rather impressive title of being Sir Alex Ferguson’s first signing at Manchester United. Verdict: Arsenal Leighton moved to Arsenal but did not feature for the club Credit: Getty Images Jim Leighton Manchester United 1988-1991 (94 caps); Arsenal 1991 (0 apps) After following Sir Alex Ferguson to Manchester from Aberdeen, Scottish goalkeeper Leighton struggled to hold down a position in the first team. His loan spell at Arsenal proved even more difficult to secure game-time, he never made a senior appearance for the north Londoners. Verdict: Manchester United David Platt Manchester United 1982-1985 (0 apps); Arsenal 1995-1998 (108 apps, 15 goals) Platt signed his first professional contract at Manchester United but moved on to Crewe Alexandra after failing to break in to the first team at Old Trafford. The dynamic midfielder fared much better at Arsenal, later in his career after successful stints in Italy with Juventus and Sampdoria. In his first season with Arsenal, Platt helped the Gunners secure Uefa Cup football with a fifth-placed finish. A Premier League triumph followed in 1998 in Platt’s final season at the club. Verdict: Arsenal Cole won the treble with Manchester United Credit: Andrew Budd/Action Images Andy Cole Arsenal: 1989-1992 (2 apps, 0 goals); Manchester United: 1995-2001 (195 apps, 93 goals) The striker began a peripatetic journey across a variety of top-division clubs at Arsenal, having graduated from the academy, but never managed to start a game for the Gunners, appearing twice as off the subs' bench. It was quite a different story at United however. After a £7million move from Newcastle in 1995, Cole won three Premier League titles at Old Trafford, including one as part of the stunning Treble winning season of 1998/1999. Verdict: Manchester United Mikael Silvestre Manchester United 1999-2008 (361 apps, 10 goals); Arsenal 2008-2010 (46 apps, 6 goals) French international defender Silvestre enjoyed vast success during his time at Old Trafford. The Frenchman earned four Premier League titles, one Champions League winners’ medal and FA Cup and League Cup triumphs before Sir Alex Ferguson deemed him surplus to requirements. A move to Arsenal followed in 2008 by which time his peak had passed. Verdict: Manchester United Robin van Persie and Danny Welbeck were more successful at Manchester United Credit: Getty Images Robin van Persie Arsenal: 2004-2012 (279 apps, 132 goals); Manchester United: 2012-2015 (105 apps, 58 goals) A player that has best epitomised the difference between the two clubs in recent times, the Dutch striker was captain when he departed the Emirates Stadium in 2012 to hunt trophies under Sir Alex Ferguson. It worked, securing the Premier League title in his first season at Old Trafford while also being the top scorer in the division. Verdict: Manchester United Alexis Sanchez-Henrikh Mkhitarayan swap deal | All you need to know around the big football transfer Danny Welbeck Manchester United: 2008-2014 (142 apps, 29 goals); Arsenal: 2014-present (91 apps, 22 goals) Left Manchester United for Arsenal in 2014 after a promising, though short of fulfilling, spell in the first-team, featuring 27 times in Manchester United's 2012-13 title-winning season. His time at the Emirates has been hampered by injury, while he has only featured four times for England in the last three seasons. Verdict: Manchester United
14 players who featured for both Arsenal and Manchester United – and where they performed best
Alexis Sanchez and Henrikh Mkhitaryan completed their swap deal between Manchester United and Arsenal on Monday, treading a well-worn path of transfers between the two clubs over the years. Here, we look back at 14 players who switched sides and how they got on. Paddy Sloan Manchester United: 1938-1939 (0 apps; 0 goals); Arsenal: 1946-48 (33 apps, 1 goal) Irish footballer who left Manchester United for Tranmere before the Second World War without making an appearance. After, he decided to join Arsenal where he established himself as a first-team regular in the 1946-47 season before losing his place and moving to Italy. Among footballers who played for both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland national teams. Verdict: [Performed better for] Arsenal David Herd Arsenal: 1954-1961 (166 apps, 99 goals); Manchester United: 1961-1968 (265 apps, 145 goals) Herd enjoyed fruitful spells at both clubs, acquiring strike-rates that bettered a goal every two games. After helping Arsenal to third place in the league 1959, Sir Matt Busby swooped for the former Stockport player in 1961. Herd went on to score two goals in a victorious FA Cup final for United against Leicester City in 1963 before becoming Division One champions in 1965. Verdict: Manchester United Ian Ure Arsenal: 1963-1969 (202 apps, 2 goals); Manchester United: 1969-1971 (65 apps, 1 goal) Arsenal manager Billy Wright moved hastily to bring the Scottish defender to London following an impressive spell at Dundee. However, Ure struggled with his move south of the border culminating in a shocking display in the 1969 League Cup final against Swindon. He departed for United that summer where he stayed for just two seasons before moving to Motherwell. Verdict: Neither George Graham Arsenal: 1966-1972 (308 apps, 77 goals); Manchester United: 1972-1974 (46 apps, 2 goals) As a midfielder or forward Graham’s playing career at the London club was impressive. He was a pivotal creative figure as Arsenal achieved the First Division and FA Cup double in 1971. He crossed to United in 1972 following the arrival of Alan Ball at Highbury but stayed for just under two years. The Scot would go on to win two First Division titles with Arsenal (1989 and 1991), the Uefa Cup (1994), the FA Cup (1993), two League Cups (1987 and 1993) in a nine-year spell. Verdict: Arsenal Graham won two First Division titles with Arsenal Credit: Getty Images Jimmy Rimmer Manchester United: 1965-1974 (46 apps, 0 goals); Arsenal: 1974-1977 (apps, 146, 0 goals) After spending nine years as understudy to Alex Stepney, Rimmer’s impressive loan spell at Swansea was enough to convince Bertie Mee that he could succeed as No1 at Highbury. By the following season Rimmer had become Arsenal's first-choice 'keeper. In 1975, he won Arsenal’s Player of the Year award and an England cap followed a year later. Verdict: Arsenal Brian Kidd Manchester United 1967-1974 (264 apps, 70 goals); Arsenal 1974-1976 (90 apps, 34 goals) The forward’s time at United was one of immense highs and lows. From scoring in United’s European Cup final triumph over Benfica in 1968, he suffered relegation with the same club six years later. He was top goal-scorer for Arsenal in his first season at the club, but failed to leave a lasting impact on the club. Verdict: Manchester United Kidd, here playing in the 1968 European Cup final at Wembley Credit: Getty/ALLSPORT Frank Stapleton Arsenal: 1971-1981 (300 apps, 108 goals); Manchester United: 1981-1987 (288 apps, 78 goals) The original RVP, Stapleton’s time at Arsenal was one of disappointment due to a lack of team success. He participated in three successive FA Cup finals, two of which ended in defeat. A familiar tale of Arsenal finishing fourth and failing to sign star players frustrated Stapleton. In 1981 he moved to the more ambitious United where he claimed two FA Cup winners’ medals in 1983 and 1985. Verdict: Manchester United Viv Anderson Arsenal: 1984-1987 (150 apps, 15 goals); Manchester United: 1987-1991 (64 apps, 4 goals) Widely known for being the first black footballer to represent England in a full international, defender Anderson was part of the Arsenal side that claimed the League Cup in 1987 and famously scored against Tottenham in the semi-final. Shortly afterwards, however, Anderson moved up north, achieving the rather impressive title of being Sir Alex Ferguson’s first signing at Manchester United. Verdict: Arsenal Leighton moved to Arsenal but did not feature for the club Credit: Getty Images Jim Leighton Manchester United 1988-1991 (94 caps); Arsenal 1991 (0 apps) After following Sir Alex Ferguson to Manchester from Aberdeen, Scottish goalkeeper Leighton struggled to hold down a position in the first team. His loan spell at Arsenal proved even more difficult to secure game-time, he never made a senior appearance for the north Londoners. Verdict: Manchester United David Platt Manchester United 1982-1985 (0 apps); Arsenal 1995-1998 (108 apps, 15 goals) Platt signed his first professional contract at Manchester United but moved on to Crewe Alexandra after failing to break in to the first team at Old Trafford. The dynamic midfielder fared much better at Arsenal, later in his career after successful stints in Italy with Juventus and Sampdoria. In his first season with Arsenal, Platt helped the Gunners secure Uefa Cup football with a fifth-placed finish. A Premier League triumph followed in 1998 in Platt’s final season at the club. Verdict: Arsenal Cole won the treble with Manchester United Credit: Andrew Budd/Action Images Andy Cole Arsenal: 1989-1992 (2 apps, 0 goals); Manchester United: 1995-2001 (195 apps, 93 goals) The striker began a peripatetic journey across a variety of top-division clubs at Arsenal, having graduated from the academy, but never managed to start a game for the Gunners, appearing twice as off the subs' bench. It was quite a different story at United however. After a £7million move from Newcastle in 1995, Cole won three Premier League titles at Old Trafford, including one as part of the stunning Treble winning season of 1998/1999. Verdict: Manchester United Mikael Silvestre Manchester United 1999-2008 (361 apps, 10 goals); Arsenal 2008-2010 (46 apps, 6 goals) French international defender Silvestre enjoyed vast success during his time at Old Trafford. The Frenchman earned four Premier League titles, one Champions League winners’ medal and FA Cup and League Cup triumphs before Sir Alex Ferguson deemed him surplus to requirements. A move to Arsenal followed in 2008 by which time his peak had passed. Verdict: Manchester United Robin van Persie and Danny Welbeck were more successful at Manchester United Credit: Getty Images Robin van Persie Arsenal: 2004-2012 (279 apps, 132 goals); Manchester United: 2012-2015 (105 apps, 58 goals) A player that has best epitomised the difference between the two clubs in recent times, the Dutch striker was captain when he departed the Emirates Stadium in 2012 to hunt trophies under Sir Alex Ferguson. It worked, securing the Premier League title in his first season at Old Trafford while also being the top scorer in the division. Verdict: Manchester United Alexis Sanchez-Henrikh Mkhitarayan swap deal | All you need to know around the big football transfer Danny Welbeck Manchester United: 2008-2014 (142 apps, 29 goals); Arsenal: 2014-present (91 apps, 22 goals) Left Manchester United for Arsenal in 2014 after a promising, though short of fulfilling, spell in the first-team, featuring 27 times in Manchester United's 2012-13 title-winning season. His time at the Emirates has been hampered by injury, while he has only featured four times for England in the last three seasons. Verdict: Manchester United
Alexis Sanchez and Henrikh Mkhitaryan completed their swap deal between Manchester United and Arsenal on Monday, treading a well-worn path of transfers between the two clubs over the years. Here, we look back at 14 players who switched sides and how they got on. Paddy Sloan Manchester United: 1938-1939 (0 apps; 0 goals); Arsenal: 1946-48 (33 apps, 1 goal) Irish footballer who left Manchester United for Tranmere before the Second World War without making an appearance. After, he decided to join Arsenal where he established himself as a first-team regular in the 1946-47 season before losing his place and moving to Italy. Among footballers who played for both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland national teams. Verdict: [Performed better for] Arsenal David Herd Arsenal: 1954-1961 (166 apps, 99 goals); Manchester United: 1961-1968 (265 apps, 145 goals) Herd enjoyed fruitful spells at both clubs, acquiring strike-rates that bettered a goal every two games. After helping Arsenal to third place in the league 1959, Sir Matt Busby swooped for the former Stockport player in 1961. Herd went on to score two goals in a victorious FA Cup final for United against Leicester City in 1963 before becoming Division One champions in 1965. Verdict: Manchester United Ian Ure Arsenal: 1963-1969 (202 apps, 2 goals); Manchester United: 1969-1971 (65 apps, 1 goal) Arsenal manager Billy Wright moved hastily to bring the Scottish defender to London following an impressive spell at Dundee. However, Ure struggled with his move south of the border culminating in a shocking display in the 1969 League Cup final against Swindon. He departed for United that summer where he stayed for just two seasons before moving to Motherwell. Verdict: Neither George Graham Arsenal: 1966-1972 (308 apps, 77 goals); Manchester United: 1972-1974 (46 apps, 2 goals) As a midfielder or forward Graham’s playing career at the London club was impressive. He was a pivotal creative figure as Arsenal achieved the First Division and FA Cup double in 1971. He crossed to United in 1972 following the arrival of Alan Ball at Highbury but stayed for just under two years. The Scot would go on to win two First Division titles with Arsenal (1989 and 1991), the Uefa Cup (1994), the FA Cup (1993), two League Cups (1987 and 1993) in a nine-year spell. Verdict: Arsenal Graham won two First Division titles with Arsenal Credit: Getty Images Jimmy Rimmer Manchester United: 1965-1974 (46 apps, 0 goals); Arsenal: 1974-1977 (apps, 146, 0 goals) After spending nine years as understudy to Alex Stepney, Rimmer’s impressive loan spell at Swansea was enough to convince Bertie Mee that he could succeed as No1 at Highbury. By the following season Rimmer had become Arsenal's first-choice 'keeper. In 1975, he won Arsenal’s Player of the Year award and an England cap followed a year later. Verdict: Arsenal Brian Kidd Manchester United 1967-1974 (264 apps, 70 goals); Arsenal 1974-1976 (90 apps, 34 goals) The forward’s time at United was one of immense highs and lows. From scoring in United’s European Cup final triumph over Benfica in 1968, he suffered relegation with the same club six years later. He was top goal-scorer for Arsenal in his first season at the club, but failed to leave a lasting impact on the club. Verdict: Manchester United Kidd, here playing in the 1968 European Cup final at Wembley Credit: Getty/ALLSPORT Frank Stapleton Arsenal: 1971-1981 (300 apps, 108 goals); Manchester United: 1981-1987 (288 apps, 78 goals) The original RVP, Stapleton’s time at Arsenal was one of disappointment due to a lack of team success. He participated in three successive FA Cup finals, two of which ended in defeat. A familiar tale of Arsenal finishing fourth and failing to sign star players frustrated Stapleton. In 1981 he moved to the more ambitious United where he claimed two FA Cup winners’ medals in 1983 and 1985. Verdict: Manchester United Viv Anderson Arsenal: 1984-1987 (150 apps, 15 goals); Manchester United: 1987-1991 (64 apps, 4 goals) Widely known for being the first black footballer to represent England in a full international, defender Anderson was part of the Arsenal side that claimed the League Cup in 1987 and famously scored against Tottenham in the semi-final. Shortly afterwards, however, Anderson moved up north, achieving the rather impressive title of being Sir Alex Ferguson’s first signing at Manchester United. Verdict: Arsenal Leighton moved to Arsenal but did not feature for the club Credit: Getty Images Jim Leighton Manchester United 1988-1991 (94 caps); Arsenal 1991 (0 apps) After following Sir Alex Ferguson to Manchester from Aberdeen, Scottish goalkeeper Leighton struggled to hold down a position in the first team. His loan spell at Arsenal proved even more difficult to secure game-time, he never made a senior appearance for the north Londoners. Verdict: Manchester United David Platt Manchester United 1982-1985 (0 apps); Arsenal 1995-1998 (108 apps, 15 goals) Platt signed his first professional contract at Manchester United but moved on to Crewe Alexandra after failing to break in to the first team at Old Trafford. The dynamic midfielder fared much better at Arsenal, later in his career after successful stints in Italy with Juventus and Sampdoria. In his first season with Arsenal, Platt helped the Gunners secure Uefa Cup football with a fifth-placed finish. A Premier League triumph followed in 1998 in Platt’s final season at the club. Verdict: Arsenal Cole won the treble with Manchester United Credit: Andrew Budd/Action Images Andy Cole Arsenal: 1989-1992 (2 apps, 0 goals); Manchester United: 1995-2001 (195 apps, 93 goals) The striker began a peripatetic journey across a variety of top-division clubs at Arsenal, having graduated from the academy, but never managed to start a game for the Gunners, appearing twice as off the subs' bench. It was quite a different story at United however. After a £7million move from Newcastle in 1995, Cole won three Premier League titles at Old Trafford, including one as part of the stunning Treble winning season of 1998/1999. Verdict: Manchester United Mikael Silvestre Manchester United 1999-2008 (361 apps, 10 goals); Arsenal 2008-2010 (46 apps, 6 goals) French international defender Silvestre enjoyed vast success during his time at Old Trafford. The Frenchman earned four Premier League titles, one Champions League winners’ medal and FA Cup and League Cup triumphs before Sir Alex Ferguson deemed him surplus to requirements. A move to Arsenal followed in 2008 by which time his peak had passed. Verdict: Manchester United Robin van Persie and Danny Welbeck were more successful at Manchester United Credit: Getty Images Robin van Persie Arsenal: 2004-2012 (279 apps, 132 goals); Manchester United: 2012-2015 (105 apps, 58 goals) A player that has best epitomised the difference between the two clubs in recent times, the Dutch striker was captain when he departed the Emirates Stadium in 2012 to hunt trophies under Sir Alex Ferguson. It worked, securing the Premier League title in his first season at Old Trafford while also being the top scorer in the division. Verdict: Manchester United Alexis Sanchez-Henrikh Mkhitarayan swap deal | All you need to know around the big football transfer Danny Welbeck Manchester United: 2008-2014 (142 apps, 29 goals); Arsenal: 2014-present (91 apps, 22 goals) Left Manchester United for Arsenal in 2014 after a promising, though short of fulfilling, spell in the first-team, featuring 27 times in Manchester United's 2012-13 title-winning season. His time at the Emirates has been hampered by injury, while he has only featured four times for England in the last three seasons. Verdict: Manchester United
14 players who featured for both Arsenal and Manchester United – and where they performed best
Alexis Sanchez and Henrikh Mkhitaryan completed their swap deal between Manchester United and Arsenal on Monday, treading a well-worn path of transfers between the two clubs over the years. Here, we look back at 14 players who switched sides and how they got on. Paddy Sloan Manchester United: 1938-1939 (0 apps; 0 goals); Arsenal: 1946-48 (33 apps, 1 goal) Irish footballer who left Manchester United for Tranmere before the Second World War without making an appearance. After, he decided to join Arsenal where he established himself as a first-team regular in the 1946-47 season before losing his place and moving to Italy. Among footballers who played for both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland national teams. Verdict: [Performed better for] Arsenal David Herd Arsenal: 1954-1961 (166 apps, 99 goals); Manchester United: 1961-1968 (265 apps, 145 goals) Herd enjoyed fruitful spells at both clubs, acquiring strike-rates that bettered a goal every two games. After helping Arsenal to third place in the league 1959, Sir Matt Busby swooped for the former Stockport player in 1961. Herd went on to score two goals in a victorious FA Cup final for United against Leicester City in 1963 before becoming Division One champions in 1965. Verdict: Manchester United Ian Ure Arsenal: 1963-1969 (202 apps, 2 goals); Manchester United: 1969-1971 (65 apps, 1 goal) Arsenal manager Billy Wright moved hastily to bring the Scottish defender to London following an impressive spell at Dundee. However, Ure struggled with his move south of the border culminating in a shocking display in the 1969 League Cup final against Swindon. He departed for United that summer where he stayed for just two seasons before moving to Motherwell. Verdict: Neither George Graham Arsenal: 1966-1972 (308 apps, 77 goals); Manchester United: 1972-1974 (46 apps, 2 goals) As a midfielder or forward Graham’s playing career at the London club was impressive. He was a pivotal creative figure as Arsenal achieved the First Division and FA Cup double in 1971. He crossed to United in 1972 following the arrival of Alan Ball at Highbury but stayed for just under two years. The Scot would go on to win two First Division titles with Arsenal (1989 and 1991), the Uefa Cup (1994), the FA Cup (1993), two League Cups (1987 and 1993) in a nine-year spell. Verdict: Arsenal Graham won two First Division titles with Arsenal Credit: Getty Images Jimmy Rimmer Manchester United: 1965-1974 (46 apps, 0 goals); Arsenal: 1974-1977 (apps, 146, 0 goals) After spending nine years as understudy to Alex Stepney, Rimmer’s impressive loan spell at Swansea was enough to convince Bertie Mee that he could succeed as No1 at Highbury. By the following season Rimmer had become Arsenal's first-choice 'keeper. In 1975, he won Arsenal’s Player of the Year award and an England cap followed a year later. Verdict: Arsenal Brian Kidd Manchester United 1967-1974 (264 apps, 70 goals); Arsenal 1974-1976 (90 apps, 34 goals) The forward’s time at United was one of immense highs and lows. From scoring in United’s European Cup final triumph over Benfica in 1968, he suffered relegation with the same club six years later. He was top goal-scorer for Arsenal in his first season at the club, but failed to leave a lasting impact on the club. Verdict: Manchester United Kidd, here playing in the 1968 European Cup final at Wembley Credit: Getty/ALLSPORT Frank Stapleton Arsenal: 1971-1981 (300 apps, 108 goals); Manchester United: 1981-1987 (288 apps, 78 goals) The original RVP, Stapleton’s time at Arsenal was one of disappointment due to a lack of team success. He participated in three successive FA Cup finals, two of which ended in defeat. A familiar tale of Arsenal finishing fourth and failing to sign star players frustrated Stapleton. In 1981 he moved to the more ambitious United where he claimed two FA Cup winners’ medals in 1983 and 1985. Verdict: Manchester United Viv Anderson Arsenal: 1984-1987 (150 apps, 15 goals); Manchester United: 1987-1991 (64 apps, 4 goals) Widely known for being the first black footballer to represent England in a full international, defender Anderson was part of the Arsenal side that claimed the League Cup in 1987 and famously scored against Tottenham in the semi-final. Shortly afterwards, however, Anderson moved up north, achieving the rather impressive title of being Sir Alex Ferguson’s first signing at Manchester United. Verdict: Arsenal Leighton moved to Arsenal but did not feature for the club Credit: Getty Images Jim Leighton Manchester United 1988-1991 (94 caps); Arsenal 1991 (0 apps) After following Sir Alex Ferguson to Manchester from Aberdeen, Scottish goalkeeper Leighton struggled to hold down a position in the first team. His loan spell at Arsenal proved even more difficult to secure game-time, he never made a senior appearance for the north Londoners. Verdict: Manchester United David Platt Manchester United 1982-1985 (0 apps); Arsenal 1995-1998 (108 apps, 15 goals) Platt signed his first professional contract at Manchester United but moved on to Crewe Alexandra after failing to break in to the first team at Old Trafford. The dynamic midfielder fared much better at Arsenal, later in his career after successful stints in Italy with Juventus and Sampdoria. In his first season with Arsenal, Platt helped the Gunners secure Uefa Cup football with a fifth-placed finish. A Premier League triumph followed in 1998 in Platt’s final season at the club. Verdict: Arsenal Cole won the treble with Manchester United Credit: Andrew Budd/Action Images Andy Cole Arsenal: 1989-1992 (2 apps, 0 goals); Manchester United: 1995-2001 (195 apps, 93 goals) The striker began a peripatetic journey across a variety of top-division clubs at Arsenal, having graduated from the academy, but never managed to start a game for the Gunners, appearing twice as off the subs' bench. It was quite a different story at United however. After a £7million move from Newcastle in 1995, Cole won three Premier League titles at Old Trafford, including one as part of the stunning Treble winning season of 1998/1999. Verdict: Manchester United Mikael Silvestre Manchester United 1999-2008 (361 apps, 10 goals); Arsenal 2008-2010 (46 apps, 6 goals) French international defender Silvestre enjoyed vast success during his time at Old Trafford. The Frenchman earned four Premier League titles, one Champions League winners’ medal and FA Cup and League Cup triumphs before Sir Alex Ferguson deemed him surplus to requirements. A move to Arsenal followed in 2008 by which time his peak had passed. Verdict: Manchester United Robin van Persie and Danny Welbeck were more successful at Manchester United Credit: Getty Images Robin van Persie Arsenal: 2004-2012 (279 apps, 132 goals); Manchester United: 2012-2015 (105 apps, 58 goals) A player that has best epitomised the difference between the two clubs in recent times, the Dutch striker was captain when he departed the Emirates Stadium in 2012 to hunt trophies under Sir Alex Ferguson. It worked, securing the Premier League title in his first season at Old Trafford while also being the top scorer in the division. Verdict: Manchester United Alexis Sanchez-Henrikh Mkhitarayan swap deal | All you need to know around the big football transfer Danny Welbeck Manchester United: 2008-2014 (142 apps, 29 goals); Arsenal: 2014-present (91 apps, 22 goals) Left Manchester United for Arsenal in 2014 after a promising, though short of fulfilling, spell in the first-team, featuring 27 times in Manchester United's 2012-13 title-winning season. His time at the Emirates has been hampered by injury, while he has only featured four times for England in the last three seasons. Verdict: Manchester United
