Mourning and acts of solidarity for the victims of the Charlottesville attack at a white nationalist rally

From New York to California, people joined together at memorials and rallies to condemn the violent attack in Charlottesville, Va., on Aug. 12, 2017. After white nationalists clashed with counterdemonstrators, a car plowed into a crowd near the scene of the earlier melee, the mayor of Charlottesville said. One person was killed and many were injured.

The clashes on Saturday morning prompted the governor to declare an emergency and halt the rally, which had been called to protest the removal of a Confederate general’s statue from a public park. (Reuters)

Slideshow: Violent clashes erupt at ‘Unite the Right’ rally in Charlottesville, Va. >>>

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Mourning and acts of solidarity for the victims of the Charlottesville attack at a white nationalist rally

Worshipers hold hands during morning services at Mount Zion First African Baptist Church August 13, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. The city of Charlottesville is still reeling following violence at a ‘Unite the Right’ rally held by white nationalists, neo-Nazis and members of the ‘alt-right’. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Mourning and acts of solidarity for the victims of the Charlottesville attack at a white nationalist rally

Protesters listen during a “Peace and Sanity” rally Sunday Aug. 13, 2017, in New York, as speakers address white supremacy violence in Charlottesville, Va., yesterday. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

Mourning and acts of solidarity for the victims of the Charlottesville attack at a white nationalist rally

Members of Charlottesville’s Mt. Zion First African Baptist Church pray during Sunday services the morning after the attack on counter-protesters at the “Unite the Right” rally organized by white nationalists in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 13, 2017. (Jim Bourg/Reuters)

Mourning and acts of solidarity for the victims of the Charlottesville attack at a white nationalist rally

A woman mourns at the corner of Fourth Street and Water Street, where a car plughed into a crowd of people at a rally, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, 13 August 2017. According to media reports at least one person was killed and 19 injured after the car hit a crowd of people counter-protesting the ‘Unite the Right’ rally which was scheduled to take place in Charlottesville on 12 August. At least 15 others were injured in clashes during protests. (Tasos Katopodis/EPA/REX/Shutterstock)

Mourning and acts of solidarity for the victims of the Charlottesville attack at a white nationalist rally

A demonstrator holds sign during a rally in response to the Charlottesville, Virginia car attack on counter-protesters after the “Unite the Right” rally organised by white nationalists, in Oakland, California, U.S., August 12, 2017. (Stephen Lam/Reuters)

Mourning and acts of solidarity for the victims of the Charlottesville attack at a white nationalist rally

Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe (C) holds hands with Deaconess Beverly Terrell (L) and Pastor Alvin Edwards as members of Charlottesville’s Mt. Zion First African Baptist Church pray during Sunday services the morning after the attack on counter-protesters at the “Unite the Right” rally organized by white nationalists in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 13, 2017. (Jim Bourg/Reuters)

Mourning and acts of solidarity for the victims of the Charlottesville attack at a white nationalist rally

Counter protesters pay their respects at a vigil where 20 candles were burned for the 19 people injured and one killed when a car plowed into a crowd of counter protesters at the “Unite the Right” rally organized by white nationalists in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 12, 2017. (Jim Bourg/Reuters)

Mourning and acts of solidarity for the victims of the Charlottesville attack at a white nationalist rally

People take part in a candle light vigil in downtown San Francisco, the United States, on August 12, 2017. Three people were killed and 19 wounded in Charlottesville, as a supporter of the so-called alt-right movement rammed his car into a crowd of protesters against a white nationalist rally. Then, a local group known as Indivisible SF, short for San Francisco, called for the vigil ”to stand in solidarity with Charlottesville.” (Xu Yong/Xinhua via ZUMA Wire)

Mourning and acts of solidarity for the victims of the Charlottesville attack at a white nationalist rally

Demonstrators march in response in response to the Charlottesville, Virginia car attack on counter-protesters after the “Unite the Right” rally organised by white nationalists, in Oakland, California, U.S., August 12, 2017. (Stephen Lam/Reuters)

Mourning and acts of solidarity for the victims of the Charlottesville attack at a white nationalist rally

People place candles as they gather during a vigil in Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, 12 August 2017. According to media reports at least one person was killed and 19 injured after a car hit a crowd of people counter-protesting the ‘Unite the Right’ rally which was scheduled to take place in Charlottesville on 12 August. At least 15 others were injured in clashes during protests. (Tasos Katopodis/EPA/REX/Shutterstock)

Mourning and acts of solidarity for the victims of the Charlottesville attack at a white nationalist rally

A demonstrator holds signs during a rally in response to the Charlottesville, Virginia car attack on counter-protesters after the “Unite the Right” rally organised by white nationalists, in Oakland, California, U.S., August 12, 2017. (Stephen Lam/Reuters)

Mourning and acts of solidarity for the victims of the Charlottesville attack at a white nationalist rally

Two people stop to comfort Joseph Culver (C) of Charlottesville as he kneels at a late night vigil to pay his respect for a friend injured in a car attack on counter protesters after the “Unite the Right” rally organized by white nationalists in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 12, 2017. Picture taken August 12, 2017. (Jim Bourg/Reuters)

Mourning and acts of solidarity for the victims of the Charlottesville attack at a white nationalist rally

The statue of Confederat Gen. Robert E. Lee stands in the center of Emancipation Park the day after the Unite the Right rally devolved into violence August 13, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. The Charlottesville City Council voted to remove the statue and change the name of the space from Lee Park to Emancipation Park, sparking protests from white nationalists, neo-Nazis, the Ku Klux Klan and members of the ‘alt-right.’ (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

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