Luton Town

Luton Town slideshow

Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town players celebrate promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town players celebrate promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town's Dan Potts celebrates promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town's Dan Potts celebrates promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town's James Collins celebrates promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town's James Collins celebrates promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town's Dan Potts celebrates promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town's Dan Potts celebrates promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town players celebrate promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town players celebrate promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town fans celebrate promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town fans celebrate promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town's James Collins and team mates celebrate promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town's James Collins and team mates celebrate promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town fans celebrate promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town fans celebrate promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town celebrate promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town celebrate promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town manager Nathan Jones celebrate promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town manager Nathan Jones celebrate promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town players celebrate promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town players celebrate promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town manager Nathan Jones celebrates promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town manager Nathan Jones celebrates promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town manager Nathan Jones celebrates promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town manager Nathan Jones celebrates promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town manager Nathan Jones celebrates promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town manager Nathan Jones celebrates promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town players celebrate promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town players celebrate promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town players celebrate promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town players celebrate promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town players celebrate promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town players celebrate promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town players celebrate promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town players celebrate promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town players celebrate promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town players celebrate promotion after the game Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town's Oliver Lee celebrates scoring their first goal with team mates Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town's Oliver Lee celebrates scoring their first goal with team mates Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town's Oliver Lee celebrates scoring their first goal Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town's Oliver Lee celebrates scoring their first goal Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town's Oliver Lee celebrates scoring their first goal Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town's Oliver Lee celebrates scoring their first goal Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town's Oliver Lee celebrates scoring their first goal Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town's Oliver Lee celebrates scoring their first goal Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town's Oliver Lee scores their first goal Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town's Oliver Lee scores their first goal Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town's Oliver Lee celebrates scoring their first goal Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town's Oliver Lee celebrates scoring their first goal Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town's Jack Stacey in action with Carlisle United's Jack Bonham Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town's Jack Stacey in action with Carlisle United's Jack Bonham Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town's Jack Stacey in action with Carlisle United's Jamal Campbell-Ryce Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town's Jack Stacey in action with Carlisle United's Jamal Campbell-Ryce Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town's Danny Hylton speaks with referee Sebastian Stockbridge Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town's Danny Hylton speaks with referee Sebastian Stockbridge Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Carlisle United's Mike Jones in action with Luton Town's Pelly Ruddock Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Carlisle United's Mike Jones in action with Luton Town's Pelly Ruddock Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Carlisle United's Danny Grainger celebrates scoring their first goal Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Carlisle United's Danny Grainger celebrates scoring their first goal Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town manager Nathan Jones Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town
Soccer Football - League Two - Carlisle United v Luton Town - Brunton Park, Carlisle, Britain - April 21, 2018 Luton Town manager Nathan Jones Action Images/John Clifton EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
As seasonal bonuses go, John Coleman is poised on the brink of a rather unusual one. If he gains promotion to League One with his high-flying Accrington Stanley side, a local hair replacement clinic has promised to give him a celebratory new thatch. “I thought it was a joke, but apparently they mean it,” the long-time entirely hair-free Coleman says of the incentive. “Not sure what the lads will make of it, mind, if I suddenly go full [Antonio] Conte on them.” Before he emerges with a luxuriant new coiffure, Coleman, however, might be wise to check with the Football League that he is not breaching any of its regulations on undisclosed rewards. After all, the governing body has just demanded the club’s chairman, Andy Holt, explain what he was doing after he revealed this week that he had been buying the team a round of McDonald’s after every victory this season. Which, given they have won 16 of their past 18 League Two matches, has come to quite a burger bill. The EFL’s prissy intervention has been roundly mocked, with many wondering how a body that has allowed all sorts of charlatans and frauds to take control of its clubs can apparently sniff impropriety in the purchase of a few Big Macs. Not that Coleman seems remotely perturbed by the official inquiry. “If they’ve won, they can eat pizza, chicken whatever they want as far as I’m concerned,” he says of his players. “If the lads want to eat McDonald’s and the chairman wants to buy it for them, I’m certainly not going to stop them.” Accrington have won 16 of their last 18 games under Coleman Credit: REX But there is something wonderfully Accrington about the story. Of all the clubs that might choose to celebrate a win in fast food, Stanley is the one. This is not a place that exudes wealth. This is not a club that wallows in privilege. This is a club where everything is modest, from the cramped board room in which Coleman sits, to the fact the players have to warm up before training on a gravel patch behind the car park. This is a club, after all, whose two most renowned ex-players became famous doing something else: cricketer David “Bumble” Lloyd and Jon Anderson, the lead singer of prog-rockers Yes, played together in Stanley’s amateur Northern League days. But all that may well be about to change. Since the club – or at least its previous incarnation – entered the league in 1921, before resigning midway through the 1962 season, going bust and then reforming in 1968, it has never played above the fourth tier of English football. Coleman is thus on the verge of achieving a remarkable first. The prospect of creating history, however, is not being discussed in the Wham Stadium (named after Holt’s plastics company, not George Michael’s first band). Here in this former pub pitch behind the Crown public house, despite the fact the team has embarked on a winning league run which is the third best in Europe after Juventus and Paris St Germain, caution is at all times the manager’s watchword. “I’ll believe it when and only when it’s mathematically certain,” says Coleman. His restraint is understandable. After all he has first-hand knowledge of disappointment. After steering the club to three promotions through the non-leagues in his two spells in charge, in 2016 he looked as if he were about to hit the big time. Coleman is not looking beyond Stanley's next match Credit: THE TELEGRAPH Right up until the last moment of