Alexis Sanchez and Henrikh Mkhitaryan completed their swap deal between Manchester United and Arsenal on Monday, treading a well-worn path of transfers between the two clubs over the years. Here, we look back at 14 players who switched sides and how they got on. Paddy Sloan Manchester United: 1938-1939 (0 apps; 0 goals); Arsenal: 1946-48 (33 apps, 1 goal) Irish footballer who left Manchester United for Tranmere before the Second World War without making an appearance. After, he decided to join Arsenal where he established himself as a first-team regular in the 1946-47 season before losing his place and moving to Italy. Among footballers who played for both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland national teams. Verdict: [Performed better for] Arsenal David Herd Arsenal: 1954-1961 (166 apps, 99 goals); Manchester United: 1961-1968 (265 apps, 145 goals) Herd enjoyed fruitful spells at both clubs, acquiring strike-rates that bettered a goal every two games. After helping Arsenal to third place in the league 1959, Sir Matt Busby swooped for the former Stockport player in 1961. Herd went on to score two goals in a victorious FA Cup final for United against Leicester City in 1963 before becoming Division One champions in 1965. Verdict: Manchester United Ian Ure Arsenal: 1963-1969 (202 apps, 2 goals); Manchester United: 1969-1971 (65 apps, 1 goal) Arsenal manager Billy Wright moved hastily to bring the Scottish defender to London following an impressive spell at Dundee. However, Ure struggled with his move south of the border culminating in a shocking display in the 1969 League Cup final against Swindon. He departed for United that summer where he stayed for just two seasons before moving to Motherwell. Verdict: Neither George Graham Arsenal: 1966-1972 (308 apps, 77 goals); Manchester United: 1972-1974 (46 apps, 2 goals) As a midfielder or forward Graham’s playing career at the London club was impressive. He was a pivotal creative figure as Arsenal achieved the First Division and FA Cup double in 1971. He crossed to United in 1972 following the arrival of Alan Ball at Highbury but stayed for just under two years. The Scot would go on to win two First Division titles with Arsenal (1989 and 1991), the Uefa Cup (1994), the FA Cup (1993), two League Cups (1987 and 1993) in a nine-year spell. Verdict: Arsenal Graham won two First Division titles with Arsenal Credit: Getty Images Jimmy Rimmer Manchester United: 1965-1974 (46 apps, 0 goals); Arsenal: 1974-1977 (apps, 146, 0 goals) After spending nine years as understudy to Alex Stepney, Rimmer’s impressive loan spell at Swansea was enough to convince Bertie Mee that he could succeed as No1 at Highbury. By the following season Rimmer had become Arsenal's first-choice 'keeper. In 1975, he won Arsenal’s Player of the Year award and an England cap followed a year later. Verdict: Arsenal Brian Kidd Manchester United 1967-1974 (264 apps, 70 goals); Arsenal 1974-1976 (90 apps, 34 goals) The forward’s time at United was one of immense highs and lows. From scoring in United’s European Cup final triumph over Benfica in 1968, he suffered relegation with the same club six years later. He was top goal-scorer for Arsenal in his first season at the club, but failed to leave a lasting impact on the club. Verdict: Manchester United Kidd, here playing in the 1968 European Cup final at Wembley Credit: Getty/ALLSPORT Frank Stapleton Arsenal: 1971-1981 (300 apps, 108 goals); Manchester United: 1981-1987 (288 apps, 78 goals) The original RVP, Stapleton’s time at Arsenal was one of disappointment due to a lack of team success. He participated in three successive FA Cup finals, two of which ended in defeat. A familiar tale of Arsenal finishing fourth and failing to sign star players frustrated Stapleton. In 1981 he moved to the more ambitious United where he claimed two FA Cup winners’ medals in 1983 and 1985. Verdict: Manchester United Viv Anderson Arsenal: 1984-1987 (150 apps, 15 goals); Manchester United: 1987-1991 (64 apps, 4 goals) Widely known for being the first black footballer to represent England in a full international, defender Anderson was part of the Arsenal side that claimed the League Cup in 1987 and famously scored against Tottenham in the semi-final. Shortly afterwards, however, Anderson moved up north, achieving the rather impressive title of being Sir Alex Ferguson’s first signing at Manchester United. Verdict: Arsenal Leighton moved to Arsenal but did not feature for the club Credit: Getty Images Jim Leighton Manchester United 1988-1991 (94 caps); Arsenal 1991 (0 apps) After following Sir Alex Ferguson to Manchester from Aberdeen, Scottish goalkeeper Leighton struggled to hold down a position in the first team. His loan spell at Arsenal proved even more difficult to secure game-time, he never made a senior appearance for the north Londoners. Verdict: Manchester United David Platt Manchester United 1982-1985 (0 apps); Arsenal 1995-1998 (108 apps, 15 goals) Platt signed his first professional contract at Manchester United but moved on to Crewe Alexandra after failing to break in to the first team at Old Trafford. The dynamic midfielder fared much better at Arsenal, later in his career after successful stints in Italy with Juventus and Sampdoria. In his first season with Arsenal, Platt helped the Gunners secure Uefa Cup football with a fifth-placed finish. A Premier League triumph followed in 1998 in Platt’s final season at the club. Verdict: Arsenal Cole won the treble with Manchester United Credit: Andrew Budd/Action Images Andy Cole Arsenal: 1989-1992 (2 apps, 0 goals); Manchester United: 1995-2001 (195 apps, 93 goals) The striker began a peripatetic journey across a variety of top-division clubs at Arsenal, having graduated from the academy, but never managed to start a game for the Gunners, appearing twice as off the subs' bench. It was quite a different story at United however. After a £7million move from Newcastle in 1995, Cole won three Premier League titles at Old Trafford, including one as part of the stunning Treble winning season of 1998/1999. Verdict: Manchester United Mikael Silvestre Manchester United 1999-2008 (361 apps, 10 goals); Arsenal 2008-2010 (46 apps, 6 goals) French international defender Silvestre enjoyed vast success during his time at Old Trafford. The Frenchman earned four Premier League titles, one Champions League winners’ medal and FA Cup and League Cup triumphs before Sir Alex Ferguson deemed him surplus to requirements. A move to Arsenal followed in 2008 by which time his peak had passed. Verdict: Manchester United Robin van Persie and Danny Welbeck were more successful at Manchester United Credit: Getty Images Robin van Persie Arsenal: 2004-2012 (279 apps, 132 goals); Manchester United: 2012-2015 (105 apps, 58 goals) A player that has best epitomised the difference between the two clubs in recent times, the Dutch striker was captain when he departed the Emirates Stadium in 2012 to hunt trophies under Sir Alex Ferguson. It worked, securing the Premier League title in his first season at Old Trafford while also being the top scorer in the division. Verdict: Manchester United Alexis Sanchez-Henrikh Mkhitarayan swap deal | All you need to know around the big football transfer Danny Welbeck Manchester United: 2008-2014 (142 apps, 29 goals); Arsenal: 2014-present (91 apps, 22 goals) Left Manchester United for Arsenal in 2014 after a promising, though short of fulfilling, spell in the first-team, featuring 27 times in Manchester United's 2012-13 title-winning season. His time at the Emirates has been hampered by injury, while he has only featured four times for England in the last three seasons. Verdict: Manchester United
14 players who featured for both Arsenal and Manchester United – and where they performed best
Alexis Sanchez and Henrikh Mkhitaryan completed their swap deal between Manchester United and Arsenal on Monday, treading a well-worn path of transfers between the two clubs over the years. Here, we look back at 14 players who switched sides and how they got on. Paddy Sloan Manchester United: 1938-1939 (0 apps; 0 goals); Arsenal: 1946-48 (33 apps, 1 goal) Irish footballer who left Manchester United for Tranmere before the Second World War without making an appearance. After, he decided to join Arsenal where he established himself as a first-team regular in the 1946-47 season before losing his place and moving to Italy. Among footballers who played for both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland national teams. Verdict: [Performed better for] Arsenal David Herd Arsenal: 1954-1961 (166 apps, 99 goals); Manchester United: 1961-1968 (265 apps, 145 goals) Herd enjoyed fruitful spells at both clubs, acquiring strike-rates that bettered a goal every two games. After helping Arsenal to third place in the league 1959, Sir Matt Busby swooped for the former Stockport player in 1961. Herd went on to score two goals in a victorious FA Cup final for United against Leicester City in 1963 before becoming Division One champions in 1965. Verdict: Manchester United Ian Ure Arsenal: 1963-1969 (202 apps, 2 goals); Manchester United: 1969-1971 (65 apps, 1 goal) Arsenal manager Billy Wright moved hastily to bring the Scottish defender to London following an impressive spell at Dundee. However, Ure struggled with his move south of the border culminating in a shocking display in the 1969 League Cup final against Swindon. He departed for United that summer where he stayed for just two seasons before moving to Motherwell. Verdict: Neither George Graham Arsenal: 1966-1972 (308 apps, 77 goals); Manchester United: 1972-1974 (46 apps, 2 goals) As a midfielder or forward Graham’s playing career at the London club was impressive. He was a pivotal creative figure as Arsenal achieved the First Division and FA Cup double in 1971. He crossed to United in 1972 following the arrival of Alan Ball at Highbury but stayed for just under two years. The Scot would go on to win two First Division titles with Arsenal (1989 and 1991), the Uefa Cup (1994), the FA Cup (1993), two League Cups (1987 and 1993) in a nine-year spell. Verdict: Arsenal Graham won two First Division titles with Arsenal Credit: Getty Images Jimmy Rimmer Manchester United: 1965-1974 (46 apps, 0 goals); Arsenal: 1974-1977 (apps, 146, 0 goals) After spending nine years as understudy to Alex Stepney, Rimmer’s impressive loan spell at Swansea was enough to convince Bertie Mee that he could succeed as No1 at Highbury. By the following season Rimmer had become Arsenal's first-choice 'keeper. In 1975, he won Arsenal’s Player of the Year award and an England cap followed a year later. Verdict: Arsenal Brian Kidd Manchester United 1967-1974 (264 apps, 70 goals); Arsenal 1974-1976 (90 apps, 34 goals) The forward’s time at United was one of immense highs and lows. From scoring in United’s European Cup final triumph over Benfica in 1968, he suffered relegation with the same club six years later. He was top goal-scorer for Arsenal in his first season at the club, but failed to leave a lasting impact on the club. Verdict: Manchester United Kidd, here playing in the 1968 European Cup final at Wembley Credit: Getty/ALLSPORT Frank Stapleton Arsenal: 1971-1981 (300 apps, 108 goals); Manchester United: 1981-1987 (288 apps, 78 goals) The original RVP, Stapleton’s time at Arsenal was one of disappointment due to a lack of team success. He participated in three successive FA Cup finals, two of which ended in defeat. A familiar tale of Arsenal finishing fourth and failing to sign star players frustrated Stapleton. In 1981 he moved to the more ambitious United where he claimed two FA Cup winners’ medals in 1983 and 1985. Verdict: Manchester United Viv Anderson Arsenal: 1984-1987 (150 apps, 15 goals); Manchester United: 1987-1991 (64 apps, 4 goals) Widely known for being the first black footballer to represent England in a full international, defender Anderson was part of the Arsenal side that claimed the League Cup in 1987 and famously scored against Tottenham in the semi-final. Shortly afterwards, however, Anderson moved up north, achieving the rather impressive title of being Sir Alex Ferguson’s first signing at Manchester United. Verdict: Arsenal Leighton moved to Arsenal but did not feature for the club Credit: Getty Images Jim Leighton Manchester United 1988-1991 (94 caps); Arsenal 1991 (0 apps) After following Sir Alex Ferguson to Manchester from Aberdeen, Scottish goalkeeper Leighton struggled to hold down a position in the first team. His loan spell at Arsenal proved even more difficult to secure game-time, he never made a senior appearance for the north Londoners. Verdict: Manchester United David Platt Manchester United 1982-1985 (0 apps); Arsenal 1995-1998 (108 apps, 15 goals) Platt signed his first professional contract at Manchester United but moved on to Crewe Alexandra after failing to break in to the first team at Old Trafford. The dynamic midfielder fared much better at Arsenal, later in his career after successful stints in Italy with Juventus and Sampdoria. In his first season with Arsenal, Platt helped the Gunners secure Uefa Cup football with a fifth-placed finish. A Premier League triumph followed in 1998 in Platt’s final season at the club. Verdict: Arsenal Cole won the treble with Manchester United Credit: Andrew Budd/Action Images Andy Cole Arsenal: 1989-1992 (2 apps, 0 goals); Manchester United: 1995-2001 (195 apps, 93 goals) The striker began a peripatetic journey across a variety of top-division clubs at Arsenal, having graduated from the academy, but never managed to start a game for the Gunners, appearing twice as off the subs' bench. It was quite a different story at United however. After a £7million move from Newcastle in 1995, Cole won three Premier League titles at Old Trafford, including one as part of the stunning Treble winning season of 1998/1999. Verdict: Manchester United Mikael Silvestre Manchester United 1999-2008 (361 apps, 10 goals); Arsenal 2008-2010 (46 apps, 6 goals) French international defender Silvestre enjoyed vast success during his time at Old Trafford. The Frenchman earned four Premier League titles, one Champions League winners’ medal and FA Cup and League Cup triumphs before Sir Alex Ferguson deemed him surplus to requirements. A move to Arsenal followed in 2008 by which time his peak had passed. Verdict: Manchester United Robin van Persie and Danny Welbeck were more successful at Manchester United Credit: Getty Images Robin van Persie Arsenal: 2004-2012 (279 apps, 132 goals); Manchester United: 2012-2015 (105 apps, 58 goals) A player that has best epitomised the difference between the two clubs in recent times, the Dutch striker was captain when he departed the Emirates Stadium in 2012 to hunt trophies under Sir Alex Ferguson. It worked, securing the Premier League title in his first season at Old Trafford while also being the top scorer in the division. Verdict: Manchester United Alexis Sanchez-Henrikh Mkhitarayan swap deal | All you need to know around the big football transfer Danny Welbeck Manchester United: 2008-2014 (142 apps, 29 goals); Arsenal: 2014-present (91 apps, 22 goals) Left Manchester United for Arsenal in 2014 after a promising, though short of fulfilling, spell in the first-team, featuring 27 times in Manchester United's 2012-13 title-winning season. His time at the Emirates has been hampered by injury, while he has only featured four times for England in the last three seasons. Verdict: Manchester United
Alexis Sanchez and Henrikh Mkhitaryan completed their swap deal between Manchester United and Arsenal on Monday, treading a well-worn path of transfers between the two clubs over the years. Here, we look back at 14 players who switched sides and how they got on. Paddy Sloan Manchester United: 1938-1939 (0 apps; 0 goals); Arsenal: 1946-48 (33 apps, 1 goal) Irish footballer who left Manchester United for Tranmere before the Second World War without making an appearance. After, he decided to join Arsenal where he established himself as a first-team regular in the 1946-47 season before losing his place and moving to Italy. Among footballers who played for both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland national teams. Verdict: [Performed better for] Arsenal David Herd Arsenal: 1954-1961 (166 apps, 99 goals); Manchester United: 1961-1968 (265 apps, 145 goals) Herd enjoyed fruitful spells at both clubs, acquiring strike-rates that bettered a goal every two games. After helping Arsenal to third place in the league 1959, Sir Matt Busby swooped for the former Stockport player in 1961. Herd went on to score two goals in a victorious FA Cup final for United against Leicester City in 1963 before becoming Division One champions in 1965. Verdict: Manchester United Ian Ure Arsenal: 1963-1969 (202 apps, 2 goals); Manchester United: 1969-1971 (65 apps, 1 goal) Arsenal manager Billy Wright moved hastily to bring the Scottish defender to London following an impressive spell at Dundee. However, Ure struggled with his move south of the border culminating in a shocking display in the 1969 League Cup final against Swindon. He departed for United that summer where he stayed for just two seasons before moving to Motherwell. Verdict: Neither George Graham Arsenal: 1966-1972 (308 apps, 77 goals); Manchester United: 1972-1974 (46 apps, 2 goals) As a midfielder or forward Graham’s playing career at the London club was impressive. He was a pivotal creative figure as Arsenal achieved the First Division and FA Cup double in 1971. He crossed to United in 1972 following the arrival of Alan Ball at Highbury but stayed for just under two years. The Scot would go on to win two First Division titles with Arsenal (1989 and 1991), the Uefa Cup (1994), the FA Cup (1993), two League Cups (1987 and 1993) in a nine-year spell. Verdict: Arsenal Graham won two First Division titles with Arsenal Credit: Getty Images Jimmy Rimmer Manchester United: 1965-1974 (46 apps, 0 goals); Arsenal: 1974-1977 (apps, 146, 0 goals) After spending nine years as understudy to Alex Stepney, Rimmer’s impressive loan spell at Swansea was enough to convince Bertie Mee that he could succeed as No1 at Highbury. By the following season Rimmer had become Arsenal's first-choice 'keeper. In 1975, he won Arsenal’s Player of the Year award and an England cap followed a year later. Verdict: Arsenal Brian Kidd Manchester United 1967-1974 (264 apps, 70 goals); Arsenal 1974-1976 (90 apps, 34 goals) The forward’s time at United was one of immense highs and lows. From scoring in United’s European Cup final triumph over Benfica in 1968, he suffered relegation with the same club six years later. He was top goal-scorer for Arsenal in his first season at the club, but failed to leave a lasting impact on the club. Verdict: Manchester United Kidd, here playing in the 1968 European Cup final at Wembley Credit: Getty/ALLSPORT Frank Stapleton Arsenal: 1971-1981 (300 apps, 108 goals); Manchester United: 1981-1987 (288 apps, 78 goals) The original RVP, Stapleton’s time at Arsenal was one of disappointment due to a lack of team success. He participated in three successive FA Cup finals, two of which ended in defeat. A familiar tale of Arsenal finishing fourth and failing to sign star players frustrated Stapleton. In 1981 he moved to the more ambitious United where he claimed two FA Cup winners’ medals in 1983 and 1985. Verdict: Manchester United Viv Anderson Arsenal: 1984-1987 (150 apps, 15 goals); Manchester United: 1987-1991 (64 apps, 4 goals) Widely known for being the first black footballer to represent England in a full international, defender Anderson was part of the Arsenal side that claimed the League Cup in 1987 and famously scored against Tottenham in the semi-final. Shortly afterwards, however, Anderson moved up north, achieving the rather impressive title of being Sir Alex Ferguson’s first signing at Manchester United. Verdict: Arsenal Leighton moved to Arsenal but did not feature for the club Credit: Getty Images Jim Leighton Manchester United 1988-1991 (94 caps); Arsenal 1991 (0 apps) After following Sir Alex Ferguson to Manchester from Aberdeen, Scottish goalkeeper Leighton struggled to hold down a position in the first team. His loan spell at Arsenal proved even more difficult to secure game-time, he never made a senior appearance for the north Londoners. Verdict: Manchester United David Platt Manchester United 1982-1985 (0 apps); Arsenal 1995-1998 (108 apps, 15 goals) Platt signed his first professional contract at Manchester United but moved on to Crewe Alexandra after failing to break in to the first team at Old Trafford. The dynamic midfielder fared much better at Arsenal, later in his career after successful stints in Italy with Juventus and Sampdoria. In his first season with Arsenal, Platt helped the Gunners secure Uefa Cup football with a fifth-placed finish. A Premier League triumph followed in 1998 in Platt’s final season at the club. Verdict: Arsenal Cole won the treble with Manchester United Credit: Andrew Budd/Action Images Andy Cole Arsenal: 1989-1992 (2 apps, 0 goals); Manchester United: 1995-2001 (195 apps, 93 goals) The striker began a peripatetic journey across a variety of top-division clubs at Arsenal, having graduated from the academy, but never managed to start a game for the Gunners, appearing twice as off the subs' bench. It was quite a different story at United however. After a £7million move from Newcastle in 1995, Cole won three Premier League titles at Old Trafford, including one as part of the stunning Treble winning season of 1998/1999. Verdict: Manchester United Mikael Silvestre Manchester United 1999-2008 (361 apps, 10 goals); Arsenal 2008-2010 (46 apps, 6 goals) French international defender Silvestre enjoyed vast success during his time at Old Trafford. The Frenchman earned four Premier League titles, one Champions League winners’ medal and FA Cup and League Cup triumphs before Sir Alex Ferguson deemed him surplus to requirements. A move to Arsenal followed in 2008 by which time his peak had passed. Verdict: Manchester United Robin van Persie and Danny Welbeck were more successful at Manchester United Credit: Getty Images Robin van Persie Arsenal: 2004-2012 (279 apps, 132 goals); Manchester United: 2012-2015 (105 apps, 58 goals) A player that has best epitomised the difference between the two clubs in recent times, the Dutch striker was captain when he departed the Emirates Stadium in 2012 to hunt trophies under Sir Alex Ferguson. It worked, securing the Premier League title in his first season at Old Trafford while also being the top scorer in the division. Verdict: Manchester United Alexis Sanchez-Henrikh Mkhitarayan swap deal | All you need to know around the big football transfer Danny Welbeck Manchester United: 2008-2014 (142 apps, 29 goals); Arsenal: 2014-present (91 apps, 22 goals) Left Manchester United for Arsenal in 2014 after a promising, though short of fulfilling, spell in the first-team, featuring 27 times in Manchester United's 2012-13 title-winning season. His time at the Emirates has been hampered by injury, while he has only featured four times for England in the last three seasons. Verdict: Manchester United
14 players who featured for both Arsenal and Manchester United – and where they performed best
Alexis Sanchez and Henrikh Mkhitaryan completed their swap deal between Manchester United and Arsenal on Monday, treading a well-worn path of transfers between the two clubs over the years. Here, we look back at 14 players who switched sides and how they got on. Paddy Sloan Manchester United: 1938-1939 (0 apps; 0 goals); Arsenal: 1946-48 (33 apps, 1 goal) Irish footballer who left Manchester United for Tranmere before the Second World War without making an appearance. After, he decided to join Arsenal where he established himself as a first-team regular in the 1946-47 season before losing his place and moving to Italy. Among footballers who played for both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland national teams. Verdict: [Performed better for] Arsenal David Herd Arsenal: 1954-1961 (166 apps, 99 goals); Manchester United: 1961-1968 (265 apps, 145 goals) Herd enjoyed fruitful spells at both clubs, acquiring strike-rates that bettered a goal every two games. After helping Arsenal to third place in the league 1959, Sir Matt Busby swooped for the former Stockport player in 1961. Herd went on to score two goals in a victorious FA Cup final for United against Leicester City in 1963 before becoming Division One champions in 1965. Verdict: Manchester United Ian Ure Arsenal: 1963-1969 (202 apps, 2 goals); Manchester United: 1969-1971 (65 apps, 1 goal) Arsenal manager Billy Wright moved hastily to bring the Scottish defender to London following an impressive spell at Dundee. However, Ure struggled with his move south of the border culminating in a shocking display in the 1969 League Cup final against Swindon. He departed for United that summer where he stayed for just two seasons before moving to Motherwell. Verdict: Neither George Graham Arsenal: 1966-1972 (308 apps, 77 goals); Manchester United: 1972-1974 (46 apps, 2 goals) As a midfielder or forward Graham’s playing career at the London club was impressive. He was a pivotal creative figure as Arsenal achieved the First Division and FA Cup double in 1971. He crossed to United in 1972 following the arrival of Alan Ball at Highbury but stayed for just under two years. The Scot would go on to win two First Division titles with Arsenal (1989 and 1991), the Uefa Cup (1994), the FA Cup (1993), two League Cups (1987 and 1993) in a nine-year spell. Verdict: Arsenal Graham won two First Division titles with Arsenal Credit: Getty Images Jimmy Rimmer Manchester United: 1965-1974 (46 apps, 0 goals); Arsenal: 1974-1977 (apps, 146, 0 goals) After spending nine years as understudy to Alex Stepney, Rimmer’s impressive loan spell at Swansea was enough to convince Bertie Mee that he could succeed as No1 at Highbury. By the following season Rimmer had become Arsenal's first-choice 'keeper. In 1975, he won Arsenal’s Player of the Year award and an England cap followed a year later. Verdict: Arsenal Brian Kidd Manchester United 1967-1974 (264 apps, 70 goals); Arsenal 1974-1976 (90 apps, 34 goals) The forward’s time at United was one of immense highs and lows. From scoring in United’s European Cup final triumph over Benfica in 1968, he suffered relegation with the same club six years later. He was top goal-scorer for Arsenal in his first season at the club, but failed to leave a lasting impact on the club. Verdict: Manchester United Kidd, here playing in the 1968 European Cup final at Wembley Credit: Getty/ALLSPORT Frank Stapleton Arsenal: 1971-1981 (300 apps, 108 goals); Manchester United: 1981-1987 (288 apps, 78 goals) The original RVP, Stapleton’s time at Arsenal was one of disappointment due to a lack of team success. He participated in three successive FA Cup finals, two of which ended in defeat. A familiar tale of Arsenal finishing fourth and failing to sign star players frustrated Stapleton. In 1981 he moved to the more ambitious United where he claimed two FA Cup winners’ medals in 1983 and 1985. Verdict: Manchester United Viv Anderson Arsenal: 1984-1987 (150 apps, 15 goals); Manchester United: 1987-1991 (64 apps, 4 goals) Widely known for being the first black footballer to represent England in a full international, defender Anderson was part of the Arsenal side that claimed the League Cup in 1987 and famously scored against Tottenham in the semi-final. Shortly afterwards, however, Anderson moved up north, achieving the rather impressive title of being Sir Alex Ferguson’s first signing at Manchester United. Verdict: Arsenal Leighton moved to Arsenal but did not feature for the club Credit: Getty Images Jim Leighton Manchester United 1988-1991 (94 caps); Arsenal 1991 (0 apps) After following Sir Alex Ferguson to Manchester from Aberdeen, Scottish goalkeeper Leighton struggled to hold down a position in the first team. His loan spell at Arsenal proved even more difficult to secure game-time, he never made a senior appearance for the north Londoners. Verdict: Manchester United David Platt Manchester United 1982-1985 (0 apps); Arsenal 1995-1998 (108 apps, 15 goals) Platt signed his first professional contract at Manchester United but moved on to Crewe Alexandra after failing to break in to the first team at Old Trafford. The dynamic midfielder fared much better at Arsenal, later in his career after successful stints in Italy with Juventus and Sampdoria. In his first season with Arsenal, Platt helped the Gunners secure Uefa Cup football with a fifth-placed finish. A Premier League triumph followed in 1998 in Platt’s final season at the club. Verdict: Arsenal Cole won the treble with Manchester United Credit: Andrew Budd/Action Images Andy Cole Arsenal: 1989-1992 (2 apps, 0 goals); Manchester United: 1995-2001 (195 apps, 93 goals) The striker began a peripatetic journey across a variety of top-division clubs at Arsenal, having graduated from the academy, but never managed to start a game for the Gunners, appearing twice as off the subs' bench. It was quite a different story at United however. After a £7million move from Newcastle in 1995, Cole won three Premier League titles at Old Trafford, including one as part of the stunning Treble winning season of 1998/1999. Verdict: Manchester United Mikael Silvestre Manchester United 1999-2008 (361 apps, 10 goals); Arsenal 2008-2010 (46 apps, 6 goals) French international defender Silvestre enjoyed vast success during his time at Old Trafford. The Frenchman earned four Premier League titles, one Champions League winners’ medal and FA Cup and League Cup triumphs before Sir Alex Ferguson deemed him surplus to requirements. A move to Arsenal followed in 2008 by which time his peak had passed. Verdict: Manchester United Robin van Persie and Danny Welbeck were more successful at Manchester United Credit: Getty Images Robin van Persie Arsenal: 2004-2012 (279 apps, 132 goals); Manchester United: 2012-2015 (105 apps, 58 goals) A player that has best epitomised the difference between the two clubs in recent times, the Dutch striker was captain when he departed the Emirates Stadium in 2012 to hunt trophies under Sir Alex Ferguson. It worked, securing the Premier League title in his first season at Old Trafford while also being the top scorer in the division. Verdict: Manchester United Alexis Sanchez-Henrikh Mkhitarayan swap deal | All you need to know around the big football transfer Danny Welbeck Manchester United: 2008-2014 (142 apps, 29 goals); Arsenal: 2014-present (91 apps, 22 goals) Left Manchester United for Arsenal in 2014 after a promising, though short of fulfilling, spell in the first-team, featuring 27 times in Manchester United's 2012-13 title-winning season. His time at the Emirates has been hampered by injury, while he has only featured four times for England in the last three seasons. Verdict: Manchester United
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round Replay - Crewe Alexandra vs Blackburn Rovers - The Alexandra Stadium, Crewe, Britain - December 13, 2017 Crewe Alexandra manager David Artell Action Images/Craig Brough
FA Cup Second Round Replay - Crewe Alexandra vs Blackburn Rovers
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round Replay - Crewe Alexandra vs Blackburn Rovers - The Alexandra Stadium, Crewe, Britain - December 13, 2017 Crewe Alexandra manager David Artell Action Images/Craig Brough
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round Replay - Crewe Alexandra vs Blackburn Rovers - The Alexandra Stadium, Crewe, Britain - December 13, 2017 Blackburn Rovers manager Tony Mowbray applauds the fans after the match Action Images/Craig Brough
FA Cup Second Round Replay - Crewe Alexandra vs Blackburn Rovers
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round Replay - Crewe Alexandra vs Blackburn Rovers - The Alexandra Stadium, Crewe, Britain - December 13, 2017 Blackburn Rovers manager Tony Mowbray applauds the fans after the match Action Images/Craig Brough
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round Replay - Crewe Alexandra vs Blackburn Rovers - The Alexandra Stadium, Crewe, Britain - December 13, 2017 Crewe Alexandra's Chris Dagnall (C) goes close to scoring Action Images/Craig Brough
FA Cup Second Round Replay - Crewe Alexandra vs Blackburn Rovers
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round Replay - Crewe Alexandra vs Blackburn Rovers - The Alexandra Stadium, Crewe, Britain - December 13, 2017 Crewe Alexandra's Chris Dagnall (C) goes close to scoring Action Images/Craig Brough
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round Replay - Crewe Alexandra vs Blackburn Rovers - The Alexandra Stadium, Crewe, Britain - December 13, 2017 Crewe Alexandra's Chris Dagnall looks dejected Action Images/Craig Brough
FA Cup Second Round Replay - Crewe Alexandra vs Blackburn Rovers
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round Replay - Crewe Alexandra vs Blackburn Rovers - The Alexandra Stadium, Crewe, Britain - December 13, 2017 Crewe Alexandra's Chris Dagnall looks dejected Action Images/Craig Brough
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round Replay - Crewe Alexandra vs Blackburn Rovers - The Alexandra Stadium, Crewe, Britain - December 13, 2017 General view during the match Action Images/Craig Brough
FA Cup Second Round Replay - Crewe Alexandra vs Blackburn Rovers
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round Replay - Crewe Alexandra vs Blackburn Rovers - The Alexandra Stadium, Crewe, Britain - December 13, 2017 General view during the match Action Images/Craig Brough
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round Replay - Crewe Alexandra vs Blackburn Rovers - The Alexandra Stadium, Crewe, Britain - December 13, 2017 Blackburn Rovers' Charlie Mulgrew (L) in action with Crewe Alexandra's Chris Dagnall Action Images/Craig Brough
FA Cup Second Round Replay - Crewe Alexandra vs Blackburn Rovers
