Georgia RU

Georgia slideshow

Saturday 7 April Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway ITV, 7.00pm It can’t be easy hosting a show as exuberant as Saturday Night Takeaway on your own but Declan Donnelly made a solid if understandably restrained go of it last week. He ensured that the light entertainment series proceeded pretty much as normal in the absence of long-time work partner Ant McPartlin, whose travails were sensibly referenced only in very brief passing (“I’ve got twice the amount of work to do,” Donnelly noted at one point before mock-berating the production crew that “I’ll have to do it myself, like everything else around here this week”). That said, this final episode ups the ante as Donnelly takes the show on the road to the Universal Orlando Resort in Florida. Once there we’re promised a “super-sized” edition featuring stunts, surprises and “extra-special” guests. No word yet as to who those guests will be but expect Donnelly to continue making the best of a difficult situation, buoyed by extra support from Scarlett Moffatt, who is in charge of ensuring that the Place on the Plane winners have a wonderful time, and Stephen Mulhern, who has the possibly less than enviable task of explaining In for a Penny to an American audience. Sarah Hughes Premier League Football: Everton v Liverpool Sky Sports Main Event, 12.30pm Tired, perhaps, from their Champions League quarter-final first leg against Man City, Liverpool face their bitter local rivals Everton at Goodison Park. The home side, who’ve won three of their last six games, haven’t beaten Liverpool since October 2010, when Tim Cahill and Mikel Arteta gave them a 2-0 victory. Premiership Rugby Union: Bath v Leicester Tigers Channel 5, 1.30pm Time was when Bath and Leicester were the titans of English rugby. Currently they are fifth and eighth in the league, respectively. In September, Bath claimed a 27-23 win at Welford Road, as they held on for their first away win at Leicester since 2003, ensuring an unhappy return for George Ford against the club he left in the summer. The two sides also met in the Anglo-Welsh Cup at the Recreation Ground in November, where Bath also emerged victorious, beating Leicester 33-31 on that occasion. Premier League Football: Manchester City v Manchester United Sky Sports Main Event, 5.30pm What better way for Pep Guardiola’s Manchester City to clinch the title than by beating second-placed Manchester United at the Etihad Stadium. Sixteen points ahead of them in the table, City have been formidable this season, winning 27 of the 31 league games they’ve played. One of those victories came at Old Trafford, with a goal from Nicolas Otamendi giving City a 2-1 victory when these sides met in December. Britain’s Most Historic Towns Channel 4, 8.00pm Alice Roberts is our guide for this new six-part series, which sees her search the UK for the places that best sum up an historical era. The first era is Roman Britain, so Roberts heads to Chester, where she abseils down walls, hunkers in caves and uncovers the truth about the city. Casualty BBC One, 8.20pm The medical drama’s storyline about Dylan’s (William Beck) alcoholism continues to be sensitively handled as the medic’s ex-wife Sam (Charlotte Salt) worries about whether she can help him. Meanwhile, Ethan (George Hardy) struggles with his own demons as he realises that a patient is related to his brother’s killer. The Voice UK: Live Final ITV, 8.30pm Every reality TV idea has an allotted shelf life and it’s hard not to feel that musical talent contests have come to the end of their run. For those who disagree, The Voice UK’s grand finale is here and the final four battle it out for public approval. Below the Surface BBC Four, 9.00pm & 9.45pm BBC Four’s latest Scandi drama started off tensely but like its predecessor, Modus, it has gone on to become ever more ludicrous. Now it’s the final two episodes, and Philip Norgaard (Johannes Lassen) faces off against Mark (Jakob Oftebro), the man behind the hostage crisis. Much heartfelt talking follows, although you may end up feeling more sympathetic towards the damaged Mark than the chilly Norgaard. Pearl Jam: Let’s Play Two Sky Arts, 9.00pm When is a music documentary not a music documentary? When it’s also a sports film. This exuberant film, which was made following the Chicago Cubs’ victory in baseball’s World Series in 2016, follows die-hard Cubs fan and Pearl Jam lead singer Eddie Vedder as he cheers on his team during their championship run while also preparing the band for two August shows at the team’s Wrigley Field Stadium. The result is an affectionate portrait of the singer as fan. SH Troy: Fall of a City BBC One, 9.10pm David Farr’s epic series reaches its climax with the arrival of the most famous horse in history. After an uninspiring start, Troy has picked up in recent weeks and the final episode is a well-handled tale of betrayal and death. It’s a curate’s egg of a series, let down by poor casting. SH X-Men (2000) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.00pm Bryan Singer directs an all-star cast that includes Patrick Stewart, Hugh Jackman, Ian McKellen and Halle Berry, in the first of the X-Men franchise. A group of mutants must decide whether to side with Professor Xavier (Stewart) or the evil Magneto (McKellen) in what is a solid opening to the series and which paved the way for plenty of big-budget sequels. This is followed by X-Men 2 and X-Men 3 at 9.00pm and 11.35pm respectively. Legend (2015) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Tom Hardy gives a solid, convincing performance as east London gangster Reggie Kray but his caricatured portrayal of twin brother Ronnie lets him down, and this inconsistency leads to an entertaining though muddled film. Emily Browning, however, gives just the right mix of defiance and despair as Frances Shea, Reggie’s put-upon wife. Watch out for some particularly gory scenes. Lethal Weapon 2 (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.05pm Mel Gibson sports his signature Eighties mullet in the second film of this daft-but-fun action franchise. LAPD officer Riggs (Gibson) teams up once again with his partner Murtaugh (Danny Glover) to track down a band of South African criminals while protecting a painfully frenzied witness (Joe Pesci). Naturally, the pair find themselves drawn into violent action sequences orchestrated by stereotypical bad guys. Sunday 8 April Hostess with the mostest: Catherine Tate presents the awards Credit: ITV The Olivier Awards 2018 ITV, 10.20pm Last year, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child swept the board with nine Olivier Awards, something that looked impossible to top. But then came Lin Manuel Miranda’s blockbuster musical Hamilton, whose West End run has received reviews every bit as rapturous as those from its Broadway debut. The show has a record-breaking 13 nominations, which it is thought will be translated into awards. After being snubbed for Jerusalem, Jez Butterworth will surely be rewarded for his equally magisterial play The Ferryman (its eight nominations include best play and best director for Sam Mendes), while contenders in the acting categories include Bryan Cranston for Network, Andrew Garfield for Angels in America and Lesley Manville for Long Day’s Journey into Night. Catherine Tate will be on hosting duties for the event at the Royal Albert Hall, which will, as usual, feature a crop of stellar performances; this one will include a special tribute to Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, which turns 50 this year. Let’s hope the organisers bring together Josephs of the past for a big singalong: Jason Donovan, Phillip Schofield, Ian “H” Watkins and Lee Mead will all, one suspects, be available. Gabriel Tate Sex Robots and Us BBC Three, from 10.00am James Young, an amputee who created his own bionic arm, meets the people who design sex robots and hears about their plans for them, from being given to old people’s homes to “employment” in brothels. But is it the harmless, even socially responsible pursuit thatthey claim? Formula 1: The Bahrain Grand Prix Sky Sports F1, 3.30pm After the Australian Grand Prix – in which Sebastian Vettel took advantage of a safety-car blunder to win under pristine Melbourne skies – attention turns to the second round of the season at the Bahrain International Circuit in Sakhir. Another blunder cost Lewis Hamilton on this circuit last year – this time it happened in the pit lane, with Vettel capitalising to win by 6.6 seconds. The Generation Game BBC One, 8.00pm How do you top last week’s cavalcade of silliness in this rebooted game show? You rope in Danny Dyer to join Mel Giedroyc, Sue Perkins and panellists Melvin Odoom and Roisin Conaty for challenges that include cake decorating, balloon modelling and dancing the Argentine Tango. The Durrells ITV, 8.00pm In the fourth episode of the popular drama, Larry (Josh O’Connor) visits Athens with two oddly named guests – Captain Creech (James Cosmo) and Prince Jeejeebuoy (Tanmay Dhanania) – in tow. There, they offer advice to Gerry (Milo Parker), who is applying for a new school. Jesus’ Female Disciples: the New Evidence Channel 4, 8.00pm For centuries, the birth of Christianity was regarded as a largely male affair, with women as only bit-part players. Now, Bible experts Helen Bond and Joan Taylor have discovered evidence that women were involved in everything from preaching and baptising to funding the movement as it grew. This absorbing documentary follows the historians’ progress. Golf: The Masters Sky Sports Main Event, 8.00pm Prepare for a dramatic finale as this year’s first Major – from the Augusta National in Georgia – concludes. Last year, Spain’s Sergio Garcia won the coveted green jacket, beating Justin Rose in a tense play-off. Ordeal by Innocence BBC One, 9.00pm Sarah Phelps’s splendid adaptation continues, as Arthur Calgary (Luke Treadaway) resolves to prove the truth about Jack Argyll’s (Anthony Boyle) alibi by any means necessary. GT Folk Awards 2018 BBC Four, 9.00pm Mark Radcliffe and Julie Fowlis introduce highlights from this year’s Radio 2 Folk Awards in Belfast. It features performances from Cara Dillon, Lankum and Eliza Carthy and the Wayward Band. The great Nick Drake will also be inducted into the Hall of Fame, his genius long-established, even if such recognition eluded him during his short life. Producer Dónal Lunny, meanwhile, receives the Lifetime Achievement Award for decades of tireless work promoting the renaissance in Irish music, plus The Armagh Pipers Club are presented with the Good Tradition Award. GT Emma (1996) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 3.00pm Gwyneth Paltrow’s American iciness melts in this deft adaptation of Jane Austen’s classic comic romance. She is Emma Woodhouse, spoilt, charming and an inveterate meddler. Only Mr George Knightley (Jeremy Northam) dares challenge her behaviour – but what are his motives? A clever film with a superb supporting cast, including Toni Collette, Alan Cumming and Ewan McGregor. United 93 (2006) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 9.55pm Director Paul Greengrass’s boneshaking, real-time take on the final hours of the United Airlines plane whose passengers rebelled against their hijackers on September 11, 2001 feels uncomfortably realistic. Greengrass, whose signature rapid cutting made the second and third Bourne films so exciting, proves expert at handling the most infamous atrocity of modern times with intelligence and sobriety. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 11.00pm This superb adaptation of John le Carré’s brilliant, intricate Cold War spy novel is a triumph. The espionage drama follows the hunt for a Soviet double agent at the top of the British secret service, with Gary Oldman spearheading the excellent ensemble cast, which includes Colin Firth, Tom Hardy, John Hurt and Benedict Cumberbatch. It’s funny, seductive and suspenseful. Monday 9 April I spy: a recruit sees if she’s got what it takes to be an SOE agent Credit: BBC Secret Agent Selection: WW2 BBC Two, 9.00pm Not unlike Channel 4’s SAS: Who Dares Wins and BBC Two’s Astronauts: Do You Have What It Takes?, this absorbing new series puts a group of recruits through a series of gruelling physical and psychological challenges to see if they could make the grade as a secret agent according to an established selection test used during the Second World War. This test was used by the Special Operations Executive (SOE) to determine whether recruits from many different walks of life would be capable of being dropped behind enemy lines and surviving as a covert officer with a brief to cause the maximum disruption possible to the enemy in the territory. As with the original SOE, the 14 candidates come from diverse backgrounds (among them a research scientist, a property developer, former police officer, a drag act performer, a retired investment banker and an Army veteran). In the opening episode, they undergo the initial four-day assessment at a remote Scottish country-house estate. The aim is to winnow out weakness and determine who should win a place on the advanced, and suitably terrifying, course in assassination, sabotage and covert intelligence techniques. Gerard O’Donovan Famalam BBC Three, from 10.00am After a successful pilot last year, Vivienne Acheampong, Gbemisola Ikumelo, Roxanne Sternberg, Tom Moutchi and John MacMillan return with more culturally skewed sketches. Once again, they feature William and Funke’s raunchy chat show, misunderstood superhero Eclipse, Croydon’s voodoo practitioner Professor Lofuko, and a version of Midsomer Murders. 800 Words BBC One, 2.15pm If you like The Durrells you will definitely want to watch hit Australian comedy drama 800 Words. This gently funny series follows George (Erik Thomson), a widower, who horrifies his teenaged children when he moves the entire family to a remote seaside town in New Zealand. Springtime on the Farm Channel 5, 8.00pm This is the first of five shows this week celebrating the “great British farmer”, with the help of Yorkshire Vet stars Peter Wright and Julian Norton, Adam Henson of Countryfile and Springwatch’s Lindsey Chapman. In this programme, they explore how to cope with the stresses of lambing. MasterChef: The Finals BBC One, 9.00pm Oodles of challenges lie ahead for the remaining amateur chefs in the final week, which takes them as far afield as Peru ahead of Friday’s concluding cook-off. First, though, they’re off to North Yorkshire to cater a country-house lunch for local grandees and farmers. Lisbon: An Art Lovers’ Guide BBC Four, 9.00pm Having covered Barcelona, St Petersburg and Amsterdam in their first series of city-break guides, historian Dr Janina Ramirez and art critic Alastair Sooke jet off to explore three less obvious, art-rich destinations. Beirut and Baku are perhaps the more intriguing but it opens in Lisbon, which built up its art reserves during the centuries Portugal was part of one of the world’s great empires, and currently boasts one of the hottest contemporary art scenes in Europe. GO Marcella ITV, 9.00pm This drama’s been a little less fraught the second time round but Marcella still pushes the boundaries of credibility. In this concluding part, the heroine (Anna Friel) tracks down the killer, only to suffer one of her unfortunate episodes. GO The Core (2003) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.25pm Rome starts to crumble, the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco collapses and pigeons go mental in Trafalgar Square. Something is obviously amiss, and this time it isn’t climate change. In fact, the Earth’s core has stopped rotating and a team of scientists has to build a special burrowing machine to start it spinning again. Hilary Swank, Stanley Tucci and Aaron Eckhart do their best, but the excitement is intermittent. The Emoji Movie (2017) ★☆☆☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 6.30pm In this animated comedy set inside a smartphone, Gene (voiced by T J Miller), an emoji with multiple facial features, sets out on a quest to be like his colleagues who have only one. He does so with the help of apps like Spotify and Candy Crush. Sadly, the result is so horrendous that there aren’t enough Patrick Stewart-voiced emojis in the world to express what an ugly, artless exercise this is. Triple 9 (2016) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A gang of criminals and corrupt cops plan to kill a police officer in order to pull off their biggest heist yet in John Hillcoat’s crime thriller. There is a lot to like here: a big opening and a strong cast (with Kate Winslet, Gal Gadot, Anthony Mackie and Chiwetel Ejiofor among them). But it feels like fragments of a great crime drama are missing; it’s enthralling up close, but then the big picture isn’t complete. Tuesday 10 April Back to school: Mark, who has two sons with autism Credit: Channel 4 Class of Mum and Dad Channel 4, 8.00pm Another week, another Channel 4 series about education. Hold off on the black marks, however, because this one is pretty good. The premise is simple: Blackrod Primary School just outside of Bolton has thrown open its doors to a class made up of pupils’ parents (and one grandparent). They’ve agreed to go back to school for the summer term to see what modern education is really like, sports day, Sats tests and all. Naturally, its harder than many of them were expecting – 36-year-old decorator Jonny states early on that he thought he’d be able to slope off for a swift cigarette break rather than having to adhere to strict class rules – but there are some touching stories amid the more obvious moments. Most notably, this opening episode focuses on two parents with challenging home lives – Julia, who is raising her 10-year-old cousin Asha after Asha’s mother died, and Mark, who has two autistic sons. While the parents’ travails are interesting, the children are the real scene-stealers, however, from those delighted that their mothers and fathers are taking part to those who are more sceptical. The pair of five-year-olds who spend their time corpsing in front of the camera are particularly endearing. Sarah Hughes Champions League Football: Manchester City v Liverpool BT Sport 2, 7.45pm The Etihad Stadium is the setting as City and Liverpool fight it out for a place in the semi-finals. Liverpool have the advantage following a 3-0 win at Anfield in the first leg. This Time Next Year ITV, 8.00pm Davina McCall returns with another set of heart-tugging stories of people attempting to transform their lives over the course of a year. First up are two new parents who dream of making life wonderful for their baby girl who has been deaf since birth and a couple desperate to start a family. Come Home BBC One, 9.00pm Danny Brocklehurst’s claustrophobic family drama comes to a head as we flashback to find out exactly what went wrong in Greg (Christopher Eccleston) and Marie’s (Paula Malcomson) marriage. Hospital BBC Two, 9.00pm The engrossing fly-on-the-wall medical series continues with Nottingham University Hospitals Trust struggling to cope with the new NHS ruling regarding the cancellation of all non-urgent surgery. The episode focuses on Val, a 55-year-old with mouth cancer whose surgeon is desperately trying to ensure that her operation goes ahead. Here and Now Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm With only two episodes left to go, Alan Ball’s family drama continues to tread water in the most frustrating ways. On paper, there are a whole bunch of interesting stories in the mix, from Kristen’s (Sosie Bacon) possible relationship with Navid (Marwan Salama) to Ramon’s (Daniel Zovatto) continuing visions, but the problem is nothing much happens with any of them as each story moves on only incrementally each week. In this episode, Audrey (Holly Hunter) finally turns the tables on the perpetually smug Greg (Tim Robbins). Cunk on Britain BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm Diane Morgan’s pitch-perfect send-up of history programmes moves to the Tudor era and beyond as Cunk takes on Henry VIII, aka “The kingiest king who kinged over Britain” before giving us her unique perspective on “Bloody” Mary Tudor (“horrible like the drink”) and Elizabeth I. SH Divorce Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The acerbic Sarah Jessica Parker sitcom has been firing on all cylinders throughout its second series – possibly because it’s more interesting watching Frances (Parker) and Robert (the excellent Thomas Haden Church) navigate life after divorce than it was watching them get there. Here, Frances tries to make a new contact in the art world. SH Speed (1994) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm “There’s a bomb on the bus!” is the most famous line and basically the entire plot of one of the best action thrillers of the Nineties. The sizzling chemistry between LAPD Swat specialist Jack Traven (Keanu Reeves) and passenger Annie Porter (Sandra Bullock) sexes up the exhilarating action scenes, while Dennis Hopper is fantastically unhinged as a revenge-driven, retired bomb squad member turned terrorist. Fast & Furious 7 (2015) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 9.00pm Paul Walker was killed in a car crash part-way through making this film so it was completed with the help of his two younger brothers and some subtle computer graphics. The good news is that this is the best film in the franchise and does justice to Walker. It isn’t polished blockbuster film-making – though if it was, it wouldn’t be Fast & Furious. But it speaks straight to your adrenal glands. The Witches of Eastwick (1987) ★★★☆☆ Syfy, 9.00pm It is remarkable that director George Miller’s daft, unfettered romp of a film works at all. But, thanks to Jack Nicholson’s delicious overacting as Daryl Van Horne, a manic gentleman who closely resembles the devil, and the three gorgeous, single small-town friends, Alexandra (Cher), Jane (Susan Sarandon) and Sukie (Michelle Pfeiffer), who vie for his debased attentions, it somehow does. Wednesday 11 April Family ties: Edgar Ramirez and Penelope Cruz Credit: BBC The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story BBC Two, 9.00pm It’s been fascinating to discover the “true” story behind the 1997 murder of fhion designer Gianni Versace in Ryan Murphy’s glitzy drama, which has expertly depicted the inner world of the perpetrator, a Walter Mitty-style serial killer called Andrew Cunanan (a career-defining role for Darren Criss). This episode, however, has a mid-series lull about it as Cunanan ascends to the higher echelons of gay society, shaping himself meticulously into the posh, preppy eye-candy who saw a sugar daddy (or two) as his way to the top. Elsewhere, the Versace siblings return at last. Gianni (Edgar Ramirez), now in failing health decides to champion his insecure sister Donatella (Penélope Cruz in a frightful wig) and turns her into both designer and muse. Despite a lack of characters to root for – the Versaces’ moments of vulnerability dissolve into tedious histrionics and are eclipsed by Cunanan’s cold-blooded machinations – it’s all quite a fabulous mix of fashion, high society and brutal murder, with some interesting commentary on homophobia in the Nineties as well. Vicki Power The Secret Helpers BBC Two, 8.00pm Watch and weep as timid elderly widow Lesley begins a new life as an out gay woman in this life-affirming docu-series. She’s encouraged with warmth and wisdom by amateur “sages” from abroad, who talk to her secretly through a hidden earpiece. From World War to Cold War Yesterday, 8.00pm As the Second World War drew to a close, Churchill, Stalin and Roosevelt met at Yalta in the Crimea to broker post-war peace. This brisk two-part documentary raids the archives for clips and letters from those who attended, and gathers experts and relatives – including FDR’s grandson – to investigate power plays by Stalin that wrong-footed his Allied counterparts. It’s a detailed look at how and why the compromises reached at Yalta were quickly cast aside. Bacchus Uncovered: Ancient God of Ecstasy BBC Four, 9.00pm Historian Bettany Hughes continues to explore ancient civilisations, moving on to Bacchus, the Roman god of wine. Hughes’s odyssey starts under the City of London, where an 1,800-year-old Roman temple to Bacchus was discovered less than 100 years ago, and takes her to Greece, the Middle East and the Caucasus to explore the god’s roots and influence. VP Benidorm ITV, 9.00pm Fluffy as candyfloss, this lewd seaside comedy provides some fun, particularly in the retro casting of stars of yesteryear. This week, an exuberant Sammy (Shane Richie) tries to persuade Monty (John Challis) that, after his successful comeback gig, he is ready for an evening slot. One Born Every Minute Channel 4, 9.00pm This feelgood documentary series brings more poignant tales from a Birmingham labour ward. This week we meet Chantell, about to deliver her third child, who regales us with a moving story of how parenthood with partner Phil has healed the wounds of a traumatic past. First Dates Channel 4, 10.00pm The thoughtful dating show pairs up four more couples, but the road to love is bumpy – septuagenarian Deanna finds her date more interested in the waiter than her. More promising is the match between Bianca and Teza, who allow their vulnerabilities to show. VP The Thin Red Line (1998) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 3.10pm This lyrical Second World War drama, directed by Terrence Malick, tells the story of a group of young US soldiers fighting the Japanese for control of the island of Guadalcanal. Full of stars such as Sean Penn and George Clooney, it struggles with its own battle to squeeze in so many characters but is still an atmospheric meditation on the nature of war. Nick Nolte and Adrien Brody also star. The Remains of the Day (1993) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 3.55pm The success of Merchant Ivory’s adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro’s Thirties-set novel, a well-observed study of regret, is built around its perfectly cast leads: Anthony Hopkins as James, the butler to the doltish aristocrat Lord Darlington (James Fox) and Emma Thompson as a housekeeper who tries to draw him out of his sterile shell. Lush visuals give it an added richness. Transporter 2 (2005) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A martial arts action sequel, in which Jason Statham and Alessandro Gassman are the sporadically thrilling stars. Statham is Frank Martin, who accepts a job as chauffeur to Jack (Hunter Clary), the son of Miami’s politician Jefferson Billings (Matthew Modine). But the local Colombian drug dealers aren’t happy with his boss’s efforts to clean up the city. Cue a kidnapping, and a potentially deadly encounter with a cocaine baron. Thursday 12 April Changing attitudes: Holly and Hollie Credit: BBC Living with the Brainy Bunch BBC Two, 8.00pm Enterprising, PR-conscious Ash Ali is headmaster of Chessington Community College, a fast-improving school with a few problem pupils. Among them are Jack and Hollie who, on the surface, are comically awful teenagers. Hollie gripes constantly, throws strops and storms out of classrooms if things aren’t going her way. Jack is sullen, lazy and has clocked up 15 suspensions in the past year. It will come as no surprise to regular viewers of such documentaries that their behaviour is rooted in low self-esteem, although their parents unquestionably indulge their foibles. Ali’s novel solution is to place Hollie with Holly, tapdancing head girl and gregarious boffin, and Jack with Tharush, a Sri Lankan immigrant by way of Italy, whose talents are only matched by his work ethic. Now that Jack and Hollie are in the bosom of new families for six weeks, it’s hoped that a new environment, greater discipline and rigid routines will see their results improve and attitudes pick up. There are setbacks on the largely familiar narrative trajectory, but it’s cast to perfection and, as a demonstration of the importance of parenting in academic achievement, the experiment gets an A-star. Gabriel Tate European Tour Golf: The Open de Espana Sky Sports Golf, 11.00am The opening day’s play of the event from the Centro Nacional de Golf in Madrid, which was won by Andrew Johnston the last time it was held in 2016. War Above the Trenches Yesterday, 8.00pm This decent two-parter tells the story of the Royal Flying Corps and their battle to win control of the air in the First World War. Based on Peter Hart’s book Bloody April, it draws affectingly on the testimony of veterans to show there was more to the Western Front than trench warfare. Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm The modern age draws closer, as Simon Schama tackles the theme of radiance, guiding us through Gothic cathedrals, Baroque Venetian masterpieces and dazzling Japanese woodblock prints. The Investigator: A British Crime Story ITV, 9.00pm The second real-life case of the series sees Mark Williams-Thomas investigating the 1977 murders of three women in Glasgow. The suspect is Angus Sinclair, who is currently serving a life sentence for killing two other women that same year. We hear from his ex-wife, and learn how he was a prime suspect but escaped charges for the first killings when key evidence went missing. Indian Summer School Channel 4, 9.00pm This diverting documentary series concludes with a Himalayan trek, a controversial article in the school newspaper and the GCSE retakes that were the goal of the entire enterprise. Will Alfie, Harry, Jack and co see their grades improve? Urban Myths: Marilyn Monroe and Billy Wilder Sky Arts, 9.00pm Sky Arts’ boldly cast series of vaguely apocryphal tales from the pop-culture frontlines returns with a dispatch from the set of Some Like It Hot, the magnificent 1959 comedy that is almost certainly more fun to watch than it was to make. In this minor but entertaining reimagining, Tony Curtis (Alex Pettyfer) is threatening to cuckold Arthur Miller (Dougray Scott) by making off with Marilyn Monroe (Gemma Arterton), whose caprice, drinking and sensitivity is driving director Billy Wilder (James Purefoy) to distraction. GT Still Game BBC One, 9.30pm; BBC Two Wales, 10.00pm Justifying its prime-time BBC One slot, the Scottish sitcom bows out in triumph with a typically well-wrought farce involving a Hollywood stuntman, a disastrous driving lesson and romance for the widowed Isa (Jane McCarry). GT The Man with the Golden Gun (1974) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Christopher Lee steals the show as the titular assassin, Francisco Scaramanga, in this classic Bond adventure. Roger Moore’s secret agent, in his second outing as 007, must pursue him, with the help of sidekick Mary Goodnight (Britt Ekland), to the villain’s island lair in order to prevent him harnessing the power of the Sun for evil. The confrontations between Moore and Lee are easily the film’s highlights. Swordfish (2001) ★★☆☆☆ TCM, 9.00pm The most often quoted bit of trivia about this film is that Halle Berry was paid an additional £500,000 to go topless. It’s rather lucky she agreed because she’s probably the most appealing aspect of this frenetic thriller. John Travolta and Hugh Jackman put on testosterone-fuelled displays as a morally dubious counter-terrorist agent and the hacker he blackmails into accessing billions of dollars of government money. Some Like It Hot (1959, b/w) ★★★★★ Sky Arts, 9.30pm When two musicians (Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis) witness a mob hit, they flee the state disguised as women in an all-female band, but further complications arise in the form of demure ukulele player Sugar Kane, superbly played by Marilyn Monroe. Billy Wilder’s classic comedy is effortlessly wacky and clever. Before, at 9pm, is Urban Myths, which imagines what happened on the set of this romcom. Friday 13 April Dishing out opinions: John Torode and Gregg Wallace Credit: BBC MasterChef: The Final BBC One, 8.30pm It has taken 25 episodes over seven weeks to whittle down the 56 amateur contestants to three finalists, and in the process, MasterChef 2018 has produced some of the best cooking – and some of the toughest competition – in the series’ long history. (It has been running in one form or another since 1990; and since 2005 in, roughly, its current format with judges Gregg Wallace and John Torode presenting.) This last week has been no exception, with the finalists having to dig deeper than ever to produce the best dishes of their lives and some great moments – notably during the spectacular trip to South America when they met Peruvian superchef Gaston Acurio and took on a service at the fifth best restaurant in the world, the Central in Lima, under Michelin-starred maestro Virgilio Martínez Véliz. In the finale, it’s all about who cooks the best food, though, as the final three return to the studio kitchen to undergo a test of culinary skills and nerve as they set about creating the most important three-course meal of their lives – in the hope of being judged worthy of a title that has launched many a great career: MasterChef champion. Gerard O’Donovan Chef’s Table: Pastry Netflix, from today This mouth-watering spin-off from Netflix’s popular global foodie series Chef’s Table puts the focus entirely on sweet stuff, talking the cameras inside the kitchens of some of the world’s best pastry chefs, among them Christina Tosi’s Milk Bar in New York, Corrado Assenza’s Caffé Sicilia in Noto, Sicily, Jordi Roca’s El Celler de Can Roca in Girona, and Will Goldfarb’s Room4Dessert in Bali. Lost in Space Netflix, from today Not so much a rerun as a spectacular new take on the classic Sixties sci-fi series about a family marooned in space when their ship runs into difficulty on their way to a new colony and crashes on an unknown and surprisingly hostile planet. There are plenty of thrills and impressive visual effects, and Toby Stephens and Molly Parker are excellent as the pioneering Robinson parents John and Judy, while Parker Posey is an enigmatic (and now female) Dr Smith. GO The City & The City BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 9.30pm Cop thrillers don’t come much more weirdly dystopian than China Miéville’s award-winning 2009 novel and this ultra-stylish adaptation serves its source material very well. In episode two, Inspector Borlú (David Morrissey) ventures back across the border while investigating the murder of a foreign student. Episodes BBC Two, 10.00pm; Wales, 11.05pm Having overcome last week’s unfortunate episode in this sitcom, Matt (Matt LeBlanc) is back on top and leveraging his spurt in the ratings for all it’s worth, handing Sean (Stephen Mangan) and Beverly (Tamsin Greig) a welcome opportunity for escape. Lee and Dean Channel 4, 10.00pm More rough charm, as life gets complicated for Stevenage’s very own Dumb and Dumber when Lee’s (Miles Chapman) financial worries mount and Dean (Mark O’Sullivan) is persuaded to premiere his poetry at the local arts club. Front Row Late BBC Two, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm Freedom of speech and censorship are under the spotlight as host Mary Beard and guests discuss Theatre Clwyd’s production The Assassination of Katie Hopkins and former US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright’s new book Fascism: A Warning. GO Alien: Covenant (2017) ★★★★★ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm The latest film in the Alien saga from Ridley Scott is arguably a mad scientist movie. It follows the crew of the colony ship Covenant (including Katherine Waterson) as they discover what they think is an uncharted paradise, but what they uncover a threat beyond their imagination. Michael Fassbender puts in a spectacular turn as kindly robot David and his twisted “brother” Walter. Invictus (2009) ★★★★☆ ITV, 10.45pm Following the death of Nelson Mandela’s ex-wife Winnie last week, aged 81, here’s Clint Eastwood’s take on South Africa’s World Cup victory in 1995. As the country emerges from apartheid, the newly elected President Mandela (an uncanny Morgan Freeman) sees the potential for the national rugby team, led by François Pienaar (Matt Damon), to be a catalyst for harmony. This is a polished and uplifting film. Monty Python Live at the Hollywood Bowl (1982) ★★★★☆ Gold, 1.40am Much like the Secret Policeman’s Ball, this comedy performance film sees the Monty Python gang take to the stage, but this time they’re in Hollywood. Among the sketches are the Silly Olympics, where athletes compete in absurd sports, The Lumberjack Song, and The Ministry of Silly Walks. This film also features Carol Cleveland in numerous supporting roles. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: Dec goes solo again for the last Saturday Night Takeaway, plus The Voice final
Saturday 7 April Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway ITV, 7.00pm It can’t be easy hosting a show as exuberant as Saturday Night Takeaway on your own but Declan Donnelly made a solid if understandably restrained go of it last week. He ensured that the light entertainment series proceeded pretty much as normal in the absence of long-time work partner Ant McPartlin, whose travails were sensibly referenced only in very brief passing (“I’ve got twice the amount of work to do,” Donnelly noted at one point before mock-berating the production crew that “I’ll have to do it myself, like everything else around here this week”). That said, this final episode ups the ante as Donnelly takes the show on the road to the Universal Orlando Resort in Florida. Once there we’re promised a “super-sized” edition featuring stunts, surprises and “extra-special” guests. No word yet as to who those guests will be but expect Donnelly to continue making the best of a difficult situation, buoyed by extra support from Scarlett Moffatt, who is in charge of ensuring that the Place on the Plane winners have a wonderful time, and Stephen Mulhern, who has the possibly less than enviable task of explaining In for a Penny to an American audience. Sarah Hughes Premier League Football: Everton v Liverpool Sky Sports Main Event, 12.30pm Tired, perhaps, from their Champions League quarter-final first leg against Man City, Liverpool face their bitter local rivals Everton at Goodison Park. The home side, who’ve won three of their last six games, haven’t beaten Liverpool since October 2010, when Tim Cahill and Mikel Arteta gave them a 2-0 victory. Premiership Rugby Union: Bath v Leicester Tigers Channel 5, 1.30pm Time was when Bath and Leicester were the titans of English rugby. Currently they are fifth and eighth in the league, respectively. In September, Bath claimed a 27-23 win at Welford Road, as they held on for their first away win at Leicester since 2003, ensuring an unhappy return for George Ford against the club he left in the summer. The two sides also met in the Anglo-Welsh Cup at the Recreation Ground in November, where Bath also emerged victorious, beating Leicester 33-31 on that occasion. Premier League Football: Manchester City v Manchester United Sky Sports Main Event, 5.30pm What better way for Pep Guardiola’s Manchester City to clinch the title than by beating second-placed Manchester United at the Etihad Stadium. Sixteen points ahead of them in the table, City have been formidable this season, winning 27 of the 31 league games they’ve played. One of those victories came at Old Trafford, with a goal from Nicolas Otamendi giving City a 2-1 victory when these sides met in December. Britain’s Most Historic Towns Channel 4, 8.00pm Alice Roberts is our guide for this new six-part series, which sees her search the UK for the places that best sum up an historical era. The first era is Roman Britain, so Roberts heads to Chester, where she abseils down walls, hunkers in caves and uncovers the truth about the city. Casualty BBC One, 8.20pm The medical drama’s storyline about Dylan’s (William Beck) alcoholism continues to be sensitively handled as the medic’s ex-wife Sam (Charlotte Salt) worries about whether she can help him. Meanwhile, Ethan (George Hardy) struggles with his own demons as he realises that a patient is related to his brother’s killer. The Voice UK: Live Final ITV, 8.30pm Every reality TV idea has an allotted shelf life and it’s hard not to feel that musical talent contests have come to the end of their run. For those who disagree, The Voice UK’s grand finale is here and the final four battle it out for public approval. Below the Surface BBC Four, 9.00pm & 9.45pm BBC Four’s latest Scandi drama started off tensely but like its predecessor, Modus, it has gone on to become ever more ludicrous. Now it’s the final two episodes, and Philip Norgaard (Johannes Lassen) faces off against Mark (Jakob Oftebro), the man behind the hostage crisis. Much heartfelt talking follows, although you may end up feeling more sympathetic towards the damaged Mark than the chilly Norgaard. Pearl Jam: Let’s Play Two Sky Arts, 9.00pm When is a music documentary not a music documentary? When it’s also a sports film. This exuberant film, which was made following the Chicago Cubs’ victory in baseball’s World Series in 2016, follows die-hard Cubs fan and Pearl Jam lead singer Eddie Vedder as he cheers on his team during their championship run while also preparing the band for two August shows at the team’s Wrigley Field Stadium. The result is an affectionate portrait of the singer as fan. SH Troy: Fall of a City BBC One, 9.10pm David Farr’s epic series reaches its climax with the arrival of the most famous horse in history. After an uninspiring start, Troy has picked up in recent weeks and the final episode is a well-handled tale of betrayal and death. It’s a curate’s egg of a series, let down by poor casting. SH X-Men (2000) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.00pm Bryan Singer directs an all-star cast that includes Patrick Stewart, Hugh Jackman, Ian McKellen and Halle Berry, in the first of the X-Men franchise. A group of mutants must decide whether to side with Professor Xavier (Stewart) or the evil Magneto (McKellen) in what is a solid opening to the series and which paved the way for plenty of big-budget sequels. This is followed by X-Men 2 and X-Men 3 at 9.00pm and 11.35pm respectively. Legend (2015) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Tom Hardy gives a solid, convincing performance as east London gangster Reggie Kray but his caricatured portrayal of twin brother Ronnie lets him down, and this inconsistency leads to an entertaining though muddled film. Emily Browning, however, gives just the right mix of defiance and despair as Frances Shea, Reggie’s put-upon wife. Watch out for some particularly gory scenes. Lethal Weapon 2 (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.05pm Mel Gibson sports his signature Eighties mullet in the second film of this daft-but-fun action franchise. LAPD officer Riggs (Gibson) teams up once again with his partner Murtaugh (Danny Glover) to track down a band of South African criminals while protecting a painfully frenzied witness (Joe Pesci). Naturally, the pair find themselves drawn into violent action sequences orchestrated by stereotypical bad guys. Sunday 8 April Hostess with the mostest: Catherine Tate presents the awards Credit: ITV The Olivier Awards 2018 ITV, 10.20pm Last year, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child swept the board with nine Olivier Awards, something that looked impossible to top. But then came Lin Manuel Miranda’s blockbuster musical Hamilton, whose West End run has received reviews every bit as rapturous as those from its Broadway debut. The show has a record-breaking 13 nominations, which it is thought will be translated into awards. After being snubbed for Jerusalem, Jez Butterworth will surely be rewarded for his equally magisterial play The Ferryman (its eight nominations include best play and best director for Sam Mendes), while contenders in the acting categories include Bryan Cranston for Network, Andrew Garfield for Angels in America and Lesley Manville for Long Day’s Journey into Night. Catherine Tate will be on hosting duties for the event at the Royal Albert Hall, which will, as usual, feature a crop of stellar performances; this one will include a special tribute to Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, which turns 50 this year. Let’s hope the organisers bring together Josephs of the past for a big singalong: Jason Donovan, Phillip Schofield, Ian “H” Watkins and Lee Mead will all, one suspects, be available. Gabriel Tate Sex Robots and Us BBC Three, from 10.00am James Young, an amputee who created his own bionic arm, meets the people who design sex robots and hears about their plans for them, from being given to old people’s homes to “employment” in brothels. But is it the harmless, even socially responsible pursuit thatthey claim? Formula 1: The Bahrain Grand Prix Sky Sports F1, 3.30pm After the Australian Grand Prix – in which Sebastian Vettel took advantage of a safety-car blunder to win under pristine Melbourne skies – attention turns to the second round of the season at the Bahrain International Circuit in Sakhir. Another blunder cost Lewis Hamilton on this circuit last year – this time it happened in the pit lane, with Vettel capitalising to win by 6.6 seconds. The Generation Game BBC One, 8.00pm How do you top last week’s cavalcade of silliness in this rebooted game show? You rope in Danny Dyer to join Mel Giedroyc, Sue Perkins and panellists Melvin Odoom and Roisin Conaty for challenges that include cake decorating, balloon modelling and dancing the Argentine Tango. The Durrells ITV, 8.00pm In the fourth episode of the popular drama, Larry (Josh O’Connor) visits Athens with two oddly named guests – Captain Creech (James Cosmo) and Prince Jeejeebuoy (Tanmay Dhanania) – in tow. There, they offer advice to Gerry (Milo Parker), who is applying for a new school. Jesus’ Female Disciples: the New Evidence Channel 4, 8.00pm For centuries, the birth of Christianity was regarded as a largely male affair, with women as only bit-part players. Now, Bible experts Helen Bond and Joan Taylor have discovered evidence that women were involved in everything from preaching and baptising to funding the movement as it grew. This absorbing documentary follows the historians’ progress. Golf: The Masters Sky Sports Main Event, 8.00pm Prepare for a dramatic finale as this year’s first Major – from the Augusta National in Georgia – concludes. Last year, Spain’s Sergio Garcia won the coveted green jacket, beating Justin Rose in a tense play-off. Ordeal by Innocence BBC One, 9.00pm Sarah Phelps’s splendid adaptation continues, as Arthur Calgary (Luke Treadaway) resolves to prove the truth about Jack Argyll’s (Anthony Boyle) alibi by any means necessary. GT Folk Awards 2018 BBC Four, 9.00pm Mark Radcliffe and Julie Fowlis introduce highlights from this year’s Radio 2 Folk Awards in Belfast. It features performances from Cara Dillon, Lankum and Eliza Carthy and the Wayward Band. The great Nick Drake will also be inducted into the Hall of Fame, his genius long-established, even if such recognition eluded him during his short life. Producer Dónal Lunny, meanwhile, receives the Lifetime Achievement Award for decades of tireless work promoting the renaissance in Irish music, plus The Armagh Pipers Club are presented with the Good Tradition Award. GT Emma (1996) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 3.00pm Gwyneth Paltrow’s American iciness melts in this deft adaptation of Jane Austen’s classic comic romance. She is Emma Woodhouse, spoilt, charming and an inveterate meddler. Only Mr George Knightley (Jeremy Northam) dares challenge her behaviour – but what are his motives? A clever film with a superb supporting cast, including Toni Collette, Alan Cumming and Ewan McGregor. United 93 (2006) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 9.55pm Director Paul Greengrass’s boneshaking, real-time take on the final hours of the United Airlines plane whose passengers rebelled against their hijackers on September 11, 2001 feels uncomfortably realistic. Greengrass, whose signature rapid cutting made the second and third Bourne films so exciting, proves expert at handling the most infamous atrocity of modern times with intelligence and sobriety. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 11.00pm This superb adaptation of John le Carré’s brilliant, intricate Cold War spy novel is a triumph. The espionage drama follows the hunt for a Soviet double agent at the top of the British secret service, with Gary Oldman spearheading the excellent ensemble cast, which includes Colin Firth, Tom Hardy, John Hurt and Benedict Cumberbatch. It’s funny, seductive and suspenseful. Monday 9 April I spy: a recruit sees if she’s got what it takes to be an SOE agent Credit: BBC Secret Agent Selection: WW2 BBC Two, 9.00pm Not unlike Channel 4’s SAS: Who Dares Wins and BBC Two’s Astronauts: Do You Have What It Takes?, this absorbing new series puts a group of recruits through a series of gruelling physical and psychological challenges to see if they could make the grade as a secret agent according to an established selection test used during the Second World War. This test was used by the Special Operations Executive (SOE) to determine whether recruits from many different walks of life would be capable of being dropped behind enemy lines and surviving as a covert officer with a brief to cause the maximum disruption possible to the enemy in the territory. As with the original SOE, the 14 candidates come from diverse backgrounds (among them a research scientist, a property developer, former police officer, a drag act performer, a retired investment banker and an Army veteran). In the opening episode, they undergo the initial four-day assessment at a remote Scottish country-house estate. The aim is to winnow out weakness and determine who should win a place on the advanced, and suitably terrifying, course in assassination, sabotage and covert intelligence techniques. Gerard O’Donovan Famalam BBC Three, from 10.00am After a successful pilot last year, Vivienne Acheampong, Gbemisola Ikumelo, Roxanne Sternberg, Tom Moutchi and John MacMillan return with more culturally skewed sketches. Once again, they feature William and Funke’s raunchy chat show, misunderstood superhero Eclipse, Croydon’s voodoo practitioner Professor Lofuko, and a version of Midsomer Murders. 800 Words BBC One, 2.15pm If you like The Durrells you will definitely want to watch hit Australian comedy drama 800 Words. This gently funny series follows George (Erik Thomson), a widower, who horrifies his teenaged children when he moves the entire family to a remote seaside town in New Zealand. Springtime on the Farm Channel 5, 8.00pm This is the first of five shows this week celebrating the “great British farmer”, with the help of Yorkshire Vet stars Peter Wright and Julian Norton, Adam Henson of Countryfile and Springwatch’s Lindsey Chapman. In this programme, they explore how to cope with the stresses of lambing. MasterChef: The Finals BBC One, 9.00pm Oodles of challenges lie ahead for the remaining amateur chefs in the final week, which takes them as far afield as Peru ahead of Friday’s concluding cook-off. First, though, they’re off to North Yorkshire to cater a country-house lunch for local grandees and farmers. Lisbon: An Art Lovers’ Guide BBC Four, 9.00pm Having covered Barcelona, St Petersburg and Amsterdam in their first series of city-break guides, historian Dr Janina Ramirez and art critic Alastair Sooke jet off to explore three less obvious, art-rich destinations. Beirut and Baku are perhaps the more intriguing but it opens in Lisbon, which built up its art reserves during the centuries Portugal was part of one of the world’s great empires, and currently boasts one of the hottest contemporary art scenes in Europe. GO Marcella ITV, 9.00pm This drama’s been a little less fraught the second time round but Marcella still pushes the boundaries of credibility. In this concluding part, the heroine (Anna Friel) tracks down the killer, only to suffer one of her unfortunate episodes. GO The Core (2003) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.25pm Rome starts to crumble, the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco collapses and pigeons go mental in Trafalgar Square. Something is obviously amiss, and this time it isn’t climate change. In fact, the Earth’s core has stopped rotating and a team of scientists has to build a special burrowing machine to start it spinning again. Hilary Swank, Stanley Tucci and Aaron Eckhart do their best, but the excitement is intermittent. The Emoji Movie (2017) ★☆☆☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 6.30pm In this animated comedy set inside a smartphone, Gene (voiced by T J Miller), an emoji with multiple facial features, sets out on a quest to be like his colleagues who have only one. He does so with the help of apps like Spotify and Candy Crush. Sadly, the result is so horrendous that there aren’t enough Patrick Stewart-voiced emojis in the world to express what an ugly, artless exercise this is. Triple 9 (2016) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A gang of criminals and corrupt cops plan to kill a police officer in order to pull off their biggest heist yet in John Hillcoat’s crime thriller. There is a lot to like here: a big opening and a strong cast (with Kate Winslet, Gal Gadot, Anthony Mackie and Chiwetel Ejiofor among them). But it feels like fragments of a great crime drama are missing; it’s enthralling up close, but then the big picture isn’t complete. Tuesday 10 April Back to school: Mark, who has two sons with autism Credit: Channel 4 Class of Mum and Dad Channel 4, 8.00pm Another week, another Channel 4 series about education. Hold off on the black marks, however, because this one is pretty good. The premise is simple: Blackrod Primary School just outside of Bolton has thrown open its doors to a class made up of pupils’ parents (and one grandparent). They’ve agreed to go back to school for the summer term to see what modern education is really like, sports day, Sats tests and all. Naturally, its harder than many of them were expecting – 36-year-old decorator Jonny states early on that he thought he’d be able to slope off for a swift cigarette break rather than having to adhere to strict class rules – but there are some touching stories amid the more obvious moments. Most notably, this opening episode focuses on two parents with challenging home lives – Julia, who is raising her 10-year-old cousin Asha after Asha’s mother died, and Mark, who has two autistic sons. While the parents’ travails are interesting, the children are the real scene-stealers, however, from those delighted that their mothers and fathers are taking part to those who are more sceptical. The pair of five-year-olds who spend their time corpsing in front of the camera are particularly endearing. Sarah Hughes Champions League Football: Manchester City v Liverpool BT Sport 2, 7.45pm The Etihad Stadium is the setting as City and Liverpool fight it out for a place in the semi-finals. Liverpool have the advantage following a 3-0 win at Anfield in the first leg. This Time Next Year ITV, 8.00pm Davina McCall returns with another set of heart-tugging stories of people attempting to transform their lives over the course of a year. First up are two new parents who dream of making life wonderful for their baby girl who has been deaf since birth and a couple desperate to start a family. Come Home BBC One, 9.00pm Danny Brocklehurst’s claustrophobic family drama comes to a head as we flashback to find out exactly what went wrong in Greg (Christopher Eccleston) and Marie’s (Paula Malcomson) marriage. Hospital BBC Two, 9.00pm The engrossing fly-on-the-wall medical series continues with Nottingham University Hospitals Trust struggling to cope with the new NHS ruling regarding the cancellation of all non-urgent surgery. The episode focuses on Val, a 55-year-old with mouth cancer whose surgeon is desperately trying to ensure that her operation goes ahead. Here and Now Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm With only two episodes left to go, Alan Ball’s family drama continues to tread water in the most frustrating ways. On paper, there are a whole bunch of interesting stories in the mix, from Kristen’s (Sosie Bacon) possible relationship with Navid (Marwan Salama) to Ramon’s (Daniel Zovatto) continuing visions, but the problem is nothing much happens with any of them as each story moves on only incrementally each week. In this episode, Audrey (Holly Hunter) finally turns the tables on the perpetually smug Greg (Tim Robbins). Cunk on Britain BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm Diane Morgan’s pitch-perfect send-up of history programmes moves to the Tudor era and beyond as Cunk takes on Henry VIII, aka “The kingiest king who kinged over Britain” before giving us her unique perspective on “Bloody” Mary Tudor (“horrible like the drink”) and Elizabeth I. SH Divorce Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The acerbic Sarah Jessica Parker sitcom has been firing on all cylinders throughout its second series – possibly because it’s more interesting watching Frances (Parker) and Robert (the excellent Thomas Haden Church) navigate life after divorce than it was watching them get there. Here, Frances tries to make a new contact in the art world. SH Speed (1994) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm “There’s a bomb on the bus!” is the most famous line and basically the entire plot of one of the best action thrillers of the Nineties. The sizzling chemistry between LAPD Swat specialist Jack Traven (Keanu Reeves) and passenger Annie Porter (Sandra Bullock) sexes up the exhilarating action scenes, while Dennis Hopper is fantastically unhinged as a revenge-driven, retired bomb squad member turned terrorist. Fast & Furious 7 (2015) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 9.00pm Paul Walker was killed in a car crash part-way through making this film so it was completed with the help of his two younger brothers and some subtle computer graphics. The good news is that this is the best film in the franchise and does justice to Walker. It isn’t polished blockbuster film-making – though if it was, it wouldn’t be Fast & Furious. But it speaks straight to your adrenal glands. The Witches of Eastwick (1987) ★★★☆☆ Syfy, 9.00pm It is remarkable that director George Miller’s daft, unfettered romp of a film works at all. But, thanks to Jack Nicholson’s delicious overacting as Daryl Van Horne, a manic gentleman who closely resembles the devil, and the three gorgeous, single small-town friends, Alexandra (Cher), Jane (Susan Sarandon) and Sukie (Michelle Pfeiffer), who vie for his debased attentions, it somehow does. Wednesday 11 April Family ties: Edgar Ramirez and Penelope Cruz Credit: BBC The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story BBC Two, 9.00pm It’s been fascinating to discover the “true” story behind the 1997 murder of fhion designer Gianni Versace in Ryan Murphy’s glitzy drama, which has expertly depicted the inner world of the perpetrator, a Walter Mitty-style serial killer called Andrew Cunanan (a career-defining role for Darren Criss). This episode, however, has a mid-series lull about it as Cunanan ascends to the higher echelons of gay society, shaping himself meticulously into the posh, preppy eye-candy who saw a sugar daddy (or two) as his way to the top. Elsewhere, the Versace siblings return at last. Gianni (Edgar Ramirez), now in failing health decides to champion his insecure sister Donatella (Penélope Cruz in a frightful wig) and turns her into both designer and muse. Despite a lack of characters to root for – the Versaces’ moments of vulnerability dissolve into tedious histrionics and are eclipsed by Cunanan’s cold-blooded machinations – it’s all quite a fabulous mix of fashion, high society and brutal murder, with some interesting commentary on homophobia in the Nineties as well. Vicki Power The Secret Helpers BBC Two, 8.00pm Watch and weep as timid elderly widow Lesley begins a new life as an out gay woman in this life-affirming docu-series. She’s encouraged with warmth and wisdom by amateur “sages” from abroad, who talk to her secretly through a hidden earpiece. From World War to Cold War Yesterday, 8.00pm As the Second World War drew to a close, Churchill, Stalin and Roosevelt met at Yalta in the Crimea to broker post-war peace. This brisk two-part documentary raids the archives for clips and letters from those who attended, and gathers experts and relatives – including FDR’s grandson – to investigate power plays by Stalin that wrong-footed his Allied counterparts. It’s a detailed look at how and why the compromises reached at Yalta were quickly cast aside. Bacchus Uncovered: Ancient God of Ecstasy BBC Four, 9.00pm Historian Bettany Hughes continues to explore ancient civilisations, moving on to Bacchus, the Roman god of wine. Hughes’s odyssey starts under the City of London, where an 1,800-year-old Roman temple to Bacchus was discovered less than 100 years ago, and takes her to Greece, the Middle East and the Caucasus to explore the god’s roots and influence. VP Benidorm ITV, 9.00pm Fluffy as candyfloss, this lewd seaside comedy provides some fun, particularly in the retro casting of stars of yesteryear. This week, an exuberant Sammy (Shane Richie) tries to persuade Monty (John Challis) that, after his successful comeback gig, he is ready for an evening slot. One Born Every Minute Channel 4, 9.00pm This feelgood documentary series brings more poignant tales from a Birmingham labour ward. This week we meet Chantell, about to deliver her third child, who regales us with a moving story of how parenthood with partner Phil has healed the wounds of a traumatic past. First Dates Channel 4, 10.00pm The thoughtful dating show pairs up four more couples, but the road to love is bumpy – septuagenarian Deanna finds her date more interested in the waiter than her. More promising is the match between Bianca and Teza, who allow their vulnerabilities to show. VP The Thin Red Line (1998) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 3.10pm This lyrical Second World War drama, directed by Terrence Malick, tells the story of a group of young US soldiers fighting the Japanese for control of the island of Guadalcanal. Full of stars such as Sean Penn and George Clooney, it struggles with its own battle to squeeze in so many characters but is still an atmospheric meditation on the nature of war. Nick Nolte and Adrien Brody also star. The Remains of the Day (1993) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 3.55pm The success of Merchant Ivory’s adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro’s Thirties-set novel, a well-observed study of regret, is built around its perfectly cast leads: Anthony Hopkins as James, the butler to the doltish aristocrat Lord Darlington (James Fox) and Emma Thompson as a housekeeper who tries to draw him out of his sterile shell. Lush visuals give it an added richness. Transporter 2 (2005) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A martial arts action sequel, in which Jason Statham and Alessandro Gassman are the sporadically thrilling stars. Statham is Frank Martin, who accepts a job as chauffeur to Jack (Hunter Clary), the son of Miami’s politician Jefferson Billings (Matthew Modine). But the local Colombian drug dealers aren’t happy with his boss’s efforts to clean up the city. Cue a kidnapping, and a potentially deadly encounter with a cocaine baron. Thursday 12 April Changing attitudes: Holly and Hollie Credit: BBC Living with the Brainy Bunch BBC Two, 8.00pm Enterprising, PR-conscious Ash Ali is headmaster of Chessington Community College, a fast-improving school with a few problem pupils. Among them are Jack and Hollie who, on the surface, are comically awful teenagers. Hollie gripes constantly, throws strops and storms out of classrooms if things aren’t going her way. Jack is sullen, lazy and has clocked up 15 suspensions in the past year. It will come as no surprise to regular viewers of such documentaries that their behaviour is rooted in low self-esteem, although their parents unquestionably indulge their foibles. Ali’s novel solution is to place Hollie with Holly, tapdancing head girl and gregarious boffin, and Jack with Tharush, a Sri Lankan immigrant by way of Italy, whose talents are only matched by his work ethic. Now that Jack and Hollie are in the bosom of new families for six weeks, it’s hoped that a new environment, greater discipline and rigid routines will see their results improve and attitudes pick up. There are setbacks on the largely familiar narrative trajectory, but it’s cast to perfection and, as a demonstration of the importance of parenting in academic achievement, the experiment gets an A-star. Gabriel Tate European Tour Golf: The Open de Espana Sky Sports Golf, 11.00am The opening day’s play of the event from the Centro Nacional de Golf in Madrid, which was won by Andrew Johnston the last time it was held in 2016. War Above the Trenches Yesterday, 8.00pm This decent two-parter tells the story of the Royal Flying Corps and their battle to win control of the air in the First World War. Based on Peter Hart’s book Bloody April, it draws affectingly on the testimony of veterans to show there was more to the Western Front than trench warfare. Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm The modern age draws closer, as Simon Schama tackles the theme of radiance, guiding us through Gothic cathedrals, Baroque Venetian masterpieces and dazzling Japanese woodblock prints. The Investigator: A British Crime Story ITV, 9.00pm The second real-life case of the series sees Mark Williams-Thomas investigating the 1977 murders of three women in Glasgow. The suspect is Angus Sinclair, who is currently serving a life sentence for killing two other women that same year. We hear from his ex-wife, and learn how he was a prime suspect but escaped charges for the first killings when key evidence went missing. Indian Summer School Channel 4, 9.00pm This diverting documentary series concludes with a Himalayan trek, a controversial article in the school newspaper and the GCSE retakes that were the goal of the entire enterprise. Will Alfie, Harry, Jack and co see their grades improve? Urban Myths: Marilyn Monroe and Billy Wilder Sky Arts, 9.00pm Sky Arts’ boldly cast series of vaguely apocryphal tales from the pop-culture frontlines returns with a dispatch from the set of Some Like It Hot, the magnificent 1959 comedy that is almost certainly more fun to watch than it was to make. In this minor but entertaining reimagining, Tony Curtis (Alex Pettyfer) is threatening to cuckold Arthur Miller (Dougray Scott) by making off with Marilyn Monroe (Gemma Arterton), whose caprice, drinking and sensitivity is driving director Billy Wilder (James Purefoy) to distraction. GT Still Game BBC One, 9.30pm; BBC Two Wales, 10.00pm Justifying its prime-time BBC One slot, the Scottish sitcom bows out in triumph with a typically well-wrought farce involving a Hollywood stuntman, a disastrous driving lesson and romance for the widowed Isa (Jane McCarry). GT The Man with the Golden Gun (1974) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Christopher Lee steals the show as the titular assassin, Francisco Scaramanga, in this classic Bond adventure. Roger Moore’s secret agent, in his second outing as 007, must pursue him, with the help of sidekick Mary Goodnight (Britt Ekland), to the villain’s island lair in order to prevent him harnessing the power of the Sun for evil. The confrontations between Moore and Lee are easily the film’s highlights. Swordfish (2001) ★★☆☆☆ TCM, 9.00pm The most often quoted bit of trivia about this film is that Halle Berry was paid an additional £500,000 to go topless. It’s rather lucky she agreed because she’s probably the most appealing aspect of this frenetic thriller. John Travolta and Hugh Jackman put on testosterone-fuelled displays as a morally dubious counter-terrorist agent and the hacker he blackmails into accessing billions of dollars of government money. Some Like It Hot (1959, b/w) ★★★★★ Sky Arts, 9.30pm When two musicians (Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis) witness a mob hit, they flee the state disguised as women in an all-female band, but further complications arise in the form of demure ukulele player Sugar Kane, superbly played by Marilyn Monroe. Billy Wilder’s classic comedy is effortlessly wacky and clever. Before, at 9pm, is Urban Myths, which imagines what happened on the set of this romcom. Friday 13 April Dishing out opinions: John Torode and Gregg Wallace Credit: BBC MasterChef: The Final BBC One, 8.30pm It has taken 25 episodes over seven weeks to whittle down the 56 amateur contestants to three finalists, and in the process, MasterChef 2018 has produced some of the best cooking – and some of the toughest competition – in the series’ long history. (It has been running in one form or another since 1990; and since 2005 in, roughly, its current format with judges Gregg Wallace and John Torode presenting.) This last week has been no exception, with the finalists having to dig deeper than ever to produce the best dishes of their lives and some great moments – notably during the spectacular trip to South America when they met Peruvian superchef Gaston Acurio and took on a service at the fifth best restaurant in the world, the Central in Lima, under Michelin-starred maestro Virgilio Martínez Véliz. In the finale, it’s all about who cooks the best food, though, as the final three return to the studio kitchen to undergo a test of culinary skills and nerve as they set about creating the most important three-course meal of their lives – in the hope of being judged worthy of a title that has launched many a great career: MasterChef champion. Gerard O’Donovan Chef’s Table: Pastry Netflix, from today This mouth-watering spin-off from Netflix’s popular global foodie series Chef’s Table puts the focus entirely on sweet stuff, talking the cameras inside the kitchens of some of the world’s best pastry chefs, among them Christina Tosi’s Milk Bar in New York, Corrado Assenza’s Caffé Sicilia in Noto, Sicily, Jordi Roca’s El Celler de Can Roca in Girona, and Will Goldfarb’s Room4Dessert in Bali. Lost in Space Netflix, from today Not so much a rerun as a spectacular new take on the classic Sixties sci-fi series about a family marooned in space when their ship runs into difficulty on their way to a new colony and crashes on an unknown and surprisingly hostile planet. There are plenty of thrills and impressive visual effects, and Toby Stephens and Molly Parker are excellent as the pioneering Robinson parents John and Judy, while Parker Posey is an enigmatic (and now female) Dr Smith. GO The City & The City BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 9.30pm Cop thrillers don’t come much more weirdly dystopian than China Miéville’s award-winning 2009 novel and this ultra-stylish adaptation serves its source material very well. In episode two, Inspector Borlú (David Morrissey) ventures back across the border while investigating the murder of a foreign student. Episodes BBC Two, 10.00pm; Wales, 11.05pm Having overcome last week’s unfortunate episode in this sitcom, Matt (Matt LeBlanc) is back on top and leveraging his spurt in the ratings for all it’s worth, handing Sean (Stephen Mangan) and Beverly (Tamsin Greig) a welcome opportunity for escape. Lee and Dean Channel 4, 10.00pm More rough charm, as life gets complicated for Stevenage’s very own Dumb and Dumber when Lee’s (Miles Chapman) financial worries mount and Dean (Mark O’Sullivan) is persuaded to premiere his poetry at the local arts club. Front Row Late BBC Two, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm Freedom of speech and censorship are under the spotlight as host Mary Beard and guests discuss Theatre Clwyd’s production The Assassination of Katie Hopkins and former US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright’s new book Fascism: A Warning. GO Alien: Covenant (2017) ★★★★★ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm The latest film in the Alien saga from Ridley Scott is arguably a mad scientist movie. It follows the crew of the colony ship Covenant (including Katherine Waterson) as they discover what they think is an uncharted paradise, but what they uncover a threat beyond their imagination. Michael Fassbender puts in a spectacular turn as kindly robot David and his twisted “brother” Walter. Invictus (2009) ★★★★☆ ITV, 10.45pm Following the death of Nelson Mandela’s ex-wife Winnie last week, aged 81, here’s Clint Eastwood’s take on South Africa’s World Cup victory in 1995. As the country emerges from apartheid, the newly elected President Mandela (an uncanny Morgan Freeman) sees the potential for the national rugby team, led by François Pienaar (Matt Damon), to be a catalyst for harmony. This is a polished and uplifting film. Monty Python Live at the Hollywood Bowl (1982) ★★★★☆ Gold, 1.40am Much like the Secret Policeman’s Ball, this comedy performance film sees the Monty Python gang take to the stage, but this time they’re in Hollywood. Among the sketches are the Silly Olympics, where athletes compete in absurd sports, The Lumberjack Song, and The Ministry of Silly Walks. This film also features Carol Cleveland in numerous supporting roles. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