the final fixture of that season, his Accrington side appeared to be in line for automatic promotion to League One. “In the 93rd minute we’re up, in the 94th we hit the crossbar,” Coleman recalls. “Then in the 95th minute Bristol Rovers score in their game and that’s it we’re not going up, they are. It was the only game all season we didn’t score at home.” An exhausted Accrington subsequently stumbled in the play-offs. And that seemed to be that. The club with the lowest playing budget and lowest gates in the league appeared to have blown a once-in-a-generation chance to progress. Particularly when finances dictated that its best two players – Josh Windass and Matt Crooks – were sold to Rangers. But Coleman regrouped. “The pain of that day has driven me on,” he says. “I still haven’t got over it to be honest.” And after finishing 16th last season, he has turned his team this year into a rolling victory machine, three points clear at the top of the table with two games in hand over second-placed Luton Town. It has been done, he says, not as a result of any magical increase in the budget, but by recruiting hungry young players keen to use Accrington as a staging post to a more substantial career. “If our chairman said go sign five players tomorrow on five grand a week, it wouldn’t fit my model. They wouldn’t be signing for Accrington, they’d be signing for the money, not to further their careers. I want players who eventually want to earn £20,000 but not with me. “Too many League Two teams pay ridiculous money they don’t need to. They’re spending money that’s killing the hunger.” Coleman wants his players to enjoy their football - but work hard in the process Credit: THE TELEGRAPH And when players – such as the division’s leading scorer Billy Kee, or the fluent midfielder Sean McConville – arrive in east Lancashire, they find Coleman drives them hard. “I think we’re the fittest team in the division,” he says. “But we have fun doing it. It’s not a holiday camp, but I’m of the view you’ll do the job better if you’re enjoying it.” The evidence for their stamina is evident, he adds, in the fact he has not made a substitution in the last six league games. “I’m of the opinion if it ain’t broke don’t fix it,” he says. “Course it helps if you’re winning. Don’t need to change anything do you?” And as he prepares to play Colchester in what could be another huge step towards history, the ebullient Scouser takes a moment to consider what promotion would mean to the club. “Even before I came I always had a fascination with this club, the milk advert and all that. I’ve been here nearly 20 years, it’s been like watching a child grow. We were in the first division of the Unibond when I started. Now we could soon be in League One.” Though he immediately checks himself at the very thought. “But I won’t count my chickens until we’re there. I’ve been here before. We got to 94 minutes of the last game thinking we were there. And we weren’t. Worth remembering that.”
Accrington Stanley and manager John Coleman remain modest despite being on the brink of historic promotion
As seasonal bonuses go, John Coleman is poised on the brink of a rather unusual one. If he gains promotion to League One with his high-flying Accrington Stanley side, a local hair replacement clinic has promised to give him a celebratory new thatch. “I thought it was a joke, but apparently they mean it,” the long-time entirely hair-free Coleman says of the incentive. “Not sure what the lads will make of it, mind, if I suddenly go full [Antonio] Conte on them.” Before he emerges with a luxuriant new coiffure, Coleman, however, might be wise to check with the Football League that he is not breaching any of its regulations on undisclosed rewards. After all, the governing body has just demanded the club’s chairman, Andy Holt, explain what he was doing after he revealed this week that he had been buying the team a round of McDonald’s after every victory this season. Which, given they have won 16 of their past 18 League Two matches, has come to quite a burger bill. The EFL’s prissy intervention has been roundly mocked, with many wondering how a body that has allowed all sorts of charlatans and frauds to take control of its clubs can apparently sniff impropriety in the purchase of a few Big Macs. Not that Coleman seems remotely perturbed by the official inquiry. “If they’ve won, they can eat pizza, chicken whatever they want as far as I’m concerned,” he says of his players. “If the lads want to eat McDonald’s and the chairman wants to buy it for them, I’m certainly not going to stop them.” Accrington have won 16 of their last 18 games under Coleman Credit: REX But there is something wonderfully Accrington about the story. Of all the clubs that might choose to celebrate a win in fast food, Stanley is the one. This is not a place that exudes wealth. This is not a club that wallows in privilege. This is a club where everything is modest, from the cramped board room in which Coleman sits, to the fact the players have to warm up before training on a gravel patch behind the car park. This is a club, after all, whose two most renowned ex-players became famous doing something else: cricketer David “Bumble” Lloyd and Jon Anderson, the lead singer of prog-rockers Yes, played together in Stanley’s amateur Northern League days. But all that may well be about to change. Since the club – or at least its previous incarnation – entered the league in 1921, before resigning midway through the 1962 season, going bust and then reforming in 1968, it has never played above the fourth tier of English football. Coleman is thus on the verge of achieving a remarkable first. The prospect of creating history, however, is not being discussed in the Wham Stadium (named after Holt’s plastics company, not George Michael’s first band). Here in this former pub pitch behind the Crown public house, despite the fact the team has embarked on a winning league run which is the third best in Europe after Juventus and Paris St Germain, caution is at all times the manager’s watchword. “I’ll believe it when and only when it’s mathematically certain,” says Coleman. His restraint is understandable. After all he has first-hand knowledge of disappointment. After steering the club to three promotions through the non-leagues in his two spells in charge, in 2016 he looked as if he were about to hit the big time. Coleman is not looking beyond Stanley's next match Credit: THE TELEGRAPH Right up until the last moment of the final fixture of that season, his Accrington side appeared to be in line for automatic promotion to League One. “In the 93rd minute we’re up, in the 94th we hit the crossbar,” Coleman recalls. “Then in the 95th minute Bristol Rovers score in their game and that’s it we’re not going up, they are. It was the only game all season we didn’t score at home.” An exhausted Accrington subsequently stumbled in the play-offs. And that seemed to be that. The club with the lowest playing budget and lowest gates in the league appeared to have blown a once-in-a-generation chance to progress. Particularly when finances dictated that its best two players – Josh Windass and Matt Crooks – were sold to Rangers. But Coleman regrouped. “The pain of that day has driven me on,” he says. “I still haven’t got over it to be honest.” And after finishing 16th last season, he has turned his team this year into a rolling victory machine, three points clear at the top of the table with two games in hand over second-placed Luton Town. It has been done, he says, not as a result of any magical increase in the budget, but by recruiting hungry young players keen to use Accrington as a staging post to a more substantial career. “If our chairman said go sign five players tomorrow on five grand a week, it wouldn’t fit my model. They wouldn’t be signing for Accrington, they’d be signing for the money, not to further their careers. I want players who eventually want to earn £20,000 but not with me. “Too many League Two teams pay ridiculous money they don’t need to. They’re spending money that’s killing the hunger.” Coleman wants his players to enjoy their football - but work hard in the process Credit: THE TELEGRAPH And when players – such as the division’s leading scorer Billy Kee, or the fluent midfielder Sean McConville – arrive in east Lancashire, they find Coleman drives them hard. “I think we’re the fittest team in the division,” he says. “But we have fun doing it. It’s not a holiday camp, but I’m of the view you’ll do the job better if you’re enjoying it.” The evidence for their stamina is evident, he adds, in the fact he has not made a substitution in the last six league games. “I’m of the opinion if it ain’t broke don’t fix it,” he says. “Course it helps if you’re winning. Don’t need to change anything do you?” And as he prepares to play Colchester in what could be another huge step towards history, the ebullient Scouser takes a moment to consider what promotion would mean to the club. “Even before I came I always had a fascination with this club, the milk advert and all that. I’ve been here nearly 20 years, it’s been like watching a child grow. We were in the first division of the Unibond when I started. Now we could soon be in League One.” Though he immediately checks himself at the very thought. “But I won’t count my chickens until we’re there. I’ve been here before. We got to 94 minutes of the last game thinking we were there. And we weren’t. Worth remembering that.”