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round Replay - Crewe Alexandra vs Blackburn Rovers - The Alexandra Stadium, Crewe, Britain - December 13, 2017 Blackburn Rovers' Charlie Mulgrew (L) in action with Crewe Alexandra's Chris Dagnall Action Images/Craig Brough
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round Replay - Crewe Alexandra vs Blackburn Rovers - The Alexandra Stadium, Crewe, Britain - December 13, 2017 Crewe Alexandra's Ben Garratt looks dejected Action Images/Craig Brough
FA Cup Second Round Replay - Crewe Alexandra vs Blackburn Rovers
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round Replay - Crewe Alexandra vs Blackburn Rovers - The Alexandra Stadium, Crewe, Britain - December 13, 2017 Crewe Alexandra's Ben Garratt looks dejected Action Images/Craig Brough
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round Replay - Crewe Alexandra vs Blackburn Rovers - The Alexandra Stadium, Crewe, Britain - December 13, 2017 Blackburn Rovers Manager Tony Mowbray Action Images/Craig Brough
FA Cup Second Round Replay - Crewe Alexandra vs Blackburn Rovers
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round Replay - Crewe Alexandra vs Blackburn Rovers - The Alexandra Stadium, Crewe, Britain - December 13, 2017 Blackburn Rovers Manager Tony Mowbray Action Images/Craig Brough
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round Replay - Crewe Alexandra vs Blackburn Rovers - The Alexandra Stadium, Crewe, Britain - December 13, 2017 Crewe Alexandra's Tom Lowery (L) in action with Blackburn Rovers' Richard Smallwood Action Images/Craig Brough
FA Cup Second Round Replay - Crewe Alexandra vs Blackburn Rovers
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round Replay - Crewe Alexandra vs Blackburn Rovers - The Alexandra Stadium, Crewe, Britain - December 13, 2017 Crewe Alexandra's Tom Lowery (L) in action with Blackburn Rovers' Richard Smallwood Action Images/Craig Brough
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round Replay - Crewe Alexandra vs Blackburn Rovers - The Alexandra Stadium, Crewe, Britain - December 13, 2017 Crewe Alexandra's Chris Dagnall in action with Blackburn Rovers' Derrick Williams Action Images/Craig Brough
FA Cup Second Round Replay - Crewe Alexandra vs Blackburn Rovers
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round Replay - Crewe Alexandra vs Blackburn Rovers - The Alexandra Stadium, Crewe, Britain - December 13, 2017 Crewe Alexandra's Chris Dagnall in action with Blackburn Rovers' Derrick Williams Action Images/Craig Brough
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round Replay - Crewe Alexandra vs Blackburn Rovers - The Alexandra Stadium, Crewe, Britain - December 13, 2017 Blackburn Rovers' Danny Graham scores their first goal Action Images/Craig Brough
FA Cup Second Round Replay - Crewe Alexandra vs Blackburn Rovers
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round Replay - Crewe Alexandra vs Blackburn Rovers - The Alexandra Stadium, Crewe, Britain - December 13, 2017 Blackburn Rovers' Danny Graham scores their first goal Action Images/Craig Brough
Former footballer Andy Woodward -- shown here in December 2016 -- revealed last year that he was abused by a convicted child molester at Crewe Alexandra
Former footballer Andy Woodward -- shown here in December 2016 -- revealed last year that he was abused by a convicted child molester at Crewe Alexandra
Former footballer Andy Woodward -- shown here in December 2016 -- revealed last year that he was abused by a convicted child molester at Crewe Alexandra
Former footballer Andy Woodward -- shown here in December 2016 -- revealed last year that he was abused by a convicted child molester at Crewe Alexandra (AFP Photo/PAUL ELLIS)
Former footballer Andy Woodward -- shown here in December 2016 -- revealed last year that he was abused by a convicted child molester at Crewe Alexandra
Former footballer Andy Woodward -- shown here in December 2016 -- revealed last year that he was abused by a convicted child molester at Crewe Alexandra (AFP Photo/PAUL ELLIS)
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Wycombe Wanders' Craig Mackail-Smith celebrates scoring their second goal with team mates Action Images/Carl Recine
FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Wycombe Wanders' Craig Mackail-Smith celebrates scoring their second goal with team mates Action Images/Carl Recine
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Wycombe Wanders' Craig Mackail-Smith scores their second goal Action Images/Carl Recine
FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Wycombe Wanders' Craig Mackail-Smith scores their second goal Action Images/Carl Recine
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Blackburn manager Tony Mowbray Action Images/Carl Recine
FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Blackburn manager Tony Mowbray Action Images/Carl Recine
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Chris Porter (L) celebrates after he scores Crewe's third goal Action Images/Carl Recine
FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Chris Porter (L) celebrates after he scores Crewe's third goal Action Images/Carl Recine
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Chris Porter scores Crewe's third goal Action Images/Carl Recine
FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Chris Porter scores Crewe's third goal Action Images/Carl Recine
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Eddie Nolan scores Crewe's second goal Action Images/Carl Recine
FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Eddie Nolan scores Crewe's second goal Action Images/Carl Recine
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Eddie Nolan scores Crewe's second goal Action Images/Carl Recine
FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Eddie Nolan scores Crewe's second goal Action Images/Carl Recine
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Blackburn's Elliott Bennett is shown a red card Action Images/Carl Recine
FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Blackburn's Elliott Bennett is shown a red card Action Images/Carl Recine
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Blackburn's Elliott Bennett is shown a red card by referee David Webb Action Images/Carl Recine
FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Blackburn's Elliott Bennett is shown a red card by referee David Webb Action Images/Carl Recine
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 General view of empty seats as Blackburn fans display a banner during the game Action Images/Carl Recine
FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 General view of empty seats as Blackburn fans display a banner during the game Action Images/Carl Recine
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 A fan with a inflatable in the crowd Action Images/Carl Recine
FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 A fan with a inflatable in the crowd Action Images/Carl Recine
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 A inflatable is held up in the crowd Action Images/Carl Recine
FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 A inflatable is held up in the crowd Action Images/Carl Recine
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Blackburn's Dominic Samuel in action with Crewe's Harry Pickering Action Images/Carl Recine
FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Blackburn's Dominic Samuel in action with Crewe's Harry Pickering Action Images/Carl Recine
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Chris Porter scores Crewe's first goal Action Images/Carl Recine
FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Chris Porter scores Crewe's first goal Action Images/Carl Recine
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Blackburn's Danny Graham in action with Crewe's Perry Ng Action Images/Carl Recine
FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Blackburn's Danny Graham in action with Crewe's Perry Ng Action Images/Carl Recine
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Crewe fans with a flare celebrate a goal Action Images/Carl Recine
FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Crewe fans with a flare celebrate a goal Action Images/Carl Recine
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Crewe Alexandra manager David Artell Action Images/Carl Recine
FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Crewe Alexandra manager David Artell Action Images/Carl Recine
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Dominic Samuel celebrates after he scores Blackburn's third goal Action Images/Carl Recine
FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Dominic Samuel celebrates after he scores Blackburn's third goal Action Images/Carl Recine
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Crewe Alexandra manager David Artell Action Images/Carl Recine
FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Crewe Alexandra manager David Artell Action Images/Carl Recine
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Danny Graham celebrates after he scores Blackburn's second goal Action Images/Carl Recine
FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Danny Graham celebrates after he scores Blackburn's second goal Action Images/Carl Recine
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Danny Graham celebrates after he scores Blackburn's second goal Action Images/Carl Recine
FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Danny Graham celebrates after he scores Blackburn's second goal Action Images/Carl Recine
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Danny Graham celebrates after he scores Blackburn's second goal Action Images/Carl Recine
FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Danny Graham celebrates after he scores Blackburn's second goal Action Images/Carl Recine
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Danny Graham scores Blackburn's second goal Action Images/Carl Recine
FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Danny Graham scores Blackburn's second goal Action Images/Carl Recine
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Danny Graham scores Blackburn's second goal Action Images/Carl Recine
FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Danny Graham scores Blackburn's second goal Action Images/Carl Recine
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Dominic Samuel scores Blackburn's first goal Action Images/Carl Recine
FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Dominic Samuel scores Blackburn's first goal Action Images/Carl Recine
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Dominic Samuel scores Blackburn's first goal Action Images/Carl Recine
FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Dominic Samuel scores Blackburn's first goal Action Images/Carl Recine
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Dominic Samuel scores Blackburn's first goal Action Images/Carl Recine
FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra
Soccer Football - FA Cup Second Round - Blackburn Rovers vs Crewe Alexandra - Ewood Park, Blackburn, Britain - December 3, 2017 Dominic Samuel scores Blackburn's first goal Action Images/Carl Recine
In an enormous stately home near Berkhamsted that now houses Ashridge Business School, a bunch of football coaches are telling each other tall tales. Split into pairs, they have been invited to create a yarn, one sentence at a time. Passing the plot back and forth as they might a ball, they are building on the opening line: “Gabriel walked out into the street.” Within no more than a minute, one pair has Gabriel naked up a tree, another has him being chased by the Queen riding a moped, while a third has thrust him into the midst of a steamy affair with David Attenborough’s wife. Which is not the kind of material you often hear at a manager’s press conference. Under the vaulted ceilings and preposterous chandeliers of Ashridge, more than 80 academy coaches have gathered for a residential training programme run by the Premier League. At no point today will any of them go anywhere near kicking a ball. Rather, they are taking part in a comedy improvisation workshop, run by a group called The Comedy School. They are learning some tricks of the trade as they build up to putting on an improvised show of their own, staged in front of their peers. “Seriously, soon as I saw there was going to be a performance at the end of the day, I was thinking how I could get out of it,” says Carl Martin, the former Crewe Alexandra player who coaches Watford’s under-18 squad. “This is way out of my comfort zone.” Which is largely the point. The course is a Premier League initiative to complement the education programmes all the coaches are currently undertaking. While Uefa licences largely centre on learning how to deliver coaching sessions, this is about personal development. Comedy and coaching share a surprising number of transferable skills Credit: Julian Simmonds Across 12 different away days spread over two years, the coaches will do everything from spending a weekend being put through their paces by the SAS in the Brecon Beacons to learning how to project their voice at the Royal Shakespeare Company. And today they are engaging with improvised comedy, under the stewardship of a bunch of veterans of the renowned Comedy Store Players. “The guys are convinced they won’t be able to do it,” says Pippa Evans, who has taught the skills of improv to everyone from lawyers to ex-offenders. “Actually they’ll soon find anyone can. The point is, everyone is funny.” As soon becomes apparent as the coaches spend much of their day roaring with laughter at each other’s antics. “There was a bit of scepticism when we first started,” says Simone Lewis, the Premier League’s head of curriculum learning and development, of the course. “But that quickly disappeared as it has become clear how much can be learnt from other businesses and sports in terms of stress and conflict management. The idea is to be challenged by doing something that you would never otherwise dream of doing.” Among those being challenged is Darius Vassell, these days a coach at the Wolves academy. He may have once taken a spot-kick for England in a penalty shoot-out, but he can never have dreamt that one day he would be standing in the middle of a circle of 20 other coaches following a shouted-out instruction that he mime being bludgeoned to death by an aubergine. “It’s been a right laugh so far,” he says, during a break for coffee. “I must admit at first I asked myself, enjoyable as this is, how on earth does it relate to coaching? But actually the more we’ve done, the more I can see its relevance. Football is all about being spontaneous. “And I found as a player the more confident you are, the more instinctive you can be. What this is doing is showing us how to be confident even about something we’d never imagine ourselves doing.” Plus, he believes, comedy can be a more than useful tool for the coach. “You have to be careful though,” he says. “You can’t use humour to belittle. But you can use it to bond the group. I remember the funniest coach I had was Steve Harrison, who was assistant to John Gregory at the Villa. He was hilarious, a full-on, pull-the-tablecloth-off-the-table, fall-down-the-stairs practical joker. It was brilliant for team spirit. That said, I’m not sure the manager himself can be a stand-up comedian. As the main man, he needs to be taken seriously.” To Vassell’s approval, there is no belittling here. Importantly, everything is collaborative. One of the first exercises the coaches do involves swapping storylines. They try it by saying “yes, and” at the start of every sentence. Then they try it by saying “no, but”. They quickly discover that “no, but” soon kills the narrative; the more positive the language, the more likely the improvisation will soar. Vassell gets some laughs from his fellow coaches Credit: Julian Simmonds “I’ve done all sorts of groups and these guys have got it very quickly,” says Luke Sorba, the comedian leading the session. “But then improvisation is a team sport. When an improviser gets on stage, it’s like when a footballer goes on the pitch: you know the rules but you’ve no idea of the outcome. What we have in common is that we’re in a place we can’t control, but we’re cool with that as long as we work together to try to embrace it.” That co-operation is put to the test at the climax of the day’s improvisation. In the ballroom, a stage has been constructed, there are spotlights and an electric piano to provide musical accompaniment. This is showtime. Sorba acts as compere for a bout of competitive improv. In groups, the coaches go through their paces in a bunch of improv set-pieces, acting on instructions shouted from the audience. And while, in truth, Paul Merton need not be too alarmed about a threat to his pre-eminence as the country’s foremost comedy improviser, what is surprising, as they make up tales about WWE wrestlers and midgets stealing all the jelly babies, is how imaginative the coaches are. Not to mention how infrequently they reach for the rude to raise a laugh. “Eighteen minutes before anyone’s used the word penis,” announces Sorba at one point. “I think that is a record.” When it is all done, when the laughter has settled, the participants compare notes. “Fact is, as a coach you have to improvise all the time,” says Vassell. “I think this has really helped me how to challenge the fear of feeling uncomfortable.” Which, you suspect, is a technique that will come in more than useful if one day he were to become a manager.
Teamwork pays off as coaches rise to the challenge of playing for laughs
In an enormous stately home near Berkhamsted that now houses Ashridge Business School, a bunch of football coaches are telling each other tall tales. Split into pairs, they have been invited to create a yarn, one sentence at a time. Passing the plot back and forth as they might a ball, they are building on the opening line: “Gabriel walked out into the street.” Within no more than a minute, one pair has Gabriel naked up a tree, another has him being chased by the Queen riding a moped, while a third has thrust him into the midst of a steamy affair with David Attenborough’s wife. Which is not the kind of material you often hear at a manager’s press conference. Under the vaulted ceilings and preposterous chandeliers of Ashridge, more than 80 academy coaches have gathered for a residential training programme run by the Premier League. At no point today will any of them go anywhere near kicking a ball. Rather, they are taking part in a comedy improvisation workshop, run by a group called The Comedy School. They are learning some tricks of the trade as they build up to putting on an improvised show of their own, staged in front of their peers. “Seriously, soon as I saw there was going to be a performance at the end of the day, I was thinking how I could get out of it,” says Carl Martin, the former Crewe Alexandra player who coaches Watford’s under-18 squad. “This is way out of my comfort zone.” Which is largely the point. The course is a Premier League initiative to complement the education programmes all the coaches are currently undertaking. While Uefa licences largely centre on learning how to deliver coaching sessions, this is about personal development. Comedy and coaching share a surprising number of transferable skills Credit: Julian Simmonds Across 12 different away days spread over two years, the coaches will do everything from spending a weekend being put through their paces by the SAS in the Brecon Beacons to learning how to project their voice at the Royal Shakespeare Company. And today they are engaging with improvised comedy, under the stewardship of a bunch of veterans of the renowned Comedy Store Players. “The guys are convinced they won’t be able to do it,” says Pippa Evans, who has taught the skills of improv to everyone from lawyers to ex-offenders. “Actually they’ll soon find anyone can. The point is, everyone is funny.” As soon becomes apparent as the coaches spend much of their day roaring with laughter at each other’s antics. “There was a bit of scepticism when we first started,” says Simone Lewis, the Premier League’s head of curriculum learning and development, of the course. “But that quickly disappeared as it has become clear how much can be learnt from other businesses and sports in terms of stress and conflict management. The idea is to be challenged by doing something that you would never otherwise dream of doing.” Among those being challenged is Darius Vassell, these days a coach at the Wolves academy. He may have once taken a spot-kick for England in a penalty shoot-out, but he can never have dreamt that one day he would be standing in the middle of a circle of 20 other coaches following a shouted-out instruction that he mime being bludgeoned to death by an aubergine. “It’s been a right laugh so far,” he says, during a break for coffee. “I must admit at first I asked myself, enjoyable as this is, how on earth does it relate to coaching? But actually the more we’ve done, the more I can see its relevance. Football is all about being spontaneous. “And I found as a player the more confident you are, the more instinctive you can be. What this is doing is showing us how to be confident even about something we’d never imagine ourselves doing.” Plus, he believes, comedy can be a more than useful tool for the coach. “You have to be careful though,” he says. “You can’t use humour to belittle. But you can use it to bond the group. I remember the funniest coach I had was Steve Harrison, who was assistant to John Gregory at the Villa. He was hilarious, a full-on, pull-the-tablecloth-off-the-table, fall-down-the-stairs practical joker. It was brilliant for team spirit. That said, I’m not sure the manager himself can be a stand-up comedian. As the main man, he needs to be taken seriously.” To Vassell’s approval, there is no belittling here. Importantly, everything is collaborative. One of the first exercises the coaches do involves swapping storylines. They try it by saying “yes, and” at the start of every sentence. Then they try it by saying “no, but”. They quickly discover that “no, but” soon kills the narrative; the more positive the language, the more likely the improvisation will soar. Vassell gets some laughs from his fellow coaches Credit: Julian Simmonds “I’ve done all sorts of groups and these guys have got it very quickly,” says Luke Sorba, the comedian leading the session. “But then improvisation is a team sport. When an improviser gets on stage, it’s like when a footballer goes on the pitch: you know the rules but you’ve no idea of the outcome. What we have in common is that we’re in a place we can’t control, but we’re cool with that as long as we work together to try to embrace it.” That co-operation is put to the test at the climax of the day’s improvisation. In the ballroom, a stage has been constructed, there are spotlights and an electric piano to provide musical accompaniment. This is showtime. Sorba acts as compere for a bout of competitive improv. In groups, the coaches go through their paces in a bunch of improv set-pieces, acting on instructions shouted from the audience. And while, in truth, Paul Merton need not be too alarmed about a threat to his pre-eminence as the country’s foremost comedy improviser, what is surprising, as they make up tales about WWE wrestlers and midgets stealing all the jelly babies, is how imaginative the coaches are. Not to mention how infrequently they reach for the rude to raise a laugh. “Eighteen minutes before anyone’s used the word penis,” announces Sorba at one point. “I think that is a record.” When it is all done, when the laughter has settled, the participants compare notes. “Fact is, as a coach you have to improvise all the time,” says Vassell. “I think this has really helped me how to challenge the fear of feeling uncomfortable.” Which, you suspect, is a technique that will come in more than useful if one day he were to become a manager.
In an enormous stately home near Berkhamsted that now houses Ashridge Business School, a bunch of football coaches are telling each other tall tales. Split into pairs, they have been invited to create a yarn, one sentence at a time. Passing the plot back and forth as they might a ball, they are building on the opening line: “Gabriel walked out into the street.” Within no more than a minute, one pair has Gabriel naked up a tree, another has him being chased by the Queen riding a moped, while a third has thrust him into the midst of a steamy affair with David Attenborough’s wife. Which is not the kind of material you often hear at a manager’s press conference. Under the vaulted ceilings and preposterous chandeliers of Ashridge, more than 80 academy coaches have gathered for a residential training programme run by the Premier League. At no point today will any of them go anywhere near kicking a ball. Rather, they are taking part in a comedy improvisation workshop, run by a group called The Comedy School. They are learning some tricks of the trade as they build up to putting on an improvised show of their own, staged in front of their peers. “Seriously, soon as I saw there was going to be a performance at the end of the day, I was thinking how I could get out of it,” says Carl Martin, the former Crewe Alexandra player who coaches Watford’s under-18 squad. “This is way out of my comfort zone.” Which is largely the point. The course is a Premier League initiative to complement the education programmes all the coaches are currently undertaking. While Uefa licences largely centre on learning how to deliver coaching sessions, this is about personal development. Comedy and coaching share a surprising number of transferable skills Credit: Julian Simmonds Across 12 different away days spread over two years, the coaches will do everything from spending a weekend being put through their paces by the SAS in the Brecon Beacons to learning how to project their voice at the Royal Shakespeare Company. And today they are engaging with improvised comedy, under the stewardship of a bunch of veterans of the renowned Comedy Store Players. “The guys are convinced they won’t be able to do it,” says Pippa Evans, who has taught the skills of improv to everyone from lawyers to ex-offenders. “Actually they’ll soon find anyone can. The point is, everyone is funny.” As soon becomes apparent as the coaches spend much of their day roaring with laughter at each other’s antics. “There was a bit of scepticism when we first started,” says Simone Lewis, the Premier League’s head of curriculum learning and development, of the course. “But that quickly disappeared as it has become clear how much can be learnt from other businesses and sports in terms of stress and conflict management. The idea is to be challenged by doing something that you would never otherwise dream of doing.” Among those being challenged is Darius Vassell, these days a coach at the Wolves academy. He may have once taken a spot-kick for England in a penalty shoot-out, but he can never have dreamt that one day he would be standing in the middle of a circle of 20 other coaches following a shouted-out instruction that he mime being bludgeoned to death by an aubergine. “It’s been a right laugh so far,” he says, during a break for coffee. “I must admit at first I asked myself, enjoyable as this is, how on earth does it relate to coaching? But actually the more we’ve done, the more I can see its relevance. Football is all about being spontaneous. “And I found as a player the more confident you are, the more instinctive you can be. What this is doing is showing us how to be confident even about something we’d never imagine ourselves doing.” Plus, he believes, comedy can be a more than useful tool for the coach. “You have to be careful though,” he says. “You can’t use humour to belittle. But you can use it to bond the group. I remember the funniest coach I had was Steve Harrison, who was assistant to John Gregory at the Villa. He was hilarious, a full-on, pull-the-tablecloth-off-the-table, fall-down-the-stairs practical joker. It was brilliant for team spirit. That said, I’m not sure the manager himself can be a stand-up comedian. As the main man, he needs to be taken seriously.” To Vassell’s approval, there is no belittling here. Importantly, everything is collaborative. One of the first exercises the coaches do involves swapping storylines. They try it by saying “yes, and” at the start of every sentence. Then they try it by saying “no, but”. They quickly discover that “no, but” soon kills the narrative; the more positive the language, the more likely the improvisation will soar. Vassell gets some laughs from his fellow coaches Credit: Julian Simmonds “I’ve done all sorts of groups and these guys have got it very quickly,” says Luke Sorba, the comedian leading the session. “But then improvisation is a team sport. When an improviser gets on stage, it’s like when a footballer goes on the pitch: you know the rules but you’ve no idea of the outcome. What we have in common is that we’re in a place we can’t control, but we’re cool with that as long as we work together to try to embrace it.” That co-operation is put to the test at the climax of the day’s improvisation. In the ballroom, a stage has been constructed, there are spotlights and an electric piano to provide musical accompaniment. This is showtime. Sorba acts as compere for a bout of competitive improv. In groups, the coaches go through their paces in a bunch of improv set-pieces, acting on instructions shouted from the audience. And while, in truth, Paul Merton need not be too alarmed about a threat to his pre-eminence as the country’s foremost comedy improviser, what is surprising, as they make up tales about WWE wrestlers and midgets stealing all the jelly babies, is how imaginative the coaches are. Not to mention how infrequently they reach for the rude to raise a laugh. “Eighteen minutes before anyone’s used the word penis,” announces Sorba at one point. “I think that is a record.” When it is all done, when the laughter has settled, the participants compare notes. “Fact is, as a coach you have to improvise all the time,” says Vassell. “I think this has really helped me how to challenge the fear of feeling uncomfortable.” Which, you suspect, is a technique that will come in more than useful if one day he were to become a manager.