Saturday 7 April Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway ITV, 7.00pm It can’t be easy hosting a show as exuberant as Saturday Night Takeaway on your own but Declan Donnelly made a solid if understandably restrained go of it last week. He ensured that the light entertainment series proceeded pretty much as normal in the absence of long-time work partner Ant McPartlin, whose travails were sensibly referenced only in very brief passing (“I’ve got twice the amount of work to do,” Donnelly noted at one point before mock-berating the production crew that “I’ll have to do it myself, like everything else around here this week”). That said, this final episode ups the ante as Donnelly takes the show on the road to the Universal Orlando Resort in Florida. Once there we’re promised a “super-sized” edition featuring stunts, surprises and “extra-special” guests. No word yet as to who those guests will be but expect Donnelly to continue making the best of a difficult situation, buoyed by extra support from Scarlett Moffatt, who is in charge of ensuring that the Place on the Plane winners have a wonderful time, and Stephen Mulhern, who has the possibly less than enviable task of explaining In for a Penny to an American audience. Sarah Hughes Premier League Football: Everton v Liverpool Sky Sports Main Event, 12.30pm Tired, perhaps, from their Champions League quarter-final first leg against Man City, Liverpool face their bitter local rivals Everton at Goodison Park. The home side, who’ve won three of their last six games, haven’t beaten Liverpool since October 2010, when Tim Cahill and Mikel Arteta gave them a 2-0 victory. Premiership Rugby Union: Bath v Leicester Tigers Channel 5, 1.30pm Time was when Bath and Leicester were the titans of English rugby. Currently they are fifth and eighth in the league, respectively. In September, Bath claimed a 27-23 win at Welford Road, as they held on for their first away win at Leicester since 2003, ensuring an unhappy return for George Ford against the club he left in the summer. The two sides also met in the Anglo-Welsh Cup at the Recreation Ground in November, where Bath also emerged victorious, beating Leicester 33-31 on that occasion. Premier League Football: Manchester City v Manchester United Sky Sports Main Event, 5.30pm What better way for Pep Guardiola’s Manchester City to clinch the title than by beating second-placed Manchester United at the Etihad Stadium. Sixteen points ahead of them in the table, City have been formidable this season, winning 27 of the 31 league games they’ve played. One of those victories came at Old Trafford, with a goal from Nicolas Otamendi giving City a 2-1 victory when these sides met in December. Britain’s Most Historic Towns Channel 4, 8.00pm Alice Roberts is our guide for this new six-part series, which sees her search the UK for the places that best sum up an historical era. The first era is Roman Britain, so Roberts heads to Chester, where she abseils down walls, hunkers in caves and uncovers the truth about the city. Casualty BBC One, 8.20pm The medical drama’s storyline about Dylan’s (William Beck) alcoholism continues to be sensitively handled as the medic’s ex-wife Sam (Charlotte Salt) worries about whether she can help him. Meanwhile, Ethan (George Hardy) struggles with his own demons as he realises that a patient is related to his brother’s killer. The Voice UK: Live Final ITV, 8.30pm Every reality TV idea has an allotted shelf life and it’s hard not to feel that musical talent contests have come to the end of their run. For those who disagree, The Voice UK’s grand finale is here and the final four battle it out for public approval. Below the Surface BBC Four, 9.00pm & 9.45pm BBC Four’s latest Scandi drama started off tensely but like its predecessor, Modus, it has gone on to become ever more ludicrous. Now it’s the final two episodes, and Philip Norgaard (Johannes Lassen) faces off against Mark (Jakob Oftebro), the man behind the hostage crisis. Much heartfelt talking follows, although you may end up feeling more sympathetic towards the damaged Mark than the chilly Norgaard. Pearl Jam: Let’s Play Two Sky Arts, 9.00pm When is a music documentary not a music documentary? When it’s also a sports film. This exuberant film, which was made following the Chicago Cubs’ victory in baseball’s World Series in 2016, follows die-hard Cubs fan and Pearl Jam lead singer Eddie Vedder as he cheers on his team during their championship run while also preparing the band for two August shows at the team’s Wrigley Field Stadium. The result is an affectionate portrait of the singer as fan. SH Troy: Fall of a City BBC One, 9.10pm David Farr’s epic series reaches its climax with the arrival of the most famous horse in history. After an uninspiring start, Troy has picked up in recent weeks and the final episode is a well-handled tale of betrayal and death. It’s a curate’s egg of a series, let down by poor casting. SH X-Men (2000) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.00pm Bryan Singer directs an all-star cast that includes Patrick Stewart, Hugh Jackman, Ian McKellen and Halle Berry, in the first of the X-Men franchise. A group of mutants must decide whether to side with Professor Xavier (Stewart) or the evil Magneto (McKellen) in what is a solid opening to the series and which paved the way for plenty of big-budget sequels. This is followed by X-Men 2 and X-Men 3 at 9.00pm and 11.35pm respectively. Legend (2015) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Tom Hardy gives a solid, convincing performance as east London gangster Reggie Kray but his caricatured portrayal of twin brother Ronnie lets him down, and this inconsistency leads to an entertaining though muddled film. Emily Browning, however, gives just the right mix of defiance and despair as Frances Shea, Reggie’s put-upon wife. Watch out for some particularly gory scenes. Lethal Weapon 2 (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.05pm Mel Gibson sports his signature Eighties mullet in the second film of this daft-but-fun action franchise. LAPD officer Riggs (Gibson) teams up once again with his partner Murtaugh (Danny Glover) to track down a band of South African criminals while protecting a painfully frenzied witness (Joe Pesci). Naturally, the pair find themselves drawn into violent action sequences orchestrated by stereotypical bad guys. Sunday 8 April Hostess with the mostest: Catherine Tate presents the awards Credit: ITV The Olivier Awards 2018 ITV, 10.20pm Last year, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child swept the board with nine Olivier Awards, something that looked impossible to top. But then came Lin Manuel Miranda’s blockbuster musical Hamilton, whose West End run has received reviews every bit as rapturous as those from its Broadway debut. The show has a record-breaking 13 nominations, which it is thought will be translated into awards. After being snubbed for Jerusalem, Jez Butterworth will surely be rewarded for his equally magisterial play The Ferryman (its eight nominations include best play and best director for Sam Mendes), while contenders in the acting categories include Bryan Cranston for Network, Andrew Garfield for Angels in America and Lesley Manville for Long Day’s Journey into Night. Catherine Tate will be on hosting duties for the event at the Royal Albert Hall, which will, as usual, feature a crop of stellar performances; this one will include a special tribute to Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, which turns 50 this year. Let’s hope the organisers bring together Josephs of the past for a big singalong: Jason Donovan, Phillip Schofield, Ian “H” Watkins and Lee Mead will all, one suspects, be available. Gabriel Tate Sex Robots and Us BBC Three, from 10.00am James Young, an amputee who created his own bionic arm, meets the people who design sex robots and hears about their plans for them, from being given to old people’s homes to “employment” in brothels. But is it the harmless, even socially responsible pursuit thatthey claim? Formula 1: The Bahrain Grand Prix Sky Sports F1, 3.30pm After the Australian Grand Prix – in which Sebastian Vettel took advantage of a safety-car blunder to win under pristine Melbourne skies – attention turns to the second round of the season at the Bahrain International Circuit in Sakhir. Another blunder cost Lewis Hamilton on this circuit last year – this time it happened in the pit lane, with Vettel capitalising to win by 6.6 seconds. The Generation Game BBC One, 8.00pm How do you top last week’s cavalcade of silliness in this rebooted game show? You rope in Danny Dyer to join Mel Giedroyc, Sue Perkins and panellists Melvin Odoom and Roisin Conaty for challenges that include cake decorating, balloon modelling and dancing the Argentine Tango. The Durrells ITV, 8.00pm In the fourth episode of the popular drama, Larry (Josh O’Connor) visits Athens with two oddly named guests – Captain Creech (James Cosmo) and Prince Jeejeebuoy (Tanmay Dhanania) – in tow. There, they offer advice to Gerry (Milo Parker), who is applying for a new school. Jesus’ Female Disciples: the New Evidence Channel 4, 8.00pm For centuries, the birth of Christianity was regarded as a largely male affair, with women as only bit-part players. Now, Bible experts Helen Bond and Joan Taylor have discovered evidence that women were involved in everything from preaching and baptising to funding the movement as it grew. This absorbing documentary follows the historians’ progress. Golf: The Masters Sky Sports Main Event, 8.00pm Prepare for a dramatic finale as this year’s first Major – from the Augusta National in Georgia – concludes. Last year, Spain’s Sergio Garcia won the coveted green jacket, beating Justin Rose in a tense play-off. Ordeal by Innocence BBC One, 9.00pm Sarah Phelps’s splendid adaptation continues, as Arthur Calgary (Luke Treadaway) resolves to prove the truth about Jack Argyll’s (Anthony Boyle) alibi by any means necessary. GT Folk Awards 2018 BBC Four, 9.00pm Mark Radcliffe and Julie Fowlis introduce highlights from this year’s Radio 2 Folk Awards in Belfast. It features performances from Cara Dillon, Lankum and Eliza Carthy and the Wayward Band. The great Nick Drake will also be inducted into the Hall of Fame, his genius long-established, even if such recognition eluded him during his short life. Producer Dónal Lunny, meanwhile, receives the Lifetime Achievement Award for decades of tireless work promoting the renaissance in Irish music, plus The Armagh Pipers Club are presented with the Good Tradition Award. GT Emma (1996) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 3.00pm Gwyneth Paltrow’s American iciness melts in this deft adaptation of Jane Austen’s classic comic romance. She is Emma Woodhouse, spoilt, charming and an inveterate meddler. Only Mr George Knightley (Jeremy Northam) dares challenge her behaviour – but what are his motives? A clever film with a superb supporting cast, including Toni Collette, Alan Cumming and Ewan McGregor. United 93 (2006) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 9.55pm Director Paul Greengrass’s boneshaking, real-time take on the final hours of the United Airlines plane whose passengers rebelled against their hijackers on September 11, 2001 feels uncomfortably realistic. Greengrass, whose signature rapid cutting made the second and third Bourne films so exciting, proves expert at handling the most infamous atrocity of modern times with intelligence and sobriety. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 11.00pm This superb adaptation of John le Carré’s brilliant, intricate Cold War spy novel is a triumph. The espionage drama follows the hunt for a Soviet double agent at the top of the British secret service, with Gary Oldman spearheading the excellent ensemble cast, which includes Colin Firth, Tom Hardy, John Hurt and Benedict Cumberbatch. It’s funny, seductive and suspenseful. Monday 9 April I spy: a recruit sees if she’s got what it takes to be an SOE agent Credit: BBC Secret Agent Selection: WW2 BBC Two, 9.00pm Not unlike Channel 4’s SAS: Who Dares Wins and BBC Two’s Astronauts: Do You Have What It Takes?, this absorbing new series puts a group of recruits through a series of gruelling physical and psychological challenges to see if they could make the grade as a secret agent according to an established selection test used during the Second World War. This test was used by the Special Operations Executive (SOE) to determine whether recruits from many different walks of life would be capable of being dropped behind enemy lines and surviving as a covert officer with a brief to cause the maximum disruption possible to the enemy in the territory. As with the original SOE, the 14 candidates come from diverse backgrounds (among them a research scientist, a property developer, former police officer, a drag act performer, a retired investment banker and an Army veteran). In the opening episode, they undergo the initial four-day assessment at a remote Scottish country-house estate. The aim is to winnow out weakness and determine who should win a place on the advanced, and suitably terrifying, course in assassination, sabotage and covert intelligence techniques. Gerard O’Donovan Famalam BBC Three, from 10.00am After a successful pilot last year, Vivienne Acheampong, Gbemisola Ikumelo, Roxanne Sternberg, Tom Moutchi and John MacMillan return with more culturally skewed sketches. Once again, they feature William and Funke’s raunchy chat show, misunderstood superhero Eclipse, Croydon’s voodoo practitioner Professor Lofuko, and a version of Midsomer Murders. 800 Words BBC One, 2.15pm If you like The Durrells you will definitely want to watch hit Australian comedy drama 800 Words. This gently funny series follows George (Erik Thomson), a widower, who horrifies his teenaged children when he moves the entire family to a remote seaside town in New Zealand. Springtime on the Farm Channel 5, 8.00pm This is the first of five shows this week celebrating the “great British farmer”, with the help of Yorkshire Vet stars Peter Wright and Julian Norton, Adam Henson of Countryfile and Springwatch’s Lindsey Chapman. In this programme, they explore how to cope with the stresses of lambing. MasterChef: The Finals BBC One, 9.00pm Oodles of challenges lie ahead for the remaining amateur chefs in the final week, which takes them as far afield as Peru ahead of Friday’s concluding cook-off. First, though, they’re off to North Yorkshire to cater a country-house lunch for local grandees and farmers. Lisbon: An Art Lovers’ Guide BBC Four, 9.00pm Having covered Barcelona, St Petersburg and Amsterdam in their first series of city-break guides, historian Dr Janina Ramirez and art critic Alastair Sooke jet off to explore three less obvious, art-rich destinations. Beirut and Baku are perhaps the more intriguing but it opens in Lisbon, which built up its art reserves during the centuries Portugal was part of one of the world’s great empires, and currently boasts one of the hottest contemporary art scenes in Europe. GO Marcella ITV, 9.00pm This drama’s been a little less fraught the second time round but Marcella still pushes the boundaries of credibility. In this concluding part, the heroine (Anna Friel) tracks down the killer, only to suffer one of her unfortunate episodes. GO The Core (2003) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.25pm Rome starts to crumble, the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco collapses and pigeons go mental in Trafalgar Square. Something is obviously amiss, and this time it isn’t climate change. In fact, the Earth’s core has stopped rotating and a team of scientists has to build a special burrowing machine to start it spinning again. Hilary Swank, Stanley Tucci and Aaron Eckhart do their best, but the excitement is intermittent. The Emoji Movie (2017) ★☆☆☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 6.30pm In this animated comedy set inside a smartphone, Gene (voiced by T J Miller), an emoji with multiple facial features, sets out on a quest to be like his colleagues who have only one. He does so with the help of apps like Spotify and Candy Crush. Sadly, the result is so horrendous that there aren’t enough Patrick Stewart-voiced emojis in the world to express what an ugly, artless exercise this is. Triple 9 (2016) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A gang of criminals and corrupt cops plan to kill a police officer in order to pull off their biggest heist yet in John Hillcoat’s crime thriller. There is a lot to like here: a big opening and a strong cast (with Kate Winslet, Gal Gadot, Anthony Mackie and Chiwetel Ejiofor among them). But it feels like fragments of a great crime drama are missing; it’s enthralling up close, but then the big picture isn’t complete. Tuesday 10 April Back to school: Mark, who has two sons with autism Credit: Channel 4 Class of Mum and Dad Channel 4, 8.00pm Another week, another Channel 4 series about education. Hold off on the black marks, however, because this one is pretty good. The premise is simple: Blackrod Primary School just outside of Bolton has thrown open its doors to a class made up of pupils’ parents (and one grandparent). They’ve agreed to go back to school for the summer term to see what modern education is really like, sports day, Sats tests and all. Naturally, its harder than many of them were expecting – 36-year-old decorator Jonny states early on that he thought he’d be able to slope off for a swift cigarette break rather than having to adhere to strict class rules – but there are some touching stories amid the more obvious moments. Most notably, this opening episode focuses on two parents with challenging home lives – Julia, who is raising her 10-year-old cousin Asha after Asha’s mother died, and Mark, who has two autistic sons. While the parents’ travails are interesting, the children are the real scene-stealers, however, from those delighted that their mothers and fathers are taking part to those who are more sceptical. The pair of five-year-olds who spend their time corpsing in front of the camera are particularly endearing. Sarah Hughes Champions League Football: Manchester City v Liverpool BT Sport 2, 7.45pm The Etihad Stadium is the setting as City and Liverpool fight it out for a place in the semi-finals. Liverpool have the advantage following a 3-0 win at Anfield in the first leg. This Time Next Year ITV, 8.00pm Davina McCall returns with another set of heart-tugging stories of people attempting to transform their lives over the course of a year. First up are two new parents who dream of making life wonderful for their baby girl who has been deaf since birth and a couple desperate to start a family. Come Home BBC One, 9.00pm Danny Brocklehurst’s claustrophobic family drama comes to a head as we flashback to find out exactly what went wrong in Greg (Christopher Eccleston) and Marie’s (Paula Malcomson) marriage. Hospital BBC Two, 9.00pm The engrossing fly-on-the-wall medical series continues with Nottingham University Hospitals Trust struggling to cope with the new NHS ruling regarding the cancellation of all non-urgent surgery. The episode focuses on Val, a 55-year-old with mouth cancer whose surgeon is desperately trying to ensure that her operation goes ahead. Here and Now Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm With only two episodes left to go, Alan Ball’s family drama continues to tread water in the most frustrating ways. On paper, there are a whole bunch of interesting stories in the mix, from Kristen’s (Sosie Bacon) possible relationship with Navid (Marwan Salama) to Ramon’s (Daniel Zovatto) continuing visions, but the problem is nothing much happens with any of them as each story moves on only incrementally each week. In this episode, Audrey (Holly Hunter) finally turns the tables on the perpetually smug Greg (Tim Robbins). Cunk on Britain BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm Diane Morgan’s pitch-perfect send-up of history programmes moves to the Tudor era and beyond as Cunk takes on Henry VIII, aka “The kingiest king who kinged over Britain” before giving us her unique perspective on “Bloody” Mary Tudor (“horrible like the drink”) and Elizabeth I. SH Divorce Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The acerbic Sarah Jessica Parker sitcom has been firing on all cylinders throughout its second series – possibly because it’s more interesting watching Frances (Parker) and Robert (the excellent Thomas Haden Church) navigate life after divorce than it was watching them get there. Here, Frances tries to make a new contact in the art world. SH Speed (1994) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm “There’s a bomb on the bus!” is the most famous line and basically the entire plot of one of the best action thrillers of the Nineties. The sizzling chemistry between LAPD Swat specialist Jack Traven (Keanu Reeves) and passenger Annie Porter (Sandra Bullock) sexes up the exhilarating action scenes, while Dennis Hopper is fantastically unhinged as a revenge-driven, retired bomb squad member turned terrorist. Fast & Furious 7 (2015) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 9.00pm Paul Walker was killed in a car crash part-way through making this film so it was completed with the help of his two younger brothers and some subtle computer graphics. The good news is that this is the best film in the franchise and does justice to Walker. It isn’t polished blockbuster film-making – though if it was, it wouldn’t be Fast & Furious. But it speaks straight to your adrenal glands. The Witches of Eastwick (1987) ★★★☆☆ Syfy, 9.00pm It is remarkable that director George Miller’s daft, unfettered romp of a film works at all. But, thanks to Jack Nicholson’s delicious overacting as Daryl Van Horne, a manic gentleman who closely resembles the devil, and the three gorgeous, single small-town friends, Alexandra (Cher), Jane (Susan Sarandon) and Sukie (Michelle Pfeiffer), who vie for his debased attentions, it somehow does. Wednesday 11 April Family ties: Edgar Ramirez and Penelope Cruz Credit: BBC The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story BBC Two, 9.00pm It’s been fascinating to discover the “true” story behind the 1997 murder of fhion designer Gianni Versace in Ryan Murphy’s glitzy drama, which has expertly depicted the inner world of the perpetrator, a Walter Mitty-style serial killer called Andrew Cunanan (a career-defining role for Darren Criss). This episode, however, has a mid-series lull about it as Cunanan ascends to the higher echelons of gay society, shaping himself meticulously into the posh, preppy eye-candy who saw a sugar daddy (or two) as his way to the top. Elsewhere, the Versace siblings return at last. Gianni (Edgar Ramirez), now in failing health decides to champion his insecure sister Donatella (Penélope Cruz in a frightful wig) and turns her into both designer and muse. Despite a lack of characters to root for – the Versaces’ moments of vulnerability dissolve into tedious histrionics and are eclipsed by Cunanan’s cold-blooded machinations – it’s all quite a fabulous mix of fashion, high society and brutal murder, with some interesting commentary on homophobia in the Nineties as well. Vicki Power The Secret Helpers BBC Two, 8.00pm Watch and weep as timid elderly widow Lesley begins a new life as an out gay woman in this life-affirming docu-series. She’s encouraged with warmth and wisdom by amateur “sages” from abroad, who talk to her secretly through a hidden earpiece. From World War to Cold War Yesterday, 8.00pm As the Second World War drew to a close, Churchill, Stalin and Roosevelt met at Yalta in the Crimea to broker post-war peace. This brisk two-part documentary raids the archives for clips and letters from those who attended, and gathers experts and relatives – including FDR’s grandson – to investigate power plays by Stalin that wrong-footed his Allied counterparts. It’s a detailed look at how and why the compromises reached at Yalta were quickly cast aside. Bacchus Uncovered: Ancient God of Ecstasy BBC Four, 9.00pm Historian Bettany Hughes continues to explore ancient civilisations, moving on to Bacchus, the Roman god of wine. Hughes’s odyssey starts under the City of London, where an 1,800-year-old Roman temple to Bacchus was discovered less than 100 years ago, and takes her to Greece, the Middle East and the Caucasus to explore the god’s roots and influence. VP Benidorm ITV, 9.00pm Fluffy as candyfloss, this lewd seaside comedy provides some fun, particularly in the retro casting of stars of yesteryear. This week, an exuberant Sammy (Shane Richie) tries to persuade Monty (John Challis) that, after his successful comeback gig, he is ready for an evening slot. One Born Every Minute Channel 4, 9.00pm This feelgood documentary series brings more poignant tales from a Birmingham labour ward. This week we meet Chantell, about to deliver her third child, who regales us with a moving story of how parenthood with partner Phil has healed the wounds of a traumatic past. First Dates Channel 4, 10.00pm The thoughtful dating show pairs up four more couples, but the road to love is bumpy – septuagenarian Deanna finds her date more interested in the waiter than her. More promising is the match between Bianca and Teza, who allow their vulnerabilities to show. VP The Thin Red Line (1998) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 3.10pm This lyrical Second World War drama, directed by Terrence Malick, tells the story of a group of young US soldiers fighting the Japanese for control of the island of Guadalcanal. Full of stars such as Sean Penn and George Clooney, it struggles with its own battle to squeeze in so many characters but is still an atmospheric meditation on the nature of war. Nick Nolte and Adrien Brody also star. The Remains of the Day (1993) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 3.55pm The success of Merchant Ivory’s adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro’s Thirties-set novel, a well-observed study of regret, is built around its perfectly cast leads: Anthony Hopkins as James, the butler to the doltish aristocrat Lord Darlington (James Fox) and Emma Thompson as a housekeeper who tries to draw him out of his sterile shell. Lush visuals give it an added richness. Transporter 2 (2005) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A martial arts action sequel, in which Jason Statham and Alessandro Gassman are the sporadically thrilling stars. Statham is Frank Martin, who accepts a job as chauffeur to Jack (Hunter Clary), the son of Miami’s politician Jefferson Billings (Matthew Modine). But the local Colombian drug dealers aren’t happy with his boss’s efforts to clean up the city. Cue a kidnapping, and a potentially deadly encounter with a cocaine baron. Thursday 12 April Changing attitudes: Holly and Hollie Credit: BBC Living with the Brainy Bunch BBC Two, 8.00pm Enterprising, PR-conscious Ash Ali is headmaster of Chessington Community College, a fast-improving school with a few problem pupils. Among them are Jack and Hollie who, on the surface, are comically awful teenagers. Hollie gripes constantly, throws strops and storms out of classrooms if things aren’t going her way. Jack is sullen, lazy and has clocked up 15 suspensions in the past year. It will come as no surprise to regular viewers of such documentaries that their behaviour is rooted in low self-esteem, although their parents unquestionably indulge their foibles. Ali’s novel solution is to place Hollie with Holly, tapdancing head girl and gregarious boffin, and Jack with Tharush, a Sri Lankan immigrant by way of Italy, whose talents are only matched by his work ethic. Now that Jack and Hollie are in the bosom of new families for six weeks, it’s hoped that a new environment, greater discipline and rigid routines will see their results improve and attitudes pick up. There are setbacks on the largely familiar narrative trajectory, but it’s cast to perfection and, as a demonstration of the importance of parenting in academic achievement, the experiment gets an A-star. Gabriel Tate European Tour Golf: The Open de Espana Sky Sports Golf, 11.00am The opening day’s play of the event from the Centro Nacional de Golf in Madrid, which was won by Andrew Johnston the last time it was held in 2016. War Above the Trenches Yesterday, 8.00pm This decent two-parter tells the story of the Royal Flying Corps and their battle to win control of the air in the First World War. Based on Peter Hart’s book Bloody April, it draws affectingly on the testimony of veterans to show there was more to the Western Front than trench warfare. Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm The modern age draws closer, as Simon Schama tackles the theme of radiance, guiding us through Gothic cathedrals, Baroque Venetian masterpieces and dazzling Japanese woodblock prints. The Investigator: A British Crime Story ITV, 9.00pm The second real-life case of the series sees Mark Williams-Thomas investigating the 1977 murders of three women in Glasgow. The suspect is Angus Sinclair, who is currently serving a life sentence for killing two other women that same year. We hear from his ex-wife, and learn how he was a prime suspect but escaped charges for the first killings when key evidence went missing. Indian Summer School Channel 4, 9.00pm This diverting documentary series concludes with a Himalayan trek, a controversial article in the school newspaper and the GCSE retakes that were the goal of the entire enterprise. Will Alfie, Harry, Jack and co see their grades improve? Urban Myths: Marilyn Monroe and Billy Wilder Sky Arts, 9.00pm Sky Arts’ boldly cast series of vaguely apocryphal tales from the pop-culture frontlines returns with a dispatch from the set of Some Like It Hot, the magnificent 1959 comedy that is almost certainly more fun to watch than it was to make. In this minor but entertaining reimagining, Tony Curtis (Alex Pettyfer) is threatening to cuckold Arthur Miller (Dougray Scott) by making off with Marilyn Monroe (Gemma Arterton), whose caprice, drinking and sensitivity is driving director Billy Wilder (James Purefoy) to distraction. GT Still Game BBC One, 9.30pm; BBC Two Wales, 10.00pm Justifying its prime-time BBC One slot, the Scottish sitcom bows out in triumph with a typically well-wrought farce involving a Hollywood stuntman, a disastrous driving lesson and romance for the widowed Isa (Jane McCarry). GT The Man with the Golden Gun (1974) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Christopher Lee steals the show as the titular assassin, Francisco Scaramanga, in this classic Bond adventure. Roger Moore’s secret agent, in his second outing as 007, must pursue him, with the help of sidekick Mary Goodnight (Britt Ekland), to the villain’s island lair in order to prevent him harnessing the power of the Sun for evil. The confrontations between Moore and Lee are easily the film’s highlights. Swordfish (2001) ★★☆☆☆ TCM, 9.00pm The most often quoted bit of trivia about this film is that Halle Berry was paid an additional £500,000 to go topless. It’s rather lucky she agreed because she’s probably the most appealing aspect of this frenetic thriller. John Travolta and Hugh Jackman put on testosterone-fuelled displays as a morally dubious counter-terrorist agent and the hacker he blackmails into accessing billions of dollars of government money. Some Like It Hot (1959, b/w) ★★★★★ Sky Arts, 9.30pm When two musicians (Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis) witness a mob hit, they flee the state disguised as women in an all-female band, but further complications arise in the form of demure ukulele player Sugar Kane, superbly played by Marilyn Monroe. Billy Wilder’s classic comedy is effortlessly wacky and clever. Before, at 9pm, is Urban Myths, which imagines what happened on the set of this romcom. Friday 13 April Dishing out opinions: John Torode and Gregg Wallace Credit: BBC MasterChef: The Final BBC One, 8.30pm It has taken 25 episodes over seven weeks to whittle down the 56 amateur contestants to three finalists, and in the process, MasterChef 2018 has produced some of the best cooking – and some of the toughest competition – in the series’ long history. (It has been running in one form or another since 1990; and since 2005 in, roughly, its current format with judges Gregg Wallace and John Torode presenting.) This last week has been no exception, with the finalists having to dig deeper than ever to produce the best dishes of their lives and some great moments – notably during the spectacular trip to South America when they met Peruvian superchef Gaston Acurio and took on a service at the fifth best restaurant in the world, the Central in Lima, under Michelin-starred maestro Virgilio Martínez Véliz. In the finale, it’s all about who cooks the best food, though, as the final three return to the studio kitchen to undergo a test of culinary skills and nerve as they set about creating the most important three-course meal of their lives – in the hope of being judged worthy of a title that has launched many a great career: MasterChef champion. Gerard O’Donovan Chef’s Table: Pastry Netflix, from today This mouth-watering spin-off from Netflix’s popular global foodie series Chef’s Table puts the focus entirely on sweet stuff, talking the cameras inside the kitchens of some of the world’s best pastry chefs, among them Christina Tosi’s Milk Bar in New York, Corrado Assenza’s Caffé Sicilia in Noto, Sicily, Jordi Roca’s El Celler de Can Roca in Girona, and Will Goldfarb’s Room4Dessert in Bali. Lost in Space Netflix, from today Not so much a rerun as a spectacular new take on the classic Sixties sci-fi series about a family marooned in space when their ship runs into difficulty on their way to a new colony and crashes on an unknown and surprisingly hostile planet. There are plenty of thrills and impressive visual effects, and Toby Stephens and Molly Parker are excellent as the pioneering Robinson parents John and Judy, while Parker Posey is an enigmatic (and now female) Dr Smith. GO The City & The City BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 9.30pm Cop thrillers don’t come much more weirdly dystopian than China Miéville’s award-winning 2009 novel and this ultra-stylish adaptation serves its source material very well. In episode two, Inspector Borlú (David Morrissey) ventures back across the border while investigating the murder of a foreign student. Episodes BBC Two, 10.00pm; Wales, 11.05pm Having overcome last week’s unfortunate episode in this sitcom, Matt (Matt LeBlanc) is back on top and leveraging his spurt in the ratings for all it’s worth, handing Sean (Stephen Mangan) and Beverly (Tamsin Greig) a welcome opportunity for escape. Lee and Dean Channel 4, 10.00pm More rough charm, as life gets complicated for Stevenage’s very own Dumb and Dumber when Lee’s (Miles Chapman) financial worries mount and Dean (Mark O’Sullivan) is persuaded to premiere his poetry at the local arts club. Front Row Late BBC Two, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm Freedom of speech and censorship are under the spotlight as host Mary Beard and guests discuss Theatre Clwyd’s production The Assassination of Katie Hopkins and former US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright’s new book Fascism: A Warning. GO Alien: Covenant (2017) ★★★★★ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm The latest film in the Alien saga from Ridley Scott is arguably a mad scientist movie. It follows the crew of the colony ship Covenant (including Katherine Waterson) as they discover what they think is an uncharted paradise, but what they uncover a threat beyond their imagination. Michael Fassbender puts in a spectacular turn as kindly robot David and his twisted “brother” Walter. Invictus (2009) ★★★★☆ ITV, 10.45pm Following the death of Nelson Mandela’s ex-wife Winnie last week, aged 81, here’s Clint Eastwood’s take on South Africa’s World Cup victory in 1995. As the country emerges from apartheid, the newly elected President Mandela (an uncanny Morgan Freeman) sees the potential for the national rugby team, led by François Pienaar (Matt Damon), to be a catalyst for harmony. This is a polished and uplifting film. Monty Python Live at the Hollywood Bowl (1982) ★★★★☆ Gold, 1.40am Much like the Secret Policeman’s Ball, this comedy performance film sees the Monty Python gang take to the stage, but this time they’re in Hollywood. Among the sketches are the Silly Olympics, where athletes compete in absurd sports, The Lumberjack Song, and The Ministry of Silly Walks. This film also features Carol Cleveland in numerous supporting roles. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: Dec goes solo again for the last Saturday Night Takeaway, plus The Voice final
Saturday 7 April Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway ITV, 7.00pm It can’t be easy hosting a show as exuberant as Saturday Night Takeaway on your own but Declan Donnelly made a solid if understandably restrained go of it last week. He ensured that the light entertainment series proceeded pretty much as normal in the absence of long-time work partner Ant McPartlin, whose travails were sensibly referenced only in very brief passing (“I’ve got twice the amount of work to do,” Donnelly noted at one point before mock-berating the production crew that “I’ll have to do it myself, like everything else around here this week”). That said, this final episode ups the ante as Donnelly takes the show on the road to the Universal Orlando Resort in Florida. Once there we’re promised a “super-sized” edition featuring stunts, surprises and “extra-special” guests. No word yet as to who those guests will be but expect Donnelly to continue making the best of a difficult situation, buoyed by extra support from Scarlett Moffatt, who is in charge of ensuring that the Place on the Plane winners have a wonderful time, and Stephen Mulhern, who has the possibly less than enviable task of explaining In for a Penny to an American audience. Sarah Hughes Premier League Football: Everton v Liverpool Sky Sports Main Event, 12.30pm Tired, perhaps, from their Champions League quarter-final first leg against Man City, Liverpool face their bitter local rivals Everton at Goodison Park. The home side, who’ve won three of their last six games, haven’t beaten Liverpool since October 2010, when Tim Cahill and Mikel Arteta gave them a 2-0 victory. Premiership Rugby Union: Bath v Leicester Tigers Channel 5, 1.30pm Time was when Bath and Leicester were the titans of English rugby. Currently they are fifth and eighth in the league, respectively. In September, Bath claimed a 27-23 win at Welford Road, as they held on for their first away win at Leicester since 2003, ensuring an unhappy return for George Ford against the club he left in the summer. The two sides also met in the Anglo-Welsh Cup at the Recreation Ground in November, where Bath also emerged victorious, beating Leicester 33-31 on that occasion. Premier League Football: Manchester City v Manchester United Sky Sports Main Event, 5.30pm What better way for Pep Guardiola’s Manchester City to clinch the title than by beating second-placed Manchester United at the Etihad Stadium. Sixteen points ahead of them in the table, City have been formidable this season, winning 27 of the 31 league games they’ve played. One of those victories came at Old Trafford, with a goal from Nicolas Otamendi giving City a 2-1 victory when these sides met in December. Britain’s Most Historic Towns Channel 4, 8.00pm Alice Roberts is our guide for this new six-part series, which sees her search the UK for the places that best sum up an historical era. The first era is Roman Britain, so Roberts heads to Chester, where she abseils down walls, hunkers in caves and uncovers the truth about the city. Casualty BBC One, 8.20pm The medical drama’s storyline about Dylan’s (William Beck) alcoholism continues to be sensitively handled as the medic’s ex-wife Sam (Charlotte Salt) worries about whether she can help him. Meanwhile, Ethan (George Hardy) struggles with his own demons as he realises that a patient is related to his brother’s killer. The Voice UK: Live Final ITV, 8.30pm Every reality TV idea has an allotted shelf life and it’s hard not to feel that musical talent contests have come to the end of their run. For those who disagree, The Voice UK’s grand finale is here and the final four battle it out for public approval. Below the Surface BBC Four, 9.00pm & 9.45pm BBC Four’s latest Scandi drama started off tensely but like its predecessor, Modus, it has gone on to become ever more ludicrous. Now it’s the final two episodes, and Philip Norgaard (Johannes Lassen) faces off against Mark (Jakob Oftebro), the man behind the hostage crisis. Much heartfelt talking follows, although you may end up feeling more sympathetic towards the damaged Mark than the chilly Norgaard. Pearl Jam: Let’s Play Two Sky Arts, 9.00pm When is a music documentary not a music documentary? When it’s also a sports film. This exuberant film, which was made following the Chicago Cubs’ victory in baseball’s World Series in 2016, follows die-hard Cubs fan and Pearl Jam lead singer Eddie Vedder as he cheers on his team during their championship run while also preparing the band for two August shows at the team’s Wrigley Field Stadium. The result is an affectionate portrait of the singer as fan. SH Troy: Fall of a City BBC One, 9.10pm David Farr’s epic series reaches its climax with the arrival of the most famous horse in history. After an uninspiring start, Troy has picked up in recent weeks and the final episode is a well-handled tale of betrayal and death. It’s a curate’s egg of a series, let down by poor casting. SH X-Men (2000) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.00pm Bryan Singer directs an all-star cast that includes Patrick Stewart, Hugh Jackman, Ian McKellen and Halle Berry, in the first of the X-Men franchise. A group of mutants must decide whether to side with Professor Xavier (Stewart) or the evil Magneto (McKellen) in what is a solid opening to the series and which paved the way for plenty of big-budget sequels. This is followed by X-Men 2 and X-Men 3 at 9.00pm and 11.35pm respectively. Legend (2015) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Tom Hardy gives a solid, convincing performance as east London gangster Reggie Kray but his caricatured portrayal of twin brother Ronnie lets him down, and this inconsistency leads to an entertaining though muddled film. Emily Browning, however, gives just the right mix of defiance and despair as Frances Shea, Reggie’s put-upon wife. Watch out for some particularly gory scenes. Lethal Weapon 2 (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.05pm Mel Gibson sports his signature Eighties mullet in the second film of this daft-but-fun action franchise. LAPD officer Riggs (Gibson) teams up once again with his partner Murtaugh (Danny Glover) to track down a band of South African criminals while protecting a painfully frenzied witness (Joe Pesci). Naturally, the pair find themselves drawn into violent action sequences orchestrated by stereotypical bad guys. Sunday 8 April Hostess with the mostest: Catherine Tate presents the awards Credit: ITV The Olivier Awards 2018 ITV, 10.20pm Last year, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child swept the board with nine Olivier Awards, something that looked impossible to top. But then came Lin Manuel Miranda’s blockbuster musical Hamilton, whose West End run has received reviews every bit as rapturous as those from its Broadway debut. The show has a record-breaking 13 nominations, which it is thought will be translated into awards. After being snubbed for Jerusalem, Jez Butterworth will surely be rewarded for his equally magisterial play The Ferryman (its eight nominations include best play and best director for Sam Mendes), while contenders in the acting categories include Bryan Cranston for Network, Andrew Garfield for Angels in America and Lesley Manville for Long Day’s Journey into Night. Catherine Tate will be on hosting duties for the event at the Royal Albert Hall, which will, as usual, feature a crop of stellar performances; this one will include a special tribute to Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, which turns 50 this year. Let’s hope the organisers bring together Josephs of the past for a big singalong: Jason Donovan, Phillip Schofield, Ian “H” Watkins and Lee Mead will all, one suspects, be available. Gabriel Tate Sex Robots and Us BBC Three, from 10.00am James Young, an amputee who created his own bionic arm, meets the people who design sex robots and hears about their plans for them, from being given to old people’s homes to “employment” in brothels. But is it the harmless, even socially responsible pursuit thatthey claim? Formula 1: The Bahrain Grand Prix Sky Sports F1, 3.30pm After the Australian Grand Prix – in which Sebastian Vettel took advantage of a safety-car blunder to win under pristine Melbourne skies – attention turns to the second round of the season at the Bahrain International Circuit in Sakhir. Another blunder cost Lewis Hamilton on this circuit last year – this time it happened in the pit lane, with Vettel capitalising to win by 6.6 seconds. The Generation Game BBC One, 8.00pm How do you top last week’s cavalcade of silliness in this rebooted game show? You rope in Danny Dyer to join Mel Giedroyc, Sue Perkins and panellists Melvin Odoom and Roisin Conaty for challenges that include cake decorating, balloon modelling and dancing the Argentine Tango. The Durrells ITV, 8.00pm In the fourth episode of the popular drama, Larry (Josh O’Connor) visits Athens with two oddly named guests – Captain Creech (James Cosmo) and Prince Jeejeebuoy (Tanmay Dhanania) – in tow. There, they offer advice to Gerry (Milo Parker), who is applying for a new school. Jesus’ Female Disciples: the New Evidence Channel 4, 8.00pm For centuries, the birth of Christianity was regarded as a largely male affair, with women as only bit-part players. Now, Bible experts Helen Bond and Joan Taylor have discovered evidence that women were involved in everything from preaching and baptising to funding the movement as it grew. This absorbing documentary follows the historians’ progress. Golf: The Masters Sky Sports Main Event, 8.00pm Prepare for a dramatic finale as this year’s first Major – from the Augusta National in Georgia – concludes. Last year, Spain’s Sergio Garcia won the coveted green jacket, beating Justin Rose in a tense play-off. Ordeal by Innocence BBC One, 9.00pm Sarah Phelps’s splendid adaptation continues, as Arthur Calgary (Luke Treadaway) resolves to prove the truth about Jack Argyll’s (Anthony Boyle) alibi by any means necessary. GT Folk Awards 2018 BBC Four, 9.00pm Mark Radcliffe and Julie Fowlis introduce highlights from this year’s Radio 2 Folk Awards in Belfast. It features performances from Cara Dillon, Lankum and Eliza Carthy and the Wayward Band. The great Nick Drake will also be inducted into the Hall of Fame, his genius long-established, even if such recognition eluded him during his short life. Producer Dónal Lunny, meanwhile, receives the Lifetime Achievement Award for decades of tireless work promoting the renaissance in Irish music, plus The Armagh Pipers Club are presented with the Good Tradition Award. GT Emma (1996) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 3.00pm Gwyneth Paltrow’s American iciness melts in this deft adaptation of Jane Austen’s classic comic romance. She is Emma Woodhouse, spoilt, charming and an inveterate meddler. Only Mr George Knightley (Jeremy Northam) dares challenge her behaviour – but what are his motives? A clever film with a superb supporting cast, including Toni Collette, Alan Cumming and Ewan McGregor. United 93 (2006) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 9.55pm Director Paul Greengrass’s boneshaking, real-time take on the final hours of the United Airlines plane whose passengers rebelled against their hijackers on September 11, 2001 feels uncomfortably realistic. Greengrass, whose signature rapid cutting made the second and third Bourne films so exciting, proves expert at handling the most infamous atrocity of modern times with intelligence and sobriety. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 11.00pm This superb adaptation of John le Carré’s brilliant, intricate Cold War spy novel is a triumph. The espionage drama follows the hunt for a Soviet double agent at the top of the British secret service, with Gary Oldman spearheading the excellent ensemble cast, which includes Colin Firth, Tom Hardy, John Hurt and Benedict Cumberbatch. It’s funny, seductive and suspenseful. Monday 9 April I spy: a recruit sees if she’s got what it takes to be an SOE agent Credit: BBC Secret Agent Selection: WW2 BBC Two, 9.00pm Not unlike Channel 4’s SAS: Who Dares Wins and BBC Two’s Astronauts: Do You Have What It Takes?, this absorbing new series puts a group of recruits through a series of gruelling physical and psychological challenges to see if they could make the grade as a secret agent according to an established selection test used during the Second World War. This test was used by the Special Operations Executive (SOE) to determine whether recruits from many different walks of life would be capable of being dropped behind enemy lines and surviving as a covert officer with a brief to cause the maximum disruption possible to the enemy in the territory. As with the original SOE, the 14 candidates come from diverse backgrounds (among them a research scientist, a property developer, former police officer, a drag act performer, a retired investment banker and an Army veteran). In the opening episode, they undergo the initial four-day assessment at a remote Scottish country-house estate. The aim is to winnow out weakness and determine who should win a place on the advanced, and suitably terrifying, course in assassination, sabotage and covert intelligence techniques. Gerard O’Donovan Famalam BBC Three, from 10.00am After a successful pilot last year, Vivienne Acheampong, Gbemisola Ikumelo, Roxanne Sternberg, Tom Moutchi and John MacMillan return with more culturally skewed sketches. Once again, they feature William and Funke’s raunchy chat show, misunderstood superhero Eclipse, Croydon’s voodoo practitioner Professor Lofuko, and a version of Midsomer Murders. 800 Words BBC One, 2.15pm If you like The Durrells you will definitely want to watch hit Australian comedy drama 800 Words. This gently funny series follows George (Erik Thomson), a widower, who horrifies his teenaged children when he moves the entire family to a remote seaside town in New Zealand. Springtime on the Farm Channel 5, 8.00pm This is the first of five shows this week celebrating the “great British farmer”, with the help of Yorkshire Vet stars Peter Wright and Julian Norton, Adam Henson of Countryfile and Springwatch’s Lindsey Chapman. In this programme, they explore how to cope with the stresses of lambing. MasterChef: The Finals BBC One, 9.00pm Oodles of challenges lie ahead for the remaining amateur chefs in the final week, which takes them as far afield as Peru ahead of Friday’s concluding cook-off. First, though, they’re off to North Yorkshire to cater a country-house lunch for local grandees and farmers. Lisbon: An Art Lovers’ Guide BBC Four, 9.00pm Having covered Barcelona, St Petersburg and Amsterdam in their first series of city-break guides, historian Dr Janina Ramirez and art critic Alastair Sooke jet off to explore three less obvious, art-rich destinations. Beirut and Baku are perhaps the more intriguing but it opens in Lisbon, which built up its art reserves during the centuries Portugal was part of one of the world’s great empires, and currently boasts one of the hottest contemporary art scenes in Europe. GO Marcella ITV, 9.00pm This drama’s been a little less fraught the second time round but Marcella still pushes the boundaries of credibility. In this concluding part, the heroine (Anna Friel) tracks down the killer, only to suffer one of her unfortunate episodes. GO The Core (2003) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.25pm Rome starts to crumble, the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco collapses and pigeons go mental in Trafalgar Square. Something is obviously amiss, and this time it isn’t climate change. In fact, the Earth’s core has stopped rotating and a team of scientists has to build a special burrowing machine to start it spinning again. Hilary Swank, Stanley Tucci and Aaron Eckhart do their best, but the excitement is intermittent. The Emoji Movie (2017) ★☆☆☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 6.30pm In this animated comedy set inside a smartphone, Gene (voiced by T J Miller), an emoji with multiple facial features, sets out on a quest to be like his colleagues who have only one. He does so with the help of apps like Spotify and Candy Crush. Sadly, the result is so horrendous that there aren’t enough Patrick Stewart-voiced emojis in the world to express what an ugly, artless exercise this is. Triple 9 (2016) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A gang of criminals and corrupt cops plan to kill a police officer in order to pull off their biggest heist yet in John Hillcoat’s crime thriller. There is a lot to like here: a big opening and a strong cast (with Kate Winslet, Gal Gadot, Anthony Mackie and Chiwetel Ejiofor among them). But it feels like fragments of a great crime drama are missing; it’s enthralling up close, but then the big picture isn’t complete. Tuesday 10 April Back to school: Mark, who has two sons with autism Credit: Channel 4 Class of Mum and Dad Channel 4, 8.00pm Another week, another Channel 4 series about education. Hold off on the black marks, however, because this one is pretty good. The premise is simple: Blackrod Primary School just outside of Bolton has thrown open its doors to a class made up of pupils’ parents (and one grandparent). They’ve agreed to go back to school for the summer term to see what modern education is really like, sports day, Sats tests and all. Naturally, its harder than many of them were expecting – 36-year-old decorator Jonny states early on that he thought he’d be able to slope off for a swift cigarette break rather than having to adhere to strict class rules – but there are some touching stories amid the more obvious moments. Most notably, this opening episode focuses on two parents with challenging home lives – Julia, who is raising her 10-year-old cousin Asha after Asha’s mother died, and Mark, who has two autistic sons. While the parents’ travails are interesting, the children are the real scene-stealers, however, from those delighted that their mothers and fathers are taking part to those who are more sceptical. The pair of five-year-olds who spend their time corpsing in front of the camera are particularly endearing. Sarah Hughes Champions League Football: Manchester City v Liverpool BT Sport 2, 7.45pm The Etihad Stadium is the setting as City and Liverpool fight it out for a place in the semi-finals. Liverpool have the advantage following a 3-0 win at Anfield in the first leg. This Time Next Year ITV, 8.00pm Davina McCall returns with another set of heart-tugging stories of people attempting to transform their lives over the course of a year. First up are two new parents who dream of making life wonderful for their baby girl who has been deaf since birth and a couple desperate to start a family. Come Home BBC One, 9.00pm Danny Brocklehurst’s claustrophobic family drama comes to a head as we flashback to find out exactly what went wrong in Greg (Christopher Eccleston) and Marie’s (Paula Malcomson) marriage. Hospital BBC Two, 9.00pm The engrossing fly-on-the-wall medical series continues with Nottingham University Hospitals Trust struggling to cope with the new NHS ruling regarding the cancellation of all non-urgent surgery. The episode focuses on Val, a 55-year-old with mouth cancer whose surgeon is desperately trying to ensure that her operation goes ahead. Here and Now Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm With only two episodes left to go, Alan Ball’s family drama continues to tread water in the most frustrating ways. On paper, there are a whole bunch of interesting stories in the mix, from Kristen’s (Sosie Bacon) possible relationship with Navid (Marwan Salama) to Ramon’s (Daniel Zovatto) continuing visions, but the problem is nothing much happens with any of them as each story moves on only incrementally each week. In this episode, Audrey (Holly Hunter) finally turns the tables on the perpetually smug Greg (Tim Robbins). Cunk on Britain BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm Diane Morgan’s pitch-perfect send-up of history programmes moves to the Tudor era and beyond as Cunk takes on Henry VIII, aka “The kingiest king who kinged over Britain” before giving us her unique perspective on “Bloody” Mary Tudor (“horrible like the drink”) and Elizabeth I. SH Divorce Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The acerbic Sarah Jessica Parker sitcom has been firing on all cylinders throughout its second series – possibly because it’s more interesting watching Frances (Parker) and Robert (the excellent Thomas Haden Church) navigate life after divorce than it was watching them get there. Here, Frances tries to make a new contact in the art world. SH Speed (1994) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm “There’s a bomb on the bus!” is the most famous line and basically the entire plot of one of the best action thrillers of the Nineties. The sizzling chemistry between LAPD Swat specialist Jack Traven (Keanu Reeves) and passenger Annie Porter (Sandra Bullock) sexes up the exhilarating action scenes, while Dennis Hopper is fantastically unhinged as a revenge-driven, retired bomb squad member turned terrorist. Fast & Furious 7 (2015) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 9.00pm Paul Walker was killed in a car crash part-way through making this film so it was completed with the help of his two younger brothers and some subtle computer graphics. The good news is that this is the best film in the franchise and does justice to Walker. It isn’t polished blockbuster film-making – though if it was, it wouldn’t be Fast & Furious. But it speaks straight to your adrenal glands. The Witches of Eastwick (1987) ★★★☆☆ Syfy, 9.00pm It is remarkable that director George Miller’s daft, unfettered romp of a film works at all. But, thanks to Jack Nicholson’s delicious overacting as Daryl Van Horne, a manic gentleman who closely resembles the devil, and the three gorgeous, single small-town friends, Alexandra (Cher), Jane (Susan Sarandon) and Sukie (Michelle Pfeiffer), who vie for his debased attentions, it somehow does. Wednesday 11 April Family ties: Edgar Ramirez and Penelope Cruz Credit: BBC The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story BBC Two, 9.00pm It’s been fascinating to discover the “true” story behind the 1997 murder of fhion designer Gianni Versace in Ryan Murphy’s glitzy drama, which has expertly depicted the inner world of the perpetrator, a Walter Mitty-style serial killer called Andrew Cunanan (a career-defining role for Darren Criss). This episode, however, has a mid-series lull about it as Cunanan ascends to the higher echelons of gay society, shaping himself meticulously into the posh, preppy eye-candy who saw a sugar daddy (or two) as his way to the top. Elsewhere, the Versace siblings return at last. Gianni (Edgar Ramirez), now in failing health decides to champion his insecure sister Donatella (Penélope Cruz in a frightful wig) and turns her into both designer and muse. Despite a lack of characters to root for – the Versaces’ moments of vulnerability dissolve into tedious histrionics and are eclipsed by Cunanan’s cold-blooded machinations – it’s all quite a fabulous mix of fashion, high society and brutal murder, with some interesting commentary on homophobia in the Nineties as well. Vicki Power The Secret Helpers BBC Two, 8.00pm Watch and weep as timid elderly widow Lesley begins a new life as an out gay woman in this life-affirming docu-series. She’s encouraged with warmth and wisdom by amateur “sages” from abroad, who talk to her secretly through a hidden earpiece. From World War to Cold War Yesterday, 8.00pm As the Second World War drew to a close, Churchill, Stalin and Roosevelt met at Yalta in the Crimea to broker post-war peace. This brisk two-part documentary raids the archives for clips and letters from those who attended, and gathers experts and relatives – including FDR’s grandson – to investigate power plays by Stalin that wrong-footed his Allied counterparts. It’s a detailed look at how and why the compromises reached at Yalta were quickly cast aside. Bacchus Uncovered: Ancient God of Ecstasy BBC Four, 9.00pm Historian Bettany Hughes continues to explore ancient civilisations, moving on to Bacchus, the Roman god of wine. Hughes’s odyssey starts under the City of London, where an 1,800-year-old Roman temple to Bacchus was discovered less than 100 years ago, and takes her to Greece, the Middle East and the Caucasus to explore the god’s roots and influence. VP Benidorm ITV, 9.00pm Fluffy as candyfloss, this lewd seaside comedy provides some fun, particularly in the retro casting of stars of yesteryear. This week, an exuberant Sammy (Shane Richie) tries to persuade Monty (John Challis) that, after his successful comeback gig, he is ready for an evening slot. One Born Every Minute Channel 4, 9.00pm This feelgood documentary series brings more poignant tales from a Birmingham labour ward. This week we meet Chantell, about to deliver her third child, who regales us with a moving story of how parenthood with partner Phil has healed the wounds of a traumatic past. First Dates Channel 4, 10.00pm The thoughtful dating show pairs up four more couples, but the road to love is bumpy – septuagenarian Deanna finds her date more interested in the waiter than her. More promising is the match between Bianca and Teza, who allow their vulnerabilities to show. VP The Thin Red Line (1998) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 3.10pm This lyrical Second World War drama, directed by Terrence Malick, tells the story of a group of young US soldiers fighting the Japanese for control of the island of Guadalcanal. Full of stars such as Sean Penn and George Clooney, it struggles with its own battle to squeeze in so many characters but is still an atmospheric meditation on the nature of war. Nick Nolte and Adrien Brody also star. The Remains of the Day (1993) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 3.55pm The success of Merchant Ivory’s adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro’s Thirties-set novel, a well-observed study of regret, is built around its perfectly cast leads: Anthony Hopkins as James, the butler to the doltish aristocrat Lord Darlington (James Fox) and Emma Thompson as a housekeeper who tries to draw him out of his sterile shell. Lush visuals give it an added richness. Transporter 2 (2005) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A martial arts action sequel, in which Jason Statham and Alessandro Gassman are the sporadically thrilling stars. Statham is Frank Martin, who accepts a job as chauffeur to Jack (Hunter Clary), the son of Miami’s politician Jefferson Billings (Matthew Modine). But the local Colombian drug dealers aren’t happy with his boss’s efforts to clean up the city. Cue a kidnapping, and a potentially deadly encounter with a cocaine baron. Thursday 12 April Changing attitudes: Holly and Hollie Credit: BBC Living with the Brainy Bunch BBC Two, 8.00pm Enterprising, PR-conscious Ash Ali is headmaster of Chessington Community College, a fast-improving school with a few problem pupils. Among them are Jack and Hollie who, on the surface, are comically awful teenagers. Hollie gripes constantly, throws strops and storms out of classrooms if things aren’t going her way. Jack is sullen, lazy and has clocked up 15 suspensions in the past year. It will come as no surprise to regular viewers of such documentaries that their behaviour is rooted in low self-esteem, although their parents unquestionably indulge their foibles. Ali’s novel solution is to place Hollie with Holly, tapdancing head girl and gregarious boffin, and Jack with Tharush, a Sri Lankan immigrant by way of Italy, whose talents are only matched by his work ethic. Now that Jack and Hollie are in the bosom of new families for six weeks, it’s hoped that a new environment, greater discipline and rigid routines will see their results improve and attitudes pick up. There are setbacks on the largely familiar narrative trajectory, but it’s cast to perfection and, as a demonstration of the importance of parenting in academic achievement, the experiment gets an A-star. Gabriel Tate European Tour Golf: The Open de Espana Sky Sports Golf, 11.00am The opening day’s play of the event from the Centro Nacional de Golf in Madrid, which was won by Andrew Johnston the last time it was held in 2016. War Above the Trenches Yesterday, 8.00pm This decent two-parter tells the story of the Royal Flying Corps and their battle to win control of the air in the First World War. Based on Peter Hart’s book Bloody April, it draws affectingly on the testimony of veterans to show there was more to the Western Front than trench warfare. Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm The modern age draws closer, as Simon Schama tackles the theme of radiance, guiding us through Gothic cathedrals, Baroque Venetian masterpieces and dazzling Japanese woodblock prints. The Investigator: A British Crime Story ITV, 9.00pm The second real-life case of the series sees Mark Williams-Thomas investigating the 1977 murders of three women in Glasgow. The suspect is Angus Sinclair, who is currently serving a life sentence for killing two other women that same year. We hear from his ex-wife, and learn how he was a prime suspect but escaped charges for the first killings when key evidence went missing. Indian Summer School Channel 4, 9.00pm This diverting documentary series concludes with a Himalayan trek, a controversial article in the school newspaper and the GCSE retakes that were the goal of the entire enterprise. Will Alfie, Harry, Jack and co see their grades improve? Urban Myths: Marilyn Monroe and Billy Wilder Sky Arts, 9.00pm Sky Arts’ boldly cast series of vaguely apocryphal tales from the pop-culture frontlines returns with a dispatch from the set of Some Like It Hot, the magnificent 1959 comedy that is almost certainly more fun to watch than it was to make. In this minor but entertaining reimagining, Tony Curtis (Alex Pettyfer) is threatening to cuckold Arthur Miller (Dougray Scott) by making off with Marilyn Monroe (Gemma Arterton), whose caprice, drinking and sensitivity is driving director Billy Wilder (James Purefoy) to distraction. GT Still Game BBC One, 9.30pm; BBC Two Wales, 10.00pm Justifying its prime-time BBC One slot, the Scottish sitcom bows out in triumph with a typically well-wrought farce involving a Hollywood stuntman, a disastrous driving lesson and romance for the widowed Isa (Jane McCarry). GT The Man with the Golden Gun (1974) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Christopher Lee steals the show as the titular assassin, Francisco Scaramanga, in this classic Bond adventure. Roger Moore’s secret agent, in his second outing as 007, must pursue him, with the help of sidekick Mary Goodnight (Britt Ekland), to the villain’s island lair in order to prevent him harnessing the power of the Sun for evil. The confrontations between Moore and Lee are easily the film’s highlights. Swordfish (2001) ★★☆☆☆ TCM, 9.00pm The most often quoted bit of trivia about this film is that Halle Berry was paid an additional £500,000 to go topless. It’s rather lucky she agreed because she’s probably the most appealing aspect of this frenetic thriller. John Travolta and Hugh Jackman put on testosterone-fuelled displays as a morally dubious counter-terrorist agent and the hacker he blackmails into accessing billions of dollars of government money. Some Like It Hot (1959, b/w) ★★★★★ Sky Arts, 9.30pm When two musicians (Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis) witness a mob hit, they flee the state disguised as women in an all-female band, but further complications arise in the form of demure ukulele player Sugar Kane, superbly played by Marilyn Monroe. Billy Wilder’s classic comedy is effortlessly wacky and clever. Before, at 9pm, is Urban Myths, which imagines what happened on the set of this romcom. Friday 13 April Dishing out opinions: John Torode and Gregg Wallace Credit: BBC MasterChef: The Final BBC One, 8.30pm It has taken 25 episodes over seven weeks to whittle down the 56 amateur contestants to three finalists, and in the process, MasterChef 2018 has produced some of the best cooking – and some of the toughest competition – in the series’ long history. (It has been running in one form or another since 1990; and since 2005 in, roughly, its current format with judges Gregg Wallace and John Torode presenting.) This last week has been no exception, with the finalists having to dig deeper than ever to produce the best dishes of their lives and some great moments – notably during the spectacular trip to South America when they met Peruvian superchef Gaston Acurio and took on a service at the fifth best restaurant in the world, the Central in Lima, under Michelin-starred maestro Virgilio Martínez Véliz. In the finale, it’s all about who cooks the best food, though, as the final three return to the studio kitchen to undergo a test of culinary skills and nerve as they set about creating the most important three-course meal of their lives – in the hope of being judged worthy of a title that has launched many a great career: MasterChef champion. Gerard O’Donovan Chef’s Table: Pastry Netflix, from today This mouth-watering spin-off from Netflix’s popular global foodie series Chef’s Table puts the focus entirely on sweet stuff, talking the cameras inside the kitchens of some of the world’s best pastry chefs, among them Christina Tosi’s Milk Bar in New York, Corrado Assenza’s Caffé Sicilia in Noto, Sicily, Jordi Roca’s El Celler de Can Roca in Girona, and Will Goldfarb’s Room4Dessert in Bali. Lost in Space Netflix, from today Not so much a rerun as a spectacular new take on the classic Sixties sci-fi series about a family marooned in space when their ship runs into difficulty on their way to a new colony and crashes on an unknown and surprisingly hostile planet. There are plenty of thrills and impressive visual effects, and Toby Stephens and Molly Parker are excellent as the pioneering Robinson parents John and Judy, while Parker Posey is an enigmatic (and now female) Dr Smith. GO The City & The City BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 9.30pm Cop thrillers don’t come much more weirdly dystopian than China Miéville’s award-winning 2009 novel and this ultra-stylish adaptation serves its source material very well. In episode two, Inspector Borlú (David Morrissey) ventures back across the border while investigating the murder of a foreign student. Episodes BBC Two, 10.00pm; Wales, 11.05pm Having overcome last week’s unfortunate episode in this sitcom, Matt (Matt LeBlanc) is back on top and leveraging his spurt in the ratings for all it’s worth, handing Sean (Stephen Mangan) and Beverly (Tamsin Greig) a welcome opportunity for escape. Lee and Dean Channel 4, 10.00pm More rough charm, as life gets complicated for Stevenage’s very own Dumb and Dumber when Lee’s (Miles Chapman) financial worries mount and Dean (Mark O’Sullivan) is persuaded to premiere his poetry at the local arts club. Front Row Late BBC Two, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm Freedom of speech and censorship are under the spotlight as host Mary Beard and guests discuss Theatre Clwyd’s production The Assassination of Katie Hopkins and former US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright’s new book Fascism: A Warning. GO Alien: Covenant (2017) ★★★★★ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm The latest film in the Alien saga from Ridley Scott is arguably a mad scientist movie. It follows the crew of the colony ship Covenant (including Katherine Waterson) as they discover what they think is an uncharted paradise, but what they uncover a threat beyond their imagination. Michael Fassbender puts in a spectacular turn as kindly robot David and his twisted “brother” Walter. Invictus (2009) ★★★★☆ ITV, 10.45pm Following the death of Nelson Mandela’s ex-wife Winnie last week, aged 81, here’s Clint Eastwood’s take on South Africa’s World Cup victory in 1995. As the country emerges from apartheid, the newly elected President Mandela (an uncanny Morgan Freeman) sees the potential for the national rugby team, led by François Pienaar (Matt Damon), to be a catalyst for harmony. This is a polished and uplifting film. Monty Python Live at the Hollywood Bowl (1982) ★★★★☆ Gold, 1.40am Much like the Secret Policeman’s Ball, this comedy performance film sees the Monty Python gang take to the stage, but this time they’re in Hollywood. Among the sketches are the Silly Olympics, where athletes compete in absurd sports, The Lumberjack Song, and The Ministry of Silly Walks. This film also features Carol Cleveland in numerous supporting roles. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
Friday 6 April The City & the City BBC Two, 9.00pm; Northern Ireland, 9.30pm “I knew there was another city I dare not see… Just on the other side of where I was supposed to look.” So states Inspector Tyador Borlú (David Morrissey) midway through this engrossing adaptation of China Miéville’s Borgesian novel, which achieves the apparently impossible by bringing a dense and clever book to brilliant, atmospheric life. Borlú, a detective with the Extreme Crime Squad in the rundown vaguely Eastern European city of Beszul, is handed the task of solving the murder of a foreign student. So far, so standard, but what unfolds turns out to be anything but as scriptwriter Tony Grisoni (Red Riding) expertly captures Miéville’s vision of a world in which a city is divided not by a wall or barricade, but by blurred realities the populace is trained from birth not to see. Thus the two cities of Beszul and Ul Qoma coexist in the same space but without acknowledging each other, the town hall their only shared space. To look directly on the other city is to commit “Breach”, bringing about the wrath of the secret police. Grisoni and director Tom Shankland build the tension inexorably as Borlú’s world is slowly but surely upended. An absolute treat. Sarah Hughes Sounds Like Friday Night BBC One, 7.30pm The BBC’s music TV revival didn’t make a huge splash with its first series but it’s still worth checking out, if only because co-host and Radio 1Xtra presenter Dotty is such a likeable presence. Tonight, she’s on the road, while Greg James anchors from the studio. Professor Green, Snow Patrol and Years & Years perform. Have I Got News for You BBC One, 9.30pm The satirical quiz show returns for a 55th series, with captains Paul Merton and Ian Hislop joined by presenter Steph McGovern and comedian Josh Widdicombe; Jeremy Paxman hosts. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm In an era when the talk show appears tired somehow Graham Norton manages to keep the format enjoyable. Tonight’s episode, the first in a new series, sees husband-and-wife team Emily Blunt and John Krasinski discuss their horror A Quiet Place. Front Row Late BBC Two, 11.05pm; N Ireland, 11.35pm Following the kerfuffle over its poorly received first series, the arts show returns with a rejigged format and Mary Beard in the presenter’s chair. Informed debate is promised, although Beard has said that she won’t simply replicate the notoriously combative Newsnight Review. SH BBC Young Musician 2018 BBC Four, 7.30pm The contest kicks off at the Royal Birmingham Conservatoire’s new concert hall. Presenter Josie d’Arby is joined by 1998 finalist Alison Balsom as we meet the final five: violinists Elodie Chousmer-Howelles and Stephanie Childress, double bassist Will Duerden, guitarist Torrin Williams and cellist Maxim Calver. The judges are double bassist Leon Bosch, classical guitarist Miloš Karadaglić, violinist and previous Young Musician of the Year winner, Jennifer Pike. Composer Kerry Andrew and the contestants will perform works by Bach, Brahms and Stravinsky. The Nineties Sky Arts, 9.00pm There’s nothing like seeing the decade you came of age in co-opted for nostalgic TV to make you feel old, but for those who can bear seeing their youth dissected Sky Arts at least does it well. Tonight’s second episode continues the focus on the decade’s TV with The Sopranos and Seinfeld under discussion. SH Fury (2014) ★★★★★ 5STAR, 9.00pm David Ayer’s study of the habits and habitats of the American killer male is an astonishing, stirring drama. It’s Germany 1945, and Sgt Don “Wardaddy” Collie (Brad Pitt) and his team are grinding towards Berlin in a battered M4 Sherman tank. There is no rescue mission, just an agonising rumble from one brush with death to the next. The set-piece battles are gripping, and the raw terror of war is blasted home. Four Weddings and a Funeral (1994) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm The best of Richard Curtis and Hugh Grant’s romcoms about awfully nice chaps dithering over frightfully pretty girls. Grant plays bumbling Charles, who, ah, er, can’t tell what’s, um, going on between him and the scrummy Carrie (Andie MacDowell), who he keeps, gosh, bumping into at weddings. It’s aged pretty well and certainly knocks spots off Love, Actually. Lawless (2012) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 12.45am An adaptation of the historical novel The Wettest County in the World, John Hillcoat’s Prohibition-era western follows three brothers (played by Tom Hardy, Shia LaBeouf and Jason Clarke), who do a tidy business distilling and selling illegal moonshine whiskey. It’s an oddly affectionate clan portrait – the violence the brothers mete out is implicitly forgiven – but the period detail is well observed. Saturday 7 April Saturday night fever: Declan Donnelly presents from Orlando Credit: Rex/Shutterstock Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway ITV, 7.00pm It can’t be easy hosting a show as exuberant as Saturday Night Takeaway on your own but Declan Donnelly made a solid if understandably restrained go of it last week. He ensured that the light entertainment series proceeded pretty much as normal in the absence of long-time work partner Ant McPartlin, whose travails were sensibly referenced only in very brief passing (“I’ve got twice the amount of work to do,” Donnelly noted at one point before mock-berating the production crew that “I’ll have to do it myself, like everything else around here this week”). That said, this final episode ups the ante as Donnelly takes the show on the road to the Universal Orlando Resort in Florida. Once there we’re promised a “super-sized” edition featuring stunts, surprises and “extra-special” guests. No word yet as to who those guests will be but expect Donnelly to continue making the best of a difficult situation, buoyed by extra support from Scarlett Moffatt, who is in charge of ensuring that the Place on the Plane winners have a wonderful time, and Stephen Mulhern, who has the possibly less than enviable task of explaining In for a Penny to an American audience. Sarah Hughes Premier League Football: Everton v Liverpool Sky Sports Main Event, 12.30pm Tired, perhaps, from their Champions League quarter-final first leg against Man City, Liverpool face their bitter local rivals Everton at Goodison Park. The home side, who’ve won three of their last six games, haven’t beaten Liverpool since October 2010, when Tim Cahill and Mikel Arteta gave them a 2-0 victory. Premiership Rugby Union: Bath v Leicester Tigers Channel 5, 1.30pm Time was when Bath and Leicester were the titans of English rugby. Currently they are fifth and eighth in the league, respectively. In September, Bath claimed a 27-23 win at Welford Road, as they held on for their first away win at Leicester since 2003, ensuring an unhappy return for George Ford against the club he left in the summer. The two sides also met in the Anglo-Welsh Cup at the Recreation Ground in November, where Bath also emerged victorious, beating Leicester 33-31 on that occasion. Premier League Football: Manchester City v Manchester United Sky Sports Main Event, 5.30pm What better way for Pep Guardiola’s Manchester City to clinch the title than by beating second-placed Manchester United at the Etihad Stadium. Sixteen points ahead of them in the table, City have been formidable this season, winning 27 of the 31 league games they’ve played. One of those victories came at Old Trafford, with a goal from Nicolas Otamendi giving City a 2-1 victory when these sides met in December. Britain’s Most Historic Towns Channel 4, 8.00pm Alice Roberts is our guide for this new six-part series, which sees her search the UK for the places that best sum up an historical era. The first era is Roman Britain, so Roberts heads to Chester, where she abseils down walls, hunkers in caves and uncovers the truth about the city. Casualty BBC One, 8.20pm The medical drama’s storyline about Dylan’s (William Beck) alcoholism continues to be sensitively handled as the medic’s ex-wife Sam (Charlotte Salt) worries about whether she can help him. Meanwhile, Ethan (George Hardy) struggles with his own demons as he realises that a patient is related to his brother’s killer. The Voice UK: Live Final ITV, 8.30pm Every reality TV idea has an allotted shelf life and it’s hard not to feel that musical talent contests have come to the end of their run. For those who disagree, The Voice UK’s grand finale is here and the final four battle it out for public approval. Below the Surface BBC Four, 9.00pm & 9.45pm BBC Four’s latest Scandi drama started off tensely but like its predecessor, Modus, it has gone on to become ever more ludicrous. Now it’s the final two episodes, and Philip Norgaard (Johannes Lassen) faces off against Mark (Jakob Oftebro), the man behind the hostage crisis. Much heartfelt talking follows, although you may end up feeling more sympathetic towards the damaged Mark than the chilly Norgaard. Pearl Jam: Let’s Play Two Sky Arts, 9.00pm When is a music documentary not a music documentary? When it’s also a sports film. This exuberant film, which was made following the Chicago Cubs’ victory in baseball’s World Series in 2016, follows die-hard Cubs fan and Pearl Jam lead singer Eddie Vedder as he cheers on his team during their championship run while also preparing the band for two August shows at the team’s Wrigley Field Stadium. The result is an affectionate portrait of the singer as fan. SH Troy: Fall of a City BBC One, 9.10pm David Farr’s epic series reaches its climax with the arrival of the most famous horse in history. After an uninspiring start, Troy has picked up in recent weeks and the final episode is a well-handled tale of betrayal and death. It’s a curate’s egg of a series, let down by poor casting. SH X-Men (2000) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.00pm Bryan Singer directs an all-star cast that includes Patrick Stewart, Hugh Jackman, Ian McKellen and Halle Berry, in the first of the X-Men franchise. A group of mutants must decide whether to side with Professor Xavier (Stewart) or the evil Magneto (McKellen) in what is a solid opening to the series and which paved the way for plenty of big-budget sequels. This is followed by X-Men 2 and X-Men 3 at 9.00pm and 11.35pm respectively. Legend (2015) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Tom Hardy gives a solid, convincing performance as east London gangster Reggie Kray but his caricatured portrayal of twin brother Ronnie lets him down, and this inconsistency leads to an entertaining though muddled film. Emily Browning, however, gives just the right mix of defiance and despair as Frances Shea, Reggie’s put-upon wife. Watch out for some particularly gory scenes. Lethal Weapon 2 (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.05pm Mel Gibson sports his signature Eighties mullet in the second film of this daft-but-fun action franchise. LAPD officer Riggs (Gibson) teams up once again with his partner Murtaugh (Danny Glover) to track down a band of South African criminals while protecting a painfully frenzied witness (Joe Pesci). Naturally, the pair find themselves drawn into violent action sequences orchestrated by stereotypical bad guys. Sunday 8 April Hostess with the mostest: Catherine Tate presents the awards Credit: ITV The Olivier Awards 2018 ITV, 10.20pm Last year, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child swept the board with nine Olivier Awards, something that looked impossible to top. But then came Lin Manuel Miranda’s blockbuster musical Hamilton, whose West End run has received reviews every bit as rapturous as those from its Broadway debut. The show has a record-breaking 13 nominations, which it is thought will be translated into awards. After being snubbed for Jerusalem, Jez Butterworth will surely be rewarded for his equally magisterial play The Ferryman (its eight nominations include best play and best director for Sam Mendes), while contenders in the acting categories include Bryan Cranston for Network, Andrew Garfield for Angels in America and Lesley Manville for Long Day’s Journey into Night. Catherine Tate will be on hosting duties for the event at the Royal Albert Hall, which will, as usual, feature a crop of stellar performances; this one will include a special tribute to Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, which turns 50 this year. Let’s hope the organisers bring together Josephs of the past for a big singalong: Jason Donovan, Phillip Schofield, Ian “H” Watkins and Lee Mead will all, one suspects, be available. Gabriel Tate Sex Robots and Us BBC Three, from 10.00am James Young, an amputee who created his own bionic arm, meets the people who design sex robots and hears about their plans for them, from being given to old people’s homes to “employment” in brothels. But is it the harmless, even socially responsible pursuit thatthey claim? Formula 1: The Bahrain Grand Prix Sky Sports F1, 3.30pm After the Australian Grand Prix – in which Sebastian Vettel took advantage of a safety-car blunder to win under pristine Melbourne skies – attention turns to the second round of the season at the Bahrain International Circuit in Sakhir. Another blunder cost Lewis Hamilton on this circuit last year – this time it happened in the pit lane, with Vettel capitalising to win by 6.6 seconds. The Generation Game BBC One, 8.00pm How do you top last week’s cavalcade of silliness in this rebooted game show? You rope in Danny Dyer to join Mel Giedroyc, Sue Perkins and panellists Melvin Odoom and Roisin Conaty for challenges that include cake decorating, balloon modelling and dancing the Argentine Tango. The Durrells ITV, 8.00pm In the fourth episode of the popular drama, Larry (Josh O’Connor) visits Athens with two oddly named guests – Captain Creech (James Cosmo) and Prince Jeejeebuoy (Tanmay Dhanania) – in tow. There, they offer advice to Gerry (Milo Parker), who is applying for a new school. Jesus’ Female Disciples: the New Evidence Channel 4, 8.00pm For centuries, the birth of Christianity was regarded as a largely male affair, with women as only bit-part players. Now, Bible experts Helen Bond and Joan Taylor have discovered evidence that women were involved in everything from preaching and baptising to funding the movement as it grew. This absorbing documentary follows the historians’ progress. Golf: The Masters Sky Sports Main Event, 8.00pm Prepare for a dramatic finale as this year’s first Major – from the Augusta National in Georgia – concludes. Last year, Spain’s Sergio Garcia won the coveted green jacket, beating Justin Rose in a tense play-off. Ordeal by Innocence BBC One, 9.00pm Sarah Phelps’s splendid adaptation continues, as Arthur Calgary (Luke Treadaway) resolves to prove the truth about Jack Argyll’s (Anthony Boyle) alibi by any means necessary. GT Folk Awards 2018 BBC Four, 9.00pm Mark Radcliffe and Julie Fowlis introduce highlights from this year’s Radio 2 Folk Awards in Belfast. It features performances from Cara Dillon, Lankum and Eliza Carthy and the Wayward Band. The great Nick Drake will also be inducted into the Hall of Fame, his genius long-established, even if such recognition eluded him during his short life. Producer Dónal Lunny, meanwhile, receives the Lifetime Achievement Award for decades of tireless work promoting the renaissance in Irish music, plus The Armagh Pipers Club are presented with the Good Tradition Award. GT Emma (1996) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 3.00pm Gwyneth Paltrow’s American iciness melts in this deft adaptation of Jane Austen’s classic comic romance. She is Emma Woodhouse, spoilt, charming and an inveterate meddler. Only Mr George Knightley (Jeremy Northam) dares challenge her behaviour – but what are his motives? A clever film with a superb supporting cast, including Toni Collette, Alan Cumming and Ewan McGregor. United 93 (2006) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 9.55pm Director Paul Greengrass’s boneshaking, real-time take on the final hours of the United Airlines plane whose passengers rebelled against their hijackers on September 11, 2001 feels uncomfortably realistic. Greengrass, whose signature rapid cutting made the second and third Bourne films so exciting, proves expert at handling the most infamous atrocity of modern times with intelligence and sobriety. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 11.00pm This superb adaptation of John le Carré’s brilliant, intricate Cold War spy novel is a triumph. The espionage drama follows the hunt for a Soviet double agent at the top of the British secret service, with Gary Oldman spearheading the excellent ensemble cast, which includes Colin Firth, Tom Hardy, John Hurt and Benedict Cumberbatch. It’s funny, seductive and suspenseful. Monday 9 April I spy: a recruit sees if she’s got what it takes to be an SOE agent Credit: BBC Secret Agent Selection: WW2 BBC Two, 9.00pm Not unlike Channel 4’s SAS: Who Dares Wins and BBC Two’s Astronauts: Do You Have What It Takes?, this absorbing new series puts a group of recruits through a series of gruelling physical and psychological challenges to see if they could make the grade as a secret agent according to an established selection test used during the Second World War. This test was used by the Special Operations Executive (SOE) to determine whether recruits from many different walks of life would be capable of being dropped behind enemy lines and surviving as a covert officer with a brief to cause the maximum disruption possible to the enemy in the territory. As with the original SOE, the 14 candidates come from diverse backgrounds (among them a research scientist, a property developer, former police officer, a drag act performer, a retired investment banker and an Army veteran). In the opening episode, they undergo the initial four-day assessment at a remote Scottish country-house estate. The aim is to winnow out weakness and determine who should win a place on the advanced, and suitably terrifying, course in assassination, sabotage and covert intelligence techniques. Gerard O’Donovan Famalam BBC Three, from 10.00am After a successful pilot last year, Vivienne Acheampong, Gbemisola Ikumelo, Roxanne Sternberg, Tom Moutchi and John MacMillan return with more culturally skewed sketches. Once again, they feature William and Funke’s raunchy chat show, misunderstood superhero Eclipse, Croydon’s voodoo practitioner Professor Lofuko, and a version of Midsomer Murders. 