As seasonal bonuses go, John Coleman is poised on the brink of a rather unusual one. If he gains promotion to League One with his high-flying Accrington Stanley side, a local hair replacement clinic has promised to give him a celebratory new thatch. “I thought it was a joke, but apparently they mean it,” the long-time entirely hair-free Coleman says of the incentive. “Not sure what the lads will make of it, mind, if I suddenly go full [Antonio] Conte on them.” Before he emerges with a luxuriant new coiffure, Coleman, however, might be wise to check with the Football League that he is not breaching any of its regulations on undisclosed rewards. After all, the governing body has just demanded the club’s chairman, Andy Holt, explain what he was doing after he revealed this week that he had been buying the team a round of McDonald’s after every victory this season. Which, given they have won 16 of their past 18 League Two matches, has come to quite a burger bill. The EFL’s prissy intervention has been roundly mocked, with many wondering how a body that has allowed all sorts of charlatans and frauds to take control of its clubs can apparently sniff impropriety in the purchase of a few Big Macs. Not that Coleman seems remotely perturbed by the official inquiry. “If they’ve won, they can eat pizza, chicken whatever they want as far as I’m concerned,” he says of his players. “If the lads want to eat McDonald’s and the chairman wants to buy it for them, I’m certainly not going to stop them.” Accrington have won 16 of their last 18 games under Coleman Credit: REX But there is something wonderfully Accrington about the story. Of all the clubs that might choose to celebrate a win in fast food, Stanley is the one. This is not a place that exudes wealth. This is not a club that wallows in privilege. This is a club where everything is modest, from the cramped board room in which Coleman sits, to the fact the players have to warm up before training on a gravel patch behind the car park. This is a club, after all, whose two most renowned ex-players became famous doing something else: cricketer David “Bumble” Lloyd and Jon Anderson, the lead singer of prog-rockers Yes, played together in Stanley’s amateur Northern League days. But all that may well be about to change. Since the club – or at least its previous incarnation – entered the league in 1921, before resigning midway through the 1962 season, going bust and then reforming in 1968, it has never played above the fourth tier of English football. Coleman is thus on the verge of achieving a remarkable first. The prospect of creating history, however, is not being discussed in the Wham Stadium (named after Holt’s plastics company, not George Michael’s first band). Here in this former pub pitch behind the Crown public house, despite the fact the team has embarked on a winning league run which is the third best in Europe after Juventus and Paris St Germain, caution is at all times the manager’s watchword. “I’ll believe it when and only when it’s mathematically certain,” says Coleman. His restraint is understandable. After all he has first-hand knowledge of disappointment. After steering the club to three promotions through the non-leagues in his two spells in charge, in 2016 he looked as if he were about to hit the big time. Coleman is not looking beyond Stanley's next match Credit: THE TELEGRAPH Right up until the last moment of the final fixture of that season, his Accrington side appeared to be in line for automatic promotion to League One. “In the 93rd minute we’re up, in the 94th we hit the crossbar,” Coleman recalls. “Then in the 95th minute Bristol Rovers score in their game and that’s it we’re not going up, they are. It was the only game all season we didn’t score at home.” An exhausted Accrington subsequently stumbled in the play-offs. And that seemed to be that. The club with the lowest playing budget and lowest gates in the league appeared to have blown a once-in-a-generation chance to progress. Particularly when finances dictated that its best two players – Josh Windass and Matt Crooks – were sold to Rangers. But Coleman regrouped. “The pain of that day has driven me on,” he says. “I still haven’t got over it to be honest.” And after finishing 16th last season, he has turned his team this year into a rolling victory machine, three points clear at the top of the table with two games in hand over second-placed Luton Town. It has been done, he says, not as a result of any magical increase in the budget, but by recruiting hungry young players keen to use Accrington as a staging post to a more substantial career. “If our chairman said go sign five players tomorrow on five grand a week, it wouldn’t fit my model. They wouldn’t be signing for Accrington, they’d be signing for the money, not to further their careers. I want players who eventually want to earn £20,000 but not with me. “Too many League Two teams pay ridiculous money they don’t need to. They’re spending money that’s killing the hunger.” Coleman wants his players to enjoy their football - but work hard in the process Credit: THE TELEGRAPH And when players – such as the division’s leading scorer Billy Kee, or the fluent midfielder Sean McConville – arrive in east Lancashire, they find Coleman drives them hard. “I think we’re the fittest team in the division,” he says. “But we have fun doing it. It’s not a holiday camp, but I’m of the view you’ll do the job better if you’re enjoying it.” The evidence for their stamina is evident, he adds, in the fact he has not made a substitution in the last six league games. “I’m of the opinion if it ain’t broke don’t fix it,” he says. “Course it helps if you’re winning. Don’t need to change anything do you?” And as he prepares to play Colchester in what could be another huge step towards history, the ebullient Scouser takes a moment to consider what promotion would mean to the club. “Even before I came I always had a fascination with this club, the milk advert and all that. I’ve been here nearly 20 years, it’s been like watching a child grow. We were in the first division of the Unibond when I started. Now we could soon be in League One.” Though he immediately checks himself at the very thought. “But I won’t count my chickens until we’re there. I’ve been here before. We got to 94 minutes of the last game thinking we were there. And we weren’t. Worth remembering that.”