Teamwork pays off as coaches rise to the challenge of playing for laughs
In an enormous stately home near Berkhamsted that now houses Ashridge Business School, a bunch of football coaches are telling each other tall tales. Split into pairs, they have been invited to create a yarn, one sentence at a time. Passing the plot back and forth as they might a ball, they are building on the opening line: “Gabriel walked out into the street.” Within no more than a minute, one pair has Gabriel naked up a tree, another has him being chased by the Queen riding a moped, while a third has thrust him into the midst of a steamy affair with David Attenborough’s wife. Which is not the kind of material you often hear at a manager’s press conference. Under the vaulted ceilings and preposterous chandeliers of Ashridge, more than 80 academy coaches have gathered for a residential training programme run by the Premier League. At no point today will any of them go anywhere near kicking a ball. Rather, they are taking part in a comedy improvisation workshop, run by a group called The Comedy School. They are learning some tricks of the trade as they build up to putting on an improvised show of their own, staged in front of their peers. “Seriously, soon as I saw there was going to be a performance at the end of the day, I was thinking how I could get out of it,” says Carl Martin, the former Crewe Alexandra player who coaches Watford’s under-18 squad. “This is way out of my comfort zone.” Which is largely the point. The course is a Premier League initiative to complement the education programmes all the coaches are currently undertaking. While Uefa licences largely centre on learning how to deliver coaching sessions, this is about personal development. Comedy and coaching share a surprising number of transferable skills Credit: Julian Simmonds Across 12 different away days spread over two years, the coaches will do everything from spending a weekend being put through their paces by the SAS in the Brecon Beacons to learning how to project their voice at the Royal Shakespeare Company. And today they are engaging with improvised comedy, under the stewardship of a bunch of veterans of the renowned Comedy Store Players. “The guys are convinced they won’t be able to do it,” says Pippa Evans, who has taught the skills of improv to everyone from lawyers to ex-offenders. “Actually they’ll soon find anyone can. The point is, everyone is funny.” As soon becomes apparent as the coaches spend much of their day roaring with laughter at each other’s antics. “There was a bit of scepticism when we first started,” says Simone Lewis, the Premier League’s head of curriculum learning and development, of the course. “But that quickly disappeared as it has become clear how much can be learnt from other businesses and sports in terms of stress and conflict management. The idea is to be challenged by doing something that you would never otherwise dream of doing.” Among those being challenged is Darius Vassell, these days a coach at the Wolves academy. He may have once taken a spot-kick for England in a penalty shoot-out, but he can never have dreamt that one day he would be standing in the middle of a circle of 20 other coaches following a shouted-out instruction that he mime being bludgeoned to death by an aubergine. “It’s been a right laugh so far,” he says, during a break for coffee. “I must admit at first I asked myself, enjoyable as this is, how on earth does it relate to coaching? But actually the more we’ve done, the more I can see its relevance. Football is all about being spontaneous. “And I found as a player the more confident you are, the more instinctive you can be. What this is doing is showing us how to be confident even about something we’d never imagine ourselves doing.” Plus, he believes, comedy can be a more than useful tool for the coach. “You have to be careful though,” he says. “You can’t use humour to belittle. But you can use it to bond the group. I remember the funniest coach I had was Steve Harrison, who was assistant to John Gregory at the Villa. He was hilarious, a full-on, pull-the-tablecloth-off-the-table, fall-down-the-stairs practical joker. It was brilliant for team spirit. That said, I’m not sure the manager himself can be a stand-up comedian. As the main man, he needs to be taken seriously.” To Vassell’s approval, there is no belittling here. Importantly, everything is collaborative. One of the first exercises the coaches do involves swapping storylines. They try it by saying “yes, and” at the start of every sentence. Then they try it by saying “no, but”. They quickly discover that “no, but” soon kills the narrative; the more positive the language, the more likely the improvisation will soar. Vassell gets some laughs from his fellow coaches Credit: Julian Simmonds “I’ve done all sorts of groups and these guys have got it very quickly,” says Luke Sorba, the comedian leading the session. “But then improvisation is a team sport. When an improviser gets on stage, it’s like when a footballer goes on the pitch: you know the rules but you’ve no idea of the outcome. What we have in common is that we’re in a place we can’t control, but we’re cool with that as long as we work together to try to embrace it.” That co-operation is put to the test at the climax of the day’s improvisation. In the ballroom, a stage has been constructed, there are spotlights and an electric piano to provide musical accompaniment. This is showtime. Sorba acts as compere for a bout of competitive improv. In groups, the coaches go through their paces in a bunch of improv set-pieces, acting on instructions shouted from the audience. And while, in truth, Paul Merton need not be too alarmed about a threat to his pre-eminence as the country’s foremost comedy improviser, what is surprising, as they make up tales about WWE wrestlers and midgets stealing all the jelly babies, is how imaginative the coaches are. Not to mention how infrequently they reach for the rude to raise a laugh. “Eighteen minutes before anyone’s used the word penis,” announces Sorba at one point. “I think that is a record.” When it is all done, when the laughter has settled, the participants compare notes. “Fact is, as a coach you have to improvise all the time,” says Vassell. “I think this has really helped me how to challenge the fear of feeling uncomfortable.” Which, you suspect, is a technique that will come in more than useful if one day he were to become a manager.
In an enormous stately home near Berkhamsted that now houses Ashridge Business School, a bunch of football coaches are telling each other tall tales. Split into pairs, they have been invited to create a yarn, one sentence at a time. Passing the plot back and forth as they might a ball, they are building on the opening line: “Gabriel walked out into the street.” Within no more than a minute, one pair has Gabriel naked up a tree, another has him being chased by the Queen riding a moped, while a third has thrust him into the midst of a steamy affair with David Attenborough’s wife. Which is not the kind of material you often hear at a manager’s press conference. Under the vaulted ceilings and preposterous chandeliers of Ashridge, more than 80 academy coaches have gathered for a residential training programme run by the Premier League. At no point today will any of them go anywhere near kicking a ball. Rather, they are taking part in a comedy improvisation workshop, run by a group called The Comedy School. They are learning some tricks of the trade as they build up to putting on an improvised show of their own, staged in front of their peers. “Seriously, soon as I saw there was going to be a performance at the end of the day, I was thinking how I could get out of it,” says Carl Martin, the former Crewe Alexandra player who coaches Watford’s under-18 squad. “This is way out of my comfort zone.” Which is largely the point. The course is a Premier League initiative to complement the education programmes all the coaches are currently undertaking. While Uefa licences largely centre on learning how to deliver coaching sessions, this is about personal development. Comedy and coaching share a surprising number of transferable skills Credit: Julian Simmonds Across 12 different away days spread over two years, the coaches will do everything from spending a weekend being put through their paces by the SAS in the Brecon Beacons to learning how to project their voice at the Royal Shakespeare Company. And today they are engaging with improvised comedy, under the stewardship of a bunch of veterans of the renowned Comedy Store Players. “The guys are convinced they won’t be able to do it,” says Pippa Evans, who has taught the skills of improv to everyone from lawyers to ex-offenders. “Actually they’ll soon find anyone can. The point is, everyone is funny.” As soon becomes apparent as the coaches spend much of their day roaring with laughter at each other’s antics. “There was a bit of scepticism when we first started,” says Simone Lewis, the Premier League’s head of curriculum learning and development, of the course. “But that quickly disappeared as it has become clear how much can be learnt from other businesses and sports in terms of stress and conflict management. The idea is to be challenged by doing something that you would never otherwise dream of doing.” Among those being challenged is Darius Vassell, these days a coach at the Wolves academy. He may have once taken a spot-kick for England in a penalty shoot-out, but he can never have dreamt that one day he would be standing in the middle of a circle of 20 other coaches following a shouted-out instruction that he mime being bludgeoned to death by an aubergine. “It’s been a right laugh so far,” he says, during a break for coffee. “I must admit at first I asked myself, enjoyable as this is, how on earth does it relate to coaching? But actually the more we’ve done, the more I can see its relevance. Football is all about being spontaneous. “And I found as a player the more confident you are, the more instinctive you can be. What this is doing is showing us how to be confident even about something we’d never imagine ourselves doing.” Plus, he believes, comedy can be a more than useful tool for the coach. “You have to be careful though,” he says. “You can’t use humour to belittle. But you can use it to bond the group. I remember the funniest coach I had was Steve Harrison, who was assistant to John Gregory at the Villa. He was hilarious, a full-on, pull-the-tablecloth-off-the-table, fall-down-the-stairs practical joker. It was brilliant for team spirit. That said, I’m not sure the manager himself can be a stand-up comedian. As the main man, he needs to be taken seriously.” To Vassell’s approval, there is no belittling here. Importantly, everything is collaborative. One of the first exercises the coaches do involves swapping storylines. They try it by saying “yes, and” at the start of every sentence. Then they try it by saying “no, but”. They quickly discover that “no, but” soon kills the narrative; the more positive the language, the more likely the improvisation will soar. Vassell gets some laughs from his fellow coaches Credit: Julian Simmonds “I’ve done all sorts of groups and these guys have got it very quickly,” says Luke Sorba, the comedian leading the session. “But then improvisation is a team sport. When an improviser gets on stage, it’s like when a footballer goes on the pitch: you know the rules but you’ve no idea of the outcome. What we have in common is that we’re in a place we can’t control, but we’re cool with that as long as we work together to try to embrace it.” That co-operation is put to the test at the climax of the day’s improvisation. In the ballroom, a stage has been constructed, there are spotlights and an electric piano to provide musical accompaniment. This is showtime. Sorba acts as compere for a bout of competitive improv. In groups, the coaches go through their paces in a bunch of improv set-pieces, acting on instructions shouted from the audience. And while, in truth, Paul Merton need not be too alarmed about a threat to his pre-eminence as the country’s foremost comedy improviser, what is surprising, as they make up tales about WWE wrestlers and midgets stealing all the jelly babies, is how imaginative the coaches are. Not to mention how infrequently they reach for the rude to raise a laugh. “Eighteen minutes before anyone’s used the word penis,” announces Sorba at one point. “I think that is a record.” When it is all done, when the laughter has settled, the participants compare notes. “Fact is, as a coach you have to improvise all the time,” says Vassell. “I think this has really helped me how to challenge the fear of feeling uncomfortable.” Which, you suspect, is a technique that will come in more than useful if one day he were to become a manager.
Teamwork pays off as coaches rise to the challenge of playing for laughs
In an enormous stately home near Berkhamsted that now houses Ashridge Business School, a bunch of football coaches are telling each other tall tales. Split into pairs, they have been invited to create a yarn, one sentence at a time. Passing the plot back and forth as they might a ball, they are building on the opening line: “Gabriel walked out into the street.” Within no more than a minute, one pair has Gabriel naked up a tree, another has him being chased by the Queen riding a moped, while a third has thrust him into the midst of a steamy affair with David Attenborough’s wife. Which is not the kind of material you often hear at a manager’s press conference. Under the vaulted ceilings and preposterous chandeliers of Ashridge, more than 80 academy coaches have gathered for a residential training programme run by the Premier League. At no point today will any of them go anywhere near kicking a ball. Rather, they are taking part in a comedy improvisation workshop, run by a group called The Comedy School. They are learning some tricks of the trade as they build up to putting on an improvised show of their own, staged in front of their peers. “Seriously, soon as I saw there was going to be a performance at the end of the day, I was thinking how I could get out of it,” says Carl Martin, the former Crewe Alexandra player who coaches Watford’s under-18 squad. “This is way out of my comfort zone.” Which is largely the point. The course is a Premier League initiative to complement the education programmes all the coaches are currently undertaking. While Uefa licences largely centre on learning how to deliver coaching sessions, this is about personal development. Comedy and coaching share a surprising number of transferable skills Credit: Julian Simmonds Across 12 different away days spread over two years, the coaches will do everything from spending a weekend being put through their paces by the SAS in the Brecon Beacons to learning how to project their voice at the Royal Shakespeare Company. And today they are engaging with improvised comedy, under the stewardship of a bunch of veterans of the renowned Comedy Store Players. “The guys are convinced they won’t be able to do it,” says Pippa Evans, who has taught the skills of improv to everyone from lawyers to ex-offenders. “Actually they’ll soon find anyone can. The point is, everyone is funny.” As soon becomes apparent as the coaches spend much of their day roaring with laughter at each other’s antics. “There was a bit of scepticism when we first started,” says Simone Lewis, the Premier League’s head of curriculum learning and development, of the course. “But that quickly disappeared as it has become clear how much can be learnt from other businesses and sports in terms of stress and conflict management. The idea is to be challenged by doing something that you would never otherwise dream of doing.” Among those being challenged is Darius Vassell, these days a coach at the Wolves academy. He may have once taken a spot-kick for England in a penalty shoot-out, but he can never have dreamt that one day he would be standing in the middle of a circle of 20 other coaches following a shouted-out instruction that he mime being bludgeoned to death by an aubergine. “It’s been a right laugh so far,” he says, during a break for coffee. “I must admit at first I asked myself, enjoyable as this is, how on earth does it relate to coaching? But actually the more we’ve done, the more I can see its relevance. Football is all about being spontaneous. “And I found as a player the more confident you are, the more instinctive you can be. What this is doing is showing us how to be confident even about something we’d never imagine ourselves doing.” Plus, he believes, comedy can be a more than useful tool for the coach. “You have to be careful though,” he says. “You can’t use humour to belittle. But you can use it to bond the group. I remember the funniest coach I had was Steve Harrison, who was assistant to John Gregory at the Villa. He was hilarious, a full-on, pull-the-tablecloth-off-the-table, fall-down-the-stairs practical joker. It was brilliant for team spirit. That said, I’m not sure the manager himself can be a stand-up comedian. As the main man, he needs to be taken seriously.” To Vassell’s approval, there is no belittling here. Importantly, everything is collaborative. One of the first exercises the coaches do involves swapping storylines. They try it by saying “yes, and” at the start of every sentence. Then they try it by saying “no, but”. They quickly discover that “no, but” soon kills the narrative; the more positive the language, the more likely the improvisation will soar. Vassell gets some laughs from his fellow coaches Credit: Julian Simmonds “I’ve done all sorts of groups and these guys have got it very quickly,” says Luke Sorba, the comedian leading the session. “But then improvisation is a team sport. When an improviser gets on stage, it’s like when a footballer goes on the pitch: you know the rules but you’ve no idea of the outcome. What we have in common is that we’re in a place we can’t control, but we’re cool with that as long as we work together to try to embrace it.” That co-operation is put to the test at the climax of the day’s improvisation. In the ballroom, a stage has been constructed, there are spotlights and an electric piano to provide musical accompaniment. This is showtime. Sorba acts as compere for a bout of competitive improv. In groups, the coaches go through their paces in a bunch of improv set-pieces, acting on instructions shouted from the audience. And while, in truth, Paul Merton need not be too alarmed about a threat to his pre-eminence as the country’s foremost comedy improviser, what is surprising, as they make up tales about WWE wrestlers and midgets stealing all the jelly babies, is how imaginative the coaches are. Not to mention how infrequently they reach for the rude to raise a laugh. “Eighteen minutes before anyone’s used the word penis,” announces Sorba at one point. “I think that is a record.” When it is all done, when the laughter has settled, the participants compare notes. “Fact is, as a coach you have to improvise all the time,” says Vassell. “I think this has really helped me how to challenge the fear of feeling uncomfortable.” Which, you suspect, is a technique that will come in more than useful if one day he were to become a manager.
FA Cup second round draw National League side AFC Fylde will host 2013 FA Cup winners Wigan in the second round of the competition. Fylde, through to this stage of the competition for the first time in their history following a victory over Kidderminster, were paired with the League One side when the second round draw was made on Monday. Fylde's fellow non-League side Boreham Wood will also face former winners of the competition in the shape of Coventry, who lifted the cup in 1987. Coventry will be at home for the tie. There were a total of 12 non-League sides in the draw. National League South Oxford City were drawn away to Notts County. Seventh-tier Hereford, the lowest-ranked side through to the second round, will face either Chorley or Fleetwood after their tie on Monday night. Leatherhead, who are ranked lower than Hereford, would go away to Wycombe if they win their replay against Billericay Town. Woking or Bury vs Tranmere or Peterborough MK Dons v Maidstone United Newport Co v Cambridge Utd Wycombe v Leatherhead or Billericay Port Vale v Yeovil Town Shrewsbury v Morecambe Doncaster Rovers v Northampton or Scunthorpe Slough Town v Rochdale AFC Wimbledon v Charlton Athletic Stevenage v Swindon Town Mansfield Town v Guiseley or Accrington Stanley Gateshead v Luton Town Bradford City v Plymouth Argyle Blackburn Rovers v Crewe Alexandra AFC Fylde v Wigan Athletic Gillingham v Carlisle Utd Notts Co v Oxford City Forest Green v Exeter City Chorley or Fleetwood v Hereford Coventry City v Boreham Wood Town 7:28PM There you go Everyone present with 'Mark' Chapman professes themselves pleased with the draw. There's not much more I can add to the raw draw. Enjoy! Thanks for your company. 7:24PM TV picks I would guess would be Slough v Rochdale and Fylde v Wigan. Gateshead v Luton would be worth watching. 7:23PM The second round draw in full Woking or Bury vs Tranmere or Peterborough MK Dons v Maidstone United Newport Co v Cambridge Utd Wycombe v Leatherhead or Billericay Port Vale v Yeovil Town Shrewsbury v Morecambe Doncaster Rovers v Northampton or Scunthorpe Slough Town v Rochdale AFC Wimbledon v Charlton Athletic Stevenage v Swindon Town Mansfield Town v Guiseley or Accrington Stanley Gateshead v Luton Town Bradford City v Plymouth Argyle Blackburn Rovers v Crewe Alexandra AFC Fylde v Wigan Athletic Gillingham v Carlisle Utd Notts Co v Oxford City Forest Green v Exeter City Chorley or Fleetwood v Hereford Coventry City v Boreham Wood 7:19PM Tie 20 Coventry City v Boreham Wood 7:19PM Tie 19 Chorley or Fleetwood v Hereford 7:18PM Tie 18 Forest Green v Exeter City 7:18PM Tie 17 Notts Co v Oxford City 7:18PM Tie 16 Gillingham v Carlisle Utd 7:17PM Tie 15 AFC Fylde v Wigan Athletic 7:17PM Tie 14 Blackburn Rovers v Crewe Alexandra 7:17PM Tie 13 Bradford City v Plymouth Argyle 7:16PM Tie 12 Gateshead v Luton Town 7:16PM Tie 11 Mansfield Town v Guiseley or Accrington Stanley 7:16PM Tie 10 Stevenage v Swindon Town 7:16PM Tie nine AFC Wimbledon v Charlton Athletic 7:15PM Tie eight Slough Town v Rochdale 7:15PM Tie seven Donny Rovers v Northampton or Scunthorpe 7:15PM Tie six Shrewsbury v Morecambe 7:14PM Tie five Port Vale v Yeovil Town 7:14PM Tie four Wycombe v Leatherhead or Billericay 7:14PM Tie three Newport Co v Cambridge Utd 7:13PM Tie two MK Dons v Maidstone United 7:13PM First out Woking or Bury vs Tranmere or Peterborough 7:10PM Andy Cole and Kevin Davies Will draw the balls. 7:10PM Here we go The BBC hands over to BT Sport 7:09PM The draw will take place in 10 minutes Mark Chapman interviews Saturday's Slough Town heroes who thrashed Gainsborough Trinity 6-0. Everyone displays his/her poppy pinned to a tracksuit top. Chapman has his in his buttonhole. I'm perplexed that Chapman, a Manc, allows himself to be called 'Chappers'. That's a bit rah, isn't it? 'Chappy', 'Chap', 'grizzly' or 'face farm' would be far more Manc 7:03PM Former winners Bradford, Charlton, Blackburn, Wimbledon (oh, yes), Coventry and Wigan are all in the 'hat'. I use the quotation marks advisedly, unless you favour adorning your swede with a jaunty, plastic transparent bowl. And let's face it, who doesn't. 6:51PM Good evening All first-round winners have bagged their £18,000 prize money and set off in pursuit of the £27,000 on offer for a victory in the second round this evening. What, it's not about the money, it's about the glory? Could have fooled me after years of Premier League and Championship numpties fielding scratch sides to concentrate on the consolidation of 12th place. For years the FA has allowed its Challenge Cup to be abused by myopic, soulless blowhards and yet it still thrives. We shall celebrate it here today as we find out who stands in the way of teams on the next leg of the road to Wembley (for the semi-finals! Gah! See what they've done there? Audrey, the screens!) 6:40PM A second-round FA Cup draw primer What is it? It's the draw for the second round of the 2017 FA Cup. When is it? It's on Monday November 6. - ie today. What time does it start? It will begin after 19.00 GMT - before the Chorley vs Fleetwood match on Monday night. What TV channel is it on? The match and draw will be on BT Sport 1 and BBC 2. Alternatively, you can follow the draw here. What's left of this weekend's action? First-round review Exeter assistant manager Matt Oakley was delighted to progress to round two of the FA Cup after seeing his side see off gallant Heybridge Swifts 3-1 at St James' Park. Two Jayden Stockley goals shortly past the hour mark gave the Grecians a commanding lead, but Samuel Bentick turned in a cross to reduce the arrears and give the Swifts hope. But any hopes of a comeback were ended by Liam McAlinden, whose shot squeezed through the legs of goalkeeper Danny Sambridge, much to the relief of Oakley, who was standing in for the absent Paul Tisdale. "I'm very pleased. It was a banana skin waiting to happen for us, when you see the draw come out," Oakley said. Relief for Exeter as they see off Heybridge Swifts Credit: PA "I am very pleased with the result, very pleased with the second half performance and pleased to come in at half-time with a clean sheet. "We had a very difficult time at Warrington a few years ago when we conceded after a few minutes and we couldn't break them down after that. It was one of the messages we talked about before the game, so I was very pleased. "They put us under a lot of pressure and probably came out after the first half with a bit more confidence than we did. I thought we started the game really well, I was really pleased with the start, but then we started losing the ball and a few misplaced touches and they grew in confidence and came into it. "They didn't threaten our goal too much, so I wasn't too worried about it. We just needed to tighten up in certain areas and improve our attacking play in wide areas and we did that well in the second half." What are the draw numbers? STEVENAGE BRADFORD CITY PORT VALE NEWPORT COUNTY MORECAMBE YEOVIL TOWN PETERBOROUGH UNITED OR TRANMERE ROVERS CAMBRIDGE UNITED FOREST GREEN ROVERS AFC FYLDE LUTON TOWN SHREWSBURY TOWN HEREFORD GUISELEY OR ACCRINGTON STANLEY BLACKBURN ROVERS DONCASTER ROVERS LEATHERHEAD OR BILLERICAY TOWN BOREHAM WOOD MANSFIELD TOWN OXFORD CITY PLYMOUTH ARGYLE AFC WIMBLEDON ROCHDALE COVENTRY CITY CHORLEY OR FLEETWOOD TOWN CARLISLE UNITED NOTTS COUNTY SWINDON TOWN MAIDSTONE UNITED WOKING OR BURY CREWE ALEXANDRA GILLINGHAM MILTON KEYNES DONS SLOUGH TOWN WYCOMBE WANDERERS NORTHAMPTON TOWN OR SCUNTHORPE UNITED CHARLTON ATHELTIC WIGAN ATHLETIC GATESHEAD EXETER CITY When will the second round fixtures take place? Weekend of December 2 and 3. What are the latest FA Cup odds? Chelsea - 5/1 Man City - 5/1 Man Utd - 6/1 Tottenham - 8/1 Arsenal - 8/1 Liverpool - 9/1
FA Cup second-round draw: Fylde host 2013 winners Wigan, Boreham Wood sent to Coventry
