Paralympics London 2012

Prince Harry will marry Meghan Markle on Saturday at St George's Chapel, in one of the most anticipated events of the year. Since the moment he was born, the Prince's life has been recorded, photographed and documented. The public seemingly know everything there is to know about him. We were there for his parents' divorce and his mother’s death. We are all aware of his will-they-won't-they relationships, his job, that one time he wore a swastika and that other time he went to Las Vagas and got his kit off. But there is plenty we don't know about the prince. Here are 31 facts about the groom for you to impress fellow revellers with at your wedding-watching party. Prince Harry during a teacher training session at Eccles Rugby Club, Salford Credit: Rex Features When he started nursery school in London aged three, Prince Harry didn't automatically get on well with the other children and was reportedly picked on by bullies. His kind-heartedness started early. He owned a lop-eared rabbit that lived in a hutch in the stable yard at Highgrove. The young prince would also spend hours tending to the sheep on the country estate. Harry met his ex-girlfriend Cressida Bonas through his cousin Princess Eugenie in May 2012. Prince Harry and Cressida Bonas are actually related, albeit very distantly. She is rumoured to be Prince Harry’s ninth cousin through King Charles II. Harry had the idea for, and spearheaded, the Invictus Games: a Paralympic-style multi sport event for wounded, injured or sick servicemen and women. In 1997 he travelled to South Africa with his father where he met Nelson Mandela and watched the Spice Girls perform. In the Army, he was known as "Captain Wales". As a British prince, he doesn’t have a fixed surname and so instead used the name of the area over which his father holds title, as a territorial suffix in place of a surname. He’s a dab hand at the Fifa video game, which we know because he told the Press in an interview while out in Afghanistan, saying, "You can ask the guys, I thrash them at Fifa the whole time". Game on, Harry. He will not be reading this article. Not only because obviously there’s not a lot about himself he doesn’t know, but because neither he nor William take any pleasure in reading articles about themselves and try to avoid it if they can. He really hates Twitter. Poor man. One of his middle names is David. The other two are Charles and Albert. Aged 18, he spent his gap year in Australia and Lesotho. While in Australia, he spent time working, as his father had done, on a cattle station and participating in the Young England vs Young Australia Polo Test Match. In 2007-2008 he served for 77 days in Helmand, Afghanistan. He was pulled out after the publication of the story in an Australian magazine. He returned to Afghanistan for a 20-week deployment in 2012-2013 with the Army Air Corps He studied geography, art history and art at A-Level and left school with a B in art and a D in geography - enough to get him into Sandhurst. He produced the documentary film The Forgotten Kingdom during his gap year in Lesotho, where he also visited Mants’ase Children’s Home near Mohale’s Hoek. He was educated at Eton College, famous for having graduates from the world of politics and business. He has his own coat of arms, granted to him on his 18th birthday. On the 10th anniversary of his mother’s death, he gave a speech at the Thanksgiving Service in which he said: "What is far more important to us now is how she is remembered as she was: fun-loving, generous, down-to-earth, entirely genuine." Prince Harry also has his own monogram. It’s a lovely curly "H" with a crown on the top. When commenting on the Las Vegas naked picture scandal, Prince Harry said that "at the end of the day I probably let myself down, I let my family down, I let other people down," but also that "I was in a private area and there should have been a certain amount of privacy that should have been expected." Quite right, too. In an interview with NBC News, Harry said he would never stop wondering about the night that his mother died and what happened in that tunnel. There was an American TV show called I Wanna Marry Harry, in which 12 women were led to believe that they were competing for Prince Harry's affections. The Harry in question was an actor, so they weren't. Apparently he can fix a broken cable TV – which would come in very handy for anyone struggling to watch I Wanna Marry Harry. While visiting a temporary home in Valparaiso in Chile, he noticed a family’s TV cable wasn’t working and fixed it. He supports Arsenal Football Club. When he was a child, Princess Diana took William and Harry around homeless projects and Aids wards in the hope that it would give them an understanding of people’s emotions, insecurities and of people's hopes and dreams. As part of the Walking With The Wounded South Pole Allied Challenge of 2013, Harry became the first member of the royal family to reach the South Pole. He has named himself "the Funcle" (that's "Fun" "Uncle", for those of you wondering) of Prince George. When Prince Harry presented the rings at his brother’s wedding, he carried them in the cuff of his tunic as his military uniform didn’t have any pockets. Prince Harry was a supporter rather than a best man during the wedding. Apparently royal weddings don’t have a best man. Following training at the Royal Military Academy in Sandhurst, he was commissioned as a second lieutenant into the Blues and Royals of the Household Cavalry Regiment. Harry has three medals to his name: an Operation Service Medal for Afghanistan, Queen Elizabeth II Golden Jubilee Medal and Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal. Royal wedding | Read more
31 things you didn't know about Prince Harry
Prince Harry will marry Meghan Markle on Saturday at St George's Chapel, in one of the most anticipated events of the year. Since the moment he was born, the Prince's life has been recorded, photographed and documented. The public seemingly know everything there is to know about him. We were there for his parents' divorce and his mother’s death. We are all aware of his will-they-won't-they relationships, his job, that one time he wore a swastika and that other time he went to Las Vagas and got his kit off. But there is plenty we don't know about the prince. Here are 31 facts about the groom for you to impress fellow revellers with at your wedding-watching party. Prince Harry during a teacher training session at Eccles Rugby Club, Salford Credit: Rex Features When he started nursery school in London aged three, Prince Harry didn't automatically get on well with the other children and was reportedly picked on by bullies. His kind-heartedness started early. He owned a lop-eared rabbit that lived in a hutch in the stable yard at Highgrove. The young prince would also spend hours tending to the sheep on the country estate. Harry met his ex-girlfriend Cressida Bonas through his cousin Princess Eugenie in May 2012. Prince Harry and Cressida Bonas are actually related, albeit very distantly. She is rumoured to be Prince Harry’s ninth cousin through King Charles II. Harry had the idea for, and spearheaded, the Invictus Games: a Paralympic-style multi sport event for wounded, injured or sick servicemen and women. In 1997 he travelled to South Africa with his father where he met Nelson Mandela and watched the Spice Girls perform. In the Army, he was known as "Captain Wales". As a British prince, he doesn’t have a fixed surname and so instead used the name of the area over which his father holds title, as a territorial suffix in place of a surname. He’s a dab hand at the Fifa video game, which we know because he told the Press in an interview while out in Afghanistan, saying, "You can ask the guys, I thrash them at Fifa the whole time". Game on, Harry. He will not be reading this article. Not only because obviously there’s not a lot about himself he doesn’t know, but because neither he nor William take any pleasure in reading articles about themselves and try to avoid it if they can. He really hates Twitter. Poor man. One of his middle names is David. The other two are Charles and Albert. Aged 18, he spent his gap year in Australia and Lesotho. While in Australia, he spent time working, as his father had done, on a cattle station and participating in the Young England vs Young Australia Polo Test Match. In 2007-2008 he served for 77 days in Helmand, Afghanistan. He was pulled out after the publication of the story in an Australian magazine. He returned to Afghanistan for a 20-week deployment in 2012-2013 with the Army Air Corps He studied geography, art history and art at A-Level and left school with a B in art and a D in geography - enough to get him into Sandhurst. He produced the documentary film The Forgotten Kingdom during his gap year in Lesotho, where he also visited Mants’ase Children’s Home near Mohale’s Hoek. He was educated at Eton College, famous for having graduates from the world of politics and business. He has his own coat of arms, granted to him on his 18th birthday. On the 10th anniversary of his mother’s death, he gave a speech at the Thanksgiving Service in which he said: "What is far more important to us now is how she is remembered as she was: fun-loving, generous, down-to-earth, entirely genuine." Prince Harry also has his own monogram. It’s a lovely curly "H" with a crown on the top. When commenting on the Las Vegas naked picture scandal, Prince Harry said that "at the end of the day I probably let myself down, I let my family down, I let other people down," but also that "I was in a private area and there should have been a certain amount of privacy that should have been expected." Quite right, too. In an interview with NBC News, Harry said he would never stop wondering about the night that his mother died and what happened in that tunnel. There was an American TV show called I Wanna Marry Harry, in which 12 women were led to believe that they were competing for Prince Harry's affections. The Harry in question was an actor, so they weren't. Apparently he can fix a broken cable TV – which would come in very handy for anyone struggling to watch I Wanna Marry Harry. While visiting a temporary home in Valparaiso in Chile, he noticed a family’s TV cable wasn’t working and fixed it. He supports Arsenal Football Club. When he was a child, Princess Diana took William and Harry around homeless projects and Aids wards in the hope that it would give them an understanding of people’s emotions, insecurities and of people's hopes and dreams. As part of the Walking With The Wounded South Pole Allied Challenge of 2013, Harry became the first member of the royal family to reach the South Pole. He has named himself "the Funcle" (that's "Fun" "Uncle", for those of you wondering) of Prince George. When Prince Harry presented the rings at his brother’s wedding, he carried them in the cuff of his tunic as his military uniform didn’t have any pockets. Prince Harry was a supporter rather than a best man during the wedding. Apparently royal weddings don’t have a best man. Following training at the Royal Military Academy in Sandhurst, he was commissioned as a second lieutenant into the Blues and Royals of the Household Cavalry Regiment. Harry has three medals to his name: an Operation Service Medal for Afghanistan, Queen Elizabeth II Golden Jubilee Medal and Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal. Royal wedding | Read more
Prince Harry will marry Meghan Markle on Saturday at St George's Chapel, in one of the most anticipated events of the year. Since the moment he was born, the Prince's life has been recorded, photographed and documented. The public seemingly know everything there is to know about him. We were there for his parents' divorce and his mother’s death. We are all aware of his will-they-won't-they relationships, his job, that one time he wore a swastika and that other time he went to Las Vagas and got his kit off. But there is plenty we don't know about the prince. Here are 31 facts about the groom for you to impress fellow revellers with at your wedding-watching party. Prince Harry during a teacher training session at Eccles Rugby Club, Salford Credit: Rex Features When he started nursery school in London aged three, Prince Harry didn't automatically get on well with the other children and was reportedly picked on by bullies. His kind-heartedness started early. He owned a lop-eared rabbit that lived in a hutch in the stable yard at Highgrove. The young prince would also spend hours tending to the sheep on the country estate. Harry met his ex-girlfriend Cressida Bonas through his cousin Princess Eugenie in May 2012. Prince Harry and Cressida Bonas are actually related, albeit very distantly. She is rumoured to be Prince Harry’s ninth cousin through King Charles II. Harry had the idea for, and spearheaded, the Invictus Games: a Paralympic-style multi sport event for wounded, injured or sick servicemen and women. In 1997 he travelled to South Africa with his father where he met Nelson Mandela and watched the Spice Girls perform. In the Army, he was known as "Captain Wales". As a British prince, he doesn’t have a fixed surname and so instead used the name of the area over which his father holds title, as a territorial suffix in place of a surname. He’s a dab hand at the Fifa video game, which we know because he told the Press in an interview while out in Afghanistan, saying, "You can ask the guys, I thrash them at Fifa the whole time". Game on, Harry. He will not be reading this article. Not only because obviously there’s not a lot about himself he doesn’t know, but because neither he nor William take any pleasure in reading articles about themselves and try to avoid it if they can. He really hates Twitter. Poor man. One of his middle names is David. The other two are Charles and Albert. Aged 18, he spent his gap year in Australia and Lesotho. While in Australia, he spent time working, as his father had done, on a cattle station and participating in the Young England vs Young Australia Polo Test Match. In 2007-2008 he served for 77 days in Helmand, Afghanistan. He was pulled out after the publication of the story in an Australian magazine. He returned to Afghanistan for a 20-week deployment in 2012-2013 with the Army Air Corps He studied geography, art history and art at A-Level and left school with a B in art and a D in geography - enough to get him into Sandhurst. He produced the documentary film The Forgotten Kingdom during his gap year in Lesotho, where he also visited Mants’ase Children’s Home near Mohale’s Hoek. He was educated at Eton College, famous for having graduates from the world of politics and business. He has his own coat of arms, granted to him on his 18th birthday. On the 10th anniversary of his mother’s death, he gave a speech at the Thanksgiving Service in which he said: "What is far more important to us now is how she is remembered as she was: fun-loving, generous, down-to-earth, entirely genuine." Prince Harry also has his own monogram. It’s a lovely curly "H" with a crown on the top. When commenting on the Las Vegas naked picture scandal, Prince Harry said that "at the end of the day I probably let myself down, I let my family down, I let other people down," but also that "I was in a private area and there should have been a certain amount of privacy that should have been expected." Quite right, too. In an interview with NBC News, Harry said he would never stop wondering about the night that his mother died and what happened in that tunnel. There was an American TV show called I Wanna Marry Harry, in which 12 women were led to believe that they were competing for Prince Harry's affections. The Harry in question was an actor, so they weren't. Apparently he can fix a broken cable TV – which would come in very handy for anyone struggling to watch I Wanna Marry Harry. While visiting a temporary home in Valparaiso in Chile, he noticed a family’s TV cable wasn’t working and fixed it. He supports Arsenal Football Club. When he was a child, Princess Diana took William and Harry around homeless projects and Aids wards in the hope that it would give them an understanding of people’s emotions, insecurities and of people's hopes and dreams. As part of the Walking With The Wounded South Pole Allied Challenge of 2013, Harry became the first member of the royal family to reach the South Pole. He has named himself "the Funcle" (that's "Fun" "Uncle", for those of you wondering) of Prince George. When Prince Harry presented the rings at his brother’s wedding, he carried them in the cuff of his tunic as his military uniform didn’t have any pockets. Prince Harry was a supporter rather than a best man during the wedding. Apparently royal weddings don’t have a best man. Following training at the Royal Military Academy in Sandhurst, he was commissioned as a second lieutenant into the Blues and Royals of the Household Cavalry Regiment. Harry has three medals to his name: an Operation Service Medal for Afghanistan, Queen Elizabeth II Golden Jubilee Medal and Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal. Royal wedding | Read more