Accrington Stanley and manager John Coleman remain modest despite being on the brink of historic promotion
As seasonal bonuses go, John Coleman is poised on the brink of a rather unusual one. If he gains promotion to League One with his high-flying Accrington Stanley side, a local hair replacement clinic has promised to give him a celebratory new thatch. “I thought it was a joke, but apparently they mean it,” the long-time entirely hair-free Coleman says of the incentive. “Not sure what the lads will make of it, mind, if I suddenly go full [Antonio] Conte on them.” Before he emerges with a luxuriant new coiffure, Coleman, however, might be wise to check with the Football League that he is not breaching any of its regulations on undisclosed rewards. After all, the governing body has just demanded the club’s chairman, Andy Holt, explain what he was doing after he revealed this week that he had been buying the team a round of McDonald’s after every victory this season. Which, given they have won 16 of their past 18 League Two matches, has come to quite a burger bill. The EFL’s prissy intervention has been roundly mocked, with many wondering how a body that has allowed all sorts of charlatans and frauds to take control of its clubs can apparently sniff impropriety in the purchase of a few Big Macs. Not that Coleman seems remotely perturbed by the official inquiry. “If they’ve won, they can eat pizza, chicken whatever they want as far as I’m concerned,” he says of his players. “If the lads want to eat McDonald’s and the chairman wants to buy it for them, I’m certainly not going to stop them.” Accrington have won 16 of their last 18 games under Coleman Credit: REX But there is something wonderfully Accrington about the story. Of all the clubs that might choose to celebrate a win in fast food, Stanley is the one. This is not a place that exudes wealth. This is not a club that wallows in privilege. This is a club where everything is modest, from the cramped board room in which Coleman sits, to the fact the players have to warm up before training on a gravel patch behind the car park. This is a club, after all, whose two most renowned ex-players became famous doing something else: cricketer David “Bumble” Lloyd and Jon Anderson, the lead singer of prog-rockers Yes, played together in Stanley’s amateur Northern League days. But all that may well be about to change. Since the club – or at least its previous incarnation – entered the league in 1921, before resigning midway through the 1962 season, going bust and then reforming in 1968, it has never played above the fourth tier of English football. Coleman is thus on the verge of achieving a remarkable first. The prospect of creating history, however, is not being discussed in the Wham Stadium (named after Holt’s plastics company, not George Michael’s first band). Here in this former pub pitch behind the Crown public house, despite the fact the team has embarked on a winning league run which is the third best in Europe after Juventus and Paris St Germain, caution is at all times the manager’s watchword. “I’ll believe it when and only when it’s mathematically certain,” says Coleman. His restraint is understandable. After all he has first-hand knowledge of disappointment. After steering the club to three promotions through the non-leagues in his two spells in charge, in 2016 he looked as if he were about to hit the big time. Coleman is not looking beyond Stanley's next match Credit: THE TELEGRAPH Right up until the last moment of the final fixture of that season, his Accrington side appeared to be in line for automatic promotion to League One. “In the 93rd minute we’re up, in the 94th we hit the crossbar,” Coleman recalls. “Then in the 95th minute Bristol Rovers score in their game and that’s it we’re not going up, they are. It was the only game all season we didn’t score at home.” An exhausted Accrington subsequently stumbled in the play-offs. And that seemed to be that. The club with the lowest playing budget and lowest gates in the league appeared to have blown a once-in-a-generation chance to progress. Particularly when finances dictated that its best two players – Josh Windass and Matt Crooks – were sold to Rangers. But Coleman regrouped. “The pain of that day has driven me on,” he says. “I still haven’t got over it to be honest.” And after finishing 16th last season, he has turned his team this year into a rolling victory machine, three points clear at the top of the table with two games in hand over second-placed Luton Town. It has been done, he says, not as a result of any magical increase in the budget, but by recruiting hungry young players keen to use Accrington as a staging post to a more substantial career. “If our chairman said go sign five players tomorrow on five grand a week, it wouldn’t fit my model. They wouldn’t be signing for Accrington, they’d be signing for the money, not to further their careers. I want players who eventually want to earn £20,000 but not with me. “Too many League Two teams pay ridiculous money they don’t need to. They’re spending money that’s killing the hunger.” Coleman wants his players to enjoy their football - but work hard in the process Credit: THE TELEGRAPH And when players – such as the division’s leading scorer Billy Kee, or the fluent midfielder Sean McConville – arrive in east Lancashire, they find Coleman drives them hard. “I think we’re the fittest team in the division,” he says. “But we have fun doing it. It’s not a holiday camp, but I’m of the view you’ll do the job better if you’re enjoying it.” The evidence for their stamina is evident, he adds, in the fact he has not made a substitution in the last six league games. “I’m of the opinion if it ain’t broke don’t fix it,” he says. “Course it helps if you’re winning. Don’t need to change anything do you?” And as he prepares to play Colchester in what could be another huge step towards history, the ebullient Scouser takes a moment to consider what promotion would mean to the club. “Even before I came I always had a fascination with this club, the milk advert and all that. I’ve been here nearly 20 years, it’s been like watching a child grow. We were in the first division of the Unibond when I started. Now we could soon be in League One.” Though he immediately checks himself at the very thought. “But I won’t count my chickens until we’re there. I’ve been here before. We got to 94 minutes of the last game thinking we were there. And we weren’t. Worth remembering that.”