FA Cup second round draw National League side AFC Fylde will host 2013 FA Cup winners Wigan in the second round of the competition. Fylde, through to this stage of the competition for the first time in their history following a victory over Kidderminster, were paired with the League One side when the second round draw was made on Monday. Fylde's fellow non-League side Boreham Wood will also face former winners of the competition in the shape of Coventry, who lifted the cup in 1987. Coventry will be at home for the tie. There were a total of 12 non-League sides in the draw. National League South Oxford City were drawn away to Notts County. Seventh-tier Hereford, the lowest-ranked side through to the second round, will face either Chorley or Fleetwood after their tie on Monday night. Leatherhead, who are ranked lower than Hereford, would go away to Wycombe if they win their replay against Billericay Town. Woking or Bury vs Tranmere or Peterborough MK Dons v Maidstone United Newport Co v Cambridge Utd Wycombe v Leatherhead or Billericay Port Vale v Yeovil Town Shrewsbury v Morecambe Doncaster Rovers v Northampton or Scunthorpe Slough Town v Rochdale AFC Wimbledon v Charlton Athletic Stevenage v Swindon Town Mansfield Town v Guiseley or Accrington Stanley Gateshead v Luton Town Bradford City v Plymouth Argyle Blackburn Rovers v Crewe Alexandra AFC Fylde v Wigan Athletic Gillingham v Carlisle Utd Notts Co v Oxford City Forest Green v Exeter City Chorley or Fleetwood v Hereford Coventry City v Boreham Wood Town 7:28PM There you go Everyone present with 'Mark' Chapman professes themselves pleased with the draw. There's not much more I can add to the raw draw. Enjoy! Thanks for your company. 7:24PM TV picks I would guess would be Slough v Rochdale and Fylde v Wigan. Gateshead v Luton would be worth watching. 7:23PM The second round draw in full Woking or Bury vs Tranmere or Peterborough MK Dons v Maidstone United Newport Co v Cambridge Utd Wycombe v Leatherhead or Billericay Port Vale v Yeovil Town Shrewsbury v Morecambe Doncaster Rovers v Northampton or Scunthorpe Slough Town v Rochdale AFC Wimbledon v Charlton Athletic Stevenage v Swindon Town Mansfield Town v Guiseley or Accrington Stanley Gateshead v Luton Town Bradford City v Plymouth Argyle Blackburn Rovers v Crewe Alexandra AFC Fylde v Wigan Athletic Gillingham v Carlisle Utd Notts Co v Oxford City Forest Green v Exeter City Chorley or Fleetwood v Hereford Coventry City v Boreham Wood 7:19PM Tie 20 Coventry City v Boreham Wood 7:19PM Tie 19 Chorley or Fleetwood v Hereford 7:18PM Tie 18 Forest Green v Exeter City 7:18PM Tie 17 Notts Co v Oxford City 7:18PM Tie 16 Gillingham v Carlisle Utd 7:17PM Tie 15 AFC Fylde v Wigan Athletic 7:17PM Tie 14 Blackburn Rovers v Crewe Alexandra 7:17PM Tie 13 Bradford City v Plymouth Argyle 7:16PM Tie 12 Gateshead v Luton Town 7:16PM Tie 11 Mansfield Town v Guiseley or Accrington Stanley 7:16PM Tie 10 Stevenage v Swindon Town 7:16PM Tie nine AFC Wimbledon v Charlton Athletic 7:15PM Tie eight Slough Town v Rochdale 7:15PM Tie seven Donny Rovers v Northampton or Scunthorpe 7:15PM Tie six Shrewsbury v Morecambe 7:14PM Tie five Port Vale v Yeovil Town 7:14PM Tie four Wycombe v Leatherhead or Billericay 7:14PM Tie three Newport Co v Cambridge Utd 7:13PM Tie two MK Dons v Maidstone United 7:13PM First out Woking or Bury vs Tranmere or Peterborough 7:10PM Andy Cole and Kevin Davies Will draw the balls. 7:10PM Here we go The BBC hands over to BT Sport 7:09PM The draw will take place in 10 minutes Mark Chapman interviews Saturday's Slough Town heroes who thrashed Gainsborough Trinity 6-0. Everyone displays his/her poppy pinned to a tracksuit top. Chapman has his in his buttonhole. I'm perplexed that Chapman, a Manc, allows himself to be called 'Chappers'. That's a bit rah, isn't it? 'Chappy', 'Chap', 'grizzly' or 'face farm' would be far more Manc 7:03PM Former winners Bradford, Charlton, Blackburn, Wimbledon (oh, yes), Coventry and Wigan are all in the 'hat'. I use the quotation marks advisedly, unless you favour adorning your swede with a jaunty, plastic transparent bowl. And let's face it, who doesn't. 6:51PM Good evening All first-round winners have bagged their £18,000 prize money and set off in pursuit of the £27,000 on offer for a victory in the second round this evening. What, it's not about the money, it's about the glory? Could have fooled me after years of Premier League and Championship numpties fielding scratch sides to concentrate on the consolidation of 12th place. For years the FA has allowed its Challenge Cup to be abused by myopic, soulless blowhards and yet it still thrives. We shall celebrate it here today as we find out who stands in the way of teams on the next leg of the road to Wembley (for the semi-finals! Gah! See what they've done there? Audrey, the screens!) 6:40PM A second-round FA Cup draw primer What is it? It's the draw for the second round of the 2017 FA Cup. When is it? It's on Monday November 6. - ie today. What time does it start? It will begin after 19.00 GMT - before the Chorley vs Fleetwood match on Monday night. What TV channel is it on? The match and draw will be on BT Sport 1 and BBC 2. Alternatively, you can follow the draw here. What's left of this weekend's action? First-round review Exeter assistant manager Matt Oakley was delighted to progress to round two of the FA Cup after seeing his side see off gallant Heybridge Swifts 3-1 at St James' Park. Two Jayden Stockley goals shortly past the hour mark gave the Grecians a commanding lead, but Samuel Bentick turned in a cross to reduce the arrears and give the Swifts hope. But any hopes of a comeback were ended by Liam McAlinden, whose shot squeezed through the legs of goalkeeper Danny Sambridge, much to the relief of Oakley, who was standing in for the absent Paul Tisdale. "I'm very pleased. It was a banana skin waiting to happen for us, when you see the draw come out," Oakley said. Relief for Exeter as they see off Heybridge Swifts Credit: PA "I am very pleased with the result, very pleased with the second half performance and pleased to come in at half-time with a clean sheet. "We had a very difficult time at Warrington a few years ago when we conceded after a few minutes and we couldn't break them down after that. It was one of the messages we talked about before the game, so I was very pleased. "They put us under a lot of pressure and probably came out after the first half with a bit more confidence than we did. I thought we started the game really well, I was really pleased with the start, but then we started losing the ball and a few misplaced touches and they grew in confidence and came into it. "They didn't threaten our goal too much, so I wasn't too worried about it. We just needed to tighten up in certain areas and improve our attacking play in wide areas and we did that well in the second half." What are the draw numbers? STEVENAGE BRADFORD CITY PORT VALE NEWPORT COUNTY MORECAMBE YEOVIL TOWN PETERBOROUGH UNITED OR TRANMERE ROVERS CAMBRIDGE UNITED FOREST GREEN ROVERS AFC FYLDE LUTON TOWN SHREWSBURY TOWN HEREFORD GUISELEY OR ACCRINGTON STANLEY BLACKBURN ROVERS DONCASTER ROVERS LEATHERHEAD OR BILLERICAY TOWN BOREHAM WOOD MANSFIELD TOWN OXFORD CITY PLYMOUTH ARGYLE AFC WIMBLEDON ROCHDALE COVENTRY CITY CHORLEY OR FLEETWOOD TOWN CARLISLE UNITED NOTTS COUNTY SWINDON TOWN MAIDSTONE UNITED WOKING OR BURY CREWE ALEXANDRA GILLINGHAM MILTON KEYNES DONS SLOUGH TOWN WYCOMBE WANDERERS NORTHAMPTON TOWN OR SCUNTHORPE UNITED CHARLTON ATHELTIC WIGAN ATHLETIC GATESHEAD EXETER CITY When will the second round fixtures take place? Weekend of December 2 and 3. What are the latest FA Cup odds? Chelsea - 5/1 Man City - 5/1 Man Utd - 6/1 Tottenham - 8/1 Arsenal - 8/1 Liverpool - 9/1
FA Cup second round draw National League side AFC Fylde will host 2013 FA Cup winners Wigan in the second round of the competition. Fylde, through to this stage of the competition for the first time in their history following a victory over Kidderminster, were paired with the League One side when the second round draw was made on Monday. Fylde's fellow non-League side Boreham Wood will also face former winners of the competition in the shape of Coventry, who lifted the cup in 1987. Coventry will be at home for the tie. There were a total of 12 non-League sides in the draw. National League South Oxford City were drawn away to Notts County. Seventh-tier Hereford, the lowest-ranked side through to the second round, will face either Chorley or Fleetwood after their tie on Monday night. Leatherhead, who are ranked lower than Hereford, would go away to Wycombe if they win their replay against Billericay Town. Woking or Bury vs Tranmere or Peterborough MK Dons v Maidstone United Newport Co v Cambridge Utd Wycombe v Leatherhead or Billericay Port Vale v Yeovil Town Shrewsbury v Morecambe Doncaster Rovers v Northampton or Scunthorpe Slough Town v Rochdale AFC Wimbledon v Charlton Athletic Stevenage v Swindon Town Mansfield Town v Guiseley or Accrington Stanley Gateshead v Luton Town Bradford City v Plymouth Argyle Blackburn Rovers v Crewe Alexandra AFC Fylde v Wigan Athletic Gillingham v Carlisle Utd Notts Co v Oxford City Forest Green v Exeter City Chorley or Fleetwood v Hereford Coventry City v Boreham Wood Town 7:28PM There you go Everyone present with 'Mark' Chapman professes themselves pleased with the draw. There's not much more I can add to the raw draw. Enjoy! Thanks for your company. 7:24PM TV picks I would guess would be Slough v Rochdale and Fylde v Wigan. Gateshead v Luton would be worth watching. 7:23PM The second round draw in full Woking or Bury vs Tranmere or Peterborough MK Dons v Maidstone United Newport Co v Cambridge Utd Wycombe v Leatherhead or Billericay Port Vale v Yeovil Town Shrewsbury v Morecambe Doncaster Rovers v Northampton or Scunthorpe Slough Town v Rochdale AFC Wimbledon v Charlton Athletic Stevenage v Swindon Town Mansfield Town v Guiseley or Accrington Stanley Gateshead v Luton Town Bradford City v Plymouth Argyle Blackburn Rovers v Crewe Alexandra AFC Fylde v Wigan Athletic Gillingham v Carlisle Utd Notts Co v Oxford City Forest Green v Exeter City Chorley or Fleetwood v Hereford Coventry City v Boreham Wood 7:19PM Tie 20 Coventry City v Boreham Wood 7:19PM Tie 19 Chorley or Fleetwood v Hereford 7:18PM Tie 18 Forest Green v Exeter City 7:18PM Tie 17 Notts Co v Oxford City 7:18PM Tie 16 Gillingham v Carlisle Utd 7:17PM Tie 15 AFC Fylde v Wigan Athletic 7:17PM Tie 14 Blackburn Rovers v Crewe Alexandra 7:17PM Tie 13 Bradford City v Plymouth Argyle 7:16PM Tie 12 Gateshead v Luton Town 7:16PM Tie 11 Mansfield Town v Guiseley or Accrington Stanley 7:16PM Tie 10 Stevenage v Swindon Town 7:16PM Tie nine AFC Wimbledon v Charlton Athletic 7:15PM Tie eight Slough Town v Rochdale 7:15PM Tie seven Donny Rovers v Northampton or Scunthorpe 7:15PM Tie six Shrewsbury v Morecambe 7:14PM Tie five Port Vale v Yeovil Town 7:14PM Tie four Wycombe v Leatherhead or Billericay 7:14PM Tie three Newport Co v Cambridge Utd 7:13PM Tie two MK Dons v Maidstone United 7:13PM First out Woking or Bury vs Tranmere or Peterborough 7:10PM Andy Cole and Kevin Davies Will draw the balls. 7:10PM Here we go The BBC hands over to BT Sport 7:09PM The draw will take place in 10 minutes Mark Chapman interviews Saturday's Slough Town heroes who thrashed Gainsborough Trinity 6-0. Everyone displays his/her poppy pinned to a tracksuit top. Chapman has his in his buttonhole. I'm perplexed that Chapman, a Manc, allows himself to be called 'Chappers'. That's a bit rah, isn't it? 'Chappy', 'Chap', 'grizzly' or 'face farm' would be far more Manc 7:03PM Former winners Bradford, Charlton, Blackburn, Wimbledon (oh, yes), Coventry and Wigan are all in the 'hat'. I use the quotation marks advisedly, unless you favour adorning your swede with a jaunty, plastic transparent bowl. And let's face it, who doesn't. 6:51PM Good evening All first-round winners have bagged their £18,000 prize money and set off in pursuit of the £27,000 on offer for a victory in the second round this evening. What, it's not about the money, it's about the glory? Could have fooled me after years of Premier League and Championship numpties fielding scratch sides to concentrate on the consolidation of 12th place. For years the FA has allowed its Challenge Cup to be abused by myopic, soulless blowhards and yet it still thrives. We shall celebrate it here today as we find out who stands in the way of teams on the next leg of the road to Wembley (for the semi-finals! Gah! See what they've done there? Audrey, the screens!) 6:40PM A second-round FA Cup draw primer What is it? It's the draw for the second round of the 2017 FA Cup. When is it? It's on Monday November 6. - ie today. What time does it start? It will begin after 19.00 GMT - before the Chorley vs Fleetwood match on Monday night. What TV channel is it on? The match and draw will be on BT Sport 1 and BBC 2. Alternatively, you can follow the draw here. What's left of this weekend's action? First-round review Exeter assistant manager Matt Oakley was delighted to progress to round two of the FA Cup after seeing his side see off gallant Heybridge Swifts 3-1 at St James' Park. Two Jayden Stockley goals shortly past the hour mark gave the Grecians a commanding lead, but Samuel Bentick turned in a cross to reduce the arrears and give the Swifts hope. But any hopes of a comeback were ended by Liam McAlinden, whose shot squeezed through the legs of goalkeeper Danny Sambridge, much to the relief of Oakley, who was standing in for the absent Paul Tisdale. "I'm very pleased. It was a banana skin waiting to happen for us, when you see the draw come out," Oakley said. Relief for Exeter as they see off Heybridge Swifts Credit: PA "I am very pleased with the result, very pleased with the second half performance and pleased to come in at half-time with a clean sheet. "We had a very difficult time at Warrington a few years ago when we conceded after a few minutes and we couldn't break them down after that. It was one of the messages we talked about before the game, so I was very pleased. "They put us under a lot of pressure and probably came out after the first half with a bit more confidence than we did. I thought we started the game really well, I was really pleased with the start, but then we started losing the ball and a few misplaced touches and they grew in confidence and came into it. "They didn't threaten our goal too much, so I wasn't too worried about it. We just needed to tighten up in certain areas and improve our attacking play in wide areas and we did that well in the second half." What are the draw numbers? STEVENAGE BRADFORD CITY PORT VALE NEWPORT COUNTY MORECAMBE YEOVIL TOWN PETERBOROUGH UNITED OR TRANMERE ROVERS CAMBRIDGE UNITED FOREST GREEN ROVERS AFC FYLDE LUTON TOWN SHREWSBURY TOWN HEREFORD GUISELEY OR ACCRINGTON STANLEY BLACKBURN ROVERS DONCASTER ROVERS LEATHERHEAD OR BILLERICAY TOWN BOREHAM WOOD MANSFIELD TOWN OXFORD CITY PLYMOUTH ARGYLE AFC WIMBLEDON ROCHDALE COVENTRY CITY CHORLEY OR FLEETWOOD TOWN CARLISLE UNITED NOTTS COUNTY SWINDON TOWN MAIDSTONE UNITED WOKING OR BURY CREWE ALEXANDRA GILLINGHAM MILTON KEYNES DONS SLOUGH TOWN WYCOMBE WANDERERS NORTHAMPTON TOWN OR SCUNTHORPE UNITED CHARLTON ATHELTIC WIGAN ATHLETIC GATESHEAD EXETER CITY When will the second round fixtures take place? Weekend of December 2 and 3. What are the latest FA Cup odds? Chelsea - 5/1 Man City - 5/1 Man Utd - 6/1 Tottenham - 8/1 Arsenal - 8/1 Liverpool - 9/1
FA Cup second-round draw: Fylde host 2013 winners Wigan, Boreham Wood sent to Coventry
FA Cup second round draw National League side AFC Fylde will host 2013 FA Cup winners Wigan in the second round of the competition. Fylde, through to this stage of the competition for the first time in their history following a victory over Kidderminster, were paired with the League One side when the second round draw was made on Monday. Fylde's fellow non-League side Boreham Wood will also face former winners of the competition in the shape of Coventry, who lifted the cup in 1987. Coventry will be at home for the tie. There were a total of 12 non-League sides in the draw. National League South Oxford City were drawn away to Notts County. Seventh-tier Hereford, the lowest-ranked side through to the second round, will face either Chorley or Fleetwood after their tie on Monday night. Leatherhead, who are ranked lower than Hereford, would go away to Wycombe if they win their replay against Billericay Town. Woking or Bury vs Tranmere or Peterborough MK Dons v Maidstone United Newport Co v Cambridge Utd Wycombe v Leatherhead or Billericay Port Vale v Yeovil Town Shrewsbury v Morecambe Doncaster Rovers v Northampton or Scunthorpe Slough Town v Rochdale AFC Wimbledon v Charlton Athletic Stevenage v Swindon Town Mansfield Town v Guiseley or Accrington Stanley Gateshead v Luton Town Bradford City v Plymouth Argyle Blackburn Rovers v Crewe Alexandra AFC Fylde v Wigan Athletic Gillingham v Carlisle Utd Notts Co v Oxford City Forest Green v Exeter City Chorley or Fleetwood v Hereford Coventry City v Boreham Wood Town 7:28PM There you go Everyone present with 'Mark' Chapman professes themselves pleased with the draw. There's not much more I can add to the raw draw. Enjoy! Thanks for your company. 7:24PM TV picks I would guess would be Slough v Rochdale and Fylde v Wigan. Gateshead v Luton would be worth watching. 7:23PM The second round draw in full Woking or Bury vs Tranmere or Peterborough MK Dons v Maidstone United Newport Co v Cambridge Utd Wycombe v Leatherhead or Billericay Port Vale v Yeovil Town Shrewsbury v Morecambe Doncaster Rovers v Northampton or Scunthorpe Slough Town v Rochdale AFC Wimbledon v Charlton Athletic Stevenage v Swindon Town Mansfield Town v Guiseley or Accrington Stanley Gateshead v Luton Town Bradford City v Plymouth Argyle Blackburn Rovers v Crewe Alexandra AFC Fylde v Wigan Athletic Gillingham v Carlisle Utd Notts Co v Oxford City Forest Green v Exeter City Chorley or Fleetwood v Hereford Coventry City v Boreham Wood 7:19PM Tie 20 Coventry City v Boreham Wood 7:19PM Tie 19 Chorley or Fleetwood v Hereford 7:18PM Tie 18 Forest Green v Exeter City 7:18PM Tie 17 Notts Co v Oxford City 7:18PM Tie 16 Gillingham v Carlisle Utd 7:17PM Tie 15 AFC Fylde v Wigan Athletic 7:17PM Tie 14 Blackburn Rovers v Crewe Alexandra 7:17PM Tie 13 Bradford City v Plymouth Argyle 7:16PM Tie 12 Gateshead v Luton Town 7:16PM Tie 11 Mansfield Town v Guiseley or Accrington Stanley 7:16PM Tie 10 Stevenage v Swindon Town 7:16PM Tie nine AFC Wimbledon v Charlton Athletic 7:15PM Tie eight Slough Town v Rochdale 7:15PM Tie seven Donny Rovers v Northampton or Scunthorpe 7:15PM Tie six Shrewsbury v Morecambe 7:14PM Tie five Port Vale v Yeovil Town 7:14PM Tie four Wycombe v Leatherhead or Billericay 7:14PM Tie three Newport Co v Cambridge Utd 7:13PM Tie two MK Dons v Maidstone United 7:13PM First out Woking or Bury vs Tranmere or Peterborough 7:10PM Andy Cole and Kevin Davies Will draw the balls. 7:10PM Here we go The BBC hands over to BT Sport 7:09PM The draw will take place in 10 minutes Mark Chapman interviews Saturday's Slough Town heroes who thrashed Gainsborough Trinity 6-0. Everyone displays his/her poppy pinned to a tracksuit top. Chapman has his in his buttonhole. I'm perplexed that Chapman, a Manc, allows himself to be called 'Chappers'. That's a bit rah, isn't it? 'Chappy', 'Chap', 'grizzly' or 'face farm' would be far more Manc 7:03PM Former winners Bradford, Charlton, Blackburn, Wimbledon (oh, yes), Coventry and Wigan are all in the 'hat'. I use the quotation marks advisedly, unless you favour adorning your swede with a jaunty, plastic transparent bowl. And let's face it, who doesn't. 6:51PM Good evening All first-round winners have bagged their £18,000 prize money and set off in pursuit of the £27,000 on offer for a victory in the second round this evening. What, it's not about the money, it's about the glory? Could have fooled me after years of Premier League and Championship numpties fielding scratch sides to concentrate on the consolidation of 12th place. For years the FA has allowed its Challenge Cup to be abused by myopic, soulless blowhards and yet it still thrives. We shall celebrate it here today as we find out who stands in the way of teams on the next leg of the road to Wembley (for the semi-finals! Gah! See what they've done there? Audrey, the screens!) 6:40PM A second-round FA Cup draw primer What is it? It's the draw for the second round of the 2017 FA Cup. When is it? It's on Monday November 6. - ie today. What time does it start? It will begin after 19.00 GMT - before the Chorley vs Fleetwood match on Monday night. What TV channel is it on? The match and draw will be on BT Sport 1 and BBC 2. Alternatively, you can follow the draw here. What's left of this weekend's action? First-round review Exeter assistant manager Matt Oakley was delighted to progress to round two of the FA Cup after seeing his side see off gallant Heybridge Swifts 3-1 at St James' Park. Two Jayden Stockley goals shortly past the hour mark gave the Grecians a commanding lead, but Samuel Bentick turned in a cross to reduce the arrears and give the Swifts hope. But any hopes of a comeback were ended by Liam McAlinden, whose shot squeezed through the legs of goalkeeper Danny Sambridge, much to the relief of Oakley, who was standing in for the absent Paul Tisdale. "I'm very pleased. It was a banana skin waiting to happen for us, when you see the draw come out," Oakley said. Relief for Exeter as they see off Heybridge Swifts Credit: PA "I am very pleased with the result, very pleased with the second half performance and pleased to come in at half-time with a clean sheet. "We had a very difficult time at Warrington a few years ago when we conceded after a few minutes and we couldn't break them down after that. It was one of the messages we talked about before the game, so I was very pleased. "They put us under a lot of pressure and probably came out after the first half with a bit more confidence than we did. I thought we started the game really well, I was really pleased with the start, but then we started losing the ball and a few misplaced touches and they grew in confidence and came into it. "They didn't threaten our goal too much, so I wasn't too worried about it. We just needed to tighten up in certain areas and improve our attacking play in wide areas and we did that well in the second half." What are the draw numbers? STEVENAGE BRADFORD CITY PORT VALE NEWPORT COUNTY MORECAMBE YEOVIL TOWN PETERBOROUGH UNITED OR TRANMERE ROVERS CAMBRIDGE UNITED FOREST GREEN ROVERS AFC FYLDE LUTON TOWN SHREWSBURY TOWN HEREFORD GUISELEY OR ACCRINGTON STANLEY BLACKBURN ROVERS DONCASTER ROVERS LEATHERHEAD OR BILLERICAY TOWN BOREHAM WOOD MANSFIELD TOWN OXFORD CITY PLYMOUTH ARGYLE AFC WIMBLEDON ROCHDALE COVENTRY CITY CHORLEY OR FLEETWOOD TOWN CARLISLE UNITED NOTTS COUNTY SWINDON TOWN MAIDSTONE UNITED WOKING OR BURY CREWE ALEXANDRA GILLINGHAM MILTON KEYNES DONS SLOUGH TOWN WYCOMBE WANDERERS NORTHAMPTON TOWN OR SCUNTHORPE UNITED CHARLTON ATHELTIC WIGAN ATHLETIC GATESHEAD EXETER CITY When will the second round fixtures take place? Weekend of December 2 and 3. What are the latest FA Cup odds? Chelsea - 5/1 Man City - 5/1 Man Utd - 6/1 Tottenham - 8/1 Arsenal - 8/1 Liverpool - 9/1
FILE PHOTO - Football - Stock 09/10 - 29/7/09 .Zoltan Szelesi - Wolverhampton Wanderers. Mandatory Credit: Action Images / Ed Sykes
Crewe Alexandra v Wolverhampton Wanderers Pre Season Friendly
FILE PHOTO - Football - Stock 09/10 - 29/7/09 .Zoltan Szelesi - Wolverhampton Wanderers. Mandatory Credit: Action Images / Ed Sykes
The failure by some to cooperate with the independent review into the game’s child sexual abuse scandal was laid bare again on Monday night after it emerged six County Football Associations had not responded to requests for information five months after being asked to do so. Following the revelation in May that eight professional clubs had missed two deadlines over four months to tell investigators what they knew, it transpired that six of the 46 County FAs had also ignored more than one attempt to contact them, putting them at risk of disciplinary action. The inquiry team, led by Clive Sheldon QC, was forced last week to contact the Football Association itself to ask it to act over what one source branded “inertia” on the part of several counties, something that as of last night had the desired effect on only two out of the six in question. They had originally been written to on May 11 and given a deadline of June 1 to respond, with those which failed to meet that contacted again on June 21. The six outstanding counties were also sent reminders more recently to provide information which could be vital to an inquiry which is investigating what FA chairman Greg Clarke has admitted is the biggest crisis he could recall the game facing. The probe will examine how it dealt with the alleged abuse of schoolboy players between 1970 and 2005, whether there was any cover-up, and even whether a paedophile ring operated in the game. It also transpired that the final report by Sheldon had been delayed until at least Easter after the process of examining up to five million documents in an FA archive proved more arduous than anticipated. Sheldon and his team, who had originally planned to report early next year, had also managed to interview only 15 survivors of abuse - there are 741 potential victims according to the most recent police figures - and 35 other persons of interest. Alleged victims spoken to include former internationals, although sources refused to confirm whether Matt Le Tissier, David White and Paul Stewart - all of whom had gone public - had been among them. Survivors’ stories were said to have been “harrowing”, with Sheldon and his team - as well as victims - requiring counselling as a result. Meetings were planned yesterday with a further 20-30 survivors, as well as with other persons of interest, with the inquiry restricted in who it could talk to due to ongoing criminal investigations and the upcoming trials of former Crewe Alexandra coach Barry Bennell and ex-Southampton youth coach Bob Higgins. Sources close to the investigation confirmed suspended Crewe director of football Dario Gradi - who denies covering up abuse claims - had been on a list of intended interviewees but refused to reveal whether he had been spoken to yet. Former Aston Villa assistant manager Dave Richardson is also a person of interest after the inquiry was told by one victim, Tony Brien, that former England boss Graham Taylor was involved in a cover-up while at the club. No one approached so far has openly refused to co-operate with the inquiry. The Bennell and Higgins trials early next year could also limit either what Sheldon says about allegations against each of them in his report or what the FA is able to publish of his findings. His report is likely to focus on case studies of 10-12 clubs to paint a picture of the game’s handling of claims of child abuse during the years covered by the inquiry, amid the impossibility of speaking to every potential victim and witness.
