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What's on TV tonight: Louis Theroux returns, plus more Electric Dreams

Sunday 8 October Louis Theroux: Dark States – Heroin Town BBC Two, 9.00pm Louis Theroux’s second coming as a chronicler of society’s underdogs, outcasts and victims continues with this examination of life and death on the fringes (documentaries on murder and sex trafficking are to come). He is in Huntington, West Virginia, a former industrial town in the grip of a drug epidemic fuelled by Big Pharma’s record of encouraging doctors to overmedicate workplace injuries: here fatal-overdose rates are 13 times the national average and one in 10 babies are born with an opiate addiction. Such is the extent of the problem that local efforts are focused on containment as much as prevention, and the emergency services are overstretched while the rehab centres struggling. As ever, Theroux’s combination of apparent guilelessness and fearlessness bears fruit in the intimate encounters. Whether teasing out the distressing realities of one addict and the partner who assists her, or prodding away at the motives of another who seems superficially content, he gleans genuinely valuable insights. One thing is clear in this incisive and troubling film, their spirits crushed, any potential is strangled and optimism is in diminishing supply. Gabriel Tate Formula 1: Japanese Grand Prix Sky Sports F1, 5.30am Despite Max Verstappen’s impressive victory in the Malaysian Grand Prix, Lewis Hamilton has plenty to be cheerful about as F1 heads to Japan. Indeed, by finishing second last weekend, having toiled with his Mercedes all weekend, Hamilton extended his lead in the drivers’ championship to 34 points, with five races of the season remaining. His nearest rival, Sebastian Vettel, on the other hand, is out of sorts: having not finished in Singapore, then started at the back of the grid in Malaysia but finished in fourth place. He’ll need to be much improved at the Suzuka Circuit. Premiership Rugby Union: Saracens v Wasps BT Sport 1, 2.30pm Having lost three of their opening five matches, the most recent of which was a 25-9 defeat at home to Bath, Wasps need a win to boost morale. The problem is they’re away at Saracens, who’ve won four from five and are looking imperious, as anyone who witnessed their 25-3 trouncing of Worcester last weekend will attest. Among the scorers that day was England full-back Alex Goode.  International Football: Lithuania v England ITV, 4.30pm England round off an eventful qualifying campaign that began with them replacing Sam Allardyce as manager with Gareth Southgate. Since then Wayne Rooney, England’s top scorer, has called time on his international career, while younger players such as Harry Kane and Dele Alli have grown in stature. The former, who has been in sublime form for Spurs this season, has been named captain and will be confident of adding to tally this afternoon at the LFF Stadium in Vilnius. When these sides met in Match, goals from Jermain Defoe – his first for England since 2013 – and Jamie Vardy gave Southgate’s side a 2-0 victory.  The Last Post BBC One, 9.00pm Peter Moffat’s evocative Sixties drama continues with the arrival of an American war reporter, Martha Franklin (Essie Davis), which disrupts the delicate dynamic on the military base, while insurgent leader Abdul-Kadir Hakim is targeted for the murder of Captain Page (Joseph Kennedy). Electric Dreams: Crazy Diamond Channel 4, 9.00pm In this episode of the Philip K Dick adaptations, Ed Morris (Steve Buscemi) is offered a chance to inject some excitement into his drab life with wife Sally (Julia Davis) by Jill (Sidse Babbett Knudsen), a synthetic human. The plot is cluttered, but the ending is satisfying indeed. The Gifted Fox, 9.00pm Marvel’s colonisation of the small screen continues with this entry in the X-Men universe. While The Gifted is a far cry from the mind-bending visions of Noah Hawley’s Legion, it provides plenty of bang for your buck in its tales of a family, headed by True Blood’s Stephen Moyer, that is rocked by revelations that its children have mutant abilities and go on the run from dastardly government forces. Festival No 6 Sky Arts, 9.00pm Highlights from the deeply eccentric beanfeast in Portmeirion, the Italianate Welsh coastal home of The Prisoner TV series. Expect music from Mogwai, Bloc Party and the wonderful Flaming Lips. The Sky at Night BBC Four, 10.00pm Maggie Aderin-Pocock considers the renewal of interest in manned missions to the moon, and the role of tech companies in funding and driving these new initiatives. GT Snowfall BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI This new 10-parter from John Singleton (Boyz N the Hood) traces the shockwaves from the crack cocaine epidemic that ravaged Los Angeles in the Eighties. In the first episode, we meet Franklin Saint (Damson Idris), who is living with his mum and senses an opportunity that will change his life, and his city. It’s a notch below Narcos, but it’s still compelling and sharp. Sir Bobby Charlton at 80 BBC One, 10.30pm Alex Ferguson, Eric Cantona and more pay tribute to an Old Trafford great in a hagiography, yet Charlton is a man of such decency and dignity that it’s hard to object. GT Dial M for Murder (1954) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 1.15pm  It’s not quite on the same plane of brilliance as Vertigo, but Hitchcock’s adaptation of Frederick Knott’s stage play is still a briskly efficient exercise in suspense. Tony Wendice (Ray Milland) is trying to have his socialite wife Margot (Grace Kelly) murdered, after she has an affair with a writer. When Tony’s first plan fails, he dreams up another that’s even more devious. This Sporting Life (1963) ★★★★ London Live, 8.00pm  It’s Yorkshire accents and monochrome realism as Richard Harris goes down the mines, plays rugby and has an affair. As an uncompromising portrait of male attitudes, Lindsay Anderson’s stunning adaptation of David Storey’s novel is like a punch to the gut, and a direct antecedent of Scorsese’s Raging Bull. Rachel Roberts (star of earlier kitchen sink drama Saturday Night and Sunday Morning) co-stars. The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (2013) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 11.05pm  Mild-mannered Walter Mitty’s life is controlled  by his overbearing mother. He finds his escape by imagining himself living in the worlds pictured on the covers of Life magazine  and becoming a pilot, a sea captain and couturier.  Ben Stiller directs and stars in this loose revamping of the James Thurber’s story: the result is a flawed but  still entertaining and enjoyable adventure. Monday 9 October At your service: Steph and Dom Parker Credit: Channel 4 Steph and Dom’s One Star to Five Star Channel 4, 5.30pm Daytime programming isn’t normally where we look for originality, so it comes as no surprise to find little in this new weekday show hosted by Steph and Dom Parker, those once, seemingly ever-sozzled breakout stars from Gogglebox. What there is, though, is fun and lots of it, even if at times it can be hard to tell whether it is intentional or not. Like the illegitimate offspring of Four in a Bed and any number of hackneyed Hotel Inspector-style shows, this series sees the Parkers take their own limited experience as B & B owners in Kent as proof that they know everything there is to know about the international hospitality industry and descend on an ailing hotel for a week with a view to making it marginally more appealing.  They begin with the dowdy Ransdale Hotel in Bridlington, a slightly tatty, underperforming establishment where they reckon seaside-themed rooms, kedgeree for breakfast and a party atmosphere in the bar will get the occupancy levels up from the current “negligible”. Could getting the clientele drunk cause the approval ratings to peak? It’s probably more likely than the kedgeree. Gerard O’Donovan The Human Body: Secrets of Your Life Revealed BBC Two, 9.00pm In the series’ concluding part, Chris and Xand van Tulleken explore how experiences shape our minds and bodies, and show for the very first time how memories are formed in the brain and continue to influence us throughout our lives.  Tunes for Tyrants: Music and Power with Suzy Klein BBC Four, 9.00pm In this edition of the documentary series, Suzy Klein explores the Thirties and how classical music, while it was exploited to idealise violent nationalism and prop up the totalitarian regimes of the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany, was also be a source of coded resistance. Liar ITV, 9.00pm In a torrid penultimate episode, Laura (Joanne Froggatt) convinces ex-boyfriend Tom (Warren Brown) to help bring Andrew Earlham (Ioan Gruffudd) to justice as she’s forced to resort to a somewhat unusual method of forcing a confession out of him. W1A BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI This is a terrific edition of the sitcom. As the crisis over the axing of the BBC’s Big Swing Band goes viral, Head of Values Ian Fletcher (Hugh Bonneville) once again finds himself caught in the media cross-hairs.  The Vietnam War BBC Four, 10.00pm & 10.55pm Another double helping of Ken Burns’s stately and impeccably researched history of the Vietnam War rolls us on through 1967 when, with casualties mounting and the Viet Cong striking back in the infamous Tet offensive, a US victory looked increasingly beyond reach. Timewasters ITV2, 10.00pm & 10.30pm ITV2 launches a season of new comedies with this sharply scripted sitcom about a struggling four-piece jazz band who get stuck in Twenties London when their time machine breaks down. GO After the News ITV, 10.45pm; NI, 12.45am; not STV; Wales, 11.15pm Current affairs presenters Emma Barnett and Nick Ferrari are hot tickets just now following some hard-hitting “holiday cover” hosting on Newsnight this summer. Now ITV has signed them up for this new nightly debate show that takes its subject matter straight from ITV News at Ten. After the unmitigated flop of The Nightly Show, ITV will be keen to for this to shine. GO Pimpernel Smith (1941, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 3.50pm  Leslie Howard, famed for his role in Gone with the Wind, directs and stars in this deft drama set in 1939 Berlin. An academic (Howard) recruits students to go to Europe under the guise of an archaeological dig. However, his real mission is to smuggle victims of Nazi persecution out of Germany. An absorbing film and, retrospectively, quite haunting since Howard was shot down in the war by a Nazi plane two years later. The Birth of a Nation (2016) ★★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 4.10pm and daily  Writer-director-star Nate Parker’s attempt to reappropriate the notorious racism of DW Griffith’s 1915 foundation myth and spin it on its axis is a graceless, pretentious mallet to the head of history. Parker (whose galvanising performance is much the strongest) tells the story of Nat Turner’s 1831 slave rebellion from the side of the true victims. Se7en (1995) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm  Gluttony, avarice, envy, sloth, wrath, lust and pride; the seven deadly sins are explored graphically, and imaginatively, in this gloomy thriller from director David Fincher. It follows a detective (an outstanding Morgan Freeman) and his rookie partner (Brad Pitt) on the hunt for a maniac who kills those guilty of the above vices. Brutal and gripping, with an ending you won’t forget in a hurry. Gwyneth Paltrow and Kevin Spacey co-star. Tuesday 10 October In the field: Michelle Keegan as Georgie Lane Credit: BBC Our Girl: Nepal Tour BBC One, 9.00pm Michelle Keegan returns as dedicated army medic Georgie Lane in Tony Grounds’s entertaining if soapy army drama. This time the main action is in Nepal, where Georgie and the rest of 2 Section, including Ben Aldridge’s patrician Captain Charles James, are posted to provide humanitarian relief following an earthquake.  