31 things you didn't know about Prince Harry
Prince Harry will marry Meghan Markle on Saturday at St George's Chapel, in one of the most anticipated events of the year. Since the moment he was born, the Prince's life has been recorded, photographed and documented. The public seemingly know everything there is to know about him. We were there for his parents' divorce and his mother’s death. We are all aware of his will-they-won't-they relationships, his job, that one time he wore a swastika and that other time he went to Las Vagas and got his kit off. But there is plenty we don't know about the prince. Here are 31 facts about the groom for you to impress fellow revellers with at your wedding-watching party. Prince Harry during a teacher training session at Eccles Rugby Club, Salford Credit: Rex Features When he started nursery school in London aged three, Prince Harry didn't automatically get on well with the other children and was reportedly picked on by bullies. His kind-heartedness started early. He owned a lop-eared rabbit that lived in a hutch in the stable yard at Highgrove. The young prince would also spend hours tending to the sheep on the country estate. Harry met his ex-girlfriend Cressida Bonas through his cousin Princess Eugenie in May 2012. Prince Harry and Cressida Bonas are actually related, albeit very distantly. She is rumoured to be Prince Harry’s ninth cousin through King Charles II. Harry had the idea for, and spearheaded, the Invictus Games: a Paralympic-style multi sport event for wounded, injured or sick servicemen and women. In 1997 he travelled to South Africa with his father where he met Nelson Mandela and watched the Spice Girls perform. In the Army, he was known as "Captain Wales". As a British prince, he doesn’t have a fixed surname and so instead used the name of the area over which his father holds title, as a territorial suffix in place of a surname. He’s a dab hand at the Fifa video game, which we know because he told the Press in an interview while out in Afghanistan, saying, "You can ask the guys, I thrash them at Fifa the whole time". Game on, Harry. He will not be reading this article. Not only because obviously there’s not a lot about himself he doesn’t know, but because neither he nor William take any pleasure in reading articles about themselves and try to avoid it if they can. He really hates Twitter. Poor man. One of his middle names is David. The other two are Charles and Albert. Aged 18, he spent his gap year in Australia and Lesotho. While in Australia, he spent time working, as his father had done, on a cattle station and participating in the Young England vs Young Australia Polo Test Match. In 2007-2008 he served for 77 days in Helmand, Afghanistan. He was pulled out after the publication of the story in an Australian magazine. He returned to Afghanistan for a 20-week deployment in 2012-2013 with the Army Air Corps He studied geography, art history and art at A-Level and left school with a B in art and a D in geography - enough to get him into Sandhurst. He produced the documentary film The Forgotten Kingdom during his gap year in Lesotho, where he also visited Mants’ase Children’s Home near Mohale’s Hoek. He was educated at Eton College, famous for having graduates from the world of politics and business. He has his own coat of arms, granted to him on his 18th birthday. On the 10th anniversary of his mother’s death, he gave a speech at the Thanksgiving Service in which he said: "What is far more important to us now is how she is remembered as she was: fun-loving, generous, down-to-earth, entirely genuine." Prince Harry also has his own monogram. It’s a lovely curly "H" with a crown on the top. When commenting on the Las Vegas naked picture scandal, Prince Harry said that "at the end of the day I probably let myself down, I let my family down, I let other people down," but also that "I was in a private area and there should have been a certain amount of privacy that should have been expected." Quite right, too. In an interview with NBC News, Harry said he would never stop wondering about the night that his mother died and what happened in that tunnel. There was an American TV show called I Wanna Marry Harry, in which 12 women were led to believe that they were competing for Prince Harry's affections. The Harry in question was an actor, so they weren't. Apparently he can fix a broken cable TV – which would come in very handy for anyone struggling to watch I Wanna Marry Harry. While visiting a temporary home in Valparaiso in Chile, he noticed a family’s TV cable wasn’t working and fixed it. He supports Arsenal Football Club. When he was a child, Princess Diana took William and Harry around homeless projects and Aids wards in the hope that it would give them an understanding of people’s emotions, insecurities and of people's hopes and dreams. As part of the Walking With The Wounded South Pole Allied Challenge of 2013, Harry became the first member of the royal family to reach the South Pole. He has named himself "the Funcle" (that's "Fun" "Uncle", for those of you wondering) of Prince George. When Prince Harry presented the rings at his brother’s wedding, he carried them in the cuff of his tunic as his military uniform didn’t have any pockets. Prince Harry was a supporter rather than a best man during the wedding. Apparently royal weddings don’t have a best man. Following training at the Royal Military Academy in Sandhurst, he was commissioned as a second lieutenant into the Blues and Royals of the Household Cavalry Regiment. Harry has three medals to his name: an Operation Service Medal for Afghanistan, Queen Elizabeth II Golden Jubilee Medal and Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal. Royal wedding | Read more
 Dame Tessa Jowell’s dying wish that NHS cancer patients be offered experimental methods of treatment will be granted as part of her “lasting legacy”, ministers have announced. Theresa May agreed a new £20 million fund to fight the disease as she paid tribute to the “inspirational” Labour grandee, who has died aged 70 a year after being diagnosed with brain cancer. As leading politicians from across the political divide and from the world of sport united in praise of the “heroically brave” former culture secretary and Olympics minister, her family said she had passed away in the arms of her husband and two children. Her daughter-in-law Ella Mills said her family had told her she would “live forever in the centre of their souls”. Jeremy Hunt, the Health Secretary, said that “her legacy will be lives saved and heartbreak averted for thousands of other families” as his department arranged the rollout of a series of treatments Dame Tessa had called for. The Prime Minister praised her “dignity and courage” in confronting “a terrible disease”. Matt’s extraordinary Mum passed away last night. She was lying in Matt, his sister Jess, and their Dad’s arms, as they told her that she would live forever in the centre of their souls. I’ve never seen love like I have since becoming part of this family. Tessa was the warmest and kindest soul, she welcomed me so generously into their family, and no matter what she has achieved in her life - and she achieved an extraordinary amount - I know her family are the thing that made her most proud. They were the complete core of her life and I’m honored to be part of it. Thank you for giving me Matt, Tessa, and for teaching us all so much about love, kindness, optimism and courage. The bravery you showed this past year was like nothing I have ever seen and I will be inspired by it every day of my life. Matt carries every bit of your goodness, drive, compassion and love, and I’ll look after him forever. xxxx A post shared by Deliciously Ella (@deliciouslyella) on May 13, 2018 at 12:43am PDT Dame Tessa, who spent her final months campaigning for better cancer care, died “peacefully” at her Warwickshire home on Saturday night after suffering a brain haemorrhage the previous day that left her in a coma. Ms Mills, who is the wife of Dame Tessa’s son, wrote in a tribute posted online: “She was lying in Matt, his sister Jess, and their Dad's arms, as they told her that she would live forever in the centre of their souls. “I've never seen love like I have since becoming part of this family. Tessa was the warmest and kindest soul...the bravery you showed this past year was like nothing I have ever seen and I will be inspired by it every day of my life.” Tony Blair, the former prime minister, said: "Tessa had passion, determination and simple human decency in greater measure than any person I have ever known. She was an inspiration to work with, and a joy to be near. She was the most wise of counsellors, the most loyal and supportive of colleagues, and the best of friends.” In a speech which moved fellow peers to tears and resulted in a standing ovation in the House of Lords in January, Dame Tessa described how she was diagnosed with a rare glioblastoma multiforme tumour in May last year. She said she had been on her way to deliver a talk in east London and: “I got into a taxi but couldn't speak. I had two powerful seizures. I was taken to hospital. Two days later, I was told that I had a brain tumour.” A week later she had surgery to remove the tumour, followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, which failed to prevent its return. She made her speech in the Lords wearing an electronic skull cap that fired electrical currents at her tumour. The Government today announces that it is doubling investment in brain cancer research from £20m to £40m for what will be known as the Tessa Jowell Brain Cancer Research Fund, which will total £65m when existing private donations are taken into account. An annual Tessa Jowell global symposium will be launched in the UK to bring together the world’s leading experts on brain cancer in the search for new treatments. Tessa Jowell with Gordon Brown and Denise Lewis, outside 10 Downing Street, with the torch for the 2008 Beijing Olympics Credit: Ian Walton/Getty Images The NHS will also roll out nationally a “gold standard” brain cancer diagnosis test, involving the use of dye to identify tumours, which had until now only been available in half of cancer units, as highlighted by Dame Tessa. Hospitals will also accelerate the use of so-called adaptive trials, in which several treatments can be tried at once to increase the chance of success, in line with another of Dame Tessa’s requests. Ministers have stopped short of re-introducing the so-called Saatchi Bill, sponsored by Lord Saatchi following his wife’s death from ovarian cancer, which would have changed the law to allow the use of untested treatments at patients’ request. Dame Tessa had said in her speech to the House of Lords: “I am not afraid, but I am fearful that this new and important approach may be put into the 'too difficult' box. "I hope this debate will give hope to other cancer patients like me so that we can live well with cancer, not just be dying of it." Answering her call, Mrs May said: “I hope that the actions we are taking now and in the future to improve care and research for those confronting a terrible disease will form part of the lasting legacy of an inspirational woman." Tessa Jowell and David Beckham celebrate as London are named hosts of the 2012 Olympic Games, in Singapore in July 2005 Credit: John Gichigi/Getty Images Lord Sebastian Coe, president of the IAAF and former chairman of the London organising committee of the Olympic Games, said that without Dame Tessa’s contribution the UK would not have won the 2012 bid. "Her contribution to the Olympic and Paralympic Games is easily defined - quite simply, without Tessa there would have been no London 2012, and without Tessa they would not have been the success they were,” he added. "No politician deserves greater credit for the Games. She showed unflinching tenacity in persuading the Prime Minister and the Cabinet that the Government should throw its full weight behind the bid." Tessa Jowell with Denis Healey, then Chancellor of the Exchequer, at a 1978 press conference in Ilford North, where they were campaigning in support of Jowell Credit: PA Chair of UK Sport and Olympic gold medal winner Dame Katherine Grainger said: "Her accomplishments are enormous but just as impressive is how she achieved them: with decency, determination, guts and grace. “Others have already noted how there would have been no London 2012 without Tessa’s vision and drive. Tessa was a true believer in the power and inspiration of sport, for which all of us who benefited from her support and conviction will be eternally grateful. Her legacy lives on.” Dame Tessa's family said there will be a small private funeral followed by a public memorial service at a later date.