800 Words BBC One, 2.15pm If you like The Durrells you will definitely want to watch hit Australian comedy drama 800 Words. This gently funny series follows George (Erik Thomson), a widower, who horrifies his teenaged children when he moves the entire family to a remote seaside town in New Zealand. Springtime on the Farm Channel 5, 8.00pm This is the first of five shows this week celebrating the “great British farmer”, with the help of Yorkshire Vet stars Peter Wright and Julian Norton, Adam Henson of Countryfile and Springwatch’s Lindsey Chapman. In this programme, they explore how to cope with the stresses of lambing. MasterChef: The Finals BBC One, 9.00pm Oodles of challenges lie ahead for the remaining amateur chefs in the final week, which takes them as far afield as Peru ahead of Friday’s concluding cook-off. First, though, they’re off to North Yorkshire to cater a country-house lunch for local grandees and farmers. Lisbon: An Art Lovers’ Guide BBC Four, 9.00pm Having covered Barcelona, St Petersburg and Amsterdam in their first series of city-break guides, historian Dr Janina Ramirez and art critic Alastair Sooke jet off to explore three less obvious, art-rich destinations. Beirut and Baku are perhaps the more intriguing but it opens in Lisbon, which built up its art reserves during the centuries Portugal was part of one of the world’s great empires, and currently boasts one of the hottest contemporary art scenes in Europe. GO Marcella ITV, 9.00pm This drama’s been a little less fraught the second time round but Marcella still pushes the boundaries of credibility. In this concluding part, the heroine (Anna Friel) tracks down the killer, only to suffer one of her unfortunate episodes. GO The Core (2003) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.25pm Rome starts to crumble, the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco collapses and pigeons go mental in Trafalgar Square. Something is obviously amiss, and this time it isn’t climate change. In fact, the Earth’s core has stopped rotating and a team of scientists has to build a special burrowing machine to start it spinning again. Hilary Swank, Stanley Tucci and Aaron Eckhart do their best, but the excitement is intermittent. The Emoji Movie (2017) ★☆☆☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 6.30pm In this animated comedy set inside a smartphone, Gene (voiced by T J Miller), an emoji with multiple facial features, sets out on a quest to be like his colleagues who have only one. He does so with the help of apps like Spotify and Candy Crush. Sadly, the result is so horrendous that there aren’t enough Patrick Stewart-voiced emojis in the world to express what an ugly, artless exercise this is. Triple 9 (2016) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A gang of criminals and corrupt cops plan to kill a police officer in order to pull off their biggest heist yet in John Hillcoat’s crime thriller. There is a lot to like here: a big opening and a strong cast (with Kate Winslet, Gal Gadot, Anthony Mackie and Chiwetel Ejiofor among them). But it feels like fragments of a great crime drama are missing; it’s enthralling up close, but then the big picture isn’t complete. Tuesday 10 April Back to school: Mark, who has two sons with autism Credit: Channel 4 Class of Mum and Dad Channel 4, 8.00pm Another week, another Channel 4 series about education. Hold off on the black marks, however, because this one is pretty good. The premise is simple: Blackrod Primary School just outside of Bolton has thrown open its doors to a class made up of pupils’ parents (and one grandparent). They’ve agreed to go back to school for the summer term to see what modern education is really like, sports day, Sats tests and all. Naturally, its harder than many of them were expecting – 36-year-old decorator Jonny states early on that he thought he’d be able to slope off for a swift cigarette break rather than having to adhere to strict class rules – but there are some touching stories amid the more obvious moments. Most notably, this opening episode focuses on two parents with challenging home lives – Julia, who is raising her 10-year-old cousin Asha after Asha’s mother died, and Mark, who has two autistic sons. While the parents’ travails are interesting, the children are the real scene-stealers, however, from those delighted that their mothers and fathers are taking part to those who are more sceptical. The pair of five-year-olds who spend their time corpsing in front of the camera are particularly endearing. Sarah Hughes Champions League Football: Manchester City v Liverpool BT Sport 2, 7.45pm The Etihad Stadium is the setting as City and Liverpool fight it out for a place in the semi-finals. Liverpool have the advantage following a 3-0 win at Anfield in the first leg. This Time Next Year ITV, 8.00pm Davina McCall returns with another set of heart-tugging stories of people attempting to transform their lives over the course of a year. First up are two new parents who dream of making life wonderful for their baby girl who has been deaf since birth and a couple desperate to start a family. Come Home BBC One, 9.00pm Danny Brocklehurst’s claustrophobic family drama comes to a head as we flashback to find out exactly what went wrong in Greg (Christopher Eccleston) and Marie’s (Paula Malcomson) marriage. Hospital BBC Two, 9.00pm The engrossing fly-on-the-wall medical series continues with Nottingham University Hospitals Trust struggling to cope with the new NHS ruling regarding the cancellation of all non-urgent surgery. The episode focuses on Val, a 55-year-old with mouth cancer whose surgeon is desperately trying to ensure that her operation goes ahead. Here and Now Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm With only two episodes left to go, Alan Ball’s family drama continues to tread water in the most frustrating ways. On paper, there are a whole bunch of interesting stories in the mix, from Kristen’s (Sosie Bacon) possible relationship with Navid (Marwan Salama) to Ramon’s (Daniel Zovatto) continuing visions, but the problem is nothing much happens with any of them as each story moves on only incrementally each week. In this episode, Audrey (Holly Hunter) finally turns the tables on the perpetually smug Greg (Tim Robbins). Cunk on Britain BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm Diana Morgan’s pitch-perfect send-up of history programmes moves to the Tudor era and beyond as Cunk takes on Henry VIII, aka “The kingiest king who kinged over Britain” before giving us her unique perspective on “Bloody” Mary Tudor (“horrible like the drink”) and Elizabeth I. SH Divorce Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The acerbic Sarah Jessica Parker sitcom has been firing on all cylinders throughout its second series – possibly because it’s more interesting watching Frances (Parker) and Robert (the excellent Thomas Haden Church) navigate life after divorce than it was watching them get there. Here, Frances tries to make a new contact in the art world. SH Speed (1994) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm “There’s a bomb on the bus!” is the most famous line and basically the entire plot of one of the best action thrillers of the Nineties. The sizzling chemistry between LAPD Swat specialist Jack Traven (Keanu Reeves) and passenger Annie Porter (Sandra Bullock) sexes up the exhilarating action scenes, while Dennis Hopper is fantastically unhinged as a revenge-driven, retired bomb squad member turned terrorist. Fast & Furious 7 (2015) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 9.00pm Paul Walker was killed in a car crash part-way through making this film so it was completed with the help of his two younger brothers and some subtle computer graphics. The good news is that this is the best film in the franchise and does justice to Walker. It isn’t polished blockbuster film-making – though if it was, it wouldn’t be Fast & Furious. But it speaks straight to your adrenal glands. The Witches of Eastwick (1987) ★★★☆☆ Syfy, 9.00pm It is remarkable that director George Miller’s daft, unfettered romp of a film works at all. But, thanks to Jack Nicholson’s delicious overacting as Daryl Van Horne, a manic gentleman who closely resembles the devil, and the three gorgeous, single small-town friends, Alexandra (Cher), Jane (Susan Sarandon) and Sukie (Michelle Pfeiffer), who vie for his debased attentions, it somehow does. Wednesday 11 April Family ties: Edgar Ramirez and Penelope Cruz Credit: BBC The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story BBC Two, 9.00pm It’s been fascinating to discover the “true” story behind the 1997 murder of fhion designer Gianni Versace in Ryan Murphy’s glitzy drama, which has expertly depicted the inner world of the perpetrator, a Walter Mitty-style serial killer called Andrew Cunanan (a career-defining role for Darren Criss). This episode, however, has a mid-series lull about it as Cunanan ascends to the higher echelons of gay society, shaping himself meticulously into the posh, preppy eye-candy who saw a sugar daddy (or two) as his way to the top. Elsewhere, the Versace siblings return at last. Gianni (Edgar Ramirez), now in failing health decides to champion his insecure sister Donatella (Penélope Cruz in a frightful wig) and turns her into both designer and muse. Despite a lack of characters to root for – the Versaces’ moments of vulnerability dissolve into tedious histrionics and are eclipsed by Cunanan’s cold-blooded machinations – it’s all quite a fabulous mix of fashion, high society and brutal murder, with some interesting commentary on homophobia in the Nineties as well. Vicki Power The Secret Helpers BBC Two, 8.00pm Watch and weep as timid elderly widow Lesley begins a new life as an out gay woman in this life-affirming docu-series. She’s encouraged with warmth and wisdom by amateur “sages” from abroad, who talk to her secretly through a hidden earpiece. From World War to Cold War Yesterday, 8.00pm As the Second World War drew to a close, Churchill, Stalin and Roosevelt met at Yalta in the Crimea to broker post-war peace. This brisk two-part documentary raids the archives for clips and letters from those who attended, and gathers experts and relatives – including FDR’s grandson – to investigate power plays by Stalin that wrong-footed his Allied counterparts. It’s a detailed look at how and why the compromises reached at Yalta were quickly cast aside. Bacchus Uncovered: Ancient God of Ecstasy BBC Four, 9.00pm Historian Bettany Hughes continues to explore ancient civilisations, moving on to Bacchus, the Roman god of wine. Hughes’s odyssey starts under the City of London, where an 1,800-year-old Roman temple to Bacchus was discovered less than 100 years ago, and takes her to Greece, the Middle East and the Caucasus to explore the god’s roots and influence. VP Benidorm ITV, 9.00pm Fluffy as candyfloss, this lewd seaside comedy provides some fun, particularly in the retro casting of stars of yesteryear. This week, an exuberant Sammy (Shane Richie) tries to persuade Monty (John Challis) that, after his successful comeback gig, he is ready for an evening slot. One Born Every Minute Channel 4, 9.00pm This feelgood documentary series brings more poignant tales from a Birmingham labour ward. This week we meet Chantell, about to deliver her third child, who regales us with a moving story of how parenthood with partner Phil has healed the wounds of a traumatic past. First Dates Channel 4, 10.00pm The thoughtful dating show pairs up four more couples, but the road to love is bumpy – septuagenarian Deanna finds her date more interested in the waiter than her. More promising is the match between Bianca and Teza, who allow their vulnerabilities to show. VP The Thin Red Line (1998) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 3.10pm This lyrical Second World War drama, directed by Terrence Malick, tells the story of a group of young US soldiers fighting the Japanese for control of the island of Guadalcanal. Full of stars such as Sean Penn and George Clooney, it struggles with its own battle to squeeze in so many characters but is still an atmospheric meditation on the nature of war. Nick Nolte and Adrien Brody also star. The Remains of the Day (1993) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 3.55pm The success of Merchant Ivory’s adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro’s Thirties-set novel, a well-observed study of regret, is built around its perfectly cast leads: Anthony Hopkins as James, the butler to the doltish aristocrat Lord Darlington (James Fox) and Emma Thompson as a housekeeper who tries to draw him out of his sterile shell. Lush visuals give it an added richness. Transporter 2 (2005) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A martial arts action sequel, in which Jason Statham and Alessandro Gassman are the sporadically thrilling stars. Statham is Frank Martin, who accepts a job as chauffeur to Jack (Hunter Clary), the son of Miami’s politician Jefferson Billings (Matthew Modine). But the local Colombian drug dealers aren’t happy with his boss’s efforts to clean up the city. Cue a kidnapping, and a potentially deadly encounter with a cocaine baron. Thursday 12 April Changing attitudes: Holly and Hollie Credit: BBC Living with the Brainy Bunch BBC Two, 8.00pm Enterprising, PR-conscious Ash Ali is headmaster of Chessington Community College, a fast-improving school with a few problem pupils. Among them are Jack and Hollie who, on the surface, are comically awful teenagers. Hollie gripes constantly, throws strops and storms out of classrooms if things aren’t going her way. Jack is sullen, lazy and has clocked up 15 suspensions in the past year. It will come as no surprise to regular viewers of such documentaries that their behaviour is rooted in low self-esteem, although their parents unquestionably indulge their foibles. Ali’s novel solution is to place Hollie with Holly, tapdancing head girl and gregarious boffin, and Jack with Tharush, a Sri Lankan immigrant by way of Italy, whose talents are only matched by his work ethic. Now that Jack and Hollie are in the bosom of new families for six weeks, it’s hoped that a new environment, greater discipline and rigid routines will see their results improve and attitudes pick up. There are setbacks on the largely familiar narrative trajectory, but it’s cast to perfection and, as a demonstration of the importance of parenting in academic achievement, the experiment gets an A-star. Gabriel Tate European Tour Golf: The Open de Espana Sky Sports Golf, 11.00am The opening day’s play of the event from the Centro Nacional de Golf in Madrid, which was won by Andrew Johnston the last time it was held in 2016. War Above the Trenches Yesterday, 8.00pm This decent two-parter tells the story of the Royal Flying Corps and their battle to win control of the air in the First World War. Based on Peter Hart’s book Bloody April, it draws affectingly on the testimony of veterans to show there was more to the Western Front than trench warfare. Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm The modern age draws closer, as Simon Schama tackles the theme of radiance, guiding us through Gothic cathedrals, Baroque Venetian masterpieces and dazzling Japanese woodblock prints. The Investigator: A British Crime Story ITV, 9.00pm The second real-life case of the series sees Mark Williams-Thomas investigating the 1977 murders of three women in Glasgow. The suspect is Angus Sinclair, who is currently serving a life sentence for killing two other women that same year. We hear from his ex-wife, and learn how he was a prime suspect but escaped charges for the first killings when key evidence went missing. Indian Summer School Channel 4, 9.00pm This diverting documentary series concludes with a Himalayan trek, a controversial article in the school newspaper and the GCSE retakes that were the goal of the entire enterprise. Will Alfie, Harry, Jack and co see their grades improve? Urban Myths: Marilyn Monroe and Billy Wilder Sky Arts, 9.00pm Sky Arts’ boldly cast series of vaguely apocryphal tales from the pop-culture frontlines returns with a dispatch from the set of Some Like It Hot, the magnificent 1959 comedy that is almost certainly more fun to watch than it was to make. In this minor but entertaining reimagining, Tony Curtis (Alex Pettyfer) is threatening to cuckold Arthur Miller (Dougray Scott) by making off with Marilyn Monroe (Gemma Arterton), whose caprice, drinking and sensitivity is driving director Billy Wilder (James Purefoy) to distraction. GT Still Game BBC One, 9.30pm; BBC Two Wales, 10.00pm Justifying its prime-time BBC One slot, the Scottish sitcom bows out in triumph with a typically well-wrought farce involving a Hollywood stuntman, a disastrous driving lesson and romance for the widowed Isa (Jane McCarry). GT The Man with the Golden Gun (1974) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Christopher Lee steals the show as the titular assassin, Francisco Scaramanga, in this classic Bond adventure. Roger Moore’s secret agent, in his second outing as 007, must pursue him, with the help of sidekick Mary Goodnight (Britt Ekland), to the villain’s island lair in order to prevent him harnessing the power of the Sun for evil. The confrontations between Moore and Lee are easily the film’s highlights. Swordfish (2001) ★★☆☆☆ TCM, 9.00pm The most often quoted bit of trivia about this film is that Halle Berry was paid an additional £500,000 to go topless. It’s rather lucky she agreed because she’s probably the most appealing aspect of this frenetic thriller. John Travolta and Hugh Jackman put on testosterone-fuelled displays as a morally dubious counter-terrorist agent and the hacker he blackmails into accessing billions of dollars of government money. Some Like It Hot (1959, b/w) ★★★★★ Sky Arts, 9.30pm When two musicians (Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis) witness a mob hit, they flee the state disguised as women in an all-female band, but further complications arise in the form of demure ukulele player Sugar Kane, superbly played by Marilyn Monroe. Billy Wilder’s classic comedy is effortlessly wacky and clever. Before, at 9pm, is Urban Myths, which imagines what happened on the set of this romcom. Friday 13 April Dishing out opinions: John Torode and Gregg Wallace Credit: BBC MasterChef: The Final BBC One, 8.30pm It has taken 25 episodes over seven weeks to whittle down the 56 amateur contestants to three finalists, and in the process, MasterChef 2018 has produced some of the best cooking – and some of the toughest competition – in the series’ long history. (It has been running in one form or another since 1990; and since 2005 in, roughly, its current format with judges Gregg Wallace and John Torode presenting.) This last week has been no exception, with the finalists having to dig deeper than ever to produce the best dishes of their lives and some great moments – notably during the spectacular trip to South America when they met Peruvian superchef Gaston Acurio and took on a service at the fifth best restaurant in the world, the Central in Lima, under Michelin-starred maestro Virgilio Martínez Véliz. In the finale, it’s all about who cooks the best food, though, as the final three return to the studio kitchen to undergo a test of culinary skills and nerve as they set about creating the most important three-course meal of their lives – in the hope of being judged worthy of a title that has launched many a great career: MasterChef champion. Gerard O’Donovan Chef’s Table: Pastry Netflix, from today This mouth-watering spin-off from Netflix’s popular global foodie series Chef’s Table puts the focus entirely on sweet stuff, talking the cameras inside the kitchens of some of the world’s best pastry chefs, among them Christina Tosi’s Milk Bar in New York, Corrado Assenza’s Caffé Sicilia in Noto, Sicily, Jordi Roca’s El Celler de Can Roca in Girona, and Will Goldfarb’s Room4Dessert in Bali. Lost in Space Netflix, from today Not so much a rerun as a spectacular new take on the classic Sixties sci-fi series about a family marooned in space when their ship runs into difficulty on their way to a new colony and crashes on an unknown and surprisingly hostile planet. There are plenty of thrills and impressive visual effects, and Toby Stephens and Molly Parker are excellent as the pioneering Robinson parents John and Judy, while Parker Posey is an enigmatic (and now female) Dr Smith. GO The City & The City BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 9.30pm Cop thrillers don’t come much more weirdly dystopian than China Miéville’s award-winning 2009 novel and this ultra-stylish adaptation serves its source material very well. In episode two, Inspector Borlú (David Morrissey) ventures back across the border while investigating the murder of a foreign student. Episodes BBC Two, 10.00pm; Wales, 11.05pm Having overcome last week’s unfortunate episode in this sitcom, Matt (Matt LeBlanc) is back on top and leveraging his spurt in the ratings for all it’s worth, handing Sean (Stephen Mangan) and Beverly (Tamsin Greig) a welcome opportunity for escape. Lee and Dean Channel 4, 10.00pm More rough charm, as life gets complicated for Stevenage’s very own Dumb and Dumber when Lee’s (Miles Chapman) financial worries mount and Dean (Mark O’Sullivan) is persuaded to premiere his poetry at the local arts club. Front Row Late BBC Two, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm Freedom of speech and censorship are under the spotlight as host Mary Beard and guests discuss Theatre Clwyd’s production The Assassination of Katie Hopkins and former US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright’s new book Fascism: A Warning. GO Alien: Covenant (2017) ★★★★★ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm The latest film in the Alien saga from Ridley Scott is arguably a mad scientist movie. It follows the crew of the colony ship Covenant (including Katherine Waterson) as they discover what they think is an uncharted paradise, but what they uncover a threat beyond their imagination. Michael Fassbender puts in a spectacular turn as kindly robot David and his twisted “brother” Walter. Invictus (2009) ★★★★☆ ITV, 10.45pm Following the death of Nelson Mandela’s ex-wife Winnie last week, aged 81, here’s Clint Eastwood’s take on South Africa’s World Cup victory in 1995. As the country emerges from apartheid, the newly elected President Mandela (an uncanny Morgan Freeman) sees the potential for the national rugby team, led by François Pienaar (Matt Damon), to be a catalyst for harmony. This is a polished and uplifting film. Monty Python Live at the Hollywood Bowl (1982) ★★★★☆ Gold, 1.40am Much like the Secret Policeman’s Ball, this comedy performance film sees the Monty Python gang take to the stage, but this time they’re in Hollywood. Among the sketches are the Silly Olympics, where athletes compete in absurd sports, The Lumberjack Song, and The Ministry of Silly Walks. This film also features Carol Cleveland in numerous supporting roles. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: The City & the City, Sounds Like Friday Night and Have I Got News for You
Friday 6 April The City & the City BBC Two, 9.00pm; Northern Ireland, 9.30pm “I knew there was another city I dare not see… Just on the other side of where I was supposed to look.” So states Inspector Tyador Borlú (David Morrissey) midway through this engrossing adaptation of China Miéville’s Borgesian novel, which achieves the apparently impossible by bringing a dense and clever book to brilliant, atmospheric life. Borlú, a detective with the Extreme Crime Squad in the rundown vaguely Eastern European city of Beszul, is handed the task of solving the murder of a foreign student. So far, so standard, but what unfolds turns out to be anything but as scriptwriter Tony Grisoni (Red Riding) expertly captures Miéville’s vision of a world in which a city is divided not by a wall or barricade, but by blurred realities the populace is trained from birth not to see. Thus the two cities of Beszul and Ul Qoma coexist in the same space but without acknowledging each other, the town hall their only shared space. To look directly on the other city is to commit “Breach”, bringing about the wrath of the secret police. Grisoni and director Tom Shankland build the tension inexorably as Borlú’s world is slowly but surely upended. An absolute treat. Sarah Hughes Sounds Like Friday Night BBC One, 7.30pm The BBC’s music TV revival didn’t make a huge splash with its first series but it’s still worth checking out, if only because co-host and Radio 1Xtra presenter Dotty is such a likeable presence. Tonight, she’s on the road, while Greg James anchors from the studio. Professor Green, Snow Patrol and Years & Years perform. Have I Got News for You BBC One, 9.30pm The satirical quiz show returns for a 55th series, with captains Paul Merton and Ian Hislop joined by presenter Steph McGovern and comedian Josh Widdicombe; Jeremy Paxman hosts. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm In an era when the talk show appears tired somehow Graham Norton manages to keep the format enjoyable. Tonight’s episode, the first in a new series, sees husband-and-wife team Emily Blunt and John Krasinski discuss their horror A Quiet Place. Front Row Late BBC Two, 11.05pm; N Ireland, 11.35pm Following the kerfuffle over its poorly received first series, the arts show returns with a rejigged format and Mary Beard in the presenter’s chair. Informed debate is promised, although Beard has said that she won’t simply replicate the notoriously combative Newsnight Review. SH BBC Young Musician 2018 BBC Four, 7.30pm The contest kicks off at the Royal Birmingham Conservatoire’s new concert hall. Presenter Josie d’Arby is joined by 1998 finalist Alison Balsom as we meet the final five: violinists Elodie Chousmer-Howelles and Stephanie Childress, double bassist Will Duerden, guitarist Torrin Williams and cellist Maxim Calver. The judges are double bassist Leon Bosch, classical guitarist Miloš Karadaglić, violinist and previous Young Musician of the Year winner, Jennifer Pike. Composer Kerry Andrew and the contestants will perform works by Bach, Brahms and Stravinsky. The Nineties Sky Arts, 9.00pm There’s nothing like seeing the decade you came of age in co-opted for nostalgic TV to make you feel old, but for those who can bear seeing their youth dissected Sky Arts at least does it well. Tonight’s second episode continues the focus on the decade’s TV with The Sopranos and Seinfeld under discussion. SH Fury (2014) ★★★★★ 5STAR, 9.00pm David Ayer’s study of the habits and habitats of the American killer male is an astonishing, stirring drama. It’s Germany 1945, and Sgt Don “Wardaddy” Collie (Brad Pitt) and his team are grinding towards Berlin in a battered M4 Sherman tank. There is no rescue mission, just an agonising rumble from one brush with death to the next. The set-piece battles are gripping, and the raw terror of war is blasted home. Four Weddings and a Funeral (1994) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm The best of Richard Curtis and Hugh Grant’s romcoms about awfully nice chaps dithering over frightfully pretty girls. Grant plays bumbling Charles, who, ah, er, can’t tell what’s, um, going on between him and the scrummy Carrie (Andie MacDowell), who he keeps, gosh, bumping into at weddings. It’s aged pretty well and certainly knocks spots off Love, Actually. Lawless (2012) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 12.45am An adaptation of the historical novel The Wettest County in the World, John Hillcoat’s Prohibition-era western follows three brothers (played by Tom Hardy, Shia LaBeouf and Jason Clarke), who do a tidy business distilling and selling illegal moonshine whiskey. It’s an oddly affectionate clan portrait – the violence the brothers mete out is implicitly forgiven – but the period detail is well observed. Saturday 7 April Saturday night fever: Declan Donnelly presents from Orlando Credit: Rex/Shutterstock Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway ITV, 7.00pm It can’t be easy hosting a show as exuberant as Saturday Night Takeaway on your own but Declan Donnelly made a solid if understandably restrained go of it last week. He ensured that the light entertainment series proceeded pretty much as normal in the absence of long-time work partner Ant McPartlin, whose travails were sensibly referenced only in very brief passing (“I’ve got twice the amount of work to do,” Donnelly noted at one point before mock-berating the production crew that “I’ll have to do it myself, like everything else around here this week”). That said, this final episode ups the ante as Donnelly takes the show on the road to the Universal Orlando Resort in Florida. Once there we’re promised a “super-sized” edition featuring stunts, surprises and “extra-special” guests. No word yet as to who those guests will be but expect Donnelly to continue making the best of a difficult situation, buoyed by extra support from Scarlett Moffatt, who is in charge of ensuring that the Place on the Plane winners have a wonderful time, and Stephen Mulhern, who has the possibly less than enviable task of explaining In for a Penny to an American audience. Sarah Hughes Premier League Football: Everton v Liverpool Sky Sports Main Event, 12.30pm Tired, perhaps, from their Champions League quarter-final first leg against Man City, Liverpool face their bitter local rivals Everton at Goodison Park. The home side, who’ve won three of their last six games, haven’t beaten Liverpool since October 2010, when Tim Cahill and Mikel Arteta gave them a 2-0 victory. Premiership Rugby Union: Bath v Leicester Tigers Channel 5, 1.30pm Time was when Bath and Leicester were the titans of English rugby. Currently they are fifth and eighth in the league, respectively. In September, Bath claimed a 27-23 win at Welford Road, as they held on for their first away win at Leicester since 2003, ensuring an unhappy return for George Ford against the club he left in the summer. The two sides also met in the Anglo-Welsh Cup at the Recreation Ground in November, where Bath also emerged victorious, beating Leicester 33-31 on that occasion. Premier League Football: Manchester City v Manchester United Sky Sports Main Event, 5.30pm What better way for Pep Guardiola’s Manchester City to clinch the title than by beating second-placed Manchester United at the Etihad Stadium. Sixteen points ahead of them in the table, City have been formidable this season, winning 27 of the 31 league games they’ve played. One of those victories came at Old Trafford, with a goal from Nicolas Otamendi giving City a 2-1 victory when these sides met in December. Britain’s Most Historic Towns Channel 4, 8.00pm Alice Roberts is our guide for this new six-part series, which sees her search the UK for the places that best sum up an historical era. The first era is Roman Britain, so Roberts heads to Chester, where she abseils down walls, hunkers in caves and uncovers the truth about the city. Casualty BBC One, 8.20pm The medical drama’s storyline about Dylan’s (William Beck) alcoholism continues to be sensitively handled as the medic’s ex-wife Sam (Charlotte Salt) worries about whether she can help him. Meanwhile, Ethan (George Hardy) struggles with his own demons as he realises that a patient is related to his brother’s killer. The Voice UK: Live Final ITV, 8.30pm Every reality TV idea has an allotted shelf life and it’s hard not to feel that musical talent contests have come to the end of their run. For those who disagree, The Voice UK’s grand finale is here and the final four battle it out for public approval. Below the Surface BBC Four, 9.00pm & 9.45pm BBC Four’s latest Scandi drama started off tensely but like its predecessor, Modus, it has gone on to become ever more ludicrous. Now it’s the final two episodes, and Philip Norgaard (Johannes Lassen) faces off against Mark (Jakob Oftebro), the man behind the hostage crisis. Much heartfelt talking follows, although you may end up feeling more sympathetic towards the damaged Mark than the chilly Norgaard. Pearl Jam: Let’s Play Two Sky Arts, 9.00pm When is a music documentary not a music documentary? When it’s also a sports film. This exuberant film, which was made following the Chicago Cubs’ victory in baseball’s World Series in 2016, follows die-hard Cubs fan and Pearl Jam lead singer Eddie Vedder as he cheers on his team during their championship run while also preparing the band for two August shows at the team’s Wrigley Field Stadium. The result is an affectionate portrait of the singer as fan. SH Troy: Fall of a City BBC One, 9.10pm David Farr’s epic series reaches its climax with the arrival of the most famous horse in history. After an uninspiring start, Troy has picked up in recent weeks and the final episode is a well-handled tale of betrayal and death. It’s a curate’s egg of a series, let down by poor casting. SH X-Men (2000) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.00pm Bryan Singer directs an all-star cast that includes Patrick Stewart, Hugh Jackman, Ian McKellen and Halle Berry, in the first of the X-Men franchise. A group of mutants must decide whether to side with Professor Xavier (Stewart) or the evil Magneto (McKellen) in what is a solid opening to the series and which paved the way for plenty of big-budget sequels. This is followed by X-Men 2 and X-Men 3 at 9.00pm and 11.35pm respectively. Legend (2015) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Tom Hardy gives a solid, convincing performance as east London gangster Reggie Kray but his caricatured portrayal of twin brother Ronnie lets him down, and this inconsistency leads to an entertaining though muddled film. Emily Browning, however, gives just the right mix of defiance and despair as Frances Shea, Reggie’s put-upon wife. Watch out for some particularly gory scenes. Lethal Weapon 2 (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.05pm Mel Gibson sports his signature Eighties mullet in the second film of this daft-but-fun action franchise. LAPD officer Riggs (Gibson) teams up once again with his partner Murtaugh (Danny Glover) to track down a band of South African criminals while protecting a painfully frenzied witness (Joe Pesci). Naturally, the pair find themselves drawn into violent action sequences orchestrated by stereotypical bad guys. Sunday 8 April Hostess with the mostest: Catherine Tate presents the awards Credit: ITV The Olivier Awards 2018 ITV, 10.20pm Last year, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child swept the board with nine Olivier Awards, something that looked impossible to top. But then came Lin Manuel Miranda’s blockbuster musical Hamilton, whose West End run has received reviews every bit as rapturous as those from its Broadway debut. The show has a record-breaking 13 nominations, which it is thought will be translated into awards. After being snubbed for Jerusalem, Jez Butterworth will surely be rewarded for his equally magisterial play The Ferryman (its eight nominations include best play and best director for Sam Mendes), while contenders in the acting categories include Bryan Cranston for Network, Andrew Garfield for Angels in America and Lesley Manville for Long Day’s Journey into Night. Catherine Tate will be on hosting duties for the event at the Royal Albert Hall, which will, as usual, feature a crop of stellar performances; this one will include a special tribute to Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, which turns 50 this year. Let’s hope the organisers bring together Josephs of the past for a big singalong: Jason Donovan, Phillip Schofield, Ian “H” Watkins and Lee Mead will all, one suspects, be available. Gabriel Tate Sex Robots and Us BBC Three, from 10.00am James Young, an amputee who created his own bionic arm, meets the people who design sex robots and hears about their plans for them, from being given to old people’s homes to “employment” in brothels. But is it the harmless, even socially responsible pursuit thatthey claim? Formula 1: The Bahrain Grand Prix Sky Sports F1, 3.30pm After the Australian Grand Prix – in which Sebastian Vettel took advantage of a safety-car blunder to win under pristine Melbourne skies – attention turns to the second round of the season at the Bahrain International Circuit in Sakhir. Another blunder cost Lewis Hamilton on this circuit last year – this time it happened in the pit lane, with Vettel capitalising to win by 6.6 seconds. The Generation Game BBC One, 8.00pm How do you top last week’s cavalcade of silliness in this rebooted game show? You rope in Danny Dyer to join Mel Giedroyc, Sue Perkins and panellists Melvin Odoom and Roisin Conaty for challenges that include cake decorating, balloon modelling and dancing the Argentine Tango. The Durrells ITV, 8.00pm In the fourth episode of the popular drama, Larry (Josh O’Connor) visits Athens with two oddly named guests – Captain Creech (James Cosmo) and Prince Jeejeebuoy (Tanmay Dhanania) – in tow. There, they offer advice to Gerry (Milo Parker), who is applying for a new school. Jesus’ Female Disciples: the New Evidence Channel 4, 8.00pm For centuries, the birth of Christianity was regarded as a largely male affair, with women as only bit-part players. Now, Bible experts Helen Bond and Joan Taylor have discovered evidence that women were involved in everything from preaching and baptising to funding the movement as it grew. This absorbing documentary follows the historians’ progress. Golf: The Masters Sky Sports Main Event, 8.00pm Prepare for a dramatic finale as this year’s first Major – from the Augusta National in Georgia – concludes. Last year, Spain’s Sergio Garcia won the coveted green jacket, beating Justin Rose in a tense play-off. Ordeal by Innocence BBC One, 9.00pm Sarah Phelps’s splendid adaptation continues, as Arthur Calgary (Luke Treadaway) resolves to prove the truth about Jack Argyll’s (Anthony Boyle) alibi by any means necessary. GT Folk Awards 2018 BBC Four, 9.00pm Mark Radcliffe and Julie Fowlis introduce highlights from this year’s Radio 2 Folk Awards in Belfast. It features performances from Cara Dillon, Lankum and Eliza Carthy and the Wayward Band. The great Nick Drake will also be inducted into the Hall of Fame, his genius long-established, even if such recognition eluded him during his short life. Producer Dónal Lunny, meanwhile, receives the Lifetime Achievement Award for decades of tireless work promoting the renaissance in Irish music, plus The Armagh Pipers Club are presented with the Good Tradition Award. GT Emma (1996) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 3.00pm Gwyneth Paltrow’s American iciness melts in this deft adaptation of Jane Austen’s classic comic romance. She is Emma Woodhouse, spoilt, charming and an inveterate meddler. Only Mr George Knightley (Jeremy Northam) dares challenge her behaviour – but what are his motives? A clever film with a superb supporting cast, including Toni Collette, Alan Cumming and Ewan McGregor. United 93 (2006) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 9.55pm Director Paul Greengrass’s boneshaking, real-time take on the final hours of the United Airlines plane whose passengers rebelled against their hijackers on September 11, 2001 feels uncomfortably realistic. Greengrass, whose signature rapid cutting made the second and third Bourne films so exciting, proves expert at handling the most infamous atrocity of modern times with intelligence and sobriety. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 11.00pm This superb adaptation of John le Carré’s brilliant, intricate Cold War spy novel is a triumph. The espionage drama follows the hunt for a Soviet double agent at the top of the British secret service, with Gary Oldman spearheading the excellent ensemble cast, which includes Colin Firth, Tom Hardy, John Hurt and Benedict Cumberbatch. It’s funny, seductive and suspenseful. Monday 9 April I spy: a recruit sees if she’s got what it takes to be an SOE agent Credit: BBC Secret Agent Selection: WW2 BBC Two, 9.00pm Not unlike Channel 4’s SAS: Who Dares Wins and BBC Two’s Astronauts: Do You Have What It Takes?, this absorbing new series puts a group of recruits through a series of gruelling physical and psychological challenges to see if they could make the grade as a secret agent according to an established selection test used during the Second World War. This test was used by the Special Operations Executive (SOE) to determine whether recruits from many different walks of life would be capable of being dropped behind enemy lines and surviving as a covert officer with a brief to cause the maximum disruption possible to the enemy in the territory. As with the original SOE, the 14 candidates come from diverse backgrounds (among them a research scientist, a property developer, former police officer, a drag act performer, a retired investment banker and an Army veteran). In the opening episode, they undergo the initial four-day assessment at a remote Scottish country-house estate. The aim is to winnow out weakness and determine who should win a place on the advanced, and suitably terrifying, course in assassination, sabotage and covert intelligence techniques. Gerard O’Donovan Famalam BBC Three, from 10.00am After a successful pilot last year, Vivienne Acheampong, Gbemisola Ikumelo, Roxanne Sternberg, Tom Moutchi and John MacMillan return with more culturally skewed sketches. Once again, they feature William and Funke’s raunchy chat show, misunderstood superhero Eclipse, Croydon’s voodoo practitioner Professor Lofuko, and a version of Midsomer Murders. 800 Words BBC One, 2.15pm If you like The Durrells you will definitely want to watch hit Australian comedy drama 800 Words. This gently funny series follows George (Erik Thomson), a widower, who horrifies his teenaged children when he moves the entire family to a remote seaside town in New Zealand. Springtime on the Farm Channel 5, 8.00pm This is the first of five shows this week celebrating the “great British farmer”, with the help of Yorkshire Vet stars Peter Wright and Julian Norton, Adam Henson of Countryfile and Springwatch’s Lindsey Chapman. In this programme, they explore how to cope with the stresses of lambing. MasterChef: The Finals BBC One, 9.00pm Oodles of challenges lie ahead for the remaining amateur chefs in the final week, which takes them as far afield as Peru ahead of Friday’s concluding cook-off. First, though, they’re off to North Yorkshire to cater a country-house lunch for local grandees and farmers. Lisbon: An Art Lovers’ Guide BBC Four, 9.00pm Having covered Barcelona, St Petersburg and Amsterdam in their first series of city-break guides, historian Dr Janina Ramirez and art critic Alastair Sooke jet off to explore three less obvious, art-rich destinations. Beirut and Baku are perhaps the more intriguing but it opens in Lisbon, which built up its art reserves during the centuries Portugal was part of one of the world’s great empires, and currently boasts one of the hottest contemporary art scenes in Europe. GO Marcella ITV, 9.00pm This drama’s been a little less fraught the second time round but Marcella still pushes the boundaries of credibility. In this concluding part, the heroine (Anna Friel) tracks down the killer, only to suffer one of her unfortunate episodes. GO The Core (2003) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.25pm Rome starts to crumble, the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco collapses and pigeons go mental in Trafalgar Square. Something is obviously amiss, and this time it isn’t climate change. In fact, the Earth’s core has stopped rotating and a team of scientists has to build a special burrowing machine to start it spinning again. Hilary Swank, Stanley Tucci and Aaron Eckhart do their best, but the excitement is intermittent. The Emoji Movie (2017) ★☆☆☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 6.30pm In this animated comedy set inside a smartphone, Gene (voiced by T J Miller), an emoji with multiple facial features, sets out on a quest to be like his colleagues who have only one. He does so with the help of apps like Spotify and Candy Crush. Sadly, the result is so horrendous that there aren’t enough Patrick Stewart-voiced emojis in the world to express what an ugly, artless exercise this is. Triple 9 (2016) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A gang of criminals and corrupt cops plan to kill a police officer in order to pull off their biggest heist yet in John Hillcoat’s crime thriller. There is a lot to like here: a big opening and a strong cast (with Kate Winslet, Gal Gadot, Anthony Mackie and Chiwetel Ejiofor among them). But it feels like fragments of a great crime drama are missing; it’s enthralling up close, but then the big picture isn’t complete. Tuesday 10 April Back to school: Mark, who has two sons with autism Credit: Channel 4 Class of Mum and Dad Channel 4, 8.00pm Another week, another Channel 4 series about education. Hold off on the black marks, however, because this one is pretty good. The premise is simple: Blackrod Primary School just outside of Bolton has thrown open its doors to a class made up of pupils’ parents (and one grandparent). They’ve agreed to go back to school for the summer term to see what modern education is really like, sports day, Sats tests and all. Naturally, its harder than many of them were expecting – 36-year-old decorator Jonny states early on that he thought he’d be able to slope off for a swift cigarette break rather than having to adhere to strict class rules – but there are some touching stories amid the more obvious moments. Most notably, this opening episode focuses on two parents with challenging home lives – Julia, who is raising her 10-year-old cousin Asha after Asha’s mother died, and Mark, who has two autistic sons. While the parents’ travails are interesting, the children are the real scene-stealers, however, from those delighted that their mothers and fathers are taking part to those who are more sceptical. The pair of five-year-olds who spend their time corpsing in front of the camera are particularly endearing. Sarah Hughes Champions League Football: Manchester City v Liverpool BT Sport 2, 7.45pm The Etihad Stadium is the setting as City and Liverpool fight it out for a place in the semi-finals. Liverpool have the advantage following a 3-0 win at Anfield in the first leg. This Time Next Year ITV, 8.00pm Davina McCall returns with another set of heart-tugging stories of people attempting to transform their lives over the course of a year. First up are two new parents who dream of making life wonderful for their baby girl who has been deaf since birth and a couple desperate to start a family. Come Home BBC One, 9.00pm Danny Brocklehurst’s claustrophobic family drama comes to a head as we flashback to find out exactly what went wrong in Greg (Christopher Eccleston) and Marie’s (Paula Malcomson) marriage. Hospital BBC Two, 9.00pm The engrossing fly-on-the-wall medical series continues with Nottingham University Hospitals Trust struggling to cope with the new NHS ruling regarding the cancellation of all non-urgent surgery. The episode focuses on Val, a 55-year-old with mouth cancer whose surgeon is desperately trying to ensure that her operation goes ahead. Here and Now Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm With only two episodes left to go, Alan Ball’s family drama continues to tread water in the most frustrating ways. On paper, there are a whole bunch of interesting stories in the mix, from Kristen’s (Sosie Bacon) possible relationship with Navid (Marwan Salama) to Ramon’s (Daniel Zovatto) continuing visions, but the problem is nothing much happens with any of them as each story moves on only incrementally each week. In this episode, Audrey (Holly Hunter) finally turns the tables on the perpetually smug Greg (Tim Robbins). Cunk on Britain BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm Diana Morgan’s pitch-perfect send-up of history programmes moves to the Tudor era and beyond as Cunk takes on Henry VIII, aka “The kingiest king who kinged over Britain” before giving us her unique perspective on “Bloody” Mary Tudor (“horrible like the drink”) and Elizabeth I. SH Divorce Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The acerbic Sarah Jessica Parker sitcom has been firing on all cylinders throughout its second series – possibly because it’s more interesting watching Frances (Parker) and Robert (the excellent Thomas Haden Church) navigate life after divorce than it was watching them get there. Here, Frances tries to make a new contact in the art world. SH Speed (1994) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm “There’s a bomb on the bus!” is the most famous line and basically the entire plot of one of the best action thrillers of the Nineties. The sizzling chemistry between LAPD Swat specialist Jack Traven (Keanu Reeves) and passenger Annie Porter (Sandra Bullock) sexes up the exhilarating action scenes, while Dennis Hopper is fantastically unhinged as a revenge-driven, retired bomb squad member turned terrorist. Fast & Furious 7 (2015) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 9.00pm Paul Walker was killed in a car crash part-way through making this film so it was completed with the help of his two younger brothers and some subtle computer graphics. The good news is that this is the best film in the franchise and does justice to Walker. It isn’t polished blockbuster film-making – though if it was, it wouldn’t be Fast & Furious. But it speaks straight to your adrenal glands. The Witches of Eastwick (1987) ★★★☆☆ Syfy, 9.00pm It is remarkable that director George Miller’s daft, unfettered romp of a film works at all. But, thanks to Jack Nicholson’s delicious overacting as Daryl Van Horne, a manic gentleman who closely resembles the devil, and the three gorgeous, single small-town friends, Alexandra (Cher), Jane (Susan Sarandon) and Sukie (Michelle Pfeiffer), who vie for his debased attentions, it somehow does. Wednesday 11 April Family ties: Edgar Ramirez and Penelope Cruz Credit: BBC The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story BBC Two, 9.00pm It’s been fascinating to discover the “true” story behind the 1997 murder of fhion designer Gianni Versace in Ryan Murphy’s glitzy drama, which has expertly depicted the inner world of the perpetrator, a Walter Mitty-style serial killer called Andrew Cunanan (a career-defining role for Darren Criss). This episode, however, has a mid-series lull about it as Cunanan ascends to the higher echelons of gay society, shaping himself meticulously into the posh, preppy eye-candy who saw a sugar daddy (or two) as his way to the top. Elsewhere, the Versace siblings return at last. Gianni (Edgar Ramirez), now in failing health decides to champion his insecure sister Donatella (Penélope Cruz in a frightful wig) and turns her into both designer and muse. Despite a lack of characters to root for – the Versaces’ moments of vulnerability dissolve into tedious histrionics and are eclipsed by Cunanan’s cold-blooded machinations – it’s all quite a fabulous mix of fashion, high society and brutal murder, with some interesting commentary on homophobia in the Nineties as well. Vicki Power The Secret Helpers BBC Two, 8.00pm Watch and weep as timid elderly widow Lesley begins a new life as an out gay woman in this life-affirming docu-series. She’s encouraged with warmth and wisdom by amateur “sages” from abroad, who talk to her secretly through a hidden earpiece. From World War to Cold War Yesterday, 8.00pm As the Second World War drew to a close, Churchill, Stalin and Roosevelt met at Yalta in the Crimea to broker post-war peace. This brisk two-part documentary raids the archives for clips and letters from those who attended, and gathers experts and relatives – including FDR’s grandson – to investigate power plays by Stalin that wrong-footed his Allied counterparts. It’s a detailed look at how and why the compromises reached at Yalta were quickly cast aside. Bacchus Uncovered: Ancient God of Ecstasy BBC Four, 9.00pm Historian Bettany Hughes continues to explore ancient civilisations, moving on to Bacchus, the Roman god of wine. Hughes’s odyssey starts under the City of London, where an 1,800-year-old Roman temple to Bacchus was discovered less than 100 years ago, and takes her to Greece, the Middle East and the Caucasus to explore the god’s roots and influence. VP Benidorm ITV, 9.00pm Fluffy as candyfloss, this lewd seaside comedy provides some fun, particularly in the retro casting of stars of yesteryear. This week, an exuberant Sammy (Shane Richie) tries to persuade Monty (John Challis) that, after his successful comeback gig, he is ready for an evening slot. One Born Every Minute Channel 4, 9.00pm This feelgood documentary series brings more poignant tales from a Birmingham labour ward. This week we meet Chantell, about to deliver her third child, who regales us with a moving story of how parenthood with partner Phil has healed the wounds of a traumatic past. First Dates Channel 4, 10.00pm The thoughtful dating show pairs up four more couples, but the road to love is bumpy – septuagenarian Deanna finds her date more interested in the waiter than her. More promising is the match between Bianca and Teza, who allow their vulnerabilities to show. VP The Thin Red Line (1998) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 3.10pm This lyrical Second World War drama, directed by Terrence Malick, tells the story of a group of young US soldiers fighting the Japanese for control of the island of Guadalcanal. Full of stars such as Sean Penn and George Clooney, it struggles with its own battle to squeeze in so many characters but is still an atmospheric meditation on the nature of war. Nick Nolte and Adrien Brody also star. The Remains of the Day (1993) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 3.55pm The success of Merchant Ivory’s adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro’s Thirties-set novel, a well-observed study of regret, is built around its perfectly cast leads: Anthony Hopkins as James, the butler to the doltish aristocrat Lord Darlington (James Fox) and Emma Thompson as a housekeeper who tries to draw him out of his sterile shell. Lush visuals give it an added richness. Transporter 2 (2005) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A martial arts action sequel, in which Jason Statham and Alessandro Gassman are the sporadically thrilling stars. Statham is Frank Martin, who accepts a job as chauffeur to Jack (Hunter Clary), the son of Miami’s politician Jefferson Billings (Matthew Modine). But the local Colombian drug dealers aren’t happy with his boss’s efforts to clean up the city. Cue a kidnapping, and a potentially deadly encounter with a cocaine baron. Thursday 12 April Changing attitudes: Holly and Hollie Credit: BBC Living with the Brainy Bunch BBC Two, 8.00pm Enterprising, PR-conscious Ash Ali is headmaster of Chessington Community College, a fast-improving school with a few problem pupils. Among them are Jack and Hollie who, on the surface, are comically awful teenagers. Hollie gripes constantly, throws strops and storms out of classrooms if things aren’t going her way. Jack is sullen, lazy and has clocked up 15 suspensions in the past year. It will come as no surprise to regular viewers of such documentaries that their behaviour is rooted in low self-esteem, although their parents unquestionably indulge their foibles. Ali’s novel solution is to place Hollie with Holly, tapdancing head girl and gregarious boffin, and Jack with Tharush, a Sri Lankan immigrant by way of Italy, whose talents are only matched by his work ethic. Now that Jack and Hollie are in the bosom of new families for six weeks, it’s hoped that a new environment, greater discipline and rigid routines will see their results improve and attitudes pick up. There are setbacks on the largely familiar narrative trajectory, but it’s cast to perfection and, as a demonstration of the importance of parenting in academic achievement, the experiment gets an A-star. Gabriel Tate European Tour Golf: The Open de Espana Sky Sports Golf, 11.00am The opening day’s play of the event from the Centro Nacional de Golf in Madrid, which was won by Andrew Johnston the last time it was held in 2016. War Above the Trenches Yesterday, 8.00pm This decent two-parter tells the story of the Royal Flying Corps and their battle to win control of the air in the First World War. Based on Peter Hart’s book Bloody April, it draws affectingly on the testimony of veterans to show there was more to the Western Front than trench warfare. Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm The modern age draws closer, as Simon Schama tackles the theme of radiance, guiding us through Gothic cathedrals, Baroque Venetian masterpieces and dazzling Japanese woodblock prints. The Investigator: A British Crime Story ITV, 9.00pm The second real-life case of the series sees Mark Williams-Thomas investigating the 1977 murders of three women in Glasgow. The suspect is Angus Sinclair, who is currently serving a life sentence for killing two other women that same year. We hear from his ex-wife, and learn how he was a prime suspect but escaped charges for the first killings when key evidence went missing. Indian Summer School Channel 4, 9.00pm This diverting documentary series concludes with a Himalayan trek, a controversial article in the school newspaper and the GCSE retakes that were the goal of the entire enterprise. Will Alfie, Harry, Jack and co see their grades improve? Urban Myths: Marilyn Monroe and Billy Wilder Sky Arts, 9.00pm Sky Arts’ boldly cast series of vaguely apocryphal tales from the pop-culture frontlines returns with a dispatch from the set of Some Like It Hot, the magnificent 1959 comedy that is almost certainly more fun to watch than it was to make. In this minor but entertaining reimagining, Tony Curtis (Alex Pettyfer) is threatening to cuckold Arthur Miller (Dougray Scott) by making off with Marilyn Monroe (Gemma Arterton), whose caprice, drinking and sensitivity is driving director Billy Wilder (James Purefoy) to distraction. GT Still Game BBC One, 9.30pm; BBC Two Wales, 10.00pm Justifying its prime-time BBC One slot, the Scottish sitcom bows out in triumph with a typically well-wrought farce involving a Hollywood stuntman, a disastrous driving lesson and romance for the widowed Isa (Jane McCarry). GT The Man with the Golden Gun (1974) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Christopher Lee steals the show as the titular assassin, Francisco Scaramanga, in this classic Bond adventure. Roger Moore’s secret agent, in his second outing as 007, must pursue him, with the help of sidekick Mary Goodnight (Britt Ekland), to the villain’s island lair in order to prevent him harnessing the power of the Sun for evil. The confrontations between Moore and Lee are easily the film’s highlights. Swordfish (2001) ★★☆☆☆ TCM, 9.00pm The most often quoted bit of trivia about this film is that Halle Berry was paid an additional £500,000 to go topless. It’s rather lucky she agreed because she’s probably the most appealing aspect of this frenetic thriller. John Travolta and Hugh Jackman put on testosterone-fuelled displays as a morally dubious counter-terrorist agent and the hacker he blackmails into accessing billions of dollars of government money. Some Like It Hot (1959, b/w) ★★★★★ Sky Arts, 9.30pm When two musicians (Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis) witness a mob hit, they flee the state disguised as women in an all-female band, but further complications arise in the form of demure ukulele player Sugar Kane, superbly played by Marilyn Monroe. Billy Wilder’s classic comedy is effortlessly wacky and clever. Before, at 9pm, is Urban Myths, which imagines what happened on the set of this romcom. Friday 13 April Dishing out opinions: John Torode and Gregg Wallace Credit: BBC MasterChef: The Final BBC One, 8.30pm It has taken 25 episodes over seven weeks to whittle down the 56 amateur contestants to three finalists, and in the process, MasterChef 2018 has produced some of the best cooking – and some of the toughest competition – in the series’ long history. (It has been running in one form or another since 1990; and since 2005 in, roughly, its current format with judges Gregg Wallace and John Torode presenting.) This last week has been no exception, with the finalists having to dig deeper than ever to produce the best dishes of their lives and some great moments – notably during the spectacular trip to South America when they met Peruvian superchef Gaston Acurio and took on a service at the fifth best restaurant in the world, the Central in Lima, under Michelin-starred maestro Virgilio Martínez Véliz. In the finale, it’s all about who cooks the best food, though, as the final three return to the studio kitchen to undergo a test of culinary skills and nerve as they set about creating the most important three-course meal of their lives – in the hope of being judged worthy of a title that has launched many a great career: MasterChef champion. Gerard O’Donovan Chef’s Table: Pastry Netflix, from today This mouth-watering spin-off from Netflix’s popular global foodie series Chef’s Table puts the focus entirely on sweet stuff, talking the cameras inside the kitchens of some of the world’s best pastry chefs, among them Christina Tosi’s Milk Bar in New York, Corrado Assenza’s Caffé Sicilia in Noto, Sicily, Jordi Roca’s El Celler de Can Roca in Girona, and Will Goldfarb’s Room4Dessert in Bali. Lost in Space Netflix, from today Not so much a rerun as a spectacular new take on the classic Sixties sci-fi series about a family marooned in space when their ship runs into difficulty on their way to a new colony and crashes on an unknown and surprisingly hostile planet. There are plenty of thrills and impressive visual effects, and Toby Stephens and Molly Parker are excellent as the pioneering Robinson parents John and Judy, while Parker Posey is an enigmatic (and now female) Dr Smith. GO The City & The City BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 9.30pm Cop thrillers don’t come much more weirdly dystopian than China Miéville’s award-winning 2009 novel and this ultra-stylish adaptation serves its source material very well. In episode two, Inspector Borlú (David Morrissey) ventures back across the border while investigating the murder of a foreign student. Episodes BBC Two, 10.00pm; Wales, 11.05pm Having overcome last week’s unfortunate episode in this sitcom, Matt (Matt LeBlanc) is back on top and leveraging his spurt in the ratings for all it’s worth, handing Sean (Stephen Mangan) and Beverly (Tamsin Greig) a welcome opportunity for escape. Lee and Dean Channel 4, 10.00pm More rough charm, as life gets complicated for Stevenage’s very own Dumb and Dumber when Lee’s (Miles Chapman) financial worries mount and Dean (Mark O’Sullivan) is persuaded to premiere his poetry at the local arts club. Front Row Late BBC Two, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm Freedom of speech and censorship are under the spotlight as host Mary Beard and guests discuss Theatre Clwyd’s production The Assassination of Katie Hopkins and former US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright’s new book Fascism: A Warning. GO Alien: Covenant (2017) ★★★★★ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm The latest film in the Alien saga from Ridley Scott is arguably a mad scientist movie. It follows the crew of the colony ship Covenant (including Katherine Waterson) as they discover what they think is an uncharted paradise, but what they uncover a threat beyond their imagination. Michael Fassbender puts in a spectacular turn as kindly robot David and his twisted “brother” Walter. Invictus (2009) ★★★★☆ ITV, 10.45pm Following the death of Nelson Mandela’s ex-wife Winnie last week, aged 81, here’s Clint Eastwood’s take on South Africa’s World Cup victory in 1995. As the country emerges from apartheid, the newly elected President Mandela (an uncanny Morgan Freeman) sees the potential for the national rugby team, led by François Pienaar (Matt Damon), to be a catalyst for harmony. This is a polished and uplifting film. Monty Python Live at the Hollywood Bowl (1982) ★★★★☆ Gold, 1.40am Much like the Secret Policeman’s Ball, this comedy performance film sees the Monty Python gang take to the stage, but this time they’re in Hollywood. Among the sketches are the Silly Olympics, where athletes compete in absurd sports, The Lumberjack Song, and The Ministry of Silly Walks. This film also features Carol Cleveland in numerous supporting roles. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
Friday 6 April The City & the City BBC Two, 9.00pm; Northern Ireland, 9.30pm “I knew there was another city I dare not see… Just on the other side of where I was supposed to look.” So states Inspector Tyador Borlú (David Morrissey) midway through this engrossing adaptation of China Miéville’s Borgesian novel, which achieves the apparently impossible by bringing a dense and clever book to brilliant, atmospheric life. Borlú, a detective with the Extreme Crime Squad in the rundown vaguely Eastern European city of Beszul, is handed the task of solving the murder of a foreign student. So far, so standard, but what unfolds turns out to be anything but as scriptwriter Tony Grisoni (Red Riding) expertly captures Miéville’s vision of a world in which a city is divided not by a wall or barricade, but by blurred realities the populace is trained from birth not to see. Thus the two cities of Beszul and Ul Qoma coexist in the same space but without acknowledging each other, the town hall their only shared space. To look directly on the other city is to commit “Breach”, bringing about the wrath of the secret police. Grisoni and director Tom Shankland build the tension inexorably as Borlú’s world is slowly but surely upended. An absolute treat. Sarah Hughes Sounds Like Friday Night BBC One, 7.30pm The BBC’s music TV revival didn’t make a huge splash with its first series but it’s still worth checking out, if only because co-host and Radio 1Xtra presenter Dotty is such a likeable presence. Tonight, she’s on the road, while Greg James anchors from the studio. Professor Green, Snow Patrol and Years & Years perform. Have I Got News for You BBC One, 9.30pm The satirical quiz show returns for a 55th series, with captains Paul Merton and Ian Hislop joined by presenter Steph McGovern and comedian Josh Widdicombe; Jeremy Paxman hosts. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm In an era when the talk show appears tired somehow Graham Norton manages to keep the format enjoyable. Tonight’s episode, the first in a new series, sees husband-and-wife team Emily Blunt and John Krasinski discuss their horror A Quiet Place. Front Row Late BBC Two, 11.05pm; N Ireland, 11.35pm Following the kerfuffle over its poorly received first series, the arts show returns with a rejigged format and Mary Beard in the presenter’s chair. Informed debate is promised, although Beard has said that she won’t simply replicate the notoriously combative Newsnight Review. SH BBC Young Musician 2018 BBC Four, 7.30pm The contest kicks off at the Royal Birmingham Conservatoire’s new concert hall. Presenter Josie d’Arby is joined by 1998 finalist Alison Balsom as we meet the final five: violinists Elodie Chousmer-Howelles and Stephanie Childress, double bassist Will Duerden, guitarist Torrin Williams and cellist Maxim Calver. The judges are double bassist Leon Bosch, classical guitarist Miloš Karadaglić, violinist and previous Young Musician of the Year winner, Jennifer Pike. Composer Kerry Andrew and the contestants will perform works by Bach, Brahms and Stravinsky. The Nineties Sky Arts, 9.00pm There’s nothing like seeing the decade you came of age in co-opted for nostalgic TV to make you feel old, but for those who can bear seeing their youth dissected Sky Arts at least does it well. Tonight’s second episode continues the focus on the decade’s TV with The Sopranos and Seinfeld under discussion. SH Fury (2014) ★★★★★ 5STAR, 9.00pm David Ayer’s study of the habits and habitats of the American killer male is an astonishing, stirring drama. It’s Germany 1945, and Sgt Don “Wardaddy” Collie (Brad Pitt) and his team are grinding towards Berlin in a battered M4 Sherman tank. There is no rescue mission, just an agonising rumble from one brush with death to the next. The set-piece battles are gripping, and the raw terror of war is blasted home. Four Weddings and a Funeral (1994) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm The best of Richard Curtis and Hugh Grant’s romcoms about awfully nice chaps dithering over frightfully pretty girls. Grant plays bumbling Charles, who, ah, er, can’t tell what’s, um, going on between him and the scrummy Carrie (Andie MacDowell), who he keeps, gosh, bumping into at weddings. It’s aged pretty well and certainly knocks spots off Love, Actually. Lawless (2012) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 12.45am An adaptation of the historical novel The Wettest County in the World, John Hillcoat’s Prohibition-era western follows three brothers (played by Tom Hardy, Shia LaBeouf and Jason Clarke), who do a tidy business distilling and selling illegal moonshine whiskey. It’s an oddly affectionate clan portrait – the violence the brothers mete out is implicitly forgiven – but the period detail is well observed. Saturday 7 April Saturday night fever: Declan Donnelly presents from Orlando Credit: Rex/Shutterstock Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway ITV, 7.00pm It can’t be easy hosting a show as exuberant as Saturday Night Takeaway on your own but Declan Donnelly made a solid if understandably restrained go of it last week. He ensured that the light entertainment series proceeded pretty much as normal in the absence of long-time work partner Ant McPartlin, whose travails were sensibly referenced only in very brief passing (“I’ve got twice the amount of work to do,” Donnelly noted at one point before mock-berating the production crew that “I’ll have to do it myself, like everything else around here this week”). That said, this final episode ups the ante as Donnelly takes the show on the road to the Universal Orlando Resort in Florida. Once there we’re promised a “super-sized” edition featuring stunts, surprises and “extra-special” guests. No word yet as to who those guests will be but expect Donnelly to continue making the best of a difficult situation, buoyed by extra support from Scarlett Moffatt, who is in charge of ensuring that the Place on the Plane winners have a wonderful time, and Stephen Mulhern, who has the possibly less than enviable task of explaining In for a Penny to an American audience. Sarah Hughes Premier League Football: Everton v Liverpool Sky Sports Main Event, 12.30pm Tired, perhaps, from their Champions League quarter-final first leg against Man City, Liverpool face their bitter local rivals Everton at Goodison Park. The home side, who’ve won three of their last six games, haven’t beaten Liverpool since October 2010, when Tim Cahill and Mikel Arteta gave them a 2-0 victory. Premiership Rugby Union: Bath v Leicester Tigers Channel 5, 1.30pm Time was when Bath and Leicester were the titans of English rugby. Currently they are fifth and eighth in the league, respectively. In September, Bath claimed a 27-23 win at Welford Road, as they held on for their first away win at Leicester since 2003, ensuring an unhappy return for George Ford against the club he left in the summer. The two sides also met in the Anglo-Welsh Cup at the Recreation Ground in November, where Bath also emerged victorious, beating Leicester 33-31 on that occasion. Premier League Football: Manchester City v Manchester United Sky Sports Main Event, 5.30pm What better way for Pep Guardiola’s Manchester City to clinch the title than by beating second-placed Manchester United at the Etihad Stadium. Sixteen points ahead of them in the table, City have been formidable this season, winning 27 of the 31 league games they’ve played. One of those victories came at Old Trafford, with a goal from Nicolas Otamendi giving City a 2-1 victory when these sides met in December. Britain’s Most Historic Towns Channel 4, 8.00pm Alice Roberts is our guide for this new six-part series, which sees her search the UK for the places that best sum up an historical era. The first era is Roman Britain, so Roberts heads to Chester, where she abseils down walls, hunkers in caves and uncovers the truth about the city. Casualty BBC One, 8.20pm The medical drama’s storyline about Dylan’s (William Beck) alcoholism continues to be sensitively handled as the medic’s ex-wife Sam (Charlotte Salt) worries about whether she can help him. Meanwhile, Ethan (George Hardy) struggles with his own demons as he realises that a patient is related to his brother’s killer. The Voice UK: Live Final ITV, 8.30pm Every reality TV idea has an allotted shelf life and it’s hard not to feel that musical talent contests have come to the end of their run. For those who disagree, The Voice UK’s grand finale is here and the final four battle it out for public approval. Below the Surface BBC Four, 9.00pm & 9.45pm BBC Four’s latest Scandi drama started off tensely but like its predecessor, Modus, it has gone on to become ever more ludicrous. Now it’s the final two episodes, and Philip Norgaard (Johannes Lassen) faces off against Mark (Jakob Oftebro), the man behind the hostage crisis. Much heartfelt talking follows, although you may end up feeling more sympathetic towards the damaged Mark than the chilly Norgaard. Pearl Jam: Let’s Play Two Sky Arts, 9.00pm When is a music documentary not a music documentary? When it’s also a sports film. This exuberant film, which was made following the Chicago Cubs’ victory in baseball’s World Series in 2016, follows die-hard Cubs fan and Pearl Jam lead singer Eddie Vedder as he cheers on his team during their championship run while also preparing the band for two August shows at the team’s Wrigley Field Stadium. The result is an affectionate portrait of the singer as fan. SH Troy: Fall of a City BBC One, 9.10pm David Farr’s epic series reaches its climax with the arrival of the most famous horse in history. After an uninspiring start, Troy has picked up in recent weeks and the final episode is a well-handled tale of betrayal and death. It’s a curate’s egg of a series, let down by poor casting. SH X-Men (2000) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.00pm Bryan Singer directs an all-star cast that includes Patrick Stewart, Hugh Jackman, Ian McKellen and Halle Berry, in the first of the X-Men franchise. A group of mutants must decide whether to side with Professor Xavier (Stewart) or the evil Magneto (McKellen) in what is a solid opening to the series and which paved the way for plenty of big-budget sequels. This is followed by X-Men 2 and X-Men 3 at 9.00pm and 11.35pm respectively. Legend (2015) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Tom Hardy gives a solid, convincing performance as east London gangster Reggie Kray but his caricatured portrayal of twin brother Ronnie lets him down, and this inconsistency leads to an entertaining though muddled film. Emily Browning, however, gives just the right mix of defiance and despair as Frances Shea, Reggie’s put-upon wife. Watch out for some particularly gory scenes. Lethal Weapon 2 (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.05pm Mel Gibson sports his signature Eighties mullet in the second film of this daft-but-fun action franchise. LAPD officer Riggs (Gibson) teams up once again with his partner Murtaugh (Danny Glover) to track down a band of South African criminals while protecting a painfully frenzied witness (Joe Pesci). Naturally, the pair find themselves drawn into violent action sequences orchestrated by stereotypical bad guys. Sunday 8 April Hostess with the mostest: Catherine Tate presents the awards Credit: ITV The Olivier Awards 2018 ITV, 10.20pm Last year, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child swept the board with nine Olivier Awards, something that looked impossible to top. But then came Lin Manuel Miranda’s blockbuster musical Hamilton, whose West End run has received reviews every bit as rapturous as those from its Broadway debut. The show has a record-breaking 13 nominations, which it is thought will be translated into awards. After being snubbed for Jerusalem, Jez Butterworth will surely be rewarded for his equally magisterial play The Ferryman (its eight nominations include best play and best director for Sam Mendes), while contenders in the acting categories include Bryan Cranston for Network, Andrew Garfield for Angels in America and Lesley Manville for Long Day’s Journey into Night. Catherine Tate will be on hosting duties for the event at the Royal Albert Hall, which will, as usual, feature a crop of stellar performances; this one will include a special tribute to Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, which turns 50 this year. Let’s hope the organisers bring together Josephs of the past for a big singalong: Jason Donovan, Phillip Schofield, Ian “H” Watkins and Lee Mead will all, one suspects, be available. Gabriel Tate Sex Robots and Us BBC Three, from 10.00am James Young, an amputee who created his own bionic arm, meets the people who design sex robots and hears about their plans for them, from being given to old people’s homes to “employment” in brothels. But is it the harmless, even socially responsible pursuit thatthey claim? Formula 1: The Bahrain Grand Prix Sky Sports F1, 3.30pm After the Australian Grand Prix – in which Sebastian Vettel took advantage of a safety-car blunder to win under pristine Melbourne skies – attention turns to the second round of the season at the Bahrain International Circuit in Sakhir. Another blunder cost Lewis Hamilton on this circuit last year – this time it happened in the pit lane, with Vettel capitalising to win by 6.6 seconds. The Generation Game BBC One, 8.00pm How do you top last week’s cavalcade of silliness in this rebooted game show? You rope in Danny Dyer to join Mel Giedroyc, Sue Perkins and panellists Melvin Odoom and Roisin Conaty for challenges that include cake decorating, balloon modelling and dancing the Argentine Tango. The Durrells ITV, 8.00pm In the fourth episode of the popular drama, Larry (Josh O’Connor) visits Athens with two oddly named guests – Captain Creech (James Cosmo) and Prince Jeejeebuoy (Tanmay Dhanania) – in tow. There, they offer advice to Gerry (Milo Parker), who is applying for a new school. Jesus’ Female Disciples: the New Evidence Channel 4, 8.00pm For centuries, the birth of Christianity was regarded as a largely male affair, with women as only bit-part players. Now, Bible experts Helen Bond and Joan Taylor have discovered evidence that women were involved in everything from preaching and baptising to funding the movement as it grew. This absorbing documentary follows the historians’ progress. Golf: The Masters Sky Sports Main Event, 8.00pm Prepare for a dramatic finale as this year’s first Major – from the Augusta National in Georgia – concludes. Last year, Spain’s Sergio Garcia won the coveted green jacket, beating Justin Rose in a tense play-off. Ordeal by Innocence BBC One, 9.00pm Sarah Phelps’s splendid adaptation continues, as Arthur Calgary (Luke Treadaway) resolves to prove the truth about Jack Argyll’s (Anthony Boyle) alibi by any means necessary. GT Folk Awards 2018 BBC Four, 9.00pm Mark Radcliffe and Julie Fowlis introduce highlights from this year’s Radio 2 Folk Awards in Belfast. It features performances from Cara Dillon, Lankum and Eliza Carthy and the Wayward Band. The great Nick Drake will also be inducted into the Hall of Fame, his genius long-established, even if such recognition eluded him during his short life. Producer Dónal Lunny, meanwhile, receives the Lifetime Achievement Award for decades of tireless work promoting the renaissance in Irish music, plus The Armagh Pipers Club are presented with the Good Tradition Award. GT Emma (1996) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 3.00pm Gwyneth Paltrow’s American iciness melts in this deft adaptation of Jane Austen’s classic comic romance. She is Emma Woodhouse, spoilt, charming and an inveterate meddler. Only Mr George Knightley (Jeremy Northam) dares challenge her behaviour – but what are his motives? A clever film with a superb supporting cast, including Toni Collette, Alan Cumming and Ewan McGregor. United 93 (2006) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 9.55pm Director Paul Greengrass’s boneshaking, real-time take on the final hours of the United Airlines plane whose passengers rebelled against their hijackers on September 11, 2001 feels uncomfortably realistic. Greengrass, whose signature rapid cutting made the second and third Bourne films so exciting, proves expert at handling the most infamous atrocity of modern times with intelligence and sobriety. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 11.00pm This superb adaptation of John le Carré’s brilliant, intricate Cold War spy novel is a triumph. The espionage drama follows the hunt for a Soviet double agent at the top of the British secret service, with Gary Oldman spearheading the excellent ensemble cast, which includes Colin Firth, Tom Hardy, John Hurt and Benedict Cumberbatch. It’s funny, seductive and suspenseful. Monday 9 April I spy: a recruit sees if she’s got what it takes to be an SOE agent Credit: BBC Secret Agent Selection: WW2 BBC Two, 9.00pm Not unlike Channel 4’s SAS: Who Dares Wins and BBC Two’s Astronauts: Do You Have What It Takes?, this absorbing new series puts a group of recruits through a series of gruelling physical and psychological challenges to see if they could make the grade as a secret agent according to an established selection test used during the Second World War. This test was used by the Special Operations Executive (SOE) to determine whether recruits from many different walks of life would be capable of being dropped behind enemy lines and surviving as a covert officer with a brief to cause the maximum disruption possible to the enemy in the territory. As with the original SOE, the 14 candidates come from diverse backgrounds (among them a research scientist, a property developer, former police officer, a drag act performer, a retired investment banker and an Army veteran). In the opening episode, they undergo the initial four-day assessment at a remote Scottish country-house estate. The aim is to winnow out weakness and determine who should win a place on the advanced, and suitably terrifying, course in assassination, sabotage and covert intelligence techniques. Gerard O’Donovan Famalam BBC Three, from 10.00am After a successful pilot last year, Vivienne Acheampong, Gbemisola Ikumelo, Roxanne Sternberg, Tom Moutchi and John MacMillan return with more culturally skewed sketches. Once again, they feature William and Funke’s raunchy chat show, misunderstood superhero Eclipse, Croydon’s voodoo practitioner Professor Lofuko, and a version of Midsomer Murders. 