This being Our Girl, the personal relationships are as important as the action and Georgie soon finds herself having a perfectly arched eyebrow-off with new recruit Maisie Richards (the excellent Shalom Brune-Franklin). Yet behind the jokes there are serious points raised about the way in which the army operates, and whether individualism ever has a place. Fans of the will they/won’t they romance between Georgie and her slick former fiancé Elvis (Luke Pasqualino) will be disappointed by how little the latter features in this opening episode (just one brief scene in Syria before the main action begins), although Rudi Dharmalingam gallantly steps into the breach as impassioned NGO worker Milan. The real joy, however, comes not from the plot twists but from the expert way in which Grounds captures both the banter and boredom of army life. Sarah Hughes Once Upon a Time Netflix, from today This popular fantasy series that follows fairy-tale characters living in the real world returns for its seventh season. It marks a reboot of sorts, with our now-adult hero Henry Mills (Jared S Gilmore) finding himself in the same position as when the story began. The Great British Bake Off Channel 4, 8.00pm The cooking competition continues to roll out new themes, with this episode marking the first Italian Week. But you can be sure that it won’t have anything to do with making a bog-standard spag bol. Unfortunately the weather is not on their side, as the contestants suffer in the hottest temperatures ever recorded in the tent. Russia 1917: Countdown to Revolution BBC Two, 9.00pm Juliet Stevenson narrates this insightful documentary made to mark the centenary of the Russian Revolution. Martin Amis, Orlando Figes and Helen Rappaport are among those discussing and recounting how Russia transitioned from a tsarist autocracy to become the first communist state – and the roles played by Lenin, Trotsky and Stalin. Concorde: A Supersonic Story BBC Four, 9.00pm The Concorde was considered the “most glamorous plane ever built” – until it was retired in 2003 following the crash of Air France Flight 4590. But its story is a fascinating one. Sophie Okonedo narrates this tale of rows between French and British governments, while former passengers recount queuing for the lavatory with celebrities.  The Deuce Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Vincent (James Franco) is putting the finishing touches to his new bar, in this third episode of the gritty, Seventies New York-set drama. But then an unexpected silent partner turns up. CG Celebrity Hunted Channel 4, 9.15pm The real-life thriller returns for a celebrity charity edition. Anneka Rice and former Strictly winner Jay McGuiness are among those attempting to avoid detection.  Later Live… with Jools Holland BBC Two, 10.00pm; N Ireland, 11.15pm Former Led Zeppelin singer Robert Plant performs live with his band Sensational Space Shifters. He’s joined by Beck, with songs from his first new album in three years. Catherine Gee Ice Age: Continental Drift (2012) ★★☆☆☆ E4, 8.00pm Surprisingly, the Ice Age series has accrued more lucre than Pixar’s Toy Story trilogy. But this fourth film is the thinnest and redeemed only by a demented squirrel. Once again, the story revolves around Manny the mammoth (Ray Romano), Sid the sloth (John Leguizamo) and Diego the smilodon (Denis Leary), who are separated from their herd thanks to the shifting of the Earth’s land masses. Southpaw (2015) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Jake Gyllenhaal lays his body on the line for 0a boxing drama so predictable that you could set your watch by it. If only someone had devoted equivalent stamina to the screenplay, we might have an actual movie on our hands. Nevertheless, it’s rousingly entertaining as Gyllenhaal’s Billy “The Great” Hope learns the art of subterfuge from a new coach (Forest Whitaker). Rachel McAdams co-stars. I Origins (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film 4, 11.25pm  Eyes and souls have been cinematically intertwined since at least 1929, when, in Un Chien Andalou, Buñuel and Dalí carved out their visionary manifesto with the quick swipe of a razor blade across a plump and oozing eyeball. In Mike Cahill’s film, the metaphor trots off down a strange and lyrical new trail when a biology student (Michael Pitt) encounters a model (Astrid Bergès-Frisbey) who makes him question scientific fact. Wednesday 11 October Not sitting well: David Mitchell as Stephen Credit: Channel 4 Back Channel 4, 10.00pm The ratings may have been a little underwhelming, but in contrast to David Mitchell and Robert Webb’s tonally uncertain and muddled Ambassadors, Back has been a triumph. Simon Blackwell’s often brutal, witheringly funny script has granted the leading men roles that riff on their Peep Show personas of Mark and Jez without ever becoming beholden to them. Prodigal foster son Andrew’s (Webb) victory over biological offspring Stephen (Mitchell) is apparently complete, as the former struts around his flourishing gastropub, bragging about his chef’s clafoutis while the latter moulders in a caravan. “He’s stolen my life and he’s living it better than me,” Stephen fumes, impotently. Their father’s memorial party – and the associated speeches – offer Stephen one final shot at redemption: when a clutch of other returning foster children eclipse Andrew’s efforts to ingratiate himself, Stephen has a revelation that sends him on a demented trip of vengeance to fill the gaps in his rival’s life story. Finding profound bathos in often gasp-inducing misanthropy and reuniting the best British double act around (pace Vic and Bob), Back undoubtedly merits a return. Gabriel Tate The Apprentice BBC One, 9.00pm Enjoying a new lease of life after a disappointing series last year, reality TV’s version of an extended job interview this week unleashes the candidates’ aesthetic pretensions by asking them to turn interior designers at a five-star hotel. The mind boggles at the bills that needed settling at the end of this particular stay. The Detectives: Murder on the Streets BBC Two, 9.00pm This utterly involving and consistently impressive documentary series comes to a climax with the arrival of the trial in the case of the murder of young homeless man Daniel Smith. This is true crime of the most empathetic and socially responsible kind. Britain’s Lost Masterpieces BBC Four, 9.00pm Dr Bendor Grosvenor and Emma Dabiri visit Carmathenshire County Museum, home to a damaged portrait of a 16th-century Earl whose provenance is disputed. Doc Martin ITV, 9.00pm Receptionist Morwenna’s (Jessica Ransom) parents pay her a surprise visit and present Doc Martin (Martin Clunes) with a dilemma as the amiable comedy drama ambles through another hour. Ray Donovan Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Susan Sarandon has been both a welcome addition and much-needed counterpart to this occasionally testosterone-heavy series, with Liev Schreiber’s eponymous heavy facing the repercussions of years of making enemies in high places. Norskov Channel 4, 10.35pm The titular Danish industrial port is blighted by a drug problem. Enter ace detective Tom Noack (Thomas Levin), an old acquaintance of the city’s mayor to clean the place up and, inevitably, disturb a few ghosts. It’s a slick Nordic noir – the whole series will be available on C4’s online service Walter Presents after this episode airs. GT Inside Birmingham Children’s Hospital More4, 10.00pm The BBC and Channel 4 continue to match each other, blow for blow, with medical documentaries. This latest series follows a girl diagnosed with a life-changing condition, a boy with leukaemia and a five-year-old whose epilepsy is proving increasingly hard to manage. As so often, their stoicism and resilience are humbling and very affecting. GT Charade (1963) ★★★★☆ Film4, 4.35pm Audrey Hepburn as a temperamental-but-alluring damsel in distress and Cary Grant as a shadowy charmer are characters that the two actors played over and over during their careers. But they do so exceptionally in this suspense comedy from Stanley Donen, often referred to as the best Hitchcock movie that Hitchcock never made. Hepburn is the widow being trailed by four men hunting for her late husband’s stolen fortune. Starship Troopers (1997) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 10.00pm  On first appearances, this Oscar-nominated sci-fi action thriller looks distressingly silly: in the distant future, a group of American high-school friends join the armed forces to do intergalactic war with some malicious insectoid aliens, or “Bugs”. The whole of humanity is at risk. Thankfully director Paul Verhoeven deftly underpins the whole thing with wicked satirical verve and no-nonsense action. Dying Laughing (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Arts, 10.30pm  Dozens of stand-up comics, including Kevin Hart, Jerry Seinfeld and Amy Schumer, contribute to this understated but rather wonderful documentary film about the infrequent highs and relentless lows of trying to make people laugh. It can be painful – one anecdote about “bombing” on stage is particularly uncomfortable – but then a comic will recall that first great gig and you can just tell that all the anguish has been worth it. Thursday 12 October Every second counts: McDonald follows a murder investigation Credit: ITV An Hour to Catch a Killer with Trevor McDonald ITV, 9.00pm Trevor McDonald’s abiding fascination with such murky matters as serial murder and organised crime, especially in the United States, is well established. For the first programme in ITV’s new Crime and Punishment season, McDonald examines a key concept of modern crime detection: how the decisions made by investigating officers in the so-called “Golden Hour” – the first 60 minutes of a murder inquiry – have a vital impact on whether or not a killer is caught and successfully prosecuted. And here he examines a case much closer to home. With full access to the Northumbria Police Homicide Unit’s investigation into the murder of 24-year-old graduate Alice Ruggles last October, the film follows the case from the moment the murder was reported, through every layer of the investigation as it develops, to the moment the all-too-obvious prime suspect is located and charged.  