As seasonal bonuses go, John Coleman is poised on the brink of a rather unusual one. If he gains promotion to League One with his high-flying Accrington Stanley side, a local hair replacement clinic has promised to give him a celebratory new thatch. “I thought it was a joke, but apparently they mean it,” the long-time entirely hair-free Coleman says of the incentive. “Not sure what the lads will make of it, mind, if I suddenly go full [Antonio] Conte on them.” Before he emerges with a luxuriant new coiffure, Coleman, however, might be wise to check with the Football League that he is not breaching any of its regulations on undisclosed rewards. After all, the governing body has just demanded the club’s chairman, Andy Holt, explain what he was doing after he revealed this week that he had been buying the team a round of McDonald’s after every victory this season. Which, given they have won 16 of their past 18 League Two matches, has come to quite a burger bill. The EFL’s prissy intervention has been roundly mocked, with many wondering how a body that has allowed all sorts of charlatans and frauds to take control of its clubs can apparently sniff impropriety in the purchase of a few Big Macs. Not that Coleman seems remotely perturbed by the official inquiry. “If they’ve won, they can eat pizza, chicken whatever they want as far as I’m concerned,” he says of his players. “If the lads want to eat McDonald’s and the chairman wants to buy it for them, I’m certainly not going to stop them.” Accrington have won 16 of their last 18 games under Coleman Credit: REX But there is something wonderfully Accrington about the story. Of all the clubs that might choose to celebrate a win in fast food, Stanley is the one. This is not a place that exudes wealth. This is not a club that wallows in privilege. This is a club where everything is modest, from the cramped board room in which Coleman sits, to the fact the players have to warm up before training on a gravel patch behind the car park. This is a club, after all, whose two most renowned ex-players became famous doing something else: cricketer David “Bumble” Lloyd and Jon Anderson, the lead singer of prog-rockers Yes, played together in Stanley’s amateur Northern League days. But all that may well be about to change. Since the club – or at least its previous incarnation – entered the league in 1921, before resigning midway through the 1962 season, going bust and then reforming in 1968, it has never played above the fourth tier of English football. Coleman is thus on the verge of achieving a remarkable first. The prospect of creating history, however, is not being discussed in the Wham Stadium (named after Holt’s plastics company, not George Michael’s first band). Here in this former pub pitch behind the Crown public house, despite the fact the team has embarked on a winning league run which is the third best in Europe after Juventus and Paris St Germain, caution is at all times the manager’s watchword. “I’ll believe it when and only when it’s mathematically certain,” says Coleman. His restraint is understandable. After all he has first-hand knowledge of disappointment. After steering the club to three promotions through the non-leagues in his two spells in charge, in 2016 he looked as if he were about to hit the big time. Coleman is not looking beyond Stanley's next match Credit: THE TELEGRAPH Right up until the last moment of the final fixture of that season, his Accrington side appeared to be in line for automatic promotion to League One. “In the 93rd minute we’re up, in the 94th we hit the crossbar,” Coleman recalls. “Then in the 95th minute Bristol Rovers score in their game and that’s it we’re not going up, they are. It was the only game all season we didn’t score at home.” An exhausted Accrington subsequently stumbled in the play-offs. And that seemed to be that. The club with the lowest playing budget and lowest gates in the league appeared to have blown a once-in-a-generation chance to progress. Particularly when finances dictated that its best two players – Josh Windass and Matt Crooks – were sold to Rangers. But Coleman regrouped. “The pain of that day has driven me on,” he says. “I still haven’t got over it to be honest.” And after finishing 16th last season, he has turned his team this year into a rolling victory machine, three points clear at the top of the table with two games in hand over second-placed Luton Town. It has been done, he says, not as a result of any magical increase in the budget, but by recruiting hungry young players keen to use Accrington as a staging post to a more substantial career. “If our chairman said go sign five players tomorrow on five grand a week, it wouldn’t fit my model. They wouldn’t be signing for Accrington, they’d be signing for the money, not to further their careers. I want players who eventually want to earn £20,000 but not with me. “Too many League Two teams pay ridiculous money they don’t need to. They’re spending money that’s killing the hunger.” Coleman wants his players to enjoy their football - but work hard in the process Credit: THE TELEGRAPH And when players – such as the division’s leading scorer Billy Kee, or the fluent midfielder Sean McConville – arrive in east Lancashire, they find Coleman drives them hard. “I think we’re the fittest team in the division,” he says. “But we have fun doing it. It’s not a holiday camp, but I’m of the view you’ll do the job better if you’re enjoying it.” The evidence for their stamina is evident, he adds, in the fact he has not made a substitution in the last six league games. “I’m of the opinion if it ain’t broke don’t fix it,” he says. “Course it helps if you’re winning. Don’t need to change anything do you?” And as he prepares to play Colchester in what could be another huge step towards history, the ebullient Scouser takes a moment to consider what promotion would mean to the club. “Even before I came I always had a fascination with this club, the milk advert and all that. I’ve been here nearly 20 years, it’s been like watching a child grow. We were in the first division of the Unibond when I started. Now we could soon be in League One.” Though he immediately checks himself at the very thought. “But I won’t count my chickens until we’re there. I’ve been here before. We got to 94 minutes of the last game thinking we were there. And we weren’t. Worth remembering that.”