Dame Tessa Jowell's 'legacy' will be the cancer treatments she campaigned for, ministers announce
Dame Tessa Jowell’s dying wish that NHS cancer patients be offered experimental methods of treatment will be granted as part of her “lasting legacy”, ministers have announced. Theresa May agreed a new £20 million fund to fight the disease as she paid tribute to the “inspirational” Labour grandee, who has died aged 70 a year after being diagnosed with brain cancer. As leading politicians from across the political divide and from the world of sport united in praise of the “heroically brave” former culture secretary and Olympics minister, her family said she had passed away in the arms of her husband and two children. Her daughter-in-law Ella Mills said her family had told her she would “live forever in the centre of their souls”. Jeremy Hunt, the Health Secretary, said that “her legacy will be lives saved and heartbreak averted for thousands of other families” as his department arranged the rollout of a series of treatments Dame Tessa had called for. The Prime Minister praised her “dignity and courage” in confronting “a terrible disease”. Matt’s extraordinary Mum passed away last night. She was lying in Matt, his sister Jess, and their Dad’s arms, as they told her that she would live forever in the centre of their souls. I’ve never seen love like I have since becoming part of this family. Tessa was the warmest and kindest soul, she welcomed me so generously into their family, and no matter what she has achieved in her life - and she achieved an extraordinary amount - I know her family are the thing that made her most proud. They were the complete core of her life and I’m honored to be part of it. Thank you for giving me Matt, Tessa, and for teaching us all so much about love, kindness, optimism and courage. The bravery you showed this past year was like nothing I have ever seen and I will be inspired by it every day of my life. Matt carries every bit of your goodness, drive, compassion and love, and I’ll look after him forever. xxxx A post shared by Deliciously Ella (@deliciouslyella) on May 13, 2018 at 12:43am PDT Dame Tessa, who spent her final months campaigning for better cancer care, died “peacefully” at her Warwickshire home on Saturday night after suffering a brain haemorrhage the previous day that left her in a coma. Ms Mills, who is the wife of Dame Tessa’s son, wrote in a tribute posted online: “She was lying in Matt, his sister Jess, and their Dad's arms, as they told her that she would live forever in the centre of their souls. “I've never seen love like I have since becoming part of this family. Tessa was the warmest and kindest soul...the bravery you showed this past year was like nothing I have ever seen and I will be inspired by it every day of my life.” Tony Blair, the former prime minister, said: "Tessa had passion, determination and simple human decency in greater measure than any person I have ever known. She was an inspiration to work with, and a joy to be near. She was the most wise of counsellors, the most loyal and supportive of colleagues, and the best of friends.” In a speech which moved fellow peers to tears and resulted in a standing ovation in the House of Lords in January, Dame Tessa described how she was diagnosed with a rare glioblastoma multiforme tumour in May last year. She said she had been on her way to deliver a talk in east London and: “I got into a taxi but couldn't speak. I had two powerful seizures. I was taken to hospital. Two days later, I was told that I had a brain tumour.” A week later she had surgery to remove the tumour, followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, which failed to prevent its return. She made her speech in the Lords wearing an electronic skull cap that fired electrical currents at her tumour. The Government today announces that it is doubling investment in brain cancer research from £20m to £40m for what will be known as the Tessa Jowell Brain Cancer Research Fund, which will total £65m when existing private donations are taken into account. An annual Tessa Jowell global symposium will be launched in the UK to bring together the world’s leading experts on brain cancer in the search for new treatments. Tessa Jowell with Gordon Brown and Denise Lewis, outside 10 Downing Street, with the torch for the 2008 Beijing Olympics Credit: Ian Walton/Getty Images The NHS will also roll out nationally a “gold standard” brain cancer diagnosis test, involving the use of dye to identify tumours, which had until now only been available in half of cancer units, as highlighted by Dame Tessa. Hospitals will also accelerate the use of so-called adaptive trials, in which several treatments can be tried at once to increase the chance of success, in line with another of Dame Tessa’s requests. Ministers have stopped short of re-introducing the so-called Saatchi Bill, sponsored by Lord Saatchi following his wife’s death from ovarian cancer, which would have changed the law to allow the use of untested treatments at patients’ request. Dame Tessa had said in her speech to the House of Lords: “I am not afraid, but I am fearful that this new and important approach may be put into the 'too difficult' box. "I hope this debate will give hope to other cancer patients like me so that we can live well with cancer, not just be dying of it." Answering her call, Mrs May said: “I hope that the actions we are taking now and in the future to improve care and research for those confronting a terrible disease will form part of the lasting legacy of an inspirational woman." Tessa Jowell and David Beckham celebrate as London are named hosts of the 2012 Olympic Games, in Singapore in July 2005 Credit: John Gichigi/Getty Images Lord Sebastian Coe, president of the IAAF and former chairman of the London organising committee of the Olympic Games, said that without Dame Tessa’s contribution the UK would not have won the 2012 bid. "Her contribution to the Olympic and Paralympic Games is easily defined - quite simply, without Tessa there would have been no London 2012, and without Tessa they would not have been the success they were,” he added. "No politician deserves greater credit for the Games. She showed unflinching tenacity in persuading the Prime Minister and the Cabinet that the Government should throw its full weight behind the bid." Tessa Jowell with Denis Healey, then Chancellor of the Exchequer, at a 1978 press conference in Ilford North, where they were campaigning in support of Jowell Credit: PA Chair of UK Sport and Olympic gold medal winner Dame Katherine Grainger said: "Her accomplishments are enormous but just as impressive is how she achieved them: with decency, determination, guts and grace. “Others have already noted how there would have been no London 2012 without Tessa’s vision and drive. Tessa was a true believer in the power and inspiration of sport, for which all of us who benefited from her support and conviction will be eternally grateful. Her legacy lives on.” Dame Tessa's family said there will be a small private funeral followed by a public memorial service at a later date.
 Dame Tessa Jowell’s dying wish that NHS cancer patients be offered experimental methods of treatment will be granted as part of her “lasting legacy”, ministers have announced. Theresa May agreed a new £20 million fund to fight the disease as she paid tribute to the “inspirational” Labour grandee, who has died aged 70 a year after being diagnosed with brain cancer. As leading politicians from across the political divide and from the world of sport united in praise of the “heroically brave” former culture secretary and Olympics minister, her family said she had passed away in the arms of her husband and two children. Her daughter-in-law Ella Mills said her family had told her she would “live forever in the centre of their souls”. Jeremy Hunt, the Health Secretary, said that “her legacy will be lives saved and heartbreak averted for thousands of other families” as his department arranged the rollout of a series of treatments Dame Tessa had called for. The Prime Minister praised her “dignity and courage” in confronting “a terrible disease”. Matt’s extraordinary Mum passed away last night. She was lying in Matt, his sister Jess, and their Dad’s arms, as they told her that she would live forever in the centre of their souls. I’ve never seen love like I have since becoming part of this family. Tessa was the warmest and kindest soul, she welcomed me so generously into their family, and no matter what she has achieved in her life - and she achieved an extraordinary amount - I know her family are the thing that made her most proud. They were the complete core of her life and I’m honored to be part of it. Thank you for giving me Matt, Tessa, and for teaching us all so much about love, kindness, optimism and courage. The bravery you showed this past year was like nothing I have ever seen and I will be inspired by it every day of my life. Matt carries every bit of your goodness, drive, compassion and love, and I’ll look after him forever. xxxx A post shared by Deliciously Ella (@deliciouslyella) on May 13, 2018 at 12:43am PDT Dame Tessa, who spent her final months campaigning for better cancer care, died “peacefully” at her Warwickshire home on Saturday night after suffering a brain haemorrhage the previous day that left her in a coma. Ms Mills, who is the wife of Dame Tessa’s son, wrote in a tribute posted online: “She was lying in Matt, his sister Jess, and their Dad's arms, as they told her that she would live forever in the centre of their souls. “I've never seen love like I have since becoming part of this family. Tessa was the warmest and kindest soul...the bravery you showed this past year was like nothing I have ever seen and I will be inspired by it every day of my life.” Tony Blair, the former prime minister, said: "Tessa had passion, determination and simple human decency in greater measure than any person I have ever known. She was an inspiration to work with, and a joy to be near. She was the most wise of counsellors, the most loyal and supportive of colleagues, and the best of friends.” In a speech which moved fellow peers to tears and resulted in a standing ovation in the House of Lords in January, Dame Tessa described how she was diagnosed with a rare glioblastoma multiforme tumour in May last year. She said she had been on her way to deliver a talk in east London and: “I got into a taxi but couldn't speak. I had two powerful seizures. I was taken to hospital. Two days later, I was told that I had a brain tumour.” A week later she had surgery to remove the tumour, followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, which failed to prevent its return. She made her speech in the Lords wearing an electronic skull cap that fired electrical currents at her tumour. The Government today announces that it is doubling investment in brain cancer research from £20m to £40m for what will be known as the Tessa Jowell Brain Cancer Research Fund, which will total £65m when existing private donations are taken into account. An annual Tessa Jowell global symposium will be launched in the UK to bring together the world’s leading experts on brain cancer in the search for new treatments. Tessa Jowell with Gordon Brown and Denise Lewis, outside 10 Downing Street, with the torch for the 2008 Beijing Olympics Credit: Ian Walton/Getty Images The NHS will also roll out nationally a “gold standard” brain cancer diagnosis test, involving the use of dye to identify tumours, which had until now only been available in half of cancer units, as highlighted by Dame Tessa. Hospitals will also accelerate the use of so-called adaptive trials, in which several treatments can be tried at once to increase the chance of success, in line with another of Dame Tessa’s requests. Ministers have stopped short of re-introducing the so-called Saatchi Bill, sponsored by Lord Saatchi following his wife’s death from ovarian cancer, which would have changed the law to allow the use of untested treatments at patients’ request. Dame Tessa had said in her speech to the House of Lords: “I am not afraid, but I am fearful that this new and important approach may be put into the 'too difficult' box. "I hope this debate will give hope to other cancer patients like me so that we can live well with cancer, not just be dying of it." Answering her call, Mrs May said: “I hope that the actions we are taking now and in the future to improve care and research for those confronting a terrible disease will form part of the lasting legacy of an inspirational woman." Tessa Jowell and David Beckham celebrate as London are named hosts of the 2012 Olympic Games, in Singapore in July 2005 Credit: John Gichigi/Getty Images Lord Sebastian Coe, president of the IAAF and former chairman of the London organising committee of the Olympic Games, said that without Dame Tessa’s contribution the UK would not have won the 2012 bid. "Her contribution to the Olympic and Paralympic Games is easily defined - quite simply, without Tessa there would have been no London 2012, and without Tessa they would not have been the success they were,” he added. "No politician deserves greater credit for the Games. She showed unflinching tenacity in persuading the Prime Minister and the Cabinet that the Government should throw its full weight behind the bid." Tessa Jowell with Denis Healey, then Chancellor of the Exchequer, at a 1978 press conference in Ilford North, where they were campaigning in support of Jowell Credit: PA Chair of UK Sport and Olympic gold medal winner Dame Katherine Grainger said: "Her accomplishments are enormous but just as impressive is how she achieved them: with decency, determination, guts and grace. “Others have already noted how there would have been no London 2012 without Tessa’s vision and drive. Tessa was a true believer in the power and inspiration of sport, for which all of us who benefited from her support and conviction will be eternally grateful. Her legacy lives on.” Dame Tessa's family said there will be a small private funeral followed by a public memorial service at a later date.