Later in this series, Susannah Reid, Piers Morgan, Ross Kemp and, more randomly, Gordon Ramsay will present reports on subjects as diverse as the lucrative international cocaine trade and gang warfare inside the notorious Barlinnie Prison in Glasgow. Gerard O’Donovan Mr Robot Amazon Prime, from today Techno-paranoia is still the name of the game as the US hacker drama returns for a much-anticipated third series. With 10 new episodes to get through, clearly the first thing to sort out is the fate of the not-always-reliable narrator Elliot Alderson (Rami Malek), who was shot in last season’s cliffhanger. Dynasty Netflix, from today As in the original, bling, bubbles and bonking dominate this 22-episode reboot of one of the Eighties’ silliest US soap operas. Once again it follows the boardroom and bedroom escapades of Denver’s super-rich Carrington clan.  PGA Tour Golf: The CIMB Classic Sky Sports Main Event, 6.00am Coverage of the opening day’s play at the annual event from the Kuala Lumpur Golf & Country Club in Malaysia, where Justin Thomas has won the last two titles.  Council House Crackdown BBC One, 8.00pm Michelle Ackerley uncovers more tales of social housing fraud as council investigators stake out a woman suspected of faking a disability and a tenant alleged to be illegally subletting housing association property. Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm; BBC Two Wales, 9.00pm The final programme in this affecting series again focuses on the tough decisions the London Ambulance Service faces when its slim resources are stretched to capacity and calls must be prioritised. Russia with Simon Reeve BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 11.15pm This is by far the best travelogue Reeve has done for a while, and for this final leg, the adventurer starts in Crimea, where he weighs up the political and economic costs of its annexation by Russia. From there, he travels north through the vast plains of western Russia to where the country’s real power has always resided, Moscow and St Petersburg.  Educating Greater Manchester Channel 4, 9.00pm In tonight’s episode, it’s Valentine’s Day and romance is in the air for even the school’s youngest pupils. Plus, a recently qualified teacher who’s come to Harrop Fold looking for a new challenge gets more than he bargained for. GO The History of Comedy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This new documentary has an overambitious title for a series that focuses almost entirely on US comedy of fairly recent vintage. Still, it’s an interesting thematic survey of how certain types of laughter making have evolved in the last century. GO Titanic (1997) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Eleven Oscars won and more than a billion dollars taken worldwide in ticket sales. James Cameron deserved his success with this opulent blockbuster about the sinking of the RMS Titanic, a story that has a grand romance between penniless artist Jack (Leonardo DiCaprio) and rich American girl Rose (Kate Winslet) at its heart. Even viewers determined to find it soppy are liable to be swept along by the emotion. Heist (2001) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 10.50pm  Prepare to be triple-crossed, duped and bewildered by this piece of con-artistry, which pulls the rug out from under your feet with such regularity that it’s tempting just to give up and lie down. Gene Hackman, Danny DeVito and Rebecca Pidgeon set out to steal some gold; needless to say, it does not go smoothly. There are excellent performances, plus endless twists and cracking dialogue. Just Go with It (2011) ★★☆☆☆ 5STAR, 11.00pm  Adam Sandler stars in this remake of the 1971 comedy Cactus Flower (itself adapted from a Broadway stage play by Abe Burrows), as Danny, a single plastic surgeon in Los Angeles who feigns an unhappy marriage in order to have no-strings-attached flings with women. What follows is a complex low-grade romantic farce which is saved by a sparky performance from Jennifer Aniston as Danny’s office manager and best friend. Friday 13 October Life on the edge: Ray Mears is in Australia Credit: ITV Australian Wilderness with Ray Mears ITV, 8.00pm; not STV/UTV/Wales The great appeal of Ray Mears’s wildlife documentaries is his no-nonsense approach. Where other presenters rush around telling you how exciting and amazing and wonderful everything is, Mears tends to amble gently through it, explaining a few facts and otherwise allowing you to gaze at the beauty unfurling across your TV screen. It’s an approach that pays high dividends in this new series about the Australian wilderness, a landscape that is vast, beautiful and oddly eerie.  The opening episode focuses more on sea than land (although there is time for a quick trek through rocky desert towards the Indian Ocean) as Mears dives on Ningaloo Reef, the longest fringing coral reef in the world. After a pleasant meeting with some friendly stingrays and a few “wish you were here” shots of the turquoise sea, the real star of the show heaves into sight as Mears and his companions find themselves swimming alongside a passing whale shark, the largest fish in the world. “This is what we’ve all been waiting for,” says Mears as the fish floats into view. It’s a breathtaking, beautiful moment and one which manages to shake even Mears out of his habitual calm. Sarah Hughes Lore Amazon Prime, from today Not for the faint of heart, this disquieting new documentary series is based on Aaron Mahnke’s popular podcast of the same name, with each episode exploring the story behind pop culture’s most legendary horror myths, from vampires and werewolves to possessed dolls.  Mindhunter Netflix, from today Imagine Se7en crossed with Zodiac and Silence of the Lambs and you’ll get the gist of this excellent new detective drama executive produced by David Fincher and Charlize Theron. Based on the non-fiction book Mind Hunter: Inside the FBI’s Elite Serial Crime Unit and set in the late Seventies, it follows a pair of FBI agents (Jonathan Groff and Holt McCallany) who interview and analyse imprisoned mass murderers in order to better understand serial killers. The first episode, which is shot by master of murk Fincher, moves languidly – but is no less absorbing. PS International T20 Cricket: India v Australia Friday, Sky Sports Main Event, 2.20pm The Rajiv Gandhi International Stadium in Hyderabad is the setting as India and Australia contest the final game in a three-match T20 series. Unreported World Channel 4, 7.30pm On August 14, a mudslide in Sierra Leone, caused by torrential rain, destroyed the small town of Regent on the outskirts of the capital, Freetown. Hundreds lost their lives. In this affecting report, Seyi Rhodes talks to the survivors and the rescue teams desperately trying to find those still missing.  Crystal Maze / Have I Got News for You Channel 4, 8.00pm / BBC One, 9.00pm Richard Ayoade fans, rejoice: tonight you can see him twice – somewhat fitting given that he once wrote and directed a black comedy called The Double. First up, he continues to add warmth and irony to a rousing revamp of The Crystal Maze, as the current series concludes. Then, in HIGNFY, he puts that bone-dry wit to good use yet again, as he guest presents the long-running news quiz.  Cold Feet ITV, 9.00pm Affectionate writing and a great ensemble are the foundations on which Mark Bullen’s middle-aged comedy drama are built. Tonight, as this Nineties-show revival continues, Adam (James Nesbitt) and Pete (John Thomson) throw a joint 50th birthday dinner.  Porridge BBC One, 9.30pm  On the subject of revivals, this sort-of sequel to the classic Seventies comedy continues to be so-so. Tonight, there’s a new prison officer on the scene. Patrick Smith The Meyerowitz Stories (2017) ★★★★☆ Netflix, from today  It’s been a long time coming but Adam Sandler is finally in a good film. He plays Danny, a New Yorker whose unemployment and divorce has left him defined purely in terms of his bloodline. The narrative arc is about Danny, sister Jean and half-brother Matthew reconciling themselves with their curmudgeon father Harold (Dustin Hoffman). Emma Thompson is woozily uproarious as Harold’s wife. Lion (2016) ★★★★☆ Amazon Prime, from today Derived from a 2012 memoir by the grown Saroo Brierley, called A Long Way Home, this is the story of a lost boy: a five-year-old Indian who grew up in the Eighties in the area around Khandwa. With no paper trail or family name, he becomes a lost cause, eventually shipped off to kindly foster parents in Tasmania, played by Nicole Kidman and David Wenham. The excellent script, by Luke Davies, sticks rigidly to Saroo’s own point of view. Good Will Hunting (1997) ★★★★☆ W, 9.00pm  Matt Damon and Ben Affleck won an Oscar for Best Screenplay with this stirring if occasionally gloopy story. Will Hunting (Damon) is a hot-headed, 20-year-old janitor with a photographic memory and an untapped genius for mathematics. Robin Williams plays the inspiring therapist who channels Will’s rage into solving quadratics, and Minnie Driver is his brainy, Harvard graduate love interest.   Television previewers Catherine Gee, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: Louis Theroux returns, plus more Electric Dreams