Six County FAs fail to respond to questions on football sex abuse
The failure by some to cooperate with the independent review into the game’s child sexual abuse scandal was laid bare again on Monday night after it emerged six County Football Associations had not responded to requests for information five months after being asked to do so. Following the revelation in May that eight professional clubs had missed two deadlines over four months to tell investigators what they knew, it transpired that six of the 46 County FAs had also ignored more than one attempt to contact them, putting them at risk of disciplinary action. The inquiry team, led by Clive Sheldon QC, was forced last week to contact the Football Association itself to ask it to act over what one source branded “inertia” on the part of several counties, something that as of last night had the desired effect on only two out of the six in question. They had originally been written to on May 11 and given a deadline of June 1 to respond, with those which failed to meet that contacted again on June 21. The six outstanding counties were also sent reminders more recently to provide information which could be vital to an inquiry which is investigating what FA chairman Greg Clarke has admitted is the biggest crisis he could recall the game facing. The probe will examine how it dealt with the alleged abuse of schoolboy players between 1970 and 2005, whether there was any cover-up, and even whether a paedophile ring operated in the game. It also transpired that the final report by Sheldon had been delayed until at least Easter after the process of examining up to five million documents in an FA archive proved more arduous than anticipated. Sheldon and his team, who had originally planned to report early next year, had also managed to interview only 15 survivors of abuse - there are 741 potential victims according to the most recent police figures - and 35 other persons of interest. Alleged victims spoken to include former internationals, although sources refused to confirm whether Matt Le Tissier, David White and Paul Stewart - all of whom had gone public - had been among them. Survivors’ stories were said to have been “harrowing”, with Sheldon and his team - as well as victims - requiring counselling as a result. Meetings were planned yesterday with a further 20-30 survivors, as well as with other persons of interest, with the inquiry restricted in who it could talk to due to ongoing criminal investigations and the upcoming trials of former Crewe Alexandra coach Barry Bennell and ex-Southampton youth coach Bob Higgins. Sources close to the investigation confirmed suspended Crewe director of football Dario Gradi - who denies covering up abuse claims - had been on a list of intended interviewees but refused to reveal whether he had been spoken to yet. Former Aston Villa assistant manager Dave Richardson is also a person of interest after the inquiry was told by one victim, Tony Brien, that former England boss Graham Taylor was involved in a cover-up while at the club. No one approached so far has openly refused to co-operate with the inquiry. The Bennell and Higgins trials early next year could also limit either what Sheldon says about allegations against each of them in his report or what the FA is able to publish of his findings. His report is likely to focus on case studies of 10-12 clubs to paint a picture of the game’s handling of claims of child abuse during the years covered by the inquiry, amid the impossibility of speaking to every potential victim and witness.
 7:28PM And that's the draw The excitement is over! No more balls will be drawn! Morecambe vs Hartlepool is pretty good, Doncaster will visit either East Thurrock or Ebsfleet. Hyde vs MK Dons is a brilliant tie for the minnows. I was really hoping for a Slough vs Swindon draw, purely for Office quotes. 7:25PM Eighth tier Hyde will play MK Dons! The crowd goes wild in the BBC studio as the draw is announced. That's the big club the players wanted. 7:24PM Lads, can we please have some music Or something. This draw is not one of the most exciting things I've ever seen on television. That Liverpool vs Man Utd game on Saturday was more entertaining. 7:21PM AFC Wimbledon vs Lincoln City AFC Wimbledon are one of the clubs to have benefited immensely from TV money brought by the FA Cup and they are drawn against Lincoln City. 7:19PM Some more fixtures for you Peterborough Utd v Tranmere Cambridge Utd v Sutton Utd Forest Green Rovers v Macclesfield Town AFC Fylde v Kidderminster Harriers Luton v Portsmouth Shrewsbury v Aldershot Hereford v AFC Telford Utd Guiseley v Accrington Stanley Blackburn Rovers v Barnet 7:16PM No huge match ups so far Bradford City v Chesterfield Port Vale v Oxford Utd Newport County v Walsall Morecambe v Hartlepool Utd 7:14PM And it's set of balls number eight And Lancelot is the FA Cup draw machine for tonight. What a hilarious National Lottery joke. And the first fixture is Stevenage vs Nantwich or Kettering. IT'S ALL KICKING OFF NOW, CLIVE. 7:12PM Your Davids, your Goliaths Hyde, Heybridge Swifts and Ossett Town are the lowest ranked teams in the competition, with all three occupying the eighth tier of English football. 7:10PM David Sharpe The Wigan chairman, grandson of Dave Whelan, fancies Wigan's chances this season. And now it's time for the draw! 7:05PM Who do the small teams want to get in the draw? According to a couple of Hyde football staff (manager and player), the management want to play against a team they can probably beat whereas the players want to draw Blackburn or Charlton - one of the 'big' clubs. Hyde actually own the record for biggest defeat in the FA Cup. A 26-0 hiding (see what I did) by Preston North End. 7:00PM The live coverage begins! Here we go. The draw is being held at Hyde United's ground. Look how cool their sun was earlier: Red sun today. FA Cup draw at Hyde United. Is that an omen. #EmiratesFACuppic.twitter.com/LoZ27mZjKW— Hyde United FC (@hydeunited) October 16, 2017 6:47PM The difference the FA Cup actually makes I wrote this in January about just how much an FA Cup run is worth to a small club. It turns out the answer is everything. The FA awards a prize of £1.8million to the winners of the competition, the kind of short-change a Champions League club might use as a sweetener for a promising youth prospect’s signing-on fee. For non-league side Curzon Ashton just qualifying for the second round of the competition will, and has, had an enormous impact. Image Landscape Portrait Square Original/Custom Edit Selected Crop... Caption: Description: curzon ashton Agency: GETTY IMAGES Artist: Edit... Delete “It means so much to us a club,” says their CEO Natalie Atkinson. “The FA Cup is enabling us, through prize money, funds gained and TV money to work with the FA and football foundations to replace our 3G pitch next to the stadium.” Curzon Ashton, currently 15th in the National League North, lost 4-3 to AFC Wimbledon in December, conceding four goals in the final 10 minutes of the game. The prize for qualifying for the second round was £27,000, in addition to £18,000 earned from the first round. Those sucker-punch goals prevented a windfall of £67,500 for making it to third round. However, thanks to the wonder of television money, the club received more for their defeat to Wimbledon than they would have if they’d won a non-televised second round match. There's more on the article, if you fancy clicking on it. 6:30PM The magic of the cup This most holy of trophies always produces magical moments and even if a guilty few/most don't pay attention to the competition until their team is involved, those matches between minnows of the lower leagues and giants of... in this case, League One, are always thoroughly enjoyable. Sutton are looking to make a lot more money from another (pie free) run at the cup this year, Accrington Stanley's involvement will be upping the YouTube view count on this milk advert, and today is the first time I have ever heard of Gainsborough Trinity. Perhaps they will become my new favourite non-league - maybe they'll be yours! It all depends who has to play who - and which of those games the people in charge at BBC decide to broadcast... 6:15PM Good evening! Hello there sports fans. Welcome to our live coverage of what is sure to be a riveting FA Cup first round draw. The action will kick-off at 7:10pm and we'll keep you up to date with the draw as it happens. For right now, that wait should give you time to look at all the nice photographs of that weird looking sun from earlier today. It was like being in Blade Runner. 6:09PM Preview What is it? It's the draw for the first round proper of the FA Cup: the oldest competition in world football. The first round sees the 48 teams from League One and League Two joined by 32 non-league sides. When is it? Monday October 16. What time is it? The draw itself will begin at 7:10pm on Monday evening. The first round of the FA Cup will take place on Saturday November 4 Credit: AP What TV channel is it on? The draw will be broadcast live on both BBC Two and BT Sport. Mark Chapman will present the BBC's coverage of the draw in half-hour long episode from 7pm, while BT Sport 3's show will also begin at 7pm. When will the matches take place? The first round will take place over the weekend of Friday November 3 to Monday 6 November 2017 Who's in the hat? Sutton United made it to the fifth round of the FA Cup last season Credit: Getty Images Three teams from the eighth tier of English football are among the non-league teams in the hat for the first round. Hyde United, who play in the Northern Premier League, beat Scarborough Athletic on Sunday afternoon to book their place in the competition. Hampton and Richmond, who are coached by Sky Sports commentator Martin Tyler, failed in their bid to reach the FA Cup proper after losing to National League South rivals Truro City. Truro's 2-0 victory over their league rivals means they become the first Cornwal team to reach the FA Cup first round since 1969. Billericay Town, whose current players include Jamie O'Hara, Paul Konchesky and Jermaine Pennant, will also take their place in the draw. FA Cup first round numbers 1 ACCRINGTON STANLEY 2 AFC WIMBLEDON 3 BARNET 4 BLACKBURN ROVERS 5 BLACKPOOL 6 BRADFORD CITY 7 BRISTOL ROVERS 8 BURY 9 CAMBRIDGE UNITED 10 CARLISLE UNITED 11 CHARLTON ATHLETIC 12 CHELTENHAM TOWN 13 CHESTERFIELD 14 COLCHESTER UNITED 15 COVENTRY CITY 16 CRAWLEY TOWN 17 CREWE ALEXANDRA 18 DONCASTER ROVERS 19 EXETER CITY 20 FLEETWOOD TOWN 21 FOREST GREEN ROVERS 22 GILLINGHAM 23 GRIMSBY TOWN 24 LINCOLN CITY 25 LUTON TOWN 26 MANSFIELD TOWN 27 MILTON KEYNES DONS 28 MORECAMBE 29 NEWPORT COUNTY 30 NORTHAMPTON TOWN 31 NOTTS COUNTY 32 OLDHAM ATHLETIC 33 OXFORD UNITED 34 PETERBOROUGH UNITED 35 PLYMOUTH ARGYLE 36 PORT VALE 37 PORTSMOUTH 38 ROCHDALE 39 ROTHERHAM UNITED 40 SCUNTHORPE UNITED 41 SHREWSBURY TOWN 42 SOUTHEND UNITED 43 STEVENAGE 44 SWINDON TOWN 45 WALSALL 46 WIGAN ATHLETIC 47 WYCOMBE WANDERERS 48 YEOVIL TOWN 49 TRANMERE ROVERS 50 SOLIHULL MOORS OR OSSETT TOWN 51 HARTLEPOOL UNITED 52 SHAW LANE ASSOCIATION 53 CHORLEY OR BOSTON UNITED 54 AFC TELFORD UNITED 55 GAINSBOROUGH TRINITY 56 NANTWICH TOWN OR KETTERING TOWN 57 GATESHEAD 58 GUISELEY 59 AFC FYLDE 60 KIDDERMINSTER HARRIERS 61 HYDE UNITED 62 MACCLESFIELD TOWN 63 BRACKLEY TOWN OR BILLERICAY TOWN 64 DAGENHAM & REDBRIDGE OR LEYTON ORIENT 65 HEREFORD 66 ALDERSHOT TOWN 67 BATH CITY OR CHELMSFORD CITY 68 OXFORD CITY 69 MAIDENHEAD UNITED 70 HEYBRIDGE SWIFTS 71 WOKING OR CONCORD RANGERS 72 TRURO CITY 73 DOVER ATHLETIC OR BROMLEY 74 SLOUGH TOWN 75 DARTFORD 76 BOREHAM WOOD 77 MAIDSTONE UNITED OR ENFIELD TOWN 78 LEATHERHEAD 79 SUTTON UNITED 80 EAST THURROCK UNITED OR EBBSFLEET UNITED
FA Cup first round draw: Hyde United (eighth tier) host MK Dons
7:28PM And that's the draw The excitement is over! No more balls will be drawn! Morecambe vs Hartlepool is pretty good, Doncaster will visit either East Thurrock or Ebsfleet. Hyde vs MK Dons is a brilliant tie for the minnows. I was really hoping for a Slough vs Swindon draw, purely for Office quotes. 7:25PM Eighth tier Hyde will play MK Dons! The crowd goes wild in the BBC studio as the draw is announced. That's the big club the players wanted. 7:24PM Lads, can we please have some music Or something. This draw is not one of the most exciting things I've ever seen on television. That Liverpool vs Man Utd game on Saturday was more entertaining. 7:21PM AFC Wimbledon vs Lincoln City AFC Wimbledon are one of the clubs to have benefited immensely from TV money brought by the FA Cup and they are drawn against Lincoln City. 7:19PM Some more fixtures for you Peterborough Utd v Tranmere Cambridge Utd v Sutton Utd Forest Green Rovers v Macclesfield Town AFC Fylde v Kidderminster Harriers Luton v Portsmouth Shrewsbury v Aldershot Hereford v AFC Telford Utd Guiseley v Accrington Stanley Blackburn Rovers v Barnet 7:16PM No huge match ups so far Bradford City v Chesterfield Port Vale v Oxford Utd Newport County v Walsall Morecambe v Hartlepool Utd 7:14PM And it's set of balls number eight And Lancelot is the FA Cup draw machine for tonight. What a hilarious National Lottery joke. And the first fixture is Stevenage vs Nantwich or Kettering. IT'S ALL KICKING OFF NOW, CLIVE. 7:12PM Your Davids, your Goliaths Hyde, Heybridge Swifts and Ossett Town are the lowest ranked teams in the competition, with all three occupying the eighth tier of English football. 7:10PM David Sharpe The Wigan chairman, grandson of Dave Whelan, fancies Wigan's chances this season. And now it's time for the draw! 7:05PM Who do the small teams want to get in the draw? According to a couple of Hyde football staff (manager and player), the management want to play against a team they can probably beat whereas the players want to draw Blackburn or Charlton - one of the 'big' clubs. Hyde actually own the record for biggest defeat in the FA Cup. A 26-0 hiding (see what I did) by Preston North End. 7:00PM The live coverage begins! Here we go. The draw is being held at Hyde United's ground. Look how cool their sun was earlier: Red sun today. FA Cup draw at Hyde United. Is that an omen. #EmiratesFACuppic.twitter.com/LoZ27mZjKW— Hyde United FC (@hydeunited) October 16, 2017 6:47PM The difference the FA Cup actually makes I wrote this in January about just how much an FA Cup run is worth to a small club. It turns out the answer is everything. The FA awards a prize of £1.8million to the winners of the competition, the kind of short-change a Champions League club might use as a sweetener for a promising youth prospect’s signing-on fee. For non-league side Curzon Ashton just qualifying for the second round of the competition will, and has, had an enormous impact. Image Landscape Portrait Square Original/Custom Edit Selected Crop... Caption: Description: curzon ashton Agency: GETTY IMAGES Artist: Edit... Delete “It means so much to us a club,” says their CEO Natalie Atkinson. “The FA Cup is enabling us, through prize money, funds gained and TV money to work with the FA and football foundations to replace our 3G pitch next to the stadium.” Curzon Ashton, currently 15th in the National League North, lost 4-3 to AFC Wimbledon in December, conceding four goals in the final 10 minutes of the game. The prize for qualifying for the second round was £27,000, in addition to £18,000 earned from the first round. Those sucker-punch goals prevented a windfall of £67,500 for making it to third round. However, thanks to the wonder of television money, the club received more for their defeat to Wimbledon than they would have if they’d won a non-televised second round match. There's more on the article, if you fancy clicking on it. 6:30PM The magic of the cup This most holy of trophies always produces magical moments and even if a guilty few/most don't pay attention to the competition until their team is involved, those matches between minnows of the lower leagues and giants of... in this case, League One, are always thoroughly enjoyable. Sutton are looking to make a lot more money from another (pie free) run at the cup this year, Accrington Stanley's involvement will be upping the YouTube view count on this milk advert, and today is the first time I have ever heard of Gainsborough Trinity. Perhaps they will become my new favourite non-league - maybe they'll be yours! It all depends who has to play who - and which of those games the people in charge at BBC decide to broadcast... 6:15PM Good evening! Hello there sports fans. Welcome to our live coverage of what is sure to be a riveting FA Cup first round draw. The action will kick-off at 7:10pm and we'll keep you up to date with the draw as it happens. For right now, that wait should give you time to look at all the nice photographs of that weird looking sun from earlier today. It was like being in Blade Runner. 6:09PM Preview What is it? It's the draw for the first round proper of the FA Cup: the oldest competition in world football. The first round sees the 48 teams from League One and League Two joined by 32 non-league sides. When is it? Monday October 16. What time is it? The draw itself will begin at 7:10pm on Monday evening. The first round of the FA Cup will take place on Saturday November 4 Credit: AP What TV channel is it on? The draw will be broadcast live on both BBC Two and BT Sport. Mark Chapman will present the BBC's coverage of the draw in half-hour long episode from 7pm, while BT Sport 3's show will also begin at 7pm. When will the matches take place? The first round will take place over the weekend of Friday November 3 to Monday 6 November 2017 Who's in the hat? Sutton United made it to the fifth round of the FA Cup last season Credit: Getty Images Three teams from the eighth tier of English football are among the non-league teams in the hat for the first round. Hyde United, who play in the Northern Premier League, beat Scarborough Athletic on Sunday afternoon to book their place in the competition. Hampton and Richmond, who are coached by Sky Sports commentator Martin Tyler, failed in their bid to reach the FA Cup proper after losing to National League South rivals Truro City. Truro's 2-0 victory over their league rivals means they become the first Cornwal team to reach the FA Cup first round since 1969. Billericay Town, whose current players include Jamie O'Hara, Paul Konchesky and Jermaine Pennant, will also take their place in the draw. FA Cup first round numbers 1 ACCRINGTON STANLEY 2 AFC WIMBLEDON 3 BARNET 4 BLACKBURN ROVERS 5 BLACKPOOL 6 BRADFORD CITY 7 BRISTOL ROVERS 8 BURY 9 CAMBRIDGE UNITED 10 CARLISLE UNITED 11 CHARLTON ATHLETIC 12 CHELTENHAM TOWN 13 CHESTERFIELD 14 COLCHESTER UNITED 15 COVENTRY CITY 16 CRAWLEY TOWN 17 CREWE ALEXANDRA 18 DONCASTER ROVERS 19 EXETER CITY 20 FLEETWOOD TOWN 21 FOREST GREEN ROVERS 22 GILLINGHAM 23 GRIMSBY TOWN 24 LINCOLN CITY 25 LUTON TOWN 26 MANSFIELD TOWN 27 MILTON KEYNES DONS 28 MORECAMBE 29 NEWPORT COUNTY 30 NORTHAMPTON TOWN 31 NOTTS COUNTY 32 OLDHAM ATHLETIC 33 OXFORD UNITED 34 PETERBOROUGH UNITED 35 PLYMOUTH ARGYLE 36 PORT VALE 37 PORTSMOUTH 38 ROCHDALE 39 ROTHERHAM UNITED 40 SCUNTHORPE UNITED 41 SHREWSBURY TOWN 42 SOUTHEND UNITED 43 STEVENAGE 44 SWINDON TOWN 45 WALSALL 46 WIGAN ATHLETIC 47 WYCOMBE WANDERERS 48 YEOVIL TOWN 49 TRANMERE ROVERS 50 SOLIHULL MOORS OR OSSETT TOWN 51 HARTLEPOOL UNITED 52 SHAW LANE ASSOCIATION 53 CHORLEY OR BOSTON UNITED 54 AFC TELFORD UNITED 55 GAINSBOROUGH TRINITY 56 NANTWICH TOWN OR KETTERING TOWN 57 GATESHEAD 58 GUISELEY 59 AFC FYLDE 60 KIDDERMINSTER HARRIERS 61 HYDE UNITED 62 MACCLESFIELD TOWN 63 BRACKLEY TOWN OR BILLERICAY TOWN 64 DAGENHAM & REDBRIDGE OR LEYTON ORIENT 65 HEREFORD 66 ALDERSHOT TOWN 67 BATH CITY OR CHELMSFORD CITY 68 OXFORD CITY 69 MAIDENHEAD UNITED 70 HEYBRIDGE SWIFTS 71 WOKING OR CONCORD RANGERS 72 TRURO CITY 73 DOVER ATHLETIC OR BROMLEY 74 SLOUGH TOWN 75 DARTFORD 76 BOREHAM WOOD 77 MAIDSTONE UNITED OR ENFIELD TOWN 78 LEATHERHEAD 79 SUTTON UNITED 80 EAST THURROCK UNITED OR EBBSFLEET UNITED
 7:28PM And that's the draw The excitement is over! No more balls will be drawn! Morecambe vs Hartlepool is pretty good, Doncaster will visit either East Thurrock or Ebsfleet. Hyde vs MK Dons is a brilliant tie for the minnows. I was really hoping for a Slough vs Swindon draw, purely for Office quotes. 7:25PM Eighth tier Hyde will play MK Dons! The crowd goes wild in the BBC studio as the draw is announced. That's the big club the players wanted. 7:24PM Lads, can we please have some music Or something. This draw is not one of the most exciting things I've ever seen on television. That Liverpool vs Man Utd game on Saturday was more entertaining. 7:21PM AFC Wimbledon vs Lincoln City AFC Wimbledon are one of the clubs to have benefited immensely from TV money brought by the FA Cup and they are drawn against Lincoln City. 7:19PM Some more fixtures for you Peterborough Utd v Tranmere Cambridge Utd v Sutton Utd Forest Green Rovers v Macclesfield Town AFC Fylde v Kidderminster Harriers Luton v Portsmouth Shrewsbury v Aldershot Hereford v AFC Telford Utd Guiseley v Accrington Stanley Blackburn Rovers v Barnet 7:16PM No huge match ups so far Bradford City v Chesterfield Port Vale v Oxford Utd Newport County v Walsall Morecambe v Hartlepool Utd 7:14PM And it's set of balls number eight And Lancelot is the FA Cup draw machine for tonight. What a hilarious National Lottery joke. And the first fixture is Stevenage vs Nantwich or Kettering. IT'S ALL KICKING OFF NOW, CLIVE. 7:12PM Your Davids, your Goliaths Hyde, Heybridge Swifts and Ossett Town are the lowest ranked teams in the competition, with all three occupying the eighth tier of English football. 7:10PM David Sharpe The Wigan chairman, grandson of Dave Whelan, fancies Wigan's chances this season. And now it's time for the draw! 7:05PM Who do the small teams want to get in the draw? According to a couple of Hyde football staff (manager and player), the management want to play against a team they can probably beat whereas the players want to draw Blackburn or Charlton - one of the 'big' clubs. Hyde actually own the record for biggest defeat in the FA Cup. A 26-0 hiding (see what I did) by Preston North End. 7:00PM The live coverage begins! Here we go. The draw is being held at Hyde United's ground. Look how cool their sun was earlier: Red sun today. FA Cup draw at Hyde United. Is that an omen. #EmiratesFACuppic.twitter.com/LoZ27mZjKW— Hyde United FC (@hydeunited) October 16, 2017 6:47PM The difference the FA Cup actually makes I wrote this in January about just how much an FA Cup run is worth to a small club. It turns out the answer is everything. The FA awards a prize of £1.8million to the winners of the competition, the kind of short-change a Champions League club might use as a sweetener for a promising youth prospect’s signing-on fee. For non-league side Curzon Ashton just qualifying for the second round of the competition will, and has, had an enormous impact. Image Landscape Portrait Square Original/Custom Edit Selected Crop... Caption: Description: curzon ashton Agency: GETTY IMAGES Artist: Edit... Delete “It means so much to us a club,” says their CEO Natalie Atkinson. “The FA Cup is enabling us, through prize money, funds gained and TV money to work with the FA and football foundations to replace our 3G pitch next to the stadium.” Curzon Ashton, currently 15th in the National League North, lost 4-3 to AFC Wimbledon in December, conceding four goals in the final 10 minutes of the game. The prize for qualifying for the second round was £27,000, in addition to £18,000 earned from the first round. Those sucker-punch goals prevented a windfall of £67,500 for making it to third round. However, thanks to the wonder of television money, the club received more for their defeat to Wimbledon than they would have if they’d won a non-televised second round match. There's more on the article, if you fancy clicking on it. 6:30PM The magic of the cup This most holy of trophies always produces magical moments and even if a guilty few/most don't pay attention to the competition until their team is involved, those matches between minnows of the lower leagues and giants of... in this case, League One, are always thoroughly enjoyable. Sutton are looking to make a lot more money from another (pie free) run at the cup this year, Accrington Stanley's involvement will be upping the YouTube view count on this milk advert, and today is the first time I have ever heard of Gainsborough Trinity. Perhaps they will become my new favourite non-league - maybe they'll be yours! It all depends who has to play who - and which of those games the people in charge at BBC decide to broadcast... 6:15PM Good evening! Hello there sports fans. Welcome to our live coverage of what is sure to be a riveting FA Cup first round draw. The action will kick-off at 7:10pm and we'll keep you up to date with the draw as it happens. For right now, that wait should give you time to look at all the nice photographs of that weird looking sun from earlier today. It was like being in Blade Runner. 6:09PM Preview What is it? It's the draw for the first round proper of the FA Cup: the oldest competition in world football. The first round sees the 48 teams from League One and League Two joined by 32 non-league sides. When is it? Monday October 16. What time is it? The draw itself will begin at 7:10pm on Monday evening. The first round of the FA Cup will take place on Saturday November 4 Credit: AP What TV channel is it on? The draw will be broadcast live on both BBC Two and BT Sport. Mark Chapman will present the BBC's coverage of the draw in half-hour long episode from 7pm, while BT Sport 3's show will also begin at 7pm. When will the matches take place? The first round will take place over the weekend of Friday November 3 to Monday 6 November 2017 Who's in the hat? Sutton United made it to the fifth round of the FA Cup last season Credit: Getty Images Three teams from the eighth tier of English football are among the non-league teams in the hat for the first round. Hyde United, who play in the Northern Premier League, beat Scarborough Athletic on Sunday afternoon to book their place in the competition. Hampton and Richmond, who are coached by Sky Sports commentator Martin Tyler, failed in their bid to reach the FA Cup proper after losing to National League South rivals Truro City. Truro's 2-0 victory over their league rivals means they become the first Cornwal team to reach the FA Cup first round since 1969. Billericay Town, whose current players include Jamie O'Hara, Paul Konchesky and Jermaine Pennant, will also take their place in the draw. FA Cup first round numbers 1 ACCRINGTON STANLEY 2 AFC WIMBLEDON 3 BARNET 4 BLACKBURN ROVERS 5 BLACKPOOL 6 BRADFORD CITY 7 BRISTOL ROVERS 8 BURY 9 CAMBRIDGE UNITED 10 CARLISLE UNITED 11 CHARLTON ATHLETIC 12 CHELTENHAM TOWN 13 CHESTERFIELD 14 COLCHESTER UNITED 15 COVENTRY CITY 16 CRAWLEY TOWN 17 CREWE ALEXANDRA 18 DONCASTER ROVERS 19 EXETER CITY 20 FLEETWOOD TOWN 21 FOREST GREEN ROVERS 22 GILLINGHAM 23 GRIMSBY TOWN 24 LINCOLN CITY 25 LUTON TOWN 26 MANSFIELD TOWN 27 MILTON KEYNES DONS 28 MORECAMBE 29 NEWPORT COUNTY 30 NORTHAMPTON TOWN 31 NOTTS COUNTY 32 OLDHAM ATHLETIC 33 OXFORD UNITED 34 PETERBOROUGH UNITED 35 PLYMOUTH ARGYLE 36 PORT VALE 37 PORTSMOUTH 38 ROCHDALE 39 ROTHERHAM UNITED 40 SCUNTHORPE UNITED 41 SHREWSBURY TOWN 42 SOUTHEND UNITED 43 STEVENAGE 44 SWINDON TOWN 45 WALSALL 46 WIGAN ATHLETIC 47 WYCOMBE WANDERERS 48 YEOVIL TOWN 49 TRANMERE ROVERS 50 SOLIHULL MOORS OR OSSETT TOWN 51 HARTLEPOOL UNITED 52 SHAW LANE ASSOCIATION 53 CHORLEY OR BOSTON UNITED 54 AFC TELFORD UNITED 55 GAINSBOROUGH TRINITY 56 NANTWICH TOWN OR KETTERING TOWN 57 GATESHEAD 58 GUISELEY 59 AFC FYLDE 60 KIDDERMINSTER HARRIERS 61 HYDE UNITED 62 MACCLESFIELD TOWN 63 BRACKLEY TOWN OR BILLERICAY TOWN 64 DAGENHAM & REDBRIDGE OR LEYTON ORIENT 65 HEREFORD 66 ALDERSHOT TOWN 67 BATH CITY OR CHELMSFORD CITY 68 OXFORD CITY 69 MAIDENHEAD UNITED 70 HEYBRIDGE SWIFTS 71 WOKING OR CONCORD RANGERS 72 TRURO CITY 73 DOVER ATHLETIC OR BROMLEY 74 SLOUGH TOWN 75 DARTFORD 76 BOREHAM WOOD 77 MAIDSTONE UNITED OR ENFIELD TOWN 78 LEATHERHEAD 79 SUTTON UNITED 80 EAST THURROCK UNITED OR EBBSFLEET UNITED