800 Words BBC One, 2.15pm If you like The Durrells you will definitely want to watch hit Australian comedy drama 800 Words. This gently funny series follows George (Erik Thomson), a widower, who horrifies his teenaged children when he moves the entire family to a remote seaside town in New Zealand. Springtime on the Farm Channel 5, 8.00pm This is the first of five shows this week celebrating the “great British farmer”, with the help of Yorkshire Vet stars Peter Wright and Julian Norton, Adam Henson of Countryfile and Springwatch’s Lindsey Chapman. In this programme, they explore how to cope with the stresses of lambing. MasterChef: The Finals BBC One, 9.00pm Oodles of challenges lie ahead for the remaining amateur chefs in the final week, which takes them as far afield as Peru ahead of Friday’s concluding cook-off. First, though, they’re off to North Yorkshire to cater a country-house lunch for local grandees and farmers. Lisbon: An Art Lovers’ Guide BBC Four, 9.00pm Having covered Barcelona, St Petersburg and Amsterdam in their first series of city-break guides, historian Dr Janina Ramirez and art critic Alastair Sooke jet off to explore three less obvious, art-rich destinations. Beirut and Baku are perhaps the more intriguing but it opens in Lisbon, which built up its art reserves during the centuries Portugal was part of one of the world’s great empires, and currently boasts one of the hottest contemporary art scenes in Europe. GO Marcella ITV, 9.00pm This drama’s been a little less fraught the second time round but Marcella still pushes the boundaries of credibility. In this concluding part, the heroine (Anna Friel) tracks down the killer, only to suffer one of her unfortunate episodes. GO The Core (2003) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.25pm Rome starts to crumble, the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco collapses and pigeons go mental in Trafalgar Square. Something is obviously amiss, and this time it isn’t climate change. In fact, the Earth’s core has stopped rotating and a team of scientists has to build a special burrowing machine to start it spinning again. Hilary Swank, Stanley Tucci and Aaron Eckhart do their best, but the excitement is intermittent. The Emoji Movie (2017) ★☆☆☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 6.30pm In this animated comedy set inside a smartphone, Gene (voiced by T J Miller), an emoji with multiple facial features, sets out on a quest to be like his colleagues who have only one. He does so with the help of apps like Spotify and Candy Crush. Sadly, the result is so horrendous that there aren’t enough Patrick Stewart-voiced emojis in the world to express what an ugly, artless exercise this is. Triple 9 (2016) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A gang of criminals and corrupt cops plan to kill a police officer in order to pull off their biggest heist yet in John Hillcoat’s crime thriller. There is a lot to like here: a big opening and a strong cast (with Kate Winslet, Gal Gadot, Anthony Mackie and Chiwetel Ejiofor among them). But it feels like fragments of a great crime drama are missing; it’s enthralling up close, but then the big picture isn’t complete. Tuesday 10 April Back to school: Mark, who has two sons with autism Credit: Channel 4 Class of Mum and Dad Channel 4, 8.00pm Another week, another Channel 4 series about education. Hold off on the black marks, however, because this one is pretty good. The premise is simple: Blackrod Primary School just outside of Bolton has thrown open its doors to a class made up of pupils’ parents (and one grandparent). They’ve agreed to go back to school for the summer term to see what modern education is really like, sports day, Sats tests and all. Naturally, its harder than many of them were expecting – 36-year-old decorator Jonny states early on that he thought he’d be able to slope off for a swift cigarette break rather than having to adhere to strict class rules – but there are some touching stories amid the more obvious moments. Most notably, this opening episode focuses on two parents with challenging home lives – Julia, who is raising her 10-year-old cousin Asha after Asha’s mother died, and Mark, who has two autistic sons. While the parents’ travails are interesting, the children are the real scene-stealers, however, from those delighted that their mothers and fathers are taking part to those who are more sceptical. The pair of five-year-olds who spend their time corpsing in front of the camera are particularly endearing. Sarah Hughes Champions League Football: Manchester City v Liverpool BT Sport 2, 7.45pm The Etihad Stadium is the setting as City and Liverpool fight it out for a place in the semi-finals. Liverpool have the advantage following a 3-0 win at Anfield in the first leg. This Time Next Year ITV, 8.00pm Davina McCall returns with another set of heart-tugging stories of people attempting to transform their lives over the course of a year. First up are two new parents who dream of making life wonderful for their baby girl who has been deaf since birth and a couple desperate to start a family. Come Home BBC One, 9.00pm Danny Brocklehurst’s claustrophobic family drama comes to a head as we flashback to find out exactly what went wrong in Greg (Christopher Eccleston) and Marie’s (Paula Malcomson) marriage. Hospital BBC Two, 9.00pm The engrossing fly-on-the-wall medical series continues with Nottingham University Hospitals Trust struggling to cope with the new NHS ruling regarding the cancellation of all non-urgent surgery. The episode focuses on Val, a 55-year-old with mouth cancer whose surgeon is desperately trying to ensure that her operation goes ahead. Here and Now Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm With only two episodes left to go, Alan Ball’s family drama continues to tread water in the most frustrating ways. On paper, there are a whole bunch of interesting stories in the mix, from Kristen’s (Sosie Bacon) possible relationship with Navid (Marwan Salama) to Ramon’s (Daniel Zovatto) continuing visions, but the problem is nothing much happens with any of them as each story moves on only incrementally each week. In this episode, Audrey (Holly Hunter) finally turns the tables on the perpetually smug Greg (Tim Robbins). Cunk on Britain BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm Diana Morgan’s pitch-perfect send-up of history programmes moves to the Tudor era and beyond as Cunk takes on Henry VIII, aka “The kingiest king who kinged over Britain” before giving us her unique perspective on “Bloody” Mary Tudor (“horrible like the drink”) and Elizabeth I. SH Divorce Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The acerbic Sarah Jessica Parker sitcom has been firing on all cylinders throughout its second series – possibly because it’s more interesting watching Frances (Parker) and Robert (the excellent Thomas Haden Church) navigate life after divorce than it was watching them get there. Here, Frances tries to make a new contact in the art world. SH Speed (1994) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm “There’s a bomb on the bus!” is the most famous line and basically the entire plot of one of the best action thrillers of the Nineties. The sizzling chemistry between LAPD Swat specialist Jack Traven (Keanu Reeves) and passenger Annie Porter (Sandra Bullock) sexes up the exhilarating action scenes, while Dennis Hopper is fantastically unhinged as a revenge-driven, retired bomb squad member turned terrorist. Fast & Furious 7 (2015) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 9.00pm Paul Walker was killed in a car crash part-way through making this film so it was completed with the help of his two younger brothers and some subtle computer graphics. The good news is that this is the best film in the franchise and does justice to Walker. It isn’t polished blockbuster film-making – though if it was, it wouldn’t be Fast & Furious. But it speaks straight to your adrenal glands. The Witches of Eastwick (1987) ★★★☆☆ Syfy, 9.00pm It is remarkable that director George Miller’s daft, unfettered romp of a film works at all. But, thanks to Jack Nicholson’s delicious overacting as Daryl Van Horne, a manic gentleman who closely resembles the devil, and the three gorgeous, single small-town friends, Alexandra (Cher), Jane (Susan Sarandon) and Sukie (Michelle Pfeiffer), who vie for his debased attentions, it somehow does. Wednesday 11 April Family ties: Edgar Ramirez and Penelope Cruz Credit: BBC The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story BBC Two, 9.00pm It’s been fascinating to discover the “true” story behind the 1997 murder of fhion designer Gianni Versace in Ryan Murphy’s glitzy drama, which has expertly depicted the inner world of the perpetrator, a Walter Mitty-style serial killer called Andrew Cunanan (a career-defining role for Darren Criss). This episode, however, has a mid-series lull about it as Cunanan ascends to the higher echelons of gay society, shaping himself meticulously into the posh, preppy eye-candy who saw a sugar daddy (or two) as his way to the top. Elsewhere, the Versace siblings return at last. Gianni (Edgar Ramirez), now in failing health decides to champion his insecure sister Donatella (Penélope Cruz in a frightful wig) and turns her into both designer and muse. Despite a lack of characters to root for – the Versaces’ moments of vulnerability dissolve into tedious histrionics and are eclipsed by Cunanan’s cold-blooded machinations – it’s all quite a fabulous mix of fashion, high society and brutal murder, with some interesting commentary on homophobia in the Nineties as well. Vicki Power The Secret Helpers BBC Two, 8.00pm Watch and weep as timid elderly widow Lesley begins a new life as an out gay woman in this life-affirming docu-series. She’s encouraged with warmth and wisdom by amateur “sages” from abroad, who talk to her secretly through a hidden earpiece. From World War to Cold War Yesterday, 8.00pm As the Second World War drew to a close, Churchill, Stalin and Roosevelt met at Yalta in the Crimea to broker post-war peace. This brisk two-part documentary raids the archives for clips and letters from those who attended, and gathers experts and relatives – including FDR’s grandson – to investigate power plays by Stalin that wrong-footed his Allied counterparts. It’s a detailed look at how and why the compromises reached at Yalta were quickly cast aside. Bacchus Uncovered: Ancient God of Ecstasy BBC Four, 9.00pm Historian Bettany Hughes continues to explore ancient civilisations, moving on to Bacchus, the Roman god of wine. Hughes’s odyssey starts under the City of London, where an 1,800-year-old Roman temple to Bacchus was discovered less than 100 years ago, and takes her to Greece, the Middle East and the Caucasus to explore the god’s roots and influence. VP Benidorm ITV, 9.00pm Fluffy as candyfloss, this lewd seaside comedy provides some fun, particularly in the retro casting of stars of yesteryear. This week, an exuberant Sammy (Shane Richie) tries to persuade Monty (John Challis) that, after his successful comeback gig, he is ready for an evening slot. One Born Every Minute Channel 4, 9.00pm This feelgood documentary series brings more poignant tales from a Birmingham labour ward. This week we meet Chantell, about to deliver her third child, who regales us with a moving story of how parenthood with partner Phil has healed the wounds of a traumatic past. First Dates Channel 4, 10.00pm The thoughtful dating show pairs up four more couples, but the road to love is bumpy – septuagenarian Deanna finds her date more interested in the waiter than her. More promising is the match between Bianca and Teza, who allow their vulnerabilities to show. VP The Thin Red Line (1998) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 3.10pm This lyrical Second World War drama, directed by Terrence Malick, tells the story of a group of young US soldiers fighting the Japanese for control of the island of Guadalcanal. Full of stars such as Sean Penn and George Clooney, it struggles with its own battle to squeeze in so many characters but is still an atmospheric meditation on the nature of war. Nick Nolte and Adrien Brody also star. The Remains of the Day (1993) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 3.55pm The success of Merchant Ivory’s adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro’s Thirties-set novel, a well-observed study of regret, is built around its perfectly cast leads: Anthony Hopkins as James, the butler to the doltish aristocrat Lord Darlington (James Fox) and Emma Thompson as a housekeeper who tries to draw him out of his sterile shell. Lush visuals give it an added richness. Transporter 2 (2005) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A martial arts action sequel, in which Jason Statham and Alessandro Gassman are the sporadically thrilling stars. Statham is Frank Martin, who accepts a job as chauffeur to Jack (Hunter Clary), the son of Miami’s politician Jefferson Billings (Matthew Modine). But the local Colombian drug dealers aren’t happy with his boss’s efforts to clean up the city. Cue a kidnapping, and a potentially deadly encounter with a cocaine baron. Thursday 12 April Changing attitudes: Holly and Hollie Credit: BBC Living with the Brainy Bunch BBC Two, 8.00pm Enterprising, PR-conscious Ash Ali is headmaster of Chessington Community College, a fast-improving school with a few problem pupils. Among them are Jack and Hollie who, on the surface, are comically awful teenagers. Hollie gripes constantly, throws strops and storms out of classrooms if things aren’t going her way. Jack is sullen, lazy and has clocked up 15 suspensions in the past year. It will come as no surprise to regular viewers of such documentaries that their behaviour is rooted in low self-esteem, although their parents unquestionably indulge their foibles. Ali’s novel solution is to place Hollie with Holly, tapdancing head girl and gregarious boffin, and Jack with Tharush, a Sri Lankan immigrant by way of Italy, whose talents are only matched by his work ethic. Now that Jack and Hollie are in the bosom of new families for six weeks, it’s hoped that a new environment, greater discipline and rigid routines will see their results improve and attitudes pick up. There are setbacks on the largely familiar narrative trajectory, but it’s cast to perfection and, as a demonstration of the importance of parenting in academic achievement, the experiment gets an A-star. Gabriel Tate European Tour Golf: The Open de Espana Sky Sports Golf, 11.00am The opening day’s play of the event from the Centro Nacional de Golf in Madrid, which was won by Andrew Johnston the last time it was held in 2016. War Above the Trenches Yesterday, 8.00pm This decent two-parter tells the story of the Royal Flying Corps and their battle to win control of the air in the First World War. Based on Peter Hart’s book Bloody April, it draws affectingly on the testimony of veterans to show there was more to the Western Front than trench warfare. Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm The modern age draws closer, as Simon Schama tackles the theme of radiance, guiding us through Gothic cathedrals, Baroque Venetian masterpieces and dazzling Japanese woodblock prints. The Investigator: A British Crime Story ITV, 9.00pm The second real-life case of the series sees Mark Williams-Thomas investigating the 1977 murders of three women in Glasgow. The suspect is Angus Sinclair, who is currently serving a life sentence for killing two other women that same year. We hear from his ex-wife, and learn how he was a prime suspect but escaped charges for the first killings when key evidence went missing. Indian Summer School Channel 4, 9.00pm This diverting documentary series concludes with a Himalayan trek, a controversial article in the school newspaper and the GCSE retakes that were the goal of the entire enterprise. Will Alfie, Harry, Jack and co see their grades improve? Urban Myths: Marilyn Monroe and Billy Wilder Sky Arts, 9.00pm Sky Arts’ boldly cast series of vaguely apocryphal tales from the pop-culture frontlines returns with a dispatch from the set of Some Like It Hot, the magnificent 1959 comedy that is almost certainly more fun to watch than it was to make. In this minor but entertaining reimagining, Tony Curtis (Alex Pettyfer) is threatening to cuckold Arthur Miller (Dougray Scott) by making off with Marilyn Monroe (Gemma Arterton), whose caprice, drinking and sensitivity is driving director Billy Wilder (James Purefoy) to distraction. GT Still Game BBC One, 9.30pm; BBC Two Wales, 10.00pm Justifying its prime-time BBC One slot, the Scottish sitcom bows out in triumph with a typically well-wrought farce involving a Hollywood stuntman, a disastrous driving lesson and romance for the widowed Isa (Jane McCarry). GT The Man with the Golden Gun (1974) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Christopher Lee steals the show as the titular assassin, Francisco Scaramanga, in this classic Bond adventure. Roger Moore’s secret agent, in his second outing as 007, must pursue him, with the help of sidekick Mary Goodnight (Britt Ekland), to the villain’s island lair in order to prevent him harnessing the power of the Sun for evil. The confrontations between Moore and Lee are easily the film’s highlights. Swordfish (2001) ★★☆☆☆ TCM, 9.00pm The most often quoted bit of trivia about this film is that Halle Berry was paid an additional £500,000 to go topless. It’s rather lucky she agreed because she’s probably the most appealing aspect of this frenetic thriller. John Travolta and Hugh Jackman put on testosterone-fuelled displays as a morally dubious counter-terrorist agent and the hacker he blackmails into accessing billions of dollars of government money. Some Like It Hot (1959, b/w) ★★★★★ Sky Arts, 9.30pm When two musicians (Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis) witness a mob hit, they flee the state disguised as women in an all-female band, but further complications arise in the form of demure ukulele player Sugar Kane, superbly played by Marilyn Monroe. Billy Wilder’s classic comedy is effortlessly wacky and clever. Before, at 9pm, is Urban Myths, which imagines what happened on the set of this romcom. Friday 13 April Dishing out opinions: John Torode and Gregg Wallace Credit: BBC MasterChef: The Final BBC One, 8.30pm It has taken 25 episodes over seven weeks to whittle down the 56 amateur contestants to three finalists, and in the process, MasterChef 2018 has produced some of the best cooking – and some of the toughest competition – in the series’ long history. (It has been running in one form or another since 1990; and since 2005 in, roughly, its current format with judges Gregg Wallace and John Torode presenting.) This last week has been no exception, with the finalists having to dig deeper than ever to produce the best dishes of their lives and some great moments – notably during the spectacular trip to South America when they met Peruvian superchef Gaston Acurio and took on a service at the fifth best restaurant in the world, the Central in Lima, under Michelin-starred maestro Virgilio Martínez Véliz. In the finale, it’s all about who cooks the best food, though, as the final three return to the studio kitchen to undergo a test of culinary skills and nerve as they set about creating the most important three-course meal of their lives – in the hope of being judged worthy of a title that has launched many a great career: MasterChef champion. Gerard O’Donovan Chef’s Table: Pastry Netflix, from today This mouth-watering spin-off from Netflix’s popular global foodie series Chef’s Table puts the focus entirely on sweet stuff, talking the cameras inside the kitchens of some of the world’s best pastry chefs, among them Christina Tosi’s Milk Bar in New York, Corrado Assenza’s Caffé Sicilia in Noto, Sicily, Jordi Roca’s El Celler de Can Roca in Girona, and Will Goldfarb’s Room4Dessert in Bali. Lost in Space Netflix, from today Not so much a rerun as a spectacular new take on the classic Sixties sci-fi series about a family marooned in space when their ship runs into difficulty on their way to a new colony and crashes on an unknown and surprisingly hostile planet. There are plenty of thrills and impressive visual effects, and Toby Stephens and Molly Parker are excellent as the pioneering Robinson parents John and Judy, while Parker Posey is an enigmatic (and now female) Dr Smith. GO The City & The City BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 9.30pm Cop thrillers don’t come much more weirdly dystopian than China Miéville’s award-winning 2009 novel and this ultra-stylish adaptation serves its source material very well. In episode two, Inspector Borlú (David Morrissey) ventures back across the border while investigating the murder of a foreign student. Episodes BBC Two, 10.00pm; Wales, 11.05pm Having overcome last week’s unfortunate episode in this sitcom, Matt (Matt LeBlanc) is back on top and leveraging his spurt in the ratings for all it’s worth, handing Sean (Stephen Mangan) and Beverly (Tamsin Greig) a welcome opportunity for escape. Lee and Dean Channel 4, 10.00pm More rough charm, as life gets complicated for Stevenage’s very own Dumb and Dumber when Lee’s (Miles Chapman) financial worries mount and Dean (Mark O’Sullivan) is persuaded to premiere his poetry at the local arts club. Front Row Late BBC Two, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm Freedom of speech and censorship are under the spotlight as host Mary Beard and guests discuss Theatre Clwyd’s production The Assassination of Katie Hopkins and former US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright’s new book Fascism: A Warning. GO Alien: Covenant (2017) ★★★★★ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm The latest film in the Alien saga from Ridley Scott is arguably a mad scientist movie. It follows the crew of the colony ship Covenant (including Katherine Waterson) as they discover what they think is an uncharted paradise, but what they uncover a threat beyond their imagination. Michael Fassbender puts in a spectacular turn as kindly robot David and his twisted “brother” Walter. Invictus (2009) ★★★★☆ ITV, 10.45pm Following the death of Nelson Mandela’s ex-wife Winnie last week, aged 81, here’s Clint Eastwood’s take on South Africa’s World Cup victory in 1995. As the country emerges from apartheid, the newly elected President Mandela (an uncanny Morgan Freeman) sees the potential for the national rugby team, led by François Pienaar (Matt Damon), to be a catalyst for harmony. This is a polished and uplifting film. Monty Python Live at the Hollywood Bowl (1982) ★★★★☆ Gold, 1.40am Much like the Secret Policeman’s Ball, this comedy performance film sees the Monty Python gang take to the stage, but this time they’re in Hollywood. Among the sketches are the Silly Olympics, where athletes compete in absurd sports, The Lumberjack Song, and The Ministry of Silly Walks. This film also features Carol Cleveland in numerous supporting roles. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: The City & the City, Sounds Like Friday Night and Have I Got News for You
Friday 6 April The City & the City BBC Two, 9.00pm; Northern Ireland, 9.30pm “I knew there was another city I dare not see… Just on the other side of where I was supposed to look.” So states Inspector Tyador Borlú (David Morrissey) midway through this engrossing adaptation of China Miéville’s Borgesian novel, which achieves the apparently impossible by bringing a dense and clever book to brilliant, atmospheric life. Borlú, a detective with the Extreme Crime Squad in the rundown vaguely Eastern European city of Beszul, is handed the task of solving the murder of a foreign student. So far, so standard, but what unfolds turns out to be anything but as scriptwriter Tony Grisoni (Red Riding) expertly captures Miéville’s vision of a world in which a city is divided not by a wall or barricade, but by blurred realities the populace is trained from birth not to see. Thus the two cities of Beszul and Ul Qoma coexist in the same space but without acknowledging each other, the town hall their only shared space. To look directly on the other city is to commit “Breach”, bringing about the wrath of the secret police. Grisoni and director Tom Shankland build the tension inexorably as Borlú’s world is slowly but surely upended. An absolute treat. Sarah Hughes Sounds Like Friday Night BBC One, 7.30pm The BBC’s music TV revival didn’t make a huge splash with its first series but it’s still worth checking out, if only because co-host and Radio 1Xtra presenter Dotty is such a likeable presence. Tonight, she’s on the road, while Greg James anchors from the studio. Professor Green, Snow Patrol and Years & Years perform. Have I Got News for You BBC One, 9.30pm The satirical quiz show returns for a 55th series, with captains Paul Merton and Ian Hislop joined by presenter Steph McGovern and comedian Josh Widdicombe; Jeremy Paxman hosts. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm In an era when the talk show appears tired somehow Graham Norton manages to keep the format enjoyable. Tonight’s episode, the first in a new series, sees husband-and-wife team Emily Blunt and John Krasinski discuss their horror A Quiet Place. Front Row Late BBC Two, 11.05pm; N Ireland, 11.35pm Following the kerfuffle over its poorly received first series, the arts show returns with a rejigged format and Mary Beard in the presenter’s chair. Informed debate is promised, although Beard has said that she won’t simply replicate the notoriously combative Newsnight Review. SH BBC Young Musician 2018 BBC Four, 7.30pm The contest kicks off at the Royal Birmingham Conservatoire’s new concert hall. Presenter Josie d’Arby is joined by 1998 finalist Alison Balsom as we meet the final five: violinists Elodie Chousmer-Howelles and Stephanie Childress, double bassist Will Duerden, guitarist Torrin Williams and cellist Maxim Calver. The judges are double bassist Leon Bosch, classical guitarist Miloš Karadaglić, violinist and previous Young Musician of the Year winner, Jennifer Pike. Composer Kerry Andrew and the contestants will perform works by Bach, Brahms and Stravinsky. The Nineties Sky Arts, 9.00pm There’s nothing like seeing the decade you came of age in co-opted for nostalgic TV to make you feel old, but for those who can bear seeing their youth dissected Sky Arts at least does it well. Tonight’s second episode continues the focus on the decade’s TV with The Sopranos and Seinfeld under discussion. SH Fury (2014) ★★★★★ 5STAR, 9.00pm David Ayer’s study of the habits and habitats of the American killer male is an astonishing, stirring drama. It’s Germany 1945, and Sgt Don “Wardaddy” Collie (Brad Pitt) and his team are grinding towards Berlin in a battered M4 Sherman tank. There is no rescue mission, just an agonising rumble from one brush with death to the next. The set-piece battles are gripping, and the raw terror of war is blasted home. Four Weddings and a Funeral (1994) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm The best of Richard Curtis and Hugh Grant’s romcoms about awfully nice chaps dithering over frightfully pretty girls. Grant plays bumbling Charles, who, ah, er, can’t tell what’s, um, going on between him and the scrummy Carrie (Andie MacDowell), who he keeps, gosh, bumping into at weddings. It’s aged pretty well and certainly knocks spots off Love, Actually. Lawless (2012) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 12.45am An adaptation of the historical novel The Wettest County in the World, John Hillcoat’s Prohibition-era western follows three brothers (played by Tom Hardy, Shia LaBeouf and Jason Clarke), who do a tidy business distilling and selling illegal moonshine whiskey. It’s an oddly affectionate clan portrait – the violence the brothers mete out is implicitly forgiven – but the period detail is well observed. Saturday 7 April Saturday night fever: Declan Donnelly presents from Orlando Credit: Rex/Shutterstock Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway ITV, 7.00pm It can’t be easy hosting a show as exuberant as Saturday Night Takeaway on your own but Declan Donnelly made a solid if understandably restrained go of it last week. He ensured that the light entertainment series proceeded pretty much as normal in the absence of long-time work partner Ant McPartlin, whose travails were sensibly referenced only in very brief passing (“I’ve got twice the amount of work to do,” Donnelly noted at one point before mock-berating the production crew that “I’ll have to do it myself, like everything else around here this week”). That said, this final episode ups the ante as Donnelly takes the show on the road to the Universal Orlando Resort in Florida. Once there we’re promised a “super-sized” edition featuring stunts, surprises and “extra-special” guests. No word yet as to who those guests will be but expect Donnelly to continue making the best of a difficult situation, buoyed by extra support from Scarlett Moffatt, who is in charge of ensuring that the Place on the Plane winners have a wonderful time, and Stephen Mulhern, who has the possibly less than enviable task of explaining In for a Penny to an American audience. Sarah Hughes Premier League Football: Everton v Liverpool Sky Sports Main Event, 12.30pm Tired, perhaps, from their Champions League quarter-final first leg against Man City, Liverpool face their bitter local rivals Everton at Goodison Park. The home side, who’ve won three of their last six games, haven’t beaten Liverpool since October 2010, when Tim Cahill and Mikel Arteta gave them a 2-0 victory. Premiership Rugby Union: Bath v Leicester Tigers Channel 5, 1.30pm Time was when Bath and Leicester were the titans of English rugby. Currently they are fifth and eighth in the league, respectively. In September, Bath claimed a 27-23 win at Welford Road, as they held on for their first away win at Leicester since 2003, ensuring an unhappy return for George Ford against the club he left in the summer. The two sides also met in the Anglo-Welsh Cup at the Recreation Ground in November, where Bath also emerged victorious, beating Leicester 33-31 on that occasion. Premier League Football: Manchester City v Manchester United Sky Sports Main Event, 5.30pm What better way for Pep Guardiola’s Manchester City to clinch the title than by beating second-placed Manchester United at the Etihad Stadium. Sixteen points ahead of them in the table, City have been formidable this season, winning 27 of the 31 league games they’ve played. One of those victories came at Old Trafford, with a goal from Nicolas Otamendi giving City a 2-1 victory when these sides met in December. Britain’s Most Historic Towns Channel 4, 8.00pm Alice Roberts is our guide for this new six-part series, which sees her search the UK for the places that best sum up an historical era. The first era is Roman Britain, so Roberts heads to Chester, where she abseils down walls, hunkers in caves and uncovers the truth about the city. Casualty BBC One, 8.20pm The medical drama’s storyline about Dylan’s (William Beck) alcoholism continues to be sensitively handled as the medic’s ex-wife Sam (Charlotte Salt) worries about whether she can help him. Meanwhile, Ethan (George Hardy) struggles with his own demons as he realises that a patient is related to his brother’s killer. The Voice UK: Live Final ITV, 8.30pm Every reality TV idea has an allotted shelf life and it’s hard not to feel that musical talent contests have come to the end of their run. For those who disagree, The Voice UK’s grand finale is here and the final four battle it out for public approval. Below the Surface BBC Four, 9.00pm & 9.45pm BBC Four’s latest Scandi drama started off tensely but like its predecessor, Modus, it has gone on to become ever more ludicrous. Now it’s the final two episodes, and Philip Norgaard (Johannes Lassen) faces off against Mark (Jakob Oftebro), the man behind the hostage crisis. Much heartfelt talking follows, although you may end up feeling more sympathetic towards the damaged Mark than the chilly Norgaard. Pearl Jam: Let’s Play Two Sky Arts, 9.00pm When is a music documentary not a music documentary? When it’s also a sports film. This exuberant film, which was made following the Chicago Cubs’ victory in baseball’s World Series in 2016, follows die-hard Cubs fan and Pearl Jam lead singer Eddie Vedder as he cheers on his team during their championship run while also preparing the band for two August shows at the team’s Wrigley Field Stadium. The result is an affectionate portrait of the singer as fan. SH Troy: Fall of a City BBC One, 9.10pm David Farr’s epic series reaches its climax with the arrival of the most famous horse in history. After an uninspiring start, Troy has picked up in recent weeks and the final episode is a well-handled tale of betrayal and death. It’s a curate’s egg of a series, let down by poor casting. SH X-Men (2000) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.00pm Bryan Singer directs an all-star cast that includes Patrick Stewart, Hugh Jackman, Ian McKellen and Halle Berry, in the first of the X-Men franchise. A group of mutants must decide whether to side with Professor Xavier (Stewart) or the evil Magneto (McKellen) in what is a solid opening to the series and which paved the way for plenty of big-budget sequels. This is followed by X-Men 2 and X-Men 3 at 9.00pm and 11.35pm respectively. Legend (2015) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Tom Hardy gives a solid, convincing performance as east London gangster Reggie Kray but his caricatured portrayal of twin brother Ronnie lets him down, and this inconsistency leads to an entertaining though muddled film. Emily Browning, however, gives just the right mix of defiance and despair as Frances Shea, Reggie’s put-upon wife. Watch out for some particularly gory scenes. Lethal Weapon 2 (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.05pm Mel Gibson sports his signature Eighties mullet in the second film of this daft-but-fun action franchise. LAPD officer Riggs (Gibson) teams up once again with his partner Murtaugh (Danny Glover) to track down a band of South African criminals while protecting a painfully frenzied witness (Joe Pesci). Naturally, the pair find themselves drawn into violent action sequences orchestrated by stereotypical bad guys. Sunday 8 April Hostess with the mostest: Catherine Tate presents the awards Credit: ITV The Olivier Awards 2018 ITV, 10.20pm Last year, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child swept the board with nine Olivier Awards, something that looked impossible to top. But then came Lin Manuel Miranda’s blockbuster musical Hamilton, whose West End run has received reviews every bit as rapturous as those from its Broadway debut. The show has a record-breaking 13 nominations, which it is thought will be translated into awards. After being snubbed for Jerusalem, Jez Butterworth will surely be rewarded for his equally magisterial play The Ferryman (its eight nominations include best play and best director for Sam Mendes), while contenders in the acting categories include Bryan Cranston for Network, Andrew Garfield for Angels in America and Lesley Manville for Long Day’s Journey into Night. Catherine Tate will be on hosting duties for the event at the Royal Albert Hall, which will, as usual, feature a crop of stellar performances; this one will include a special tribute to Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, which turns 50 this year. Let’s hope the organisers bring together Josephs of the past for a big singalong: Jason Donovan, Phillip Schofield, Ian “H” Watkins and Lee Mead will all, one suspects, be available. Gabriel Tate Sex Robots and Us BBC Three, from 10.00am James Young, an amputee who created his own bionic arm, meets the people who design sex robots and hears about their plans for them, from being given to old people’s homes to “employment” in brothels. But is it the harmless, even socially responsible pursuit thatthey claim? Formula 1: The Bahrain Grand Prix Sky Sports F1, 3.30pm After the Australian Grand Prix – in which Sebastian Vettel took advantage of a safety-car blunder to win under pristine Melbourne skies – attention turns to the second round of the season at the Bahrain International Circuit in Sakhir. Another blunder cost Lewis Hamilton on this circuit last year – this time it happened in the pit lane, with Vettel capitalising to win by 6.6 seconds. The Generation Game BBC One, 8.00pm How do you top last week’s cavalcade of silliness in this rebooted game show? You rope in Danny Dyer to join Mel Giedroyc, Sue Perkins and panellists Melvin Odoom and Roisin Conaty for challenges that include cake decorating, balloon modelling and dancing the Argentine Tango. The Durrells ITV, 8.00pm In the fourth episode of the popular drama, Larry (Josh O’Connor) visits Athens with two oddly named guests – Captain Creech (James Cosmo) and Prince Jeejeebuoy (Tanmay Dhanania) – in tow. There, they offer advice to Gerry (Milo Parker), who is applying for a new school. Jesus’ Female Disciples: the New Evidence Channel 4, 8.00pm For centuries, the birth of Christianity was regarded as a largely male affair, with women as only bit-part players. Now, Bible experts Helen Bond and Joan Taylor have discovered evidence that women were involved in everything from preaching and baptising to funding the movement as it grew. This absorbing documentary follows the historians’ progress. Golf: The Masters Sky Sports Main Event, 8.00pm Prepare for a dramatic finale as this year’s first Major – from the Augusta National in Georgia – concludes. Last year, Spain’s Sergio Garcia won the coveted green jacket, beating Justin Rose in a tense play-off. Ordeal by Innocence BBC One, 9.00pm Sarah Phelps’s splendid adaptation continues, as Arthur Calgary (Luke Treadaway) resolves to prove the truth about Jack Argyll’s (Anthony Boyle) alibi by any means necessary. GT Folk Awards 2018 BBC Four, 9.00pm Mark Radcliffe and Julie Fowlis introduce highlights from this year’s Radio 2 Folk Awards in Belfast. It features performances from Cara Dillon, Lankum and Eliza Carthy and the Wayward Band. The great Nick Drake will also be inducted into the Hall of Fame, his genius long-established, even if such recognition eluded him during his short life. Producer Dónal Lunny, meanwhile, receives the Lifetime Achievement Award for decades of tireless work promoting the renaissance in Irish music, plus The Armagh Pipers Club are presented with the Good Tradition Award. GT Emma (1996) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 3.00pm Gwyneth Paltrow’s American iciness melts in this deft adaptation of Jane Austen’s classic comic romance. She is Emma Woodhouse, spoilt, charming and an inveterate meddler. Only Mr George Knightley (Jeremy Northam) dares challenge her behaviour – but what are his motives? A clever film with a superb supporting cast, including Toni Collette, Alan Cumming and Ewan McGregor. United 93 (2006) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 9.55pm Director Paul Greengrass’s boneshaking, real-time take on the final hours of the United Airlines plane whose passengers rebelled against their hijackers on September 11, 2001 feels uncomfortably realistic. Greengrass, whose signature rapid cutting made the second and third Bourne films so exciting, proves expert at handling the most infamous atrocity of modern times with intelligence and sobriety. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 11.00pm This superb adaptation of John le Carré’s brilliant, intricate Cold War spy novel is a triumph. The espionage drama follows the hunt for a Soviet double agent at the top of the British secret service, with Gary Oldman spearheading the excellent ensemble cast, which includes Colin Firth, Tom Hardy, John Hurt and Benedict Cumberbatch. It’s funny, seductive and suspenseful. Monday 9 April I spy: a recruit sees if she’s got what it takes to be an SOE agent Credit: BBC Secret Agent Selection: WW2 BBC Two, 9.00pm Not unlike Channel 4’s SAS: Who Dares Wins and BBC Two’s Astronauts: Do You Have What It Takes?, this absorbing new series puts a group of recruits through a series of gruelling physical and psychological challenges to see if they could make the grade as a secret agent according to an established selection test used during the Second World War. This test was used by the Special Operations Executive (SOE) to determine whether recruits from many different walks of life would be capable of being dropped behind enemy lines and surviving as a covert officer with a brief to cause the maximum disruption possible to the enemy in the territory. As with the original SOE, the 14 candidates come from diverse backgrounds (among them a research scientist, a property developer, former police officer, a drag act performer, a retired investment banker and an Army veteran). In the opening episode, they undergo the initial four-day assessment at a remote Scottish country-house estate. The aim is to winnow out weakness and determine who should win a place on the advanced, and suitably terrifying, course in assassination, sabotage and covert intelligence techniques. Gerard O’Donovan Famalam BBC Three, from 10.00am After a successful pilot last year, Vivienne Acheampong, Gbemisola Ikumelo, Roxanne Sternberg, Tom Moutchi and John MacMillan return with more culturally skewed sketches. Once again, they feature William and Funke’s raunchy chat show, misunderstood superhero Eclipse, Croydon’s voodoo practitioner Professor Lofuko, and a version of Midsomer Murders. 800 Words BBC One, 2.15pm If you like The Durrells you will definitely want to watch hit Australian comedy drama 800 Words. This gently funny series follows George (Erik Thomson), a widower, who horrifies his teenaged children when he moves the entire family to a remote seaside town in New Zealand. Springtime on the Farm Channel 5, 8.00pm This is the first of five shows this week celebrating the “great British farmer”, with the help of Yorkshire Vet stars Peter Wright and Julian Norton, Adam Henson of Countryfile and Springwatch’s Lindsey Chapman. In this programme, they explore how to cope with the stresses of lambing. MasterChef: The Finals BBC One, 9.00pm Oodles of challenges lie ahead for the remaining amateur chefs in the final week, which takes them as far afield as Peru ahead of Friday’s concluding cook-off. First, though, they’re off to North Yorkshire to cater a country-house lunch for local grandees and farmers. Lisbon: An Art Lovers’ Guide BBC Four, 9.00pm Having covered Barcelona, St Petersburg and Amsterdam in their first series of city-break guides, historian Dr Janina Ramirez and art critic Alastair Sooke jet off to explore three less obvious, art-rich destinations. Beirut and Baku are perhaps the more intriguing but it opens in Lisbon, which built up its art reserves during the centuries Portugal was part of one of the world’s great empires, and currently boasts one of the hottest contemporary art scenes in Europe. GO Marcella ITV, 9.00pm This drama’s been a little less fraught the second time round but Marcella still pushes the boundaries of credibility. In this concluding part, the heroine (Anna Friel) tracks down the killer, only to suffer one of her unfortunate episodes. GO The Core (2003) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.25pm Rome starts to crumble, the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco collapses and pigeons go mental in Trafalgar Square. Something is obviously amiss, and this time it isn’t climate change. In fact, the Earth’s core has stopped rotating and a team of scientists has to build a special burrowing machine to start it spinning again. Hilary Swank, Stanley Tucci and Aaron Eckhart do their best, but the excitement is intermittent. The Emoji Movie (2017) ★☆☆☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 6.30pm In this animated comedy set inside a smartphone, Gene (voiced by T J Miller), an emoji with multiple facial features, sets out on a quest to be like his colleagues who have only one. He does so with the help of apps like Spotify and Candy Crush. Sadly, the result is so horrendous that there aren’t enough Patrick Stewart-voiced emojis in the world to express what an ugly, artless exercise this is. Triple 9 (2016) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A gang of criminals and corrupt cops plan to kill a police officer in order to pull off their biggest heist yet in John Hillcoat’s crime thriller. There is a lot to like here: a big opening and a strong cast (with Kate Winslet, Gal Gadot, Anthony Mackie and Chiwetel Ejiofor among them). But it feels like fragments of a great crime drama are missing; it’s enthralling up close, but then the big picture isn’t complete. Tuesday 10 April Back to school: Mark, who has two sons with autism Credit: Channel 4 Class of Mum and Dad Channel 4, 8.00pm Another week, another Channel 4 series about education. Hold off on the black marks, however, because this one is pretty good. The premise is simple: Blackrod Primary School just outside of Bolton has thrown open its doors to a class made up of pupils’ parents (and one grandparent). They’ve agreed to go back to school for the summer term to see what modern education is really like, sports day, Sats tests and all. Naturally, its harder than many of them were expecting – 36-year-old decorator Jonny states early on that he thought he’d be able to slope off for a swift cigarette break rather than having to adhere to strict class rules – but there are some touching stories amid the more obvious moments. Most notably, this opening episode focuses on two parents with challenging home lives – Julia, who is raising her 10-year-old cousin Asha after Asha’s mother died, and Mark, who has two autistic sons. While the parents’ travails are interesting, the children are the real scene-stealers, however, from those delighted that their mothers and fathers are taking part to those who are more sceptical. The pair of five-year-olds who spend their time corpsing in front of the camera are particularly endearing. Sarah Hughes Champions League Football: Manchester City v Liverpool BT Sport 2, 7.45pm The Etihad Stadium is the setting as City and Liverpool fight it out for a place in the semi-finals. Liverpool have the advantage following a 3-0 win at Anfield in the first leg. This Time Next Year ITV, 8.00pm Davina McCall returns with another set of heart-tugging stories of people attempting to transform their lives over the course of a year. First up are two new parents who dream of making life wonderful for their baby girl who has been deaf since birth and a couple desperate to start a family. Come Home BBC One, 9.00pm Danny Brocklehurst’s claustrophobic family drama comes to a head as we flashback to find out exactly what went wrong in Greg (Christopher Eccleston) and Marie’s (Paula Malcomson) marriage. Hospital BBC Two, 9.00pm The engrossing fly-on-the-wall medical series continues with Nottingham University Hospitals Trust struggling to cope with the new NHS ruling regarding the cancellation of all non-urgent surgery. The episode focuses on Val, a 55-year-old with mouth cancer whose surgeon is desperately trying to ensure that her operation goes ahead. Here and Now Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm With only two episodes left to go, Alan Ball’s family drama continues to tread water in the most frustrating ways. On paper, there are a whole bunch of interesting stories in the mix, from Kristen’s (Sosie Bacon) possible relationship with Navid (Marwan Salama) to Ramon’s (Daniel Zovatto) continuing visions, but the problem is nothing much happens with any of them as each story moves on only incrementally each week. In this episode, Audrey (Holly Hunter) finally turns the tables on the perpetually smug Greg (Tim Robbins). Cunk on Britain BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm Diana Morgan’s pitch-perfect send-up of history programmes moves to the Tudor era and beyond as Cunk takes on Henry VIII, aka “The kingiest king who kinged over Britain” before giving us her unique perspective on “Bloody” Mary Tudor (“horrible like the drink”) and Elizabeth I. SH Divorce Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The acerbic Sarah Jessica Parker sitcom has been firing on all cylinders throughout its second series – possibly because it’s more interesting watching Frances (Parker) and Robert (the excellent Thomas Haden Church) navigate life after divorce than it was watching them get there. Here, Frances tries to make a new contact in the art world. SH Speed (1994) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm “There’s a bomb on the bus!” is the most famous line and basically the entire plot of one of the best action thrillers of the Nineties. The sizzling chemistry between LAPD Swat specialist Jack Traven (Keanu Reeves) and passenger Annie Porter (Sandra Bullock) sexes up the exhilarating action scenes, while Dennis Hopper is fantastically unhinged as a revenge-driven, retired bomb squad member turned terrorist. Fast & Furious 7 (2015) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 9.00pm Paul Walker was killed in a car crash part-way through making this film so it was completed with the help of his two younger brothers and some subtle computer graphics. The good news is that this is the best film in the franchise and does justice to Walker. It isn’t polished blockbuster film-making – though if it was, it wouldn’t be Fast & Furious. But it speaks straight to your adrenal glands. The Witches of Eastwick (1987) ★★★☆☆ Syfy, 9.00pm It is remarkable that director George Miller’s daft, unfettered romp of a film works at all. But, thanks to Jack Nicholson’s delicious overacting as Daryl Van Horne, a manic gentleman who closely resembles the devil, and the three gorgeous, single small-town friends, Alexandra (Cher), Jane (Susan Sarandon) and Sukie (Michelle Pfeiffer), who vie for his debased attentions, it somehow does. Wednesday 11 April Family ties: Edgar Ramirez and Penelope Cruz Credit: BBC The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story BBC Two, 9.00pm It’s been fascinating to discover the “true” story behind the 1997 murder of fhion designer Gianni Versace in Ryan Murphy’s glitzy drama, which has expertly depicted the inner world of the perpetrator, a Walter Mitty-style serial killer called Andrew Cunanan (a career-defining role for Darren Criss). This episode, however, has a mid-series lull about it as Cunanan ascends to the higher echelons of gay society, shaping himself meticulously into the posh, preppy eye-candy who saw a sugar daddy (or two) as his way to the top. Elsewhere, the Versace siblings return at last. Gianni (Edgar Ramirez), now in failing health decides to champion his insecure sister Donatella (Penélope Cruz in a frightful wig) and turns her into both designer and muse. Despite a lack of characters to root for – the Versaces’ moments of vulnerability dissolve into tedious histrionics and are eclipsed by Cunanan’s cold-blooded machinations – it’s all quite a fabulous mix of fashion, high society and brutal murder, with some interesting commentary on homophobia in the Nineties as well. Vicki Power The Secret Helpers BBC Two, 8.00pm Watch and weep as timid elderly widow Lesley begins a new life as an out gay woman in this life-affirming docu-series. She’s encouraged with warmth and wisdom by amateur “sages” from abroad, who talk to her secretly through a hidden earpiece. From World War to Cold War Yesterday, 8.00pm As the Second World War drew to a close, Churchill, Stalin and Roosevelt met at Yalta in the Crimea to broker post-war peace. This brisk two-part documentary raids the archives for clips and letters from those who attended, and gathers experts and relatives – including FDR’s grandson – to investigate power plays by Stalin that wrong-footed his Allied counterparts. It’s a detailed look at how and why the compromises reached at Yalta were quickly cast aside. Bacchus Uncovered: Ancient God of Ecstasy BBC Four, 9.00pm Historian Bettany Hughes continues to explore ancient civilisations, moving on to Bacchus, the Roman god of wine. Hughes’s odyssey starts under the City of London, where an 1,800-year-old Roman temple to Bacchus was discovered less than 100 years ago, and takes her to Greece, the Middle East and the Caucasus to explore the god’s roots and influence. VP Benidorm ITV, 9.00pm Fluffy as candyfloss, this lewd seaside comedy provides some fun, particularly in the retro casting of stars of yesteryear. This week, an exuberant Sammy (Shane Richie) tries to persuade Monty (John Challis) that, after his successful comeback gig, he is ready for an evening slot. One Born Every Minute Channel 4, 9.00pm This feelgood documentary series brings more poignant tales from a Birmingham labour ward. This week we meet Chantell, about to deliver her third child, who regales us with a moving story of how parenthood with partner Phil has healed the wounds of a traumatic past. First Dates Channel 4, 10.00pm The thoughtful dating show pairs up four more couples, but the road to love is bumpy – septuagenarian Deanna finds her date more interested in the waiter than her. More promising is the match between Bianca and Teza, who allow their vulnerabilities to show. VP The Thin Red Line (1998) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 3.10pm This lyrical Second World War drama, directed by Terrence Malick, tells the story of a group of young US soldiers fighting the Japanese for control of the island of Guadalcanal. Full of stars such as Sean Penn and George Clooney, it struggles with its own battle to squeeze in so many characters but is still an atmospheric meditation on the nature of war. Nick Nolte and Adrien Brody also star. The Remains of the Day (1993) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 3.55pm The success of Merchant Ivory’s adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro’s Thirties-set novel, a well-observed study of regret, is built around its perfectly cast leads: Anthony Hopkins as James, the butler to the doltish aristocrat Lord Darlington (James Fox) and Emma Thompson as a housekeeper who tries to draw him out of his sterile shell. Lush visuals give it an added richness. Transporter 2 (2005) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A martial arts action sequel, in which Jason Statham and Alessandro Gassman are the sporadically thrilling stars. Statham is Frank Martin, who accepts a job as chauffeur to Jack (Hunter Clary), the son of Miami’s politician Jefferson Billings (Matthew Modine). But the local Colombian drug dealers aren’t happy with his boss’s efforts to clean up the city. Cue a kidnapping, and a potentially deadly encounter with a cocaine baron. Thursday 12 April Changing attitudes: Holly and Hollie Credit: BBC Living with the Brainy Bunch BBC Two, 8.00pm Enterprising, PR-conscious Ash Ali is headmaster of Chessington Community College, a fast-improving school with a few problem pupils. Among them are Jack and Hollie who, on the surface, are comically awful teenagers. Hollie gripes constantly, throws strops and storms out of classrooms if things aren’t going her way. Jack is sullen, lazy and has clocked up 15 suspensions in the past year. It will come as no surprise to regular viewers of such documentaries that their behaviour is rooted in low self-esteem, although their parents unquestionably indulge their foibles. Ali’s novel solution is to place Hollie with Holly, tapdancing head girl and gregarious boffin, and Jack with Tharush, a Sri Lankan immigrant by way of Italy, whose talents are only matched by his work ethic. Now that Jack and Hollie are in the bosom of new families for six weeks, it’s hoped that a new environment, greater discipline and rigid routines will see their results improve and attitudes pick up. There are setbacks on the largely familiar narrative trajectory, but it’s cast to perfection and, as a demonstration of the importance of parenting in academic achievement, the experiment gets an A-star. Gabriel Tate European Tour Golf: The Open de Espana Sky Sports Golf, 11.00am The opening day’s play of the event from the Centro Nacional de Golf in Madrid, which was won by Andrew Johnston the last time it was held in 2016. War Above the Trenches Yesterday, 8.00pm This decent two-parter tells the story of the Royal Flying Corps and their battle to win control of the air in the First World War. Based on Peter Hart’s book Bloody April, it draws affectingly on the testimony of veterans to show there was more to the Western Front than trench warfare. Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm The modern age draws closer, as Simon Schama tackles the theme of radiance, guiding us through Gothic cathedrals, Baroque Venetian masterpieces and dazzling Japanese woodblock prints. The Investigator: A British Crime Story ITV, 9.00pm The second real-life case of the series sees Mark Williams-Thomas investigating the 1977 murders of three women in Glasgow. The suspect is Angus Sinclair, who is currently serving a life sentence for killing two other women that same year. We hear from his ex-wife, and learn how he was a prime suspect but escaped charges for the first killings when key evidence went missing. Indian Summer School Channel 4, 9.00pm This diverting documentary series concludes with a Himalayan trek, a controversial article in the school newspaper and the GCSE retakes that were the goal of the entire enterprise. Will Alfie, Harry, Jack and co see their grades improve? Urban Myths: Marilyn Monroe and Billy Wilder Sky Arts, 9.00pm Sky Arts’ boldly cast series of vaguely apocryphal tales from the pop-culture frontlines returns with a dispatch from the set of Some Like It Hot, the magnificent 1959 comedy that is almost certainly more fun to watch than it was to make. In this minor but entertaining reimagining, Tony Curtis (Alex Pettyfer) is threatening to cuckold Arthur Miller (Dougray Scott) by making off with Marilyn Monroe (Gemma Arterton), whose caprice, drinking and sensitivity is driving director Billy Wilder (James Purefoy) to distraction. GT Still Game BBC One, 9.30pm; BBC Two Wales, 10.00pm Justifying its prime-time BBC One slot, the Scottish sitcom bows out in triumph with a typically well-wrought farce involving a Hollywood stuntman, a disastrous driving lesson and romance for the widowed Isa (Jane McCarry). GT The Man with the Golden Gun (1974) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Christopher Lee steals the show as the titular assassin, Francisco Scaramanga, in this classic Bond adventure. Roger Moore’s secret agent, in his second outing as 007, must pursue him, with the help of sidekick Mary Goodnight (Britt Ekland), to the villain’s island lair in order to prevent him harnessing the power of the Sun for evil. The confrontations between Moore and Lee are easily the film’s highlights. Swordfish (2001) ★★☆☆☆ TCM, 9.00pm The most often quoted bit of trivia about this film is that Halle Berry was paid an additional £500,000 to go topless. It’s rather lucky she agreed because she’s probably the most appealing aspect of this frenetic thriller. John Travolta and Hugh Jackman put on testosterone-fuelled displays as a morally dubious counter-terrorist agent and the hacker he blackmails into accessing billions of dollars of government money. Some Like It Hot (1959, b/w) ★★★★★ Sky Arts, 9.30pm When two musicians (Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis) witness a mob hit, they flee the state disguised as women in an all-female band, but further complications arise in the form of demure ukulele player Sugar Kane, superbly played by Marilyn Monroe. Billy Wilder’s classic comedy is effortlessly wacky and clever. Before, at 9pm, is Urban Myths, which imagines what happened on the set of this romcom. Friday 13 April Dishing out opinions: John Torode and Gregg Wallace Credit: BBC MasterChef: The Final BBC One, 8.30pm It has taken 25 episodes over seven weeks to whittle down the 56 amateur contestants to three finalists, and in the process, MasterChef 2018 has produced some of the best cooking – and some of the toughest competition – in the series’ long history. (It has been running in one form or another since 1990; and since 2005 in, roughly, its current format with judges Gregg Wallace and John Torode presenting.) This last week has been no exception, with the finalists having to dig deeper than ever to produce the best dishes of their lives and some great moments – notably during the spectacular trip to South America when they met Peruvian superchef Gaston Acurio and took on a service at the fifth best restaurant in the world, the Central in Lima, under Michelin-starred maestro Virgilio Martínez Véliz. In the finale, it’s all about who cooks the best food, though, as the final three return to the studio kitchen to undergo a test of culinary skills and nerve as they set about creating the most important three-course meal of their lives – in the hope of being judged worthy of a title that has launched many a great career: MasterChef champion. Gerard O’Donovan Chef’s Table: Pastry Netflix, from today This mouth-watering spin-off from Netflix’s popular global foodie series Chef’s Table puts the focus entirely on sweet stuff, talking the cameras inside the kitchens of some of the world’s best pastry chefs, among them Christina Tosi’s Milk Bar in New York, Corrado Assenza’s Caffé Sicilia in Noto, Sicily, Jordi Roca’s El Celler de Can Roca in Girona, and Will Goldfarb’s Room4Dessert in Bali. Lost in Space Netflix, from today Not so much a rerun as a spectacular new take on the classic Sixties sci-fi series about a family marooned in space when their ship runs into difficulty on their way to a new colony and crashes on an unknown and surprisingly hostile planet. There are plenty of thrills and impressive visual effects, and Toby Stephens and Molly Parker are excellent as the pioneering Robinson parents John and Judy, while Parker Posey is an enigmatic (and now female) Dr Smith. GO The City & The City BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 9.30pm Cop thrillers don’t come much more weirdly dystopian than China Miéville’s award-winning 2009 novel and this ultra-stylish adaptation serves its source material very well. In episode two, Inspector Borlú (David Morrissey) ventures back across the border while investigating the murder of a foreign student. Episodes BBC Two, 10.00pm; Wales, 11.05pm Having overcome last week’s unfortunate episode in this sitcom, Matt (Matt LeBlanc) is back on top and leveraging his spurt in the ratings for all it’s worth, handing Sean (Stephen Mangan) and Beverly (Tamsin Greig) a welcome opportunity for escape. Lee and Dean Channel 4, 10.00pm More rough charm, as life gets complicated for Stevenage’s very own Dumb and Dumber when Lee’s (Miles Chapman) financial worries mount and Dean (Mark O’Sullivan) is persuaded to premiere his poetry at the local arts club. Front Row Late BBC Two, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm Freedom of speech and censorship are under the spotlight as host Mary Beard and guests discuss Theatre Clwyd’s production The Assassination of Katie Hopkins and former US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright’s new book Fascism: A Warning. GO Alien: Covenant (2017) ★★★★★ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm The latest film in the Alien saga from Ridley Scott is arguably a mad scientist movie. It follows the crew of the colony ship Covenant (including Katherine Waterson) as they discover what they think is an uncharted paradise, but what they uncover a threat beyond their imagination. Michael Fassbender puts in a spectacular turn as kindly robot David and his twisted “brother” Walter. Invictus (2009) ★★★★☆ ITV, 10.45pm Following the death of Nelson Mandela’s ex-wife Winnie last week, aged 81, here’s Clint Eastwood’s take on South Africa’s World Cup victory in 1995. As the country emerges from apartheid, the newly elected President Mandela (an uncanny Morgan Freeman) sees the potential for the national rugby team, led by François Pienaar (Matt Damon), to be a catalyst for harmony. This is a polished and uplifting film. Monty Python Live at the Hollywood Bowl (1982) ★★★★☆ Gold, 1.40am Much like the Secret Policeman’s Ball, this comedy performance film sees the Monty Python gang take to the stage, but this time they’re in Hollywood. Among the sketches are the Silly Olympics, where athletes compete in absurd sports, The Lumberjack Song, and The Ministry of Silly Walks. This film also features Carol Cleveland in numerous supporting roles. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
Thursday 5 April The Investigator: A British Crime Story ITV, 9.00pm “I have investigated some of the UK’s most infamous crimes but I’ve never encountered anything as sinister as this,” says cop turned investigative reporter Mark Williams-Thomas of this series in which he turns his attention to the disappearance of Polegate teenager Louise Kay in 1988. Which is quite a claim, coming as it does from the man who broke the Jimmy Savile story, among others. But when the Kay family turned to him for help after three decades of getting nowhere via the police, Williams Thomas says his own investigation turned up a great deal more than he was expecting, including links to a number of other missing persons cases and the possibility that he might have uncovered “the undetected crimes of a serial killer who has got away with murder for decades”. In this first episode, though, the focus is firmly on the circumstances surrounding the disappearance of 18-year-old Louise, who was last seen driving towards Beachy Head after a night out clubbing in Eastbourne, East Sussex, with her best friend, and the fact that her distinctive gold and white Ford Fiesta also vanished that night without trace. Gerard O’Donovan The Cruise: Sailing the Caribbean ITV, 8.30pm More seaborne adventures for the cruise ship Royal Princess, this time as she embarks on an island-hopping tour of such Caribbean destinations as Grenada, the Bahamas and Antigua. If they can get into port, that is, as the ship’s docking winches appear to have failed. Ho-hum. Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm David Olusoga takes the reins for a wide-ranging edition exploring how in West Africa, Central America and Japan, art left its own distinctive record of when some great civilisations of the 15th and 16th centuries came into contact for the first time. Indian Summer School Channel 4, 9.00pm The five British boys are now six weeks into their study programme at the Doon School in Uttarakhand, but it’s not easy for them, especially Jack who finds there is a high price to pay for daring to do better than the others. Unsolved: The Man with No Alibi BBC One, 10.45pm; Wales, 11.15pm In the concluding part of this report exploring the July 2002 murder in Bournemouth of Korean student Jong-Ok Shin, Bronagh Munro examines the evidence that convicted Omar Benguit despite the absence of forensics linking him to the crime. GO Deep State Fox, 9.00pm This eight-part British spy thriller gets off to an action packed start, with Mark Strong convincing as ex-MI6 spook Max Easton, unwillingly forced out of retirement by a former intelligence chief in London. It’s not long before he finds himself at the heart of a covert intelligence war and a conspiracy by powerful corporations to foment chaos and revolution in the Middle East. Silicon Valley Sky Atlantic, 10.15pm The popular HBO tech-comedy returns for a fifth series as, despite their record of failure (a video chat app that contravened privacy laws and a partner permanently sozzled in Tibet were just two of their problems), the team at Pied Piper look to be on the verge of success. As Richard’s (Thomas Middleditch) decentralised internet concept approaches launch, there’s ample funding for once and new offices. But the pressure to get things right begins to play on Richard’s mind. GO Nanny McPhee (2015) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 10.20am Emma Thompson wrote and stars in this sweet and old-fashioned fantasy film, based on Christianna Brand’s Nurse Matilda books. She plays an old nanny who finds that the children of a widower (Colin Firth) are a challenge, even for her. Poised between Lemony Snicket and Mary Poppins, the film has moral messages to impart, but luckily not at the expense of an enjoyable, magical tale. Live and Let Die (1973) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm James Bond (Roger Moore) battles one of his more extraordinary opponents, Kananga (Yaphet Kotto), a Caribbean criminal mastermind masquerading as a Harlem drug baron. The film was given lukewarm reviews on its release, but this is Moore-era Bond at its preposterous best. Highlights include 007’s voodoo snake ordeal and a thrilling speedboat chase through New Orleans. RocknRolla (2008) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 10.00pm After the dismal Revolver and Swept Away (which starred his ex-wife Madonna), Guy Ritchie attempts a return to Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels-esque form with another testosterone-heavy, twisty tale set in London’s underworld. The plot moves vaguely around the theft of a painting from a Russian mobster (Karl Roden) while getting tangled up in various sub-plots. Friday 6 April David Morrissey Credit: BBC The City & the City BBC Two, 9.00pm; Northern Ireland, 9.30pm “I knew there was another city I dare not see… Just on the other side of where I was supposed to look.” So states Inspector Tyador Borlú (David Morrissey) midway through this engrossing adaptation of China Miéville’s Borgesian novel, which achieves the apparently impossible by bringing a dense and clever book to brilliant, atmospheric life. Borlú, a detective with the Extreme Crime Squad in the rundown vaguely Eastern European city of Beszul, is handed the task of solving the murder of a foreign student. So far, so standard, but what unfolds turns out to be anything but as scriptwriter Tony Grisoni (Red Riding) expertly captures Miéville’s vision of a world in which a city is divided not by a wall or barricade, but by blurred realities the populace is trained from birth not to see. Thus the two cities of Beszul and Ul Qoma coexist in the same space but without acknowledging each other, the town hall their only shared space. To look directly on the other city is to commit “Breach”, bringing about the wrath of the secret police. Grisoni and director Tom Shankland build the tension inexorably as Borlú’s world is slowly but surely upended. An absolute treat. Sarah Hughes Sounds Like Friday Night BBC One, 7.30pm The BBC’s music TV revival didn’t make a huge splash with its first series but it’s still worth checking out, if only because co-host and Radio 1Xtra presenter Dotty is such a likeable presence. Tonight, she’s on the road, while Greg James anchors from the studio. Professor Green, Snow Patrol and Years & Years perform. Have I Got News for You BBC One, 9.30pm The satirical quiz show returns for a 55th series, with captains Paul Merton and Ian Hislop joined by presenter Steph McGovern and comedian Josh Widdicombe; Jeremy Paxman hosts. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm In an era when the talk show appears tired somehow Graham Norton manages to keep the format enjoyable. Tonight’s episode, the first in a new series, sees husband-and-wife team Emily Blunt and John Krasinski discuss their horror A Quiet Place. Front Row Late BBC Two, 11.05pm; N Ireland, 11.35pm Following the kerfuffle over its poorly received first series, the arts show returns with a rejigged format and Mary Beard in the presenter’s chair. Informed debate is promised, although Beard has said that she won’t simply replicate the notoriously combative Newsnight Review. SH BBC Young Musician 2018 BBC Four, 7.30pm The contest kicks off at the Royal Birmingham Conservatoire’s new concert hall. Presenter Josie d’Arby is joined by 1998 finalist Alison Balsom as we meet the final five: violinists Elodie Chousmer-Howelles and Stephanie Childress, double bassist Will Duerden, guitarist Torrin Williams and cellist Maxim Calver. The judges are double bassist Leon Bosch, classical guitarist Miloš Karadaglić, violinist and previous Young Musician of the Year winner, Jennifer Pike. Composer Kerry Andrew and the contestants will perform works by Bach, Brahms and Stravinsky. The Nineties Sky Arts, 9.00pm There’s nothing like seeing the decade you came of age in co-opted for nostalgic TV to make you feel old, but for those who can bear seeing their youth dissected Sky Arts at least does it well. Tonight’s second episode continues the focus on the decade’s TV with The Sopranos and Seinfeld under discussion. SH Fury (2014) ★★★★★ 5STAR, 9.00pm David Ayer’s study of the habits and habitats of the American killer male is an astonishing, stirring drama. It’s Germany 1945, and Sgt Don “Wardaddy” Collie (Brad Pitt) and his team are grinding towards Berlin in a battered M4 Sherman tank. There is no rescue mission, just an agonising rumble from one brush with death to the next. The set-piece battles are gripping, and the raw terror of war is blasted home. Four Weddings and a Funeral (1994) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm The best of Richard Curtis and Hugh Grant’s romcoms about awfully nice chaps dithering over frightfully pretty girls. Grant plays bumbling Charles, who, ah, er, can’t tell what’s, um, going on between him and the scrummy Carrie (Andie MacDowell), who he keeps, gosh, bumping into at weddings. It’s aged pretty well and certainly knocks spots off Love, Actually. Lawless (2012) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 12.45am An adaptation of the historical novel The Wettest County in the World, John Hillcoat’s Prohibition-era western follows three brothers (played by Tom Hardy, Shia LaBeouf and Jason Clarke), who do a tidy business distilling and selling illegal moonshine whiskey. It’s an oddly affectionate clan portrait – the violence the brothers mete out is implicitly forgiven – but the period detail is well observed. Saturday 7 April Saturday night fever: Declan Donnelly presents from Orlando Credit: Rex/Shutterstock Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway ITV, 7.00pm It can’t be easy hosting a show as exuberant as Saturday Night Takeaway on your own but Declan Donnelly made a solid if understandably restrained go of it last week. He ensured that the light entertainment series proceeded pretty much as normal in the absence of long-time work partner Ant McPartlin, whose travails were sensibly referenced only in very brief passing (“I’ve got twice the amount of work to do,” Donnelly noted at one point before mock-berating the production crew that “I’ll have to do it myself, like everything else around here this week”). That said, this final episode ups the ante as Donnelly takes the show on the road to the Universal Orlando Resort in Florida. Once there we’re promised a “super-sized” edition featuring stunts, surprises and “extra-special” guests. No word yet as to who those guests will be but expect Donnelly to continue making the best of a difficult situation, buoyed by extra support from Scarlett Moffatt, who is in charge of ensuring that the Place on the Plane winners have a wonderful time, and Stephen Mulhern, who has the possibly less than enviable task of explaining In for a Penny to an American audience. Sarah Hughes Premier League Football: Everton v Liverpool Sky Sports Main Event, 12.30pm Tired, perhaps, from their Champions League quarter-final first leg against Man City, Liverpool face their bitter local rivals Everton at Goodison Park. The home side, who’ve won three of their last six games, haven’t beaten Liverpool since October 2010, when Tim Cahill and Mikel Arteta gave them a 2-0 victory. Premiership Rugby Union: Bath v Leicester Tigers Channel 5, 1.30pm Time was when Bath and Leicester were the titans of English rugby. Currently they are fifth and eighth in the league, respectively. In September, Bath claimed a 27-23 win at Welford Road, as they held on for their first away win at Leicester since 2003, ensuring an unhappy return for George Ford against the club he left in the summer. The two sides also met in the Anglo-Welsh Cup at the Recreation Ground in November, where Bath also emerged victorious, beating Leicester 33-31 on that occasion. Premier League Football: Manchester City v Manchester United Sky Sports Main Event, 5.30pm What better way for Pep Guardiola’s Manchester City to clinch the title than by beating second-placed Manchester United at the Etihad Stadium. Sixteen points ahead of them in the table, City have been formidable this season, winning 27 of the 31 league games they’ve played. One of those victories came at Old Trafford, with a goal from Nicolas Otamendi giving City a 2-1 victory when these sides met in December. Britain’s Most Historic Towns Channel 4, 8.00pm Alice Roberts is our guide for this new six-part series, which sees her search the UK for the places that best sum up an historical era. The first era is Roman Britain, so Roberts heads to Chester, where she abseils down walls, hunkers in caves and uncovers the truth about the city. Casualty BBC One, 8.20pm The medical drama’s storyline about Dylan’s (William Beck) alcoholism continues to be sensitively handled as the medic’s ex-wife Sam (Charlotte Salt) worries about whether she can help him. Meanwhile, Ethan (George Hardy) struggles with his own demons as he realises that a patient is related to his brother’s killer. The Voice UK: Live Final ITV, 8.30pm Every reality TV idea has an allotted shelf life and it’s hard not to feel that musical talent contests have come to the end of their run. For those who disagree, The Voice UK’s grand finale is here and the final four battle it out for public approval. Below the Surface BBC Four, 9.00pm & 9.45pm BBC Four’s latest Scandi drama started off tensely but like its predecessor, Modus, it has gone on to become ever more ludicrous. Now it’s the final two episodes, and Philip Norgaard (Johannes Lassen) faces off against Mark (Jakob Oftebro), the man behind the hostage crisis. Much heartfelt talking follows, although you may end up feeling more sympathetic towards the damaged Mark than the chilly Norgaard. Pearl Jam: Let’s Play Two Sky Arts, 9.00pm When is a music documentary not a music documentary? When it’s also a sports film. This exuberant film, which was made following the Chicago Cubs’ victory in baseball’s World Series in 2016, follows die-hard Cubs fan and Pearl Jam lead singer Eddie Vedder as he cheers on his team during their championship run while also preparing the band for two August shows at the team’s Wrigley Field Stadium. The result is an affectionate portrait of the singer as fan. SH Troy: Fall of a City BBC One, 9.10pm David Farr’s epic series reaches its climax with the arrival of the most famous horse in history. After an uninspiring start, Troy has picked up in recent weeks and the final episode is a well-handled tale of betrayal and death. It’s a curate’s egg of a series, let down by poor casting. SH X-Men (2000) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.00pm Bryan Singer directs an all-star cast that includes Patrick Stewart, Hugh Jackman, Ian McKellen and Halle Berry, in the first of the X-Men franchise. A group of mutants must decide whether to side with Professor Xavier (Stewart) or the evil Magneto (McKellen) in what is a solid opening to the series and which paved the way for plenty of big-budget sequels. This is followed by X-Men 2 and X-Men 3 at 9.00pm and 11.35pm respectively. Legend (2015) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Tom Hardy gives a solid, convincing performance as east London gangster Reggie Kray but his caricatured portrayal of twin brother Ronnie lets him down, and this inconsistency leads to an entertaining though muddled film. Emily Browning, however, gives just the right mix of defiance and despair as Frances Shea, Reggie’s put-upon wife. Watch out for some particularly gory scenes. Lethal Weapon 2 (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.05pm Mel Gibson sports his signature Eighties mullet in the second film of this daft-but-fun action franchise. LAPD officer Riggs (Gibson) teams up once again with his partner Murtaugh (Danny Glover) to track down a band of South African criminals while protecting a painfully frenzied witness (Joe Pesci). Naturally, the pair find themselves drawn into violent action sequences orchestrated by stereotypical bad guys. Sunday 8 April Hostess with the mostest: Catherine Tate presents the awards Credit: ITV The Olivier Awards 2018 ITV, 10.20pm Last year, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child swept the board with nine Olivier Awards, something that looked impossible to top. But then came Lin Manuel Miranda’s blockbuster musical Hamilton, whose West End run has received reviews every bit as rapturous as those from its Broadway debut. The show has a record-breaking 13 nominations, which it is thought will be translated into awards. After being snubbed for Jerusalem, Jez Butterworth will surely be rewarded for his equally magisterial play The Ferryman (its eight nominations include best play and best director for Sam Mendes), while contenders in the acting categories include Bryan Cranston for Network, Andrew Garfield for Angels in America and Lesley Manville for Long Day’s Journey into Night. Catherine Tate will be on hosting duties for the event at the Royal Albert Hall, which will, as usual, feature a crop of stellar performances; this one will include a special tribute to Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, which turns 50 this year. Let’s hope the organisers bring together Josephs of the past for a big singalong: Jason Donovan, Phillip Schofield, Ian “H” Watkins and Lee Mead will all, one suspects, be available. Gabriel Tate Sex Robots and Us BBC Three, from 10.00am James Young, an amputee who created his own bionic arm, meets the people who design sex robots and hears about their plans for them, from being given to old people’s homes to “employment” in brothels. But is it the harmless, even socially responsible pursuit thatthey claim? Formula 1: The Bahrain Grand Prix Sky Sports F1, 3.30pm After the Australian Grand Prix – in which Sebastian Vettel took advantage of a safety-car blunder to win under pristine Melbourne skies – attention turns to the second round of the season at the Bahrain International Circuit in Sakhir. Another blunder cost Lewis Hamilton on this circuit last year – this time it happened in the pit lane, with Vettel capitalising to win by 6.6 seconds. The Generation Game BBC One, 8.00pm How do you top last week’s cavalcade of silliness in this rebooted game show? You rope in Danny Dyer to join Mel Giedroyc, Sue Perkins and panellists Melvin Odoom and Roisin Conaty for challenges that include cake decorating, balloon modelling and dancing the Argentine Tango. The Durrells ITV, 8.00pm In the fourth episode of the popular drama, Larry (Josh O’Connor) visits Athens with two oddly named guests – Captain Creech (James Cosmo) and Prince Jeejeebuoy (Tanmay Dhanania) – in tow. There, they offer advice to Gerry (Milo Parker), who is applying for a new school. Jesus’ Female Disciples: the New Evidence Channel 4, 8.00pm For centuries, the birth of Christianity was regarded as a largely male affair, with women as only bit-part players. Now, Bible experts Helen Bond and Joan Taylor have discovered evidence that women were involved in everything from preaching and baptising to funding the movement as it grew. This absorbing documentary follows the historians’ progress. Golf: The Masters Sky Sports Main Event, 8.00pm Prepare for a dramatic finale as this year’s first Major – from the Augusta National in Georgia – concludes. Last year, Spain’s Sergio Garcia won the coveted green jacket, beating Justin Rose in a tense play-off. Ordeal by Innocence BBC One, 9.00pm Sarah Phelps’s splendid adaptation continues, as Arthur Calgary (Luke Treadaway) resolves to prove the truth about Jack Argyll’s (Anthony Boyle) alibi by any means necessary. GT Folk Awards 2018 BBC Four, 9.00pm Mark Radcliffe and Julie Fowlis introduce highlights from this year’s Radio 2 Folk Awards in Belfast. It features performances from Cara Dillon, Lankum and Eliza Carthy and the Wayward Band. The great Nick Drake will also be inducted into the Hall of Fame, his genius long-established, even if such recognition eluded him during his short life. Producer Dónal Lunny, meanwhile, receives the Lifetime Achievement Award for decades of tireless work promoting the renaissance in Irish music, plus The Armagh Pipers Club are presented with the Good Tradition Award. GT Emma (1996) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 3.00pm Gwyneth Paltrow’s American iciness melts in this deft adaptation of Jane Austen’s classic comic romance. She is Emma Woodhouse, spoilt, charming and an inveterate meddler. Only Mr George Knightley (Jeremy Northam) dares challenge her behaviour – but what are his motives? A clever film with a superb supporting cast, including Toni Collette, Alan Cumming and Ewan McGregor. United 93 (2006) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 9.55pm Director Paul Greengrass’s boneshaking, real-time take on the final hours of the United Airlines plane whose passengers rebelled against their hijackers on September 11, 2001 feels uncomfortably realistic. Greengrass, whose signature rapid cutting made the second and third Bourne films so exciting, proves expert at handling the most infamous atrocity of modern times with intelligence and sobriety. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 11.00pm This superb adaptation of John le Carré’s brilliant, intricate Cold War spy novel is a triumph. The espionage drama follows the hunt for a Soviet double agent at the top of the British secret service, with Gary Oldman spearheading the excellent ensemble cast, which includes Colin Firth, Tom Hardy, John Hurt and Benedict Cumberbatch. It’s funny, seductive and suspenseful. Monday 9 April I spy: a recruit sees if she’s got what it takes to be an SOE agent Credit: BBC Secret Agent Selection: WW2 BBC Two, 9.00pm Not unlike Channel 4’s SAS: Who Dares Wins and BBC Two’s Astronauts: Do You Have What It Takes?, this absorbing new series puts a group of recruits through a series of gruelling physical and psychological challenges to see if they could make the grade as a secret agent according to an established selection test used during the Second World War. This test was used by the Special Operations Executive (SOE) to determine whether recruits from many different walks of life would be capable of being dropped behind enemy lines and surviving as a covert officer with a brief to cause the maximum disruption possible to the enemy in the territory. As with the original SOE, the 14 candidates come from diverse backgrounds (among them a research scientist, a property developer, former police officer, a drag act performer, a retired investment banker and an Army veteran). In the opening episode, they undergo the initial four-day assessment at a remote Scottish country-house estate. The aim is to winnow out weakness and determine who should win a place on the advanced, and suitably terrifying, course in assassination, sabotage and covert intelligence techniques. Gerard O’Donovan Famalam BBC Three, from 10.00am After a successful pilot last year, Vivienne Acheampong, Gbemisola Ikumelo, Roxanne Sternberg, Tom Moutchi and John MacMillan return with more culturally skewed sketches. Once again, they feature William and Funke’s raunchy chat show, misunderstood superhero Eclipse, Croydon’s voodoo practitioner Professor Lofuko, and a version of Midsomer Murders. 800 Words BBC One, 2.15pm If you like The Durrells you will definitely want to watch hit Australian comedy drama 800 Words. This gently funny series follows George (Erik Thomson), a widower, who horrifies his teenaged children when he moves the entire family to a remote seaside town in New Zealand. Springtime on the Farm Channel 5, 8.00pm This is the first of five shows this week celebrating the “great British farmer”, with the help of Yorkshire Vet stars Peter Wright and Julian Norton, Adam Henson of Countryfile and Springwatch’s Lindsey Chapman. In this programme, they explore how to cope with the stresses of lambing. MasterChef: The Finals BBC One, 9.00pm Oodles of challenges lie ahead for the remaining amateur chefs in the final week, which takes them as far afield as Peru ahead of Friday’s concluding cook-off. First, though, they’re off to North Yorkshire to cater a country-house lunch for local grandees and farmers. Lisbon: An Art Lovers’ Guide BBC Four, 9.00pm Having covered Barcelona, St Petersburg and Amsterdam in their first series of city-break guides, historian Dr Janina Ramirez and art critic Alastair Sooke jet off to explore three less obvious, art-rich destinations. Beirut and Baku are perhaps the more intriguing but it opens in Lisbon, which built up its art reserves during the centuries Portugal was part of one of the world’s great empires, and currently boasts one of the hottest contemporary art scenes in Europe. GO Marcella ITV, 9.00pm This drama’s been a little less fraught the second time round but Marcella still pushes the boundaries of credibility. In this concluding part, the heroine (Anna Friel) tracks down the killer, only to suffer one of her unfortunate episodes. GO The Core (2003) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.25pm Rome starts to crumble, the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco collapses and pigeons go mental in Trafalgar Square. Something is obviously amiss, and this time it isn’t climate change. In fact, the Earth’s core has stopped rotating and a team of scientists has to build a special burrowing machine to start it spinning again. Hilary Swank, Stanley Tucci and Aaron Eckhart do their best, but the excitement is intermittent. The Emoji Movie (2017) ★☆☆☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 6.30pm In this animated comedy set inside a smartphone, Gene (voiced by T J Miller), an emoji with multiple facial features, sets out on a quest to be like his colleagues who have only one. He does so with the help of apps like Spotify and Candy Crush. Sadly, the result is so horrendous that there aren’t enough Patrick Stewart-voiced emojis in the world to express what an ugly, artless exercise this is. Triple 9 (2016) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A gang of criminals and corrupt cops plan to kill a police officer in order to pull off their biggest heist yet in John Hillcoat’s crime thriller. There is a lot to like here: a big opening and a strong cast (with Kate Winslet, Gal Gadot, Anthony Mackie and Chiwetel Ejiofor among them). But it feels like fragments of a great crime drama are missing; it’s enthralling up close, but then the big picture isn’t complete. Tuesday 10 April Back to school: Mark, who has two sons with autism Credit: Channel 4 Class of Mum and Dad Channel 4, 8.00pm Another week, another Channel 4 series about education. Hold off on the black marks, however, because this one is pretty good. The premise is simple: Blackrod Primary School just outside of Bolton has thrown open its doors to a class made up of pupils’ parents (and one grandparent). They’ve agreed to go back to school for the summer term to see what modern education is really like, sports day, Sats tests and all. Naturally, its harder than many of them were expecting – 36-year-old decorator Jonny states early on that he thought he’d be able to slope off for a swift cigarette break rather than having to adhere to strict class rules – but there are some touching stories amid the more obvious moments. Most notably, this opening episode focuses on two parents with challenging home lives – Julia, who is raising her 10-year-old cousin Asha after Asha’s mother died, and Mark, who has two autistic sons. While the parents’ travails are interesting, the children are the real scene-stealers, however, from those delighted that their mothers and fathers are taking part to those who are more sceptical. The pair of five-year-olds who spend their time corpsing in front of the camera are particularly endearing. Sarah Hughes Champions League Football: Manchester City v Liverpool BT Sport 2, 7.45pm The Etihad Stadium is the setting as City and Liverpool fight it out for a place in the semi-finals. Liverpool have the advantage following a 3-0 win at Anfield in the first leg. This Time Next Year ITV, 8.00pm Davina McCall returns with another set of heart-tugging stories of people attempting to transform their lives over the course of a year. First up are two new parents who dream of making life wonderful for their baby girl who has been deaf since birth and a couple desperate to start a family. Come Home BBC One, 9.00pm Danny Brocklehurst’s claustrophobic family drama comes to a head as we flashback to find out exactly what went wrong in Greg (Christopher Eccleston) and Marie’s (Paula Malcomson) marriage. Hospital BBC Two, 9.00pm The engrossing fly-on-the-wall medical series continues with Nottingham University Hospitals Trust struggling to cope with the new NHS ruling regarding the cancellation of all non-urgent surgery. The episode focuses on Val, a 55-year-old with mouth cancer whose surgeon is desperately trying to ensure that her operation goes ahead. Here and Now Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm With only two episodes left to go, Alan Ball’s family drama continues to tread water in the most frustrating ways. On paper, there are a whole bunch of interesting stories in the mix, from Kristen’s (Sosie Bacon) possible relationship with Navid (Marwan Salama) to Ramon’s (Daniel Zovatto) continuing visions, but the problem is nothing much happens with any of them as each story moves on only incrementally each week. In this episode, Audrey (Holly Hunter) finally turns the tables on the perpetually smug Greg (Tim Robbins). Cunk on Britain BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm Diana Morgan’s pitch-perfect send-up of history programmes moves to the Tudor era and beyond as Cunk takes on Henry VIII, aka “The kingiest king who kinged over Britain” before giving us her unique perspective on “Bloody” Mary Tudor (“horrible like the drink”) and Elizabeth I. SH Divorce Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The acerbic Sarah Jessica Parker sitcom has been firing on all cylinders throughout its second series – possibly because it’s more interesting watching Frances (Parker) and Robert (the excellent Thomas Haden Church) navigate life after divorce than it was watching them get there. Here, Frances tries to make a new contact in the art world. SH Speed (1994) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm “There’s a bomb on the bus!” is the most famous line and basically the entire plot of one of the best action thrillers of the Nineties. The sizzling chemistry between LAPD Swat specialist Jack Traven (Keanu Reeves) and passenger Annie Porter (Sandra Bullock) sexes up the exhilarating action scenes, while Dennis Hopper is fantastically unhinged as a revenge-driven, retired bomb squad member turned terrorist. Fast & Furious 7 (2015) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 9.00pm Paul Walker was killed in a car crash part-way through making this film so it was completed with the help of his two younger brothers and some subtle computer graphics. The good news is that this is the best film in the franchise and does justice to Walker. It isn’t polished blockbuster film-making – though if it was, it wouldn’t be Fast & Furious. But it speaks straight to your adrenal glands. The Witches of Eastwick (1987) ★★★☆☆ Syfy, 9.00pm It is remarkable that director George Miller’s daft, unfettered romp of a film works at all. But, thanks to Jack Nicholson’s delicious overacting as Daryl Van Horne, a manic gentleman who closely resembles the devil, and the three gorgeous, single small-town friends, Alexandra (Cher), Jane (Susan Sarandon) and Sukie (Michelle Pfeiffer), who vie for his debased attentions, it somehow does. Wednesday 11 April Family ties: Edgar Ramirez and Penelope Cruz Credit: BBC The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story BBC Two, 9.00pm It’s been fascinating to discover the “true” story behind the 1997 murder of fhion designer Gianni Versace in Ryan Murphy’s glitzy drama, which has expertly depicted the inner world of the perpetrator, a Walter Mitty-style serial killer called Andrew Cunanan (a career-defining role for Darren Criss). This episode, however, has a mid-series lull about it as Cunanan ascends to the higher echelons of gay society, shaping himself meticulously into the posh, preppy eye-candy who saw a sugar daddy (or two) as his way to the top. Elsewhere, the Versace siblings return at last. Gianni (Edgar Ramirez), now in failing health decides to champion his insecure sister Donatella (Penélope Cruz in a frightful wig) and turns her into both designer and muse. Despite a lack of characters to root for – the Versaces’ moments of vulnerability dissolve into tedious histrionics and are eclipsed by Cunanan’s cold-blooded machinations – it’s all quite a fabulous mix of fashion, high society and brutal murder, with some interesting commentary on homophobia in the Nineties as well. Vicki Power The Secret Helpers BBC Two, 8.00pm Watch and weep as timid elderly widow Lesley begins a new life as an out gay woman in this life-affirming docu-series. She’s encouraged with warmth and wisdom by amateur “sages” from abroad, who talk to her secretly through a hidden earpiece. From World War to Cold War Yesterday, 8.00pm As the Second World War drew to a close, Churchill, Stalin and Roosevelt met at Yalta in the Crimea to broker post-war peace. This brisk two-part documentary raids the archives for clips and letters from those who attended, and gathers experts and relatives – including FDR’s grandson – to investigate power plays by Stalin that wrong-footed his Allied counterparts. It’s a detailed look at how and why the compromises reached at Yalta were quickly cast aside. Bacchus Uncovered: Ancient God of Ecstasy BBC Four, 9.00pm Historian Bettany Hughes continues to explore ancient civilisations, moving on to Bacchus, the Roman god of wine. Hughes’s odyssey starts under the City of London, where an 1,800-year-old Roman temple to Bacchus was discovered less than 100 years ago, and takes her to Greece, the Middle East and the Caucasus to explore the god’s roots and influence. VP Benidorm ITV, 9.00pm Fluffy as candyfloss, this lewd seaside comedy provides some fun, particularly in the retro casting of stars of yesteryear. This week, an exuberant Sammy (Shane Richie) tries to persuade Monty (John Challis) that, after his successful comeback gig, he is ready for an evening slot. One Born Every Minute Channel 4, 9.00pm This feelgood documentary series brings more poignant tales from a Birmingham labour ward. This week we meet Chantell, about to deliver her third child, who regales us with a moving story of how parenthood with partner Phil has healed the wounds of a traumatic past. First Dates Channel 4, 10.00pm The thoughtful dating show pairs up four more couples, but the road to love is bumpy – septuagenarian Deanna finds her date more interested in the waiter than her. More promising is the match between Bianca and Teza, who allow their vulnerabilities to show. VP The Thin Red Line (1998) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 3.10pm This lyrical Second World War drama, directed by Terrence Malick, tells the story of a group of young US soldiers fighting the Japanese for control of the island of Guadalcanal. Full of stars such as Sean Penn and George Clooney, it struggles with its own battle to squeeze in so many characters but is still an atmospheric meditation on the nature of war. Nick Nolte and Adrien Brody also star. The Remains of the Day (1993) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 3.55pm The success of Merchant Ivory’s adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro’s Thirties-set novel, a well-observed study of regret, is built around its perfectly cast leads: Anthony Hopkins as James, the butler to the doltish aristocrat Lord Darlington (James Fox) and Emma Thompson as a housekeeper who tries to draw him out of his sterile shell. Lush visuals give it an added richness. Transporter 2 (2005) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A martial arts action sequel, in which Jason Statham and Alessandro Gassman are the sporadically thrilling stars. Statham is Frank Martin, who accepts a job as chauffeur to Jack (Hunter Clary), the son of Miami’s politician Jefferson Billings (Matthew Modine). But the local Colombian drug dealers aren’t happy with his boss’s efforts to clean up the city. Cue a kidnapping, and a potentially deadly encounter with a cocaine baron. Thursday 12 April Changing attitudes: Holly and Hollie Credit: BBC Living with the Brainy Bunch BBC Two, 8.00pm Enterprising, PR-conscious Ash Ali is headmaster of Chessington Community College, a fast-improving school with a few problem pupils. Among them are Jack and Hollie who, on the surface, are comically awful teenagers. Hollie gripes constantly, throws strops and storms out of classrooms if things aren’t going her way. Jack is sullen, lazy and has clocked up 15 suspensions in the past year. It will come as no surprise to regular viewers of such documentaries that their behaviour is rooted in low self-esteem, although their parents unquestionably indulge their foibles. Ali’s novel solution is to place Hollie with Holly, tapdancing head girl and gregarious boffin, and Jack with Tharush, a Sri Lankan immigrant by way of Italy, whose talents are only matched by his work ethic. Now that Jack and Hollie are in the bosom of new families for six weeks, it’s hoped that a new environment, greater discipline and rigid routines will see their results improve and attitudes pick up. There are setbacks on the largely familiar narrative trajectory, but it’s cast to perfection and, as a demonstration of the importance of parenting in academic achievement, the experiment gets an A-star. Gabriel Tate European Tour Golf: The Open de Espana Sky Sports Golf, 11.00am The opening day’s play of the event from the Centro Nacional de Golf in Madrid, which was won by Andrew Johnston the last time it was held in 2016. War Above the Trenches Yesterday, 8.00pm This decent two-parter tells the story of the Royal Flying Corps and their battle to win control of the air in the First World War. Based on Peter Hart’s book Bloody April, it draws affectingly on the testimony of veterans to show there was more to the Western Front than trench warfare. Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm The modern age draws closer, as Simon Schama tackles the theme of radiance, guiding us through Gothic cathedrals, Baroque Venetian masterpieces and dazzling Japanese woodblock prints. The Investigator: A British Crime Story ITV, 9.00pm The second real-life case of the series sees Mark Williams-Thomas investigating the 1977 murders of three women in Glasgow. The suspect is Angus Sinclair, who is currently serving a life sentence for killing two other women that same year. We hear from his ex-wife, and learn how he was a prime suspect but escaped charges for the first killings when key evidence went missing. Indian Summer School Channel 4, 9.00pm This diverting documentary series concludes with a Himalayan trek, a controversial article in the school newspaper and the GCSE retakes that were the goal of the entire enterprise. Will Alfie, Harry, Jack and co see their grades improve? Urban Myths: Marilyn Monroe and Billy Wilder Sky Arts, 9.00pm Sky Arts’ boldly cast series of vaguely apocryphal tales from the pop-culture frontlines returns with a dispatch from the set of Some Like It Hot, the magnificent 1959 comedy that is almost certainly more fun to watch than it was to make. In this minor but entertaining reimagining, Tony Curtis (Alex Pettyfer) is threatening to cuckold Arthur Miller (Dougray Scott) by making off with Marilyn Monroe (Gemma Arterton), whose caprice, drinking and sensitivity is driving director Billy Wilder (James Purefoy) to distraction. GT Still Game BBC One, 9.30pm; BBC Two Wales, 10.00pm Justifying its prime-time BBC One slot, the Scottish sitcom bows out in triumph with a typically well-wrought farce involving a Hollywood stuntman, a disastrous driving lesson and romance for the widowed Isa (Jane McCarry). GT The Man with the Golden Gun (1974) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Christopher Lee steals the show as the titular assassin, Francisco Scaramanga, in this classic Bond adventure. Roger Moore’s secret agent, in his second outing as 007, must pursue him, with the help of sidekick Mary Goodnight (Britt Ekland), to the villain’s island lair in order to prevent him harnessing the power of the Sun for evil. The confrontations between Moore and Lee are easily the film’s highlights. Swordfish (2001) ★★☆☆☆ TCM, 9.00pm The most often quoted bit of trivia about this film is that Halle Berry was paid an additional £500,000 to go topless. It’s rather lucky she agreed because she’s probably the most appealing aspect of this frenetic thriller. John Travolta and Hugh Jackman put on testosterone-fuelled displays as a morally dubious counter-terrorist agent and the hacker he blackmails into accessing billions of dollars of government money. Some Like It Hot (1959, b/w) ★★★★★ Sky Arts, 9.30pm When two musicians (Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis) witness a mob hit, they flee the state disguised as women in an all-female band, but further complications arise in the form of demure ukulele player Sugar Kane, superbly played by Marilyn Monroe. Billy Wilder’s classic comedy is effortlessly wacky and clever. Before, at 9pm, is Urban Myths, which imagines what happened on the set of this romcom. Friday 13 April Dishing out opinions: John Torode and Gregg Wallace Credit: BBC MasterChef: The Final BBC One, 8.30pm It has taken 25 episodes over seven weeks to whittle down the 56 amateur contestants to three finalists, and in the process, MasterChef 2018 has produced some of the best cooking – and some of the toughest competition – in the series’ long history. (It has been running in one form or another since 1990; and since 2005 in, roughly, its current format with judges Gregg Wallace and John Torode presenting.) This last week has been no exception, with the finalists having to dig deeper than ever to produce the best dishes of their lives and some great moments – notably during the spectacular trip to South America when they met Peruvian superchef Gaston Acurio and took on a service at the fifth best restaurant in the world, the Central in Lima, under Michelin-starred maestro Virgilio Martínez Véliz. In the finale, it’s all about who cooks the best food, though, as the final three return to the studio kitchen to undergo a test of culinary skills and nerve as they set about creating the most important three-course meal of their lives – in the hope of being judged worthy of a title that has launched many a great career: MasterChef champion. Gerard O’Donovan Chef’s Table: Pastry Netflix, from today This mouth-watering spin-off from Netflix’s popular global foodie series Chef’s Table puts the focus entirely on sweet stuff, talking the cameras inside the kitchens of some of the world’s best pastry chefs, among them Christina Tosi’s Milk Bar in New York, Corrado Assenza’s Caffé Sicilia in Noto, Sicily, Jordi Roca’s El Celler de Can Roca in Girona, and Will Goldfarb’s Room4Dessert in Bali. Lost in Space Netflix, from today Not so much a rerun as a spectacular new take on the classic Sixties sci-fi series about a family marooned in space when their ship runs into difficulty on their way to a new colony and crashes on an unknown and surprisingly hostile planet. There are plenty of thrills and impressive visual effects, and Toby Stephens and Molly Parker are excellent as the pioneering Robinson parents John and Judy, while Parker Posey is an enigmatic (and now female) Dr Smith. GO The City & The City BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 9.30pm Cop thrillers don’t come much more weirdly dystopian than China Miéville’s award-winning 2009 novel and this ultra-stylish adaptation serves its source material very well. In episode two, Inspector Borlú (David Morrissey) ventures back across the border while investigating the murder of a foreign student. Episodes BBC Two, 10.00pm; Wales, 11.05pm Having overcome last week’s unfortunate episode in this sitcom, Matt (Matt LeBlanc) is back on top and leveraging his spurt in the ratings for all it’s worth, handing Sean (Stephen Mangan) and Beverly (Tamsin Greig) a welcome opportunity for escape. Lee and Dean Channel 4, 10.00pm More rough charm, as life gets complicated for Stevenage’s very own Dumb and Dumber when Lee’s (Miles Chapman) financial worries mount and Dean (Mark O’Sullivan) is persuaded to premiere his poetry at the local arts club. Front Row Late BBC Two, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm Freedom of speech and censorship are under the spotlight as host Mary Beard and guests discuss Theatre Clwyd’s production The Assassination of Katie Hopkins and former US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright’s new book Fascism: A Warning. GO Alien: Covenant (2017) ★★★★★ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm The latest film in the Alien saga from Ridley Scott is arguably a mad scientist movie. It follows the crew of the colony ship Covenant (including Katherine Waterson) as they discover what they think is an uncharted paradise, but what they uncover a threat beyond their imagination. Michael Fassbender puts in a spectacular turn as kindly robot David and his twisted “brother” Walter. Invictus (2009) ★★★★☆ ITV, 10.45pm Following the death of Nelson Mandela’s ex-wife Winnie last week, aged 81, here’s Clint Eastwood’s take on South Africa’s World Cup victory in 1995. As the country emerges from apartheid, the newly elected President Mandela (an uncanny Morgan Freeman) sees the potential for the national rugby team, led by François Pienaar (Matt Damon), to be a catalyst for harmony. This is a polished and uplifting film. Monty Python Live at the Hollywood Bowl (1982) ★★★★☆ Gold, 1.40am Much like the Secret Policeman’s Ball, this comedy performance film sees the Monty Python gang take to the stage, but this time they’re in Hollywood. Among the sketches are the Silly Olympics, where athletes compete in absurd sports, The Lumberjack Song, and The Ministry of Silly Walks. This film also features Carol Cleveland in numerous supporting roles. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: The Investigator: A British Crime Story and Civilisations
Thursday 5 April The Investigator: A British Crime Story ITV, 9.00pm “I have investigated some of the UK’s most infamous crimes but I’ve never encountered anything as sinister as this,” says cop turned investigative reporter Mark Williams-Thomas of this series in which he turns his attention to the disappearance of Polegate teenager Louise Kay in 1988. Which is quite a claim, coming as it does from the man who broke the Jimmy Savile story, among others. But when the Kay family turned to him for help after three decades of getting nowhere via the police, Williams Thomas says his own investigation turned up a great deal more than he was expecting, including links to a number of other missing persons cases and the possibility that he might have uncovered “the undetected crimes of a serial killer who has got away with murder for decades”. In this first episode, though, the focus is firmly on the circumstances surrounding the disappearance of 18-year-old Louise, who was last seen driving towards Beachy Head after a night out clubbing in Eastbourne, East Sussex, with her best friend, and the fact that her distinctive gold and white Ford Fiesta also vanished that night without trace. Gerard O’Donovan The Cruise: Sailing the Caribbean ITV, 8.30pm More seaborne adventures for the cruise ship Royal Princess, this time as she embarks on an island-hopping tour of such Caribbean destinations as Grenada, the Bahamas and Antigua. If they can get into port, that is, as the ship’s docking winches appear to have failed. Ho-hum. Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm David Olusoga takes the reins for a wide-ranging edition exploring how in West Africa, Central America and Japan, art left its own distinctive record of when some great civilisations of the 15th and 16th centuries came into contact for the first time. Indian Summer School Channel 4, 9.00pm The five British boys are now six weeks into their study programme at the Doon School in Uttarakhand, but it’s not easy for them, especially Jack who finds there is a high price to pay for daring to do better than the others. Unsolved: The Man with No Alibi BBC One, 10.45pm; Wales, 11.15pm In the concluding part of this report exploring the July 2002 murder in Bournemouth of Korean student Jong-Ok Shin, Bronagh Munro examines the evidence that convicted Omar Benguit despite the absence of forensics linking him to the crime. GO Deep State Fox, 9.00pm This eight-part British spy thriller gets off to an action packed start, with Mark Strong convincing as ex-MI6 spook Max Easton, unwillingly forced out of retirement by a former intelligence chief in London. It’s not long before he finds himself at the heart of a covert intelligence war and a conspiracy by powerful corporations to foment chaos and revolution in the Middle East. Silicon Valley Sky Atlantic, 10.15pm The popular HBO tech-comedy returns for a fifth series as, despite their record of failure (a video chat app that contravened privacy laws and a partner permanently sozzled in Tibet were just two of their problems), the team at Pied Piper look to be on the verge of success. As Richard’s (Thomas Middleditch) decentralised internet concept approaches launch, there’s ample funding for once and new offices. But the pressure to get things right begins to play on Richard’s mind. GO Nanny McPhee (2015) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 10.20am Emma Thompson wrote and stars in this sweet and old-fashioned fantasy film, based on Christianna Brand’s Nurse Matilda books. She plays an old nanny who finds that the children of a widower (Colin Firth) are a challenge, even for her. Poised between Lemony Snicket and Mary Poppins, the film has moral messages to impart, but luckily not at the expense of an enjoyable, magical tale. Live and Let Die (1973) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm James Bond (Roger Moore) battles one of his more extraordinary opponents, Kananga (Yaphet Kotto), a Caribbean criminal mastermind masquerading as a Harlem drug baron. The film was given lukewarm reviews on its release, but this is Moore-era Bond at its preposterous best. Highlights include 007’s voodoo snake ordeal and a thrilling speedboat chase through New Orleans. RocknRolla (2008) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 10.00pm After the dismal Revolver and Swept Away (which starred his ex-wife Madonna), Guy Ritchie attempts a return to Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels-esque form with another testosterone-heavy, twisty tale set in London’s underworld. The plot moves vaguely around the theft of a painting from a Russian mobster (Karl Roden) while getting tangled up in various sub-plots. Friday 6 April David Morrissey Credit: BBC The City & the City BBC Two, 9.00pm; Northern Ireland, 9.30pm “I knew there was another city I dare not see… Just on the other side of where I was supposed to look.” So states Inspector Tyador Borlú (David Morrissey) midway through this engrossing adaptation of China Miéville’s Borgesian novel, which achieves the apparently impossible by bringing a dense and clever book to brilliant, atmospheric life. Borlú, a detective with the Extreme Crime Squad in the rundown vaguely Eastern European city of Beszul, is handed the task of solving the murder of a foreign student. So far, so standard, but what unfolds turns out to be anything but as scriptwriter Tony Grisoni (Red Riding) expertly captures Miéville’s vision of a world in which a city is divided not by a wall or barricade, but by blurred realities the populace is trained from birth not to see. Thus the two cities of Beszul and Ul Qoma coexist in the same space but without acknowledging each other, the town hall their only shared space. To look directly on the other city is to commit “Breach”, bringing about the wrath of the secret police. Grisoni and director Tom Shankland build the tension inexorably as Borlú’s world is slowly but surely upended. An absolute treat. Sarah Hughes Sounds Like Friday Night BBC One, 7.30pm The BBC’s music TV revival didn’t make a huge splash with its first series but it’s still worth checking out, if only because co-host and Radio 1Xtra presenter Dotty is such a likeable presence. Tonight, she’s on the road, while Greg James anchors from the studio. Professor Green, Snow Patrol and Years & Years perform. Have I Got News for You BBC One, 9.30pm The satirical quiz show returns for a 55th series, with captains Paul Merton and Ian Hislop joined by presenter Steph McGovern and comedian Josh Widdicombe; Jeremy Paxman hosts. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm In an era when the talk show appears tired somehow Graham Norton manages to keep the format enjoyable. Tonight’s episode, the first in a new series, sees husband-and-wife team Emily Blunt and John Krasinski discuss their horror A Quiet Place. Front Row Late BBC Two, 11.05pm; N Ireland, 11.35pm Following the kerfuffle over its poorly received first series, the arts show returns with a rejigged format and Mary Beard in the presenter’s chair. Informed debate is promised, although Beard has said that she won’t simply replicate the notoriously combative Newsnight Review. SH BBC Young Musician 2018 BBC Four, 7.30pm The contest kicks off at the Royal Birmingham Conservatoire’s new concert hall. Presenter Josie d’Arby is joined by 1998 finalist Alison Balsom as we meet the final five: violinists Elodie Chousmer-Howelles and Stephanie Childress, double bassist Will Duerden, guitarist Torrin Williams and cellist Maxim Calver. The judges are double bassist Leon Bosch, classical guitarist Miloš Karadaglić, violinist and previous Young Musician of the Year winner, Jennifer Pike. Composer Kerry Andrew and the contestants will perform works by Bach, Brahms and Stravinsky. The Nineties Sky Arts, 9.00pm There’s nothing like seeing the decade you came of age in co-opted for nostalgic TV to make you feel old, but for those who can bear seeing their youth dissected Sky Arts at least does it well. Tonight’s second episode continues the focus on the decade’s TV with The Sopranos and Seinfeld under discussion. SH Fury (2014) ★★★★★ 5STAR, 9.00pm David Ayer’s study of the habits and habitats of the American killer male is an astonishing, stirring drama. It’s Germany 1945, and Sgt Don “Wardaddy” Collie (Brad Pitt) and his team are grinding towards Berlin in a battered M4 Sherman tank. There is no rescue mission, just an agonising rumble from one brush with death to the next. The set-piece battles are gripping, and the raw terror of war is blasted home. Four Weddings and a Funeral (1994) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm The best of Richard Curtis and Hugh Grant’s romcoms about awfully nice chaps dithering over frightfully pretty girls. Grant plays bumbling Charles, who, ah, er, can’t tell what’s, um, going on between him and the scrummy Carrie (Andie MacDowell), who he keeps, gosh, bumping into at weddings. It’s aged pretty well and certainly knocks spots off Love, Actually. Lawless (2012) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 12.45am An adaptation of the historical novel The Wettest County in the World, John Hillcoat’s Prohibition-era western follows three brothers (played by Tom Hardy, Shia LaBeouf and Jason Clarke), who do a tidy business distilling and selling illegal moonshine whiskey. It’s an oddly affectionate clan portrait – the violence the brothers mete out is implicitly forgiven – but the period detail is well observed. Saturday 7 April Saturday night fever: Declan Donnelly presents from Orlando Credit: Rex/Shutterstock Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway ITV, 7.00pm It can’t be easy hosting a show as exuberant as Saturday Night Takeaway on your own but Declan Donnelly made a solid if understandably restrained go of it last week. He ensured that the light entertainment series proceeded pretty much as normal in the absence of long-time work partner Ant McPartlin, whose travails were sensibly referenced only in very brief passing (“I’ve got twice the amount of work to do,” Donnelly noted at one point before mock-berating the production crew that “I’ll have to do it myself, like everything else around here this week”). That said, this final episode ups the ante as Donnelly takes the show on the road to the Universal Orlando Resort in Florida. Once there we’re promised a “super-sized” edition featuring stunts, surprises and “extra-special” guests. No word yet as to who those guests will be but expect Donnelly to continue making the best of a difficult situation, buoyed by extra support from Scarlett Moffatt, who is in charge of ensuring that the Place on the Plane winners have a wonderful time, and Stephen Mulhern, who has the possibly less than enviable task of explaining In for a Penny to an American audience. Sarah Hughes Premier League Football: Everton v Liverpool Sky Sports Main Event, 12.30pm Tired, perhaps, from their Champions League quarter-final first leg against Man City, Liverpool face their bitter local rivals Everton at Goodison Park. The home side, who’ve won three of their last six games, haven’t beaten Liverpool since October 2010, when Tim Cahill and Mikel Arteta gave them a 2-0 victory. Premiership Rugby Union: Bath v Leicester Tigers Channel 5, 1.30pm Time was when Bath and Leicester were the titans of English rugby. Currently they are fifth and eighth in the league, respectively. In September, Bath claimed a 27-23 win at Welford Road, as they held on for their first away win at Leicester since 2003, ensuring an unhappy return for George Ford against the club he left in the summer. The two sides also met in the Anglo-Welsh Cup at the Recreation Ground in November, where Bath also emerged victorious, beating Leicester 33-31 on that occasion. Premier League Football: Manchester City v Manchester United Sky Sports Main Event, 5.30pm What better way for Pep Guardiola’s Manchester City to clinch the title than by beating second-placed Manchester United at the Etihad Stadium. Sixteen points ahead of them in the table, City have been formidable this season, winning 27 of the 31 league games they’ve played. One of those victories came at Old Trafford, with a goal from Nicolas Otamendi giving City a 2-1 victory when these sides met in December. Britain’s Most Historic Towns Channel 4, 8.00pm Alice Roberts is our guide for this new six-part series, which sees her search the UK for the places that best sum up an historical era. The first era is Roman Britain, so Roberts heads to Chester, where she abseils down walls, hunkers in caves and uncovers the truth about the city. Casualty BBC One, 8.20pm The medical drama’s storyline about Dylan’s (William Beck) alcoholism continues to be sensitively handled as the medic’s ex-wife Sam (Charlotte Salt) worries about whether she can help him. Meanwhile, Ethan (George Hardy) struggles with his own demons as he realises that a patient is related to his brother’s killer. The Voice UK: Live Final ITV, 8.30pm Every reality TV idea has an allotted shelf life and it’s hard not to feel that musical talent contests have come to the end of their run. For those who disagree, The Voice UK’s grand finale is here and the final four battle it out for public approval. Below the Surface BBC Four, 9.00pm & 9.45pm BBC Four’s latest Scandi drama started off tensely but like its predecessor, Modus, it has gone on to become ever more ludicrous. Now it’s the final two episodes, and Philip Norgaard (Johannes Lassen) faces off against Mark (Jakob Oftebro), the man behind the hostage crisis. Much heartfelt talking follows, although you may end up feeling more sympathetic towards the damaged Mark than the chilly Norgaard. Pearl Jam: Let’s Play Two Sky Arts, 9.00pm When is a music documentary not a music documentary? When it’s also a sports film. This exuberant film, which was made following the Chicago Cubs’ victory in baseball’s World Series in 2016, follows die-hard Cubs fan and Pearl Jam lead singer Eddie Vedder as he cheers on his team during their championship run while also preparing the band for two August shows at the team’s Wrigley Field Stadium. The result is an affectionate portrait of the singer as fan. SH Troy: Fall of a City BBC One, 9.10pm David Farr’s epic series reaches its climax with the arrival of the most famous horse in history. After an uninspiring start, Troy has picked up in recent weeks and the final episode is a well-handled tale of betrayal and death. It’s a curate’s egg of a series, let down by poor casting. SH X-Men (2000) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.00pm Bryan Singer directs an all-star cast that includes Patrick Stewart, Hugh Jackman, Ian McKellen and Halle Berry, in the first of the X-Men franchise. A group of mutants must decide whether to side with Professor Xavier (Stewart) or the evil Magneto (McKellen) in what is a solid opening to the series and which paved the way for plenty of big-budget sequels. This is followed by X-Men 2 and X-Men 3 at 9.00pm and 11.35pm respectively. Legend (2015) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Tom Hardy gives a solid, convincing performance as east London gangster Reggie Kray but his caricatured portrayal of twin brother Ronnie lets him down, and this inconsistency leads to an entertaining though muddled film. Emily Browning, however, gives just the right mix of defiance and despair as Frances Shea, Reggie’s put-upon wife. Watch out for some particularly gory scenes. Lethal Weapon 2 (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.05pm Mel Gibson sports his signature Eighties mullet in the second film of this daft-but-fun action franchise. LAPD officer Riggs (Gibson) teams up once again with his partner Murtaugh (Danny Glover) to track down a band of South African criminals while protecting a painfully frenzied witness (Joe Pesci). Naturally, the pair find themselves drawn into violent action sequences orchestrated by stereotypical bad guys. Sunday 8 April Hostess with the mostest: Catherine Tate presents the awards Credit: ITV The Olivier Awards 2018 ITV, 10.20pm Last year, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child swept the board with nine Olivier Awards, something that looked impossible to top. But then came Lin Manuel Miranda’s blockbuster musical Hamilton, whose West End run has received reviews every bit as rapturous as those from its Broadway debut. The show has a record-breaking 13 nominations, which it is thought will be translated into awards. After being snubbed for Jerusalem, Jez Butterworth will surely be rewarded for his equally magisterial play The Ferryman (its eight nominations include best play and best director for Sam Mendes), while contenders in the acting categories include Bryan Cranston for Network, Andrew Garfield for Angels in America and Lesley Manville for Long Day’s Journey into Night. Catherine Tate will be on hosting duties for the event at the Royal Albert Hall, which will, as usual, feature a crop of stellar performances; this one will include a special tribute to Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, which turns 50 this year. Let’s hope the organisers bring together Josephs of the past for a big singalong: Jason Donovan, Phillip Schofield, Ian “H” Watkins and Lee Mead will all, one suspects, be available. Gabriel Tate Sex Robots and Us BBC Three, from 10.00am James Young, an amputee who created his own bionic arm, meets the people who design sex robots and hears about their plans for them, from being given to old people’s homes to “employment” in brothels. But is it the harmless, even socially responsible pursuit thatthey claim? Formula 1: The Bahrain Grand Prix Sky Sports F1, 3.30pm After the Australian Grand Prix – in which Sebastian Vettel took advantage of a safety-car blunder to win under pristine Melbourne skies – attention turns to the second round of the season at the Bahrain International Circuit in Sakhir. Another blunder cost Lewis Hamilton on this circuit last year – this time it happened in the pit lane, with Vettel capitalising to win by 6.6 seconds. The Generation Game BBC One, 8.00pm How do you top last week’s cavalcade of silliness in this rebooted game show? You rope in Danny Dyer to join Mel Giedroyc, Sue Perkins and panellists Melvin Odoom and Roisin Conaty for challenges that include cake decorating, balloon modelling and dancing the Argentine Tango. The Durrells ITV, 8.00pm In the fourth episode of the popular drama, Larry (Josh O’Connor) visits Athens with two oddly named guests – Captain Creech (James Cosmo) and Prince Jeejeebuoy (Tanmay Dhanania) – in tow. There, they offer advice to Gerry (Milo Parker), who is applying for a new school. Jesus’ Female Disciples: the New Evidence Channel 4, 8.00pm For centuries, the birth of Christianity was regarded as a largely male affair, with women as only bit-part players. Now, Bible experts Helen Bond and Joan Taylor have discovered evidence that women were involved in everything from preaching and baptising to funding the movement as it grew. This absorbing documentary follows the historians’ progress. Golf: The Masters Sky Sports Main Event, 8.00pm Prepare for a dramatic finale as this year’s first Major – from the Augusta National in Georgia – concludes. Last year, Spain’s Sergio Garcia won the coveted green jacket, beating Justin Rose in a tense play-off. Ordeal by Innocence BBC One, 9.00pm Sarah Phelps’s splendid adaptation continues, as Arthur Calgary (Luke Treadaway) resolves to prove the truth about Jack Argyll’s (Anthony Boyle) alibi by any means necessary. GT Folk Awards 2018 BBC Four, 9.00pm Mark Radcliffe and Julie Fowlis introduce highlights from this year’s Radio 2 Folk Awards in Belfast. It features performances from Cara Dillon, Lankum and Eliza Carthy and the Wayward Band. The great Nick Drake will also be inducted into the Hall of Fame, his genius long-established, even if such recognition eluded him during his short life. Producer Dónal Lunny, meanwhile, receives the Lifetime Achievement Award for decades of tireless work promoting the renaissance in Irish music, plus The Armagh Pipers Club are presented with the Good Tradition Award. GT Emma (1996) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 3.00pm Gwyneth Paltrow’s American iciness melts in this deft adaptation of Jane Austen’s classic comic romance. She is Emma Woodhouse, spoilt, charming and an inveterate meddler. Only Mr George Knightley (Jeremy Northam) dares challenge her behaviour – but what are his motives? A clever film with a superb supporting cast, including Toni Collette, Alan Cumming and Ewan McGregor. United 93 (2006) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 9.55pm Director Paul Greengrass’s boneshaking, real-time take on the final hours of the United Airlines plane whose passengers rebelled against their hijackers on September 11, 2001 feels uncomfortably realistic. Greengrass, whose signature rapid cutting made the second and third Bourne films so exciting, proves expert at handling the most infamous atrocity of modern times with intelligence and sobriety. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 11.00pm This superb adaptation of John le Carré’s brilliant, intricate Cold War spy novel is a triumph. The espionage drama follows the hunt for a Soviet double agent at the top of the British secret service, with Gary Oldman spearheading the excellent ensemble cast, which includes Colin Firth, Tom Hardy, John Hurt and Benedict Cumberbatch. It’s funny, seductive and suspenseful. Monday 9 April I spy: a recruit sees if she’s got what it takes to be an SOE agent Credit: BBC Secret Agent Selection: WW2 BBC Two, 9.00pm Not unlike Channel 4’s SAS: Who Dares Wins and BBC Two’s Astronauts: Do You Have What It Takes?, this absorbing new series puts a group of recruits through a series of gruelling physical and psychological challenges to see if they could make the grade as a secret agent according to an established selection test used during the Second World War. This test was used by the Special Operations Executive (SOE) to determine whether recruits from many different walks of life would be capable of being dropped behind enemy lines and surviving as a covert officer with a brief to cause the maximum disruption possible to the enemy in the territory. As with the original SOE, the 14 candidates come from diverse backgrounds (among them a research scientist, a property developer, former police officer, a drag act performer, a retired investment banker and an Army veteran). In the opening episode, they undergo the initial four-day assessment at a remote Scottish country-house estate. The aim is to winnow out weakness and determine who should win a place on the advanced, and suitably terrifying, course in assassination, sabotage and covert intelligence techniques. Gerard O’Donovan Famalam BBC Three, from 10.00am After a successful pilot last year, Vivienne Acheampong, Gbemisola Ikumelo, Roxanne Sternberg, Tom Moutchi and John MacMillan return with more culturally skewed sketches. Once again, they feature William and Funke’s raunchy chat show, misunderstood superhero Eclipse, Croydon’s voodoo practitioner Professor Lofuko, and a version of Midsomer Murders. 800 Words BBC One, 2.15pm If you like The Durrells you will definitely want to watch hit Australian comedy drama 800 Words. This gently funny series follows George (Erik Thomson), a widower, who horrifies his teenaged children when he moves the entire family to a remote seaside town in New Zealand. Springtime on the Farm Channel 5, 8.00pm This is the first of five shows this week celebrating the “great British farmer”, with the help of Yorkshire Vet stars Peter Wright and Julian Norton, Adam Henson of Countryfile and Springwatch’s Lindsey Chapman. In this programme, they explore how to cope with the stresses of lambing. MasterChef: The Finals BBC One, 9.00pm Oodles of challenges lie ahead for the remaining amateur chefs in the final week, which takes them as far afield as Peru ahead of Friday’s concluding cook-off. First, though, they’re off to North Yorkshire to cater a country-house lunch for local grandees and farmers. Lisbon: An Art Lovers’ Guide BBC Four, 9.00pm Having covered Barcelona, St Petersburg and Amsterdam in their first series of city-break guides, historian Dr Janina Ramirez and art critic Alastair Sooke jet off to explore three less obvious, art-rich destinations. Beirut and Baku are perhaps the more intriguing but it opens in Lisbon, which built up its art reserves during the centuries Portugal was part of one of the world’s great empires, and currently boasts one of the hottest contemporary art scenes in Europe. GO Marcella ITV, 9.00pm This drama’s been a little less fraught the second time round but Marcella still pushes the boundaries of credibility. In this concluding part, the heroine (Anna Friel) tracks down the killer, only to suffer one of her unfortunate episodes. GO The Core (2003) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.25pm Rome starts to crumble, the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco collapses and pigeons go mental in Trafalgar Square. Something is obviously amiss, and this time it isn’t climate change. In fact, the Earth’s core has stopped rotating and a team of scientists has to build a special burrowing machine to start it spinning again. Hilary Swank, Stanley Tucci and Aaron Eckhart do their best, but the excitement is intermittent. The Emoji Movie (2017) ★☆☆☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 6.30pm In this animated comedy set inside a smartphone, Gene (voiced by T J Miller), an emoji with multiple facial features, sets out on a quest to be like his colleagues who have only one. He does so with the help of apps like Spotify and Candy Crush. Sadly, the result is so horrendous that there aren’t enough Patrick Stewart-voiced emojis in the world to express what an ugly, artless exercise this is. Triple 9 (2016) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A gang of criminals and corrupt cops plan to kill a police officer in order to pull off their biggest heist yet in John Hillcoat’s crime thriller. There is a lot to like here: a big opening and a strong cast (with Kate Winslet, Gal Gadot, Anthony Mackie and Chiwetel Ejiofor among them). But it feels like fragments of a great crime drama are missing; it’s enthralling up close, but then the big picture isn’t complete. Tuesday 10 April Back to school: Mark, who has two sons with autism Credit: Channel 4 Class of Mum and Dad Channel 4, 8.00pm Another week, another Channel 4 series about education. Hold off on the black marks, however, because this one is pretty good. The premise is simple: Blackrod Primary School just outside of Bolton has thrown open its doors to a class made up of pupils’ parents (and one grandparent). They’ve agreed to go back to school for the summer term to see what modern education is really like, sports day, Sats tests and all. Naturally, its harder than many of them were expecting – 36-year-old decorator Jonny states early on that he thought he’d be able to slope off for a swift cigarette break rather than having to adhere to strict class rules – but there are some touching stories amid the more obvious moments. Most notably, this opening episode focuses on two parents with challenging home lives – Julia, who is raising her 10-year-old cousin Asha after Asha’s mother died, and Mark, who has two autistic sons. While the parents’ travails are interesting, the children are the real scene-stealers, however, from those delighted that their mothers and fathers are taking part to those who are more sceptical. The pair of five-year-olds who spend their time corpsing in front of the camera are particularly endearing. Sarah Hughes Champions League Football: Manchester City v Liverpool BT Sport 2, 7.45pm The Etihad Stadium is the setting as City and Liverpool fight it out for a place in the semi-finals. Liverpool have the advantage following a 3-0 win at Anfield in the first leg. This Time Next Year ITV, 8.00pm Davina McCall returns with another set of heart-tugging stories of people attempting to transform their lives over the course of a year. First up are two new parents who dream of making life wonderful for their baby girl who has been deaf since birth and a couple desperate to start a family. Come Home BBC One, 9.00pm Danny Brocklehurst’s claustrophobic family drama comes to a head as we flashback to find out exactly what went wrong in Greg (Christopher Eccleston) and Marie’s (Paula Malcomson) marriage. Hospital BBC Two, 9.00pm The engrossing fly-on-the-wall medical series continues with Nottingham University Hospitals Trust struggling to cope with the new NHS ruling regarding the cancellation of all non-urgent surgery. The episode focuses on Val, a 55-year-old with mouth cancer whose surgeon is desperately trying to ensure that her operation goes ahead. Here and Now Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm With only two episodes left to go, Alan Ball’s family drama continues to tread water in the most frustrating ways. On paper, there are a whole bunch of interesting stories in the mix, from Kristen’s (Sosie Bacon) possible relationship with Navid (Marwan Salama) to Ramon’s (Daniel Zovatto) continuing visions, but the problem is nothing much happens with any of them as each story moves on only incrementally each week. In this episode, Audrey (Holly Hunter) finally turns the tables on the perpetually smug Greg (Tim Robbins). Cunk on Britain BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm Diana Morgan’s pitch-perfect send-up of history programmes moves to the Tudor era and beyond as Cunk takes on Henry VIII, aka “The kingiest king who kinged over Britain” before giving us her unique perspective on “Bloody” Mary Tudor (“horrible like the drink”) and Elizabeth I. SH Divorce Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The acerbic Sarah Jessica Parker sitcom has been firing on all cylinders throughout its second series – possibly because it’s more interesting watching Frances (Parker) and Robert (the excellent Thomas Haden Church) navigate life after divorce than it was watching them get there. Here, Frances tries to make a new contact in the art world. SH Speed (1994) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm “There’s a bomb on the bus!” is the most famous line and basically the entire plot of one of the best action thrillers of the Nineties. The sizzling chemistry between LAPD Swat specialist Jack Traven (Keanu Reeves) and passenger Annie Porter (Sandra Bullock) sexes up the exhilarating action scenes, while Dennis Hopper is fantastically unhinged as a revenge-driven, retired bomb squad member turned terrorist. Fast & Furious 7 (2015) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 9.00pm Paul Walker was killed in a car crash part-way through making this film so it was completed with the help of his two younger brothers and some subtle computer graphics. The good news is that this is the best film in the franchise and does justice to Walker. It isn’t polished blockbuster film-making – though if it was, it wouldn’t be Fast & Furious. But it speaks straight to your adrenal glands. The Witches of Eastwick (1987) ★★★☆☆ Syfy, 9.00pm It is remarkable that director George Miller’s daft, unfettered romp of a film works at all. But, thanks to Jack Nicholson’s delicious overacting as Daryl Van Horne, a manic gentleman who closely resembles the devil, and the three gorgeous, single small-town friends, Alexandra (Cher), Jane (Susan Sarandon) and Sukie (Michelle Pfeiffer), who vie for his debased attentions, it somehow does. Wednesday 11 April Family ties: Edgar Ramirez and Penelope Cruz Credit: BBC The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story BBC Two, 9.00pm It’s been fascinating to discover the “true” story behind the 1997 murder of fhion designer Gianni Versace in Ryan Murphy’s glitzy drama, which has expertly depicted the inner world of the perpetrator, a Walter Mitty-style serial killer called Andrew Cunanan (a career-defining role for Darren Criss). This episode, however, has a mid-series lull about it as Cunanan ascends to the higher echelons of gay society, shaping himself meticulously into the posh, preppy eye-candy who saw a sugar daddy (or two) as his way to the top. Elsewhere, the Versace siblings return at last. Gianni (Edgar Ramirez), now in failing health decides to champion his insecure sister Donatella (Penélope Cruz in a frightful wig) and turns her into both designer and muse. Despite a lack of characters to root for – the Versaces’ moments of vulnerability dissolve into tedious histrionics and are eclipsed by Cunanan’s cold-blooded machinations – it’s all quite a fabulous mix of fashion, high society and brutal murder, with some interesting commentary on homophobia in the Nineties as well. Vicki Power The Secret Helpers BBC Two, 8.00pm Watch and weep as timid elderly widow Lesley begins a new life as an out gay woman in this life-affirming docu-series. She’s encouraged with warmth and wisdom by amateur “sages” from abroad, who talk to her secretly through a hidden earpiece. From World War to Cold War Yesterday, 8.00pm As the Second World War drew to a close, Churchill, Stalin and Roosevelt met at Yalta in the Crimea to broker post-war peace. This brisk two-part documentary raids the archives for clips and letters from those who attended, and gathers experts and relatives – including FDR’s grandson – to investigate power plays by Stalin that wrong-footed his Allied counterparts. It’s a detailed look at how and why the compromises reached at Yalta were quickly cast aside. Bacchus Uncovered: Ancient God of Ecstasy BBC Four, 9.00pm Historian Bettany Hughes continues to explore ancient civilisations, moving on to Bacchus, the Roman god of wine. Hughes’s odyssey starts under the City of London, where an 1,800-year-old Roman temple to Bacchus was discovered less than 100 years ago, and takes her to Greece, the Middle East and the Caucasus to explore the god’s roots and influence. VP Benidorm ITV, 9.00pm Fluffy as candyfloss, this lewd seaside comedy provides some fun, particularly in the retro casting of stars of yesteryear. This week, an exuberant Sammy (Shane Richie) tries to persuade Monty (John Challis) that, after his successful comeback gig, he is ready for an evening slot. One Born Every Minute Channel 4, 9.00pm This feelgood documentary series brings more poignant tales from a Birmingham labour ward. This week we meet Chantell, about to deliver her third child, who regales us with a moving story of how parenthood with partner Phil has healed the wounds of a traumatic past. First Dates Channel 4, 10.00pm The thoughtful dating show pairs up four more couples, but the road to love is bumpy – septuagenarian Deanna finds her date more interested in the waiter than her. More promising is the match between Bianca and Teza, who allow their vulnerabilities to show. VP The Thin Red Line (1998) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 3.10pm This lyrical Second World War drama, directed by Terrence Malick, tells the story of a group of young US soldiers fighting the Japanese for control of the island of Guadalcanal. Full of stars such as Sean Penn and George Clooney, it struggles with its own battle to squeeze in so many characters but is still an atmospheric meditation on the nature of war. Nick Nolte and Adrien Brody also star. The Remains of the Day (1993) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 3.55pm The success of Merchant Ivory’s adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro’s Thirties-set novel, a well-observed study of regret, is built around its perfectly cast leads: Anthony Hopkins as James, the butler to the doltish aristocrat Lord Darlington (James Fox) and Emma Thompson as a housekeeper who tries to draw him out of his sterile shell. Lush visuals give it an added richness. Transporter 2 (2005) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A martial arts action sequel, in which Jason Statham and Alessandro Gassman are the sporadically thrilling stars. Statham is Frank Martin, who accepts a job as chauffeur to Jack (Hunter Clary), the son of Miami’s politician Jefferson Billings (Matthew Modine). But the local Colombian drug dealers aren’t happy with his boss’s efforts to clean up the city. Cue a kidnapping, and a potentially deadly encounter with a cocaine baron. Thursday 12 April Changing attitudes: Holly and Hollie Credit: BBC Living with the Brainy Bunch BBC Two, 8.00pm Enterprising, PR-conscious Ash Ali is headmaster of Chessington Community College, a fast-improving school with a few problem pupils. Among them are Jack and Hollie who, on the surface, are comically awful teenagers. Hollie gripes constantly, throws strops and storms out of classrooms if things aren’t going her way. Jack is sullen, lazy and has clocked up 15 suspensions in the past year. It will come as no surprise to regular viewers of such documentaries that their behaviour is rooted in low self-esteem, although their parents unquestionably indulge their foibles. Ali’s novel solution is to place Hollie with Holly, tapdancing head girl and gregarious boffin, and Jack with Tharush, a Sri Lankan immigrant by way of Italy, whose talents are only matched by his work ethic. Now that Jack and Hollie are in the bosom of new families for six weeks, it’s hoped that a new environment, greater discipline and rigid routines will see their results improve and attitudes pick up. There are setbacks on the largely familiar narrative trajectory, but it’s cast to perfection and, as a demonstration of the importance of parenting in academic achievement, the experiment gets an A-star. Gabriel Tate European Tour Golf: The Open de Espana Sky Sports Golf, 11.00am The opening day’s play of the event from the Centro Nacional de Golf in Madrid, which was won by Andrew Johnston the last time it was held in 2016. War Above the Trenches Yesterday, 8.00pm This decent two-parter tells the story of the Royal Flying Corps and their battle to win control of the air in the First World War. Based on Peter Hart’s book Bloody April, it draws affectingly on the testimony of veterans to show there was more to the Western Front than trench warfare. Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm The modern age draws closer, as Simon Schama tackles the theme of radiance, guiding us through Gothic cathedrals, Baroque Venetian masterpieces and dazzling Japanese woodblock prints. The Investigator: A British Crime Story ITV, 9.00pm The second real-life case of the series sees Mark Williams-Thomas investigating the 1977 murders of three women in Glasgow. The suspect is Angus Sinclair, who is currently serving a life sentence for killing two other women that same year. We hear from his ex-wife, and learn how he was a prime suspect but escaped charges for the first killings when key evidence went missing. Indian Summer School Channel 4, 9.00pm This diverting documentary series concludes with a Himalayan trek, a controversial article in the school newspaper and the GCSE retakes that were the goal of the entire enterprise. Will Alfie, Harry, Jack and co see their grades improve? Urban Myths: Marilyn Monroe and Billy Wilder Sky Arts, 9.00pm Sky Arts’ boldly cast series of vaguely apocryphal tales from the pop-culture frontlines returns with a dispatch from the set of Some Like It Hot, the magnificent 1959 comedy that is almost certainly more fun to watch than it was to make. In this minor but entertaining reimagining, Tony Curtis (Alex Pettyfer) is threatening to cuckold Arthur Miller (Dougray Scott) by making off with Marilyn Monroe (Gemma Arterton), whose caprice, drinking and sensitivity is driving director Billy Wilder (James Purefoy) to distraction. GT Still Game BBC One, 9.30pm; BBC Two Wales, 10.00pm Justifying its prime-time BBC One slot, the Scottish sitcom bows out in triumph with a typically well-wrought farce involving a Hollywood stuntman, a disastrous driving lesson and romance for the widowed Isa (Jane McCarry). GT The Man with the Golden Gun (1974) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Christopher Lee steals the show as the titular assassin, Francisco Scaramanga, in this classic Bond adventure. Roger Moore’s secret agent, in his second outing as 007, must pursue him, with the help of sidekick Mary Goodnight (Britt Ekland), to the villain’s island lair in order to prevent him harnessing the power of the Sun for evil. The confrontations between Moore and Lee are easily the film’s highlights. Swordfish (2001) ★★☆☆☆ TCM, 9.00pm The most often quoted bit of trivia about this film is that Halle Berry was paid an additional £500,000 to go topless. It’s rather lucky she agreed because she’s probably the most appealing aspect of this frenetic thriller. John Travolta and Hugh Jackman put on testosterone-fuelled displays as a morally dubious counter-terrorist agent and the hacker he blackmails into accessing billions of dollars of government money. Some Like It Hot (1959, b/w) ★★★★★ Sky Arts, 9.30pm When two musicians (Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis) witness a mob hit, they flee the state disguised as women in an all-female band, but further complications arise in the form of demure ukulele player Sugar Kane, superbly played by Marilyn Monroe. Billy Wilder’s classic comedy is effortlessly wacky and clever. Before, at 9pm, is Urban Myths, which imagines what happened on the set of this romcom. Friday 13 April Dishing out opinions: John Torode and Gregg Wallace Credit: BBC MasterChef: The Final BBC One, 8.30pm It has taken 25 episodes over seven weeks to whittle down the 56 amateur contestants to three finalists, and in the process, MasterChef 2018 has produced some of the best cooking – and some of the toughest competition – in the series’ long history. (It has been running in one form or another since 1990; and since 2005 in, roughly, its current format with judges Gregg Wallace and John Torode presenting.) This last week has been no exception, with the finalists having to dig deeper than ever to produce the best dishes of their lives and some great moments – notably during the spectacular trip to South America when they met Peruvian superchef Gaston Acurio and took on a service at the fifth best restaurant in the world, the Central in Lima, under Michelin-starred maestro Virgilio Martínez Véliz. In the finale, it’s all about who cooks the best food, though, as the final three return to the studio kitchen to undergo a test of culinary skills and nerve as they set about creating the most important three-course meal of their lives – in the hope of being judged worthy of a title that has launched many a great career: MasterChef champion. Gerard O’Donovan Chef’s Table: Pastry Netflix, from today This mouth-watering spin-off from Netflix’s popular global foodie series Chef’s Table puts the focus entirely on sweet stuff, talking the cameras inside the kitchens of some of the world’s best pastry chefs, among them Christina Tosi’s Milk Bar in New York, Corrado Assenza’s Caffé Sicilia in Noto, Sicily, Jordi Roca’s El Celler de Can Roca in Girona, and Will Goldfarb’s Room4Dessert in Bali. Lost in Space Netflix, from today Not so much a rerun as a spectacular new take on the classic Sixties sci-fi series about a family marooned in space when their ship runs into difficulty on their way to a new colony and crashes on an unknown and surprisingly hostile planet. There are plenty of thrills and impressive visual effects, and Toby Stephens and Molly Parker are excellent as the pioneering Robinson parents John and Judy, while Parker Posey is an enigmatic (and now female) Dr Smith. GO The City & The City BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 9.30pm Cop thrillers don’t come much more weirdly dystopian than China Miéville’s award-winning 2009 novel and this ultra-stylish adaptation serves its source material very well. In episode two, Inspector Borlú (David Morrissey) ventures back across the border while investigating the murder of a foreign student. Episodes BBC Two, 10.00pm; Wales, 11.05pm Having overcome last week’s unfortunate episode in this sitcom, Matt (Matt LeBlanc) is back on top and leveraging his spurt in the ratings for all it’s worth, handing Sean (Stephen Mangan) and Beverly (Tamsin Greig) a welcome opportunity for escape. Lee and Dean Channel 4, 10.00pm More rough charm, as life gets complicated for Stevenage’s very own Dumb and Dumber when Lee’s (Miles Chapman) financial worries mount and Dean (Mark O’Sullivan) is persuaded to premiere his poetry at the local arts club. Front Row Late BBC Two, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm Freedom of speech and censorship are under the spotlight as host Mary Beard and guests discuss Theatre Clwyd’s production The Assassination of Katie Hopkins and former US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright’s new book Fascism: A Warning. GO Alien: Covenant (2017) ★★★★★ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm The latest film in the Alien saga from Ridley Scott is arguably a mad scientist movie. It follows the crew of the colony ship Covenant (including Katherine Waterson) as they discover what they think is an uncharted paradise, but what they uncover a threat beyond their imagination. Michael Fassbender puts in a spectacular turn as kindly robot David and his twisted “brother” Walter. Invictus (2009) ★★★★☆ ITV, 10.45pm Following the death of Nelson Mandela’s ex-wife Winnie last week, aged 81, here’s Clint Eastwood’s take on South Africa’s World Cup victory in 1995. As the country emerges from apartheid, the newly elected President Mandela (an uncanny Morgan Freeman) sees the potential for the national rugby team, led by François Pienaar (Matt Damon), to be a catalyst for harmony. This is a polished and uplifting film. Monty Python Live at the Hollywood Bowl (1982) ★★★★☆ Gold, 1.40am Much like the Secret Policeman’s Ball, this comedy performance film sees the Monty Python gang take to the stage, but this time they’re in Hollywood. Among the sketches are the Silly Olympics, where athletes compete in absurd sports, The Lumberjack Song, and The Ministry of Silly Walks. This film also features Carol Cleveland in numerous supporting roles. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