Sunday 8 October Louis Theroux: Dark States – Heroin Town BBC Two, 9.00pm Louis Theroux’s second coming as a chronicler of society’s underdogs, outcasts and victims continues with this examination of life and death on the fringes (documentaries on murder and sex trafficking are to come). He is in Huntington, West Virginia, a former industrial town in the grip of a drug epidemic fuelled by Big Pharma’s record of encouraging doctors to overmedicate workplace injuries: here fatal-overdose rates are 13 times the national average and one in 10 babies are born with an opiate addiction. Such is the extent of the problem that local efforts are focused on containment as much as prevention, and the emergency services are overstretched while the rehab centres struggling. As ever, Theroux’s combination of apparent guilelessness and fearlessness bears fruit in the intimate encounters. Whether teasing out the distressing realities of one addict and the partner who assists her, or prodding away at the motives of another who seems superficially content, he gleans genuinely valuable insights. One thing is clear in this incisive and troubling film, their spirits crushed, any potential is strangled and optimism is in diminishing supply. Gabriel Tate Formula 1: Japanese Grand Prix Sky Sports F1, 5.30am Despite Max Verstappen’s impressive victory in the Malaysian Grand Prix, Lewis Hamilton has plenty to be cheerful about as F1 heads to Japan. Indeed, by finishing second last weekend, having toiled with his Mercedes all weekend, Hamilton extended his lead in the drivers’ championship to 34 points, with five races of the season remaining. His nearest rival, Sebastian Vettel, on the other hand, is out of sorts: having not finished in Singapore, then started at the back of the grid in Malaysia but finished in fourth place. He’ll need to be much improved at the Suzuka Circuit. Premiership Rugby Union: Saracens v Wasps BT Sport 1, 2.30pm Having lost three of their opening five matches, the most recent of which was a 25-9 defeat at home to Bath, Wasps need a win to boost morale. The problem is they’re away at Saracens, who’ve won four from five and are looking imperious, as anyone who witnessed their 25-3 trouncing of Worcester last weekend will attest. Among the scorers that day was England full-back Alex Goode.  International Football: Lithuania v England ITV, 4.30pm England round off an eventful qualifying campaign that began with them replacing Sam Allardyce as manager with Gareth Southgate. Since then Wayne Rooney, England’s top scorer, has called time on his international career, while younger players such as Harry Kane and Dele Alli have grown in stature. The former, who has been in sublime form for Spurs this season, has been named captain and will be confident of adding to tally this afternoon at the LFF Stadium in Vilnius. When these sides met in Match, goals from Jermain Defoe – his first for England since 2013 – and Jamie Vardy gave Southgate’s side a 2-0 victory.  The Last Post BBC One, 9.00pm Peter Moffat’s evocative Sixties drama continues with the arrival of an American war reporter, Martha Franklin (Essie Davis), which disrupts the delicate dynamic on the military base, while insurgent leader Abdul-Kadir Hakim is targeted for the murder of Captain Page (Joseph Kennedy). Electric Dreams: Crazy Diamond Channel 4, 9.00pm In this episode of the Philip K Dick adaptations, Ed Morris (Steve Buscemi) is offered a chance to inject some excitement into his drab life with wife Sally (Julia Davis) by Jill (Sidse Babbett Knudsen), a synthetic human. The plot is cluttered, but the ending is satisfying indeed. The Gifted Fox, 9.00pm Marvel’s colonisation of the small screen continues with this entry in the X-Men universe. While The Gifted is a far cry from the mind-bending visions of Noah Hawley’s Legion, it provides plenty of bang for your buck in its tales of a family, headed by True Blood’s Stephen Moyer, that is rocked by revelations that its children have mutant abilities and go on the run from dastardly government forces. Festival No 6 Sky Arts, 9.00pm Highlights from the deeply eccentric beanfeast in Portmeirion, the Italianate Welsh coastal home of The Prisoner TV series. Expect music from Mogwai, Bloc Party and the wonderful Flaming Lips. The Sky at Night BBC Four, 10.00pm Maggie Aderin-Pocock considers the renewal of interest in manned missions to the moon, and the role of tech companies in funding and driving these new initiatives. GT Snowfall BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI This new 10-parter from John Singleton (Boyz N the Hood) traces the shockwaves from the crack cocaine epidemic that ravaged Los Angeles in the Eighties. In the first episode, we meet Franklin Saint (Damson Idris), who is living with his mum and senses an opportunity that will change his life, and his city. It’s a notch below Narcos, but it’s still compelling and sharp. Sir Bobby Charlton at 80 BBC One, 10.30pm Alex Ferguson, Eric Cantona and more pay tribute to an Old Trafford great in a hagiography, yet Charlton is a man of such decency and dignity that it’s hard to object. GT Dial M for Murder (1954) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 1.15pm  It’s not quite on the same plane of brilliance as Vertigo, but Hitchcock’s adaptation of Frederick Knott’s stage play is still a briskly efficient exercise in suspense. Tony Wendice (Ray Milland) is trying to have his socialite wife Margot (Grace Kelly) murdered, after she has an affair with a writer. When Tony’s first plan fails, he dreams up another that’s even more devious. This Sporting Life (1963) ★★★★ London Live, 8.00pm  It’s Yorkshire accents and monochrome realism as Richard Harris goes down the mines, plays rugby and has an affair. As an uncompromising portrait of male attitudes, Lindsay Anderson’s stunning adaptation of David Storey’s novel is like a punch to the gut, and a direct antecedent of Scorsese’s Raging Bull. Rachel Roberts (star of earlier kitchen sink drama Saturday Night and Sunday Morning) co-stars. The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (2013) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 11.05pm  Mild-mannered Walter Mitty’s life is controlled  by his overbearing mother. He finds his escape by imagining himself living in the worlds pictured on the covers of Life magazine  and becoming a pilot, a sea captain and couturier.  Ben Stiller directs and stars in this loose revamping of the James Thurber’s story: the result is a flawed but  still entertaining and enjoyable adventure. Monday 9 October At your service: Steph and Dom Parker Credit: Channel 4 Steph and Dom’s One Star to Five Star Channel 4, 5.30pm Daytime programming isn’t normally where we look for originality, so it comes as no surprise to find little in this new weekday show hosted by Steph and Dom Parker, those once, seemingly ever-sozzled breakout stars from Gogglebox. What there is, though, is fun and lots of it, even if at times it can be hard to tell whether it is intentional or not. Like the illegitimate offspring of Four in a Bed and any number of hackneyed Hotel Inspector-style shows, this series sees the Parkers take their own limited experience as B & B owners in Kent as proof that they know everything there is to know about the international hospitality industry and descend on an ailing hotel for a week with a view to making it marginally more appealing.  They begin with the dowdy Ransdale Hotel in Bridlington, a slightly tatty, underperforming establishment where they reckon seaside-themed rooms, kedgeree for breakfast and a party atmosphere in the bar will get the occupancy levels up from the current “negligible”. Could getting the clientele drunk cause the approval ratings to peak? It’s probably more likely than the kedgeree. Gerard O’Donovan The Human Body: Secrets of Your Life Revealed BBC Two, 9.00pm In the series’ concluding part, Chris and Xand van Tulleken explore how experiences shape our minds and bodies, and show for the very first time how memories are formed in the brain and continue to influence us throughout our lives.  Tunes for Tyrants: Music and Power with Suzy Klein BBC Four, 9.00pm In this edition of the documentary series, Suzy Klein explores the Thirties and how classical music, while it was exploited to idealise violent nationalism and prop up the totalitarian regimes of the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany, was also be a source of coded resistance. Liar ITV, 9.00pm In a torrid penultimate episode, Laura (Joanne Froggatt) convinces ex-boyfriend Tom (Warren Brown) to help bring Andrew Earlham (Ioan Gruffudd) to justice as she’s forced to resort to a somewhat unusual method of forcing a confession out of him. W1A BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI This is a terrific edition of the sitcom. As the crisis over the axing of the BBC’s Big Swing Band goes viral, Head of Values Ian Fletcher (Hugh Bonneville) once again finds himself caught in the media cross-hairs.  The Vietnam War BBC Four, 10.00pm & 10.55pm Another double helping of Ken Burns’s stately and impeccably researched history of the Vietnam War rolls us on through 1967 when, with casualties mounting and the Viet Cong striking back in the infamous Tet offensive, a US victory looked increasingly beyond reach. Timewasters ITV2, 10.00pm & 10.30pm ITV2 launches a season of new comedies with this sharply scripted sitcom about a struggling four-piece jazz band who get stuck in Twenties London when their time machine breaks down. GO After the News ITV, 10.45pm; NI, 12.45am; not STV; Wales, 11.15pm Current affairs presenters Emma Barnett and Nick Ferrari are hot tickets just now following some hard-hitting “holiday cover” hosting on Newsnight this summer. Now ITV has signed them up for this new nightly debate show that takes its subject matter straight from ITV News at Ten. After the unmitigated flop of The Nightly Show, ITV will be keen to for this to shine. GO Pimpernel Smith (1941, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 3.50pm  Leslie Howard, famed for his role in Gone with the Wind, directs and stars in this deft drama set in 1939 Berlin. An academic (Howard) recruits students to go to Europe under the guise of an archaeological dig. However, his real mission is to smuggle victims of Nazi persecution out of Germany. An absorbing film and, retrospectively, quite haunting since Howard was shot down in the war by a Nazi plane two years later. The Birth of a Nation (2016) ★★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 4.10pm and daily  Writer-director-star Nate Parker’s attempt to reappropriate the notorious racism of DW Griffith’s 1915 foundation myth and spin it on its axis is a graceless, pretentious mallet to the head of history. Parker (whose galvanising performance is much the strongest) tells the story of Nat Turner’s 1831 slave rebellion from the side of the true victims. Se7en (1995) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm  Gluttony, avarice, envy, sloth, wrath, lust and pride; the seven deadly sins are explored graphically, and imaginatively, in this gloomy thriller from director David Fincher. It follows a detective (an outstanding Morgan Freeman) and his rookie partner (Brad Pitt) on the hunt for a maniac who kills those guilty of the above vices. Brutal and gripping, with an ending you won’t forget in a hurry. Gwyneth Paltrow and Kevin Spacey co-star. Tuesday 10 October In the field: Michelle Keegan as Georgie Lane Credit: BBC Our Girl: Nepal Tour BBC One, 9.00pm Michelle Keegan returns as dedicated army medic Georgie Lane in Tony Grounds’s entertaining if soapy army drama. This time the main action is in Nepal, where Georgie and the rest of 2 Section, including Ben Aldridge’s patrician Captain Charles James, are posted to provide humanitarian relief following an earthquake.  