Dame Tessa Jowell's 'legacy' will be the cancer treatments she campaigned for, ministers announce
Dame Tessa Jowell’s dying wish that NHS cancer patients be offered experimental methods of treatment will be granted as part of her “lasting legacy”, ministers have announced. Theresa May agreed a new £20 million fund to fight the disease as she paid tribute to the “inspirational” Labour grandee, who has died aged 70 a year after being diagnosed with brain cancer. As leading politicians from across the political divide and from the world of sport united in praise of the “heroically brave” former culture secretary and Olympics minister, her family said she had passed away in the arms of her husband and two children. Her daughter-in-law Ella Mills said her family had told her she would “live forever in the centre of their souls”. Jeremy Hunt, the Health Secretary, said that “her legacy will be lives saved and heartbreak averted for thousands of other families” as his department arranged the rollout of a series of treatments Dame Tessa had called for. The Prime Minister praised her “dignity and courage” in confronting “a terrible disease”. Matt’s extraordinary Mum passed away last night. She was lying in Matt, his sister Jess, and their Dad’s arms, as they told her that she would live forever in the centre of their souls. I’ve never seen love like I have since becoming part of this family. Tessa was the warmest and kindest soul, she welcomed me so generously into their family, and no matter what she has achieved in her life - and she achieved an extraordinary amount - I know her family are the thing that made her most proud. They were the complete core of her life and I’m honored to be part of it. Thank you for giving me Matt, Tessa, and for teaching us all so much about love, kindness, optimism and courage. The bravery you showed this past year was like nothing I have ever seen and I will be inspired by it every day of my life. Matt carries every bit of your goodness, drive, compassion and love, and I’ll look after him forever. xxxx A post shared by Deliciously Ella (@deliciouslyella) on May 13, 2018 at 12:43am PDT Dame Tessa, who spent her final months campaigning for better cancer care, died “peacefully” at her Warwickshire home on Saturday night after suffering a brain haemorrhage the previous day that left her in a coma. Ms Mills, who is the wife of Dame Tessa’s son, wrote in a tribute posted online: “She was lying in Matt, his sister Jess, and their Dad's arms, as they told her that she would live forever in the centre of their souls. “I've never seen love like I have since becoming part of this family. Tessa was the warmest and kindest soul...the bravery you showed this past year was like nothing I have ever seen and I will be inspired by it every day of my life.” Tony Blair, the former prime minister, said: "Tessa had passion, determination and simple human decency in greater measure than any person I have ever known. She was an inspiration to work with, and a joy to be near. She was the most wise of counsellors, the most loyal and supportive of colleagues, and the best of friends.” In a speech which moved fellow peers to tears and resulted in a standing ovation in the House of Lords in January, Dame Tessa described how she was diagnosed with a rare glioblastoma multiforme tumour in May last year. She said she had been on her way to deliver a talk in east London and: “I got into a taxi but couldn't speak. I had two powerful seizures. I was taken to hospital. Two days later, I was told that I had a brain tumour.” A week later she had surgery to remove the tumour, followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, which failed to prevent its return. She made her speech in the Lords wearing an electronic skull cap that fired electrical currents at her tumour. The Government today announces that it is doubling investment in brain cancer research from £20m to £40m for what will be known as the Tessa Jowell Brain Cancer Research Fund, which will total £65m when existing private donations are taken into account. An annual Tessa Jowell global symposium will be launched in the UK to bring together the world’s leading experts on brain cancer in the search for new treatments. Tessa Jowell with Gordon Brown and Denise Lewis, outside 10 Downing Street, with the torch for the 2008 Beijing Olympics Credit: Ian Walton/Getty Images The NHS will also roll out nationally a “gold standard” brain cancer diagnosis test, involving the use of dye to identify tumours, which had until now only been available in half of cancer units, as highlighted by Dame Tessa. Hospitals will also accelerate the use of so-called adaptive trials, in which several treatments can be tried at once to increase the chance of success, in line with another of Dame Tessa’s requests. Ministers have stopped short of re-introducing the so-called Saatchi Bill, sponsored by Lord Saatchi following his wife’s death from ovarian cancer, which would have changed the law to allow the use of untested treatments at patients’ request. Dame Tessa had said in her speech to the House of Lords: “I am not afraid, but I am fearful that this new and important approach may be put into the 'too difficult' box. "I hope this debate will give hope to other cancer patients like me so that we can live well with cancer, not just be dying of it." Answering her call, Mrs May said: “I hope that the actions we are taking now and in the future to improve care and research for those confronting a terrible disease will form part of the lasting legacy of an inspirational woman." Tessa Jowell and David Beckham celebrate as London are named hosts of the 2012 Olympic Games, in Singapore in July 2005 Credit: John Gichigi/Getty Images Lord Sebastian Coe, president of the IAAF and former chairman of the London organising committee of the Olympic Games, said that without Dame Tessa’s contribution the UK would not have won the 2012 bid. "Her contribution to the Olympic and Paralympic Games is easily defined - quite simply, without Tessa there would have been no London 2012, and without Tessa they would not have been the success they were,” he added. "No politician deserves greater credit for the Games. She showed unflinching tenacity in persuading the Prime Minister and the Cabinet that the Government should throw its full weight behind the bid." Tessa Jowell with Denis Healey, then Chancellor of the Exchequer, at a 1978 press conference in Ilford North, where they were campaigning in support of Jowell Credit: PA Chair of UK Sport and Olympic gold medal winner Dame Katherine Grainger said: "Her accomplishments are enormous but just as impressive is how she achieved them: with decency, determination, guts and grace. “Others have already noted how there would have been no London 2012 without Tessa’s vision and drive. Tessa was a true believer in the power and inspiration of sport, for which all of us who benefited from her support and conviction will be eternally grateful. Her legacy lives on.” Dame Tessa's family said there will be a small private funeral followed by a public memorial service at a later date.
 Dame Tessa Jowell’s dying wish that NHS cancer patients be offered experimental methods of treatment will be granted as part of her “lasting legacy”, ministers have announced. Theresa May agreed a new £20 million fund to fight the disease as she paid tribute to the “inspirational” Labour grandee, who has died aged 70 a year after being diagnosed with brain cancer. As leading politicians from across the political divide and from the world of sport united in praise of the “heroically brave” former culture secretary and Olympics minister, her family said she had passed away in the arms of her husband and two children. Her daughter-in-law Ella Mills said her family had told her she would “live forever in the centre of their souls”. Jeremy Hunt, the Health Secretary, said that “her legacy will be lives saved and heartbreak averted for thousands of other families” as his department arranged the rollout of a series of treatments Dame Tessa had called for. The Prime Minister praised her “dignity and courage” in confronting “a terrible disease”. Matt’s extraordinary Mum passed away last night. She was lying in Matt, his sister Jess, and their Dad’s arms, as they told her that she would live forever in the centre of their souls. I’ve never seen love like I have since becoming part of this family. Tessa was the warmest and kindest soul, she welcomed me so generously into their family, and no matter what she has achieved in her life - and she achieved an extraordinary amount - I know her family are the thing that made her most proud. They were the complete core of her life and I’m honored to be part of it. Thank you for giving me Matt, Tessa, and for teaching us all so much about love, kindness, optimism and courage. The bravery you showed this past year was like nothing I have ever seen and I will be inspired by it every day of my life. Matt carries every bit of your goodness, drive, compassion and love, and I’ll look after him forever. xxxx A post shared by Deliciously Ella (@deliciouslyella) on May 13, 2018 at 12:43am PDT Dame Tessa, who spent her final months campaigning for better cancer care, died “peacefully” at her Warwickshire home on Saturday night after suffering a brain haemorrhage the previous day that left her in a coma. Ms Mills, who is the wife of Dame Tessa’s son, wrote in a tribute posted online: “She was lying in Matt, his sister Jess, and their Dad's arms, as they told her that she would live forever in the centre of their souls. “I've never seen love like I have since becoming part of this family. Tessa was the warmest and kindest soul...the bravery you showed this past year was like nothing I have ever seen and I will be inspired by it every day of my life.” Tony Blair, the former prime minister, said: "Tessa had passion, determination and simple human decency in greater measure than any person I have ever known. She was an inspiration to work with, and a joy to be near. She was the most wise of counsellors, the most loyal and supportive of colleagues, and the best of friends.” In a speech which moved fellow peers to tears and resulted in a standing ovation in the House of Lords in January, Dame Tessa described how she was diagnosed with a rare glioblastoma multiforme tumour in May last year. She said she had been on her way to deliver a talk in east London and: “I got into a taxi but couldn't speak. I had two powerful seizures. I was taken to hospital. Two days later, I was told that I had a brain tumour.” A week later she had surgery to remove the tumour, followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, which failed to prevent its return. She made her speech in the Lords wearing an electronic skull cap that fired electrical currents at her tumour. The Government today announces that it is doubling investment in brain cancer research from £20m to £40m for what will be known as the Tessa Jowell Brain Cancer Research Fund, which will total £65m when existing private donations are taken into account. An annual Tessa Jowell global symposium will be launched in the UK to bring together the world’s leading experts on brain cancer in the search for new treatments. Tessa Jowell with Gordon Brown and Denise Lewis, outside 10 Downing Street, with the torch for the 2008 Beijing Olympics Credit: Ian Walton/Getty Images The NHS will also roll out nationally a “gold standard” brain cancer diagnosis test, involving the use of dye to identify tumours, which had until now only been available in half of cancer units, as highlighted by Dame Tessa. Hospitals will also accelerate the use of so-called adaptive trials, in which several treatments can be tried at once to increase the chance of success, in line with another of Dame Tessa’s requests. Ministers have stopped short of re-introducing the so-called Saatchi Bill, sponsored by Lord Saatchi following his wife’s death from ovarian cancer, which would have changed the law to allow the use of untested treatments at patients’ request. Dame Tessa had said in her speech to the House of Lords: “I am not afraid, but I am fearful that this new and important approach may be put into the 'too difficult' box. "I hope this debate will give hope to other cancer patients like me so that we can live well with cancer, not just be dying of it." Answering her call, Mrs May said: “I hope that the actions we are taking now and in the future to improve care and research for those confronting a terrible disease will form part of the lasting legacy of an inspirational woman." Tessa Jowell and David Beckham celebrate as London are named hosts of the 2012 Olympic Games, in Singapore in July 2005 Credit: John Gichigi/Getty Images Lord Sebastian Coe, president of the IAAF and former chairman of the London organising committee of the Olympic Games, said that without Dame Tessa’s contribution the UK would not have won the 2012 bid. "Her contribution to the Olympic and Paralympic Games is easily defined - quite simply, without Tessa there would have been no London 2012, and without Tessa they would not have been the success they were,” he added. "No politician deserves greater credit for the Games. She showed unflinching tenacity in persuading the Prime Minister and the Cabinet that the Government should throw its full weight behind the bid." Tessa Jowell with Denis Healey, then Chancellor of the Exchequer, at a 1978 press conference in Ilford North, where they were campaigning in support of Jowell Credit: PA Chair of UK Sport and Olympic gold medal winner Dame Katherine Grainger said: "Her accomplishments are enormous but just as impressive is how she achieved them: with decency, determination, guts and grace. “Others have already noted how there would have been no London 2012 without Tessa’s vision and drive. Tessa was a true believer in the power and inspiration of sport, for which all of us who benefited from her support and conviction will be eternally grateful. Her legacy lives on.” Dame Tessa's family said there will be a small private funeral followed by a public memorial service at a later date.