Thursday 5 April The Investigator: A British Crime Story ITV, 9.00pm “I have investigated some of the UK’s most infamous crimes but I’ve never encountered anything as sinister as this,” says cop turned investigative reporter Mark Williams-Thomas of this series in which he turns his attention to the disappearance of Polegate teenager Louise Kay in 1988. Which is quite a claim, coming as it does from the man who broke the Jimmy Savile story, among others. But when the Kay family turned to him for help after three decades of getting nowhere via the police, Williams Thomas says his own investigation turned up a great deal more than he was expecting, including links to a number of other missing persons cases and the possibility that he might have uncovered “the undetected crimes of a serial killer who has got away with murder for decades”. In this first episode, though, the focus is firmly on the circumstances surrounding the disappearance of 18-year-old Louise, who was last seen driving towards Beachy Head after a night out clubbing in Eastbourne, East Sussex, with her best friend, and the fact that her distinctive gold and white Ford Fiesta also vanished that night without trace. Gerard O’Donovan The Cruise: Sailing the Caribbean ITV, 8.30pm More seaborne adventures for the cruise ship Royal Princess, this time as she embarks on an island-hopping tour of such Caribbean destinations as Grenada, the Bahamas and Antigua. If they can get into port, that is, as the ship’s docking winches appear to have failed. Ho-hum. Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm David Olusoga takes the reins for a wide-ranging edition exploring how in West Africa, Central America and Japan, art left its own distinctive record of when some great civilisations of the 15th and 16th centuries came into contact for the first time. Indian Summer School Channel 4, 9.00pm The five British boys are now six weeks into their study programme at the Doon School in Uttarakhand, but it’s not easy for them, especially Jack who finds there is a high price to pay for daring to do better than the others. Unsolved: The Man with No Alibi BBC One, 10.45pm; Wales, 11.15pm In the concluding part of this report exploring the July 2002 murder in Bournemouth of Korean student Jong-Ok Shin, Bronagh Munro examines the evidence that convicted Omar Benguit despite the absence of forensics linking him to the crime. GO Deep State Fox, 9.00pm This eight-part British spy thriller gets off to an action packed start, with Mark Strong convincing as ex-MI6 spook Max Easton, unwillingly forced out of retirement by a former intelligence chief in London. It’s not long before he finds himself at the heart of a covert intelligence war and a conspiracy by powerful corporations to foment chaos and revolution in the Middle East. Silicon Valley Sky Atlantic, 10.15pm The popular HBO tech-comedy returns for a fifth series as, despite their record of failure (a video chat app that contravened privacy laws and a partner permanently sozzled in Tibet were just two of their problems), the team at Pied Piper look to be on the verge of success. As Richard’s (Thomas Middleditch) decentralised internet concept approaches launch, there’s ample funding for once and new offices. But the pressure to get things right begins to play on Richard’s mind. GO Nanny McPhee (2015) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 10.20am Emma Thompson wrote and stars in this sweet and old-fashioned fantasy film, based on Christianna Brand’s Nurse Matilda books. She plays an old nanny who finds that the children of a widower (Colin Firth) are a challenge, even for her. Poised between Lemony Snicket and Mary Poppins, the film has moral messages to impart, but luckily not at the expense of an enjoyable, magical tale. Live and Let Die (1973) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm James Bond (Roger Moore) battles one of his more extraordinary opponents, Kananga (Yaphet Kotto), a Caribbean criminal mastermind masquerading as a Harlem drug baron. The film was given lukewarm reviews on its release, but this is Moore-era Bond at its preposterous best. Highlights include 007’s voodoo snake ordeal and a thrilling speedboat chase through New Orleans. RocknRolla (2008) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 10.00pm After the dismal Revolver and Swept Away (which starred his ex-wife Madonna), Guy Ritchie attempts a return to Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels-esque form with another testosterone-heavy, twisty tale set in London’s underworld. The plot moves vaguely around the theft of a painting from a Russian mobster (Karl Roden) while getting tangled up in various sub-plots. Friday 6 April David Morrissey Credit: BBC The City & the City BBC Two, 9.00pm; Northern Ireland, 9.30pm “I knew there was another city I dare not see… Just on the other side of where I was supposed to look.” So states Inspector Tyador Borlú (David Morrissey) midway through this engrossing adaptation of China Miéville’s Borgesian novel, which achieves the apparently impossible by bringing a dense and clever book to brilliant, atmospheric life. Borlú, a detective with the Extreme Crime Squad in the rundown vaguely Eastern European city of Beszul, is handed the task of solving the murder of a foreign student. So far, so standard, but what unfolds turns out to be anything but as scriptwriter Tony Grisoni (Red Riding) expertly captures Miéville’s vision of a world in which a city is divided not by a wall or barricade, but by blurred realities the populace is trained from birth not to see. Thus the two cities of Beszul and Ul Qoma coexist in the same space but without acknowledging each other, the town hall their only shared space. To look directly on the other city is to commit “Breach”, bringing about the wrath of the secret police. Grisoni and director Tom Shankland build the tension inexorably as Borlú’s world is slowly but surely upended. An absolute treat. Sarah Hughes Sounds Like Friday Night BBC One, 7.30pm The BBC’s music TV revival didn’t make a huge splash with its first series but it’s still worth checking out, if only because co-host and Radio 1Xtra presenter Dotty is such a likeable presence. Tonight, she’s on the road, while Greg James anchors from the studio. Professor Green, Snow Patrol and Years & Years perform. Have I Got News for You BBC One, 9.30pm The satirical quiz show returns for a 55th series, with captains Paul Merton and Ian Hislop joined by presenter Steph McGovern and comedian Josh Widdicombe; Jeremy Paxman hosts. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm In an era when the talk show appears tired somehow Graham Norton manages to keep the format enjoyable. Tonight’s episode, the first in a new series, sees husband-and-wife team Emily Blunt and John Krasinski discuss their horror A Quiet Place. Front Row Late BBC Two, 11.05pm; N Ireland, 11.35pm Following the kerfuffle over its poorly received first series, the arts show returns with a rejigged format and Mary Beard in the presenter’s chair. Informed debate is promised, although Beard has said that she won’t simply replicate the notoriously combative Newsnight Review. SH BBC Young Musician 2018 BBC Four, 7.30pm The contest kicks off at the Royal Birmingham Conservatoire’s new concert hall. Presenter Josie d’Arby is joined by 1998 finalist Alison Balsom as we meet the final five: violinists Elodie Chousmer-Howelles and Stephanie Childress, double bassist Will Duerden, guitarist Torrin Williams and cellist Maxim Calver. The judges are double bassist Leon Bosch, classical guitarist Miloš Karadaglić, violinist and previous Young Musician of the Year winner, Jennifer Pike. Composer Kerry Andrew and the contestants will perform works by Bach, Brahms and Stravinsky. The Nineties Sky Arts, 9.00pm There’s nothing like seeing the decade you came of age in co-opted for nostalgic TV to make you feel old, but for those who can bear seeing their youth dissected Sky Arts at least does it well. Tonight’s second episode continues the focus on the decade’s TV with The Sopranos and Seinfeld under discussion. SH Fury (2014) ★★★★★ 5STAR, 9.00pm David Ayer’s study of the habits and habitats of the American killer male is an astonishing, stirring drama. It’s Germany 1945, and Sgt Don “Wardaddy” Collie (Brad Pitt) and his team are grinding towards Berlin in a battered M4 Sherman tank. There is no rescue mission, just an agonising rumble from one brush with death to the next. The set-piece battles are gripping, and the raw terror of war is blasted home. Four Weddings and a Funeral (1994) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm The best of Richard Curtis and Hugh Grant’s romcoms about awfully nice chaps dithering over frightfully pretty girls. Grant plays bumbling Charles, who, ah, er, can’t tell what’s, um, going on between him and the scrummy Carrie (Andie MacDowell), who he keeps, gosh, bumping into at weddings. It’s aged pretty well and certainly knocks spots off Love, Actually. Lawless (2012) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 12.45am An adaptation of the historical novel The Wettest County in the World, John Hillcoat’s Prohibition-era western follows three brothers (played by Tom Hardy, Shia LaBeouf and Jason Clarke), who do a tidy business distilling and selling illegal moonshine whiskey. It’s an oddly affectionate clan portrait – the violence the brothers mete out is implicitly forgiven – but the period detail is well observed. Saturday 7 April Saturday night fever: Declan Donnelly presents from Orlando Credit: Rex/Shutterstock Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway ITV, 7.00pm It can’t be easy hosting a show as exuberant as Saturday Night Takeaway on your own but Declan Donnelly made a solid if understandably restrained go of it last week. He ensured that the light entertainment series proceeded pretty much as normal in the absence of long-time work partner Ant McPartlin, whose travails were sensibly referenced only in very brief passing (“I’ve got twice the amount of work to do,” Donnelly noted at one point before mock-berating the production crew that “I’ll have to do it myself, like everything else around here this week”). That said, this final episode ups the ante as Donnelly takes the show on the road to the Universal Orlando Resort in Florida. Once there we’re promised a “super-sized” edition featuring stunts, surprises and “extra-special” guests. No word yet as to who those guests will be but expect Donnelly to continue making the best of a difficult situation, buoyed by extra support from Scarlett Moffatt, who is in charge of ensuring that the Place on the Plane winners have a wonderful time, and Stephen Mulhern, who has the possibly less than enviable task of explaining In for a Penny to an American audience. Sarah Hughes Premier League Football: Everton v Liverpool Sky Sports Main Event, 12.30pm Tired, perhaps, from their Champions League quarter-final first leg against Man City, Liverpool face their bitter local rivals Everton at Goodison Park. The home side, who’ve won three of their last six games, haven’t beaten Liverpool since October 2010, when Tim Cahill and Mikel Arteta gave them a 2-0 victory. Premiership Rugby Union: Bath v Leicester Tigers Channel 5, 1.30pm Time was when Bath and Leicester were the titans of English rugby. Currently they are fifth and eighth in the league, respectively. In September, Bath claimed a 27-23 win at Welford Road, as they held on for their first away win at Leicester since 2003, ensuring an unhappy return for George Ford against the club he left in the summer. The two sides also met in the Anglo-Welsh Cup at the Recreation Ground in November, where Bath also emerged victorious, beating Leicester 33-31 on that occasion. Premier League Football: Manchester City v Manchester United Sky Sports Main Event, 5.30pm What better way for Pep Guardiola’s Manchester City to clinch the title than by beating second-placed Manchester United at the Etihad Stadium. Sixteen points ahead of them in the table, City have been formidable this season, winning 27 of the 31 league games they’ve played. One of those victories came at Old Trafford, with a goal from Nicolas Otamendi giving City a 2-1 victory when these sides met in December. Britain’s Most Historic Towns Channel 4, 8.00pm Alice Roberts is our guide for this new six-part series, which sees her search the UK for the places that best sum up an historical era. The first era is Roman Britain, so Roberts heads to Chester, where she abseils down walls, hunkers in caves and uncovers the truth about the city. Casualty BBC One, 8.20pm The medical drama’s storyline about Dylan’s (William Beck) alcoholism continues to be sensitively handled as the medic’s ex-wife Sam (Charlotte Salt) worries about whether she can help him. Meanwhile, Ethan (George Hardy) struggles with his own demons as he realises that a patient is related to his brother’s killer. The Voice UK: Live Final ITV, 8.30pm Every reality TV idea has an allotted shelf life and it’s hard not to feel that musical talent contests have come to the end of their run. For those who disagree, The Voice UK’s grand finale is here and the final four battle it out for public approval. Below the Surface BBC Four, 9.00pm & 9.45pm BBC Four’s latest Scandi drama started off tensely but like its predecessor, Modus, it has gone on to become ever more ludicrous. Now it’s the final two episodes, and Philip Norgaard (Johannes Lassen) faces off against Mark (Jakob Oftebro), the man behind the hostage crisis. Much heartfelt talking follows, although you may end up feeling more sympathetic towards the damaged Mark than the chilly Norgaard. Pearl Jam: Let’s Play Two Sky Arts, 9.00pm When is a music documentary not a music documentary? When it’s also a sports film. This exuberant film, which was made following the Chicago Cubs’ victory in baseball’s World Series in 2016, follows die-hard Cubs fan and Pearl Jam lead singer Eddie Vedder as he cheers on his team during their championship run while also preparing the band for two August shows at the team’s Wrigley Field Stadium. The result is an affectionate portrait of the singer as fan. SH Troy: Fall of a City BBC One, 9.10pm David Farr’s epic series reaches its climax with the arrival of the most famous horse in history. After an uninspiring start, Troy has picked up in recent weeks and the final episode is a well-handled tale of betrayal and death. It’s a curate’s egg of a series, let down by poor casting. SH X-Men (2000) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.00pm Bryan Singer directs an all-star cast that includes Patrick Stewart, Hugh Jackman, Ian McKellen and Halle Berry, in the first of the X-Men franchise. A group of mutants must decide whether to side with Professor Xavier (Stewart) or the evil Magneto (McKellen) in what is a solid opening to the series and which paved the way for plenty of big-budget sequels. This is followed by X-Men 2 and X-Men 3 at 9.00pm and 11.35pm respectively. Legend (2015) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Tom Hardy gives a solid, convincing performance as east London gangster Reggie Kray but his caricatured portrayal of twin brother Ronnie lets him down, and this inconsistency leads to an entertaining though muddled film. Emily Browning, however, gives just the right mix of defiance and despair as Frances Shea, Reggie’s put-upon wife. Watch out for some particularly gory scenes. Lethal Weapon 2 (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.05pm Mel Gibson sports his signature Eighties mullet in the second film of this daft-but-fun action franchise. LAPD officer Riggs (Gibson) teams up once again with his partner Murtaugh (Danny Glover) to track down a band of South African criminals while protecting a painfully frenzied witness (Joe Pesci). Naturally, the pair find themselves drawn into violent action sequences orchestrated by stereotypical bad guys. Sunday 8 April Hostess with the mostest: Catherine Tate presents the awards Credit: ITV The Olivier Awards 2018 ITV, 10.20pm Last year, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child swept the board with nine Olivier Awards, something that looked impossible to top. But then came Lin Manuel Miranda’s blockbuster musical Hamilton, whose West End run has received reviews every bit as rapturous as those from its Broadway debut. The show has a record-breaking 13 nominations, which it is thought will be translated into awards. After being snubbed for Jerusalem, Jez Butterworth will surely be rewarded for his equally magisterial play The Ferryman (its eight nominations include best play and best director for Sam Mendes), while contenders in the acting categories include Bryan Cranston for Network, Andrew Garfield for Angels in America and Lesley Manville for Long Day’s Journey into Night. Catherine Tate will be on hosting duties for the event at the Royal Albert Hall, which will, as usual, feature a crop of stellar performances; this one will include a special tribute to Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, which turns 50 this year. Let’s hope the organisers bring together Josephs of the past for a big singalong: Jason Donovan, Phillip Schofield, Ian “H” Watkins and Lee Mead will all, one suspects, be available. Gabriel Tate Sex Robots and Us BBC Three, from 10.00am James Young, an amputee who created his own bionic arm, meets the people who design sex robots and hears about their plans for them, from being given to old people’s homes to “employment” in brothels. But is it the harmless, even socially responsible pursuit thatthey claim? Formula 1: The Bahrain Grand Prix Sky Sports F1, 3.30pm After the Australian Grand Prix – in which Sebastian Vettel took advantage of a safety-car blunder to win under pristine Melbourne skies – attention turns to the second round of the season at the Bahrain International Circuit in Sakhir. Another blunder cost Lewis Hamilton on this circuit last year – this time it happened in the pit lane, with Vettel capitalising to win by 6.6 seconds. The Generation Game BBC One, 8.00pm How do you top last week’s cavalcade of silliness in this rebooted game show? You rope in Danny Dyer to join Mel Giedroyc, Sue Perkins and panellists Melvin Odoom and Roisin Conaty for challenges that include cake decorating, balloon modelling and dancing the Argentine Tango. The Durrells ITV, 8.00pm In the fourth episode of the popular drama, Larry (Josh O’Connor) visits Athens with two oddly named guests – Captain Creech (James Cosmo) and Prince Jeejeebuoy (Tanmay Dhanania) – in tow. There, they offer advice to Gerry (Milo Parker), who is applying for a new school. Jesus’ Female Disciples: the New Evidence Channel 4, 8.00pm For centuries, the birth of Christianity was regarded as a largely male affair, with women as only bit-part players. Now, Bible experts Helen Bond and Joan Taylor have discovered evidence that women were involved in everything from preaching and baptising to funding the movement as it grew. This absorbing documentary follows the historians’ progress. Golf: The Masters Sky Sports Main Event, 8.00pm Prepare for a dramatic finale as this year’s first Major – from the Augusta National in Georgia – concludes. Last year, Spain’s Sergio Garcia won the coveted green jacket, beating Justin Rose in a tense play-off. Ordeal by Innocence BBC One, 9.00pm Sarah Phelps’s splendid adaptation continues, as Arthur Calgary (Luke Treadaway) resolves to prove the truth about Jack Argyll’s (Anthony Boyle) alibi by any means necessary. GT Folk Awards 2018 BBC Four, 9.00pm Mark Radcliffe and Julie Fowlis introduce highlights from this year’s Radio 2 Folk Awards in Belfast. It features performances from Cara Dillon, Lankum and Eliza Carthy and the Wayward Band. The great Nick Drake will also be inducted into the Hall of Fame, his genius long-established, even if such recognition eluded him during his short life. Producer Dónal Lunny, meanwhile, receives the Lifetime Achievement Award for decades of tireless work promoting the renaissance in Irish music, plus The Armagh Pipers Club are presented with the Good Tradition Award. GT Emma (1996) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 3.00pm Gwyneth Paltrow’s American iciness melts in this deft adaptation of Jane Austen’s classic comic romance. She is Emma Woodhouse, spoilt, charming and an inveterate meddler. Only Mr George Knightley (Jeremy Northam) dares challenge her behaviour – but what are his motives? A clever film with a superb supporting cast, including Toni Collette, Alan Cumming and Ewan McGregor. United 93 (2006) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 9.55pm Director Paul Greengrass’s boneshaking, real-time take on the final hours of the United Airlines plane whose passengers rebelled against their hijackers on September 11, 2001 feels uncomfortably realistic. Greengrass, whose signature rapid cutting made the second and third Bourne films so exciting, proves expert at handling the most infamous atrocity of modern times with intelligence and sobriety. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 11.00pm This superb adaptation of John le Carré’s brilliant, intricate Cold War spy novel is a triumph. The espionage drama follows the hunt for a Soviet double agent at the top of the British secret service, with Gary Oldman spearheading the excellent ensemble cast, which includes Colin Firth, Tom Hardy, John Hurt and Benedict Cumberbatch. It’s funny, seductive and suspenseful. Monday 9 April I spy: a recruit sees if she’s got what it takes to be an SOE agent Credit: BBC Secret Agent Selection: WW2 BBC Two, 9.00pm Not unlike Channel 4’s SAS: Who Dares Wins and BBC Two’s Astronauts: Do You Have What It Takes?, this absorbing new series puts a group of recruits through a series of gruelling physical and psychological challenges to see if they could make the grade as a secret agent according to an established selection test used during the Second World War. This test was used by the Special Operations Executive (SOE) to determine whether recruits from many different walks of life would be capable of being dropped behind enemy lines and surviving as a covert officer with a brief to cause the maximum disruption possible to the enemy in the territory. As with the original SOE, the 14 candidates come from diverse backgrounds (among them a research scientist, a property developer, former police officer, a drag act performer, a retired investment banker and an Army veteran). In the opening episode, they undergo the initial four-day assessment at a remote Scottish country-house estate. The aim is to winnow out weakness and determine who should win a place on the advanced, and suitably terrifying, course in assassination, sabotage and covert intelligence techniques. Gerard O’Donovan Famalam BBC Three, from 10.00am After a successful pilot last year, Vivienne Acheampong, Gbemisola Ikumelo, Roxanne Sternberg, Tom Moutchi and John MacMillan return with more culturally skewed sketches. Once again, they feature William and Funke’s raunchy chat show, misunderstood superhero Eclipse, Croydon’s voodoo practitioner Professor Lofuko, and a version of Midsomer Murders. 800 Words BBC One, 2.15pm If you like The Durrells you will definitely want to watch hit Australian comedy drama 800 Words. This gently funny series follows George (Erik Thomson), a widower, who horrifies his teenaged children when he moves the entire family to a remote seaside town in New Zealand. Springtime on the Farm Channel 5, 8.00pm This is the first of five shows this week celebrating the “great British farmer”, with the help of Yorkshire Vet stars Peter Wright and Julian Norton, Adam Henson of Countryfile and Springwatch’s Lindsey Chapman. In this programme, they explore how to cope with the stresses of lambing. MasterChef: The Finals BBC One, 9.00pm Oodles of challenges lie ahead for the remaining amateur chefs in the final week, which takes them as far afield as Peru ahead of Friday’s concluding cook-off. First, though, they’re off to North Yorkshire to cater a country-house lunch for local grandees and farmers. Lisbon: An Art Lovers’ Guide BBC Four, 9.00pm Having covered Barcelona, St Petersburg and Amsterdam in their first series of city-break guides, historian Dr Janina Ramirez and art critic Alastair Sooke jet off to explore three less obvious, art-rich destinations. Beirut and Baku are perhaps the more intriguing but it opens in Lisbon, which built up its art reserves during the centuries Portugal was part of one of the world’s great empires, and currently boasts one of the hottest contemporary art scenes in Europe. GO Marcella ITV, 9.00pm This drama’s been a little less fraught the second time round but Marcella still pushes the boundaries of credibility. In this concluding part, the heroine (Anna Friel) tracks down the killer, only to suffer one of her unfortunate episodes. GO The Core (2003) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.25pm Rome starts to crumble, the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco collapses and pigeons go mental in Trafalgar Square. Something is obviously amiss, and this time it isn’t climate change. In fact, the Earth’s core has stopped rotating and a team of scientists has to build a special burrowing machine to start it spinning again. Hilary Swank, Stanley Tucci and Aaron Eckhart do their best, but the excitement is intermittent. The Emoji Movie (2017) ★☆☆☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 6.30pm In this animated comedy set inside a smartphone, Gene (voiced by T J Miller), an emoji with multiple facial features, sets out on a quest to be like his colleagues who have only one. He does so with the help of apps like Spotify and Candy Crush. Sadly, the result is so horrendous that there aren’t enough Patrick Stewart-voiced emojis in the world to express what an ugly, artless exercise this is. Triple 9 (2016) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A gang of criminals and corrupt cops plan to kill a police officer in order to pull off their biggest heist yet in John Hillcoat’s crime thriller. There is a lot to like here: a big opening and a strong cast (with Kate Winslet, Gal Gadot, Anthony Mackie and Chiwetel Ejiofor among them). But it feels like fragments of a great crime drama are missing; it’s enthralling up close, but then the big picture isn’t complete. Tuesday 10 April Back to school: Mark, who has two sons with autism Credit: Channel 4 Class of Mum and Dad Channel 4, 8.00pm Another week, another Channel 4 series about education. Hold off on the black marks, however, because this one is pretty good. The premise is simple: Blackrod Primary School just outside of Bolton has thrown open its doors to a class made up of pupils’ parents (and one grandparent). They’ve agreed to go back to school for the summer term to see what modern education is really like, sports day, Sats tests and all. Naturally, its harder than many of them were expecting – 36-year-old decorator Jonny states early on that he thought he’d be able to slope off for a swift cigarette break rather than having to adhere to strict class rules – but there are some touching stories amid the more obvious moments. Most notably, this opening episode focuses on two parents with challenging home lives – Julia, who is raising her 10-year-old cousin Asha after Asha’s mother died, and Mark, who has two autistic sons. While the parents’ travails are interesting, the children are the real scene-stealers, however, from those delighted that their mothers and fathers are taking part to those who are more sceptical. The pair of five-year-olds who spend their time corpsing in front of the camera are particularly endearing. Sarah Hughes Champions League Football: Manchester City v Liverpool BT Sport 2, 7.45pm The Etihad Stadium is the setting as City and Liverpool fight it out for a place in the semi-finals. Liverpool have the advantage following a 3-0 win at Anfield in the first leg. This Time Next Year ITV, 8.00pm Davina McCall returns with another set of heart-tugging stories of people attempting to transform their lives over the course of a year. First up are two new parents who dream of making life wonderful for their baby girl who has been deaf since birth and a couple desperate to start a family. Come Home BBC One, 9.00pm Danny Brocklehurst’s claustrophobic family drama comes to a head as we flashback to find out exactly what went wrong in Greg (Christopher Eccleston) and Marie’s (Paula Malcomson) marriage. Hospital BBC Two, 9.00pm The engrossing fly-on-the-wall medical series continues with Nottingham University Hospitals Trust struggling to cope with the new NHS ruling regarding the cancellation of all non-urgent surgery. The episode focuses on Val, a 55-year-old with mouth cancer whose surgeon is desperately trying to ensure that her operation goes ahead. Here and Now Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm With only two episodes left to go, Alan Ball’s family drama continues to tread water in the most frustrating ways. On paper, there are a whole bunch of interesting stories in the mix, from Kristen’s (Sosie Bacon) possible relationship with Navid (Marwan Salama) to Ramon’s (Daniel Zovatto) continuing visions, but the problem is nothing much happens with any of them as each story moves on only incrementally each week. In this episode, Audrey (Holly Hunter) finally turns the tables on the perpetually smug Greg (Tim Robbins). Cunk on Britain BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm Diana Morgan’s pitch-perfect send-up of history programmes moves to the Tudor era and beyond as Cunk takes on Henry VIII, aka “The kingiest king who kinged over Britain” before giving us her unique perspective on “Bloody” Mary Tudor (“horrible like the drink”) and Elizabeth I. SH Divorce Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The acerbic Sarah Jessica Parker sitcom has been firing on all cylinders throughout its second series – possibly because it’s more interesting watching Frances (Parker) and Robert (the excellent Thomas Haden Church) navigate life after divorce than it was watching them get there. Here, Frances tries to make a new contact in the art world. SH Speed (1994) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm “There’s a bomb on the bus!” is the most famous line and basically the entire plot of one of the best action thrillers of the Nineties. The sizzling chemistry between LAPD Swat specialist Jack Traven (Keanu Reeves) and passenger Annie Porter (Sandra Bullock) sexes up the exhilarating action scenes, while Dennis Hopper is fantastically unhinged as a revenge-driven, retired bomb squad member turned terrorist. Fast & Furious 7 (2015) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 9.00pm Paul Walker was killed in a car crash part-way through making this film so it was completed with the help of his two younger brothers and some subtle computer graphics. The good news is that this is the best film in the franchise and does justice to Walker. It isn’t polished blockbuster film-making – though if it was, it wouldn’t be Fast & Furious. But it speaks straight to your adrenal glands. The Witches of Eastwick (1987) ★★★☆☆ Syfy, 9.00pm It is remarkable that director George Miller’s daft, unfettered romp of a film works at all. But, thanks to Jack Nicholson’s delicious overacting as Daryl Van Horne, a manic gentleman who closely resembles the devil, and the three gorgeous, single small-town friends, Alexandra (Cher), Jane (Susan Sarandon) and Sukie (Michelle Pfeiffer), who vie for his debased attentions, it somehow does. Wednesday 11 April Family ties: Edgar Ramirez and Penelope Cruz Credit: BBC The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story BBC Two, 9.00pm It’s been fascinating to discover the “true” story behind the 1997 murder of fhion designer Gianni Versace in Ryan Murphy’s glitzy drama, which has expertly depicted the inner world of the perpetrator, a Walter Mitty-style serial killer called Andrew Cunanan (a career-defining role for Darren Criss). This episode, however, has a mid-series lull about it as Cunanan ascends to the higher echelons of gay society, shaping himself meticulously into the posh, preppy eye-candy who saw a sugar daddy (or two) as his way to the top. Elsewhere, the Versace siblings return at last. Gianni (Edgar Ramirez), now in failing health decides to champion his insecure sister Donatella (Penélope Cruz in a frightful wig) and turns her into both designer and muse. Despite a lack of characters to root for – the Versaces’ moments of vulnerability dissolve into tedious histrionics and are eclipsed by Cunanan’s cold-blooded machinations – it’s all quite a fabulous mix of fashion, high society and brutal murder, with some interesting commentary on homophobia in the Nineties as well. Vicki Power The Secret Helpers BBC Two, 8.00pm Watch and weep as timid elderly widow Lesley begins a new life as an out gay woman in this life-affirming docu-series. She’s encouraged with warmth and wisdom by amateur “sages” from abroad, who talk to her secretly through a hidden earpiece. From World War to Cold War Yesterday, 8.00pm As the Second World War drew to a close, Churchill, Stalin and Roosevelt met at Yalta in the Crimea to broker post-war peace. This brisk two-part documentary raids the archives for clips and letters from those who attended, and gathers experts and relatives – including FDR’s grandson – to investigate power plays by Stalin that wrong-footed his Allied counterparts. It’s a detailed look at how and why the compromises reached at Yalta were quickly cast aside. Bacchus Uncovered: Ancient God of Ecstasy BBC Four, 9.00pm Historian Bettany Hughes continues to explore ancient civilisations, moving on to Bacchus, the Roman god of wine. Hughes’s odyssey starts under the City of London, where an 1,800-year-old Roman temple to Bacchus was discovered less than 100 years ago, and takes her to Greece, the Middle East and the Caucasus to explore the god’s roots and influence. VP Benidorm ITV, 9.00pm Fluffy as candyfloss, this lewd seaside comedy provides some fun, particularly in the retro casting of stars of yesteryear. This week, an exuberant Sammy (Shane Richie) tries to persuade Monty (John Challis) that, after his successful comeback gig, he is ready for an evening slot. One Born Every Minute Channel 4, 9.00pm This feelgood documentary series brings more poignant tales from a Birmingham labour ward. This week we meet Chantell, about to deliver her third child, who regales us with a moving story of how parenthood with partner Phil has healed the wounds of a traumatic past. First Dates Channel 4, 10.00pm The thoughtful dating show pairs up four more couples, but the road to love is bumpy – septuagenarian Deanna finds her date more interested in the waiter than her. More promising is the match between Bianca and Teza, who allow their vulnerabilities to show. VP The Thin Red Line (1998) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 3.10pm This lyrical Second World War drama, directed by Terrence Malick, tells the story of a group of young US soldiers fighting the Japanese for control of the island of Guadalcanal. Full of stars such as Sean Penn and George Clooney, it struggles with its own battle to squeeze in so many characters but is still an atmospheric meditation on the nature of war. Nick Nolte and Adrien Brody also star. The Remains of the Day (1993) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 3.55pm The success of Merchant Ivory’s adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro’s Thirties-set novel, a well-observed study of regret, is built around its perfectly cast leads: Anthony Hopkins as James, the butler to the doltish aristocrat Lord Darlington (James Fox) and Emma Thompson as a housekeeper who tries to draw him out of his sterile shell. Lush visuals give it an added richness. Transporter 2 (2005) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A martial arts action sequel, in which Jason Statham and Alessandro Gassman are the sporadically thrilling stars. Statham is Frank Martin, who accepts a job as chauffeur to Jack (Hunter Clary), the son of Miami’s politician Jefferson Billings (Matthew Modine). But the local Colombian drug dealers aren’t happy with his boss’s efforts to clean up the city. Cue a kidnapping, and a potentially deadly encounter with a cocaine baron. Thursday 12 April Changing attitudes: Holly and Hollie Credit: BBC Living with the Brainy Bunch BBC Two, 8.00pm Enterprising, PR-conscious Ash Ali is headmaster of Chessington Community College, a fast-improving school with a few problem pupils. Among them are Jack and Hollie who, on the surface, are comically awful teenagers. Hollie gripes constantly, throws strops and storms out of classrooms if things aren’t going her way. Jack is sullen, lazy and has clocked up 15 suspensions in the past year. It will come as no surprise to regular viewers of such documentaries that their behaviour is rooted in low self-esteem, although their parents unquestionably indulge their foibles. Ali’s novel solution is to place Hollie with Holly, tapdancing head girl and gregarious boffin, and Jack with Tharush, a Sri Lankan immigrant by way of Italy, whose talents are only matched by his work ethic. Now that Jack and Hollie are in the bosom of new families for six weeks, it’s hoped that a new environment, greater discipline and rigid routines will see their results improve and attitudes pick up. There are setbacks on the largely familiar narrative trajectory, but it’s cast to perfection and, as a demonstration of the importance of parenting in academic achievement, the experiment gets an A-star. Gabriel Tate European Tour Golf: The Open de Espana Sky Sports Golf, 11.00am The opening day’s play of the event from the Centro Nacional de Golf in Madrid, which was won by Andrew Johnston the last time it was held in 2016. War Above the Trenches Yesterday, 8.00pm This decent two-parter tells the story of the Royal Flying Corps and their battle to win control of the air in the First World War. Based on Peter Hart’s book Bloody April, it draws affectingly on the testimony of veterans to show there was more to the Western Front than trench warfare. Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm The modern age draws closer, as Simon Schama tackles the theme of radiance, guiding us through Gothic cathedrals, Baroque Venetian masterpieces and dazzling Japanese woodblock prints. The Investigator: A British Crime Story ITV, 9.00pm The second real-life case of the series sees Mark Williams-Thomas investigating the 1977 murders of three women in Glasgow. The suspect is Angus Sinclair, who is currently serving a life sentence for killing two other women that same year. We hear from his ex-wife, and learn how he was a prime suspect but escaped charges for the first killings when key evidence went missing. Indian Summer School Channel 4, 9.00pm This diverting documentary series concludes with a Himalayan trek, a controversial article in the school newspaper and the GCSE retakes that were the goal of the entire enterprise. Will Alfie, Harry, Jack and co see their grades improve? Urban Myths: Marilyn Monroe and Billy Wilder Sky Arts, 9.00pm Sky Arts’ boldly cast series of vaguely apocryphal tales from the pop-culture frontlines returns with a dispatch from the set of Some Like It Hot, the magnificent 1959 comedy that is almost certainly more fun to watch than it was to make. In this minor but entertaining reimagining, Tony Curtis (Alex Pettyfer) is threatening to cuckold Arthur Miller (Dougray Scott) by making off with Marilyn Monroe (Gemma Arterton), whose caprice, drinking and sensitivity is driving director Billy Wilder (James Purefoy) to distraction. GT Still Game BBC One, 9.30pm; BBC Two Wales, 10.00pm Justifying its prime-time BBC One slot, the Scottish sitcom bows out in triumph with a typically well-wrought farce involving a Hollywood stuntman, a disastrous driving lesson and romance for the widowed Isa (Jane McCarry). GT The Man with the Golden Gun (1974) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Christopher Lee steals the show as the titular assassin, Francisco Scaramanga, in this classic Bond adventure. Roger Moore’s secret agent, in his second outing as 007, must pursue him, with the help of sidekick Mary Goodnight (Britt Ekland), to the villain’s island lair in order to prevent him harnessing the power of the Sun for evil. The confrontations between Moore and Lee are easily the film’s highlights. Swordfish (2001) ★★☆☆☆ TCM, 9.00pm The most often quoted bit of trivia about this film is that Halle Berry was paid an additional £500,000 to go topless. It’s rather lucky she agreed because she’s probably the most appealing aspect of this frenetic thriller. John Travolta and Hugh Jackman put on testosterone-fuelled displays as a morally dubious counter-terrorist agent and the hacker he blackmails into accessing billions of dollars of government money. Some Like It Hot (1959, b/w) ★★★★★ Sky Arts, 9.30pm When two musicians (Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis) witness a mob hit, they flee the state disguised as women in an all-female band, but further complications arise in the form of demure ukulele player Sugar Kane, superbly played by Marilyn Monroe. Billy Wilder’s classic comedy is effortlessly wacky and clever. Before, at 9pm, is Urban Myths, which imagines what happened on the set of this romcom. Friday 13 April Dishing out opinions: John Torode and Gregg Wallace Credit: BBC MasterChef: The Final BBC One, 8.30pm It has taken 25 episodes over seven weeks to whittle down the 56 amateur contestants to three finalists, and in the process, MasterChef 2018 has produced some of the best cooking – and some of the toughest competition – in the series’ long history. (It has been running in one form or another since 1990; and since 2005 in, roughly, its current format with judges Gregg Wallace and John Torode presenting.) This last week has been no exception, with the finalists having to dig deeper than ever to produce the best dishes of their lives and some great moments – notably during the spectacular trip to South America when they met Peruvian superchef Gaston Acurio and took on a service at the fifth best restaurant in the world, the Central in Lima, under Michelin-starred maestro Virgilio Martínez Véliz. In the finale, it’s all about who cooks the best food, though, as the final three return to the studio kitchen to undergo a test of culinary skills and nerve as they set about creating the most important three-course meal of their lives – in the hope of being judged worthy of a title that has launched many a great career: MasterChef champion. Gerard O’Donovan Chef’s Table: Pastry Netflix, from today This mouth-watering spin-off from Netflix’s popular global foodie series Chef’s Table puts the focus entirely on sweet stuff, talking the cameras inside the kitchens of some of the world’s best pastry chefs, among them Christina Tosi’s Milk Bar in New York, Corrado Assenza’s Caffé Sicilia in Noto, Sicily, Jordi Roca’s El Celler de Can Roca in Girona, and Will Goldfarb’s Room4Dessert in Bali. Lost in Space Netflix, from today Not so much a rerun as a spectacular new take on the classic Sixties sci-fi series about a family marooned in space when their ship runs into difficulty on their way to a new colony and crashes on an unknown and surprisingly hostile planet. There are plenty of thrills and impressive visual effects, and Toby Stephens and Molly Parker are excellent as the pioneering Robinson parents John and Judy, while Parker Posey is an enigmatic (and now female) Dr Smith. GO The City & The City BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 9.30pm Cop thrillers don’t come much more weirdly dystopian than China Miéville’s award-winning 2009 novel and this ultra-stylish adaptation serves its source material very well. In episode two, Inspector Borlú (David Morrissey) ventures back across the border while investigating the murder of a foreign student. Episodes BBC Two, 10.00pm; Wales, 11.05pm Having overcome last week’s unfortunate episode in this sitcom, Matt (Matt LeBlanc) is back on top and leveraging his spurt in the ratings for all it’s worth, handing Sean (Stephen Mangan) and Beverly (Tamsin Greig) a welcome opportunity for escape. Lee and Dean Channel 4, 10.00pm More rough charm, as life gets complicated for Stevenage’s very own Dumb and Dumber when Lee’s (Miles Chapman) financial worries mount and Dean (Mark O’Sullivan) is persuaded to premiere his poetry at the local arts club. Front Row Late BBC Two, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm Freedom of speech and censorship are under the spotlight as host Mary Beard and guests discuss Theatre Clwyd’s production The Assassination of Katie Hopkins and former US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright’s new book Fascism: A Warning. GO Alien: Covenant (2017) ★★★★★ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm The latest film in the Alien saga from Ridley Scott is arguably a mad scientist movie. It follows the crew of the colony ship Covenant (including Katherine Waterson) as they discover what they think is an uncharted paradise, but what they uncover a threat beyond their imagination. Michael Fassbender puts in a spectacular turn as kindly robot David and his twisted “brother” Walter. Invictus (2009) ★★★★☆ ITV, 10.45pm Following the death of Nelson Mandela’s ex-wife Winnie last week, aged 81, here’s Clint Eastwood’s take on South Africa’s World Cup victory in 1995. As the country emerges from apartheid, the newly elected President Mandela (an uncanny Morgan Freeman) sees the potential for the national rugby team, led by François Pienaar (Matt Damon), to be a catalyst for harmony. This is a polished and uplifting film. Monty Python Live at the Hollywood Bowl (1982) ★★★★☆ Gold, 1.40am Much like the Secret Policeman’s Ball, this comedy performance film sees the Monty Python gang take to the stage, but this time they’re in Hollywood. Among the sketches are the Silly Olympics, where athletes compete in absurd sports, The Lumberjack Song, and The Ministry of Silly Walks. This film also features Carol Cleveland in numerous supporting roles. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: The Investigator: A British Crime Story and Civilisations
Thursday 5 April The Investigator: A British Crime Story ITV, 9.00pm “I have investigated some of the UK’s most infamous crimes but I’ve never encountered anything as sinister as this,” says cop turned investigative reporter Mark Williams-Thomas of this series in which he turns his attention to the disappearance of Polegate teenager Louise Kay in 1988. Which is quite a claim, coming as it does from the man who broke the Jimmy Savile story, among others. But when the Kay family turned to him for help after three decades of getting nowhere via the police, Williams Thomas says his own investigation turned up a great deal more than he was expecting, including links to a number of other missing persons cases and the possibility that he might have uncovered “the undetected crimes of a serial killer who has got away with murder for decades”. In this first episode, though, the focus is firmly on the circumstances surrounding the disappearance of 18-year-old Louise, who was last seen driving towards Beachy Head after a night out clubbing in Eastbourne, East Sussex, with her best friend, and the fact that her distinctive gold and white Ford Fiesta also vanished that night without trace. Gerard O’Donovan The Cruise: Sailing the Caribbean ITV, 8.30pm More seaborne adventures for the cruise ship Royal Princess, this time as she embarks on an island-hopping tour of such Caribbean destinations as Grenada, the Bahamas and Antigua. If they can get into port, that is, as the ship’s docking winches appear to have failed. Ho-hum. Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm David Olusoga takes the reins for a wide-ranging edition exploring how in West Africa, Central America and Japan, art left its own distinctive record of when some great civilisations of the 15th and 16th centuries came into contact for the first time. Indian Summer School Channel 4, 9.00pm The five British boys are now six weeks into their study programme at the Doon School in Uttarakhand, but it’s not easy for them, especially Jack who finds there is a high price to pay for daring to do better than the others. Unsolved: The Man with No Alibi BBC One, 10.45pm; Wales, 11.15pm In the concluding part of this report exploring the July 2002 murder in Bournemouth of Korean student Jong-Ok Shin, Bronagh Munro examines the evidence that convicted Omar Benguit despite the absence of forensics linking him to the crime. GO Deep State Fox, 9.00pm This eight-part British spy thriller gets off to an action packed start, with Mark Strong convincing as ex-MI6 spook Max Easton, unwillingly forced out of retirement by a former intelligence chief in London. It’s not long before he finds himself at the heart of a covert intelligence war and a conspiracy by powerful corporations to foment chaos and revolution in the Middle East. Silicon Valley Sky Atlantic, 10.15pm The popular HBO tech-comedy returns for a fifth series as, despite their record of failure (a video chat app that contravened privacy laws and a partner permanently sozzled in Tibet were just two of their problems), the team at Pied Piper look to be on the verge of success. As Richard’s (Thomas Middleditch) decentralised internet concept approaches launch, there’s ample funding for once and new offices. But the pressure to get things right begins to play on Richard’s mind. GO Nanny McPhee (2015) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 10.20am Emma Thompson wrote and stars in this sweet and old-fashioned fantasy film, based on Christianna Brand’s Nurse Matilda books. She plays an old nanny who finds that the children of a widower (Colin Firth) are a challenge, even for her. Poised between Lemony Snicket and Mary Poppins, the film has moral messages to impart, but luckily not at the expense of an enjoyable, magical tale. Live and Let Die (1973) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm James Bond (Roger Moore) battles one of his more extraordinary opponents, Kananga (Yaphet Kotto), a Caribbean criminal mastermind masquerading as a Harlem drug baron. The film was given lukewarm reviews on its release, but this is Moore-era Bond at its preposterous best. Highlights include 007’s voodoo snake ordeal and a thrilling speedboat chase through New Orleans. RocknRolla (2008) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 10.00pm After the dismal Revolver and Swept Away (which starred his ex-wife Madonna), Guy Ritchie attempts a return to Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels-esque form with another testosterone-heavy, twisty tale set in London’s underworld. The plot moves vaguely around the theft of a painting from a Russian mobster (Karl Roden) while getting tangled up in various sub-plots. Friday 6 April David Morrissey Credit: BBC The City & the City BBC Two, 9.00pm; Northern Ireland, 9.30pm “I knew there was another city I dare not see… Just on the other side of where I was supposed to look.” So states Inspector Tyador Borlú (David Morrissey) midway through this engrossing adaptation of China Miéville’s Borgesian novel, which achieves the apparently impossible by bringing a dense and clever book to brilliant, atmospheric life. Borlú, a detective with the Extreme Crime Squad in the rundown vaguely Eastern European city of Beszul, is handed the task of solving the murder of a foreign student. So far, so standard, but what unfolds turns out to be anything but as scriptwriter Tony Grisoni (Red Riding) expertly captures Miéville’s vision of a world in which a city is divided not by a wall or barricade, but by blurred realities the populace is trained from birth not to see. Thus the two cities of Beszul and Ul Qoma coexist in the same space but without acknowledging each other, the town hall their only shared space. To look directly on the other city is to commit “Breach”, bringing about the wrath of the secret police. Grisoni and director Tom Shankland build the tension inexorably as Borlú’s world is slowly but surely upended. An absolute treat. Sarah Hughes Sounds Like Friday Night BBC One, 7.30pm The BBC’s music TV revival didn’t make a huge splash with its first series but it’s still worth checking out, if only because co-host and Radio 1Xtra presenter Dotty is such a likeable presence. Tonight, she’s on the road, while Greg James anchors from the studio. Professor Green, Snow Patrol and Years & Years perform. Have I Got News for You BBC One, 9.30pm The satirical quiz show returns for a 55th series, with captains Paul Merton and Ian Hislop joined by presenter Steph McGovern and comedian Josh Widdicombe; Jeremy Paxman hosts. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm In an era when the talk show appears tired somehow Graham Norton manages to keep the format enjoyable. Tonight’s episode, the first in a new series, sees husband-and-wife team Emily Blunt and John Krasinski discuss their horror A Quiet Place. Front Row Late BBC Two, 11.05pm; N Ireland, 11.35pm Following the kerfuffle over its poorly received first series, the arts show returns with a rejigged format and Mary Beard in the presenter’s chair. Informed debate is promised, although Beard has said that she won’t simply replicate the notoriously combative Newsnight Review. SH BBC Young Musician 2018 BBC Four, 7.30pm The contest kicks off at the Royal Birmingham Conservatoire’s new concert hall. Presenter Josie d’Arby is joined by 1998 finalist Alison Balsom as we meet the final five: violinists Elodie Chousmer-Howelles and Stephanie Childress, double bassist Will Duerden, guitarist Torrin Williams and cellist Maxim Calver. The judges are double bassist Leon Bosch, classical guitarist Miloš Karadaglić, violinist and previous Young Musician of the Year winner, Jennifer Pike. Composer Kerry Andrew and the contestants will perform works by Bach, Brahms and Stravinsky. The Nineties Sky Arts, 9.00pm There’s nothing like seeing the decade you came of age in co-opted for nostalgic TV to make you feel old, but for those who can bear seeing their youth dissected Sky Arts at least does it well. Tonight’s second episode continues the focus on the decade’s TV with The Sopranos and Seinfeld under discussion. SH Fury (2014) ★★★★★ 5STAR, 9.00pm David Ayer’s study of the habits and habitats of the American killer male is an astonishing, stirring drama. It’s Germany 1945, and Sgt Don “Wardaddy” Collie (Brad Pitt) and his team are grinding towards Berlin in a battered M4 Sherman tank. There is no rescue mission, just an agonising rumble from one brush with death to the next. The set-piece battles are gripping, and the raw terror of war is blasted home. Four Weddings and a Funeral (1994) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm The best of Richard Curtis and Hugh Grant’s romcoms about awfully nice chaps dithering over frightfully pretty girls. Grant plays bumbling Charles, who, ah, er, can’t tell what’s, um, going on between him and the scrummy Carrie (Andie MacDowell), who he keeps, gosh, bumping into at weddings. It’s aged pretty well and certainly knocks spots off Love, Actually. Lawless (2012) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 12.45am An adaptation of the historical novel The Wettest County in the World, John Hillcoat’s Prohibition-era western follows three brothers (played by Tom Hardy, Shia LaBeouf and Jason Clarke), who do a tidy business distilling and selling illegal moonshine whiskey. It’s an oddly affectionate clan portrait – the violence the brothers mete out is implicitly forgiven – but the period detail is well observed. Saturday 7 April Saturday night fever: Declan Donnelly presents from Orlando Credit: Rex/Shutterstock Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway ITV, 7.00pm It can’t be easy hosting a show as exuberant as Saturday Night Takeaway on your own but Declan Donnelly made a solid if understandably restrained go of it last week. He ensured that the light entertainment series proceeded pretty much as normal in the absence of long-time work partner Ant McPartlin, whose travails were sensibly referenced only in very brief passing (“I’ve got twice the amount of work to do,” Donnelly noted at one point before mock-berating the production crew that “I’ll have to do it myself, like everything else around here this week”). That said, this final episode ups the ante as Donnelly takes the show on the road to the Universal Orlando Resort in Florida. Once there we’re promised a “super-sized” edition featuring stunts, surprises and “extra-special” guests. No word yet as to who those guests will be but expect Donnelly to continue making the best of a difficult situation, buoyed by extra support from Scarlett Moffatt, who is in charge of ensuring that the Place on the Plane winners have a wonderful time, and Stephen Mulhern, who has the possibly less than enviable task of explaining In for a Penny to an American audience. Sarah Hughes Premier League Football: Everton v Liverpool Sky Sports Main Event, 12.30pm Tired, perhaps, from their Champions League quarter-final first leg against Man City, Liverpool face their bitter local rivals Everton at Goodison Park. The home side, who’ve won three of their last six games, haven’t beaten Liverpool since October 2010, when Tim Cahill and Mikel Arteta gave them a 2-0 victory. Premiership Rugby Union: Bath v Leicester Tigers Channel 5, 1.30pm Time was when Bath and Leicester were the titans of English rugby. Currently they are fifth and eighth in the league, respectively. In September, Bath claimed a 27-23 win at Welford Road, as they held on for their first away win at Leicester since 2003, ensuring an unhappy return for George Ford against the club he left in the summer. The two sides also met in the Anglo-Welsh Cup at the Recreation Ground in November, where Bath also emerged victorious, beating Leicester 33-31 on that occasion. Premier League Football: Manchester City v Manchester United Sky Sports Main Event, 5.30pm What better way for Pep Guardiola’s Manchester City to clinch the title than by beating second-placed Manchester United at the Etihad Stadium. Sixteen points ahead of them in the table, City have been formidable this season, winning 27 of the 31 league games they’ve played. One of those victories came at Old Trafford, with a goal from Nicolas Otamendi giving City a 2-1 victory when these sides met in December. Britain’s Most Historic Towns Channel 4, 8.00pm Alice Roberts is our guide for this new six-part series, which sees her search the UK for the places that best sum up an historical era. The first era is Roman Britain, so Roberts heads to Chester, where she abseils down walls, hunkers in caves and uncovers the truth about the city. Casualty BBC One, 8.20pm The medical drama’s storyline about Dylan’s (William Beck) alcoholism continues to be sensitively handled as the medic’s ex-wife Sam (Charlotte Salt) worries about whether she can help him. Meanwhile, Ethan (George Hardy) struggles with his own demons as he realises that a patient is related to his brother’s killer. The Voice UK: Live Final ITV, 8.30pm Every reality TV idea has an allotted shelf life and it’s hard not to feel that musical talent contests have come to the end of their run. For those who disagree, The Voice UK’s grand finale is here and the final four battle it out for public approval. Below the Surface BBC Four, 9.00pm & 9.45pm BBC Four’s latest Scandi drama started off tensely but like its predecessor, Modus, it has gone on to become ever more ludicrous. Now it’s the final two episodes, and Philip Norgaard (Johannes Lassen) faces off against Mark (Jakob Oftebro), the man behind the hostage crisis. Much heartfelt talking follows, although you may end up feeling more sympathetic towards the damaged Mark than the chilly Norgaard. Pearl Jam: Let’s Play Two Sky Arts, 9.00pm When is a music documentary not a music documentary? When it’s also a sports film. This exuberant film, which was made following the Chicago Cubs’ victory in baseball’s World Series in 2016, follows die-hard Cubs fan and Pearl Jam lead singer Eddie Vedder as he cheers on his team during their championship run while also preparing the band for two August shows at the team’s Wrigley Field Stadium. The result is an affectionate portrait of the singer as fan. SH Troy: Fall of a City BBC One, 9.10pm David Farr’s epic series reaches its climax with the arrival of the most famous horse in history. After an uninspiring start, Troy has picked up in recent weeks and the final episode is a well-handled tale of betrayal and death. It’s a curate’s egg of a series, let down by poor casting. SH X-Men (2000) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.00pm Bryan Singer directs an all-star cast that includes Patrick Stewart, Hugh Jackman, Ian McKellen and Halle Berry, in the first of the X-Men franchise. A group of mutants must decide whether to side with Professor Xavier (Stewart) or the evil Magneto (McKellen) in what is a solid opening to the series and which paved the way for plenty of big-budget sequels. This is followed by X-Men 2 and X-Men 3 at 9.00pm and 11.35pm respectively. Legend (2015) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Tom Hardy gives a solid, convincing performance as east London gangster Reggie Kray but his caricatured portrayal of twin brother Ronnie lets him down, and this inconsistency leads to an entertaining though muddled film. Emily Browning, however, gives just the right mix of defiance and despair as Frances Shea, Reggie’s put-upon wife. Watch out for some particularly gory scenes. Lethal Weapon 2 (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.05pm Mel Gibson sports his signature Eighties mullet in the second film of this daft-but-fun action franchise. LAPD officer Riggs (Gibson) teams up once again with his partner Murtaugh (Danny Glover) to track down a band of South African criminals while protecting a painfully frenzied witness (Joe Pesci). Naturally, the pair find themselves drawn into violent action sequences orchestrated by stereotypical bad guys. Sunday 8 April Hostess with the mostest: Catherine Tate presents the awards Credit: ITV The Olivier Awards 2018 ITV, 10.20pm Last year, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child swept the board with nine Olivier Awards, something that looked impossible to top. But then came Lin Manuel Miranda’s blockbuster musical Hamilton, whose West End run has received reviews every bit as rapturous as those from its Broadway debut. The show has a record-breaking 13 nominations, which it is thought will be translated into awards. After being snubbed for Jerusalem, Jez Butterworth will surely be rewarded for his equally magisterial play The Ferryman (its eight nominations include best play and best director for Sam Mendes), while contenders in the acting categories include Bryan Cranston for Network, Andrew Garfield for Angels in America and Lesley Manville for Long Day’s Journey into Night. Catherine Tate will be on hosting duties for the event at the Royal Albert Hall, which will, as usual, feature a crop of stellar performances; this one will include a special tribute to Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, which turns 50 this year. Let’s hope the organisers bring together Josephs of the past for a big singalong: Jason Donovan, Phillip Schofield, Ian “H” Watkins and Lee Mead will all, one suspects, be available. Gabriel Tate Sex Robots and Us BBC Three, from 10.00am James Young, an amputee who created his own bionic arm, meets the people who design sex robots and hears about their plans for them, from being given to old people’s homes to “employment” in brothels. But is it the harmless, even socially responsible pursuit thatthey claim? Formula 1: The Bahrain Grand Prix Sky Sports F1, 3.30pm After the Australian Grand Prix – in which Sebastian Vettel took advantage of a safety-car blunder to win under pristine Melbourne skies – attention turns to the second round of the season at the Bahrain International Circuit in Sakhir. Another blunder cost Lewis Hamilton on this circuit last year – this time it happened in the pit lane, with Vettel capitalising to win by 6.6 seconds. The Generation Game BBC One, 8.00pm How do you top last week’s cavalcade of silliness in this rebooted game show? You rope in Danny Dyer to join Mel Giedroyc, Sue Perkins and panellists Melvin Odoom and Roisin Conaty for challenges that include cake decorating, balloon modelling and dancing the Argentine Tango. The Durrells ITV, 8.00pm In the fourth episode of the popular drama, Larry (Josh O’Connor) visits Athens with two oddly named guests – Captain Creech (James Cosmo) and Prince Jeejeebuoy (Tanmay Dhanania) – in tow. There, they offer advice to Gerry (Milo Parker), who is applying for a new school. Jesus’ Female Disciples: the New Evidence Channel 4, 8.00pm For centuries, the birth of Christianity was regarded as a largely male affair, with women as only bit-part players. Now, Bible experts Helen Bond and Joan Taylor have discovered evidence that women were involved in everything from preaching and baptising to funding the movement as it grew. This absorbing documentary follows the historians’ progress. Golf: The Masters Sky Sports Main Event, 8.00pm Prepare for a dramatic finale as this year’s first Major – from the Augusta National in Georgia – concludes. Last year, Spain’s Sergio Garcia won the coveted green jacket, beating Justin Rose in a tense play-off. Ordeal by Innocence BBC One, 9.00pm Sarah Phelps’s splendid adaptation continues, as Arthur Calgary (Luke Treadaway) resolves to prove the truth about Jack Argyll’s (Anthony Boyle) alibi by any means necessary. GT Folk Awards 2018 BBC Four, 9.00pm Mark Radcliffe and Julie Fowlis introduce highlights from this year’s Radio 2 Folk Awards in Belfast. It features performances from Cara Dillon, Lankum and Eliza Carthy and the Wayward Band. The great Nick Drake will also be inducted into the Hall of Fame, his genius long-established, even if such recognition eluded him during his short life. Producer Dónal Lunny, meanwhile, receives the Lifetime Achievement Award for decades of tireless work promoting the renaissance in Irish music, plus The Armagh Pipers Club are presented with the Good Tradition Award. GT Emma (1996) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 3.00pm Gwyneth Paltrow’s American iciness melts in this deft adaptation of Jane Austen’s classic comic romance. She is Emma Woodhouse, spoilt, charming and an inveterate meddler. Only Mr George Knightley (Jeremy Northam) dares challenge her behaviour – but what are his motives? A clever film with a superb supporting cast, including Toni Collette, Alan Cumming and Ewan McGregor. United 93 (2006) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 9.55pm Director Paul Greengrass’s boneshaking, real-time take on the final hours of the United Airlines plane whose passengers rebelled against their hijackers on September 11, 2001 feels uncomfortably realistic. Greengrass, whose signature rapid cutting made the second and third Bourne films so exciting, proves expert at handling the most infamous atrocity of modern times with intelligence and sobriety. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 11.00pm This superb adaptation of John le Carré’s brilliant, intricate Cold War spy novel is a triumph. The espionage drama follows the hunt for a Soviet double agent at the top of the British secret service, with Gary Oldman spearheading the excellent ensemble cast, which includes Colin Firth, Tom Hardy, John Hurt and Benedict Cumberbatch. It’s funny, seductive and suspenseful. Monday 9 April I spy: a recruit sees if she’s got what it takes to be an SOE agent Credit: BBC Secret Agent Selection: WW2 BBC Two, 9.00pm Not unlike Channel 4’s SAS: Who Dares Wins and BBC Two’s Astronauts: Do You Have What It Takes?, this absorbing new series puts a group of recruits through a series of gruelling physical and psychological challenges to see if they could make the grade as a secret agent according to an established selection test used during the Second World War. This test was used by the Special Operations Executive (SOE) to determine whether recruits from many different walks of life would be capable of being dropped behind enemy lines and surviving as a covert officer with a brief to cause the maximum disruption possible to the enemy in the territory. As with the original SOE, the 14 candidates come from diverse backgrounds (among them a research scientist, a property developer, former police officer, a drag act performer, a retired investment banker and an Army veteran). In the opening episode, they undergo the initial four-day assessment at a remote Scottish country-house estate. The aim is to winnow out weakness and determine who should win a place on the advanced, and suitably terrifying, course in assassination, sabotage and covert intelligence techniques. Gerard O’Donovan Famalam BBC Three, from 10.00am After a successful pilot last year, Vivienne Acheampong, Gbemisola Ikumelo, Roxanne Sternberg, Tom Moutchi and John MacMillan return with more culturally skewed sketches. Once again, they feature William and Funke’s raunchy chat show, misunderstood superhero Eclipse, Croydon’s voodoo practitioner Professor Lofuko, and a version of Midsomer Murders. 800 Words BBC One, 2.15pm If you like The Durrells you will definitely want to watch hit Australian comedy drama 800 Words. This gently funny series follows George (Erik Thomson), a widower, who horrifies his teenaged children when he moves the entire family to a remote seaside town in New Zealand. Springtime on the Farm Channel 5, 8.00pm This is the first of five shows this week celebrating the “great British farmer”, with the help of Yorkshire Vet stars Peter Wright and Julian Norton, Adam Henson of Countryfile and Springwatch’s Lindsey Chapman. In this programme, they explore how to cope with the stresses of lambing. MasterChef: The Finals BBC One, 9.00pm Oodles of challenges lie ahead for the remaining amateur chefs in the final week, which takes them as far afield as Peru ahead of Friday’s concluding cook-off. First, though, they’re off to North Yorkshire to cater a country-house lunch for local grandees and farmers. Lisbon: An Art Lovers’ Guide BBC Four, 9.00pm Having covered Barcelona, St Petersburg and Amsterdam in their first series of city-break guides, historian Dr Janina Ramirez and art critic Alastair Sooke jet off to explore three less obvious, art-rich destinations. Beirut and Baku are perhaps the more intriguing but it opens in Lisbon, which built up its art reserves during the centuries Portugal was part of one of the world’s great empires, and currently boasts one of the hottest contemporary art scenes in Europe. GO Marcella ITV, 9.00pm This drama’s been a little less fraught the second time round but Marcella still pushes the boundaries of credibility. In this concluding part, the heroine (Anna Friel) tracks down the killer, only to suffer one of her unfortunate episodes. GO The Core (2003) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.25pm Rome starts to crumble, the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco collapses and pigeons go mental in Trafalgar Square. Something is obviously amiss, and this time it isn’t climate change. In fact, the Earth’s core has stopped rotating and a team of scientists has to build a special burrowing machine to start it spinning again. Hilary Swank, Stanley Tucci and Aaron Eckhart do their best, but the excitement is intermittent. The Emoji Movie (2017) ★☆☆☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 6.30pm In this animated comedy set inside a smartphone, Gene (voiced by T J Miller), an emoji with multiple facial features, sets out on a quest to be like his colleagues who have only one. He does so with the help of apps like Spotify and Candy Crush. Sadly, the result is so horrendous that there aren’t enough Patrick Stewart-voiced emojis in the world to express what an ugly, artless exercise this is. Triple 9 (2016) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A gang of criminals and corrupt cops plan to kill a police officer in order to pull off their biggest heist yet in John Hillcoat’s crime thriller. There is a lot to like here: a big opening and a strong cast (with Kate Winslet, Gal Gadot, Anthony Mackie and Chiwetel Ejiofor among them). But it feels like fragments of a great crime drama are missing; it’s enthralling up close, but then the big picture isn’t complete. Tuesday 10 April Back to school: Mark, who has two sons with autism Credit: Channel 4 Class of Mum and Dad Channel 4, 8.00pm Another week, another Channel 4 series about education. Hold off on the black marks, however, because this one is pretty good. The premise is simple: Blackrod Primary School just outside of Bolton has thrown open its doors to a class made up of pupils’ parents (and one grandparent). They’ve agreed to go back to school for the summer term to see what modern education is really like, sports day, Sats tests and all. Naturally, its harder than many of them were expecting – 36-year-old decorator Jonny states early on that he thought he’d be able to slope off for a swift cigarette break rather than having to adhere to strict class rules – but there are some touching stories amid the more obvious moments. Most notably, this opening episode focuses on two parents with challenging home lives – Julia, who is raising her 10-year-old cousin Asha after Asha’s mother died, and Mark, who has two autistic sons. While the parents’ travails are interesting, the children are the real scene-stealers, however, from those delighted that their mothers and fathers are taking part to those who are more sceptical. The pair of five-year-olds who spend their time corpsing in front of the camera are particularly endearing. Sarah Hughes Champions League Football: Manchester City v Liverpool BT Sport 2, 7.45pm The Etihad Stadium is the setting as City and Liverpool fight it out for a place in the semi-finals. Liverpool have the advantage following a 3-0 win at Anfield in the first leg. This Time Next Year ITV, 8.00pm Davina McCall returns with another set of heart-tugging stories of people attempting to transform their lives over the course of a year. First up are two new parents who dream of making life wonderful for their baby girl who has been deaf since birth and a couple desperate to start a family. Come Home BBC One, 9.00pm Danny Brocklehurst’s claustrophobic family drama comes to a head as we flashback to find out exactly what went wrong in Greg (Christopher Eccleston) and Marie’s (Paula Malcomson) marriage. Hospital BBC Two, 9.00pm The engrossing fly-on-the-wall medical series continues with Nottingham University Hospitals Trust struggling to cope with the new NHS ruling regarding the cancellation of all non-urgent surgery. The episode focuses on Val, a 55-year-old with mouth cancer whose surgeon is desperately trying to ensure that her operation goes ahead. Here and Now Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm With only two episodes left to go, Alan Ball’s family drama continues to tread water in the most frustrating ways. On paper, there are a whole bunch of interesting stories in the mix, from Kristen’s (Sosie Bacon) possible relationship with Navid (Marwan Salama) to Ramon’s (Daniel Zovatto) continuing visions, but the problem is nothing much happens with any of them as each story moves on only incrementally each week. In this episode, Audrey (Holly Hunter) finally turns the tables on the perpetually smug Greg (Tim Robbins). Cunk on Britain BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm Diana Morgan’s pitch-perfect send-up of history programmes moves to the Tudor era and beyond as Cunk takes on Henry VIII, aka “The kingiest king who kinged over Britain” before giving us her unique perspective on “Bloody” Mary Tudor (“horrible like the drink”) and Elizabeth I. SH Divorce Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm The acerbic Sarah Jessica Parker sitcom has been firing on all cylinders throughout its second series – possibly because it’s more interesting watching Frances (Parker) and Robert (the excellent Thomas Haden Church) navigate life after divorce than it was watching them get there. Here, Frances tries to make a new contact in the art world. SH Speed (1994) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm “There’s a bomb on the bus!” is the most famous line and basically the entire plot of one of the best action thrillers of the Nineties. The sizzling chemistry between LAPD Swat specialist Jack Traven (Keanu Reeves) and passenger Annie Porter (Sandra Bullock) sexes up the exhilarating action scenes, while Dennis Hopper is fantastically unhinged as a revenge-driven, retired bomb squad member turned terrorist. Fast & Furious 7 (2015) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 9.00pm Paul Walker was killed in a car crash part-way through making this film so it was completed with the help of his two younger brothers and some subtle computer graphics. The good news is that this is the best film in the franchise and does justice to Walker. It isn’t polished blockbuster film-making – though if it was, it wouldn’t be Fast & Furious. But it speaks straight to your adrenal glands. The Witches of Eastwick (1987) ★★★☆☆ Syfy, 9.00pm It is remarkable that director George Miller’s daft, unfettered romp of a film works at all. But, thanks to Jack Nicholson’s delicious overacting as Daryl Van Horne, a manic gentleman who closely resembles the devil, and the three gorgeous, single small-town friends, Alexandra (Cher), Jane (Susan Sarandon) and Sukie (Michelle Pfeiffer), who vie for his debased attentions, it somehow does. Wednesday 11 April Family ties: Edgar Ramirez and Penelope Cruz Credit: BBC The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story BBC Two, 9.00pm It’s been fascinating to discover the “true” story behind the 1997 murder of fhion designer Gianni Versace in Ryan Murphy’s glitzy drama, which has expertly depicted the inner world of the perpetrator, a Walter Mitty-style serial killer called Andrew Cunanan (a career-defining role for Darren Criss). This episode, however, has a mid-series lull about it as Cunanan ascends to the higher echelons of gay society, shaping himself meticulously into the posh, preppy eye-candy who saw a sugar daddy (or two) as his way to the top. Elsewhere, the Versace siblings return at last. Gianni (Edgar Ramirez), now in failing health decides to champion his insecure sister Donatella (Penélope Cruz in a frightful wig) and turns her into both designer and muse. Despite a lack of characters to root for – the Versaces’ moments of vulnerability dissolve into tedious histrionics and are eclipsed by Cunanan’s cold-blooded machinations – it’s all quite a fabulous mix of fashion, high society and brutal murder, with some interesting commentary on homophobia in the Nineties as well. Vicki Power The Secret Helpers BBC Two, 8.00pm Watch and weep as timid elderly widow Lesley begins a new life as an out gay woman in this life-affirming docu-series. She’s encouraged with warmth and wisdom by amateur “sages” from abroad, who talk to her secretly through a hidden earpiece. From World War to Cold War Yesterday, 8.00pm As the Second World War drew to a close, Churchill, Stalin and Roosevelt met at Yalta in the Crimea to broker post-war peace. This brisk two-part documentary raids the archives for clips and letters from those who attended, and gathers experts and relatives – including FDR’s grandson – to investigate power plays by Stalin that wrong-footed his Allied counterparts. It’s a detailed look at how and why the compromises reached at Yalta were quickly cast aside. Bacchus Uncovered: Ancient God of Ecstasy BBC Four, 9.00pm Historian Bettany Hughes continues to explore ancient civilisations, moving on to Bacchus, the Roman god of wine. Hughes’s odyssey starts under the City of London, where an 1,800-year-old Roman temple to Bacchus was discovered less than 100 years ago, and takes her to Greece, the Middle East and the Caucasus to explore the god’s roots and influence. VP Benidorm ITV, 9.00pm Fluffy as candyfloss, this lewd seaside comedy provides some fun, particularly in the retro casting of stars of yesteryear. This week, an exuberant Sammy (Shane Richie) tries to persuade Monty (John Challis) that, after his successful comeback gig, he is ready for an evening slot. One Born Every Minute Channel 4, 9.00pm This feelgood documentary series brings more poignant tales from a Birmingham labour ward. This week we meet Chantell, about to deliver her third child, who regales us with a moving story of how parenthood with partner Phil has healed the wounds of a traumatic past. First Dates Channel 4, 10.00pm The thoughtful dating show pairs up four more couples, but the road to love is bumpy – septuagenarian Deanna finds her date more interested in the waiter than her. More promising is the match between Bianca and Teza, who allow their vulnerabilities to show. VP The Thin Red Line (1998) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 3.10pm This lyrical Second World War drama, directed by Terrence Malick, tells the story of a group of young US soldiers fighting the Japanese for control of the island of Guadalcanal. Full of stars such as Sean Penn and George Clooney, it struggles with its own battle to squeeze in so many characters but is still an atmospheric meditation on the nature of war. Nick Nolte and Adrien Brody also star. The Remains of the Day (1993) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 3.55pm The success of Merchant Ivory’s adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro’s Thirties-set novel, a well-observed study of regret, is built around its perfectly cast leads: Anthony Hopkins as James, the butler to the doltish aristocrat Lord Darlington (James Fox) and Emma Thompson as a housekeeper who tries to draw him out of his sterile shell. Lush visuals give it an added richness. Transporter 2 (2005) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm A martial arts action sequel, in which Jason Statham and Alessandro Gassman are the sporadically thrilling stars. Statham is Frank Martin, who accepts a job as chauffeur to Jack (Hunter Clary), the son of Miami’s politician Jefferson Billings (Matthew Modine). But the local Colombian drug dealers aren’t happy with his boss’s efforts to clean up the city. Cue a kidnapping, and a potentially deadly encounter with a cocaine baron. Thursday 12 April Changing attitudes: Holly and Hollie Credit: BBC Living with the Brainy Bunch BBC Two, 8.00pm Enterprising, PR-conscious Ash Ali is headmaster of Chessington Community College, a fast-improving school with a few problem pupils. Among them are Jack and Hollie who, on the surface, are comically awful teenagers. Hollie gripes constantly, throws strops and storms out of classrooms if things aren’t going her way. Jack is sullen, lazy and has clocked up 15 suspensions in the past year. It will come as no surprise to regular viewers of such documentaries that their behaviour is rooted in low self-esteem, although their parents unquestionably indulge their foibles. Ali’s novel solution is to place Hollie with Holly, tapdancing head girl and gregarious boffin, and Jack with Tharush, a Sri Lankan immigrant by way of Italy, whose talents are only matched by his work ethic. Now that Jack and Hollie are in the bosom of new families for six weeks, it’s hoped that a new environment, greater discipline and rigid routines will see their results improve and attitudes pick up. There are setbacks on the largely familiar narrative trajectory, but it’s cast to perfection and, as a demonstration of the importance of parenting in academic achievement, the experiment gets an A-star. Gabriel Tate European Tour Golf: The Open de Espana Sky Sports Golf, 11.00am The opening day’s play of the event from the Centro Nacional de Golf in Madrid, which was won by Andrew Johnston the last time it was held in 2016. War Above the Trenches Yesterday, 8.00pm This decent two-parter tells the story of the Royal Flying Corps and their battle to win control of the air in the First World War. Based on Peter Hart’s book Bloody April, it draws affectingly on the testimony of veterans to show there was more to the Western Front than trench warfare. Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm The modern age draws closer, as Simon Schama tackles the theme of radiance, guiding us through Gothic cathedrals, Baroque Venetian masterpieces and dazzling Japanese woodblock prints. The Investigator: A British Crime Story ITV, 9.00pm The second real-life case of the series sees Mark Williams-Thomas investigating the 1977 murders of three women in Glasgow. The suspect is Angus Sinclair, who is currently serving a life sentence for killing two other women that same year. We hear from his ex-wife, and learn how he was a prime suspect but escaped charges for the first killings when key evidence went missing. Indian Summer School Channel 4, 9.00pm This diverting documentary series concludes with a Himalayan trek, a controversial article in the school newspaper and the GCSE retakes that were the goal of the entire enterprise. Will Alfie, Harry, Jack and co see their grades improve? Urban Myths: Marilyn Monroe and Billy Wilder Sky Arts, 9.00pm Sky Arts’ boldly cast series of vaguely apocryphal tales from the pop-culture frontlines returns with a dispatch from the set of Some Like It Hot, the magnificent 1959 comedy that is almost certainly more fun to watch than it was to make. In this minor but entertaining reimagining, Tony Curtis (Alex Pettyfer) is threatening to cuckold Arthur Miller (Dougray Scott) by making off with Marilyn Monroe (Gemma Arterton), whose caprice, drinking and sensitivity is driving director Billy Wilder (James Purefoy) to distraction. GT Still Game BBC One, 9.30pm; BBC Two Wales, 10.00pm Justifying its prime-time BBC One slot, the Scottish sitcom bows out in triumph with a typically well-wrought farce involving a Hollywood stuntman, a disastrous driving lesson and romance for the widowed Isa (Jane McCarry). GT The Man with the Golden Gun (1974) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Christopher Lee steals the show as the titular assassin, Francisco Scaramanga, in this classic Bond adventure. Roger Moore’s secret agent, in his second outing as 007, must pursue him, with the help of sidekick Mary Goodnight (Britt Ekland), to the villain’s island lair in order to prevent him harnessing the power of the Sun for evil. The confrontations between Moore and Lee are easily the film’s highlights. Swordfish (2001) ★★☆☆☆ TCM, 9.00pm The most often quoted bit of trivia about this film is that Halle Berry was paid an additional £500,000 to go topless. It’s rather lucky she agreed because she’s probably the most appealing aspect of this frenetic thriller. John Travolta and Hugh Jackman put on testosterone-fuelled displays as a morally dubious counter-terrorist agent and the hacker he blackmails into accessing billions of dollars of government money. Some Like It Hot (1959, b/w) ★★★★★ Sky Arts, 9.30pm When two musicians (Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis) witness a mob hit, they flee the state disguised as women in an all-female band, but further complications arise in the form of demure ukulele player Sugar Kane, superbly played by Marilyn Monroe. Billy Wilder’s classic comedy is effortlessly wacky and clever. Before, at 9pm, is Urban Myths, which imagines what happened on the set of this romcom. Friday 13 April Dishing out opinions: John Torode and Gregg Wallace Credit: BBC MasterChef: The Final BBC One, 8.30pm It has taken 25 episodes over seven weeks to whittle down the 56 amateur contestants to three finalists, and in the process, MasterChef 2018 has produced some of the best cooking – and some of the toughest competition – in the series’ long history. (It has been running in one form or another since 1990; and since 2005 in, roughly, its current format with judges Gregg Wallace and John Torode presenting.) This last week has been no exception, with the finalists having to dig deeper than ever to produce the best dishes of their lives and some great moments – notably during the spectacular trip to South America when they met Peruvian superchef Gaston Acurio and took on a service at the fifth best restaurant in the world, the Central in Lima, under Michelin-starred maestro Virgilio Martínez Véliz. In the finale, it’s all about who cooks the best food, though, as the final three return to the studio kitchen to undergo a test of culinary skills and nerve as they set about creating the most important three-course meal of their lives – in the hope of being judged worthy of a title that has launched many a great career: MasterChef champion. Gerard O’Donovan Chef’s Table: Pastry Netflix, from today This mouth-watering spin-off from Netflix’s popular global foodie series Chef’s Table puts the focus entirely on sweet stuff, talking the cameras inside the kitchens of some of the world’s best pastry chefs, among them Christina Tosi’s Milk Bar in New York, Corrado Assenza’s Caffé Sicilia in Noto, Sicily, Jordi Roca’s El Celler de Can Roca in Girona, and Will Goldfarb’s Room4Dessert in Bali. Lost in Space Netflix, from today Not so much a rerun as a spectacular new take on the classic Sixties sci-fi series about a family marooned in space when their ship runs into difficulty on their way to a new colony and crashes on an unknown and surprisingly hostile planet. There are plenty of thrills and impressive visual effects, and Toby Stephens and Molly Parker are excellent as the pioneering Robinson parents John and Judy, while Parker Posey is an enigmatic (and now female) Dr Smith. GO The City & The City BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 9.30pm Cop thrillers don’t come much more weirdly dystopian than China Miéville’s award-winning 2009 novel and this ultra-stylish adaptation serves its source material very well. In episode two, Inspector Borlú (David Morrissey) ventures back across the border while investigating the murder of a foreign student. Episodes BBC Two, 10.00pm; Wales, 11.05pm Having overcome last week’s unfortunate episode in this sitcom, Matt (Matt LeBlanc) is back on top and leveraging his spurt in the ratings for all it’s worth, handing Sean (Stephen Mangan) and Beverly (Tamsin Greig) a welcome opportunity for escape. Lee and Dean Channel 4, 10.00pm More rough charm, as life gets complicated for Stevenage’s very own Dumb and Dumber when Lee’s (Miles Chapman) financial worries mount and Dean (Mark O’Sullivan) is persuaded to premiere his poetry at the local arts club. Front Row Late BBC Two, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm Freedom of speech and censorship are under the spotlight as host Mary Beard and guests discuss Theatre Clwyd’s production The Assassination of Katie Hopkins and former US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright’s new book Fascism: A Warning. GO Alien: Covenant (2017) ★★★★★ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm The latest film in the Alien saga from Ridley Scott is arguably a mad scientist movie. It follows the crew of the colony ship Covenant (including Katherine Waterson) as they discover what they think is an uncharted paradise, but what they uncover a threat beyond their imagination. Michael Fassbender puts in a spectacular turn as kindly robot David and his twisted “brother” Walter. Invictus (2009) ★★★★☆ ITV, 10.45pm Following the death of Nelson Mandela’s ex-wife Winnie last week, aged 81, here’s Clint Eastwood’s take on South Africa’s World Cup victory in 1995. As the country emerges from apartheid, the newly elected President Mandela (an uncanny Morgan Freeman) sees the potential for the national rugby team, led by François Pienaar (Matt Damon), to be a catalyst for harmony. This is a polished and uplifting film. Monty Python Live at the Hollywood Bowl (1982) ★★★★☆ Gold, 1.40am Much like the Secret Policeman’s Ball, this comedy performance film sees the Monty Python gang take to the stage, but this time they’re in Hollywood. Among the sketches are the Silly Olympics, where athletes compete in absurd sports, The Lumberjack Song, and The Ministry of Silly Walks. This film also features Carol Cleveland in numerous supporting roles. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
FILE PHOTO - Rugby Union - Ireland v Georgia - Guinness Series - Aviva Stadium, Dublin, Republic of Ireland - 16/11/14 Stuart Olding of Ireland in action Mandatory Credit: Action Images / Henry Browne Livepic EDITORIAL USE ONLY.
Ireland v Georgia - Guinness Series
FILE PHOTO - Rugby Union - Ireland v Georgia - Guinness Series - Aviva Stadium, Dublin, Republic of Ireland - 16/11/14 Stuart Olding of Ireland in action Mandatory Credit: Action Images / Henry Browne Livepic EDITORIAL USE ONLY.