This being Our Girl, the personal relationships are as important as the action and Georgie soon finds herself having a perfectly arched eyebrow-off with new recruit Maisie Richards (the excellent Shalom Brune-Franklin). Yet behind the jokes there are serious points raised about the way in which the army operates, and whether individualism ever has a place. Fans of the will they/won’t they romance between Georgie and her slick former fiancé Elvis (Luke Pasqualino) will be disappointed by how little the latter features in this opening episode (just one brief scene in Syria before the main action begins), although Rudi Dharmalingam gallantly steps into the breach as impassioned NGO worker Milan. The real joy, however, comes not from the plot twists but from the expert way in which Grounds captures both the banter and boredom of army life. Sarah Hughes Once Upon a Time Netflix, from today This popular fantasy series that follows fairy-tale characters living in the real world returns for its seventh season. It marks a reboot of sorts, with our now-adult hero Henry Mills (Jared S Gilmore) finding himself in the same position as when the story began. The Great British Bake Off Channel 4, 8.00pm The cooking competition continues to roll out new themes, with this episode marking the first Italian Week. But you can be sure that it won’t have anything to do with making a bog-standard spag bol. Unfortunately the weather is not on their side, as the contestants suffer in the hottest temperatures ever recorded in the tent. Russia 1917: Countdown to Revolution BBC Two, 9.00pm Juliet Stevenson narrates this insightful documentary made to mark the centenary of the Russian Revolution. Martin Amis, Orlando Figes and Helen Rappaport are among those discussing and recounting how Russia transitioned from a tsarist autocracy to become the first communist state – and the roles played by Lenin, Trotsky and Stalin. Concorde: A Supersonic Story BBC Four, 9.00pm The Concorde was considered the “most glamorous plane ever built” – until it was retired in 2003 following the crash of Air France Flight 4590. But its story is a fascinating one. Sophie Okonedo narrates this tale of rows between French and British governments, while former passengers recount queuing for the lavatory with celebrities.  The Deuce Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Vincent (James Franco) is putting the finishing touches to his new bar, in this third episode of the gritty, Seventies New York-set drama. But then an unexpected silent partner turns up. CG Celebrity Hunted Channel 4, 9.15pm The real-life thriller returns for a celebrity charity edition. Anneka Rice and former Strictly winner Jay McGuiness are among those attempting to avoid detection.  Later Live… with Jools Holland BBC Two, 10.00pm; N Ireland, 11.15pm Former Led Zeppelin singer Robert Plant performs live with his band Sensational Space Shifters. He’s joined by Beck, with songs from his first new album in three years. Catherine Gee Ice Age: Continental Drift (2012) ★★☆☆☆ E4, 8.00pm Surprisingly, the Ice Age series has accrued more lucre than Pixar’s Toy Story trilogy. But this fourth film is the thinnest and redeemed only by a demented squirrel. Once again, the story revolves around Manny the mammoth (Ray Romano), Sid the sloth (John Leguizamo) and Diego the smilodon (Denis Leary), who are separated from their herd thanks to the shifting of the Earth’s land masses. Southpaw (2015) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Jake Gyllenhaal lays his body on the line for 0a boxing drama so predictable that you could set your watch by it. If only someone had devoted equivalent stamina to the screenplay, we might have an actual movie on our hands. Nevertheless, it’s rousingly entertaining as Gyllenhaal’s Billy “The Great” Hope learns the art of subterfuge from a new coach (Forest Whitaker). Rachel McAdams co-stars. I Origins (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film 4, 11.25pm  Eyes and souls have been cinematically intertwined since at least 1929, when, in Un Chien Andalou, Buñuel and Dalí carved out their visionary manifesto with the quick swipe of a razor blade across a plump and oozing eyeball. In Mike Cahill’s film, the metaphor trots off down a strange and lyrical new trail when a biology student (Michael Pitt) encounters a model (Astrid Bergès-Frisbey) who makes him question scientific fact. Wednesday 11 October Not sitting well: David Mitchell as Stephen Credit: Channel 4 Back Channel 4, 10.00pm The ratings may have been a little underwhelming, but in contrast to David Mitchell and Robert Webb’s tonally uncertain and muddled Ambassadors, Back has been a triumph. Simon Blackwell’s often brutal, witheringly funny script has granted the leading men roles that riff on their Peep Show personas of Mark and Jez without ever becoming beholden to them. Prodigal foster son Andrew’s (Webb) victory over biological offspring Stephen (Mitchell) is apparently complete, as the former struts around his flourishing gastropub, bragging about his chef’s clafoutis while the latter moulders in a caravan. “He’s stolen my life and he’s living it better than me,” Stephen fumes, impotently. Their father’s memorial party – and the associated speeches – offer Stephen one final shot at redemption: when a clutch of other returning foster children eclipse Andrew’s efforts to ingratiate himself, Stephen has a revelation that sends him on a demented trip of vengeance to fill the gaps in his rival’s life story. Finding profound bathos in often gasp-inducing misanthropy and reuniting the best British double act around (pace Vic and Bob), Back undoubtedly merits a return. Gabriel Tate The Apprentice BBC One, 9.00pm Enjoying a new lease of life after a disappointing series last year, reality TV’s version of an extended job interview this week unleashes the candidates’ aesthetic pretensions by asking them to turn interior designers at a five-star hotel. The mind boggles at the bills that needed settling at the end of this particular stay. The Detectives: Murder on the Streets BBC Two, 9.00pm This utterly involving and consistently impressive documentary series comes to a climax with the arrival of the trial in the case of the murder of young homeless man Daniel Smith. This is true crime of the most empathetic and socially responsible kind. Britain’s Lost Masterpieces BBC Four, 9.00pm Dr Bendor Grosvenor and Emma Dabiri visit Carmathenshire County Museum, home to a damaged portrait of a 16th-century Earl whose provenance is disputed. Doc Martin ITV, 9.00pm Receptionist Morwenna’s (Jessica Ransom) parents pay her a surprise visit and present Doc Martin (Martin Clunes) with a dilemma as the amiable comedy drama ambles through another hour. Ray Donovan Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Susan Sarandon has been both a welcome addition and much-needed counterpart to this occasionally testosterone-heavy series, with Liev Schreiber’s eponymous heavy facing the repercussions of years of making enemies in high places. Norskov Channel 4, 10.35pm The titular Danish industrial port is blighted by a drug problem. Enter ace detective Tom Noack (Thomas Levin), an old acquaintance of the city’s mayor to clean the place up and, inevitably, disturb a few ghosts. It’s a slick Nordic noir – the whole series will be available on C4’s online service Walter Presents after this episode airs. GT Inside Birmingham Children’s Hospital More4, 10.00pm The BBC and Channel 4 continue to match each other, blow for blow, with medical documentaries. This latest series follows a girl diagnosed with a life-changing condition, a boy with leukaemia and a five-year-old whose epilepsy is proving increasingly hard to manage. As so often, their stoicism and resilience are humbling and very affecting. GT Charade (1963) ★★★★☆ Film4, 4.35pm Audrey Hepburn as a temperamental-but-alluring damsel in distress and Cary Grant as a shadowy charmer are characters that the two actors played over and over during their careers. But they do so exceptionally in this suspense comedy from Stanley Donen, often referred to as the best Hitchcock movie that Hitchcock never made. Hepburn is the widow being trailed by four men hunting for her late husband’s stolen fortune. Starship Troopers (1997) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 10.00pm  On first appearances, this Oscar-nominated sci-fi action thriller looks distressingly silly: in the distant future, a group of American high-school friends join the armed forces to do intergalactic war with some malicious insectoid aliens, or “Bugs”. The whole of humanity is at risk. Thankfully director Paul Verhoeven deftly underpins the whole thing with wicked satirical verve and no-nonsense action. Dying Laughing (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Arts, 10.30pm  Dozens of stand-up comics, including Kevin Hart, Jerry Seinfeld and Amy Schumer, contribute to this understated but rather wonderful documentary film about the infrequent highs and relentless lows of trying to make people laugh. It can be painful – one anecdote about “bombing” on stage is particularly uncomfortable – but then a comic will recall that first great gig and you can just tell that all the anguish has been worth it. Thursday 12 October Every second counts: McDonald follows a murder investigation Credit: ITV An Hour to Catch a Killer with Trevor McDonald ITV, 9.00pm Trevor McDonald’s abiding fascination with such murky matters as serial murder and organised crime, especially in the United States, is well established. For the first programme in ITV’s new Crime and Punishment season, McDonald examines a key concept of modern crime detection: how the decisions made by investigating officers in the so-called “Golden Hour” – the first 60 minutes of a murder inquiry – have a vital impact on whether or not a killer is caught and successfully prosecuted. And here he examines a case much closer to home. With full access to the Northumbria Police Homicide Unit’s investigation into the murder of 24-year-old graduate Alice Ruggles last October, the film follows the case from the moment the murder was reported, through every layer of the investigation as it develops, to the moment the all-too-obvious prime suspect is located and charged.  