Dame Tessa Jowell's 'legacy' will be the cancer treatments she campaigned for, ministers announce
Dame Tessa Jowell’s dying wish that NHS cancer patients be offered experimental methods of treatment will be granted as part of her “lasting legacy”, ministers have announced. Theresa May agreed a new £20 million fund to fight the disease as she paid tribute to the “inspirational” Labour grandee, who has died aged 70 a year after being diagnosed with brain cancer. As leading politicians from across the political divide and from the world of sport united in praise of the “heroically brave” former culture secretary and Olympics minister, her family said she had passed away in the arms of her husband and two children. Her daughter-in-law Ella Mills said her family had told her she would “live forever in the centre of their souls”. Jeremy Hunt, the Health Secretary, said that “her legacy will be lives saved and heartbreak averted for thousands of other families” as his department arranged the rollout of a series of treatments Dame Tessa had called for. The Prime Minister praised her “dignity and courage” in confronting “a terrible disease”. Matt’s extraordinary Mum passed away last night. She was lying in Matt, his sister Jess, and their Dad’s arms, as they told her that she would live forever in the centre of their souls. I’ve never seen love like I have since becoming part of this family. Tessa was the warmest and kindest soul, she welcomed me so generously into their family, and no matter what she has achieved in her life - and she achieved an extraordinary amount - I know her family are the thing that made her most proud. They were the complete core of her life and I’m honored to be part of it. Thank you for giving me Matt, Tessa, and for teaching us all so much about love, kindness, optimism and courage. The bravery you showed this past year was like nothing I have ever seen and I will be inspired by it every day of my life. Matt carries every bit of your goodness, drive, compassion and love, and I’ll look after him forever. xxxx A post shared by Deliciously Ella (@deliciouslyella) on May 13, 2018 at 12:43am PDT Dame Tessa, who spent her final months campaigning for better cancer care, died “peacefully” at her Warwickshire home on Saturday night after suffering a brain haemorrhage the previous day that left her in a coma. Ms Mills, who is the wife of Dame Tessa’s son, wrote in a tribute posted online: “She was lying in Matt, his sister Jess, and their Dad's arms, as they told her that she would live forever in the centre of their souls. “I've never seen love like I have since becoming part of this family. Tessa was the warmest and kindest soul...the bravery you showed this past year was like nothing I have ever seen and I will be inspired by it every day of my life.” Tony Blair, the former prime minister, said: "Tessa had passion, determination and simple human decency in greater measure than any person I have ever known. She was an inspiration to work with, and a joy to be near. She was the most wise of counsellors, the most loyal and supportive of colleagues, and the best of friends.” In a speech which moved fellow peers to tears and resulted in a standing ovation in the House of Lords in January, Dame Tessa described how she was diagnosed with a rare glioblastoma multiforme tumour in May last year. She said she had been on her way to deliver a talk in east London and: “I got into a taxi but couldn't speak. I had two powerful seizures. I was taken to hospital. Two days later, I was told that I had a brain tumour.” A week later she had surgery to remove the tumour, followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, which failed to prevent its return. She made her speech in the Lords wearing an electronic skull cap that fired electrical currents at her tumour. The Government today announces that it is doubling investment in brain cancer research from £20m to £40m for what will be known as the Tessa Jowell Brain Cancer Research Fund, which will total £65m when existing private donations are taken into account. An annual Tessa Jowell global symposium will be launched in the UK to bring together the world’s leading experts on brain cancer in the search for new treatments. Tessa Jowell with Gordon Brown and Denise Lewis, outside 10 Downing Street, with the torch for the 2008 Beijing Olympics Credit: Ian Walton/Getty Images The NHS will also roll out nationally a “gold standard” brain cancer diagnosis test, involving the use of dye to identify tumours, which had until now only been available in half of cancer units, as highlighted by Dame Tessa. Hospitals will also accelerate the use of so-called adaptive trials, in which several treatments can be tried at once to increase the chance of success, in line with another of Dame Tessa’s requests. Ministers have stopped short of re-introducing the so-called Saatchi Bill, sponsored by Lord Saatchi following his wife’s death from ovarian cancer, which would have changed the law to allow the use of untested treatments at patients’ request. Dame Tessa had said in her speech to the House of Lords: “I am not afraid, but I am fearful that this new and important approach may be put into the 'too difficult' box. "I hope this debate will give hope to other cancer patients like me so that we can live well with cancer, not just be dying of it." Answering her call, Mrs May said: “I hope that the actions we are taking now and in the future to improve care and research for those confronting a terrible disease will form part of the lasting legacy of an inspirational woman." Tessa Jowell and David Beckham celebrate as London are named hosts of the 2012 Olympic Games, in Singapore in July 2005 Credit: John Gichigi/Getty Images Lord Sebastian Coe, president of the IAAF and former chairman of the London organising committee of the Olympic Games, said that without Dame Tessa’s contribution the UK would not have won the 2012 bid. "Her contribution to the Olympic and Paralympic Games is easily defined - quite simply, without Tessa there would have been no London 2012, and without Tessa they would not have been the success they were,” he added. "No politician deserves greater credit for the Games. She showed unflinching tenacity in persuading the Prime Minister and the Cabinet that the Government should throw its full weight behind the bid." Tessa Jowell with Denis Healey, then Chancellor of the Exchequer, at a 1978 press conference in Ilford North, where they were campaigning in support of Jowell Credit: PA Chair of UK Sport and Olympic gold medal winner Dame Katherine Grainger said: "Her accomplishments are enormous but just as impressive is how she achieved them: with decency, determination, guts and grace. “Others have already noted how there would have been no London 2012 without Tessa’s vision and drive. Tessa was a true believer in the power and inspiration of sport, for which all of us who benefited from her support and conviction will be eternally grateful. Her legacy lives on.” Dame Tessa's family said there will be a small private funeral followed by a public memorial service at a later date.
 Dame Tessa Jowell’s dying wish that NHS cancer patients be offered experimental methods of treatment will be granted as part of her “lasting legacy”, ministers have announced. Theresa May agreed a new £20 million fund to fight the disease as she paid tribute to the “inspirational” Labour grandee, who has died aged 70 a year after being diagnosed with brain cancer. As leading politicians from across the political divide and from the world of sport united in praise of the “heroically brave” former culture secretary and Olympics minister, her family said she had passed away in the arms of her husband and two children. Her daughter-in-law Ella Mills said her family had told her she would “live forever in the centre of their souls”. Jeremy Hunt, the Health Secretary, said that “her legacy will be lives saved and heartbreak averted for thousands of other families” as his department arranged the rollout of a series of treatments Dame Tessa had called for. The Prime Minister praised her “dignity and courage” in confronting “a terrible disease”. Matt’s extraordinary Mum passed away last night. She was lying in Matt, his sister Jess, and their Dad’s arms, as they told her that she would live forever in the centre of their souls. I’ve never seen love like I have since becoming part of this family. Tessa was the warmest and kindest soul, she welcomed me so generously into their family, and no matter what she has achieved in her life - and she achieved an extraordinary amount - I know her family are the thing that made her most proud. They were the complete core of her life and I’m honored to be part of it. Thank you for giving me Matt, Tessa, and for teaching us all so much about love, kindness, optimism and courage. The bravery you showed this past year was like nothing I have ever seen and I will be inspired by it every day of my life. Matt carries every bit of your goodness, drive, compassion and love, and I’ll look after him forever. xxxx A post shared by Deliciously Ella (@deliciouslyella) on May 13, 2018 at 12:43am PDT Dame Tessa, who spent her final months campaigning for better cancer care, died “peacefully” at her Warwickshire home on Saturday night after suffering a brain haemorrhage the previous day that left her in a coma. Ms Mills, who is the wife of Dame Tessa’s son, wrote in a tribute posted online: “She was lying in Matt, his sister Jess, and their Dad's arms, as they told her that she would live forever in the centre of their souls. “I've never seen love like I have since becoming part of this family. Tessa was the warmest and kindest soul...the bravery you showed this past year was like nothing I have ever seen and I will be inspired by it every day of my life.” Tony Blair, the former prime minister, said: "Tessa had passion, determination and simple human decency in greater measure than any person I have ever known. She was an inspiration to work with, and a joy to be near. She was the most wise of counsellors, the most loyal and supportive of colleagues, and the best of friends.” In a speech which moved fellow peers to tears and resulted in a standing ovation in the House of Lords in January, Dame Tessa described how she was diagnosed with a rare glioblastoma multiforme tumour in May last year. She said she had been on her way to deliver a talk in east London and: “I got into a taxi but couldn't speak. I had two powerful seizures. I was taken to hospital. Two days later, I was told that I had a brain tumour.” A week later she had surgery to remove the tumour, followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, which failed to prevent its return. She made her speech in the Lords wearing an electronic skull cap that fired electrical currents at her tumour. The Government today announces that it is doubling investment in brain cancer research from £20m to £40m for what will be known as the Tessa Jowell Brain Cancer Research Fund, which will total £65m when existing private donations are taken into account. An annual Tessa Jowell global symposium will be launched in the UK to bring together the world’s leading experts on brain cancer in the search for new treatments. Tessa Jowell with Gordon Brown and Denise Lewis, outside 10 Downing Street, with the torch for the 2008 Beijing Olympics Credit: Ian Walton/Getty Images The NHS will also roll out nationally a “gold standard” brain cancer diagnosis test, involving the use of dye to identify tumours, which had until now only been available in half of cancer units, as highlighted by Dame Tessa. Hospitals will also accelerate the use of so-called adaptive trials, in which several treatments can be tried at once to increase the chance of success, in line with another of Dame Tessa’s requests. Ministers have stopped short of re-introducing the so-called Saatchi Bill, sponsored by Lord Saatchi following his wife’s death from ovarian cancer, which would have changed the law to allow the use of untested treatments at patients’ request. Dame Tessa had said in her speech to the House of Lords: “I am not afraid, but I am fearful that this new and important approach may be put into the 'too difficult' box. "I hope this debate will give hope to other cancer patients like me so that we can live well with cancer, not just be dying of it." Answering her call, Mrs May said: “I hope that the actions we are taking now and in the future to improve care and research for those confronting a terrible disease will form part of the lasting legacy of an inspirational woman." Tessa Jowell and David Beckham celebrate as London are named hosts of the 2012 Olympic Games, in Singapore in July 2005 Credit: John Gichigi/Getty Images Lord Sebastian Coe, president of the IAAF and former chairman of the London organising committee of the Olympic Games, said that without Dame Tessa’s contribution the UK would not have won the 2012 bid. "Her contribution to the Olympic and Paralympic Games is easily defined - quite simply, without Tessa there would have been no London 2012, and without Tessa they would not have been the success they were,” he added. "No politician deserves greater credit for the Games. She showed unflinching tenacity in persuading the Prime Minister and the Cabinet that the Government should throw its full weight behind the bid." Tessa Jowell with Denis Healey, then Chancellor of the Exchequer, at a 1978 press conference in Ilford North, where they were campaigning in support of Jowell Credit: PA Chair of UK Sport and Olympic gold medal winner Dame Katherine Grainger said: "Her accomplishments are enormous but just as impressive is how she achieved them: with decency, determination, guts and grace. “Others have already noted how there would have been no London 2012 without Tessa’s vision and drive. Tessa was a true believer in the power and inspiration of sport, for which all of us who benefited from her support and conviction will be eternally grateful. Her legacy lives on.” Dame Tessa's family said there will be a small private funeral followed by a public memorial service at a later date.
Dame Tessa Jowell's 'legacy' will be the cancer treatments she campaigned for, ministers announce
Dame Tessa Jowell’s dying wish that NHS cancer patients be offered experimental methods of treatment will be granted as part of her “lasting legacy”, ministers have announced. Theresa May agreed a new £20 million fund to fight the disease as she paid tribute to the “inspirational” Labour grandee, who has died aged 70 a year after being diagnosed with brain cancer. As leading politicians from across the political divide and from the world of sport united in praise of the “heroically brave” former culture secretary and Olympics minister, her family said she had passed away in the arms of her husband and two children. Her daughter-in-law Ella Mills said her family had told her she would “live forever in the centre of their souls”. Jeremy Hunt, the Health Secretary, said that “her legacy will be lives saved and heartbreak averted for thousands of other families” as his department arranged the rollout of a series of treatments Dame Tessa had called for. The Prime Minister praised her “dignity and courage” in confronting “a terrible disease”. Matt’s extraordinary Mum passed away last night. She was lying in Matt, his sister Jess, and their Dad’s arms, as they told her that she would live forever in the centre of their souls. I’ve never seen love like I have since becoming part of this family. Tessa was the warmest and kindest soul, she welcomed me so generously into their family, and no matter what she has achieved in her life - and she achieved an extraordinary amount - I know her family are the thing that made her most proud. They were the complete core of her life and I’m honored to be part of it. Thank you for giving me Matt, Tessa, and for teaching us all so much about love, kindness, optimism and courage. The bravery you showed this past year was like nothing I have ever seen and I will be inspired by it every day of my life. Matt carries every bit of your goodness, drive, compassion and love, and I’ll look after him forever. xxxx A post shared by Deliciously Ella (@deliciouslyella) on May 13, 2018 at 12:43am PDT Dame Tessa, who spent her final months campaigning for better cancer care, died “peacefully” at her Warwickshire home on Saturday night after suffering a brain haemorrhage the previous day that left her in a coma. Ms Mills, who is the wife of Dame Tessa’s son, wrote in a tribute posted online: “She was lying in Matt, his sister Jess, and their Dad's arms, as they told her that she would live forever in the centre of their souls. “I've never seen love like I have since becoming part of this family. Tessa was the warmest and kindest soul...the bravery you showed this past year was like nothing I have ever seen and I will be inspired by it every day of my life.” Tony Blair, the former prime minister, said: "Tessa had passion, determination and simple human decency in greater measure than any person I have ever known. She was an inspiration to work with, and a joy to be near. She was the most wise of counsellors, the most loyal and supportive of colleagues, and the best of friends.” In a speech which moved fellow peers to tears and resulted in a standing ovation in the House of Lords in January, Dame Tessa described how she was diagnosed with a rare glioblastoma multiforme tumour in May last year. She said she had been on her way to deliver a talk in east London and: “I got into a taxi but couldn't speak. I had two powerful seizures. I was taken to hospital. Two days later, I was told that I had a brain tumour.” A week later she had surgery to remove the tumour, followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, which failed to prevent its return. She made her speech in the Lords wearing an electronic skull cap that fired electrical currents at her tumour. The Government today announces that it is doubling investment in brain cancer research from £20m to £40m for what will be known as the Tessa Jowell Brain Cancer Research Fund, which will total £65m when existing private donations are taken into account. An annual Tessa Jowell global symposium will be launched in the UK to bring together the world’s leading experts on brain cancer in the search for new treatments. Tessa Jowell with Gordon Brown and Denise Lewis, outside 10 Downing Street, with the torch for the 2008 Beijing Olympics Credit: Ian Walton/Getty Images The NHS will also roll out nationally a “gold standard” brain cancer diagnosis test, involving the use of dye to identify tumours, which had until now only been available in half of cancer units, as highlighted by Dame Tessa. Hospitals will also accelerate the use of so-called adaptive trials, in which several treatments can be tried at once to increase the chance of success, in line with another of Dame Tessa’s requests. Ministers have stopped short of re-introducing the so-called Saatchi Bill, sponsored by Lord Saatchi following his wife’s death from ovarian cancer, which would have changed the law to allow the use of untested treatments at patients’ request. Dame Tessa had said in her speech to the House of Lords: “I am not afraid, but I am fearful that this new and important approach may be put into the 'too difficult' box. "I hope this debate will give hope to other cancer patients like me so that we can live well with cancer, not just be dying of it." Answering her call, Mrs May said: “I hope that the actions we are taking now and in the future to improve care and research for those confronting a terrible disease will form part of the lasting legacy of an inspirational woman." Tessa Jowell and David Beckham celebrate as London are named hosts of the 2012 Olympic Games, in Singapore in July 2005 Credit: John Gichigi/Getty Images Lord Sebastian Coe, president of the IAAF and former chairman of the London organising committee of the Olympic Games, said that without Dame Tessa’s contribution the UK would not have won the 2012 bid. "Her contribution to the Olympic and Paralympic Games is easily defined - quite simply, without Tessa there would have been no London 2012, and without Tessa they would not have been the success they were,” he added. "No politician deserves greater credit for the Games. She showed unflinching tenacity in persuading the Prime Minister and the Cabinet that the Government should throw its full weight behind the bid." Tessa Jowell with Denis Healey, then Chancellor of the Exchequer, at a 1978 press conference in Ilford North, where they were campaigning in support of Jowell Credit: PA Chair of UK Sport and Olympic gold medal winner Dame Katherine Grainger said: "Her accomplishments are enormous but just as impressive is how she achieved them: with decency, determination, guts and grace. “Others have already noted how there would have been no London 2012 without Tessa’s vision and drive. Tessa was a true believer in the power and inspiration of sport, for which all of us who benefited from her support and conviction will be eternally grateful. Her legacy lives on.” Dame Tessa's family said there will be a small private funeral followed by a public memorial service at a later date.