Accrington Stanley and manager John Coleman remain modest despite being on the brink of historic promotion
As seasonal bonuses go, John Coleman is poised on the brink of a rather unusual one. If he gains promotion to League One with his high-flying Accrington Stanley side, a local hair replacement clinic has promised to give him a celebratory new thatch. “I thought it was a joke, but apparently they mean it,” the long-time entirely hair-free Coleman says of the incentive. “Not sure what the lads will make of it, mind, if I suddenly go full [Antonio] Conte on them.” Before he emerges with a luxuriant new coiffure, Coleman, however, might be wise to check with the Football League that he is not breaching any of its regulations on undisclosed rewards. After all, the governing body has just demanded the club’s chairman, Andy Holt, explain what he was doing after he revealed this week that he had been buying the team a round of McDonald’s after every victory this season. Which, given they have won 16 of their past 18 League Two matches, has come to quite a burger bill. The EFL’s prissy intervention has been roundly mocked, with many wondering how a body that has allowed all sorts of charlatans and frauds to take control of its clubs can apparently sniff impropriety in the purchase of a few Big Macs. Not that Coleman seems remotely perturbed by the official inquiry. “If they’ve won, they can eat pizza, chicken whatever they want as far as I’m concerned,” he says of his players. “If the lads want to eat McDonald’s and the chairman wants to buy it for them, I’m certainly not going to stop them.” Accrington have won 16 of their last 18 games under Coleman Credit: REX But there is something wonderfully Accrington about the story. Of all the clubs that might choose to celebrate a win in fast food, Stanley is the one. This is not a place that exudes wealth. This is not a club that wallows in privilege. This is a club where everything is modest, from the cramped board room in which Coleman sits, to the fact the players have to warm up before training on a gravel patch behind the car park. This is a club, after all, whose two most renowned ex-players became famous doing something else: cricketer David “Bumble” Lloyd and Jon Anderson, the lead singer of prog-rockers Yes, played together in Stanley’s amateur Northern League days. But all that may well be about to change. Since the club – or at least its previous incarnation – entered the league in 1921, before resigning midway through the 1962 season, going bust and then reforming in 1968, it has never played above the fourth tier of English football. Coleman is thus on the verge of achieving a remarkable first. The prospect of creating history, however, is not being discussed in the Wham Stadium (named after Holt’s plastics company, not George Michael’s first band). Here in this former pub pitch behind the Crown public house, despite the fact the team has embarked on a winning league run which is the third best in Europe after Juventus and Paris St Germain, caution is at all times the manager’s watchword. “I’ll believe it when and only when it’s mathematically certain,” says Coleman. His restraint is understandable. After all he has first-hand knowledge of disappointment. After steering the club to three promotions through the non-leagues in his two spells in charge, in 2016 he looked as if he were about to hit the big time. Coleman is not looking beyond Stanley's next match Credit: THE TELEGRAPH Right up until the last moment of the final fixture of that season, his Accrington side appeared to be in line for automatic promotion to League One. “In the 93rd minute we’re up, in the 94th we hit the crossbar,” Coleman recalls. “Then in the 95th minute Bristol Rovers score in their game and that’s it we’re not going up, they are. It was the only game all season we didn’t score at home.” An exhausted Accrington subsequently stumbled in the play-offs. And that seemed to be that. The club with the lowest playing budget and lowest gates in the league appeared to have blown a once-in-a-generation chance to progress. Particularly when finances dictated that its best two players – Josh Windass and Matt Crooks – were sold to Rangers. But Coleman regrouped. “The pain of that day has driven me on,” he says. “I still haven’t got over it to be honest.” And after finishing 16th last season, he has turned his team this year into a rolling victory machine, three points clear at the top of the table with two games in hand over second-placed Luton Town. It has been done, he says, not as a result of any magical increase in the budget, but by recruiting hungry young players keen to use Accrington as a staging post to a more substantial career. “If our chairman said go sign five players tomorrow on five grand a week, it wouldn’t fit my model. They wouldn’t be signing for Accrington, they’d be signing for the money, not to further their careers. I want players who eventually want to earn £20,000 but not with me. “Too many League Two teams pay ridiculous money they don’t need to. They’re spending money that’s killing the hunger.” Coleman wants his players to enjoy their football - but work hard in the process Credit: THE TELEGRAPH And when players – such as the division’s leading scorer Billy Kee, or the fluent midfielder Sean McConville – arrive in east Lancashire, they find Coleman drives them hard. “I think we’re the fittest team in the division,” he says. “But we have fun doing it. It’s not a holiday camp, but I’m of the view you’ll do the job better if you’re enjoying it.” The evidence for their stamina is evident, he adds, in the fact he has not made a substitution in the last six league games. “I’m of the opinion if it ain’t broke don’t fix it,” he says. “Course it helps if you’re winning. Don’t need to change anything do you?” And as he prepares to play Colchester in what could be another huge step towards history, the ebullient Scouser takes a moment to consider what promotion would mean to the club. “Even before I came I always had a fascination with this club, the milk advert and all that. I’ve been here nearly 20 years, it’s been like watching a child grow. We were in the first division of the Unibond when I started. Now we could soon be in League One.” Though he immediately checks himself at the very thought. “But I won’t count my chickens until we’re there. I’ve been here before. We got to 94 minutes of the last game thinking we were there. And we weren’t. Worth remembering that.”