Later in this series, Susannah Reid, Piers Morgan, Ross Kemp and, more randomly, Gordon Ramsay will present reports on subjects as diverse as the lucrative international cocaine trade and gang warfare inside the notorious Barlinnie Prison in Glasgow. Gerard O’Donovan Mr Robot Amazon Prime, from today Techno-paranoia is still the name of the game as the US hacker drama returns for a much-anticipated third series. With 10 new episodes to get through, clearly the first thing to sort out is the fate of the not-always-reliable narrator Elliot Alderson (Rami Malek), who was shot in last season’s cliffhanger. Dynasty Netflix, from today As in the original, bling, bubbles and bonking dominate this 22-episode reboot of one of the Eighties’ silliest US soap operas. Once again it follows the boardroom and bedroom escapades of Denver’s super-rich Carrington clan.  PGA Tour Golf: The CIMB Classic Sky Sports Main Event, 6.00am Coverage of the opening day’s play at the annual event from the Kuala Lumpur Golf & Country Club in Malaysia, where Justin Thomas has won the last two titles.  Council House Crackdown BBC One, 8.00pm Michelle Ackerley uncovers more tales of social housing fraud as council investigators stake out a woman suspected of faking a disability and a tenant alleged to be illegally subletting housing association property. Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm; BBC Two Wales, 9.00pm The final programme in this affecting series again focuses on the tough decisions the London Ambulance Service faces when its slim resources are stretched to capacity and calls must be prioritised. Russia with Simon Reeve BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 11.15pm This is by far the best travelogue Reeve has done for a while, and for this final leg, the adventurer starts in Crimea, where he weighs up the political and economic costs of its annexation by Russia. From there, he travels north through the vast plains of western Russia to where the country’s real power has always resided, Moscow and St Petersburg.  Educating Greater Manchester Channel 4, 9.00pm In tonight’s episode, it’s Valentine’s Day and romance is in the air for even the school’s youngest pupils. Plus, a recently qualified teacher who’s come to Harrop Fold looking for a new challenge gets more than he bargained for. GO The History of Comedy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This new documentary has an overambitious title for a series that focuses almost entirely on US comedy of fairly recent vintage. Still, it’s an interesting thematic survey of how certain types of laughter making have evolved in the last century. GO Titanic (1997) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Eleven Oscars won and more than a billion dollars taken worldwide in ticket sales. James Cameron deserved his success with this opulent blockbuster about the sinking of the RMS Titanic, a story that has a grand romance between penniless artist Jack (Leonardo DiCaprio) and rich American girl Rose (Kate Winslet) at its heart. Even viewers determined to find it soppy are liable to be swept along by the emotion. Heist (2001) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 10.50pm  Prepare to be triple-crossed, duped and bewildered by this piece of con-artistry, which pulls the rug out from under your feet with such regularity that it’s tempting just to give up and lie down. Gene Hackman, Danny DeVito and Rebecca Pidgeon set out to steal some gold; needless to say, it does not go smoothly. There are excellent performances, plus endless twists and cracking dialogue. Just Go with It (2011) ★★☆☆☆ 5STAR, 11.00pm  Adam Sandler stars in this remake of the 1971 comedy Cactus Flower (itself adapted from a Broadway stage play by Abe Burrows), as Danny, a single plastic surgeon in Los Angeles who feigns an unhappy marriage in order to have no-strings-attached flings with women. What follows is a complex low-grade romantic farce which is saved by a sparky performance from Jennifer Aniston as Danny’s office manager and best friend. Friday 13 October Life on the edge: Ray Mears is in Australia Credit: ITV Australian Wilderness with Ray Mears ITV, 8.00pm; not STV/UTV/Wales The great appeal of Ray Mears’s wildlife documentaries is his no-nonsense approach. Where other presenters rush around telling you how exciting and amazing and wonderful everything is, Mears tends to amble gently through it, explaining a few facts and otherwise allowing you to gaze at the beauty unfurling across your TV screen. It’s an approach that pays high dividends in this new series about the Australian wilderness, a landscape that is vast, beautiful and oddly eerie.  The opening episode focuses more on sea than land (although there is time for a quick trek through rocky desert towards the Indian Ocean) as Mears dives on Ningaloo Reef, the longest fringing coral reef in the world. After a pleasant meeting with some friendly stingrays and a few “wish you were here” shots of the turquoise sea, the real star of the show heaves into sight as Mears and his companions find themselves swimming alongside a passing whale shark, the largest fish in the world. “This is what we’ve all been waiting for,” says Mears as the fish floats into view. It’s a breathtaking, beautiful moment and one which manages to shake even Mears out of his habitual calm. Sarah Hughes Lore Amazon Prime, from today Not for the faint of heart, this disquieting new documentary series is based on Aaron Mahnke’s popular podcast of the same name, with each episode exploring the story behind pop culture’s most legendary horror myths, from vampires and werewolves to possessed dolls.  Mindhunter Netflix, from today Imagine Se7en crossed with Zodiac and Silence of the Lambs and you’ll get the gist of this excellent new detective drama executive produced by David Fincher and Charlize Theron. Based on the non-fiction book Mind Hunter: Inside the FBI’s Elite Serial Crime Unit and set in the late Seventies, it follows a pair of FBI agents (Jonathan Groff and Holt McCallany) who interview and analyse imprisoned mass murderers in order to better understand serial killers. The first episode, which is shot by master of murk Fincher, moves languidly – but is no less absorbing. PS International T20 Cricket: India v Australia Friday, Sky Sports Main Event, 2.20pm The Rajiv Gandhi International Stadium in Hyderabad is the setting as India and Australia contest the final game in a three-match T20 series. Unreported World Channel 4, 7.30pm On August 14, a mudslide in Sierra Leone, caused by torrential rain, destroyed the small town of Regent on the outskirts of the capital, Freetown. Hundreds lost their lives. In this affecting report, Seyi Rhodes talks to the survivors and the rescue teams desperately trying to find those still missing.  Crystal Maze / Have I Got News for You Channel 4, 8.00pm / BBC One, 9.00pm Richard Ayoade fans, rejoice: tonight you can see him twice – somewhat fitting given that he once wrote and directed a black comedy called The Double. First up, he continues to add warmth and irony to a rousing revamp of The Crystal Maze, as the current series concludes. Then, in HIGNFY, he puts that bone-dry wit to good use yet again, as he guest presents the long-running news quiz.  Cold Feet ITV, 9.00pm Affectionate writing and a great ensemble are the foundations on which Mark Bullen’s middle-aged comedy drama are built. Tonight, as this Nineties-show revival continues, Adam (James Nesbitt) and Pete (John Thomson) throw a joint 50th birthday dinner.  Porridge BBC One, 9.30pm  On the subject of revivals, this sort-of sequel to the classic Seventies comedy continues to be so-so. Tonight, there’s a new prison officer on the scene. Patrick Smith The Meyerowitz Stories (2017) ★★★★☆ Netflix, from today  It’s been a long time coming but Adam Sandler is finally in a good film. He plays Danny, a New Yorker whose unemployment and divorce has left him defined purely in terms of his bloodline. The narrative arc is about Danny, sister Jean and half-brother Matthew reconciling themselves with their curmudgeon father Harold (Dustin Hoffman). Emma Thompson is woozily uproarious as Harold’s wife. Lion (2016) ★★★★☆ Amazon Prime, from today Derived from a 2012 memoir by the grown Saroo Brierley, called A Long Way Home, this is the story of a lost boy: a five-year-old Indian who grew up in the Eighties in the area around Khandwa. With no paper trail or family name, he becomes a lost cause, eventually shipped off to kindly foster parents in Tasmania, played by Nicole Kidman and David Wenham. The excellent script, by Luke Davies, sticks rigidly to Saroo’s own point of view. Good Will Hunting (1997) ★★★★☆ W, 9.00pm  Matt Damon and Ben Affleck won an Oscar for Best Screenplay with this stirring if occasionally gloopy story. Will Hunting (Damon) is a hot-headed, 20-year-old janitor with a photographic memory and an untapped genius for mathematics. Robin Williams plays the inspiring therapist who channels Will’s rage into solving quadratics, and Minnie Driver is his brainy, Harvard graduate love interest.   Television previewers Catherine Gee, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: Louis Theroux returns, plus more Electric Dreams