FA Cup first round draw: Hyde United (eighth tier) host MK Dons
7:28PM And that's the draw The excitement is over! No more balls will be drawn! Morecambe vs Hartlepool is pretty good, Doncaster will visit either East Thurrock or Ebsfleet. Hyde vs MK Dons is a brilliant tie for the minnows. I was really hoping for a Slough vs Swindon draw, purely for Office quotes. 7:25PM Eighth tier Hyde will play MK Dons! The crowd goes wild in the BBC studio as the draw is announced. That's the big club the players wanted. 7:24PM Lads, can we please have some music Or something. This draw is not one of the most exciting things I've ever seen on television. That Liverpool vs Man Utd game on Saturday was more entertaining. 7:21PM AFC Wimbledon vs Lincoln City AFC Wimbledon are one of the clubs to have benefited immensely from TV money brought by the FA Cup and they are drawn against Lincoln City. 7:19PM Some more fixtures for you Peterborough Utd v Tranmere Cambridge Utd v Sutton Utd Forest Green Rovers v Macclesfield Town AFC Fylde v Kidderminster Harriers Luton v Portsmouth Shrewsbury v Aldershot Hereford v AFC Telford Utd Guiseley v Accrington Stanley Blackburn Rovers v Barnet 7:16PM No huge match ups so far Bradford City v Chesterfield Port Vale v Oxford Utd Newport County v Walsall Morecambe v Hartlepool Utd 7:14PM And it's set of balls number eight And Lancelot is the FA Cup draw machine for tonight. What a hilarious National Lottery joke. And the first fixture is Stevenage vs Nantwich or Kettering. IT'S ALL KICKING OFF NOW, CLIVE. 7:12PM Your Davids, your Goliaths Hyde, Heybridge Swifts and Ossett Town are the lowest ranked teams in the competition, with all three occupying the eighth tier of English football. 7:10PM David Sharpe The Wigan chairman, grandson of Dave Whelan, fancies Wigan's chances this season. And now it's time for the draw! 7:05PM Who do the small teams want to get in the draw? According to a couple of Hyde football staff (manager and player), the management want to play against a team they can probably beat whereas the players want to draw Blackburn or Charlton - one of the 'big' clubs. Hyde actually own the record for biggest defeat in the FA Cup. A 26-0 hiding (see what I did) by Preston North End. 7:00PM The live coverage begins! Here we go. The draw is being held at Hyde United's ground. Look how cool their sun was earlier: Red sun today. FA Cup draw at Hyde United. Is that an omen. #EmiratesFACuppic.twitter.com/LoZ27mZjKW— Hyde United FC (@hydeunited) October 16, 2017 6:47PM The difference the FA Cup actually makes I wrote this in January about just how much an FA Cup run is worth to a small club. It turns out the answer is everything. The FA awards a prize of £1.8million to the winners of the competition, the kind of short-change a Champions League club might use as a sweetener for a promising youth prospect’s signing-on fee. For non-league side Curzon Ashton just qualifying for the second round of the competition will, and has, had an enormous impact. Image Landscape Portrait Square Original/Custom Edit Selected Crop... Caption: Description: curzon ashton Agency: GETTY IMAGES Artist: Edit... Delete “It means so much to us a club,” says their CEO Natalie Atkinson. “The FA Cup is enabling us, through prize money, funds gained and TV money to work with the FA and football foundations to replace our 3G pitch next to the stadium.” Curzon Ashton, currently 15th in the National League North, lost 4-3 to AFC Wimbledon in December, conceding four goals in the final 10 minutes of the game. The prize for qualifying for the second round was £27,000, in addition to £18,000 earned from the first round. Those sucker-punch goals prevented a windfall of £67,500 for making it to third round. However, thanks to the wonder of television money, the club received more for their defeat to Wimbledon than they would have if they’d won a non-televised second round match. There's more on the article, if you fancy clicking on it. 6:30PM The magic of the cup This most holy of trophies always produces magical moments and even if a guilty few/most don't pay attention to the competition until their team is involved, those matches between minnows of the lower leagues and giants of... in this case, League One, are always thoroughly enjoyable. Sutton are looking to make a lot more money from another (pie free) run at the cup this year, Accrington Stanley's involvement will be upping the YouTube view count on this milk advert, and today is the first time I have ever heard of Gainsborough Trinity. Perhaps they will become my new favourite non-league - maybe they'll be yours! It all depends who has to play who - and which of those games the people in charge at BBC decide to broadcast... 6:15PM Good evening! Hello there sports fans. Welcome to our live coverage of what is sure to be a riveting FA Cup first round draw. The action will kick-off at 7:10pm and we'll keep you up to date with the draw as it happens. For right now, that wait should give you time to look at all the nice photographs of that weird looking sun from earlier today. It was like being in Blade Runner. 6:09PM Preview What is it? It's the draw for the first round proper of the FA Cup: the oldest competition in world football. The first round sees the 48 teams from League One and League Two joined by 32 non-league sides. When is it? Monday October 16. What time is it? The draw itself will begin at 7:10pm on Monday evening. The first round of the FA Cup will take place on Saturday November 4 Credit: AP What TV channel is it on? The draw will be broadcast live on both BBC Two and BT Sport. Mark Chapman will present the BBC's coverage of the draw in half-hour long episode from 7pm, while BT Sport 3's show will also begin at 7pm. When will the matches take place? The first round will take place over the weekend of Friday November 3 to Monday 6 November 2017 Who's in the hat? Sutton United made it to the fifth round of the FA Cup last season Credit: Getty Images Three teams from the eighth tier of English football are among the non-league teams in the hat for the first round. Hyde United, who play in the Northern Premier League, beat Scarborough Athletic on Sunday afternoon to book their place in the competition. Hampton and Richmond, who are coached by Sky Sports commentator Martin Tyler, failed in their bid to reach the FA Cup proper after losing to National League South rivals Truro City. Truro's 2-0 victory over their league rivals means they become the first Cornwal team to reach the FA Cup first round since 1969. Billericay Town, whose current players include Jamie O'Hara, Paul Konchesky and Jermaine Pennant, will also take their place in the draw. FA Cup first round numbers 1 ACCRINGTON STANLEY 2 AFC WIMBLEDON 3 BARNET 4 BLACKBURN ROVERS 5 BLACKPOOL 6 BRADFORD CITY 7 BRISTOL ROVERS 8 BURY 9 CAMBRIDGE UNITED 10 CARLISLE UNITED 11 CHARLTON ATHLETIC 12 CHELTENHAM TOWN 13 CHESTERFIELD 14 COLCHESTER UNITED 15 COVENTRY CITY 16 CRAWLEY TOWN 17 CREWE ALEXANDRA 18 DONCASTER ROVERS 19 EXETER CITY 20 FLEETWOOD TOWN 21 FOREST GREEN ROVERS 22 GILLINGHAM 23 GRIMSBY TOWN 24 LINCOLN CITY 25 LUTON TOWN 26 MANSFIELD TOWN 27 MILTON KEYNES DONS 28 MORECAMBE 29 NEWPORT COUNTY 30 NORTHAMPTON TOWN 31 NOTTS COUNTY 32 OLDHAM ATHLETIC 33 OXFORD UNITED 34 PETERBOROUGH UNITED 35 PLYMOUTH ARGYLE 36 PORT VALE 37 PORTSMOUTH 38 ROCHDALE 39 ROTHERHAM UNITED 40 SCUNTHORPE UNITED 41 SHREWSBURY TOWN 42 SOUTHEND UNITED 43 STEVENAGE 44 SWINDON TOWN 45 WALSALL 46 WIGAN ATHLETIC 47 WYCOMBE WANDERERS 48 YEOVIL TOWN 49 TRANMERE ROVERS 50 SOLIHULL MOORS OR OSSETT TOWN 51 HARTLEPOOL UNITED 52 SHAW LANE ASSOCIATION 53 CHORLEY OR BOSTON UNITED 54 AFC TELFORD UNITED 55 GAINSBOROUGH TRINITY 56 NANTWICH TOWN OR KETTERING TOWN 57 GATESHEAD 58 GUISELEY 59 AFC FYLDE 60 KIDDERMINSTER HARRIERS 61 HYDE UNITED 62 MACCLESFIELD TOWN 63 BRACKLEY TOWN OR BILLERICAY TOWN 64 DAGENHAM & REDBRIDGE OR LEYTON ORIENT 65 HEREFORD 66 ALDERSHOT TOWN 67 BATH CITY OR CHELMSFORD CITY 68 OXFORD CITY 69 MAIDENHEAD UNITED 70 HEYBRIDGE SWIFTS 71 WOKING OR CONCORD RANGERS 72 TRURO CITY 73 DOVER ATHLETIC OR BROMLEY 74 SLOUGH TOWN 75 DARTFORD 76 BOREHAM WOOD 77 MAIDSTONE UNITED OR ENFIELD TOWN 78 LEATHERHEAD 79 SUTTON UNITED 80 EAST THURROCK UNITED OR EBBSFLEET UNITED
 7:28PM And that's the draw The excitement is over! No more balls will be drawn! Morecambe vs Hartlepool is pretty good, Doncaster will visit either East Thurrock or Ebsfleet. Hyde vs MK Dons is a brilliant tie for the minnows. I was really hoping for a Slough vs Swindon draw, purely for Office quotes. 7:25PM Eighth tier Hyde will play MK Dons! The crowd goes wild in the BBC studio as the draw is announced. That's the big club the players wanted. 7:24PM Lads, can we please have some music Or something. This draw is not one of the most exciting things I've ever seen on television. That Liverpool vs Man Utd game on Saturday was more entertaining. 7:21PM AFC Wimbledon vs Lincoln City AFC Wimbledon are one of the clubs to have benefited immensely from TV money brought by the FA Cup and they are drawn against Lincoln City. 7:19PM Some more fixtures for you Peterborough Utd v Tranmere Cambridge Utd v Sutton Utd Forest Green Rovers v Macclesfield Town AFC Fylde v Kidderminster Harriers Luton v Portsmouth Shrewsbury v Aldershot Hereford v AFC Telford Utd Guiseley v Accrington Stanley Blackburn Rovers v Barnet 7:16PM No huge match ups so far Bradford City v Chesterfield Port Vale v Oxford Utd Newport County v Walsall Morecambe v Hartlepool Utd 7:14PM And it's set of balls number eight And Lancelot is the FA Cup draw machine for tonight. What a hilarious National Lottery joke. And the first fixture is Stevenage vs Nantwich or Kettering. IT'S ALL KICKING OFF NOW, CLIVE. 7:12PM Your Davids, your Goliaths Hyde, Heybridge Swifts and Ossett Town are the lowest ranked teams in the competition, with all three occupying the eighth tier of English football. 7:10PM David Sharpe The Wigan chairman, grandson of Dave Whelan, fancies Wigan's chances this season. And now it's time for the draw! 7:05PM Who do the small teams want to get in the draw? According to a couple of Hyde football staff (manager and player), the management want to play against a team they can probably beat whereas the players want to draw Blackburn or Charlton - one of the 'big' clubs. Hyde actually own the record for biggest defeat in the FA Cup. A 26-0 hiding (see what I did) by Preston North End. 7:00PM The live coverage begins! Here we go. The draw is being held at Hyde United's ground. Look how cool their sun was earlier: Red sun today. FA Cup draw at Hyde United. Is that an omen. #EmiratesFACuppic.twitter.com/LoZ27mZjKW— Hyde United FC (@hydeunited) October 16, 2017 6:47PM The difference the FA Cup actually makes I wrote this in January about just how much an FA Cup run is worth to a small club. It turns out the answer is everything. The FA awards a prize of £1.8million to the winners of the competition, the kind of short-change a Champions League club might use as a sweetener for a promising youth prospect’s signing-on fee. For non-league side Curzon Ashton just qualifying for the second round of the competition will, and has, had an enormous impact. Image Landscape Portrait Square Original/Custom Edit Selected Crop... Caption: Description: curzon ashton Agency: GETTY IMAGES Artist: Edit... Delete “It means so much to us a club,” says their CEO Natalie Atkinson. “The FA Cup is enabling us, through prize money, funds gained and TV money to work with the FA and football foundations to replace our 3G pitch next to the stadium.” Curzon Ashton, currently 15th in the National League North, lost 4-3 to AFC Wimbledon in December, conceding four goals in the final 10 minutes of the game. The prize for qualifying for the second round was £27,000, in addition to £18,000 earned from the first round. Those sucker-punch goals prevented a windfall of £67,500 for making it to third round. However, thanks to the wonder of television money, the club received more for their defeat to Wimbledon than they would have if they’d won a non-televised second round match. There's more on the article, if you fancy clicking on it. 6:30PM The magic of the cup This most holy of trophies always produces magical moments and even if a guilty few/most don't pay attention to the competition until their team is involved, those matches between minnows of the lower leagues and giants of... in this case, League One, are always thoroughly enjoyable. Sutton are looking to make a lot more money from another (pie free) run at the cup this year, Accrington Stanley's involvement will be upping the YouTube view count on this milk advert, and today is the first time I have ever heard of Gainsborough Trinity. Perhaps they will become my new favourite non-league - maybe they'll be yours! It all depends who has to play who - and which of those games the people in charge at BBC decide to broadcast... 6:15PM Good evening! Hello there sports fans. Welcome to our live coverage of what is sure to be a riveting FA Cup first round draw. The action will kick-off at 7:10pm and we'll keep you up to date with the draw as it happens. For right now, that wait should give you time to look at all the nice photographs of that weird looking sun from earlier today. It was like being in Blade Runner. 6:09PM Preview What is it? It's the draw for the first round proper of the FA Cup: the oldest competition in world football. The first round sees the 48 teams from League One and League Two joined by 32 non-league sides. When is it? Monday October 16. What time is it? The draw itself will begin at 7:10pm on Monday evening. The first round of the FA Cup will take place on Saturday November 4 Credit: AP What TV channel is it on? The draw will be broadcast live on both BBC Two and BT Sport. Mark Chapman will present the BBC's coverage of the draw in half-hour long episode from 7pm, while BT Sport 3's show will also begin at 7pm. When will the matches take place? The first round will take place over the weekend of Friday November 3 to Monday 6 November 2017 Who's in the hat? Sutton United made it to the fifth round of the FA Cup last season Credit: Getty Images Three teams from the eighth tier of English football are among the non-league teams in the hat for the first round. Hyde United, who play in the Northern Premier League, beat Scarborough Athletic on Sunday afternoon to book their place in the competition. Hampton and Richmond, who are coached by Sky Sports commentator Martin Tyler, failed in their bid to reach the FA Cup proper after losing to National League South rivals Truro City. Truro's 2-0 victory over their league rivals means they become the first Cornwal team to reach the FA Cup first round since 1969. Billericay Town, whose current players include Jamie O'Hara, Paul Konchesky and Jermaine Pennant, will also take their place in the draw. FA Cup first round numbers 1 ACCRINGTON STANLEY 2 AFC WIMBLEDON 3 BARNET 4 BLACKBURN ROVERS 5 BLACKPOOL 6 BRADFORD CITY 7 BRISTOL ROVERS 8 BURY 9 CAMBRIDGE UNITED 10 CARLISLE UNITED 11 CHARLTON ATHLETIC 12 CHELTENHAM TOWN 13 CHESTERFIELD 14 COLCHESTER UNITED 15 COVENTRY CITY 16 CRAWLEY TOWN 17 CREWE ALEXANDRA 18 DONCASTER ROVERS 19 EXETER CITY 20 FLEETWOOD TOWN 21 FOREST GREEN ROVERS 22 GILLINGHAM 23 GRIMSBY TOWN 24 LINCOLN CITY 25 LUTON TOWN 26 MANSFIELD TOWN 27 MILTON KEYNES DONS 28 MORECAMBE 29 NEWPORT COUNTY 30 NORTHAMPTON TOWN 31 NOTTS COUNTY 32 OLDHAM ATHLETIC 33 OXFORD UNITED 34 PETERBOROUGH UNITED 35 PLYMOUTH ARGYLE 36 PORT VALE 37 PORTSMOUTH 38 ROCHDALE 39 ROTHERHAM UNITED 40 SCUNTHORPE UNITED 41 SHREWSBURY TOWN 42 SOUTHEND UNITED 43 STEVENAGE 44 SWINDON TOWN 45 WALSALL 46 WIGAN ATHLETIC 47 WYCOMBE WANDERERS 48 YEOVIL TOWN 49 TRANMERE ROVERS 50 SOLIHULL MOORS OR OSSETT TOWN 51 HARTLEPOOL UNITED 52 SHAW LANE ASSOCIATION 53 CHORLEY OR BOSTON UNITED 54 AFC TELFORD UNITED 55 GAINSBOROUGH TRINITY 56 NANTWICH TOWN OR KETTERING TOWN 57 GATESHEAD 58 GUISELEY 59 AFC FYLDE 60 KIDDERMINSTER HARRIERS 61 HYDE UNITED 62 MACCLESFIELD TOWN 63 BRACKLEY TOWN OR BILLERICAY TOWN 64 DAGENHAM & REDBRIDGE OR LEYTON ORIENT 65 HEREFORD 66 ALDERSHOT TOWN 67 BATH CITY OR CHELMSFORD CITY 68 OXFORD CITY 69 MAIDENHEAD UNITED 70 HEYBRIDGE SWIFTS 71 WOKING OR CONCORD RANGERS 72 TRURO CITY 73 DOVER ATHLETIC OR BROMLEY 74 SLOUGH TOWN 75 DARTFORD 76 BOREHAM WOOD 77 MAIDSTONE UNITED OR ENFIELD TOWN 78 LEATHERHEAD 79 SUTTON UNITED 80 EAST THURROCK UNITED OR EBBSFLEET UNITED
FA Cup first round draw: Hyde United (eighth tier) host MK Dons
7:28PM And that's the draw The excitement is over! No more balls will be drawn! Morecambe vs Hartlepool is pretty good, Doncaster will visit either East Thurrock or Ebsfleet. Hyde vs MK Dons is a brilliant tie for the minnows. I was really hoping for a Slough vs Swindon draw, purely for Office quotes. 7:25PM Eighth tier Hyde will play MK Dons! The crowd goes wild in the BBC studio as the draw is announced. That's the big club the players wanted. 7:24PM Lads, can we please have some music Or something. This draw is not one of the most exciting things I've ever seen on television. That Liverpool vs Man Utd game on Saturday was more entertaining. 7:21PM AFC Wimbledon vs Lincoln City AFC Wimbledon are one of the clubs to have benefited immensely from TV money brought by the FA Cup and they are drawn against Lincoln City. 7:19PM Some more fixtures for you Peterborough Utd v Tranmere Cambridge Utd v Sutton Utd Forest Green Rovers v Macclesfield Town AFC Fylde v Kidderminster Harriers Luton v Portsmouth Shrewsbury v Aldershot Hereford v AFC Telford Utd Guiseley v Accrington Stanley Blackburn Rovers v Barnet 7:16PM No huge match ups so far Bradford City v Chesterfield Port Vale v Oxford Utd Newport County v Walsall Morecambe v Hartlepool Utd 7:14PM And it's set of balls number eight And Lancelot is the FA Cup draw machine for tonight. What a hilarious National Lottery joke. And the first fixture is Stevenage vs Nantwich or Kettering. IT'S ALL KICKING OFF NOW, CLIVE. 7:12PM Your Davids, your Goliaths Hyde, Heybridge Swifts and Ossett Town are the lowest ranked teams in the competition, with all three occupying the eighth tier of English football. 7:10PM David Sharpe The Wigan chairman, grandson of Dave Whelan, fancies Wigan's chances this season. And now it's time for the draw! 7:05PM Who do the small teams want to get in the draw? According to a couple of Hyde football staff (manager and player), the management want to play against a team they can probably beat whereas the players want to draw Blackburn or Charlton - one of the 'big' clubs. Hyde actually own the record for biggest defeat in the FA Cup. A 26-0 hiding (see what I did) by Preston North End. 7:00PM The live coverage begins! Here we go. The draw is being held at Hyde United's ground. Look how cool their sun was earlier: Red sun today. FA Cup draw at Hyde United. Is that an omen. #EmiratesFACuppic.twitter.com/LoZ27mZjKW— Hyde United FC (@hydeunited) October 16, 2017 6:47PM The difference the FA Cup actually makes I wrote this in January about just how much an FA Cup run is worth to a small club. It turns out the answer is everything. The FA awards a prize of £1.8million to the winners of the competition, the kind of short-change a Champions League club might use as a sweetener for a promising youth prospect’s signing-on fee. For non-league side Curzon Ashton just qualifying for the second round of the competition will, and has, had an enormous impact. Image Landscape Portrait Square Original/Custom Edit Selected Crop... Caption: Description: curzon ashton Agency: GETTY IMAGES Artist: Edit... Delete “It means so much to us a club,” says their CEO Natalie Atkinson. “The FA Cup is enabling us, through prize money, funds gained and TV money to work with the FA and football foundations to replace our 3G pitch next to the stadium.” Curzon Ashton, currently 15th in the National League North, lost 4-3 to AFC Wimbledon in December, conceding four goals in the final 10 minutes of the game. The prize for qualifying for the second round was £27,000, in addition to £18,000 earned from the first round. Those sucker-punch goals prevented a windfall of £67,500 for making it to third round. However, thanks to the wonder of television money, the club received more for their defeat to Wimbledon than they would have if they’d won a non-televised second round match. There's more on the article, if you fancy clicking on it. 6:30PM The magic of the cup This most holy of trophies always produces magical moments and even if a guilty few/most don't pay attention to the competition until their team is involved, those matches between minnows of the lower leagues and giants of... in this case, League One, are always thoroughly enjoyable. Sutton are looking to make a lot more money from another (pie free) run at the cup this year, Accrington Stanley's involvement will be upping the YouTube view count on this milk advert, and today is the first time I have ever heard of Gainsborough Trinity. Perhaps they will become my new favourite non-league - maybe they'll be yours! It all depends who has to play who - and which of those games the people in charge at BBC decide to broadcast... 6:15PM Good evening! Hello there sports fans. Welcome to our live coverage of what is sure to be a riveting FA Cup first round draw. The action will kick-off at 7:10pm and we'll keep you up to date with the draw as it happens. For right now, that wait should give you time to look at all the nice photographs of that weird looking sun from earlier today. It was like being in Blade Runner. 6:09PM Preview What is it? It's the draw for the first round proper of the FA Cup: the oldest competition in world football. The first round sees the 48 teams from League One and League Two joined by 32 non-league sides. When is it? Monday October 16. What time is it? The draw itself will begin at 7:10pm on Monday evening. The first round of the FA Cup will take place on Saturday November 4 Credit: AP What TV channel is it on? The draw will be broadcast live on both BBC Two and BT Sport. Mark Chapman will present the BBC's coverage of the draw in half-hour long episode from 7pm, while BT Sport 3's show will also begin at 7pm. When will the matches take place? The first round will take place over the weekend of Friday November 3 to Monday 6 November 2017 Who's in the hat? Sutton United made it to the fifth round of the FA Cup last season Credit: Getty Images Three teams from the eighth tier of English football are among the non-league teams in the hat for the first round. Hyde United, who play in the Northern Premier League, beat Scarborough Athletic on Sunday afternoon to book their place in the competition. Hampton and Richmond, who are coached by Sky Sports commentator Martin Tyler, failed in their bid to reach the FA Cup proper after losing to National League South rivals Truro City. Truro's 2-0 victory over their league rivals means they become the first Cornwal team to reach the FA Cup first round since 1969. Billericay Town, whose current players include Jamie O'Hara, Paul Konchesky and Jermaine Pennant, will also take their place in the draw. FA Cup first round numbers 1 ACCRINGTON STANLEY 2 AFC WIMBLEDON 3 BARNET 4 BLACKBURN ROVERS 5 BLACKPOOL 6 BRADFORD CITY 7 BRISTOL ROVERS 8 BURY 9 CAMBRIDGE UNITED 10 CARLISLE UNITED 11 CHARLTON ATHLETIC 12 CHELTENHAM TOWN 13 CHESTERFIELD 14 COLCHESTER UNITED 15 COVENTRY CITY 16 CRAWLEY TOWN 17 CREWE ALEXANDRA 18 DONCASTER ROVERS 19 EXETER CITY 20 FLEETWOOD TOWN 21 FOREST GREEN ROVERS 22 GILLINGHAM 23 GRIMSBY TOWN 24 LINCOLN CITY 25 LUTON TOWN 26 MANSFIELD TOWN 27 MILTON KEYNES DONS 28 MORECAMBE 29 NEWPORT COUNTY 30 NORTHAMPTON TOWN 31 NOTTS COUNTY 32 OLDHAM ATHLETIC 33 OXFORD UNITED 34 PETERBOROUGH UNITED 35 PLYMOUTH ARGYLE 36 PORT VALE 37 PORTSMOUTH 38 ROCHDALE 39 ROTHERHAM UNITED 40 SCUNTHORPE UNITED 41 SHREWSBURY TOWN 42 SOUTHEND UNITED 43 STEVENAGE 44 SWINDON TOWN 45 WALSALL 46 WIGAN ATHLETIC 47 WYCOMBE WANDERERS 48 YEOVIL TOWN 49 TRANMERE ROVERS 50 SOLIHULL MOORS OR OSSETT TOWN 51 HARTLEPOOL UNITED 52 SHAW LANE ASSOCIATION 53 CHORLEY OR BOSTON UNITED 54 AFC TELFORD UNITED 55 GAINSBOROUGH TRINITY 56 NANTWICH TOWN OR KETTERING TOWN 57 GATESHEAD 58 GUISELEY 59 AFC FYLDE 60 KIDDERMINSTER HARRIERS 61 HYDE UNITED 62 MACCLESFIELD TOWN 63 BRACKLEY TOWN OR BILLERICAY TOWN 64 DAGENHAM & REDBRIDGE OR LEYTON ORIENT 65 HEREFORD 66 ALDERSHOT TOWN 67 BATH CITY OR CHELMSFORD CITY 68 OXFORD CITY 69 MAIDENHEAD UNITED 70 HEYBRIDGE SWIFTS 71 WOKING OR CONCORD RANGERS 72 TRURO CITY 73 DOVER ATHLETIC OR BROMLEY 74 SLOUGH TOWN 75 DARTFORD 76 BOREHAM WOOD 77 MAIDSTONE UNITED OR ENFIELD TOWN 78 LEATHERHEAD 79 SUTTON UNITED 80 EAST THURROCK UNITED OR EBBSFLEET UNITED