As seasonal bonuses go, John Coleman is poised on the brink of a rather unusual one. If he gains promotion to League One with his high-flying Accrington Stanley side, a local hair replacement clinic has promised to give him a celebratory new thatch. “I thought it was a joke, but apparently they mean it,” the long-time entirely hair-free Coleman says of the incentive. “Not sure what the lads will make of it, mind, if I suddenly go full [Antonio] Conte on them.” Before he emerges with a luxuriant new coiffure, Coleman, however, might be wise to check with the Football League that he is not breaching any of its regulations on undisclosed rewards. After all, the governing body has just demanded the club’s chairman, Andy Holt, explain what he was doing after he revealed this week that he had been buying the team a round of McDonald’s after every victory this season. Which, given they have won 16 of their past 18 League Two matches, has come to quite a burger bill. The EFL’s prissy intervention has been roundly mocked, with many wondering how a body that has allowed all sorts of charlatans and frauds to take control of its clubs can apparently sniff impropriety in the purchase of a few Big Macs. Not that Coleman seems remotely perturbed by the official inquiry. “If they’ve won, they can eat pizza, chicken whatever they want as far as I’m concerned,” he says of his players. “If the lads want to eat McDonald’s and the chairman wants to buy it for them, I’m certainly not going to stop them.” Accrington have won 16 of their last 18 games under Coleman Credit: REX But there is something wonderfully Accrington about the story. Of all the clubs that might choose to celebrate a win in fast food, Stanley is the one. This is not a place that exudes wealth. This is not a club that wallows in privilege. This is a club where everything is modest, from the cramped board room in which Coleman sits, to the fact the players have to warm up before training on a gravel patch behind the car park. This is a club, after all, whose two most renowned ex-players became famous doing something else: cricketer David “Bumble” Lloyd and Jon Anderson, the lead singer of prog-rockers Yes, played together in Stanley’s amateur Northern League days. But all that may well be about to change. Since the club – or at least its previous incarnation – entered the league in 1921, before resigning midway through the 1962 season, going bust and then reforming in 1968, it has never played above the fourth tier of English football. Coleman is thus on the verge of achieving a remarkable first. The prospect of creating history, however, is not being discussed in the Wham Stadium (named after Holt’s plastics company, not George Michael’s first band). Here in this former pub pitch behind the Crown public house, despite the fact the team has embarked on a winning league run which is the third best in Europe after Juventus and Paris St Germain, caution is at all times the manager’s watchword. “I’ll believe it when and only when it’s mathematically certain,” says Coleman. His restraint is understandable. After all he has first-hand knowledge of disappointment. After steering the club to three promotions through the non-leagues in his two spells in charge, in 2016 he looked as if he were about to hit the big time. Coleman is not looking beyond Stanley's next match Credit: THE TELEGRAPH Right up until the last moment of the final fixture of that season, his Accrington side appeared to be in line for automatic promotion to League One. “In the 93rd minute we’re up, in the 94th we hit the crossbar,” Coleman recalls. “Then in the 95th minute Bristol Rovers score in their game and that’s it we’re not going up, they are. It was the only game all season we didn’t score at home.” An exhausted Accrington subsequently stumbled in the play-offs. And that seemed to be that. The club with the lowest playing budget and lowest gates in the league appeared to have blown a once-in-a-generation chance to progress. Particularly when finances dictated that its best two players – Josh Windass and Matt Crooks – were sold to Rangers. But Coleman regrouped. “The pain of that day has driven me on,” he says. “I still haven’t got over it to be honest.” And after finishing 16th last season, he has turned his team this year into a rolling victory machine, three points clear at the top of the table with two games in hand over second-placed Luton Town. It has been done, he says, not as a result of any magical increase in the budget, but by recruiting hungry young players keen to use Accrington as a staging post to a more substantial career. “If our chairman said go sign five players tomorrow on five grand a week, it wouldn’t fit my model. They wouldn’t be signing for Accrington, they’d be signing for the money, not to further their careers. I want players who eventually want to earn £20,000 but not with me. “Too many League Two teams pay ridiculous money they don’t need to. They’re spending money that’s killing the hunger.” Coleman wants his players to enjoy their football - but work hard in the process Credit: THE TELEGRAPH And when players – such as the division’s leading scorer Billy Kee, or the fluent midfielder Sean McConville – arrive in east Lancashire, they find Coleman drives them hard. “I think we’re the fittest team in the division,” he says. “But we have fun doing it. It’s not a holiday camp, but I’m of the view you’ll do the job better if you’re enjoying it.” The evidence for their stamina is evident, he adds, in the fact he has not made a substitution in the last six league games. “I’m of the opinion if it ain’t broke don’t fix it,” he says. “Course it helps if you’re winning. Don’t need to change anything do you?” And as he prepares to play Colchester in what could be another huge step towards history, the ebullient Scouser takes a moment to consider what promotion would mean to the club. “Even before I came I always had a fascination with this club, the milk advert and all that. I’ve been here nearly 20 years, it’s been like watching a child grow. We were in the first division of the Unibond when I started. Now we could soon be in League One.” Though he immediately checks himself at the very thought. “But I won’t count my chickens until we’re there. I’ve been here before. We got to 94 minutes of the last game thinking we were there. And we weren’t. Worth remembering that.”