Sunday 8 October Louis Theroux: Dark States – Heroin Town BBC Two, 9.00pm Louis Theroux’s second coming as a chronicler of society’s underdogs, outcasts and victims continues with this examination of life and death on the fringes (documentaries on murder and sex trafficking are to come). He is in Huntington, West Virginia, a former industrial town in the grip of a drug epidemic fuelled by Big Pharma’s record of encouraging doctors to overmedicate workplace injuries: here fatal-overdose rates are 13 times the national average and one in 10 babies are born with an opiate addiction. Such is the extent of the problem that local efforts are focused on containment as much as prevention, and the emergency services are overstretched while the rehab centres struggling. As ever, Theroux’s combination of apparent guilelessness and fearlessness bears fruit in the intimate encounters. Whether teasing out the distressing realities of one addict and the partner who assists her, or prodding away at the motives of another who seems superficially content, he gleans genuinely valuable insights. One thing is clear in this incisive and troubling film, their spirits crushed, any potential is strangled and optimism is in diminishing supply. Gabriel Tate Formula 1: Japanese Grand Prix Sky Sports F1, 5.30am Despite Max Verstappen’s impressive victory in the Malaysian Grand Prix, Lewis Hamilton has plenty to be cheerful about as F1 heads to Japan. Indeed, by finishing second last weekend, having toiled with his Mercedes all weekend, Hamilton extended his lead in the drivers’ championship to 34 points, with five races of the season remaining. His nearest rival, Sebastian Vettel, on the other hand, is out of sorts: having not finished in Singapore, then started at the back of the grid in Malaysia but finished in fourth place. He’ll need to be much improved at the Suzuka Circuit. Premiership Rugby Union: Saracens v Wasps BT Sport 1, 2.30pm Having lost three of their opening five matches, the most recent of which was a 25-9 defeat at home to Bath, Wasps need a win to boost morale. The problem is they’re away at Saracens, who’ve won four from five and are looking imperious, as anyone who witnessed their 25-3 trouncing of Worcester last weekend will attest. Among the scorers that day was England full-back Alex Goode.  International Football: Lithuania v England ITV, 4.30pm England round off an eventful qualifying campaign that began with them replacing Sam Allardyce as manager with Gareth Southgate. Since then Wayne Rooney, England’s top scorer, has called time on his international career, while younger players such as Harry Kane and Dele Alli have grown in stature. The former, who has been in sublime form for Spurs this season, has been named captain and will be confident of adding to tally this afternoon at the LFF Stadium in Vilnius. When these sides met in Match, goals from Jermain Defoe – his first for England since 2013 – and Jamie Vardy gave Southgate’s side a 2-0 victory.  The Last Post BBC One, 9.00pm Peter Moffat’s evocative Sixties drama continues with the arrival of an American war reporter, Martha Franklin (Essie Davis), which disrupts the delicate dynamic on the military base, while insurgent leader Abdul-Kadir Hakim is targeted for the murder of Captain Page (Joseph Kennedy). Electric Dreams: Crazy Diamond Channel 4, 9.00pm In this episode of the Philip K Dick adaptations, Ed Morris (Steve Buscemi) is offered a chance to inject some excitement into his drab life with wife Sally (Julia Davis) by Jill (Sidse Babbett Knudsen), a synthetic human. The plot is cluttered, but the ending is satisfying indeed. The Gifted Fox, 9.00pm Marvel’s colonisation of the small screen continues with this entry in the X-Men universe. While The Gifted is a far cry from the mind-bending visions of Noah Hawley’s Legion, it provides plenty of bang for your buck in its tales of a family, headed by True Blood’s Stephen Moyer, that is rocked by revelations that its children have mutant abilities and go on the run from dastardly government forces. Festival No 6 Sky Arts, 9.00pm Highlights from the deeply eccentric beanfeast in Portmeirion, the Italianate Welsh coastal home of The Prisoner TV series. Expect music from Mogwai, Bloc Party and the wonderful Flaming Lips. The Sky at Night BBC Four, 10.00pm Maggie Aderin-Pocock considers the renewal of interest in manned missions to the moon, and the role of tech companies in funding and driving these new initiatives. GT Snowfall BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI This new 10-parter from John Singleton (Boyz N the Hood) traces the shockwaves from the crack cocaine epidemic that ravaged Los Angeles in the Eighties. In the first episode, we meet Franklin Saint (Damson Idris), who is living with his mum and senses an opportunity that will change his life, and his city. It’s a notch below Narcos, but it’s still compelling and sharp. Sir Bobby Charlton at 80 BBC One, 10.30pm Alex Ferguson, Eric Cantona and more pay tribute to an Old Trafford great in a hagiography, yet Charlton is a man of such decency and dignity that it’s hard to object. GT Dial M for Murder (1954) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 1.15pm  It’s not quite on the same plane of brilliance as Vertigo, but Hitchcock’s adaptation of Frederick Knott’s stage play is still a briskly efficient exercise in suspense. Tony Wendice (Ray Milland) is trying to have his socialite wife Margot (Grace Kelly) murdered, after she has an affair with a writer. When Tony’s first plan fails, he dreams up another that’s even more devious. This Sporting Life (1963) ★★★★ London Live, 8.00pm  It’s Yorkshire accents and monochrome realism as Richard Harris goes down the mines, plays rugby and has an affair. As an uncompromising portrait of male attitudes, Lindsay Anderson’s stunning adaptation of David Storey’s novel is like a punch to the gut, and a direct antecedent of Scorsese’s Raging Bull. Rachel Roberts (star of earlier kitchen sink drama Saturday Night and Sunday Morning) co-stars. The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (2013) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 11.05pm  Mild-mannered Walter Mitty’s life is controlled  by his overbearing mother. He finds his escape by imagining himself living in the worlds pictured on the covers of Life magazine  and becoming a pilot, a sea captain and couturier.  Ben Stiller directs and stars in this loose revamping of the James Thurber’s story: the result is a flawed but  still entertaining and enjoyable adventure. Monday 9 October At your service: Steph and Dom Parker Credit: Channel 4 Steph and Dom’s One Star to Five Star Channel 4, 5.30pm Daytime programming isn’t normally where we look for originality, so it comes as no surprise to find little in this new weekday show hosted by Steph and Dom Parker, those once, seemingly ever-sozzled breakout stars from Gogglebox. What there is, though, is fun and lots of it, even if at times it can be hard to tell whether it is intentional or not. Like the illegitimate offspring of Four in a Bed and any number of hackneyed Hotel Inspector-style shows, this series sees the Parkers take their own limited experience as B & B owners in Kent as proof that they know everything there is to know about the international hospitality industry and descend on an ailing hotel for a week with a view to making it marginally more appealing.  They begin with the dowdy Ransdale Hotel in Bridlington, a slightly tatty, underperforming establishment where they reckon seaside-themed rooms, kedgeree for breakfast and a party atmosphere in the bar will get the occupancy levels up from the current “negligible”. Could getting the clientele drunk cause the approval ratings to peak? It’s probably more likely than the kedgeree. Gerard O’Donovan The Human Body: Secrets of Your Life Revealed BBC Two, 9.00pm In the series’ concluding part, Chris and Xand van Tulleken explore how experiences shape our minds and bodies, and show for the very first time how memories are formed in the brain and continue to influence us throughout our lives.  Tunes for Tyrants: Music and Power with Suzy Klein BBC Four, 9.00pm In this edition of the documentary series, Suzy Klein explores the Thirties and how classical music, while it was exploited to idealise violent nationalism and prop up the totalitarian regimes of the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany, was also be a source of coded resistance. Liar ITV, 9.00pm In a torrid penultimate episode, Laura (Joanne Froggatt) convinces ex-boyfriend Tom (Warren Brown) to help bring Andrew Earlham (Ioan Gruffudd) to justice as she’s forced to resort to a somewhat unusual method of forcing a confession out of him. W1A BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI This is a terrific edition of the sitcom. As the crisis over the axing of the BBC’s Big Swing Band goes viral, Head of Values Ian Fletcher (Hugh Bonneville) once again finds himself caught in the media cross-hairs.  The Vietnam War BBC Four, 10.00pm & 10.55pm Another double helping of Ken Burns’s stately and impeccably researched history of the Vietnam War rolls us on through 1967 when, with casualties mounting and the Viet Cong striking back in the infamous Tet offensive, a US victory looked increasingly beyond reach. Timewasters ITV2, 10.00pm & 10.30pm ITV2 launches a season of new comedies with this sharply scripted sitcom about a struggling four-piece jazz band who get stuck in Twenties London when their time machine breaks down. GO After the News ITV, 10.45pm; NI, 12.45am; not STV; Wales, 11.15pm Current affairs presenters Emma Barnett and Nick Ferrari are hot tickets just now following some hard-hitting “holiday cover” hosting on Newsnight this summer. Now ITV has signed them up for this new nightly debate show that takes its subject matter straight from ITV News at Ten. After the unmitigated flop of The Nightly Show, ITV will be keen to for this to shine. GO Pimpernel Smith (1941, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 3.50pm  Leslie Howard, famed for his role in Gone with the Wind, directs and stars in this deft drama set in 1939 Berlin. An academic (Howard) recruits students to go to Europe under the guise of an archaeological dig. However, his real mission is to smuggle victims of Nazi persecution out of Germany. An absorbing film and, retrospectively, quite haunting since Howard was shot down in the war by a Nazi plane two years later. The Birth of a Nation (2016) ★★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 4.10pm and daily  Writer-director-star Nate Parker’s attempt to reappropriate the notorious racism of DW Griffith’s 1915 foundation myth and spin it on its axis is a graceless, pretentious mallet to the head of history. Parker (whose galvanising performance is much the strongest) tells the story of Nat Turner’s 1831 slave rebellion from the side of the true victims. Se7en (1995) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm  Gluttony, avarice, envy, sloth, wrath, lust and pride; the seven deadly sins are explored graphically, and imaginatively, in this gloomy thriller from director David Fincher. It follows a detective (an outstanding Morgan Freeman) and his rookie partner (Brad Pitt) on the hunt for a maniac who kills those guilty of the above vices. Brutal and gripping, with an ending you won’t forget in a hurry. Gwyneth Paltrow and Kevin Spacey co-star. Tuesday 10 October In the field: Michelle Keegan as Georgie Lane Credit: BBC Our Girl: Nepal Tour BBC One, 9.00pm Michelle Keegan returns as dedicated army medic Georgie Lane in Tony Grounds’s entertaining if soapy army drama. This time the main action is in Nepal, where Georgie and the rest of 2 Section, including Ben Aldridge’s patrician Captain Charles James, are posted to provide humanitarian relief following an earthquake.  