For this year's contest Russia once again picked Yuliya Samoilova -- who performed at the opening ceremony to the 2014 Sochi Winter Paralympics -- to represent the country
For this year's contest Russia once again picked Yuliya Samoilova -- who performed at the opening ceremony to the 2014 Sochi Winter Paralympics -- to represent the country
For this year's contest Russia once again picked Yuliya Samoilova -- who performed at the opening ceremony to the 2014 Sochi Winter Paralympics -- to represent the country
Snow sports are acting as a valuable life-changing tool for people with additional needs and mental health problems. Since its launch in 2011 Snowbility has helped over 10,000 people to gain from both the physical and psychological benefits of skiing and snowboarding. With a slogan, “It’s cool to be different,” the company welcomes students from all walks of life, backgrounds and with various needs and problems, including learning disabilities and autism, and encourages them to get involved with winter sports. Snowbility, which was founded by keen skier and ski development coach Richard Fetherston, is based at The Snow Centre in Hemel Hempstead, an indoor real-snow slope 20 minutes outside of London. It offers the opportunity to learn in the safe and stable environment of the indoor centre throughout the year, providing many of its students with an experience they might otherwise not have felt confident enough to try. “We aim to enrich the lives of our students, parents, carers and teachers we work with, by giving people with additional needs and rehabilitation challenges the opportunity to develop both emotionally and physically through skiing and snowboarding,” said Richard. Snowbility works with students of all ages Credit: snowbility The carefully selected and experienced team at Snowbility are all qualified instructors and are either BASI (British Association of Snowsports Instructors) or IASI (Irish Association of Snowsports Instructors) registered. “We have a team of fully qualified ski and snowboard instructors with the knowledge, experience and passion to provide tailor-made coaching for a wide range of complex physical, psychological and mental health needs, including learning disabilities, autism, dyspraxia and deafness,” said Richard. Snowbility’s approach to teaching skiing and snowboarding technique is integrated with other skills such as social interaction, confidence, self-esteem, concentration and motivation. The flexible coaching methods used by the team help every student in a different way. Britain's top indoor slopes “My son has had a wonderful relationship with his ski team and it has given him confidence to cope with being on a ski slope, which he otherwise wouldn’t have been able to, had he just gone skiing with a school,” said Tanya James, whose son Santino is mildly autistic and has hypermobility syndrome. “It’s helped him with his balance and coordination in a very fun and sporting way,” said Tanya. It’s the best job in the worldRichard Fetherston, Snowbility The coaches aim to give their students a sense of achievement and pride through a personalised learning programme suited to their individual needs. Through this achievement Richard believes it enhances their social, emotional and communication skills, while also improving fitness. The Snow Centre is a safe indoor haven for learning to ski and snowboarding Credit: ross woodhall “Once we get our pupils skiing and their families start to see the changes, then they all benefit; everyone gets involved. It’s truly humbling to see lives change in such a positive way,” said Richard. Richard and his staff are calling for more exposure of the dramatic improvement snow sports can bring to the lives of people with additional needs. Recently one of its students, George, who has Glaucoma, Sturge-Weber syndrome and is on the autistic spectrum appeared on the BBC to tell his story of how skiing has helped him shape his hopes and dreams for the future. “I’d probably like to help people to learn to ski, but also get famous and maybe one day go to the Olympics or the Paralympics,” said George when asked what he’d like to do with his new skiing skills. “Socially it has given him so much confidence, because now he is a skier,” said George’s mother Gina. “It’s the best job in the world. As a team we like nothing more than seeing the progress of our students, people like George,” said Richard. Snowbility caters for pupils of all ages from children as young as five years old to adults over the age of 65. It runs lessons, both private and group, seven days a week at The Snow Centre. Booking are available through the website and an application form.
Snow sports used to combat disabilities and mental health issues in the UK
Snow sports are acting as a valuable life-changing tool for people with additional needs and mental health problems. Since its launch in 2011 Snowbility has helped over 10,000 people to gain from both the physical and psychological benefits of skiing and snowboarding. With a slogan, “It’s cool to be different,” the company welcomes students from all walks of life, backgrounds and with various needs and problems, including learning disabilities and autism, and encourages them to get involved with winter sports. Snowbility, which was founded by keen skier and ski development coach Richard Fetherston, is based at The Snow Centre in Hemel Hempstead, an indoor real-snow slope 20 minutes outside of London. It offers the opportunity to learn in the safe and stable environment of the indoor centre throughout the year, providing many of its students with an experience they might otherwise not have felt confident enough to try. “We aim to enrich the lives of our students, parents, carers and teachers we work with, by giving people with additional needs and rehabilitation challenges the opportunity to develop both emotionally and physically through skiing and snowboarding,” said Richard. Snowbility works with students of all ages Credit: snowbility The carefully selected and experienced team at Snowbility are all qualified instructors and are either BASI (British Association of Snowsports Instructors) or IASI (Irish Association of Snowsports Instructors) registered. “We have a team of fully qualified ski and snowboard instructors with the knowledge, experience and passion to provide tailor-made coaching for a wide range of complex physical, psychological and mental health needs, including learning disabilities, autism, dyspraxia and deafness,” said Richard. Snowbility’s approach to teaching skiing and snowboarding technique is integrated with other skills such as social interaction, confidence, self-esteem, concentration and motivation. The flexible coaching methods used by the team help every student in a different way. Britain's top indoor slopes “My son has had a wonderful relationship with his ski team and it has given him confidence to cope with being on a ski slope, which he otherwise wouldn’t have been able to, had he just gone skiing with a school,” said Tanya James, whose son Santino is mildly autistic and has hypermobility syndrome. “It’s helped him with his balance and coordination in a very fun and sporting way,” said Tanya. It’s the best job in the worldRichard Fetherston, Snowbility The coaches aim to give their students a sense of achievement and pride through a personalised learning programme suited to their individual needs. Through this achievement Richard believes it enhances their social, emotional and communication skills, while also improving fitness. The Snow Centre is a safe indoor haven for learning to ski and snowboarding Credit: ross woodhall “Once we get our pupils skiing and their families start to see the changes, then they all benefit; everyone gets involved. It’s truly humbling to see lives change in such a positive way,” said Richard. Richard and his staff are calling for more exposure of the dramatic improvement snow sports can bring to the lives of people with additional needs. Recently one of its students, George, who has Glaucoma, Sturge-Weber syndrome and is on the autistic spectrum appeared on the BBC to tell his story of how skiing has helped him shape his hopes and dreams for the future. “I’d probably like to help people to learn to ski, but also get famous and maybe one day go to the Olympics or the Paralympics,” said George when asked what he’d like to do with his new skiing skills. “Socially it has given him so much confidence, because now he is a skier,” said George’s mother Gina. “It’s the best job in the world. As a team we like nothing more than seeing the progress of our students, people like George,” said Richard. Snowbility caters for pupils of all ages from children as young as five years old to adults over the age of 65. It runs lessons, both private and group, seven days a week at The Snow Centre. Booking are available through the website and an application form.
Snow sports are acting as a valuable life-changing tool for people with additional needs and mental health problems. Since its launch in 2011 Snowbility has helped over 10,000 people to gain from both the physical and psychological benefits of skiing and snowboarding. With a slogan, “It’s cool to be different,” the company welcomes students from all walks of life, backgrounds and with various needs and problems, including learning disabilities and autism, and encourages them to get involved with winter sports. Snowbility, which was founded by keen skier and ski development coach Richard Fetherston, is based at The Snow Centre in Hemel Hempstead, an indoor real-snow slope 20 minutes outside of London. It offers the opportunity to learn in the safe and stable environment of the indoor centre throughout the year, providing many of its students with an experience they might otherwise not have felt confident enough to try. “We aim to enrich the lives of our students, parents, carers and teachers we work with, by giving people with additional needs and rehabilitation challenges the opportunity to develop both emotionally and physically through skiing and snowboarding,” said Richard. Snowbility works with students of all ages Credit: snowbility The carefully selected and experienced team at Snowbility are all qualified instructors and are either BASI (British Association of Snowsports Instructors) or IASI (Irish Association of Snowsports Instructors) registered. “We have a team of fully qualified ski and snowboard instructors with the knowledge, experience and passion to provide tailor-made coaching for a wide range of complex physical, psychological and mental health needs, including learning disabilities, autism, dyspraxia and deafness,” said Richard. Snowbility’s approach to teaching skiing and snowboarding technique is integrated with other skills such as social interaction, confidence, self-esteem, concentration and motivation. The flexible coaching methods used by the team help every student in a different way. Britain's top indoor slopes “My son has had a wonderful relationship with his ski team and it has given him confidence to cope with being on a ski slope, which he otherwise wouldn’t have been able to, had he just gone skiing with a school,” said Tanya James, whose son Santino is mildly autistic and has hypermobility syndrome. “It’s helped him with his balance and coordination in a very fun and sporting way,” said Tanya. It’s the best job in the worldRichard Fetherston, Snowbility The coaches aim to give their students a sense of achievement and pride through a personalised learning programme suited to their individual needs. Through this achievement Richard believes it enhances their social, emotional and communication skills, while also improving fitness. The Snow Centre is a safe indoor haven for learning to ski and snowboarding Credit: ross woodhall “Once we get our pupils skiing and their families start to see the changes, then they all benefit; everyone gets involved. It’s truly humbling to see lives change in such a positive way,” said Richard. Richard and his staff are calling for more exposure of the dramatic improvement snow sports can bring to the lives of people with additional needs. Recently one of its students, George, who has Glaucoma, Sturge-Weber syndrome and is on the autistic spectrum appeared on the BBC to tell his story of how skiing has helped him shape his hopes and dreams for the future. “I’d probably like to help people to learn to ski, but also get famous and maybe one day go to the Olympics or the Paralympics,” said George when asked what he’d like to do with his new skiing skills. “Socially it has given him so much confidence, because now he is a skier,” said George’s mother Gina. “It’s the best job in the world. As a team we like nothing more than seeing the progress of our students, people like George,” said Richard. Snowbility caters for pupils of all ages from children as young as five years old to adults over the age of 65. It runs lessons, both private and group, seven days a week at The Snow Centre. Booking are available through the website and an application form.