Rugby Union - England Training - Latymer Upper School Playing Fields, London, Britain - February 13, 2018 England's Danny Care and Georgia players during training Action Images via Reuters/Peter Cziborra
England Training
Rugby Union - England Training - Latymer Upper School Playing Fields, London, Britain - February 13, 2018 England's Danny Care and Georgia players during training Action Images via Reuters/Peter Cziborra
Rugby Union - England Training - Latymer Upper School Playing Fields, London, Britain - February 13, 2018 England and Georgia players during scrum practice Action Images via Reuters/Peter Cziborra
England Training
Rugby Union - England Training - Latymer Upper School Playing Fields, London, Britain - February 13, 2018 England and Georgia players during scrum practice Action Images via Reuters/Peter Cziborra
Sunday 4 February Endeavour ITV, 8.00pm With the likes of Black Mirror, we live in an age of increasingly inventive television, but sometimes what we all need is a nice straightforward period procedural to relax in front of on a Sunday night. Russell Lewis’s Endeavour, now returning for a fifth series, ticks all the boxes. There’s a solid cast, anchored by Shaun Evans, as the young, less grumpy, more awkward Endeavour Morse; some nice if occasionally a little precise period detail (although I did like the throwaway reference to boxer Freddie Mills); and a plot that’s just twisty enough to allow viewers to play “guess the killer”. This opening episode is a pretty bleak affair, centring around a missing Fabergé egg and a series of seemingly unlinked deaths which (topically) turn out to have their origins in a riotous stag party. Along the way, Endeavour deals with an eager but unwanted new underling (Poldark’s Lewis Peek) and crosses swords with a sharp-witted “good-time girl” (Charlotte Hope), who delivers some home truths about his tendency to put women on pedestals. Meanwhile, the wonderful Roger Allam continues to steal every scene as Detective Chief Inspector Fred Thursday. Really someone should just give him his own show. Sarah Hughes Six Nations Rugby Union: Italy v England ITV, 2.15pm Kicking off their defence of their title, England are at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome, where they face Italy. Eddie Jones’s prospects for winning an unprecedented three championships in a row have been given a major boost: Jack Nowell, Chris Robshaw, Maro Itoje and Mike Brown, who were all doubts, have all been miraculously passed fit. Italy gave the champions a scare at Twickenham last term by taking a 10-5 half-time lead, but England eventually prevailed 36-15, with Nowell and Danny Care among the scorers. Premier League Football: Liverpool v Tottenham Hotspur Sky Sports Main Event, 4.15pm Having bounced back from their defeat at Swansea with a 3-0 victory against Huddersfield – thanks to goals from Emre Can, Roberto Firmino and Mohamed Salah – Liverpool host Spurs, who are one place beneath them in fifth. When these sides met in October, two goals from Harry Kane (who else?) helped Spurs to a comprehensive 4-1 victory. Call the Midwife BBC One, 8.00pm Prepare for a real weepy as Nurse Crane (Linda Bassett) and Trixie (Helen George) try to find out what secret a pregnant mother and her family are hiding. Elsewhere, Shelagh (Laura Main) worries that her new au pair isn’t making friends. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm The eccentric yet compelling journey comes to an end as Silver Lady heads towards Inverness. Will bad weather and issues with batteries bring this great experiment to a halt? Inside Number 10 BBC Parliament, 8.00pm We know all about the pressures of being Prime Minister but what about those real-life Sir Humphrey Applebys, the Cabinet Secretaries, aka the powers behind the throne? This interesting new series sees Sue Cameron interview all five living former Cabinet Secretaries about the premierships of Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and David Cameron. McMafia BBC One, 9.00pm The action hots up considerably in this penultimate episode as Alex’s (James Norton) lies unravel. But it’s the Aleksei Serebryakov (as Alex’s father Dimitri) who continues to steal the show. Meanwhile, there’s an excellent vignette featuring nemesis Vadim (Merab Ninidze) chopping wood semi-clothed, presumably in homage to Vladimir Putin. Maltese: The Mafia Detective Channel 4, 10.00pm It might not be the most original series but this Italian import is among the most stylish. The setting is the Seventies and we open with a bang as maverick but honest cop Dario Maltese (Kim Rossi Stuart) finds himself dragged back to the corrupt Sicilian society he left years before. Arena: Stanley and his Daughters BBC Four, 10.00pm What is it really like to be the child of a genius? That question haunts the subjects of this fascinating film about the artist Stanley Spencer and his two daughters, Shirin and Unity. Now 91 and 87, Shirin and Unity were estranged for most of their lives after being separated as children. “I do feel that you were jealous of me for a time,” says Unity while Shirin looks askance. What follows is a complex and complicated story of art, betrayal, love and loss which also allows us to view Spencer’s work anew. American Football: Super Bowl LII Sky Sports Main Event, 11.00pm & BBC One, 11.15pm Hot dogs and Buffalo wings at the ready, as the New England Patriots, looking to win back-to-back Super Bowls, take on Philadelphia Eagles in Minneapolis at the US Bank Stadium. The New England Patriots overcame the Jackonsville Jaguars to set up a finale against the Eagles, who are playing in the showpiece for the first time since 2005, when they lost to the Pats. Much of the attention will be on the Patriots’ 40-year-old quarterback Tom Brady, who is attempting to become the first player to win six Super Bowl rings. Jane Eyre (1943, b/w) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 2.10pm Deep focus and shadows give Robert Stevenson’s version of Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel an extra tinge of Gothic atmosphere. Orson Welles, who provides his Mr Rochester with a hammy melancholy, is an omniscient presence but Joan Fontaine, who had a tendency to be outshone by more dynamic leading men (Cary Grant, Laurence Olivier), is formidable as Jane. Look out for Elizabeth Taylor as the ill-fated Helen Burns. Shark Tale (2004) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 4.40pm Some of Hollywood’s most famous actors, including Will Smith, Robert De Niro, Renée Zellweger, Jack Black and Angelina Jolie (as well as director Martin Scorsese) provide the voices in this comedy animation about a mafia shark family and a little wrasse (Smith) who becomes a hero after surviving a shark encounter. It’s not as good as Finding Nemo but much better than Ice Age. Plenty of gags for grown-ups, too. Yves Saint Laurent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.25am This window into the world of French fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent tells a compelling if not especially potent story. It was made with the blessing of his partner, Pierre Bergé, and charts almost the entire trip, from Saint Laurent’s upbringing in French Algeria to his rise to stardom at Christian Dior and the sexy, druggy, lucrative whirl that followed. Pierre Niney gives good doe-eyed fragility in the title role. Monday 5 February Moving On: Sue Johnston and Paula Wilcox star in Tuesday's episode Moving On BBC One, 2.15pm Jimmy McGovern’s long-running anthology series, beginning its ninth run with another five stories spread across a week, is an exemplar of daytime drama, unafraid to tackle difficult issues and frequently promoting the work of novice writers or directors. That it occasionally settles said issues a little too neatly is understandable – no one wants gale-force McGovern over tea and biscuits – but they reliably make a virtue of the short running-time to deliver intensity and coiled emotion. Stories later in the week (at 2.15pm every afternoon and 2.45pm on Friday) include Sue Johnston’s grieving widow seeking comfort in an unlikely place and Samantha Bond’s registrar forced to re-evaluate her own marriage after an unwelcome discovery. The gripping opener, however, is written by and stars Jodhi May as Rachel, a woman wrestling with the news that the teacher who abused her as a child is back working in the area. Sinead Cusack supplies doughty support as Rachel’s guilt-stricken mother, but May is hauntingly good as a woman torn between exposing her abuser and the potential impact that reopening old wounds may have on her marriage and children. Gabriel Tate My Life: Locked In Boy CBBC, 5.30pm This is a moving account of a 10-year-old whose cerebral palsy left him unable to communicate for eight years. Beginning with an alphabet board and his mother’s help, Jonathan now has a reading age beyond his years, writes poetry and is petitioning MPs to improve education for children with his condition. Horizon: My Amazing Brain: Richard’s War BBC Two, 9.00pm An extraordinary document of both personal fortitude and scientific endeavour, Fiona Lloyd-Davies’s film follows the recovery of her husband, former UN peacekeeper Richard Gray, from a stroke. Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Danny (Viveik Kalra) tries to thwart the plans of the terror cell, Omar (Mawaan Rizwan) takes matters into his own hands and Guy (Jack Davenport) faces powerful enemies. Once again packing its excitements into the closing minutes after a lengthy, patient build-up, this decent thriller concludes tomorrow. The Bulger Killers: Was Justice Done? Channel 4, 9.00pm Rather than reliving the terrible event itself, Matt Smith’s thoughtful film gathers together legal experts and those involved in the case to debate the sufficiency of the eight years served by John Venables and Robert Thompson for the murder of James Bulger in 1993. The X-Files Channel 5, 9.00pm After a patchy revival last year, The X Files rediscovers its mojo with an 11th series opener high on fun and intrigue. Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) lies hospitalised after a seizure, so Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) goes in search of their son as war looms between humans and aliens. Hull’s Headscarf Heroes BBC Four, 9.00pm Steve Humphries’s documentary meets the redoubtable Yvonne Blenkinsop, leader of the “headscarf” campaign against Hull’s trawler companies whose questionable attitude towards crew safety cost 58 lives in a series of tragedies in 1968. Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm In 2013, a gunman killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard. This documentary features an interview with the killer’s sister, still wrestling with his descent into violence. Rear Window (1954) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.40pm Wonderful in its simplicity and compelling in its execution, this belongs in the first rank of Hitchcock’s canon. The director presents a vignette of life through the lens of photographer L B “Jeff” Jeffries (James Stewart), immobilised by a broken leg during a blistering heatwave. Events take an interesting turn when he suspects one of his neighbours across the courtyard may have murdered his wife. Lincoln (2012) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Daniel Day-Lewis is on marvellous, and Oscar-winning, form as Abraham Lincoln, in Steven Spielberg’s intelligent, focused and robust film about the battle to abolish slavery. The film makes no attempt to cover the entire, unwieldy life of its subject. Instead, it dwells solely on the final months of Lincoln’s presidency, during which the political and personal stakes were never higher. Tommy Lee Jones co-stars. The Silence of the Lambs (1991) ★★★★★ Channel 5, 10.00pm Anthony Hopkins triumphs in this creepy thriller as the psychotic Dr Hannibal Lecter who is recruited by trainee FBI agent Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) to track down a serial killer nicknamed Buffalo Bill. No matter how many times you watch this film, Hopkins’s menacing performance – and his lip-smacking relish for human body parts – will always have you on the edge of your seat. Tuesday 6 February Flatpack Empire: James Futcher at SAPA aluminium factory Flatpack Empire BBC Two, 9.00pm There can’t be many urbanites in the UK who haven’t puzzled over the assembly instructions for a piece of Ikea furniture, let alone had the odd experience of being funnelled like a mouse in a maze through one of the firm’s vast depot-like stores. For this series, the Swedish company has granted a camera crew “worldwide access” – from their design headquarters in Sweden to Indian furniture factories and Polish sawmills – to film the £33 billion corporate Goliath’s global operations over the course of a year. Perhaps the biggest surprise (and certainly the thing that Ikea wants us most to know about) is their current move – unthinkable previously – into collaborations with prestige independent designers and other brands, such as audio giants Sonos and fashion designer Virgil Abloh. Among the more interesting is a project with British furniture designer Tom Dixon. “It’s not a sofa-bed, it’s a bed-sofa, but it’s really it’s a platform for living,” says Dixon, a mite grumpily, likening his role to that of a “benign parasite, where I can make a living out of this huge beast”. Maybe they’ll call the finished product “the bed bug” instead of the Swedish names that us Brits struggle to pronounce. Gerard O’Donovan Back in Time for Tea BBC Two, 8.00pm Sara Cox heads up this northern edition of the food-oriented time travel show. Tonight, the conditions that working class Yorkshire folk had to endure 100 years ago come as a shock for the Ellis family from Bradford, especially when one of them mistakes a mangle for a pasta maker. What Would Your Kid Do? ITV, 8.00pm Jason Manford puts parents’ knowledge of their offspring to the test, as children are filmed performing tasks exploring creativity, risk-taking and rule breaking while Mum and Dad have to predict what happens next. Simple and dependably entertaining. Elizabeth: Our Queen Channel 5, 9.00pm Documentaries about the Royal family seem to be appearing at an ever-increasing rate. And now here’s Channel 5’s sprawling eight-part entry, covering her life and reign and hearing from former prime ministers, friends, royal household members and special advisors. Portrait Artist of the Year 2018 Sky Arts, 8.00pm This week’s celebrity sitters are Game of Thrones star Conleth Hill, model Rachel Hunter and actor Stefanie Martini. But, as ever, it’s not so much the well-known faces as the gentle competitiveness and warm interaction between the contestants that makes this portrait painting competition so very engaging. Art, Passion & Power: The Story of the Royal Collection BBC Four, 9.00pm In the final episode of his series on the breathtaking treasures of the Royal Collection, Andrew Graham-Dixon meets the Prince of Wales and explores the last 150 years – when, as he puts it, “women took charge” and used art to help steer the monarchy through times of turbulent change. It’s also a period in which the Royal family’s changing tastes, from Fabergé eggs to the Queen Mother’s more “daring” art acquisitions, neatly demonstrate “the determined emergence of a modern monarchy”. Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm The fourth series of Reece Shearsmith and Steve Pemberton’s darkly comic anthology has been a creepy delight. In Tempting Fate they’ve kept one of the best for last, as a team of contractors clearing out a reclusive hoarder’s council flat unleash a terrible curse. 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Everything you’d expect from Michael Bay is here with bells on – the macho provocation, the sound and fury, and the diabolical pleasure in reducing everything to rubble and bloody mush. However, as a gruelling epitaph to lives wasted, this true-life Libyan shoot-’em-up starring John Krasinski is maddeningly effective and there’s a strange purity to it. Slumdog Millionaire (2008) ★★★★★ More4, 9.00pm Eight Oscars, seven Baftas and four Golden Globes cemented Danny Boyle’s energetic adaptation of Vikas Swarup’s novel Q & A as a triumph. The chaotic beauty of Mumbai is exuberantly brought to life to tell the story of an uneducated orphan (an endearing performance from Dev Patel) from the slums who is on the verge of winning a fortune on the Hindi version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. ’71 (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.50pm Jack O’Connell excels in a near-wordless role as a naive squaddie who gets stranded on the streets of Belfast in 1971 and must throw himself on the mercy of loyalist allies, who are no certain guarantees of sanctuary. It’s a tense, at times almost unbearable watch as we’re wrong-footed all the time by the combinations of terror, guilt, manoeuvring, expediency and revenge that motivate even the most minor of characters. Wednesday 7 February My Millionaire Migrant Boss My Millionaire Migrant Boss Channel 4, 9.00pm Initially, this one-off documentary – following Pakistani multi-millionaire Marwan Koukash as he puts four unemployed Brits through their paces for two weeks, before deciding whether or not to give them a job at his swanky Liverpool hotel – seems like an odd attempt to make The Apprentice on the Dole. But park that knee-jerk criticism right there because what actually unfolds is a thoughtful film in which the tough-but-likeable Koukash refuses to either play to the camera or write off his four eager contenders. That’s not to say that it’s all plain sailing: bubbly Georgia’s chronic unpunctuality soon causes issues, while Koukash, who grew up in a war zone, seems unsure of how to deal with 25-year-old Joe’s lack of confidence. The most entertaining moments, however, come in the hotelier’s relationship with the apparently lazy Heidi, who admits early on that she isn’t really sure why she has to have a job before adding: “I can’t really find out what I want to do.” A less interesting programme would have ensured that Heidi’s role was to infuriate both Koukash and the viewers at home – instead what emerges is surprisingly touching. Sarah Hughes Stacey Dooley: Face to Face with ISIS BBC Three, from 10.00am This harrowing film follows Shireen, a Yazidi woman, as she returns to Iraq with reporter Stacey Dooley for a reckoning with her past. The pair face down soldiers and officials, many of whom seem intent on ensuring that those past atrocities are never mentioned. The final confrontation between Shireen and Anmar, an Islamic State commander, sees the latter squirm blankly as the former finally and movingly gives voice to her pain. Eurovision: You Decide BBC Two, 7.30pm Six lucky contestants battle it out for the dubious honour of becoming Britain’s entrant to the 2018 Eurovision Song Contest. Among the hopefuls are a 16-year-old former Britain’s Got Talent finalist, two former The Voice UK contestants and a Eurovision backing singer. Kirstie and Phil’s Love It or List It Channel 4, 8.00pm The dynamic duo are in Windsor this week, where they meet the Farhall family who can’t decide whether they should sell their four-bedroom detached home. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This series about the history of fashion comes to an end with a look at the story behind Marie Antoinette’s famously risqué portrait in her chemise. Butchart unpicks the meaning behind the painting, looking at what the unhappy French queen was trying to convey while also considering how and why her intended message backfired. It’s a lovely conclusion to a hugely enjoyable series – here’s hoping for a swift return. The New Builds Are Coming: Battle in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Richard Macer’s topical documentary concludes with the focus shifting towards those responsible for the Cullham new builds. “Nobody has a right to a view,” states one architect. Maybe not, but as Macer talks to all involved, so it becomes increasingly clear that this is not an issue that can be easily solved. Girlfriends ITV, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama reaches its conclusion as Sue (Miranda Richardson) and Gail (Zoë Wanamaker) discover that Linda (Phyllis Logan) hasn’t exactly been honest with them about her relationship with her late husband. Harvey (1950, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am James Stewart stars as Elwood Dowd, a middle-aged, wide-eyed dreamer who spends his days getting tipsy with his best friend, a six-foot-three invisible white rabbit called Harvey. His sister Veta (an Oscar-winning Josephine Hull) tries to reform him and a comedy of errors ensues. Henry Koster’s adaptation of Mary Chase’s play is breezy, but has a lot to say about the importance of tolerance. Tango & Cash (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Bringing together two of Hollywood’s biggest action heroes, this silly shoot-’em-up is strangely appealing. Sylvester Stallone is Tango, a slick, sophisticated drug squad cop. Cash (Kurt Russell) is his uncultured rival on the force. And they don’t get on. But when they are framed and sent to prison, they’re forced to work together. It’s pure Eighties bombast, with Yazoo and Alice Cooper on the soundtrack. Harmonium (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.10pm Koji Fukada’s subtle, slow-burning thriller tells of how a family’s fragile domestic bliss is forever altered when an old friend comes to stay and teaches the daughter (Momone Shinokawa) to play the titular instrument. It’s an elegant and gripping film, with a tragic twist halfway through, and rightly won the prize in the Un Certain Regard section at the Cannes Film Festival. Thursday 8 February James Bulger: A Mother's Story James Bulger: a Mother’s Story ITV, 9.00pm Opening with the sound of Jon Venables describing in a matter-of-fact manner how he and fellow 10-year-old Robert Thompson beat and stoned toddler James Bulger to death on a railway track, this documentary relives one of the most horrifying murders of the last century in often very difficult detail. Structured around an interview between Trevor McDonald and Bulger’s mother, Denise Fergus, it exerts an awful grip while never quite deciphering the murder itself. Fergus recounts her unimaginable trauma, police and social workers describe their parts in the events and McDonald describes the trajectory of the case, from abduction to sentencing and an aftermath that has seen Fergus surround her house with CCTV cameras and Venables convicted of child pornography offences. The statements of the two killers – both, we are reminded, with troubled backgrounds – in particular are chilling: manipulative, jokey and fearful. The resilience and courage of Fergus, meanwhile, is admirable and unflinching some 25 years on: “The day I stop speaking about James,” she explains, “is the day I join him.” Gabriel Tate Death in Paradise BBC One, 9.00pm Another surreally absurd case for Jack Mooney (Ardal O’Hanlon), as the leader of a spiritual retreat is strangled while his fellow members are deep in group meditation. Trouble at the Zoo BBC Two, 9.00pm The images and stories that came out of Cumbria’s South Lakes Safari Zoo last year were deeply troubling, forcing management to step down in the face of evidence that almost 500 animals had died there in under four years. Jack Rampling’s challenging observational documentary follows staff trying to keep the institution open in the face of widespread scepticism and queries whether zoos have a place in modern society. Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 9.00pm Scraping the barrel scarcely covers this new series in which the erstwhile Supermarket Sweep host traverses the Sunshine State to check out Walt Disney World, shopping centres and spiritualists. Derry Girls Channel 4, 10.00pm One of the big comedy hits of the year so far, Lisa McGee’s evocative, ribald sitcom set during the Troubles ends with Erin (Saoirse-Monica Jackson) getting her big break as editor of the school magazine. But with great power comes great and largely unwanted responsibility. Nazi Victory: the Postwar Plan UKTV Play, from today Starting (confusingly enough) on the Yesterday channel next week, this engaging new series explores what might have happened in the event of a Nazi victory in the Second World War, from the fifth columnists planted in the United States through to his plans for concentration camps and national monuments in Britain. The latter forms the basis of this opening episode. Britannia Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Jez Butterworth’s compellingly berserk drama rampages through its fourth episode as Kerra (Kelly Reilly) is cast out by her father, King Pellenor, for parlaying with the Romans. How dare she betray the Cantii clan? He throws her to the mercy of the Druids – let’s just hope that she doesn’t meet the same fate as her mother. Meanwhile, former Druid Divis (Nikolaj Lie Kaas) suspects that there is more to General Aulus (David Morrissey) than meets the eye. Lucy (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm In this brilliant, bombastic sci-fi romp from Luc Besson, Scarlett Johansson (always worth watching) plays a drug mule who is dosed with an experimental substance that increases her brainpower by an untold degree. Space-time becomes a flick book, and Lucy’s the girl to rifle through its pages. Besson described it as La Femme Nikita plus Inception plus 2001: A Space Odyssey: that’s ambitious, egotistical, and mostly right. The Hurt Locker (2008) ★★★★☆ TCM, 9.00pm Kathryn Bigelow (Point Break) won the Best Director Oscar (the first woman to do so) for her blistering drama about a bomb disposal unit leading a perilous existence in Iraq. Jeremy Renner is outstanding as a reckless maverick who delights in putting himself in harm’s way, while the jittery cinematography stokes up the suspense to almost unbearable levels. Ralph Fiennes puts in a nice cameo as a military contractor. The Diary of a Teenage Girl (2015) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm This startling debut by Marielle Heller shows the funny side of a teenager’s explorations into her sexuality as a 15-year-old wannabe cartoonist Minnie (Bel Powley) seduces her mother’s 35-year-old boyfriend Monroe (Alexander Skarsgard). Heller’s nimble direction and clever script ensure that the film never paints either Minnie or Monroe entirely as victim or predator. Friday 9 February Winter Olympics 2018: the BBC presenting team Live Winter Olympics 2018 Opening Ceremony BBC One, 10.30am These are interesting times on the Korean peninsula, which will no doubt bring an added frisson to the Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony in Pyeongchang, South Korea. More than 3,000 athletes from 90 countries are expected to march in the ceremony, which will feature a historic moment when the North and South Korean teams march together under a unified flag. History is also being made with the disqualification of Russia from the contest due to its state-sponsored doping scandal, although, controversially, 169 Russian athletes will still compete under a designated Olympic flag. The setting for the occasion is the 35,000- seater Pyeongchang Olympic Stadium, and the following three hours of coverage comes from sure-footed BBC favourite Clare Balding, who’ll also present highlights on BBC Two at 7.00pm on BBC Two. Team GB has set its sights on a record five medals, including perhaps its first in skiing. It’s expected that North Korean artistes will perform at the ceremony in a spirit of cooperation, and while we can’t expect anything as glorious as Danny Boyle’s madcap mega-party for London 2012, we hope for a memorable kick-off to these historic Games. Vicki Power Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Actor Josh Hartnett joins his co-hosts to whip up a beloved ramen dish as the cookery show concludes its fifth series. Jamie Oliver prepares a game curry before trotting off with pal Jimmy Doherty to investigate a new method of farming. Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm Creepy noises and unexplained presences continue to unsettle incomer Matilda (Lydia Wilson) in this thriller. Determined to find out if she’s the child who disappeared from a Welsh backwater 24 years ago, Matilda begins to anger reluctant locals with her questions. Jamestown Sky One, 9.00pm A dramatic series of events in this episode provides an inkling of the high-stakes in store for season two of this glossy period piece based on the shipments of English brides to the American colonies in 1619. The opener sees Alice (Sophie Rundle) give birth and Jocelyn (Naomi Battrick) face tragedy. Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm The sharp-as-ever sitcom veers into sentimentality with the death of Rosario, the maid that Karen (Megan Mullally) loved to torment. But it’s nicely counterbalanced by Jack’s (Sean Hayes) hilarious funeral speech and a punchy cameo from Minnie Driver. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm There are performers on a well-deserved victory lap feature here. Debra Messing and Eric McCormack soak up praise for the Will & Grace revival (see preview, left), actress Saoirse Ronan basks in the glow of her third Oscar nod, and Keala Settle performs the Oscar-nominated This Is Me from The Greatest Showman. The Bold Type Amazon Prime, from today This fun comedy drama follows friends Jane (Katie Stevens), Kat (Aisha Dee) and Sutton (Meghann Fahy) working at a glossy magazine in New York. In the first episode, Jane is asked to write about her ex, while Kat attempts to convince an artist to be featured. Grand Prix Driver Amazon Prime, from today Michael Douglas narrates this behind-the-scenes look at McLaren’s F1 team during their difficult 2017 season. The four half-hour episodes take us inside McLaren’s mission control during troublesome test drives. Baywatch (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm Baywatch the TV show became a phenomenon, but everything about Baywatch the movie is big, brash and bombastic. Dwayne Johnson is preposterously buff in the role of chief lifeguard Mitch Buchannon, while Zac Efron as new recruit Matt Brody is in full-on idiot mode. A cameo by David Hasselhoff, however, appearing to the strains of Jimi Jamison’s theme I’ll Be Ready, will raise a smile. Looper (2012) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm It’s impossible not to be tickled by the playful logic of this sleek sci-fi film that ticks along with pocket-watch precision. Joseph Gordon-Levitt is a “looper” – an assassin whose targets are zapped back to him from 30 years in the future, before his contract expires and his final target is his future self. It sounds confusing, but works, and has a great cast that includes Emily Blunt, Bruce Willis and Piper Perabo. The Cabin in the Woods (2012) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.20pm Don’t be fooled by its young cast (including a pre-Thor Chris Hemsworth) and stereotypical teenage-horror appeal: Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard’s clever detonation of the scary movie is very good, with the genre’s most original plot twist in years. The story, however, is a classic one: five friends visit a cabin in the woods, where they encounter more than they bargained for. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
What's on TV tonight: new Endeavour, a weepy Call the Midwife and McMafia reaches boiling point
Sunday 4 February Endeavour ITV, 8.00pm With the likes of Black Mirror, we live in an age of increasingly inventive television, but sometimes what we all need is a nice straightforward period procedural to relax in front of on a Sunday night. Russell Lewis’s Endeavour, now returning for a fifth series, ticks all the boxes. There’s a solid cast, anchored by Shaun Evans, as the young, less grumpy, more awkward Endeavour Morse; some nice if occasionally a little precise period detail (although I did like the throwaway reference to boxer Freddie Mills); and a plot that’s just twisty enough to allow viewers to play “guess the killer”. This opening episode is a pretty bleak affair, centring around a missing Fabergé egg and a series of seemingly unlinked deaths which (topically) turn out to have their origins in a riotous stag party. Along the way, Endeavour deals with an eager but unwanted new underling (Poldark’s Lewis Peek) and crosses swords with a sharp-witted “good-time girl” (Charlotte Hope), who delivers some home truths about his tendency to put women on pedestals. Meanwhile, the wonderful Roger Allam continues to steal every scene as Detective Chief Inspector Fred Thursday. Really someone should just give him his own show. Sarah Hughes Six Nations Rugby Union: Italy v England ITV, 2.15pm Kicking off their defence of their title, England are at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome, where they face Italy. Eddie Jones’s prospects for winning an unprecedented three championships in a row have been given a major boost: Jack Nowell, Chris Robshaw, Maro Itoje and Mike Brown, who were all doubts, have all been miraculously passed fit. Italy gave the champions a scare at Twickenham last term by taking a 10-5 half-time lead, but England eventually prevailed 36-15, with Nowell and Danny Care among the scorers. Premier League Football: Liverpool v Tottenham Hotspur Sky Sports Main Event, 4.15pm Having bounced back from their defeat at Swansea with a 3-0 victory against Huddersfield – thanks to goals from Emre Can, Roberto Firmino and Mohamed Salah – Liverpool host Spurs, who are one place beneath them in fifth. When these sides met in October, two goals from Harry Kane (who else?) helped Spurs to a comprehensive 4-1 victory. Call the Midwife BBC One, 8.00pm Prepare for a real weepy as Nurse Crane (Linda Bassett) and Trixie (Helen George) try to find out what secret a pregnant mother and her family are hiding. Elsewhere, Shelagh (Laura Main) worries that her new au pair isn’t making friends. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm The eccentric yet compelling journey comes to an end as Silver Lady heads towards Inverness. Will bad weather and issues with batteries bring this great experiment to a halt? Inside Number 10 BBC Parliament, 8.00pm We know all about the pressures of being Prime Minister but what about those real-life Sir Humphrey Applebys, the Cabinet Secretaries, aka the powers behind the throne? This interesting new series sees Sue Cameron interview all five living former Cabinet Secretaries about the premierships of Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and David Cameron. McMafia BBC One, 9.00pm The action hots up considerably in this penultimate episode as Alex’s (James Norton) lies unravel. But it’s the Aleksei Serebryakov (as Alex’s father Dimitri) who continues to steal the show. Meanwhile, there’s an excellent vignette featuring nemesis Vadim (Merab Ninidze) chopping wood semi-clothed, presumably in homage to Vladimir Putin. Maltese: The Mafia Detective Channel 4, 10.00pm It might not be the most original series but this Italian import is among the most stylish. The setting is the Seventies and we open with a bang as maverick but honest cop Dario Maltese (Kim Rossi Stuart) finds himself dragged back to the corrupt Sicilian society he left years before. Arena: Stanley and his Daughters BBC Four, 10.00pm What is it really like to be the child of a genius? That question haunts the subjects of this fascinating film about the artist Stanley Spencer and his two daughters, Shirin and Unity. Now 91 and 87, Shirin and Unity were estranged for most of their lives after being separated as children. “I do feel that you were jealous of me for a time,” says Unity while Shirin looks askance. What follows is a complex and complicated story of art, betrayal, love and loss which also allows us to view Spencer’s work anew. American Football: Super Bowl LII Sky Sports Main Event, 11.00pm & BBC One, 11.15pm Hot dogs and Buffalo wings at the ready, as the New England Patriots, looking to win back-to-back Super Bowls, take on Philadelphia Eagles in Minneapolis at the US Bank Stadium. The New England Patriots overcame the Jackonsville Jaguars to set up a finale against the Eagles, who are playing in the showpiece for the first time since 2005, when they lost to the Pats. Much of the attention will be on the Patriots’ 40-year-old quarterback Tom Brady, who is attempting to become the first player to win six Super Bowl rings. Jane Eyre (1943, b/w) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 2.10pm Deep focus and shadows give Robert Stevenson’s version of Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel an extra tinge of Gothic atmosphere. Orson Welles, who provides his Mr Rochester with a hammy melancholy, is an omniscient presence but Joan Fontaine, who had a tendency to be outshone by more dynamic leading men (Cary Grant, Laurence Olivier), is formidable as Jane. Look out for Elizabeth Taylor as the ill-fated Helen Burns. Shark Tale (2004) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 4.40pm Some of Hollywood’s most famous actors, including Will Smith, Robert De Niro, Renée Zellweger, Jack Black and Angelina Jolie (as well as director Martin Scorsese) provide the voices in this comedy animation about a mafia shark family and a little wrasse (Smith) who becomes a hero after surviving a shark encounter. It’s not as good as Finding Nemo but much better than Ice Age. Plenty of gags for grown-ups, too. Yves Saint Laurent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.25am This window into the world of French fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent tells a compelling if not especially potent story. It was made with the blessing of his partner, Pierre Bergé, and charts almost the entire trip, from Saint Laurent’s upbringing in French Algeria to his rise to stardom at Christian Dior and the sexy, druggy, lucrative whirl that followed. Pierre Niney gives good doe-eyed fragility in the title role. Monday 5 February Moving On: Sue Johnston and Paula Wilcox star in Tuesday's episode Moving On BBC One, 2.15pm Jimmy McGovern’s long-running anthology series, beginning its ninth run with another five stories spread across a week, is an exemplar of daytime drama, unafraid to tackle difficult issues and frequently promoting the work of novice writers or directors. That it occasionally settles said issues a little too neatly is understandable – no one wants gale-force McGovern over tea and biscuits – but they reliably make a virtue of the short running-time to deliver intensity and coiled emotion. Stories later in the week (at 2.15pm every afternoon and 2.45pm on Friday) include Sue Johnston’s grieving widow seeking comfort in an unlikely place and Samantha Bond’s registrar forced to re-evaluate her own marriage after an unwelcome discovery. The gripping opener, however, is written by and stars Jodhi May as Rachel, a woman wrestling with the news that the teacher who abused her as a child is back working in the area. Sinead Cusack supplies doughty support as Rachel’s guilt-stricken mother, but May is hauntingly good as a woman torn between exposing her abuser and the potential impact that reopening old wounds may have on her marriage and children. Gabriel Tate My Life: Locked In Boy CBBC, 5.30pm This is a moving account of a 10-year-old whose cerebral palsy left him unable to communicate for eight years. Beginning with an alphabet board and his mother’s help, Jonathan now has a reading age beyond his years, writes poetry and is petitioning MPs to improve education for children with his condition. Horizon: My Amazing Brain: Richard’s War BBC Two, 9.00pm An extraordinary document of both personal fortitude and scientific endeavour, Fiona Lloyd-Davies’s film follows the recovery of her husband, former UN peacekeeper Richard Gray, from a stroke. Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Danny (Viveik Kalra) tries to thwart the plans of the terror cell, Omar (Mawaan Rizwan) takes matters into his own hands and Guy (Jack Davenport) faces powerful enemies. Once again packing its excitements into the closing minutes after a lengthy, patient build-up, this decent thriller concludes tomorrow. The Bulger Killers: Was Justice Done? Channel 4, 9.00pm Rather than reliving the terrible event itself, Matt Smith’s thoughtful film gathers together legal experts and those involved in the case to debate the sufficiency of the eight years served by John Venables and Robert Thompson for the murder of James Bulger in 1993. The X-Files Channel 5, 9.00pm After a patchy revival last year, The X Files rediscovers its mojo with an 11th series opener high on fun and intrigue. Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) lies hospitalised after a seizure, so Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) goes in search of their son as war looms between humans and aliens. Hull’s Headscarf Heroes BBC Four, 9.00pm Steve Humphries’s documentary meets the redoubtable Yvonne Blenkinsop, leader of the “headscarf” campaign against Hull’s trawler companies whose questionable attitude towards crew safety cost 58 lives in a series of tragedies in 1968. Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm In 2013, a gunman killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard. This documentary features an interview with the killer’s sister, still wrestling with his descent into violence. Rear Window (1954) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.40pm Wonderful in its simplicity and compelling in its execution, this belongs in the first rank of Hitchcock’s canon. The director presents a vignette of life through the lens of photographer L B “Jeff” Jeffries (James Stewart), immobilised by a broken leg during a blistering heatwave. Events take an interesting turn when he suspects one of his neighbours across the courtyard may have murdered his wife. Lincoln (2012) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Daniel Day-Lewis is on marvellous, and Oscar-winning, form as Abraham Lincoln, in Steven Spielberg’s intelligent, focused and robust film about the battle to abolish slavery. The film makes no attempt to cover the entire, unwieldy life of its subject. Instead, it dwells solely on the final months of Lincoln’s presidency, during which the political and personal stakes were never higher. Tommy Lee Jones co-stars. The Silence of the Lambs (1991) ★★★★★ Channel 5, 10.00pm Anthony Hopkins triumphs in this creepy thriller as the psychotic Dr Hannibal Lecter who is recruited by trainee FBI agent Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) to track down a serial killer nicknamed Buffalo Bill. No matter how many times you watch this film, Hopkins’s menacing performance – and his lip-smacking relish for human body parts – will always have you on the edge of your seat. Tuesday 6 February Flatpack Empire: James Futcher at SAPA aluminium factory Flatpack Empire BBC Two, 9.00pm There can’t be many urbanites in the UK who haven’t puzzled over the assembly instructions for a piece of Ikea furniture, let alone had the odd experience of being funnelled like a mouse in a maze through one of the firm’s vast depot-like stores. For this series, the Swedish company has granted a camera crew “worldwide access” – from their design headquarters in Sweden to Indian furniture factories and Polish sawmills – to film the £33 billion corporate Goliath’s global operations over the course of a year. Perhaps the biggest surprise (and certainly the thing that Ikea wants us most to know about) is their current move – unthinkable previously – into collaborations with prestige independent designers and other brands, such as audio giants Sonos and fashion designer Virgil Abloh. Among the more interesting is a project with British furniture designer Tom Dixon. “It’s not a sofa-bed, it’s a bed-sofa, but it’s really it’s a platform for living,” says Dixon, a mite grumpily, likening his role to that of a “benign parasite, where I can make a living out of this huge beast”. Maybe they’ll call the finished product “the bed bug” instead of the Swedish names that us Brits struggle to pronounce. Gerard O’Donovan Back in Time for Tea BBC Two, 8.00pm Sara Cox heads up this northern edition of the food-oriented time travel show. Tonight, the conditions that working class Yorkshire folk had to endure 100 years ago come as a shock for the Ellis family from Bradford, especially when one of them mistakes a mangle for a pasta maker. What Would Your Kid Do? ITV, 8.00pm Jason Manford puts parents’ knowledge of their offspring to the test, as children are filmed performing tasks exploring creativity, risk-taking and rule breaking while Mum and Dad have to predict what happens next. Simple and dependably entertaining. Elizabeth: Our Queen Channel 5, 9.00pm Documentaries about the Royal family seem to be appearing at an ever-increasing rate. And now here’s Channel 5’s sprawling eight-part entry, covering her life and reign and hearing from former prime ministers, friends, royal household members and special advisors. Portrait Artist of the Year 2018 Sky Arts, 8.00pm This week’s celebrity sitters are Game of Thrones star Conleth Hill, model Rachel Hunter and actor Stefanie Martini. But, as ever, it’s not so much the well-known faces as the gentle competitiveness and warm interaction between the contestants that makes this portrait painting competition so very engaging. Art, Passion & Power: The Story of the Royal Collection BBC Four, 9.00pm In the final episode of his series on the breathtaking treasures of the Royal Collection, Andrew Graham-Dixon meets the Prince of Wales and explores the last 150 years – when, as he puts it, “women took charge” and used art to help steer the monarchy through times of turbulent change. It’s also a period in which the Royal family’s changing tastes, from Fabergé eggs to the Queen Mother’s more “daring” art acquisitions, neatly demonstrate “the determined emergence of a modern monarchy”. Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm The fourth series of Reece Shearsmith and Steve Pemberton’s darkly comic anthology has been a creepy delight. In Tempting Fate they’ve kept one of the best for last, as a team of contractors clearing out a reclusive hoarder’s council flat unleash a terrible curse. 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Everything you’d expect from Michael Bay is here with bells on – the macho provocation, the sound and fury, and the diabolical pleasure in reducing everything to rubble and bloody mush. However, as a gruelling epitaph to lives wasted, this true-life Libyan shoot-’em-up starring John Krasinski is maddeningly effective and there’s a strange purity to it. Slumdog Millionaire (2008) ★★★★★ More4, 9.00pm Eight Oscars, seven Baftas and four Golden Globes cemented Danny Boyle’s energetic adaptation of Vikas Swarup’s novel Q & A as a triumph. The chaotic beauty of Mumbai is exuberantly brought to life to tell the story of an uneducated orphan (an endearing performance from Dev Patel) from the slums who is on the verge of winning a fortune on the Hindi version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. ’71 (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.50pm Jack O’Connell excels in a near-wordless role as a naive squaddie who gets stranded on the streets of Belfast in 1971 and must throw himself on the mercy of loyalist allies, who are no certain guarantees of sanctuary. It’s a tense, at times almost unbearable watch as we’re wrong-footed all the time by the combinations of terror, guilt, manoeuvring, expediency and revenge that motivate even the most minor of characters. Wednesday 7 February My Millionaire Migrant Boss My Millionaire Migrant Boss Channel 4, 9.00pm Initially, this one-off documentary – following Pakistani multi-millionaire Marwan Koukash as he puts four unemployed Brits through their paces for two weeks, before deciding whether or not to give them a job at his swanky Liverpool hotel – seems like an odd attempt to make The Apprentice on the Dole. But park that knee-jerk criticism right there because what actually unfolds is a thoughtful film in which the tough-but-likeable Koukash refuses to either play to the camera or write off his four eager contenders. That’s not to say that it’s all plain sailing: bubbly Georgia’s chronic unpunctuality soon causes issues, while Koukash, who grew up in a war zone, seems unsure of how to deal with 25-year-old Joe’s lack of confidence. The most entertaining moments, however, come in the hotelier’s relationship with the apparently lazy Heidi, who admits early on that she isn’t really sure why she has to have a job before adding: “I can’t really find out what I want to do.” A less interesting programme would have ensured that Heidi’s role was to infuriate both Koukash and the viewers at home – instead what emerges is surprisingly touching. Sarah Hughes Stacey Dooley: Face to Face with ISIS BBC Three, from 10.00am This harrowing film follows Shireen, a Yazidi woman, as she returns to Iraq with reporter Stacey Dooley for a reckoning with her past. The pair face down soldiers and officials, many of whom seem intent on ensuring that those past atrocities are never mentioned. The final confrontation between Shireen and Anmar, an Islamic State commander, sees the latter squirm blankly as the former finally and movingly gives voice to her pain. Eurovision: You Decide BBC Two, 7.30pm Six lucky contestants battle it out for the dubious honour of becoming Britain’s entrant to the 2018 Eurovision Song Contest. Among the hopefuls are a 16-year-old former Britain’s Got Talent finalist, two former The Voice UK contestants and a Eurovision backing singer. Kirstie and Phil’s Love It or List It Channel 4, 8.00pm The dynamic duo are in Windsor this week, where they meet the Farhall family who can’t decide whether they should sell their four-bedroom detached home. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This series about the history of fashion comes to an end with a look at the story behind Marie Antoinette’s famously risqué portrait in her chemise. Butchart unpicks the meaning behind the painting, looking at what the unhappy French queen was trying to convey while also considering how and why her intended message backfired. It’s a lovely conclusion to a hugely enjoyable series – here’s hoping for a swift return. The New Builds Are Coming: Battle in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Richard Macer’s topical documentary concludes with the focus shifting towards those responsible for the Cullham new builds. “Nobody has a right to a view,” states one architect. Maybe not, but as Macer talks to all involved, so it becomes increasingly clear that this is not an issue that can be easily solved. Girlfriends ITV, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama reaches its conclusion as Sue (Miranda Richardson) and Gail (Zoë Wanamaker) discover that Linda (Phyllis Logan) hasn’t exactly been honest with them about her relationship with her late husband. Harvey (1950, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am James Stewart stars as Elwood Dowd, a middle-aged, wide-eyed dreamer who spends his days getting tipsy with his best friend, a six-foot-three invisible white rabbit called Harvey. His sister Veta (an Oscar-winning Josephine Hull) tries to reform him and a comedy of errors ensues. Henry Koster’s adaptation of Mary Chase’s play is breezy, but has a lot to say about the importance of tolerance. Tango & Cash (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Bringing together two of Hollywood’s biggest action heroes, this silly shoot-’em-up is strangely appealing. Sylvester Stallone is Tango, a slick, sophisticated drug squad cop. Cash (Kurt Russell) is his uncultured rival on the force. And they don’t get on. But when they are framed and sent to prison, they’re forced to work together. It’s pure Eighties bombast, with Yazoo and Alice Cooper on the soundtrack. Harmonium (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.10pm Koji Fukada’s subtle, slow-burning thriller tells of how a family’s fragile domestic bliss is forever altered when an old friend comes to stay and teaches the daughter (Momone Shinokawa) to play the titular instrument. It’s an elegant and gripping film, with a tragic twist halfway through, and rightly won the prize in the Un Certain Regard section at the Cannes Film Festival. Thursday 8 February James Bulger: A Mother's Story James Bulger: a Mother’s Story ITV, 9.00pm Opening with the sound of Jon Venables describing in a matter-of-fact manner how he and fellow 10-year-old Robert Thompson beat and stoned toddler James Bulger to death on a railway track, this documentary relives one of the most horrifying murders of the last century in often very difficult detail. Structured around an interview between Trevor McDonald and Bulger’s mother, Denise Fergus, it exerts an awful grip while never quite deciphering the murder itself. Fergus recounts her unimaginable trauma, police and social workers describe their parts in the events and McDonald describes the trajectory of the case, from abduction to sentencing and an aftermath that has seen Fergus surround her house with CCTV cameras and Venables convicted of child pornography offences. The statements of the two killers – both, we are reminded, with troubled backgrounds – in particular are chilling: manipulative, jokey and fearful. The resilience and courage of Fergus, meanwhile, is admirable and unflinching some 25 years on: “The day I stop speaking about James,” she explains, “is the day I join him.” Gabriel Tate Death in Paradise BBC One, 9.00pm Another surreally absurd case for Jack Mooney (Ardal O’Hanlon), as the leader of a spiritual retreat is strangled while his fellow members are deep in group meditation. Trouble at the Zoo BBC Two, 9.00pm The images and stories that came out of Cumbria’s South Lakes Safari Zoo last year were deeply troubling, forcing management to step down in the face of evidence that almost 500 animals had died there in under four years. Jack Rampling’s challenging observational documentary follows staff trying to keep the institution open in the face of widespread scepticism and queries whether zoos have a place in modern society. Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 9.00pm Scraping the barrel scarcely covers this new series in which the erstwhile Supermarket Sweep host traverses the Sunshine State to check out Walt Disney World, shopping centres and spiritualists. Derry Girls Channel 4, 10.00pm One of the big comedy hits of the year so far, Lisa McGee’s evocative, ribald sitcom set during the Troubles ends with Erin (Saoirse-Monica Jackson) getting her big break as editor of the school magazine. But with great power comes great and largely unwanted responsibility. Nazi Victory: the Postwar Plan UKTV Play, from today Starting (confusingly enough) on the Yesterday channel next week, this engaging new series explores what might have happened in the event of a Nazi victory in the Second World War, from the fifth columnists planted in the United States through to his plans for concentration camps and national monuments in Britain. The latter forms the basis of this opening episode. Britannia Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Jez Butterworth’s compellingly berserk drama rampages through its fourth episode as Kerra (Kelly Reilly) is cast out by her father, King Pellenor, for parlaying with the Romans. How dare she betray the Cantii clan? He throws her to the mercy of the Druids – let’s just hope that she doesn’t meet the same fate as her mother. Meanwhile, former Druid Divis (Nikolaj Lie Kaas) suspects that there is more to General Aulus (David Morrissey) than meets the eye. Lucy (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm In this brilliant, bombastic sci-fi romp from Luc Besson, Scarlett Johansson (always worth watching) plays a drug mule who is dosed with an experimental substance that increases her brainpower by an untold degree. Space-time becomes a flick book, and Lucy’s the girl to rifle through its pages. Besson described it as La Femme Nikita plus Inception plus 2001: A Space Odyssey: that’s ambitious, egotistical, and mostly right. The Hurt Locker (2008) ★★★★☆ TCM, 9.00pm Kathryn Bigelow (Point Break) won the Best Director Oscar (the first woman to do so) for her blistering drama about a bomb disposal unit leading a perilous existence in Iraq. Jeremy Renner is outstanding as a reckless maverick who delights in putting himself in harm’s way, while the jittery cinematography stokes up the suspense to almost unbearable levels. Ralph Fiennes puts in a nice cameo as a military contractor. The Diary of a Teenage Girl (2015) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm This startling debut by Marielle Heller shows the funny side of a teenager’s explorations into her sexuality as a 15-year-old wannabe cartoonist Minnie (Bel Powley) seduces her mother’s 35-year-old boyfriend Monroe (Alexander Skarsgard). Heller’s nimble direction and clever script ensure that the film never paints either Minnie or Monroe entirely as victim or predator. Friday 9 February Winter Olympics 2018: the BBC presenting team Live Winter Olympics 2018 Opening Ceremony BBC One, 10.30am These are interesting times on the Korean peninsula, which will no doubt bring an added frisson to the Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony in Pyeongchang, South Korea. More than 3,000 athletes from 90 countries are expected to march in the ceremony, which will feature a historic moment when the North and South Korean teams march together under a unified flag. History is also being made with the disqualification of Russia from the contest due to its state-sponsored doping scandal, although, controversially, 169 Russian athletes will still compete under a designated Olympic flag. The setting for the occasion is the 35,000- seater Pyeongchang Olympic Stadium, and the following three hours of coverage comes from sure-footed BBC favourite Clare Balding, who’ll also present highlights on BBC Two at 7.00pm on BBC Two. Team GB has set its sights on a record five medals, including perhaps its first in skiing. It’s expected that North Korean artistes will perform at the ceremony in a spirit of cooperation, and while we can’t expect anything as glorious as Danny Boyle’s madcap mega-party for London 2012, we hope for a memorable kick-off to these historic Games. Vicki Power Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Actor Josh Hartnett joins his co-hosts to whip up a beloved ramen dish as the cookery show concludes its fifth series. Jamie Oliver prepares a game curry before trotting off with pal Jimmy Doherty to investigate a new method of farming. Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm Creepy noises and unexplained presences continue to unsettle incomer Matilda (Lydia Wilson) in this thriller. Determined to find out if she’s the child who disappeared from a Welsh backwater 24 years ago, Matilda begins to anger reluctant locals with her questions. Jamestown Sky One, 9.00pm A dramatic series of events in this episode provides an inkling of the high-stakes in store for season two of this glossy period piece based on the shipments of English brides to the American colonies in 1619. The opener sees Alice (Sophie Rundle) give birth and Jocelyn (Naomi Battrick) face tragedy. Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm The sharp-as-ever sitcom veers into sentimentality with the death of Rosario, the maid that Karen (Megan Mullally) loved to torment. But it’s nicely counterbalanced by Jack’s (Sean Hayes) hilarious funeral speech and a punchy cameo from Minnie Driver. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm There are performers on a well-deserved victory lap feature here. Debra Messing and Eric McCormack soak up praise for the Will & Grace revival (see preview, left), actress Saoirse Ronan basks in the glow of her third Oscar nod, and Keala Settle performs the Oscar-nominated This Is Me from The Greatest Showman. The Bold Type Amazon Prime, from today This fun comedy drama follows friends Jane (Katie Stevens), Kat (Aisha Dee) and Sutton (Meghann Fahy) working at a glossy magazine in New York. In the first episode, Jane is asked to write about her ex, while Kat attempts to convince an artist to be featured. Grand Prix Driver Amazon Prime, from today Michael Douglas narrates this behind-the-scenes look at McLaren’s F1 team during their difficult 2017 season. The four half-hour episodes take us inside McLaren’s mission control during troublesome test drives. Baywatch (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm Baywatch the TV show became a phenomenon, but everything about Baywatch the movie is big, brash and bombastic. Dwayne Johnson is preposterously buff in the role of chief lifeguard Mitch Buchannon, while Zac Efron as new recruit Matt Brody is in full-on idiot mode. A cameo by David Hasselhoff, however, appearing to the strains of Jimi Jamison’s theme I’ll Be Ready, will raise a smile. Looper (2012) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm It’s impossible not to be tickled by the playful logic of this sleek sci-fi film that ticks along with pocket-watch precision. Joseph Gordon-Levitt is a “looper” – an assassin whose targets are zapped back to him from 30 years in the future, before his contract expires and his final target is his future self. It sounds confusing, but works, and has a great cast that includes Emily Blunt, Bruce Willis and Piper Perabo. The Cabin in the Woods (2012) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.20pm Don’t be fooled by its young cast (including a pre-Thor Chris Hemsworth) and stereotypical teenage-horror appeal: Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard’s clever detonation of the scary movie is very good, with the genre’s most original plot twist in years. The story, however, is a classic one: five friends visit a cabin in the woods, where they encounter more than they bargained for. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
Sunday 4 February Endeavour ITV, 8.00pm With the likes of Black Mirror, we live in an age of increasingly inventive television, but sometimes what we all need is a nice straightforward period procedural to relax in front of on a Sunday night. Russell Lewis’s Endeavour, now returning for a fifth series, ticks all the boxes. There’s a solid cast, anchored by Shaun Evans, as the young, less grumpy, more awkward Endeavour Morse; some nice if occasionally a little precise period detail (although I did like the throwaway reference to boxer Freddie Mills); and a plot that’s just twisty enough to allow viewers to play “guess the killer”. This opening episode is a pretty bleak affair, centring around a missing Fabergé egg and a series of seemingly unlinked deaths which (topically) turn out to have their origins in a riotous stag party. Along the way, Endeavour deals with an eager but unwanted new underling (Poldark’s Lewis Peek) and crosses swords with a sharp-witted “good-time girl” (Charlotte Hope), who delivers some home truths about his tendency to put women on pedestals. Meanwhile, the wonderful Roger Allam continues to steal every scene as Detective Chief Inspector Fred Thursday. Really someone should just give him his own show. Sarah Hughes Six Nations Rugby Union: Italy v England ITV, 2.15pm Kicking off their defence of their title, England are at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome, where they face Italy. Eddie Jones’s prospects for winning an unprecedented three championships in a row have been given a major boost: Jack Nowell, Chris Robshaw, Maro Itoje and Mike Brown, who were all doubts, have all been miraculously passed fit. Italy gave the champions a scare at Twickenham last term by taking a 10-5 half-time lead, but England eventually prevailed 36-15, with Nowell and Danny Care among the scorers. Premier League Football: Liverpool v Tottenham Hotspur Sky Sports Main Event, 4.15pm Having bounced back from their defeat at Swansea with a 3-0 victory against Huddersfield – thanks to goals from Emre Can, Roberto Firmino and Mohamed Salah – Liverpool host Spurs, who are one place beneath them in fifth. When these sides met in October, two goals from Harry Kane (who else?) helped Spurs to a comprehensive 4-1 victory. Call the Midwife BBC One, 8.00pm Prepare for a real weepy as Nurse Crane (Linda Bassett) and Trixie (Helen George) try to find out what secret a pregnant mother and her family are hiding. Elsewhere, Shelagh (Laura Main) worries that her new au pair isn’t making friends. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm The eccentric yet compelling journey comes to an end as Silver Lady heads towards Inverness. Will bad weather and issues with batteries bring this great experiment to a halt? Inside Number 10 BBC Parliament, 8.00pm We know all about the pressures of being Prime Minister but what about those real-life Sir Humphrey Applebys, the Cabinet Secretaries, aka the powers behind the throne? This interesting new series sees Sue Cameron interview all five living former Cabinet Secretaries about the premierships of Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and David Cameron. McMafia BBC One, 9.00pm The action hots up considerably in this penultimate episode as Alex’s (James Norton) lies unravel. But it’s the Aleksei Serebryakov (as Alex’s father Dimitri) who continues to steal the show. Meanwhile, there’s an excellent vignette featuring nemesis Vadim (Merab Ninidze) chopping wood semi-clothed, presumably in homage to Vladimir Putin. Maltese: The Mafia Detective Channel 4, 10.00pm It might not be the most original series but this Italian import is among the most stylish. The setting is the Seventies and we open with a bang as maverick but honest cop Dario Maltese (Kim Rossi Stuart) finds himself dragged back to the corrupt Sicilian society he left years before. Arena: Stanley and his Daughters BBC Four, 10.00pm What is it really like to be the child of a genius? That question haunts the subjects of this fascinating film about the artist Stanley Spencer and his two daughters, Shirin and Unity. Now 91 and 87, Shirin and Unity were estranged for most of their lives after being separated as children. “I do feel that you were jealous of me for a time,” says Unity while Shirin looks askance. What follows is a complex and complicated story of art, betrayal, love and loss which also allows us to view Spencer’s work anew. American Football: Super Bowl LII Sky Sports Main Event, 11.00pm & BBC One, 11.15pm Hot dogs and Buffalo wings at the ready, as the New England Patriots, looking to win back-to-back Super Bowls, take on Philadelphia Eagles in Minneapolis at the US Bank Stadium. The New England Patriots overcame the Jackonsville Jaguars to set up a finale against the Eagles, who are playing in the showpiece for the first time since 2005, when they lost to the Pats. Much of the attention will be on the Patriots’ 40-year-old quarterback Tom Brady, who is attempting to become the first player to win six Super Bowl rings. Jane Eyre (1943, b/w) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 2.10pm Deep focus and shadows give Robert Stevenson’s version of Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel an extra tinge of Gothic atmosphere. Orson Welles, who provides his Mr Rochester with a hammy melancholy, is an omniscient presence but Joan Fontaine, who had a tendency to be outshone by more dynamic leading men (Cary Grant, Laurence Olivier), is formidable as Jane. Look out for Elizabeth Taylor as the ill-fated Helen Burns. Shark Tale (2004) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 4.40pm Some of Hollywood’s most famous actors, including Will Smith, Robert De Niro, Renée Zellweger, Jack Black and Angelina Jolie (as well as director Martin Scorsese) provide the voices in this comedy animation about a mafia shark family and a little wrasse (Smith) who becomes a hero after surviving a shark encounter. It’s not as good as Finding Nemo but much better than Ice Age. Plenty of gags for grown-ups, too. Yves Saint Laurent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.25am This window into the world of French fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent tells a compelling if not especially potent story. It was made with the blessing of his partner, Pierre Bergé, and charts almost the entire trip, from Saint Laurent’s upbringing in French Algeria to his rise to stardom at Christian Dior and the sexy, druggy, lucrative whirl that followed. Pierre Niney gives good doe-eyed fragility in the title role. Monday 5 February Moving On: Sue Johnston and Paula Wilcox star in Tuesday's episode Moving On BBC One, 2.15pm Jimmy McGovern’s long-running anthology series, beginning its ninth run with another five stories spread across a week, is an exemplar of daytime drama, unafraid to tackle difficult issues and frequently promoting the work of novice writers or directors. That it occasionally settles said issues a little too neatly is understandable – no one wants gale-force McGovern over tea and biscuits – but they reliably make a virtue of the short running-time to deliver intensity and coiled emotion. Stories later in the week (at 2.15pm every afternoon and 2.45pm on Friday) include Sue Johnston’s grieving widow seeking comfort in an unlikely place and Samantha Bond’s registrar forced to re-evaluate her own marriage after an unwelcome discovery. The gripping opener, however, is written by and stars Jodhi May as Rachel, a woman wrestling with the news that the teacher who abused her as a child is back working in the area. Sinead Cusack supplies doughty support as Rachel’s guilt-stricken mother, but May is hauntingly good as a woman torn between exposing her abuser and the potential impact that reopening old wounds may have on her marriage and children. Gabriel Tate My Life: Locked In Boy CBBC, 5.30pm This is a moving account of a 10-year-old whose cerebral palsy left him unable to communicate for eight years. Beginning with an alphabet board and his mother’s help, Jonathan now has a reading age beyond his years, writes poetry and is petitioning MPs to improve education for children with his condition. Horizon: My Amazing Brain: Richard’s War BBC Two, 9.00pm An extraordinary document of both personal fortitude and scientific endeavour, Fiona Lloyd-Davies’s film follows the recovery of her husband, former UN peacekeeper Richard Gray, from a stroke. Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Danny (Viveik Kalra) tries to thwart the plans of the terror cell, Omar (Mawaan Rizwan) takes matters into his own hands and Guy (Jack Davenport) faces powerful enemies. Once again packing its excitements into the closing minutes after a lengthy, patient build-up, this decent thriller concludes tomorrow. The Bulger Killers: Was Justice Done? Channel 4, 9.00pm Rather than reliving the terrible event itself, Matt Smith’s thoughtful film gathers together legal experts and those involved in the case to debate the sufficiency of the eight years served by John Venables and Robert Thompson for the murder of James Bulger in 1993. The X-Files Channel 5, 9.00pm After a patchy revival last year, The X Files rediscovers its mojo with an 11th series opener high on fun and intrigue. Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) lies hospitalised after a seizure, so Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) goes in search of their son as war looms between humans and aliens. Hull’s Headscarf Heroes BBC Four, 9.00pm Steve Humphries’s documentary meets the redoubtable Yvonne Blenkinsop, leader of the “headscarf” campaign against Hull’s trawler companies whose questionable attitude towards crew safety cost 58 lives in a series of tragedies in 1968. Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm In 2013, a gunman killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard. This documentary features an interview with the killer’s sister, still wrestling with his descent into violence. Rear Window (1954) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.40pm Wonderful in its simplicity and compelling in its execution, this belongs in the first rank of Hitchcock’s canon. The director presents a vignette of life through the lens of photographer L B “Jeff” Jeffries (James Stewart), immobilised by a broken leg during a blistering heatwave. Events take an interesting turn when he suspects one of his neighbours across the courtyard may have murdered his wife. Lincoln (2012) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Daniel Day-Lewis is on marvellous, and Oscar-winning, form as Abraham Lincoln, in Steven Spielberg’s intelligent, focused and robust film about the battle to abolish slavery. The film makes no attempt to cover the entire, unwieldy life of its subject. Instead, it dwells solely on the final months of Lincoln’s presidency, during which the political and personal stakes were never higher. Tommy Lee Jones co-stars. The Silence of the Lambs (1991) ★★★★★ Channel 5, 10.00pm Anthony Hopkins triumphs in this creepy thriller as the psychotic Dr Hannibal Lecter who is recruited by trainee FBI agent Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) to track down a serial killer nicknamed Buffalo Bill. No matter how many times you watch this film, Hopkins’s menacing performance – and his lip-smacking relish for human body parts – will always have you on the edge of your seat. Tuesday 6 February Flatpack Empire: James Futcher at SAPA aluminium factory Flatpack Empire BBC Two, 9.00pm There can’t be many urbanites in the UK who haven’t puzzled over the assembly instructions for a piece of Ikea furniture, let alone had the odd experience of being funnelled like a mouse in a maze through one of the firm’s vast depot-like stores. For this series, the Swedish company has granted a camera crew “worldwide access” – from their design headquarters in Sweden to Indian furniture factories and Polish sawmills – to film the £33 billion corporate Goliath’s global operations over the course of a year. Perhaps the biggest surprise (and certainly the thing that Ikea wants us most to know about) is their current move – unthinkable previously – into collaborations with prestige independent designers and other brands, such as audio giants Sonos and fashion designer Virgil Abloh. Among the more interesting is a project with British furniture designer Tom Dixon. “It’s not a sofa-bed, it’s a bed-sofa, but it’s really it’s a platform for living,” says Dixon, a mite grumpily, likening his role to that of a “benign parasite, where I can make a living out of this huge beast”. Maybe they’ll call the finished product “the bed bug” instead of the Swedish names that us Brits struggle to pronounce. Gerard O’Donovan Back in Time for Tea BBC Two, 8.00pm Sara Cox heads up this northern edition of the food-oriented time travel show. Tonight, the conditions that working class Yorkshire folk had to endure 100 years ago come as a shock for the Ellis family from Bradford, especially when one of them mistakes a mangle for a pasta maker. What Would Your Kid Do? ITV, 8.00pm Jason Manford puts parents’ knowledge of their offspring to the test, as children are filmed performing tasks exploring creativity, risk-taking and rule breaking while Mum and Dad have to predict what happens next. Simple and dependably entertaining. Elizabeth: Our Queen Channel 5, 9.00pm Documentaries about the Royal family seem to be appearing at an ever-increasing rate. And now here’s Channel 5’s sprawling eight-part entry, covering her life and reign and hearing from former prime ministers, friends, royal household members and special advisors. Portrait Artist of the Year 2018 Sky Arts, 8.00pm This week’s celebrity sitters are Game of Thrones star Conleth Hill, model Rachel Hunter and actor Stefanie Martini. But, as ever, it’s not so much the well-known faces as the gentle competitiveness and warm interaction between the contestants that makes this portrait painting competition so very engaging. Art, Passion & Power: The Story of the Royal Collection BBC Four, 9.00pm In the final episode of his series on the breathtaking treasures of the Royal Collection, Andrew Graham-Dixon meets the Prince of Wales and explores the last 150 years – when, as he puts it, “women took charge” and used art to help steer the monarchy through times of turbulent change. It’s also a period in which the Royal family’s changing tastes, from Fabergé eggs to the Queen Mother’s more “daring” art acquisitions, neatly demonstrate “the determined emergence of a modern monarchy”. Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm The fourth series of Reece Shearsmith and Steve Pemberton’s darkly comic anthology has been a creepy delight. In Tempting Fate they’ve kept one of the best for last, as a team of contractors clearing out a reclusive hoarder’s council flat unleash a terrible curse. 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Everything you’d expect from Michael Bay is here with bells on – the macho provocation, the sound and fury, and the diabolical pleasure in reducing everything to rubble and bloody mush. However, as a gruelling epitaph to lives wasted, this true-life Libyan shoot-’em-up starring John Krasinski is maddeningly effective and there’s a strange purity to it. Slumdog Millionaire (2008) ★★★★★ More4, 9.00pm Eight Oscars, seven Baftas and four Golden Globes cemented Danny Boyle’s energetic adaptation of Vikas Swarup’s novel Q & A as a triumph. The chaotic beauty of Mumbai is exuberantly brought to life to tell the story of an uneducated orphan (an endearing performance from Dev Patel) from the slums who is on the verge of winning a fortune on the Hindi version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. ’71 (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.50pm Jack O’Connell excels in a near-wordless role as a naive squaddie who gets stranded on the streets of Belfast in 1971 and must throw himself on the mercy of loyalist allies, who are no certain guarantees of sanctuary. It’s a tense, at times almost unbearable watch as we’re wrong-footed all the time by the combinations of terror, guilt, manoeuvring, expediency and revenge that motivate even the most minor of characters. Wednesday 7 February My Millionaire Migrant Boss My Millionaire Migrant Boss Channel 4, 9.00pm Initially, this one-off documentary – following Pakistani multi-millionaire Marwan Koukash as he puts four unemployed Brits through their paces for two weeks, before deciding whether or not to give them a job at his swanky Liverpool hotel – seems like an odd attempt to make The Apprentice on the Dole. But park that knee-jerk criticism right there because what actually unfolds is a thoughtful film in which the tough-but-likeable Koukash refuses to either play to the camera or write off his four eager contenders. That’s not to say that it’s all plain sailing: bubbly Georgia’s chronic unpunctuality soon causes issues, while Koukash, who grew up in a war zone, seems unsure of how to deal with 25-year-old Joe’s lack of confidence. The most entertaining moments, however, come in the hotelier’s relationship with the apparently lazy Heidi, who admits early on that she isn’t really sure why she has to have a job before adding: “I can’t really find out what I want to do.” A less interesting programme would have ensured that Heidi’s role was to infuriate both Koukash and the viewers at home – instead what emerges is surprisingly touching. Sarah Hughes Stacey Dooley: Face to Face with ISIS BBC Three, from 10.00am This harrowing film follows Shireen, a Yazidi woman, as she returns to Iraq with reporter Stacey Dooley for a reckoning with her past. The pair face down soldiers and officials, many of whom seem intent on ensuring that those past atrocities are never mentioned. The final confrontation between Shireen and Anmar, an Islamic State commander, sees the latter squirm blankly as the former finally and movingly gives voice to her pain. Eurovision: You Decide BBC Two, 7.30pm Six lucky contestants battle it out for the dubious honour of becoming Britain’s entrant to the 2018 Eurovision Song Contest. Among the hopefuls are a 16-year-old former Britain’s Got Talent finalist, two former The Voice UK contestants and a Eurovision backing singer. Kirstie and Phil’s Love It or List It Channel 4, 8.00pm The dynamic duo are in Windsor this week, where they meet the Farhall family who can’t decide whether they should sell their four-bedroom detached home. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This series about the history of fashion comes to an end with a look at the story behind Marie Antoinette’s famously risqué portrait in her chemise. Butchart unpicks the meaning behind the painting, looking at what the unhappy French queen was trying to convey while also considering how and why her intended message backfired. It’s a lovely conclusion to a hugely enjoyable series – here’s hoping for a swift return. The New Builds Are Coming: Battle in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Richard Macer’s topical documentary concludes with the focus shifting towards those responsible for the Cullham new builds. “Nobody has a right to a view,” states one architect. Maybe not, but as Macer talks to all involved, so it becomes increasingly clear that this is not an issue that can be easily solved. Girlfriends ITV, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama reaches its conclusion as Sue (Miranda Richardson) and Gail (Zoë Wanamaker) discover that Linda (Phyllis Logan) hasn’t exactly been honest with them about her relationship with her late husband. Harvey (1950, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am James Stewart stars as Elwood Dowd, a middle-aged, wide-eyed dreamer who spends his days getting tipsy with his best friend, a six-foot-three invisible white rabbit called Harvey. His sister Veta (an Oscar-winning Josephine Hull) tries to reform him and a comedy of errors ensues. Henry Koster’s adaptation of Mary Chase’s play is breezy, but has a lot to say about the importance of tolerance. Tango & Cash (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Bringing together two of Hollywood’s biggest action heroes, this silly shoot-’em-up is strangely appealing. Sylvester Stallone is Tango, a slick, sophisticated drug squad cop. Cash (Kurt Russell) is his uncultured rival on the force. And they don’t get on. But when they are framed and sent to prison, they’re forced to work together. It’s pure Eighties bombast, with Yazoo and Alice Cooper on the soundtrack. Harmonium (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.10pm Koji Fukada’s subtle, slow-burning thriller tells of how a family’s fragile domestic bliss is forever altered when an old friend comes to stay and teaches the daughter (Momone Shinokawa) to play the titular instrument. It’s an elegant and gripping film, with a tragic twist halfway through, and rightly won the prize in the Un Certain Regard section at the Cannes Film Festival. Thursday 8 February James Bulger: A Mother's Story James Bulger: a Mother’s Story ITV, 9.00pm Opening with the sound of Jon Venables describing in a matter-of-fact manner how he and fellow 10-year-old Robert Thompson beat and stoned toddler James Bulger to death on a railway track, this documentary relives one of the most horrifying murders of the last century in often very difficult detail. Structured around an interview between Trevor McDonald and Bulger’s mother, Denise Fergus, it exerts an awful grip while never quite deciphering the murder itself. Fergus recounts her unimaginable trauma, police and social workers describe their parts in the events and McDonald describes the trajectory of the case, from abduction to sentencing and an aftermath that has seen Fergus surround her house with CCTV cameras and Venables convicted of child pornography offences. The statements of the two killers – both, we are reminded, with troubled backgrounds – in particular are chilling: manipulative, jokey and fearful. The resilience and courage of Fergus, meanwhile, is admirable and unflinching some 25 years on: “The day I stop speaking about James,” she explains, “is the day I join him.” Gabriel Tate Death in Paradise BBC One, 9.00pm Another surreally absurd case for Jack Mooney (Ardal O’Hanlon), as the leader of a spiritual retreat is strangled while his fellow members are deep in group meditation. Trouble at the Zoo BBC Two, 9.00pm The images and stories that came out of Cumbria’s South Lakes Safari Zoo last year were deeply troubling, forcing management to step down in the face of evidence that almost 500 animals had died there in under four years. Jack Rampling’s challenging observational documentary follows staff trying to keep the institution open in the face of widespread scepticism and queries whether zoos have a place in modern society. Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 9.00pm Scraping the barrel scarcely covers this new series in which the erstwhile Supermarket Sweep host traverses the Sunshine State to check out Walt Disney World, shopping centres and spiritualists. Derry Girls Channel 4, 10.00pm One of the big comedy hits of the year so far, Lisa McGee’s evocative, ribald sitcom set during the Troubles ends with Erin (Saoirse-Monica Jackson) getting her big break as editor of the school magazine. But with great power comes great and largely unwanted responsibility. Nazi Victory: the Postwar Plan UKTV Play, from today Starting (confusingly enough) on the Yesterday channel next week, this engaging new series explores what might have happened in the event of a Nazi victory in the Second World War, from the fifth columnists planted in the United States through to his plans for concentration camps and national monuments in Britain. The latter forms the basis of this opening episode. Britannia Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Jez Butterworth’s compellingly berserk drama rampages through its fourth episode as Kerra (Kelly Reilly) is cast out by her father, King Pellenor, for parlaying with the Romans. How dare she betray the Cantii clan? He throws her to the mercy of the Druids – let’s just hope that she doesn’t meet the same fate as her mother. Meanwhile, former Druid Divis (Nikolaj Lie Kaas) suspects that there is more to General Aulus (David Morrissey) than meets the eye. Lucy (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm In this brilliant, bombastic sci-fi romp from Luc Besson, Scarlett Johansson (always worth watching) plays a drug mule who is dosed with an experimental substance that increases her brainpower by an untold degree. Space-time becomes a flick book, and Lucy’s the girl to rifle through its pages. Besson described it as La Femme Nikita plus Inception plus 2001: A Space Odyssey: that’s ambitious, egotistical, and mostly right. The Hurt Locker (2008) ★★★★☆ TCM, 9.00pm Kathryn Bigelow (Point Break) won the Best Director Oscar (the first woman to do so) for her blistering drama about a bomb disposal unit leading a perilous existence in Iraq. Jeremy Renner is outstanding as a reckless maverick who delights in putting himself in harm’s way, while the jittery cinematography stokes up the suspense to almost unbearable levels. Ralph Fiennes puts in a nice cameo as a military contractor. The Diary of a Teenage Girl (2015) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm This startling debut by Marielle Heller shows the funny side of a teenager’s explorations into her sexuality as a 15-year-old wannabe cartoonist Minnie (Bel Powley) seduces her mother’s 35-year-old boyfriend Monroe (Alexander Skarsgard). Heller’s nimble direction and clever script ensure that the film never paints either Minnie or Monroe entirely as victim or predator. Friday 9 February Winter Olympics 2018: the BBC presenting team Live Winter Olympics 2018 Opening Ceremony BBC One, 10.30am These are interesting times on the Korean peninsula, which will no doubt bring an added frisson to the Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony in Pyeongchang, South Korea. More than 3,000 athletes from 90 countries are expected to march in the ceremony, which will feature a historic moment when the North and South Korean teams march together under a unified flag. History is also being made with the disqualification of Russia from the contest due to its state-sponsored doping scandal, although, controversially, 169 Russian athletes will still compete under a designated Olympic flag. The setting for the occasion is the 35,000- seater Pyeongchang Olympic Stadium, and the following three hours of coverage comes from sure-footed BBC favourite Clare Balding, who’ll also present highlights on BBC Two at 7.00pm on BBC Two. Team GB has set its sights on a record five medals, including perhaps its first in skiing. It’s expected that North Korean artistes will perform at the ceremony in a spirit of cooperation, and while we can’t expect anything as glorious as Danny Boyle’s madcap mega-party for London 2012, we hope for a memorable kick-off to these historic Games. Vicki Power Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Actor Josh Hartnett joins his co-hosts to whip up a beloved ramen dish as the cookery show concludes its fifth series. Jamie Oliver prepares a game curry before trotting off with pal Jimmy Doherty to investigate a new method of farming. Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm Creepy noises and unexplained presences continue to unsettle incomer Matilda (Lydia Wilson) in this thriller. Determined to find out if she’s the child who disappeared from a Welsh backwater 24 years ago, Matilda begins to anger reluctant locals with her questions. Jamestown Sky One, 9.00pm A dramatic series of events in this episode provides an inkling of the high-stakes in store for season two of this glossy period piece based on the shipments of English brides to the American colonies in 1619. The opener sees Alice (Sophie Rundle) give birth and Jocelyn (Naomi Battrick) face tragedy. Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm The sharp-as-ever sitcom veers into sentimentality with the death of Rosario, the maid that Karen (Megan Mullally) loved to torment. But it’s nicely counterbalanced by Jack’s (Sean Hayes) hilarious funeral speech and a punchy cameo from Minnie Driver. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm There are performers on a well-deserved victory lap feature here. Debra Messing and Eric McCormack soak up praise for the Will & Grace revival (see preview, left), actress Saoirse Ronan basks in the glow of her third Oscar nod, and Keala Settle performs the Oscar-nominated This Is Me from The Greatest Showman. The Bold Type Amazon Prime, from today This fun comedy drama follows friends Jane (Katie Stevens), Kat (Aisha Dee) and Sutton (Meghann Fahy) working at a glossy magazine in New York. In the first episode, Jane is asked to write about her ex, while Kat attempts to convince an artist to be featured. Grand Prix Driver Amazon Prime, from today Michael Douglas narrates this behind-the-scenes look at McLaren’s F1 team during their difficult 2017 season. The four half-hour episodes take us inside McLaren’s mission control during troublesome test drives. Baywatch (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm Baywatch the TV show became a phenomenon, but everything about Baywatch the movie is big, brash and bombastic. Dwayne Johnson is preposterously buff in the role of chief lifeguard Mitch Buchannon, while Zac Efron as new recruit Matt Brody is in full-on idiot mode. A cameo by David Hasselhoff, however, appearing to the strains of Jimi Jamison’s theme I’ll Be Ready, will raise a smile. Looper (2012) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm It’s impossible not to be tickled by the playful logic of this sleek sci-fi film that ticks along with pocket-watch precision. Joseph Gordon-Levitt is a “looper” – an assassin whose targets are zapped back to him from 30 years in the future, before his contract expires and his final target is his future self. It sounds confusing, but works, and has a great cast that includes Emily Blunt, Bruce Willis and Piper Perabo. The Cabin in the Woods (2012) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.20pm Don’t be fooled by its young cast (including a pre-Thor Chris Hemsworth) and stereotypical teenage-horror appeal: Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard’s clever detonation of the scary movie is very good, with the genre’s most original plot twist in years. The story, however, is a classic one: five friends visit a cabin in the woods, where they encounter more than they bargained for. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