Neil Lennon is back on the familiar territory of death threats, controversy and outrage - faux though much of the latter might be. During his time as a combative midfielder for Celtic and then, when manager of the club, he was subject to two assaults in the streets of Glasgow, another on the side of the pitch at Tynecastle and was the subject of threatening packages and bullets sent through the mail. The latest episode follows Saturday’s volatile clash between Rangers and Hibernian at Ibrox, which the Easter Road side won 3-2. During his celebrations of Hibs’ goals, Lennon made a pumped arm gesture towards the fans behind his technical area, who were responsible for what is understood to have been sustained invective directed towards him earlier in the proceedings. Lennon’s response – commonly known in Glasgow as the ‘gerrit up ye’ gesture – prompted complaints to Police Scotland, whose spokesperson confirmed receipt of the fans’ grievances and said: “Enquiries are being conducted.” Club 1872 – the Rangers supporter and shareholding group – also issued a statement condemning Lennon for his behaviour which, after the fashion of Jane Austen, they described as “not becoming of any football manager.” The statement also said of Lennon that he was “one who likes to play the victim when things do not go his way” before adding - without evident irony - that his actions occurred “against the backdrop of possibly the worst refereeing performance ever seen at Ibrox”. The Club 1872 statement also reminded “our supporters of their duty to act as ambassadors for our club”, an admonition which did evidently did not penetrate as far down the diplomatic corps as Lennon was subject to death threats on Facebook. Hibs players celebrate during the 3-2 win against Rangers on Saturday Police Scotland said: “We are aware of offensive and threatening comments on social media directed at a named individual.” The Scottish Football Association, meanwhile, will review footage of the game, during which the Rangers midfielder, Ryan Jack, was sent off while five of his colleagues and three Hibs players were cautioned. Lennon’s actions are likely to feature in the scrutiny, although he is not currently expected to prompt any fast track procedure by the SFA compliance officer, Tony McGlennan. During the game, Rangers’ assistant manager, Helder Baptista, complained to a police officer, seemingly about Lennon, who said afterwards: “He should have got back in his box. Funnily enough he didn’t have something to say to me. I don’t know what he said. I assume he was unhappy with something. “There were a few things that went on in their dugout I was unhappy about but I didn’t go running off to the police and tell them about it.” Those whose interest extends to the sociological aspects of the controversy might observe that context is crucial to the perception of gestures. When the Commonwealth Games were held in Glasgow in 2014, Alex ‘Tattie’ Marshall – a member of the Scotland lawn bowls team and a favourite with the home crowd – marked his winning shots in the men’s pairs semi-final against England with an action similar to that of Lennon at Ibrox, in response to a group of spectators who had been heckling him. Marshall, though, attracted no condemnation for his action. Likewise, it might be assumed that Glasgow brings out the provocative side of Lennon’s character – or it might be the other way around – when one considers that his stints with Manchester City, Crewe Alexandra and Nottingham Forest did not generate death threats or cautionary visits from the constabulary. On the other hand, it can also be said that Lennon – and his detractors – have done Pedro Caixinha a favour by diverting attention from the Rangers manager’s failure to plug the gap left by Jack’s dismissal against a Hibs side which had an extra man in midfield prior to the player’s enforced departure. It is, as they say, an ill wind… Pick your free Telegraph Fantasy Football team now and start scoring from the next kick-off >>
Neil Lennon subject to death threats after his celebration of Hibernian scoring against Rangers prompts police inquiries
Neil Lennon is back on the familiar territory of death threats, controversy and outrage - faux though much of the latter might be. During his time as a combative midfielder for Celtic and then, when manager of the club, he was subject to two assaults in the streets of Glasgow, another on the side of the pitch at Tynecastle and was the subject of threatening packages and bullets sent through the mail. The latest episode follows Saturday’s volatile clash between Rangers and Hibernian at Ibrox, which the Easter Road side won 3-2. During his celebrations of Hibs’ goals, Lennon made a pumped arm gesture towards the fans behind his technical area, who were responsible for what is understood to have been sustained invective directed towards him earlier in the proceedings. Lennon’s response – commonly known in Glasgow as the ‘gerrit up ye’ gesture – prompted complaints to Police Scotland, whose spokesperson confirmed receipt of the fans’ grievances and said: “Enquiries are being conducted.” Club 1872 – the Rangers supporter and shareholding group – also issued a statement condemning Lennon for his behaviour which, after the fashion of Jane Austen, they described as “not becoming of any football manager.” The statement also said of Lennon that he was “one who likes to play the victim when things do not go his way” before adding - without evident irony - that his actions occurred “against the backdrop of possibly the worst refereeing performance ever seen at Ibrox”. The Club 1872 statement also reminded “our supporters of their duty to act as ambassadors for our club”, an admonition which did evidently did not penetrate as far down the diplomatic corps as Lennon was subject to death threats on Facebook. Hibs players celebrate during the 3-2 win against Rangers on Saturday Police Scotland said: “We are aware of offensive and threatening comments on social media directed at a named individual.” The Scottish Football Association, meanwhile, will review footage of the game, during which the Rangers midfielder, Ryan Jack, was sent off while five of his colleagues and three Hibs players were cautioned. Lennon’s actions are likely to feature in the scrutiny, although he is not currently expected to prompt any fast track procedure by the SFA compliance officer, Tony McGlennan. During the game, Rangers’ assistant manager, Helder Baptista, complained to a police officer, seemingly about Lennon, who said afterwards: “He should have got back in his box. Funnily enough he didn’t have something to say to me. I don’t know what he said. I assume he was unhappy with something. “There were a few things that went on in their dugout I was unhappy about but I didn’t go running off to the police and tell them about it.” Those whose interest extends to the sociological aspects of the controversy might observe that context is crucial to the perception of gestures. When the Commonwealth Games were held in Glasgow in 2014, Alex ‘Tattie’ Marshall – a member of the Scotland lawn bowls team and a favourite with the home crowd – marked his winning shots in the men’s pairs semi-final against England with an action similar to that of Lennon at Ibrox, in response to a group of spectators who had been heckling him. Marshall, though, attracted no condemnation for his action. Likewise, it might be assumed that Glasgow brings out the provocative side of Lennon’s character – or it might be the other way around – when one considers that his stints with Manchester City, Crewe Alexandra and Nottingham Forest did not generate death threats or cautionary visits from the constabulary. On the other hand, it can also be said that Lennon – and his detractors – have done Pedro Caixinha a favour by diverting attention from the Rangers manager’s failure to plug the gap left by Jack’s dismissal against a Hibs side which had an extra man in midfield prior to the player’s enforced departure. It is, as they say, an ill wind… Pick your free Telegraph Fantasy Football team now and start scoring from the next kick-off >>
Neil Lennon is back on the familiar territory of death threats, controversy and outrage - faux though much of the latter might be. During his time as a combative midfielder for Celtic and then, when manager of the club, he was subject to two assaults in the streets of Glasgow, another on the side of the pitch at Tynecastle and was the subject of threatening packages and bullets sent through the mail. The latest episode follows Saturday’s volatile clash between Rangers and Hibernian at Ibrox, which the Easter Road side won 3-2. During his celebrations of Hibs’ goals, Lennon made a pumped arm gesture towards the fans behind his technical area, who were responsible for what is understood to have been sustained invective directed towards him earlier in the proceedings. Lennon’s response – commonly known in Glasgow as the ‘gerrit up ye’ gesture – prompted complaints to Police Scotland, whose spokesperson confirmed receipt of the fans’ grievances and said: “Enquiries are being conducted.” Club 1872 – the Rangers supporter and shareholding group – also issued a statement condemning Lennon for his behaviour which, after the fashion of Jane Austen, they described as “not becoming of any football manager.” The statement also said of Lennon that he was “one who likes to play the victim when things do not go his way” before adding - without evident irony - that his actions occurred “against the backdrop of possibly the worst refereeing performance ever seen at Ibrox”. The Club 1872 statement also reminded “our supporters of their duty to act as ambassadors for our club”, an admonition which did evidently did not penetrate as far down the diplomatic corps as Lennon was subject to death threats on Facebook. Hibs players celebrate during the 3-2 win against Rangers on Saturday Police Scotland said: “We are aware of offensive and threatening comments on social media directed at a named individual.” The Scottish Football Association, meanwhile, will review footage of the game, during which the Rangers midfielder, Ryan Jack, was sent off while five of his colleagues and three Hibs players were cautioned. Lennon’s actions are likely to feature in the scrutiny, although he is not currently expected to prompt any fast track procedure by the SFA compliance officer, Tony McGlennan. During the game, Rangers’ assistant manager, Helder Baptista, complained to a police officer, seemingly about Lennon, who said afterwards: “He should have got back in his box. Funnily enough he didn’t have something to say to me. I don’t know what he said. I assume he was unhappy with something. “There were a few things that went on in their dugout I was unhappy about but I didn’t go running off to the police and tell them about it.” Those whose interest extends to the sociological aspects of the controversy might observe that context is crucial to the perception of gestures. When the Commonwealth Games were held in Glasgow in 2014, Alex ‘Tattie’ Marshall – a member of the Scotland lawn bowls team and a favourite with the home crowd – marked his winning shots in the men’s pairs semi-final against England with an action similar to that of Lennon at Ibrox, in response to a group of spectators who had been heckling him. Marshall, though, attracted no condemnation for his action. Likewise, it might be assumed that Glasgow brings out the provocative side of Lennon’s character – or it might be the other way around – when one considers that his stints with Manchester City, Crewe Alexandra and Nottingham Forest did not generate death threats or cautionary visits from the constabulary. On the other hand, it can also be said that Lennon – and his detractors – have done Pedro Caixinha a favour by diverting attention from the Rangers manager’s failure to plug the gap left by Jack’s dismissal against a Hibs side which had an extra man in midfield prior to the player’s enforced departure. It is, as they say, an ill wind… Pick your free Telegraph Fantasy Football team now and start scoring from the next kick-off >>
Neil Lennon subject to death threats after his celebration of Hibernian scoring against Rangers prompts police inquiries
Neil Lennon is back on the familiar territory of death threats, controversy and outrage - faux though much of the latter might be. During his time as a combative midfielder for Celtic and then, when manager of the club, he was subject to two assaults in the streets of Glasgow, another on the side of the pitch at Tynecastle and was the subject of threatening packages and bullets sent through the mail. The latest episode follows Saturday’s volatile clash between Rangers and Hibernian at Ibrox, which the Easter Road side won 3-2. During his celebrations of Hibs’ goals, Lennon made a pumped arm gesture towards the fans behind his technical area, who were responsible for what is understood to have been sustained invective directed towards him earlier in the proceedings. Lennon’s response – commonly known in Glasgow as the ‘gerrit up ye’ gesture – prompted complaints to Police Scotland, whose spokesperson confirmed receipt of the fans’ grievances and said: “Enquiries are being conducted.” Club 1872 – the Rangers supporter and shareholding group – also issued a statement condemning Lennon for his behaviour which, after the fashion of Jane Austen, they described as “not becoming of any football manager.” The statement also said of Lennon that he was “one who likes to play the victim when things do not go his way” before adding - without evident irony - that his actions occurred “against the backdrop of possibly the worst refereeing performance ever seen at Ibrox”. The Club 1872 statement also reminded “our supporters of their duty to act as ambassadors for our club”, an admonition which did evidently did not penetrate as far down the diplomatic corps as Lennon was subject to death threats on Facebook. Hibs players celebrate during the 3-2 win against Rangers on Saturday Police Scotland said: “We are aware of offensive and threatening comments on social media directed at a named individual.” The Scottish Football Association, meanwhile, will review footage of the game, during which the Rangers midfielder, Ryan Jack, was sent off while five of his colleagues and three Hibs players were cautioned. Lennon’s actions are likely to feature in the scrutiny, although he is not currently expected to prompt any fast track procedure by the SFA compliance officer, Tony McGlennan. During the game, Rangers’ assistant manager, Helder Baptista, complained to a police officer, seemingly about Lennon, who said afterwards: “He should have got back in his box. Funnily enough he didn’t have something to say to me. I don’t know what he said. I assume he was unhappy with something. “There were a few things that went on in their dugout I was unhappy about but I didn’t go running off to the police and tell them about it.” Those whose interest extends to the sociological aspects of the controversy might observe that context is crucial to the perception of gestures. When the Commonwealth Games were held in Glasgow in 2014, Alex ‘Tattie’ Marshall – a member of the Scotland lawn bowls team and a favourite with the home crowd – marked his winning shots in the men’s pairs semi-final against England with an action similar to that of Lennon at Ibrox, in response to a group of spectators who had been heckling him. Marshall, though, attracted no condemnation for his action. Likewise, it might be assumed that Glasgow brings out the provocative side of Lennon’s character – or it might be the other way around – when one considers that his stints with Manchester City, Crewe Alexandra and Nottingham Forest did not generate death threats or cautionary visits from the constabulary. On the other hand, it can also be said that Lennon – and his detractors – have done Pedro Caixinha a favour by diverting attention from the Rangers manager’s failure to plug the gap left by Jack’s dismissal against a Hibs side which had an extra man in midfield prior to the player’s enforced departure. It is, as they say, an ill wind… Pick your free Telegraph Fantasy Football team now and start scoring from the next kick-off >>
Britain Football Soccer - Carlisle United v Crewe Alexandra - Sky Bet League Two - Brunton Park - 25/3/17 General view as a minutes silence is observed in respect for the victims of the London attack before the game Action Images via Reuters / Ed Sykes Livepic EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 45 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
General view as a minutes silence is observed in respect for the victims of the London attack before the game
Britain Football Soccer - Carlisle United v Crewe Alexandra - Sky Bet League Two - Brunton Park - 25/3/17 General view as a minutes silence is observed in respect for the victims of the London attack before the game Action Images via Reuters / Ed Sykes Livepic EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 45 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
​Burnley have officially completed the signing of Aston Villa midfielder Ashley Westwood as the player trades one set of claret and blue for another in a deal believed to be worth £5m - around £800,000 is set to go to his former club Crewe Alexandra. Westwood has signed a three-and-a-half year contract that will keep him at Turf Moor to 2020, while he has been handed the club's number 18 shirt. Welcome Ashley... pic.twitter.com/zDVmoPhw7q — Burnley FC (@BurnleyOfficial) January 31, 2017 It...
Burnley Officially Complete Signing of Aston Villa Midfielder Ashley Westwood
​Burnley have officially completed the signing of Aston Villa midfielder Ashley Westwood as the player trades one set of claret and blue for another in a deal believed to be worth £5m - around £800,000 is set to go to his former club Crewe Alexandra. Westwood has signed a three-and-a-half year contract that will keep him at Turf Moor to 2020, while he has been handed the club's number 18 shirt. Welcome Ashley... pic.twitter.com/zDVmoPhw7q — Burnley FC (@BurnleyOfficial) January 31, 2017 It...
​Burnley have officially completed the signing of Aston Villa midfielder Ashley Westwood as the player trades one set of claret and blue for another in a deal believed to be worth £5m - around £800,000 is set to go to his former club Crewe Alexandra. Westwood has signed a three-and-a-half year contract that will keep him at Turf Moor to 2020, while he has been handed the club's number 18 shirt. Welcome Ashley... pic.twitter.com/zDVmoPhw7q — Burnley FC (@BurnleyOfficial) January 31, 2017 It...
Burnley Officially Complete Signing of Aston Villa Midfielder Ashley Westwood
​Burnley have officially completed the signing of Aston Villa midfielder Ashley Westwood as the player trades one set of claret and blue for another in a deal believed to be worth £5m - around £800,000 is set to go to his former club Crewe Alexandra. Westwood has signed a three-and-a-half year contract that will keep him at Turf Moor to 2020, while he has been handed the club's number 18 shirt. Welcome Ashley... pic.twitter.com/zDVmoPhw7q — Burnley FC (@BurnleyOfficial) January 31, 2017 It...
​Burnley have officially completed the signing of Aston Villa midfielder Ashley Westwood as the player trades one set of claret and blue for another in a deal believed to be worth £5m - around £800,000 is set to go to his former club Crewe Alexandra. Westwood has signed a three-and-a-half year contract that will keep him at Turf Moor to 2020, while he has been handed the club's number 18 shirt. Welcome Ashley... pic.twitter.com/zDVmoPhw7q — Burnley FC (@BurnleyOfficial) January 31, 2017 It...
Burnley Officially Complete Signing of Aston Villa Midfielder Ashley Westwood
​Burnley have officially completed the signing of Aston Villa midfielder Ashley Westwood as the player trades one set of claret and blue for another in a deal believed to be worth £5m - around £800,000 is set to go to his former club Crewe Alexandra. Westwood has signed a three-and-a-half year contract that will keep him at Turf Moor to 2020, while he has been handed the club's number 18 shirt. Welcome Ashley... pic.twitter.com/zDVmoPhw7q — Burnley FC (@BurnleyOfficial) January 31, 2017 It...
Tony Brien has made yet more shocking revelations about sexual abuse in football in a revealing interview with the ​Daily Mail. The former defender, who has waived a right to anonymity, has revealed that as a youth player at Leicester City, he was sexually abused by the club's head scout, Ted Langford. Now, 30-years on and inspired by Andy Woodward, the former Crewe Alexandra player who bravely stepped up to admit to suffering abuse, Brien has revealed shocking details about his own horrifying...
Tony Brien Recalls Sexual Abuse by Scout Ted Langford Being Ignored by Aston Villa
Tony Brien has made yet more shocking revelations about sexual abuse in football in a revealing interview with the ​Daily Mail. The former defender, who has waived a right to anonymity, has revealed that as a youth player at Leicester City, he was sexually abused by the club's head scout, Ted Langford. Now, 30-years on and inspired by Andy Woodward, the former Crewe Alexandra player who bravely stepped up to admit to suffering abuse, Brien has revealed shocking details about his own horrifying...
Tony Brien has made yet more shocking revelations about sexual abuse in football in a revealing interview with the ​Daily Mail. The former defender, who has waived a right to anonymity, has revealed that as a youth player at Leicester City, he was sexually abused by the club's head scout, Ted Langford. Now, 30-years on and inspired by Andy Woodward, the former Crewe Alexandra player who bravely stepped up to admit to suffering abuse, Brien has revealed shocking details about his own horrifying...
Tony Brien Recalls Sexual Abuse by Scout Ted Langford Being Ignored by Aston Villa
Tony Brien has made yet more shocking revelations about sexual abuse in football in a revealing interview with the ​Daily Mail. The former defender, who has waived a right to anonymity, has revealed that as a youth player at Leicester City, he was sexually abused by the club's head scout, Ted Langford. Now, 30-years on and inspired by Andy Woodward, the former Crewe Alexandra player who bravely stepped up to admit to suffering abuse, Brien has revealed shocking details about his own horrifying...
Tony Brien has made yet more shocking revelations about sexual abuse in football in a revealing interview with the ​Daily Mail. The former defender, who has waived a right to anonymity, has revealed that as a youth player at Leicester City, he was sexually abused by the club's head scout, Ted Langford. Now, 30-years on and inspired by Andy Woodward, the former Crewe Alexandra player who bravely stepped up to admit to suffering abuse, Brien has revealed shocking details about his own horrifying...
Tony Brien Recalls Sexual Abuse by Scout Ted Langford Being Ignored by Aston Villa
Tony Brien has made yet more shocking revelations about sexual abuse in football in a revealing interview with the ​Daily Mail. The former defender, who has waived a right to anonymity, has revealed that as a youth player at Leicester City, he was sexually abused by the club's head scout, Ted Langford. Now, 30-years on and inspired by Andy Woodward, the former Crewe Alexandra player who bravely stepped up to admit to suffering abuse, Brien has revealed shocking details about his own horrifying...
Tony Brien has made yet more shocking revelations about sexual abuse in football in a revealing interview with the ​Daily Mail. The former defender, who has waived a right to anonymity, has revealed that as a youth player at Leicester City, he was sexually abused by the club's head scout, Ted Langford. Now, 30-years on and inspired by Andy Woodward, the former Crewe Alexandra player who bravely stepped up to admit to suffering abuse, Brien has revealed shocking details about his own horrifying...
Tony Brien Recalls Sexual Abuse by Scout Ted Langford Being Ignored by Aston Villa
Tony Brien has made yet more shocking revelations about sexual abuse in football in a revealing interview with the ​Daily Mail. The former defender, who has waived a right to anonymity, has revealed that as a youth player at Leicester City, he was sexually abused by the club's head scout, Ted Langford. Now, 30-years on and inspired by Andy Woodward, the former Crewe Alexandra player who bravely stepped up to admit to suffering abuse, Brien has revealed shocking details about his own horrifying...
Former Crewe Alexandra coach Barry Bennell is held in custody on child sex charges
Former Crewe Alexandra coach Barry Bennell is held in custody on child sex charges
Former Crewe Alexandra coach Barry Bennell is held in custody on child sex charges

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