Snow sports used to combat disabilities and mental health issues in the UK
Snow sports are acting as a valuable life-changing tool for people with additional needs and mental health problems. Since its launch in 2011 Snowbility has helped over 10,000 people to gain from both the physical and psychological benefits of skiing and snowboarding. With a slogan, “It’s cool to be different,” the company welcomes students from all walks of life, backgrounds and with various needs and problems, including learning disabilities and autism, and encourages them to get involved with winter sports. Snowbility, which was founded by keen skier and ski development coach Richard Fetherston, is based at The Snow Centre in Hemel Hempstead, an indoor real-snow slope 20 minutes outside of London. It offers the opportunity to learn in the safe and stable environment of the indoor centre throughout the year, providing many of its students with an experience they might otherwise not have felt confident enough to try. “We aim to enrich the lives of our students, parents, carers and teachers we work with, by giving people with additional needs and rehabilitation challenges the opportunity to develop both emotionally and physically through skiing and snowboarding,” said Richard. Snowbility works with students of all ages Credit: snowbility The carefully selected and experienced team at Snowbility are all qualified instructors and are either BASI (British Association of Snowsports Instructors) or IASI (Irish Association of Snowsports Instructors) registered. “We have a team of fully qualified ski and snowboard instructors with the knowledge, experience and passion to provide tailor-made coaching for a wide range of complex physical, psychological and mental health needs, including learning disabilities, autism, dyspraxia and deafness,” said Richard. Snowbility’s approach to teaching skiing and snowboarding technique is integrated with other skills such as social interaction, confidence, self-esteem, concentration and motivation. The flexible coaching methods used by the team help every student in a different way. Britain's top indoor slopes “My son has had a wonderful relationship with his ski team and it has given him confidence to cope with being on a ski slope, which he otherwise wouldn’t have been able to, had he just gone skiing with a school,” said Tanya James, whose son Santino is mildly autistic and has hypermobility syndrome. “It’s helped him with his balance and coordination in a very fun and sporting way,” said Tanya. It’s the best job in the worldRichard Fetherston, Snowbility The coaches aim to give their students a sense of achievement and pride through a personalised learning programme suited to their individual needs. Through this achievement Richard believes it enhances their social, emotional and communication skills, while also improving fitness. The Snow Centre is a safe indoor haven for learning to ski and snowboarding Credit: ross woodhall “Once we get our pupils skiing and their families start to see the changes, then they all benefit; everyone gets involved. It’s truly humbling to see lives change in such a positive way,” said Richard. Richard and his staff are calling for more exposure of the dramatic improvement snow sports can bring to the lives of people with additional needs. Recently one of its students, George, who has Glaucoma, Sturge-Weber syndrome and is on the autistic spectrum appeared on the BBC to tell his story of how skiing has helped him shape his hopes and dreams for the future. “I’d probably like to help people to learn to ski, but also get famous and maybe one day go to the Olympics or the Paralympics,” said George when asked what he’d like to do with his new skiing skills. “Socially it has given him so much confidence, because now he is a skier,” said George’s mother Gina. “It’s the best job in the world. As a team we like nothing more than seeing the progress of our students, people like George,” said Richard. Snowbility caters for pupils of all ages from children as young as five years old to adults over the age of 65. It runs lessons, both private and group, seven days a week at The Snow Centre. Booking are available through the website and an application form.
Snow sports are acting as a valuable life-changing tool for people with additional needs and mental health problems. Since its launch in 2011 Snowbility has helped over 10,000 people to gain from both the physical and psychological benefits of skiing and snowboarding. With a slogan, “It’s cool to be different,” the company welcomes students from all walks of life, backgrounds and with various needs and problems, including learning disabilities and autism, and encourages them to get involved with winter sports. Snowbility, which was founded by keen skier and ski development coach Richard Fetherston, is based at The Snow Centre in Hemel Hempstead, an indoor real-snow slope 20 minutes outside of London. It offers the opportunity to learn in the safe and stable environment of the indoor centre throughout the year, providing many of its students with an experience they might otherwise not have felt confident enough to try. “We aim to enrich the lives of our students, parents, carers and teachers we work with, by giving people with additional needs and rehabilitation challenges the opportunity to develop both emotionally and physically through skiing and snowboarding,” said Richard. Snowbility works with students of all ages Credit: snowbility The carefully selected and experienced team at Snowbility are all qualified instructors and are either BASI (British Association of Snowsports Instructors) or IASI (Irish Association of Snowsports Instructors) registered. “We have a team of fully qualified ski and snowboard instructors with the knowledge, experience and passion to provide tailor-made coaching for a wide range of complex physical, psychological and mental health needs, including learning disabilities, autism, dyspraxia and deafness,” said Richard. Snowbility’s approach to teaching skiing and snowboarding technique is integrated with other skills such as social interaction, confidence, self-esteem, concentration and motivation. The flexible coaching methods used by the team help every student in a different way. Britain's top indoor slopes “My son has had a wonderful relationship with his ski team and it has given him confidence to cope with being on a ski slope, which he otherwise wouldn’t have been able to, had he just gone skiing with a school,” said Tanya James, whose son Santino is mildly autistic and has hypermobility syndrome. “It’s helped him with his balance and coordination in a very fun and sporting way,” said Tanya. It’s the best job in the worldRichard Fetherston, Snowbility The coaches aim to give their students a sense of achievement and pride through a personalised learning programme suited to their individual needs. Through this achievement Richard believes it enhances their social, emotional and communication skills, while also improving fitness. The Snow Centre is a safe indoor haven for learning to ski and snowboarding Credit: ross woodhall “Once we get our pupils skiing and their families start to see the changes, then they all benefit; everyone gets involved. It’s truly humbling to see lives change in such a positive way,” said Richard. Richard and his staff are calling for more exposure of the dramatic improvement snow sports can bring to the lives of people with additional needs. Recently one of its students, George, who has Glaucoma, Sturge-Weber syndrome and is on the autistic spectrum appeared on the BBC to tell his story of how skiing has helped him shape his hopes and dreams for the future. “I’d probably like to help people to learn to ski, but also get famous and maybe one day go to the Olympics or the Paralympics,” said George when asked what he’d like to do with his new skiing skills. “Socially it has given him so much confidence, because now he is a skier,” said George’s mother Gina. “It’s the best job in the world. As a team we like nothing more than seeing the progress of our students, people like George,” said Richard. Snowbility caters for pupils of all ages from children as young as five years old to adults over the age of 65. It runs lessons, both private and group, seven days a week at The Snow Centre. Booking are available through the website and an application form.
Snow sports used to combat disabilities and mental health issues in the UK
Snow sports are acting as a valuable life-changing tool for people with additional needs and mental health problems. Since its launch in 2011 Snowbility has helped over 10,000 people to gain from both the physical and psychological benefits of skiing and snowboarding. With a slogan, “It’s cool to be different,” the company welcomes students from all walks of life, backgrounds and with various needs and problems, including learning disabilities and autism, and encourages them to get involved with winter sports. Snowbility, which was founded by keen skier and ski development coach Richard Fetherston, is based at The Snow Centre in Hemel Hempstead, an indoor real-snow slope 20 minutes outside of London. It offers the opportunity to learn in the safe and stable environment of the indoor centre throughout the year, providing many of its students with an experience they might otherwise not have felt confident enough to try. “We aim to enrich the lives of our students, parents, carers and teachers we work with, by giving people with additional needs and rehabilitation challenges the opportunity to develop both emotionally and physically through skiing and snowboarding,” said Richard. Snowbility works with students of all ages Credit: snowbility The carefully selected and experienced team at Snowbility are all qualified instructors and are either BASI (British Association of Snowsports Instructors) or IASI (Irish Association of Snowsports Instructors) registered. “We have a team of fully qualified ski and snowboard instructors with the knowledge, experience and passion to provide tailor-made coaching for a wide range of complex physical, psychological and mental health needs, including learning disabilities, autism, dyspraxia and deafness,” said Richard. Snowbility’s approach to teaching skiing and snowboarding technique is integrated with other skills such as social interaction, confidence, self-esteem, concentration and motivation. The flexible coaching methods used by the team help every student in a different way. Britain's top indoor slopes “My son has had a wonderful relationship with his ski team and it has given him confidence to cope with being on a ski slope, which he otherwise wouldn’t have been able to, had he just gone skiing with a school,” said Tanya James, whose son Santino is mildly autistic and has hypermobility syndrome. “It’s helped him with his balance and coordination in a very fun and sporting way,” said Tanya. It’s the best job in the worldRichard Fetherston, Snowbility The coaches aim to give their students a sense of achievement and pride through a personalised learning programme suited to their individual needs. Through this achievement Richard believes it enhances their social, emotional and communication skills, while also improving fitness. The Snow Centre is a safe indoor haven for learning to ski and snowboarding Credit: ross woodhall “Once we get our pupils skiing and their families start to see the changes, then they all benefit; everyone gets involved. It’s truly humbling to see lives change in such a positive way,” said Richard. Richard and his staff are calling for more exposure of the dramatic improvement snow sports can bring to the lives of people with additional needs. Recently one of its students, George, who has Glaucoma, Sturge-Weber syndrome and is on the autistic spectrum appeared on the BBC to tell his story of how skiing has helped him shape his hopes and dreams for the future. “I’d probably like to help people to learn to ski, but also get famous and maybe one day go to the Olympics or the Paralympics,” said George when asked what he’d like to do with his new skiing skills. “Socially it has given him so much confidence, because now he is a skier,” said George’s mother Gina. “It’s the best job in the world. As a team we like nothing more than seeing the progress of our students, people like George,” said Richard. Snowbility caters for pupils of all ages from children as young as five years old to adults over the age of 65. It runs lessons, both private and group, seven days a week at The Snow Centre. Booking are available through the website and an application form.
<p>At a Buckingham Palace event for Olympic and Paralympics heroes, the Duchess of Cambridge revealed her daughter’s love of horses.<br><br>Rider Natasha Baker <a href="http://www.horseandhound.co.uk/news/princess-charlotte-loves-horses-riding-601799" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:revealed" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">revealed</a>: ‘I asked her how the children were and she said Charlotte is really enjoying her riding, which is great to hear and I said we may see her here on a line-up in 20 years time.’<br><br>She added: ‘She emphasised that Charlotte has this passion about horses and although she doesn’t echo it, she’ll do her best to champion and encourage it.’ <em>[Photo: Getty]</em><br></p>
She has a very special talent

At a Buckingham Palace event for Olympic and Paralympics heroes, the Duchess of Cambridge revealed her daughter’s love of horses.

Rider Natasha Baker revealed: ‘I asked her how the children were and she said Charlotte is really enjoying her riding, which is great to hear and I said we may see her here on a line-up in 20 years time.’

She added: ‘She emphasised that Charlotte has this passion about horses and although she doesn’t echo it, she’ll do her best to champion and encourage it.’ [Photo: Getty]

President Trump is under fire after saying the Paralympics were &#39;a little tough to watch&#39;. .
Paralympics 'tough to watch': Trump
President Trump is under fire after saying the Paralympics were 'a little tough to watch'. .
President Trump is under fire after saying the Paralympics were &#39;a little tough to watch&#39;. .
Paralympics 'tough to watch': Trump
President Trump is under fire after saying the Paralympics were 'a little tough to watch'. .
President Trump is under fire after saying the Paralympics were &#39;a little tough to watch&#39;. .
Paralympics 'tough to watch': Trump
President Trump is under fire after saying the Paralympics were 'a little tough to watch'. .
President Trump is under fire after saying the Paralympics were 'a little tough to watch'. .
Paralympics 'tough to watch': Trump
President Trump is under fire after saying the Paralympics were 'a little tough to watch'. .