What's on TV tonight: new Endeavour, a weepy Call the Midwife and McMafia reaches boiling point
Sunday 4 February Endeavour ITV, 8.00pm With the likes of Black Mirror, we live in an age of increasingly inventive television, but sometimes what we all need is a nice straightforward period procedural to relax in front of on a Sunday night. Russell Lewis’s Endeavour, now returning for a fifth series, ticks all the boxes. There’s a solid cast, anchored by Shaun Evans, as the young, less grumpy, more awkward Endeavour Morse; some nice if occasionally a little precise period detail (although I did like the throwaway reference to boxer Freddie Mills); and a plot that’s just twisty enough to allow viewers to play “guess the killer”. This opening episode is a pretty bleak affair, centring around a missing Fabergé egg and a series of seemingly unlinked deaths which (topically) turn out to have their origins in a riotous stag party. Along the way, Endeavour deals with an eager but unwanted new underling (Poldark’s Lewis Peek) and crosses swords with a sharp-witted “good-time girl” (Charlotte Hope), who delivers some home truths about his tendency to put women on pedestals. Meanwhile, the wonderful Roger Allam continues to steal every scene as Detective Chief Inspector Fred Thursday. Really someone should just give him his own show. Sarah Hughes Six Nations Rugby Union: Italy v England ITV, 2.15pm Kicking off their defence of their title, England are at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome, where they face Italy. Eddie Jones’s prospects for winning an unprecedented three championships in a row have been given a major boost: Jack Nowell, Chris Robshaw, Maro Itoje and Mike Brown, who were all doubts, have all been miraculously passed fit. Italy gave the champions a scare at Twickenham last term by taking a 10-5 half-time lead, but England eventually prevailed 36-15, with Nowell and Danny Care among the scorers. Premier League Football: Liverpool v Tottenham Hotspur Sky Sports Main Event, 4.15pm Having bounced back from their defeat at Swansea with a 3-0 victory against Huddersfield – thanks to goals from Emre Can, Roberto Firmino and Mohamed Salah – Liverpool host Spurs, who are one place beneath them in fifth. When these sides met in October, two goals from Harry Kane (who else?) helped Spurs to a comprehensive 4-1 victory. Call the Midwife BBC One, 8.00pm Prepare for a real weepy as Nurse Crane (Linda Bassett) and Trixie (Helen George) try to find out what secret a pregnant mother and her family are hiding. Elsewhere, Shelagh (Laura Main) worries that her new au pair isn’t making friends. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm The eccentric yet compelling journey comes to an end as Silver Lady heads towards Inverness. Will bad weather and issues with batteries bring this great experiment to a halt? Inside Number 10 BBC Parliament, 8.00pm We know all about the pressures of being Prime Minister but what about those real-life Sir Humphrey Applebys, the Cabinet Secretaries, aka the powers behind the throne? This interesting new series sees Sue Cameron interview all five living former Cabinet Secretaries about the premierships of Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and David Cameron. McMafia BBC One, 9.00pm The action hots up considerably in this penultimate episode as Alex’s (James Norton) lies unravel. But it’s the Aleksei Serebryakov (as Alex’s father Dimitri) who continues to steal the show. Meanwhile, there’s an excellent vignette featuring nemesis Vadim (Merab Ninidze) chopping wood semi-clothed, presumably in homage to Vladimir Putin. Maltese: The Mafia Detective Channel 4, 10.00pm It might not be the most original series but this Italian import is among the most stylish. The setting is the Seventies and we open with a bang as maverick but honest cop Dario Maltese (Kim Rossi Stuart) finds himself dragged back to the corrupt Sicilian society he left years before. Arena: Stanley and his Daughters BBC Four, 10.00pm What is it really like to be the child of a genius? That question haunts the subjects of this fascinating film about the artist Stanley Spencer and his two daughters, Shirin and Unity. Now 91 and 87, Shirin and Unity were estranged for most of their lives after being separated as children. “I do feel that you were jealous of me for a time,” says Unity while Shirin looks askance. What follows is a complex and complicated story of art, betrayal, love and loss which also allows us to view Spencer’s work anew. American Football: Super Bowl LII Sky Sports Main Event, 11.00pm & BBC One, 11.15pm Hot dogs and Buffalo wings at the ready, as the New England Patriots, looking to win back-to-back Super Bowls, take on Philadelphia Eagles in Minneapolis at the US Bank Stadium. The New England Patriots overcame the Jackonsville Jaguars to set up a finale against the Eagles, who are playing in the showpiece for the first time since 2005, when they lost to the Pats. Much of the attention will be on the Patriots’ 40-year-old quarterback Tom Brady, who is attempting to become the first player to win six Super Bowl rings. Jane Eyre (1943, b/w) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 2.10pm Deep focus and shadows give Robert Stevenson’s version of Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel an extra tinge of Gothic atmosphere. Orson Welles, who provides his Mr Rochester with a hammy melancholy, is an omniscient presence but Joan Fontaine, who had a tendency to be outshone by more dynamic leading men (Cary Grant, Laurence Olivier), is formidable as Jane. Look out for Elizabeth Taylor as the ill-fated Helen Burns. Shark Tale (2004) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 4.40pm Some of Hollywood’s most famous actors, including Will Smith, Robert De Niro, Renée Zellweger, Jack Black and Angelina Jolie (as well as director Martin Scorsese) provide the voices in this comedy animation about a mafia shark family and a little wrasse (Smith) who becomes a hero after surviving a shark encounter. It’s not as good as Finding Nemo but much better than Ice Age. Plenty of gags for grown-ups, too. Yves Saint Laurent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.25am This window into the world of French fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent tells a compelling if not especially potent story. It was made with the blessing of his partner, Pierre Bergé, and charts almost the entire trip, from Saint Laurent’s upbringing in French Algeria to his rise to stardom at Christian Dior and the sexy, druggy, lucrative whirl that followed. Pierre Niney gives good doe-eyed fragility in the title role. Monday 5 February Moving On: Sue Johnston and Paula Wilcox star in Tuesday's episode Moving On BBC One, 2.15pm Jimmy McGovern’s long-running anthology series, beginning its ninth run with another five stories spread across a week, is an exemplar of daytime drama, unafraid to tackle difficult issues and frequently promoting the work of novice writers or directors. That it occasionally settles said issues a little too neatly is understandable – no one wants gale-force McGovern over tea and biscuits – but they reliably make a virtue of the short running-time to deliver intensity and coiled emotion. Stories later in the week (at 2.15pm every afternoon and 2.45pm on Friday) include Sue Johnston’s grieving widow seeking comfort in an unlikely place and Samantha Bond’s registrar forced to re-evaluate her own marriage after an unwelcome discovery. The gripping opener, however, is written by and stars Jodhi May as Rachel, a woman wrestling with the news that the teacher who abused her as a child is back working in the area. Sinead Cusack supplies doughty support as Rachel’s guilt-stricken mother, but May is hauntingly good as a woman torn between exposing her abuser and the potential impact that reopening old wounds may have on her marriage and children. Gabriel Tate My Life: Locked In Boy CBBC, 5.30pm This is a moving account of a 10-year-old whose cerebral palsy left him unable to communicate for eight years. Beginning with an alphabet board and his mother’s help, Jonathan now has a reading age beyond his years, writes poetry and is petitioning MPs to improve education for children with his condition. Horizon: My Amazing Brain: Richard’s War BBC Two, 9.00pm An extraordinary document of both personal fortitude and scientific endeavour, Fiona Lloyd-Davies’s film follows the recovery of her husband, former UN peacekeeper Richard Gray, from a stroke. Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Danny (Viveik Kalra) tries to thwart the plans of the terror cell, Omar (Mawaan Rizwan) takes matters into his own hands and Guy (Jack Davenport) faces powerful enemies. Once again packing its excitements into the closing minutes after a lengthy, patient build-up, this decent thriller concludes tomorrow. The Bulger Killers: Was Justice Done? Channel 4, 9.00pm Rather than reliving the terrible event itself, Matt Smith’s thoughtful film gathers together legal experts and those involved in the case to debate the sufficiency of the eight years served by John Venables and Robert Thompson for the murder of James Bulger in 1993. The X-Files Channel 5, 9.00pm After a patchy revival last year, The X Files rediscovers its mojo with an 11th series opener high on fun and intrigue. Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) lies hospitalised after a seizure, so Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) goes in search of their son as war looms between humans and aliens. Hull’s Headscarf Heroes BBC Four, 9.00pm Steve Humphries’s documentary meets the redoubtable Yvonne Blenkinsop, leader of the “headscarf” campaign against Hull’s trawler companies whose questionable attitude towards crew safety cost 58 lives in a series of tragedies in 1968. Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm In 2013, a gunman killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard. This documentary features an interview with the killer’s sister, still wrestling with his descent into violence. Rear Window (1954) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.40pm Wonderful in its simplicity and compelling in its execution, this belongs in the first rank of Hitchcock’s canon. The director presents a vignette of life through the lens of photographer L B “Jeff” Jeffries (James Stewart), immobilised by a broken leg during a blistering heatwave. Events take an interesting turn when he suspects one of his neighbours across the courtyard may have murdered his wife. Lincoln (2012) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Daniel Day-Lewis is on marvellous, and Oscar-winning, form as Abraham Lincoln, in Steven Spielberg’s intelligent, focused and robust film about the battle to abolish slavery. The film makes no attempt to cover the entire, unwieldy life of its subject. Instead, it dwells solely on the final months of Lincoln’s presidency, during which the political and personal stakes were never higher. Tommy Lee Jones co-stars. The Silence of the Lambs (1991) ★★★★★ Channel 5, 10.00pm Anthony Hopkins triumphs in this creepy thriller as the psychotic Dr Hannibal Lecter who is recruited by trainee FBI agent Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) to track down a serial killer nicknamed Buffalo Bill. No matter how many times you watch this film, Hopkins’s menacing performance – and his lip-smacking relish for human body parts – will always have you on the edge of your seat. Tuesday 6 February Flatpack Empire: James Futcher at SAPA aluminium factory Flatpack Empire BBC Two, 9.00pm There can’t be many urbanites in the UK who haven’t puzzled over the assembly instructions for a piece of Ikea furniture, let alone had the odd experience of being funnelled like a mouse in a maze through one of the firm’s vast depot-like stores. For this series, the Swedish company has granted a camera crew “worldwide access” – from their design headquarters in Sweden to Indian furniture factories and Polish sawmills – to film the £33 billion corporate Goliath’s global operations over the course of a year. Perhaps the biggest surprise (and certainly the thing that Ikea wants us most to know about) is their current move – unthinkable previously – into collaborations with prestige independent designers and other brands, such as audio giants Sonos and fashion designer Virgil Abloh. Among the more interesting is a project with British furniture designer Tom Dixon. “It’s not a sofa-bed, it’s a bed-sofa, but it’s really it’s a platform for living,” says Dixon, a mite grumpily, likening his role to that of a “benign parasite, where I can make a living out of this huge beast”. Maybe they’ll call the finished product “the bed bug” instead of the Swedish names that us Brits struggle to pronounce. Gerard O’Donovan Back in Time for Tea BBC Two, 8.00pm Sara Cox heads up this northern edition of the food-oriented time travel show. Tonight, the conditions that working class Yorkshire folk had to endure 100 years ago come as a shock for the Ellis family from Bradford, especially when one of them mistakes a mangle for a pasta maker. What Would Your Kid Do? ITV, 8.00pm Jason Manford puts parents’ knowledge of their offspring to the test, as children are filmed performing tasks exploring creativity, risk-taking and rule breaking while Mum and Dad have to predict what happens next. Simple and dependably entertaining. Elizabeth: Our Queen Channel 5, 9.00pm Documentaries about the Royal family seem to be appearing at an ever-increasing rate. And now here’s Channel 5’s sprawling eight-part entry, covering her life and reign and hearing from former prime ministers, friends, royal household members and special advisors. Portrait Artist of the Year 2018 Sky Arts, 8.00pm This week’s celebrity sitters are Game of Thrones star Conleth Hill, model Rachel Hunter and actor Stefanie Martini. But, as ever, it’s not so much the well-known faces as the gentle competitiveness and warm interaction between the contestants that makes this portrait painting competition so very engaging. Art, Passion & Power: The Story of the Royal Collection BBC Four, 9.00pm In the final episode of his series on the breathtaking treasures of the Royal Collection, Andrew Graham-Dixon meets the Prince of Wales and explores the last 150 years – when, as he puts it, “women took charge” and used art to help steer the monarchy through times of turbulent change. It’s also a period in which the Royal family’s changing tastes, from Fabergé eggs to the Queen Mother’s more “daring” art acquisitions, neatly demonstrate “the determined emergence of a modern monarchy”. Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm The fourth series of Reece Shearsmith and Steve Pemberton’s darkly comic anthology has been a creepy delight. In Tempting Fate they’ve kept one of the best for last, as a team of contractors clearing out a reclusive hoarder’s council flat unleash a terrible curse. 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Everything you’d expect from Michael Bay is here with bells on – the macho provocation, the sound and fury, and the diabolical pleasure in reducing everything to rubble and bloody mush. However, as a gruelling epitaph to lives wasted, this true-life Libyan shoot-’em-up starring John Krasinski is maddeningly effective and there’s a strange purity to it. Slumdog Millionaire (2008) ★★★★★ More4, 9.00pm Eight Oscars, seven Baftas and four Golden Globes cemented Danny Boyle’s energetic adaptation of Vikas Swarup’s novel Q & A as a triumph. The chaotic beauty of Mumbai is exuberantly brought to life to tell the story of an uneducated orphan (an endearing performance from Dev Patel) from the slums who is on the verge of winning a fortune on the Hindi version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. ’71 (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.50pm Jack O’Connell excels in a near-wordless role as a naive squaddie who gets stranded on the streets of Belfast in 1971 and must throw himself on the mercy of loyalist allies, who are no certain guarantees of sanctuary. It’s a tense, at times almost unbearable watch as we’re wrong-footed all the time by the combinations of terror, guilt, manoeuvring, expediency and revenge that motivate even the most minor of characters. Wednesday 7 February My Millionaire Migrant Boss My Millionaire Migrant Boss Channel 4, 9.00pm Initially, this one-off documentary – following Pakistani multi-millionaire Marwan Koukash as he puts four unemployed Brits through their paces for two weeks, before deciding whether or not to give them a job at his swanky Liverpool hotel – seems like an odd attempt to make The Apprentice on the Dole. But park that knee-jerk criticism right there because what actually unfolds is a thoughtful film in which the tough-but-likeable Koukash refuses to either play to the camera or write off his four eager contenders. That’s not to say that it’s all plain sailing: bubbly Georgia’s chronic unpunctuality soon causes issues, while Koukash, who grew up in a war zone, seems unsure of how to deal with 25-year-old Joe’s lack of confidence. The most entertaining moments, however, come in the hotelier’s relationship with the apparently lazy Heidi, who admits early on that she isn’t really sure why she has to have a job before adding: “I can’t really find out what I want to do.” A less interesting programme would have ensured that Heidi’s role was to infuriate both Koukash and the viewers at home – instead what emerges is surprisingly touching. Sarah Hughes Stacey Dooley: Face to Face with ISIS BBC Three, from 10.00am This harrowing film follows Shireen, a Yazidi woman, as she returns to Iraq with reporter Stacey Dooley for a reckoning with her past. The pair face down soldiers and officials, many of whom seem intent on ensuring that those past atrocities are never mentioned. The final confrontation between Shireen and Anmar, an Islamic State commander, sees the latter squirm blankly as the former finally and movingly gives voice to her pain. Eurovision: You Decide BBC Two, 7.30pm Six lucky contestants battle it out for the dubious honour of becoming Britain’s entrant to the 2018 Eurovision Song Contest. Among the hopefuls are a 16-year-old former Britain’s Got Talent finalist, two former The Voice UK contestants and a Eurovision backing singer. Kirstie and Phil’s Love It or List It Channel 4, 8.00pm The dynamic duo are in Windsor this week, where they meet the Farhall family who can’t decide whether they should sell their four-bedroom detached home. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This series about the history of fashion comes to an end with a look at the story behind Marie Antoinette’s famously risqué portrait in her chemise. Butchart unpicks the meaning behind the painting, looking at what the unhappy French queen was trying to convey while also considering how and why her intended message backfired. It’s a lovely conclusion to a hugely enjoyable series – here’s hoping for a swift return. The New Builds Are Coming: Battle in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Richard Macer’s topical documentary concludes with the focus shifting towards those responsible for the Cullham new builds. “Nobody has a right to a view,” states one architect. Maybe not, but as Macer talks to all involved, so it becomes increasingly clear that this is not an issue that can be easily solved. Girlfriends ITV, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama reaches its conclusion as Sue (Miranda Richardson) and Gail (Zoë Wanamaker) discover that Linda (Phyllis Logan) hasn’t exactly been honest with them about her relationship with her late husband. Harvey (1950, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am James Stewart stars as Elwood Dowd, a middle-aged, wide-eyed dreamer who spends his days getting tipsy with his best friend, a six-foot-three invisible white rabbit called Harvey. His sister Veta (an Oscar-winning Josephine Hull) tries to reform him and a comedy of errors ensues. Henry Koster’s adaptation of Mary Chase’s play is breezy, but has a lot to say about the importance of tolerance. Tango & Cash (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Bringing together two of Hollywood’s biggest action heroes, this silly shoot-’em-up is strangely appealing. Sylvester Stallone is Tango, a slick, sophisticated drug squad cop. Cash (Kurt Russell) is his uncultured rival on the force. And they don’t get on. But when they are framed and sent to prison, they’re forced to work together. It’s pure Eighties bombast, with Yazoo and Alice Cooper on the soundtrack. Harmonium (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.10pm Koji Fukada’s subtle, slow-burning thriller tells of how a family’s fragile domestic bliss is forever altered when an old friend comes to stay and teaches the daughter (Momone Shinokawa) to play the titular instrument. It’s an elegant and gripping film, with a tragic twist halfway through, and rightly won the prize in the Un Certain Regard section at the Cannes Film Festival. Thursday 8 February James Bulger: A Mother's Story James Bulger: a Mother’s Story ITV, 9.00pm Opening with the sound of Jon Venables describing in a matter-of-fact manner how he and fellow 10-year-old Robert Thompson beat and stoned toddler James Bulger to death on a railway track, this documentary relives one of the most horrifying murders of the last century in often very difficult detail. Structured around an interview between Trevor McDonald and Bulger’s mother, Denise Fergus, it exerts an awful grip while never quite deciphering the murder itself. Fergus recounts her unimaginable trauma, police and social workers describe their parts in the events and McDonald describes the trajectory of the case, from abduction to sentencing and an aftermath that has seen Fergus surround her house with CCTV cameras and Venables convicted of child pornography offences. The statements of the two killers – both, we are reminded, with troubled backgrounds – in particular are chilling: manipulative, jokey and fearful. The resilience and courage of Fergus, meanwhile, is admirable and unflinching some 25 years on: “The day I stop speaking about James,” she explains, “is the day I join him.” Gabriel Tate Death in Paradise BBC One, 9.00pm Another surreally absurd case for Jack Mooney (Ardal O’Hanlon), as the leader of a spiritual retreat is strangled while his fellow members are deep in group meditation. Trouble at the Zoo BBC Two, 9.00pm The images and stories that came out of Cumbria’s South Lakes Safari Zoo last year were deeply troubling, forcing management to step down in the face of evidence that almost 500 animals had died there in under four years. Jack Rampling’s challenging observational documentary follows staff trying to keep the institution open in the face of widespread scepticism and queries whether zoos have a place in modern society. Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 9.00pm Scraping the barrel scarcely covers this new series in which the erstwhile Supermarket Sweep host traverses the Sunshine State to check out Walt Disney World, shopping centres and spiritualists. Derry Girls Channel 4, 10.00pm One of the big comedy hits of the year so far, Lisa McGee’s evocative, ribald sitcom set during the Troubles ends with Erin (Saoirse-Monica Jackson) getting her big break as editor of the school magazine. But with great power comes great and largely unwanted responsibility. Nazi Victory: the Postwar Plan UKTV Play, from today Starting (confusingly enough) on the Yesterday channel next week, this engaging new series explores what might have happened in the event of a Nazi victory in the Second World War, from the fifth columnists planted in the United States through to his plans for concentration camps and national monuments in Britain. The latter forms the basis of this opening episode. Britannia Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Jez Butterworth’s compellingly berserk drama rampages through its fourth episode as Kerra (Kelly Reilly) is cast out by her father, King Pellenor, for parlaying with the Romans. How dare she betray the Cantii clan? He throws her to the mercy of the Druids – let’s just hope that she doesn’t meet the same fate as her mother. Meanwhile, former Druid Divis (Nikolaj Lie Kaas) suspects that there is more to General Aulus (David Morrissey) than meets the eye. Lucy (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm In this brilliant, bombastic sci-fi romp from Luc Besson, Scarlett Johansson (always worth watching) plays a drug mule who is dosed with an experimental substance that increases her brainpower by an untold degree. Space-time becomes a flick book, and Lucy’s the girl to rifle through its pages. Besson described it as La Femme Nikita plus Inception plus 2001: A Space Odyssey: that’s ambitious, egotistical, and mostly right. The Hurt Locker (2008) ★★★★☆ TCM, 9.00pm Kathryn Bigelow (Point Break) won the Best Director Oscar (the first woman to do so) for her blistering drama about a bomb disposal unit leading a perilous existence in Iraq. Jeremy Renner is outstanding as a reckless maverick who delights in putting himself in harm’s way, while the jittery cinematography stokes up the suspense to almost unbearable levels. Ralph Fiennes puts in a nice cameo as a military contractor. The Diary of a Teenage Girl (2015) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm This startling debut by Marielle Heller shows the funny side of a teenager’s explorations into her sexuality as a 15-year-old wannabe cartoonist Minnie (Bel Powley) seduces her mother’s 35-year-old boyfriend Monroe (Alexander Skarsgard). Heller’s nimble direction and clever script ensure that the film never paints either Minnie or Monroe entirely as victim or predator. Friday 9 February Winter Olympics 2018: the BBC presenting team Live Winter Olympics 2018 Opening Ceremony BBC One, 10.30am These are interesting times on the Korean peninsula, which will no doubt bring an added frisson to the Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony in Pyeongchang, South Korea. More than 3,000 athletes from 90 countries are expected to march in the ceremony, which will feature a historic moment when the North and South Korean teams march together under a unified flag. History is also being made with the disqualification of Russia from the contest due to its state-sponsored doping scandal, although, controversially, 169 Russian athletes will still compete under a designated Olympic flag. The setting for the occasion is the 35,000- seater Pyeongchang Olympic Stadium, and the following three hours of coverage comes from sure-footed BBC favourite Clare Balding, who’ll also present highlights on BBC Two at 7.00pm on BBC Two. Team GB has set its sights on a record five medals, including perhaps its first in skiing. It’s expected that North Korean artistes will perform at the ceremony in a spirit of cooperation, and while we can’t expect anything as glorious as Danny Boyle’s madcap mega-party for London 2012, we hope for a memorable kick-off to these historic Games. Vicki Power Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Actor Josh Hartnett joins his co-hosts to whip up a beloved ramen dish as the cookery show concludes its fifth series. Jamie Oliver prepares a game curry before trotting off with pal Jimmy Doherty to investigate a new method of farming. Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm Creepy noises and unexplained presences continue to unsettle incomer Matilda (Lydia Wilson) in this thriller. Determined to find out if she’s the child who disappeared from a Welsh backwater 24 years ago, Matilda begins to anger reluctant locals with her questions. Jamestown Sky One, 9.00pm A dramatic series of events in this episode provides an inkling of the high-stakes in store for season two of this glossy period piece based on the shipments of English brides to the American colonies in 1619. The opener sees Alice (Sophie Rundle) give birth and Jocelyn (Naomi Battrick) face tragedy. Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm The sharp-as-ever sitcom veers into sentimentality with the death of Rosario, the maid that Karen (Megan Mullally) loved to torment. But it’s nicely counterbalanced by Jack’s (Sean Hayes) hilarious funeral speech and a punchy cameo from Minnie Driver. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm There are performers on a well-deserved victory lap feature here. Debra Messing and Eric McCormack soak up praise for the Will & Grace revival (see preview, left), actress Saoirse Ronan basks in the glow of her third Oscar nod, and Keala Settle performs the Oscar-nominated This Is Me from The Greatest Showman. The Bold Type Amazon Prime, from today This fun comedy drama follows friends Jane (Katie Stevens), Kat (Aisha Dee) and Sutton (Meghann Fahy) working at a glossy magazine in New York. In the first episode, Jane is asked to write about her ex, while Kat attempts to convince an artist to be featured. Grand Prix Driver Amazon Prime, from today Michael Douglas narrates this behind-the-scenes look at McLaren’s F1 team during their difficult 2017 season. The four half-hour episodes take us inside McLaren’s mission control during troublesome test drives. Baywatch (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm Baywatch the TV show became a phenomenon, but everything about Baywatch the movie is big, brash and bombastic. Dwayne Johnson is preposterously buff in the role of chief lifeguard Mitch Buchannon, while Zac Efron as new recruit Matt Brody is in full-on idiot mode. A cameo by David Hasselhoff, however, appearing to the strains of Jimi Jamison’s theme I’ll Be Ready, will raise a smile. Looper (2012) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm It’s impossible not to be tickled by the playful logic of this sleek sci-fi film that ticks along with pocket-watch precision. Joseph Gordon-Levitt is a “looper” – an assassin whose targets are zapped back to him from 30 years in the future, before his contract expires and his final target is his future self. It sounds confusing, but works, and has a great cast that includes Emily Blunt, Bruce Willis and Piper Perabo. The Cabin in the Woods (2012) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.20pm Don’t be fooled by its young cast (including a pre-Thor Chris Hemsworth) and stereotypical teenage-horror appeal: Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard’s clever detonation of the scary movie is very good, with the genre’s most original plot twist in years. The story, however, is a classic one: five friends visit a cabin in the woods, where they encounter more than they bargained for. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
Saturday 3 February Hard Sun BBC One, 9.30pm Five weeks in, and the BBC’s relentlessly dark, eye-wateringly violent thriller is not making much more sense than it did at the outset. All we really know is that those unlikely cops Hicks (Jim Sturgess) and Renko (Agyness Deyn) are still racing around London trying to outsmart MI5, using their belief that the world will end in a little under five years to justify doing indescribably horrible things to some indescribably horrible people. The bloody opening to this episode (suffice to say it involves an ice axe) follows on from last week’s ending in which uber-spook Grace Morrigan (Nikki Amuka-Bird) helpfully gave Renko’s psychopath son Daniel (Jojo Macari) details of who it was that raped his mother at the age 14, with predictable consequences. And guess who’s given the job of investigating the case? That’s the sort of circular plotting that gives Neil Cross’s drama its pace, intensity and throbbing sense of paranoia. But the only thing that’s truly mysterious here is how Hicks and Renko, with the security forces still breathing down their necks in pursuit of the flashdrive containing “proof” of the impending apocalypse, have any time left for the day job. Gerard O’Donovan Hugh’s Wild West BBC Two, 6.00pm; NI, 6.30pm; Wales, 5.30pm Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall heads for the Somerset Levels to witness a spectacular “murmuration” of starlings. He also discovers how one native species of butterfly was rescued from the brink of extinction. The Voice UK ITV, 8.00pm The singing contest’s second series on ITV continues to plod along, with singer Olly Murs making no great impact on the show, as yet. The blind auditions enter their fifth week with more contestants hoping that their performances will be enough to make the coaches spin their chairs. Casualty BBC One, 8.20pm Jeremy Hunt may not have predicted this year’s winter NHS crisis, but the writers of Casualty did. Here, the emergency department is in gridlock, with trolleys blocking corridors and ambulances queuing outside to admit patients. It’s just as well then that new junior doctor Bea Kinsella (Michelle Fox) is keen to get stuck in. Or is it? Grand Tours of Scotland’s Lochs BBC Two, 8.30pm In an unexpectedly explosive edition, Paul Murton visits Loch Shin, where a meteor hit the Highlands 1.2 billion years ago. Then, at Kylesku, he recalls how Britain’s “X Men” helped to destroy one of Germany’s greatest battleships during the Second World War. Johnny Cash’s Bitter Tears Sky Arts, 9.00pm This documentary celebrates one of the Man in Black’s lesser-known works, his 1964 album Bitter Tears: Ballads of the American Indian. It was a pioneering – and at the time controversial – album, which he used to draw attention to the long-running oppression of America’s native peoples. The film also covers the making of a commemorative tribute album by Emmylou Harris, Steve Earle, Kris Kristofferson and other country music stars. Spiral BBC Four, 9.00pm & 10.00pm The sixth series of this wonderfully gritty French policier, that’s been fraught even by its own standards, comes to a nail-biting climax. As gangster Drissa Camara (Narcisse Mame-Zollo) is betrayed over a gold deal, Captain Laure (Caroline Proust) and her detective team get the break they need in the Mercier case and lawyer Joséphine (Audrey Fleurot) realises that sticking to her story could place her in real jeopardy. Hamlet (1948, b/w) ★★★★★ London Live, 3.00pm This version of Shakespeare’s Hamlet was adapted and directed by Laurence Olivier, who also starred as the troubled Prince of Denmark. Despite winning the Academy Award for Best Picture, purists felt that Olivier had taken liberties with the text, condensing four hours into two and removing the characters of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. But the action remains tight and Olivier is magnificent. Suffragette (2015) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Never mind the respectable cast and period costumes – Sarah Gavron’s fiery film about the fight for women’s suffrage is far from genteel. Carey Mulligan is on form showing the transformation of Maud from bystander to activist with riveting emotional precision. As Abi Morgan’s script strips away the reasons for her to fall back into line, her nerve soars through the roof. The Talented Mr Ripley (1999) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.30pm Anthony Minghella’s glossy take on Patricia Highsmith’s novel is an engaging noir thriller with a pitch-perfect ending. New York wannabe Tom Ripley’s life changes when he begins lusting after the lifestyle of an errant playboy (Jude Law) in Italy. Matt Damon is suitably sinister in the lead role, with Philip Seymour Hoffman equally as magnificent as a bulldozer who ruptures Tom’s cosy idyll. Sunday 4 February Endeavour: Shaun Evans and Roger Allam Endeavour ITV, 8.00pm With the likes of Black Mirror, we live in an age of increasingly inventive television, but sometimes what we all need is a nice straightforward period procedural to relax in front of on a Sunday night. Russell Lewis’s Endeavour, now returning for a fifth series, ticks all the boxes. There’s a solid cast, anchored by Shaun Evans, as the young, less grumpy, more awkward Endeavour Morse; some nice if occasionally a little precise period detail (although I did like the throwaway reference to boxer Freddie Mills); and a plot that’s just twisty enough to allow viewers to play “guess the killer”. This opening episode is a pretty bleak affair, centring around a missing Fabergé egg and a series of seemingly unlinked deaths which (topically) turn out to have their origins in a riotous stag party. Along the way, Endeavour deals with an eager but unwanted new underling (Poldark’s Lewis Peek) and crosses swords with a sharp-witted “good-time girl” (Charlotte Hope), who delivers some home truths about his tendency to put women on pedestals. Meanwhile, the wonderful Roger Allam continues to steal every scene as Detective Chief Inspector Fred Thursday. Really someone should just give him his own show. Sarah Hughes Six Nations Rugby Union: Italy v England ITV, 2.15pm Kicking off their defence of their title, England are at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome, where they face Italy. Eddie Jones’s prospects for winning an unprecedented three championships in a row have been given a major boost: Jack Nowell, Chris Robshaw, Maro Itoje and Mike Brown, who were all doubts, have all been miraculously passed fit. Italy gave the champions a scare at Twickenham last term by taking a 10-5 half-time lead, but England eventually prevailed 36-15, with Nowell and Danny Care among the scorers. Premier League Football: Liverpool v Tottenham Hotspur Sky Sports Main Event, 4.15pm Having bounced back from their defeat at Swansea with a 3-0 victory against Huddersfield – thanks to goals from Emre Can, Roberto Firmino and Mohamed Salah – Liverpool host Spurs, who are one place beneath them in fifth. When these sides met in October, two goals from Harry Kane (who else?) helped Spurs to a comprehensive 4-1 victory. Call the Midwife BBC One, 8.00pm Prepare for a real weepy as Nurse Crane (Linda Bassett) and Trixie (Helen George) try to find out what secret a pregnant mother and her family are hiding. Elsewhere, Shelagh (Laura Main) worries that her new au pair isn’t making friends. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm The eccentric yet compelling journey comes to an end as Silver Lady heads towards Inverness. Will bad weather and issues with batteries bring this great experiment to a halt? Inside Number 10 BBC Parliament, 8.00pm We know all about the pressures of being Prime Minister but what about those real-life Sir Humphrey Applebys, the Cabinet Secretaries, aka the powers behind the throne? This interesting new series sees Sue Cameron interview all five living former Cabinet Secretaries about the premierships of Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and David Cameron. McMafia BBC One, 9.00pm The action hots up considerably in this penultimate episode as Alex’s (James Norton) lies unravel. But it’s the Aleksei Serebryakov (as Alex’s father Dimitri) who continues to steal the show. Meanwhile, there’s an excellent vignette featuring nemesis Vadim (Merab Ninidze) chopping wood semi-clothed, presumably in homage to Vladimir Putin. Maltese: The Mafia Detective Channel 4, 10.00pm It might not be the most original series but this Italian import is among the most stylish. The setting is the Seventies and we open with a bang as maverick but honest cop Dario Maltese (Kim Rossi Stuart) finds himself dragged back to the corrupt Sicilian society he left years before. Arena: Stanley and his Daughters BBC Four, 10.00pm What is it really like to be the child of a genius? That question haunts the subjects of this fascinating film about the artist Stanley Spencer and his two daughters, Shirin and Unity. Now 91 and 87, Shirin and Unity were estranged for most of their lives after being separated as children. “I do feel that you were jealous of me for a time,” says Unity while Shirin looks askance. What follows is a complex and complicated story of art, betrayal, love and loss which also allows us to view Spencer’s work anew. American Football: Super Bowl LII Sky Sports Main Event, 11.00pm & BBC One, 11.15pm Hot dogs and Buffalo wings at the ready, as the New England Patriots, looking to win back-to-back Super Bowls, take on Philadelphia Eagles in Minneapolis at the US Bank Stadium. The New England Patriots overcame the Jackonsville Jaguars to set up a finale against the Eagles, who are playing in the showpiece for the first time since 2005, when they lost to the Pats. Much of the attention will be on the Patriots’ 40-year-old quarterback Tom Brady, who is attempting to become the first player to win six Super Bowl rings. Jane Eyre (1943, b/w) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 2.10pm Deep focus and shadows give Robert Stevenson’s version of Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel an extra tinge of Gothic atmosphere. Orson Welles, who provides his Mr Rochester with a hammy melancholy, is an omniscient presence but Joan Fontaine, who had a tendency to be outshone by more dynamic leading men (Cary Grant, Laurence Olivier), is formidable as Jane. Look out for Elizabeth Taylor as the ill-fated Helen Burns. Shark Tale (2004) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 4.40pm Some of Hollywood’s most famous actors, including Will Smith, Robert De Niro, Renée Zellweger, Jack Black and Angelina Jolie (as well as director Martin Scorsese) provide the voices in this comedy animation about a mafia shark family and a little wrasse (Smith) who becomes a hero after surviving a shark encounter. It’s not as good as Finding Nemo but much better than Ice Age. Plenty of gags for grown-ups, too. Yves Saint Laurent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.25am This window into the world of French fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent tells a compelling if not especially potent story. It was made with the blessing of his partner, Pierre Bergé, and charts almost the entire trip, from Saint Laurent’s upbringing in French Algeria to his rise to stardom at Christian Dior and the sexy, druggy, lucrative whirl that followed. Pierre Niney gives good doe-eyed fragility in the title role. Monday 5 February Moving On: Sue Johnston and Paula Wilcox star in Tuesday's episode Moving On BBC One, 2.15pm Jimmy McGovern’s long-running anthology series, beginning its ninth run with another five stories spread across a week, is an exemplar of daytime drama, unafraid to tackle difficult issues and frequently promoting the work of novice writers or directors. That it occasionally settles said issues a little too neatly is understandable – no one wants gale-force McGovern over tea and biscuits – but they reliably make a virtue of the short running-time to deliver intensity and coiled emotion. Stories later in the week (at 2.15pm every afternoon and 2.45pm on Friday) include Sue Johnston’s grieving widow seeking comfort in an unlikely place and Samantha Bond’s registrar forced to re-evaluate her own marriage after an unwelcome discovery. The gripping opener, however, is written by and stars Jodhi May as Rachel, a woman wrestling with the news that the teacher who abused her as a child is back working in the area. Sinead Cusack supplies doughty support as Rachel’s guilt-stricken mother, but May is hauntingly good as a woman torn between exposing her abuser and the potential impact that reopening old wounds may have on her marriage and children. Gabriel Tate My Life: Locked In Boy CBBC, 5.30pm This is a moving account of a 10-year-old whose cerebral palsy left him unable to communicate for eight years. Beginning with an alphabet board and his mother’s help, Jonathan now has a reading age beyond his years, writes poetry and is petitioning MPs to improve education for children with his condition. Horizon: My Amazing Brain: Richard’s War BBC Two, 9.00pm An extraordinary document of both personal fortitude and scientific endeavour, Fiona Lloyd-Davies’s film follows the recovery of her husband, former UN peacekeeper Richard Gray, from a stroke. Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Danny (Viveik Kalra) tries to thwart the plans of the terror cell, Omar (Mawaan Rizwan) takes matters into his own hands and Guy (Jack Davenport) faces powerful enemies. Once again packing its excitements into the closing minutes after a lengthy, patient build-up, this decent thriller concludes tomorrow. The Bulger Killers: Was Justice Done? Channel 4, 9.00pm Rather than reliving the terrible event itself, Matt Smith’s thoughtful film gathers together legal experts and those involved in the case to debate the sufficiency of the eight years served by John Venables and Robert Thompson for the murder of James Bulger in 1993. The X-Files Channel 5, 9.00pm After a patchy revival last year, The X Files rediscovers its mojo with an 11th series opener high on fun and intrigue. Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) lies hospitalised after a seizure, so Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) goes in search of their son as war looms between humans and aliens. Hull’s Headscarf Heroes BBC Four, 9.00pm Steve Humphries’s documentary meets the redoubtable Yvonne Blenkinsop, leader of the “headscarf” campaign against Hull’s trawler companies whose questionable attitude towards crew safety cost 58 lives in a series of tragedies in 1968. Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm In 2013, a gunman killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard. This documentary features an interview with the killer’s sister, still wrestling with his descent into violence. Rear Window (1954) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.40pm Wonderful in its simplicity and compelling in its execution, this belongs in the first rank of Hitchcock’s canon. The director presents a vignette of life through the lens of photographer L B “Jeff” Jeffries (James Stewart), immobilised by a broken leg during a blistering heatwave. Events take an interesting turn when he suspects one of his neighbours across the courtyard may have murdered his wife. Lincoln (2012) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Daniel Day-Lewis is on marvellous, and Oscar-winning, form as Abraham Lincoln, in Steven Spielberg’s intelligent, focused and robust film about the battle to abolish slavery. The film makes no attempt to cover the entire, unwieldy life of its subject. Instead, it dwells solely on the final months of Lincoln’s presidency, during which the political and personal stakes were never higher. Tommy Lee Jones co-stars. The Silence of the Lambs (1991) ★★★★★ Channel 5, 10.00pm Anthony Hopkins triumphs in this creepy thriller as the psychotic Dr Hannibal Lecter who is recruited by trainee FBI agent Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) to track down a serial killer nicknamed Buffalo Bill. No matter how many times you watch this film, Hopkins’s menacing performance – and his lip-smacking relish for human body parts – will always have you on the edge of your seat. Tuesday 6 February Flatpack Empire: James Futcher at SAPA aluminium factory Flatpack Empire BBC Two, 9.00pm There can’t be many urbanites in the UK who haven’t puzzled over the assembly instructions for a piece of Ikea furniture, let alone had the odd experience of being funnelled like a mouse in a maze through one of the firm’s vast depot-like stores. For this series, the Swedish company has granted a camera crew “worldwide access” – from their design headquarters in Sweden to Indian furniture factories and Polish sawmills – to film the £33 billion corporate Goliath’s global operations over the course of a year. Perhaps the biggest surprise (and certainly the thing that Ikea wants us most to know about) is their current move – unthinkable previously – into collaborations with prestige independent designers and other brands, such as audio giants Sonos and fashion designer Virgil Abloh. Among the more interesting is a project with British furniture designer Tom Dixon. “It’s not a sofa-bed, it’s a bed-sofa, but it’s really it’s a platform for living,” says Dixon, a mite grumpily, likening his role to that of a “benign parasite, where I can make a living out of this huge beast”. Maybe they’ll call the finished product “the bed bug” instead of the Swedish names that us Brits struggle to pronounce. Gerard O’Donovan Back in Time for Tea BBC Two, 8.00pm Sara Cox heads up this northern edition of the food-oriented time travel show. Tonight, the conditions that working class Yorkshire folk had to endure 100 years ago come as a shock for the Ellis family from Bradford, especially when one of them mistakes a mangle for a pasta maker. What Would Your Kid Do? ITV, 8.00pm Jason Manford puts parents’ knowledge of their offspring to the test, as children are filmed performing tasks exploring creativity, risk-taking and rule breaking while Mum and Dad have to predict what happens next. Simple and dependably entertaining. Elizabeth: Our Queen Channel 5, 9.00pm Documentaries about the Royal family seem to be appearing at an ever-increasing rate. And now here’s Channel 5’s sprawling eight-part entry, covering her life and reign and hearing from former prime ministers, friends, royal household members and special advisors. Portrait Artist of the Year 2018 Sky Arts, 8.00pm This week’s celebrity sitters are Game of Thrones star Conleth Hill, model Rachel Hunter and actor Stefanie Martini. But, as ever, it’s not so much the well-known faces as the gentle competitiveness and warm interaction between the contestants that makes this portrait painting competition so very engaging. Art, Passion & Power: The Story of the Royal Collection BBC Four, 9.00pm In the final episode of his series on the breathtaking treasures of the Royal Collection, Andrew Graham-Dixon meets the Prince of Wales and explores the last 150 years – when, as he puts it, “women took charge” and used art to help steer the monarchy through times of turbulent change. It’s also a period in which the Royal family’s changing tastes, from Fabergé eggs to the Queen Mother’s more “daring” art acquisitions, neatly demonstrate “the determined emergence of a modern monarchy”. Inside No 9 BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 11.15pm The fourth series of Reece Shearsmith and Steve Pemberton’s darkly comic anthology has been a creepy delight. In Tempting Fate they’ve kept one of the best for last, as a team of contractors clearing out a reclusive hoarder’s council flat unleash a terrible curse. 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi (2016) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Everything you’d expect from Michael Bay is here with bells on – the macho provocation, the sound and fury, and the diabolical pleasure in reducing everything to rubble and bloody mush. However, as a gruelling epitaph to lives wasted, this true-life Libyan shoot-’em-up starring John Krasinski is maddeningly effective and there’s a strange purity to it. Slumdog Millionaire (2008) ★★★★★ More4, 9.00pm Eight Oscars, seven Baftas and four Golden Globes cemented Danny Boyle’s energetic adaptation of Vikas Swarup’s novel Q & A as a triumph. The chaotic beauty of Mumbai is exuberantly brought to life to tell the story of an uneducated orphan (an endearing performance from Dev Patel) from the slums who is on the verge of winning a fortune on the Hindi version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. ’71 (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 11.50pm Jack O’Connell excels in a near-wordless role as a naive squaddie who gets stranded on the streets of Belfast in 1971 and must throw himself on the mercy of loyalist allies, who are no certain guarantees of sanctuary. It’s a tense, at times almost unbearable watch as we’re wrong-footed all the time by the combinations of terror, guilt, manoeuvring, expediency and revenge that motivate even the most minor of characters. Wednesday 7 February My Millionaire Migrant Boss My Millionaire Migrant Boss Channel 4, 9.00pm Initially, this one-off documentary – following Pakistani multi-millionaire Marwan Koukash as he puts four unemployed Brits through their paces for two weeks, before deciding whether or not to give them a job at his swanky Liverpool hotel – seems like an odd attempt to make The Apprentice on the Dole. But park that knee-jerk criticism right there because what actually unfolds is a thoughtful film in which the tough-but-likeable Koukash refuses to either play to the camera or write off his four eager contenders. That’s not to say that it’s all plain sailing: bubbly Georgia’s chronic unpunctuality soon causes issues, while Koukash, who grew up in a war zone, seems unsure of how to deal with 25-year-old Joe’s lack of confidence. The most entertaining moments, however, come in the hotelier’s relationship with the apparently lazy Heidi, who admits early on that she isn’t really sure why she has to have a job before adding: “I can’t really find out what I want to do.” A less interesting programme would have ensured that Heidi’s role was to infuriate both Koukash and the viewers at home – instead what emerges is surprisingly touching. Sarah Hughes Stacey Dooley: Face to Face with ISIS BBC Three, from 10.00am This harrowing film follows Shireen, a Yazidi woman, as she returns to Iraq with reporter Stacey Dooley for a reckoning with her past. The pair face down soldiers and officials, many of whom seem intent on ensuring that those past atrocities are never mentioned. The final confrontation between Shireen and Anmar, an Islamic State commander, sees the latter squirm blankly as the former finally and movingly gives voice to her pain. Eurovision: You Decide BBC Two, 7.30pm Six lucky contestants battle it out for the dubious honour of becoming Britain’s entrant to the 2018 Eurovision Song Contest. Among the hopefuls are a 16-year-old former Britain’s Got Talent finalist, two former The Voice UK contestants and a Eurovision backing singer. Kirstie and Phil’s Love It or List It Channel 4, 8.00pm The dynamic duo are in Windsor this week, where they meet the Farhall family who can’t decide whether they should sell their four-bedroom detached home. A Stitch in Time BBC Four, 8.30pm This series about the history of fashion comes to an end with a look at the story behind Marie Antoinette’s famously risqué portrait in her chemise. Butchart unpicks the meaning behind the painting, looking at what the unhappy French queen was trying to convey while also considering how and why her intended message backfired. It’s a lovely conclusion to a hugely enjoyable series – here’s hoping for a swift return. The New Builds Are Coming: Battle in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scotland, 11.15pm Richard Macer’s topical documentary concludes with the focus shifting towards those responsible for the Cullham new builds. “Nobody has a right to a view,” states one architect. Maybe not, but as Macer talks to all involved, so it becomes increasingly clear that this is not an issue that can be easily solved. Girlfriends ITV, 9.00pm Kay Mellor’s drama reaches its conclusion as Sue (Miranda Richardson) and Gail (Zoë Wanamaker) discover that Linda (Phyllis Logan) hasn’t exactly been honest with them about her relationship with her late husband. Harvey (1950, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am James Stewart stars as Elwood Dowd, a middle-aged, wide-eyed dreamer who spends his days getting tipsy with his best friend, a six-foot-three invisible white rabbit called Harvey. His sister Veta (an Oscar-winning Josephine Hull) tries to reform him and a comedy of errors ensues. Henry Koster’s adaptation of Mary Chase’s play is breezy, but has a lot to say about the importance of tolerance. Tango & Cash (1989) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Bringing together two of Hollywood’s biggest action heroes, this silly shoot-’em-up is strangely appealing. Sylvester Stallone is Tango, a slick, sophisticated drug squad cop. Cash (Kurt Russell) is his uncultured rival on the force. And they don’t get on. But when they are framed and sent to prison, they’re forced to work together. It’s pure Eighties bombast, with Yazoo and Alice Cooper on the soundtrack. Harmonium (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.10pm Koji Fukada’s subtle, slow-burning thriller tells of how a family’s fragile domestic bliss is forever altered when an old friend comes to stay and teaches the daughter (Momone Shinokawa) to play the titular instrument. It’s an elegant and gripping film, with a tragic twist halfway through, and rightly won the prize in the Un Certain Regard section at the Cannes Film Festival. Thursday 8 February James Bulger: A Mother's Story James Bulger: a Mother’s Story ITV, 9.00pm Opening with the sound of Jon Venables describing in a matter-of-fact manner how he and fellow 10-year-old Robert Thompson beat and stoned toddler James Bulger to death on a railway track, this documentary relives one of the most horrifying murders of the last century in often very difficult detail. Structured around an interview between Trevor McDonald and Bulger’s mother, Denise Fergus, it exerts an awful grip while never quite deciphering the murder itself. Fergus recounts her unimaginable trauma, police and social workers describe their parts in the events and McDonald describes the trajectory of the case, from abduction to sentencing and an aftermath that has seen Fergus surround her house with CCTV cameras and Venables convicted of child pornography offences. The statements of the two killers – both, we are reminded, with troubled backgrounds – in particular are chilling: manipulative, jokey and fearful. The resilience and courage of Fergus, meanwhile, is admirable and unflinching some 25 years on: “The day I stop speaking about James,” she explains, “is the day I join him.” Gabriel Tate Death in Paradise BBC One, 9.00pm Another surreally absurd case for Jack Mooney (Ardal O’Hanlon), as the leader of a spiritual retreat is strangled while his fellow members are deep in group meditation. Trouble at the Zoo BBC Two, 9.00pm The images and stories that came out of Cumbria’s South Lakes Safari Zoo last year were deeply troubling, forcing management to step down in the face of evidence that almost 500 animals had died there in under four years. Jack Rampling’s challenging observational documentary follows staff trying to keep the institution open in the face of widespread scepticism and queries whether zoos have a place in modern society. Dale Winton’s Florida Fly Drive Channel 5, 9.00pm Scraping the barrel scarcely covers this new series in which the erstwhile Supermarket Sweep host traverses the Sunshine State to check out Walt Disney World, shopping centres and spiritualists. Derry Girls Channel 4, 10.00pm One of the big comedy hits of the year so far, Lisa McGee’s evocative, ribald sitcom set during the Troubles ends with Erin (Saoirse-Monica Jackson) getting her big break as editor of the school magazine. But with great power comes great and largely unwanted responsibility. Nazi Victory: the Postwar Plan UKTV Play, from today Starting (confusingly enough) on the Yesterday channel next week, this engaging new series explores what might have happened in the event of a Nazi victory in the Second World War, from the fifth columnists planted in the United States through to his plans for concentration camps and national monuments in Britain. The latter forms the basis of this opening episode. Britannia Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Jez Butterworth’s compellingly berserk drama rampages through its fourth episode as Kerra (Kelly Reilly) is cast out by her father, King Pellenor, for parlaying with the Romans. How dare she betray the Cantii clan? He throws her to the mercy of the Druids – let’s just hope that she doesn’t meet the same fate as her mother. Meanwhile, former Druid Divis (Nikolaj Lie Kaas) suspects that there is more to General Aulus (David Morrissey) than meets the eye. Lucy (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm In this brilliant, bombastic sci-fi romp from Luc Besson, Scarlett Johansson (always worth watching) plays a drug mule who is dosed with an experimental substance that increases her brainpower by an untold degree. Space-time becomes a flick book, and Lucy’s the girl to rifle through its pages. Besson described it as La Femme Nikita plus Inception plus 2001: A Space Odyssey: that’s ambitious, egotistical, and mostly right. The Hurt Locker (2008) ★★★★☆ TCM, 9.00pm Kathryn Bigelow (Point Break) won the Best Director Oscar (the first woman to do so) for her blistering drama about a bomb disposal unit leading a perilous existence in Iraq. Jeremy Renner is outstanding as a reckless maverick who delights in putting himself in harm’s way, while the jittery cinematography stokes up the suspense to almost unbearable levels. Ralph Fiennes puts in a nice cameo as a military contractor. The Diary of a Teenage Girl (2015) ★★★★☆ Film4, 10.45pm This startling debut by Marielle Heller shows the funny side of a teenager’s explorations into her sexuality as a 15-year-old wannabe cartoonist Minnie (Bel Powley) seduces her mother’s 35-year-old boyfriend Monroe (Alexander Skarsgard). Heller’s nimble direction and clever script ensure that the film never paints either Minnie or Monroe entirely as victim or predator. Friday 9 February Winter Olympics 2018: the BBC presenting team Live Winter Olympics 2018 Opening Ceremony BBC One, 10.30am These are interesting times on the Korean peninsula, which will no doubt bring an added frisson to the Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony in Pyeongchang, South Korea. More than 3,000 athletes from 90 countries are expected to march in the ceremony, which will feature a historic moment when the North and South Korean teams march together under a unified flag. History is also being made with the disqualification of Russia from the contest due to its state-sponsored doping scandal, although, controversially, 169 Russian athletes will still compete under a designated Olympic flag. The setting for the occasion is the 35,000- seater Pyeongchang Olympic Stadium, and the following three hours of coverage comes from sure-footed BBC favourite Clare Balding, who’ll also present highlights on BBC Two at 7.00pm on BBC Two. Team GB has set its sights on a record five medals, including perhaps its first in skiing. It’s expected that North Korean artistes will perform at the ceremony in a spirit of cooperation, and while we can’t expect anything as glorious as Danny Boyle’s madcap mega-party for London 2012, we hope for a memorable kick-off to these historic Games. Vicki Power Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast Channel 4, 8.00pm Actor Josh Hartnett joins his co-hosts to whip up a beloved ramen dish as the cookery show concludes its fifth series. Jamie Oliver prepares a game curry before trotting off with pal Jimmy Doherty to investigate a new method of farming. Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm Creepy noises and unexplained presences continue to unsettle incomer Matilda (Lydia Wilson) in this thriller. Determined to find out if she’s the child who disappeared from a Welsh backwater 24 years ago, Matilda begins to anger reluctant locals with her questions. Jamestown Sky One, 9.00pm A dramatic series of events in this episode provides an inkling of the high-stakes in store for season two of this glossy period piece based on the shipments of English brides to the American colonies in 1619. The opener sees Alice (Sophie Rundle) give birth and Jocelyn (Naomi Battrick) face tragedy. Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm The sharp-as-ever sitcom veers into sentimentality with the death of Rosario, the maid that Karen (Megan Mullally) loved to torment. But it’s nicely counterbalanced by Jack’s (Sean Hayes) hilarious funeral speech and a punchy cameo from Minnie Driver. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm There are performers on a well-deserved victory lap feature here. Debra Messing and Eric McCormack soak up praise for the Will & Grace revival (see preview, left), actress Saoirse Ronan basks in the glow of her third Oscar nod, and Keala Settle performs the Oscar-nominated This Is Me from The Greatest Showman. The Bold Type Amazon Prime, from today This fun comedy drama follows friends Jane (Katie Stevens), Kat (Aisha Dee) and Sutton (Meghann Fahy) working at a glossy magazine in New York. In the first episode, Jane is asked to write about her ex, while Kat attempts to convince an artist to be featured. Grand Prix Driver Amazon Prime, from today Michael Douglas narrates this behind-the-scenes look at McLaren’s F1 team during their difficult 2017 season. The four half-hour episodes take us inside McLaren’s mission control during troublesome test drives. Baywatch (2017) ★★☆☆☆ Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm Baywatch the TV show became a phenomenon, but everything about Baywatch the movie is big, brash and bombastic. Dwayne Johnson is preposterously buff in the role of chief lifeguard Mitch Buchannon, while Zac Efron as new recruit Matt Brody is in full-on idiot mode. A cameo by David Hasselhoff, however, appearing to the strains of Jimi Jamison’s theme I’ll Be Ready, will raise a smile. Looper (2012) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm It’s impossible not to be tickled by the playful logic of this sleek sci-fi film that ticks along with pocket-watch precision. Joseph Gordon-Levitt is a “looper” – an assassin whose targets are zapped back to him from 30 years in the future, before his contract expires and his final target is his future self. It sounds confusing, but works, and has a great cast that includes Emily Blunt, Bruce Willis and Piper Perabo. The Cabin in the Woods (2012) ★★★☆☆ 5STAR, 11.20pm Don’t be fooled by its young cast (including a pre-Thor Chris Hemsworth) and stereotypical teenage-horror appeal: Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard’s clever detonation of the scary movie is very good, with the genre’s most original plot twist in years. The story, however, is a classic one: five friends visit a cabin in the woods, where they encounter more than they bargained for. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
What's on TV tonight: Hard Sun, The Voice UK and more
Saturday 3 February Hard Sun BBC One, 9.30pm Five weeks in, and the BBC’s relentlessly dark, eye-wateringly violent thriller is not making much more sense than it did at the outset. All we really know is that those unlikely cops Hicks (Jim Sturgess) and Renko (Agyness Deyn) are still racing around London trying to outsmart MI5, using their belief that the world will end in a little under five years to justify doing indescribably horrible things to some indescribably horrible people. The bloody opening to this episode (suffice to say it involves an ice axe) follows on from last week’s ending in which uber-spook Grace Morrigan (Nikki Amuka-Bird) helpfully gave Renko’s psychopath son Daniel (Jojo Macari) details of who it was that raped his mother at the age 14, with predictable consequences. And guess who’s given the job of investigating the case? That’s the sort of circular plotting that gives Neil Cross’s drama its pace, intensity and throbbing sense of paranoia. But the only thing that’s truly mysterious here is how Hicks and Renko, with the security forces still breathing down their necks in pursuit of the flashdrive containing “proof” of the impending apocalypse, have any time left for the day job. Gerard O’Donovan Hugh’s Wild West BBC Two, 6.00pm; NI, 6.30pm; Wales, 5.30pm Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall heads for the Somerset Levels to witness a spectacular “murmuration” of starlings. He also discovers how one native species of butterfly was rescued from the brink of extinction. The Voice UK ITV, 8.00pm The singing contest’s second series on ITV continues to plod along, with singer Olly Murs making no great impact on the show, as yet. The blind auditions enter their fifth week with more contestants hoping that their performances will be enough to make the coaches spin their chairs. Casualty BBC One, 8.20pm Jeremy Hunt may not have predicted this year’s winter NHS crisis, but the writers of Casualty did. Here, the emergency department is in gridlock, with trolleys blocking corridors and ambulances queuing outside to admit patients. It’s just as well then that new junior doctor Bea Kinsella (Michelle Fox) is keen to get stuck in. Or is it? Grand Tours of Scotland’s Lochs BBC Two, 8.30pm In an unexpectedly explosive edition, Paul Murton visits Loch Shin, where a meteor hit the Highlands 1.2 billion years ago. Then, at Kylesku, he recalls how Britain’s “X Men” helped to destroy one of Germany’s greatest battleships during the Second World War. Johnny Cash’s Bitter Tears Sky Arts, 9.00pm This documentary celebrates one of the Man in Black’s lesser-known works, his 1964 album Bitter Tears: Ballads of the American Indian. It was a pioneering – and at the time controversial – album, which he used to draw attention to the long-running oppression of America’s native peoples. The film also covers the making of a commemorative tribute album by Emmylou Harris, Steve Earle, Kris Kristofferson and other country music stars. Spiral BBC Four, 9.00pm & 10.00pm The sixth series of this wonderfully gritty French policier, that’s been fraught even by its own standards, comes to a nail-biting climax. As gangster Drissa Camara (Narcisse Mame-Zollo) is betrayed over a gold deal, Captain Laure (Caroline Proust) and her detective team get the break they need in the Mercier case and lawyer Joséphine (Audrey Fleurot) realises that sticking to her story could place her in real jeopardy. Hamlet (1948, b/w) ★★★★★ London Live, 3.00pm This version of Shakespeare’s Hamlet was adapted and directed by Laurence Olivier, who also starred as the troubled Prince of Denmark. Despite winning the Academy Award for Best Picture, purists felt that Olivier had taken liberties with the text, condensing four hours into two and removing the characters of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. But the action remains tight and Olivier is magnificent. Suffragette (2015) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm Never mind the respectable cast and period costumes – Sarah Gavron’s fiery film about the fight for women’s suffrage is far from genteel. Carey Mulligan is on form showing the transformation of Maud from bystander to activist with riveting emotional precision. As Abi Morgan’s script strips away the reasons for her to fall back into line, her nerve soars through the roof. The Talented Mr Ripley (1999) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.30pm Anthony Minghella’s glossy take on Patricia Highsmith’s novel is an engaging noir thriller with a pitch-perfect ending. New York wannabe Tom Ripley’s life changes when he begins lusting after the lifestyle of an errant playboy (Jude Law) in Italy. Matt Damon is suitably sinister in the lead role, with Philip Seymour Hoffman equally as magnificent as a bulldozer who ruptures Tom’s cosy idyll. Sunday 4 February Endeavour: Shaun Evans and Roger Allam Endeavour ITV, 8.00pm With the likes of Black Mirror, we live in an age of increasingly inventive television, but sometimes what we all need is a nice straightforward period procedural to relax in front of on a Sunday night. Russell Lewis’s Endeavour, now returning for a fifth series, ticks all the boxes. There’s a solid cast, anchored by Shaun Evans, as the young, less grumpy, more awkward Endeavour Morse; some nice if occasionally a little precise period detail (although I did like the throwaway reference to boxer Freddie Mills); and a plot that’s just twisty enough to allow viewers to play “guess the killer”. This opening episode is a pretty bleak affair, centring around a missing Fabergé egg and a series of seemingly unlinked deaths which (topically) turn out to have their origins in a riotous stag party. Along the way, Endeavour deals with an eager but unwanted new underling (Poldark’s Lewis Peek) and crosses swords with a sharp-witted “good-time girl” (Charlotte Hope), who delivers some home truths about his tendency to put women on pedestals. Meanwhile, the wonderful Roger Allam continues to steal every scene as Detective Chief Inspector Fred Thursday. Really someone should just give him his own show. Sarah Hughes Six Nations Rugby Union: Italy v England ITV, 2.15pm Kicking off their defence of their title, England are at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome, where they face Italy. Eddie Jones’s prospects for winning an unprecedented three championships in a row have been given a major boost: Jack Nowell, Chris Robshaw, Maro Itoje and Mike Brown, who were all doubts, have all been miraculously passed fit. Italy gave the champions a scare at Twickenham last term by taking a 10-5 half-time lead, but England eventually prevailed 36-15, with Nowell and Danny Care among the scorers. Premier League Football: Liverpool v Tottenham Hotspur Sky Sports Main Event, 4.15pm Having bounced back from their defeat at Swansea with a 3-0 victory against Huddersfield – thanks to goals from Emre Can, Roberto Firmino and Mohamed Salah – Liverpool host Spurs, who are one place beneath them in fifth. When these sides met in October, two goals from Harry Kane (who else?) helped Spurs to a comprehensive 4-1 victory. Call the Midwife BBC One, 8.00pm Prepare for a real weepy as Nurse Crane (Linda Bassett) and Trixie (Helen George) try to find out what secret a pregnant mother and her family are hiding. Elsewhere, Shelagh (Laura Main) worries that her new au pair isn’t making friends. The Biggest Little Railway in the World Channel 4, 8.00pm The eccentric yet compelling journey comes to an end as Silver Lady heads towards Inverness. Will bad weather and issues with batteries bring this great experiment to a halt? Inside Number 10 BBC Parliament, 8.00pm We know all about the pressures of being Prime Minister but what about those real-life Sir Humphrey Applebys, the Cabinet Secretaries, aka the powers behind the throne? This interesting new series sees Sue Cameron interview all five living former Cabinet Secretaries about the premierships of Margaret Thatcher, John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and David Cameron. McMafia BBC One, 9.00pm The action hots up considerably in this penultimate episode as Alex’s (James Norton) lies unravel. But it’s the Aleksei Serebryakov (as Alex’s father Dimitri) who continues to steal the show. Meanwhile, there’s an excellent vignette featuring nemesis Vadim (Merab Ninidze) chopping wood semi-clothed, presumably in homage to Vladimir Putin. Maltese: The Mafia Detective Channel 4, 10.00pm It might not be the most original series but this Italian import is among the most stylish. The setting is the Seventies and we open with a bang as maverick but honest cop Dario Maltese (Kim Rossi Stuart) finds himself dragged back to the corrupt Sicilian society he left years before. Arena: Stanley and his Daughters BBC Four, 10.00pm What is it really like to be the child of a genius? That question haunts the subjects of this fascinating film about the artist Stanley Spencer and his two daughters, Shirin and Unity. Now 91 and 87, Shirin and Unity were estranged for most of their lives after being separated as children. “I do feel that you were jealous of me for a time,” says Unity while Shirin looks askance. What follows is a complex and complicated story of art, betrayal, love and loss which also allows us to view Spencer’s work anew. American Football: Super Bowl LII Sky Sports Main Event, 11.00pm & BBC One, 11.15pm Hot dogs and Buffalo wings at the ready, as the New England Patriots, looking to win back-to-back Super Bowls, take on Philadelphia Eagles in Minneapolis at the US Bank Stadium. The New England Patriots overcame the Jackonsville Jaguars to set up a finale against the Eagles, who are playing in the showpiece for the first time since 2005, when they lost to the Pats. Much of the attention will be on the Patriots’ 40-year-old quarterback Tom Brady, who is attempting to become the first player to win six Super Bowl rings. Jane Eyre (1943, b/w) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 2.10pm Deep focus and shadows give Robert Stevenson’s version of Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel an extra tinge of Gothic atmosphere. Orson Welles, who provides his Mr Rochester with a hammy melancholy, is an omniscient presence but Joan Fontaine, who had a tendency to be outshone by more dynamic leading men (Cary Grant, Laurence Olivier), is formidable as Jane. Look out for Elizabeth Taylor as the ill-fated Helen Burns. Shark Tale (2004) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 4.40pm Some of Hollywood’s most famous actors, including Will Smith, Robert De Niro, Renée Zellweger, Jack Black and Angelina Jolie (as well as director Martin Scorsese) provide the voices in this comedy animation about a mafia shark family and a little wrasse (Smith) who becomes a hero after surviving a shark encounter. It’s not as good as Finding Nemo but much better than Ice Age. Plenty of gags for grown-ups, too. Yves Saint Laurent (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.25am This window into the world of French fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent tells a compelling if not especially potent story. It was made with the blessing of his partner, Pierre Bergé, and charts almost the entire trip, from Saint Laurent’s upbringing in French Algeria to his rise to stardom at Christian Dior and the sexy, druggy, lucrative whirl that followed. Pierre Niney gives good doe-eyed fragility in the title role. Monday 5 February Moving On: Sue Johnston and Paula Wilcox star in Tuesday's episode Moving On BBC One, 2.15pm Jimmy McGovern’s long-running anthology series, beginning its ninth run with another five stories spread across a week, is an exemplar of daytime drama, unafraid to tackle difficult issues and frequently promoting the work of novice writers or directors. That it occasionally settles said issues a little too neatly is understandable – no one wants gale-force McGovern over tea and biscuits – but they reliably make a virtue of the short running-time to deliver intensity and coiled emotion. Stories later in the week (at 2.15pm every afternoon and 2.45pm on Friday) include Sue Johnston’s grieving widow seeking comfort in an unlikely place and Samantha Bond’s registrar forced to re-evaluate her own marriage after an unwelcome discovery. The gripping opener, however, is written by and stars Jodhi May as Rachel, a woman wrestling with the news that the teacher who abused her as a child is back working in the area. Sinead Cusack supplies doughty support as Rachel’s guilt-stricken mother, but May is hauntingly good as a woman torn between exposing her abuser and the potential impact that reopening old wounds may have on her marriage and children. Gabriel Tate My Life: Locked In Boy CBBC, 5.30pm This is a moving account of a 10-year-old whose cerebral palsy left him unable to communicate for eight years. Beginning with an alphabet board and his mother’s help, Jonathan now has a reading age beyond his years, writes poetry and is petitioning MPs to improve education for children with his condition. Horizon: My Amazing Brain: Richard’s War BBC Two, 9.00pm An extraordinary document of both personal fortitude and scientific endeavour, Fiona Lloyd-Davies’s film follows the recovery of her husband, former UN peacekeeper Richard Gray, from a stroke. Next of Kin ITV, 9.00pm Danny (Viveik Kalra) tries to thwart the plans of the terror cell, Omar (Mawaan Rizwan) takes matters into his own hands and Guy (Jack Davenport) faces powerful enemies. Once again packing its excitements into the closing minutes after a lengthy, patient build-up, this decent thriller concludes tomorrow. The Bulger Killers: Was Justice Done? Channel 4, 9.00pm Rather than reliving the terrible event itself, Matt Smith’s thoughtful film gathers together legal experts and those involved in the case to debate the sufficiency of the eight years served by John Venables and Robert Thompson for the murder of James Bulger in 1993. The X-Files Channel 5, 9.00pm After a patchy revival last year, The X Files rediscovers its mojo with an 11th series opener high on fun and intrigue. Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) lies hospitalised after a seizure, so Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) goes in search of their son as war looms between humans and aliens. Hull’s Headscarf Heroes BBC Four, 9.00pm Steve Humphries’s documentary meets the redoubtable Yvonne Blenkinsop, leader of the “headscarf” campaign against Hull’s trawler companies whose questionable attitude towards crew safety cost 58 lives in a series of tragedies in 1968. Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm In 2013, a gunman killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard. This documentary features an interview with the killer’s sister, still wrestling with his descent into violence. Rear Window (1954) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.40pm Wonderful in its simplicity and compelling in its execution, this belongs in the first rank of Hitchcock’s canon. The director presents a vignette of life through the lens of photographer L B “Jeff” Jeffries (James Stewart), immobilised by a broken leg during a blistering heatwave. Events take an interesting turn when he suspects one of his neighbours across the courtyard may have murdered his wife. Lincoln (2012) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Daniel Day-Lewis is on marvellous, and Oscar-winning, form as Abraham Lincoln, in Steven Spielberg’s intelligent, focused and robust film about the battle to abolish slavery. The film makes no attempt to cover the entire, unwieldy life of its subject. Instead, it dwells solely on the final months of Lincoln’s presidency, during which the political and personal stakes were never higher. Tommy Lee Jones co-stars. The Silence of the Lambs (1991) ★★★★★ Channel 5, 10.00pm Anthony Hopkins triumphs in this creepy thriller as the psychotic Dr Hannibal Lecter who is recruited by trainee FBI agent Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) to track down a serial killer nicknamed Buffalo Bill. No matter how many times you watch this film, Hopkins’s menacing performance – and his lip-smacking relish for human body parts – will always have you on the edge of your seat. Tuesday 6 February Flatpack Empire: James Futcher at SAPA aluminium factory Flatpack Empire BBC Two, 9.00pm There can’t be many urbanites in the UK who haven’t puzzled over the assembly instructions for a piece of Ikea furniture, let alone had the odd experience of being funnelled like a mouse in a maze through one of the firm’s vast depot-like stores. For this series, the Swedish company has granted a camera crew “worldwide access” – from thei