Accrington Stanley and manager John Coleman remain modest despite being on the brink of historic promotion
As seasonal bonuses go, John Coleman is poised on the brink of a rather unusual one. If he gains promotion to League One with his high-flying Accrington Stanley side, a local hair replacement clinic has promised to give him a celebratory new thatch. “I thought it was a joke, but apparently they mean it,” the long-time entirely hair-free Coleman says of the incentive. “Not sure what the lads will make of it, mind, if I suddenly go full [Antonio] Conte on them.” Before he emerges with a luxuriant new coiffure, Coleman, however, might be wise to check with the Football League that he is not breaching any of its regulations on undisclosed rewards. After all, the governing body has just demanded the club’s chairman, Andy Holt, explain what he was doing after he revealed this week that he had been buying the team a round of McDonald’s after every victory this season. Which, given they have won 16 of their past 18 League Two matches, has come to quite a burger bill. The EFL’s prissy intervention has been roundly mocked, with many wondering how a body that has allowed all sorts of charlatans and frauds to take control of its clubs can apparently sniff impropriety in the purchase of a few Big Macs. Not that Coleman seems remotely perturbed by the official inquiry. “If they’ve won, they can eat pizza, chicken whatever they want as far as I’m concerned,” he says of his players. “If the lads want to eat McDonald’s and the chairman wants to buy it for them, I’m certainly not going to stop them.” Accrington have won 16 of their last 18 games under Coleman Credit: REX But there is something wonderfully Accrington about the story. Of all the clubs that might choose to celebrate a win in fast food, Stanley is the one. This is not a place that exudes wealth. This is not a club that wallows in privilege. This is a club where everything is modest, from the cramped board room in which Coleman sits, to the fact the players have to warm up before training on a gravel patch behind the car park. This is a club, after all, whose two most renowned ex-players became famous doing something else: cricketer David “Bumble” Lloyd and Jon Anderson, the lead singer of prog-rockers Yes, played together in Stanley’s amateur Northern League days. But all that may well be about to change. Since the club – or at least its previous incarnation – entered the league in 1921, before resigning midway through the 1962 season, going bust and then reforming in 1968, it has never played above the fourth tier of English football. Coleman is thus on the verge of achieving a remarkable first. The prospect of creating history, however, is not being discussed in the Wham Stadium (named after Holt’s plastics company, not George Michael’s first band). Here in this former pub pitch behind the Crown public house, despite the fact the team has embarked on a winning league run which is the third best in Europe after Juventus and Paris St Germain, caution is at all times the manager’s watchword. “I’ll believe it when and only when it’s mathematically certain,” says Coleman. His restraint is understandable. After all he has first-hand knowledge of disappointment. After steering the club to three promotions through the non-leagues in his two spells in charge, in 2016 he looked as if he were about to hit the big time. Coleman is not looking beyond Stanley's next match Credit: THE TELEGRAPH Right up until the last moment of the final fixture of that season, his Accrington side appeared to be in line for automatic promotion to League One. “In the 93rd minute we’re up, in the 94th we hit the crossbar,” Coleman recalls. “Then in the 95th minute Bristol Rovers score in their game and that’s it we’re not going up, they are. It was the only game all season we didn’t score at home.” An exhausted Accrington subsequently stumbled in the play-offs. And that seemed to be that. The club with the lowest playing budget and lowest gates in the league appeared to have blown a once-in-a-generation chance to progress. Particularly when finances dictated that its best two players – Josh Windass and Matt Crooks – were sold to Rangers. But Coleman regrouped. “The pain of that day has driven me on,” he says. “I still haven’t got over it to be honest.” And after finishing 16th last season, he has turned his team this year into a rolling victory machine, three points clear at the top of the table with two games in hand over second-placed Luton Town. It has been done, he says, not as a result of any magical increase in the budget, but by recruiting hungry young players keen to use Accrington as a staging post to a more substantial career. “If our chairman said go sign five players tomorrow on five grand a week, it wouldn’t fit my model. They wouldn’t be signing for Accrington, they’d be signing for the money, not to further their careers. I want players who eventually want to earn £20,000 but not with me. “Too many League Two teams pay ridiculous money they don’t need to. They’re spending money that’s killing the hunger.” Coleman wants his players to enjoy their football - but work hard in the process Credit: THE TELEGRAPH And when players – such as the division’s leading scorer Billy Kee, or the fluent midfielder Sean McConville – arrive in east Lancashire, they find Coleman drives them hard. “I think we’re the fittest team in the division,” he says. “But we have fun doing it. It’s not a holiday camp, but I’m of the view you’ll do the job better if you’re enjoying it.” The evidence for their stamina is evident, he adds, in the fact he has not made a substitution in the last six league games. “I’m of the opinion if it ain’t broke don’t fix it,” he says. “Course it helps if you’re winning. Don’t need to change anything do you?” And as he prepares to play Colchester in what could be another huge step towards history, the ebullient Scouser takes a moment to consider what promotion would mean to the club. “Even before I came I always had a fascination with this club, the milk advert and all that. I’ve been here nearly 20 years, it’s been like watching a child grow. We were in the first division of the Unibond when I started. Now we could soon be in League One.” Though he immediately checks himself at the very thought. “But I won’t count my chickens until we’re there. I’ve been here before. We got to 94 minutes of the last game thinking we were there. And we weren’t. Worth remembering that.”
Soccer Football - League Two - Luton Town vs Barnet - Kenilworth Road, Luton, Britain - March 24, 2018 Luton Town's Alan Sheehan prepares to take a corner Action Images/Adam Holt EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
League Two - Luton Town vs Barnet
Soccer Football - League Two - Luton Town vs Barnet - Kenilworth Road, Luton, Britain - March 24, 2018 Luton Town's Alan Sheehan prepares to take a corner Action Images/Adam Holt EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - League Two - Luton Town vs Barnet - Kenilworth Road, Luton, Britain - March 24, 2018 Luton Town's James Collins celebrates scoring their second goal with Alan McCormack Action Images/Adam Holt EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
League Two - Luton Town vs Barnet
Soccer Football - League Two - Luton Town vs Barnet - Kenilworth Road, Luton, Britain - March 24, 2018 Luton Town's James Collins celebrates scoring their second goal with Alan McCormack Action Images/Adam Holt EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - League Two - Luton Town vs Barnet - Kenilworth Road, Luton, Britain - March 24, 2018 Luton Town's James Collins celebrates scoring their second goal with Danny Hylton Action Images/Adam Holt EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
League Two - Luton Town vs Barnet
Soccer Football - League Two - Luton Town vs Barnet - Kenilworth Road, Luton, Britain - March 24, 2018 Luton Town's James Collins celebrates scoring their second goal with Danny Hylton Action Images/Adam Holt EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Soccer Football - League Two - Luton Town vs Barnet - Kenilworth Road, Luton, Britain - March 24, 2018 Luton Town's Danny Hylton celebrates scoring their first goal with teammates Action Images/Adam Holt EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
League Two - Luton Town vs Barnet
Soccer Football - League Two - Luton Town vs Barnet - Kenilworth Road, Luton, Britain - March 24, 2018 Luton Town's Danny Hylton celebrates scoring their first goal with teammates Action Images/Adam Holt EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
James Collins strikes for Luton Town and deepens Barnet woes
James Collins strikes for Luton Town and deepens Barnet woes
James Collins strikes for Luton Town and deepens Barnet woes

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