Trump Faces Criticism After Saying Paralympic Games &#39;Tough&#39; to Watch
Trump Faces Criticism After Saying Paralympic Games 'Tough' to Watch
Trump Faces Criticism After Saying Paralympic Games 'Tough' to Watch
Trump Faces Criticism After Saying Paralympic Games &#39;Tough&#39; to Watch
Trump Faces Criticism After Saying Paralympic Games 'Tough' to Watch
Trump Faces Criticism After Saying Paralympic Games 'Tough' to Watch
Trump Faces Criticism After Saying Paralympic Games &#39;Tough&#39; to Watch
Trump Faces Criticism After Saying Paralympic Games 'Tough' to Watch
Trump Faces Criticism After Saying Paralympic Games 'Tough' to Watch
Trump Faces Criticism After Saying Paralympic Games &#39;Tough&#39; to Watch
Trump Faces Criticism After Saying Paralympic Games 'Tough' to Watch
Trump Faces Criticism After Saying Paralympic Games 'Tough' to Watch
U.S. Vice President Mike Pence listens as President Donald Trump welcomes members of the 2018 U.S. Olympic and Paralympic teams to the White House in Washington, U.S., April 27, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Trump welcomes members of the 2018 U.S. Olympic and Paralympic teams to the White House in Washington
U.S. Vice President Mike Pence listens as President Donald Trump welcomes members of the 2018 U.S. Olympic and Paralympic teams to the White House in Washington, U.S., April 27, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks next to Vice President Mike Pence while welcoming members of the 2018 U.S. Olympic and Paralympic teams to the White House in Washington, U.S., April 27, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Trump welcomes members of the 2018 U.S. Olympic and Paralympic teams to the White House in Washington
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks next to Vice President Mike Pence while welcoming members of the 2018 U.S. Olympic and Paralympic teams to the White House in Washington, U.S., April 27, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Japan has demanded that South Korea rethink a mango mousse dessert it plans to serve at a North-South summit dinner on Friday, which features a map of the Korean peninsula - including islands disputed with Japan, a recurring irritant for Tokyo. The mousse, subtitled &quot;Spring of the People&quot; in publicity photos of the menu released yesterday, features islands known as Takeshima in Japan and Dokdo in Korea, which lie about halfway between the East Asian neighbours in the Sea of Japan, which Seoul refers to as the East Sea. &quot;It is extremely regrettable,&quot; a Japanese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman said on Wednesday, adding that Japan had lodged a protest. &quot;We have asked that the dessert not be served.&quot; Japan complained to South Korea about fans waving a flag with a similar design at a friendly women&#39;s ice hockey match at the Winter Paralympics between the combined North and South Korean team and Sweden in March. The new dispute comes as North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and South Korean leader President Moon Jae-in prepare to meet to discuss Pyongyang&#39;s nuclear weapons programme on Friday. What’s on the menu at the Korean summit | Symbolism explained Relations between the two Koreas and Japan have long been strained by territorial disputes and lingering resentment over Japanese colonisation of the Korean peninsula in the first half of last century. Japan in the past has also protested against the erection of statues commemorating Korean women and girls forced to work in Japanese military brothels during World War Two. Seoul says that Tokyo has yet to deliver a heartfelt apology for its wartime actions. South Korea released pictures on Wednesday showing the room where the historic summit will take place Credit: Blue House Preparations include bespoke furniture with the peninsula etched into wood Credit: AFP But Moon and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe have vowed to present a united front and exert pressure on North Korea to abandon its nuclear and missile programmes, which it pursues in defiance of U.N. Security Council resolutions. The North-South summit at the border truce village of Panmunjom is set to be followed by a meeting between Kim and US President Donald Trump in May or June.
How a mango mousse has exposed the delicate diplomacy of the North Korea summit
Japan has demanded that South Korea rethink a mango mousse dessert it plans to serve at a North-South summit dinner on Friday, which features a map of the Korean peninsula - including islands disputed with Japan, a recurring irritant for Tokyo. The mousse, subtitled "Spring of the People" in publicity photos of the menu released yesterday, features islands known as Takeshima in Japan and Dokdo in Korea, which lie about halfway between the East Asian neighbours in the Sea of Japan, which Seoul refers to as the East Sea. "It is extremely regrettable," a Japanese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman said on Wednesday, adding that Japan had lodged a protest. "We have asked that the dessert not be served." Japan complained to South Korea about fans waving a flag with a similar design at a friendly women's ice hockey match at the Winter Paralympics between the combined North and South Korean team and Sweden in March. The new dispute comes as North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and South Korean leader President Moon Jae-in prepare to meet to discuss Pyongyang's nuclear weapons programme on Friday. What’s on the menu at the Korean summit | Symbolism explained Relations between the two Koreas and Japan have long been strained by territorial disputes and lingering resentment over Japanese colonisation of the Korean peninsula in the first half of last century. Japan in the past has also protested against the erection of statues commemorating Korean women and girls forced to work in Japanese military brothels during World War Two. Seoul says that Tokyo has yet to deliver a heartfelt apology for its wartime actions. South Korea released pictures on Wednesday showing the room where the historic summit will take place Credit: Blue House Preparations include bespoke furniture with the peninsula etched into wood Credit: AFP But Moon and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe have vowed to present a united front and exert pressure on North Korea to abandon its nuclear and missile programmes, which it pursues in defiance of U.N. Security Council resolutions. The North-South summit at the border truce village of Panmunjom is set to be followed by a meeting between Kim and US President Donald Trump in May or June.
Japan has demanded that South Korea rethink a mango mousse dessert it plans to serve at a North-South summit dinner on Friday, which features a map of the Korean peninsula - including islands disputed with Japan, a recurring irritant for Tokyo. The mousse, subtitled &quot;Spring of the People&quot; in publicity photos of the menu released yesterday, features islands known as Takeshima in Japan and Dokdo in Korea, which lie about halfway between the East Asian neighbours in the Sea of Japan, which Seoul refers to as the East Sea. &quot;It is extremely regrettable,&quot; a Japanese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman said on Wednesday, adding that Japan had lodged a protest. &quot;We have asked that the dessert not be served.&quot; Japan complained to South Korea about fans waving a flag with a similar design at a friendly women&#39;s ice hockey match at the Winter Paralympics between the combined North and South Korean team and Sweden in March. The new dispute comes as North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and South Korean leader President Moon Jae-in prepare to meet to discuss Pyongyang&#39;s nuclear weapons programme on Friday. What’s on the menu at the Korean summit | Symbolism explained Relations between the two Koreas and Japan have long been strained by territorial disputes and lingering resentment over Japanese colonisation of the Korean peninsula in the first half of last century. Japan in the past has also protested against the erection of statues commemorating Korean women and girls forced to work in Japanese military brothels during World War Two. Seoul says that Tokyo has yet to deliver a heartfelt apology for its wartime actions. South Korea released pictures on Wednesday showing the room where the historic summit will take place Credit: Blue House Preparations include bespoke furniture with the peninsula etched into wood Credit: AFP But Moon and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe have vowed to present a united front and exert pressure on North Korea to abandon its nuclear and missile programmes, which it pursues in defiance of U.N. Security Council resolutions. The North-South summit at the border truce village of Panmunjom is set to be followed by a meeting between Kim and US President Donald Trump in May or June.
How a mango mousse has exposed the delicate diplomacy of the North Korea summit
Japan has demanded that South Korea rethink a mango mousse dessert it plans to serve at a North-South summit dinner on Friday, which features a map of the Korean peninsula - including islands disputed with Japan, a recurring irritant for Tokyo. The mousse, subtitled "Spring of the People" in publicity photos of the menu released yesterday, features islands known as Takeshima in Japan and Dokdo in Korea, which lie about halfway between the East Asian neighbours in the Sea of Japan, which Seoul refers to as the East Sea. "It is extremely regrettable," a Japanese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman said on Wednesday, adding that Japan had lodged a protest. "We have asked that the dessert not be served." Japan complained to South Korea about fans waving a flag with a similar design at a friendly women's ice hockey match at the Winter Paralympics between the combined North and South Korean team and Sweden in March. The new dispute comes as North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and South Korean leader President Moon Jae-in prepare to meet to discuss Pyongyang's nuclear weapons programme on Friday. What’s on the menu at the Korean summit | Symbolism explained Relations between the two Koreas and Japan have long been strained by territorial disputes and lingering resentment over Japanese colonisation of the Korean peninsula in the first half of last century. Japan in the past has also protested against the erection of statues commemorating Korean women and girls forced to work in Japanese military brothels during World War Two. Seoul says that Tokyo has yet to deliver a heartfelt apology for its wartime actions. South Korea released pictures on Wednesday showing the room where the historic summit will take place Credit: Blue House Preparations include bespoke furniture with the peninsula etched into wood Credit: AFP But Moon and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe have vowed to present a united front and exert pressure on North Korea to abandon its nuclear and missile programmes, which it pursues in defiance of U.N. Security Council resolutions. The North-South summit at the border truce village of Panmunjom is set to be followed by a meeting between Kim and US President Donald Trump in May or June.
Japan has demanded that South Korea rethink a mango mousse dessert it plans to serve at a North-South summit dinner on Friday, which features a map of the Korean peninsula - including islands disputed with Japan, a recurring irritant for Tokyo. The mousse, subtitled &quot;Spring of the People&quot; in publicity photos of the menu released yesterday, features islands known as Takeshima in Japan and Dokdo in Korea, which lie about halfway between the East Asian neighbours in the Sea of Japan, which Seoul refers to as the East Sea. &quot;It is extremely regrettable,&quot; a Japanese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman said on Wednesday, adding that Japan had lodged a protest. &quot;We have asked that the dessert not be served.&quot; Japan complained to South Korea about fans waving a flag with a similar design at a friendly women&#39;s ice hockey match at the Winter Paralympics between the combined North and South Korean team and Sweden in March. The new dispute comes as North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and South Korean leader President Moon Jae-in prepare to meet to discuss Pyongyang&#39;s nuclear weapons programme on Friday. What’s on the menu at the Korean summit | Symbolism explained Relations between the two Koreas and Japan have long been strained by territorial disputes and lingering resentment over Japanese colonisation of the Korean peninsula in the first half of last century. Japan in the past has also protested against the erection of statues commemorating Korean women and girls forced to work in Japanese military brothels during World War Two. Seoul says that Tokyo has yet to deliver a heartfelt apology for its wartime actions. South Korea released pictures on Wednesday showing the room where the historic summit will take place Credit: Blue House Preparations include bespoke furniture with the peninsula etched into wood Credit: AFP But Moon and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe have vowed to present a united front and exert pressure on North Korea to abandon its nuclear and missile programmes, which it pursues in defiance of U.N. Security Council resolutions. The North-South summit at the border truce village of Panmunjom is set to be followed by a meeting between Kim and US President Donald Trump in May or June.
How a mango mousse has exposed the delicate diplomacy of the North Korea summit
Japan has demanded that South Korea rethink a mango mousse dessert it plans to serve at a North-South summit dinner on Friday, which features a map of the Korean peninsula - including islands disputed with Japan, a recurring irritant for Tokyo. The mousse, subtitled "Spring of the People" in publicity photos of the menu released yesterday, features islands known as Takeshima in Japan and Dokdo in Korea, which lie about halfway between the East Asian neighbours in the Sea of Japan, which Seoul refers to as the East Sea. "It is extremely regrettable," a Japanese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman said on Wednesday, adding that Japan had lodged a protest. "We have asked that the dessert not be served." Japan complained to South Korea about fans waving a flag with a similar design at a friendly women's ice hockey match at the Winter Paralympics between the combined North and South Korean team and Sweden in March. The new dispute comes as North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and South Korean leader President Moon Jae-in prepare to meet to discuss Pyongyang's nuclear weapons programme on Friday. What’s on the menu at the Korean summit | Symbolism explained Relations between the two Koreas and Japan have long been strained by territorial disputes and lingering resentment over Japanese colonisation of the Korean peninsula in the first half of last century. Japan in the past has also protested against the erection of statues commemorating Korean women and girls forced to work in Japanese military brothels during World War Two. Seoul says that Tokyo has yet to deliver a heartfelt apology for its wartime actions. South Korea released pictures on Wednesday showing the room where the historic summit will take place Credit: Blue House Preparations include bespoke furniture with the peninsula etched into wood Credit: AFP But Moon and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe have vowed to present a united front and exert pressure on North Korea to abandon its nuclear and missile programmes, which it pursues in defiance of U.N. Security Council resolutions. The North-South summit at the border truce village of Panmunjom is set to be followed by a meeting between Kim and US President Donald Trump in May or June.
International Olympic Committee (IOC) Vice President John Coates and President of Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic organising committee Yoshiro Mori attend their news conference following Project Review Meeting in Tokyo, Japan, April 24, 2018. REUTERS/Toru Hanai
IOC Vice President Coates and President of Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic organising committee Mori attend their news conference following Project Review Meeting in Tokyo
International Olympic Committee (IOC) Vice President John Coates and President of Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic organising committee Yoshiro Mori attend their news conference following Project Review Meeting in Tokyo, Japan, April 24, 2018. REUTERS/Toru Hanai

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