This being Our Girl, the personal relationships are as important as the action and Georgie soon finds herself having a perfectly arched eyebrow-off with new recruit Maisie Richards (the excellent Shalom Brune-Franklin). Yet behind the jokes there are serious points raised about the way in which the army operates, and whether individualism ever has a place. Fans of the will they/won’t they romance between Georgie and her slick former fiancé Elvis (Luke Pasqualino) will be disappointed by how little the latter features in this opening episode (just one brief scene in Syria before the main action begins), although Rudi Dharmalingam gallantly steps into the breach as impassioned NGO worker Milan. The real joy, however, comes not from the plot twists but from the expert way in which Grounds captures both the banter and boredom of army life. Sarah Hughes Once Upon a Time Netflix, from today This popular fantasy series that follows fairy-tale characters living in the real world returns for its seventh season. It marks a reboot of sorts, with our now-adult hero Henry Mills (Jared S Gilmore) finding himself in the same position as when the story began. The Great British Bake Off Channel 4, 8.00pm The cooking competition continues to roll out new themes, with this episode marking the first Italian Week. But you can be sure that it won’t have anything to do with making a bog-standard spag bol. Unfortunately the weather is not on their side, as the contestants suffer in the hottest temperatures ever recorded in the tent. Russia 1917: Countdown to Revolution BBC Two, 9.00pm Juliet Stevenson narrates this insightful documentary made to mark the centenary of the Russian Revolution. Martin Amis, Orlando Figes and Helen Rappaport are among those discussing and recounting how Russia transitioned from a tsarist autocracy to become the first communist state – and the roles played by Lenin, Trotsky and Stalin. Concorde: A Supersonic Story BBC Four, 9.00pm The Concorde was considered the “most glamorous plane ever built” – until it was retired in 2003 following the crash of Air France Flight 4590. But its story is a fascinating one. Sophie Okonedo narrates this tale of rows between French and British governments, while former passengers recount queuing for the lavatory with celebrities.  The Deuce Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Vincent (James Franco) is putting the finishing touches to his new bar, in this third episode of the gritty, Seventies New York-set drama. But then an unexpected silent partner turns up. CG Celebrity Hunted Channel 4, 9.15pm The real-life thriller returns for a celebrity charity edition. Anneka Rice and former Strictly winner Jay McGuiness are among those attempting to avoid detection.  Later Live… with Jools Holland BBC Two, 10.00pm; N Ireland, 11.15pm Former Led Zeppelin singer Robert Plant performs live with his band Sensational Space Shifters. He’s joined by Beck, with songs from his first new album in three years. Catherine Gee Ice Age: Continental Drift (2012) ★★☆☆☆ E4, 8.00pm Surprisingly, the Ice Age series has accrued more lucre than Pixar’s Toy Story trilogy. But this fourth film is the thinnest and redeemed only by a demented squirrel. Once again, the story revolves around Manny the mammoth (Ray Romano), Sid the sloth (John Leguizamo) and Diego the smilodon (Denis Leary), who are separated from their herd thanks to the shifting of the Earth’s land masses. Southpaw (2015) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Jake Gyllenhaal lays his body on the line for 0a boxing drama so predictable that you could set your watch by it. If only someone had devoted equivalent stamina to the screenplay, we might have an actual movie on our hands. Nevertheless, it’s rousingly entertaining as Gyllenhaal’s Billy “The Great” Hope learns the art of subterfuge from a new coach (Forest Whitaker). Rachel McAdams co-stars. I Origins (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film 4, 11.25pm  Eyes and souls have been cinematically intertwined since at least 1929, when, in Un Chien Andalou, Buñuel and Dalí carved out their visionary manifesto with the quick swipe of a razor blade across a plump and oozing eyeball. In Mike Cahill’s film, the metaphor trots off down a strange and lyrical new trail when a biology student (Michael Pitt) encounters a model (Astrid Bergès-Frisbey) who makes him question scientific fact. Wednesday 11 October Not sitting well: David Mitchell as Stephen Credit: Channel 4 Back Channel 4, 10.00pm The ratings may have been a little underwhelming, but in contrast to David Mitchell and Robert Webb’s tonally uncertain and muddled Ambassadors, Back has been a triumph. Simon Blackwell’s often brutal, witheringly funny script has granted the leading men roles that riff on their Peep Show personas of Mark and Jez without ever becoming beholden to them. Prodigal foster son Andrew’s (Webb) victory over biological offspring Stephen (Mitchell) is apparently complete, as the former struts around his flourishing gastropub, bragging about his chef’s clafoutis while the latter moulders in a caravan. “He’s stolen my life and he’s living it better than me,” Stephen fumes, impotently. Their father’s memorial party – and the associated speeches – offer Stephen one final shot at redemption: when a clutch of other returning foster children eclipse Andrew’s efforts to ingratiate himself, Stephen has a revelation that sends him on a demented trip of vengeance to fill the gaps in his rival’s life story. Finding profound bathos in often gasp-inducing misanthropy and reuniting the best British double act around (pace Vic and Bob), Back undoubtedly merits a return. Gabriel Tate The Apprentice BBC One, 9.00pm Enjoying a new lease of life after a disappointing series last year, reality TV’s version of an extended job interview this week unleashes the candidates’ aesthetic pretensions by asking them to turn interior designers at a five-star hotel. The mind boggles at the bills that needed settling at the end of this particular stay. The Detectives: Murder on the Streets BBC Two, 9.00pm This utterly involving and consistently impressive documentary series comes to a climax with the arrival of the trial in the case of the murder of young homeless man Daniel Smith. This is true crime of the most empathetic and socially responsible kind. Britain’s Lost Masterpieces BBC Four, 9.00pm Dr Bendor Grosvenor and Emma Dabiri visit Carmathenshire County Museum, home to a damaged portrait of a 16th-century Earl whose provenance is disputed. Doc Martin ITV, 9.00pm Receptionist Morwenna’s (Jessica Ransom) parents pay her a surprise visit and present Doc Martin (Martin Clunes) with a dilemma as the amiable comedy drama ambles through another hour. Ray Donovan Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Susan Sarandon has been both a welcome addition and much-needed counterpart to this occasionally testosterone-heavy series, with Liev Schreiber’s eponymous heavy facing the repercussions of years of making enemies in high places. Norskov Channel 4, 10.35pm The titular Danish industrial port is blighted by a drug problem. Enter ace detective Tom Noack (Thomas Levin), an old acquaintance of the city’s mayor to clean the place up and, inevitably, disturb a few ghosts. It’s a slick Nordic noir – the whole series will be available on C4’s online service Walter Presents after this episode airs. GT Inside Birmingham Children’s Hospital More4, 10.00pm The BBC and Channel 4 continue to match each other, blow for blow, with medical documentaries. This latest series follows a girl diagnosed with a life-changing condition, a boy with leukaemia and a five-year-old whose epilepsy is proving increasingly hard to manage. As so often, their stoicism and resilience are humbling and very affecting. GT Charade (1963) ★★★★☆ Film4, 4.35pm Audrey Hepburn as a temperamental-but-alluring damsel in distress and Cary Grant as a shadowy charmer are characters that the two actors played over and over during their careers. But they do so exceptionally in this suspense comedy from Stanley Donen, often referred to as the best Hitchcock movie that Hitchcock never made. Hepburn is the widow being trailed by four men hunting for her late husband’s stolen fortune. Starship Troopers (1997) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 10.00pm  On first appearances, this Oscar-nominated sci-fi action thriller looks distressingly silly: in the distant future, a group of American high-school friends join the armed forces to do intergalactic war with some malicious insectoid aliens, or “Bugs”. The whole of humanity is at risk. Thankfully director Paul Verhoeven deftly underpins the whole thing with wicked satirical verve and no-nonsense action. Dying Laughing (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Arts, 10.30pm  Dozens of stand-up comics, including Kevin Hart, Jerry Seinfeld and Amy Schumer, contribute to this understated but rather wonderful documentary film about the infrequent highs and relentless lows of trying to make people laugh. It can be painful – one anecdote about “bombing” on stage is particularly uncomfortable – but then a comic will recall that first great gig and you can just tell that all the anguish has been worth it. Thursday 12 October Every second counts: McDonald follows a murder investigation Credit: ITV An Hour to Catch a Killer with Trevor McDonald ITV, 9.00pm Trevor McDonald’s abiding fascination with such murky matters as serial murder and organised crime, especially in the United States, is well established. For the first programme in ITV’s new Crime and Punishment season, McDonald examines a key concept of modern crime detection: how the decisions made by investigating officers in the so-called “Golden Hour” – the first 60 minutes of a murder inquiry – have a vital impact on whether or not a killer is caught and successfully prosecuted. And here he examines a case much closer to home. With full access to the Northumbria Police Homicide Unit’s investigation into the murder of 24-year-old graduate Alice Ruggles last October, the film follows the case from the moment the murder was reported, through every layer of the investigation as it develops, to the moment the all-too-obvious prime suspect is located and charged.  Later in this series, Susannah Reid, Piers Morgan, Ross Kemp and, more randomly, Gordon Ramsay will present reports on subjects as diverse as the lucrative international cocaine trade and gang warfare inside the notorious Barlinnie Prison in Glasgow. Gerard O’Donovan Mr Robot Amazon Prime, from today Techno-paranoia is still the name of the game as the US hacker drama returns for a much-anticipated third series. With 10 new episodes to get through, clearly the first thing to sort out is the fate of the not-always-reliable narrator Elliot Alderson (Rami Malek), who was shot in last season’s cliffhanger. Dynasty Netflix, from today As in the original, bling, bubbles and bonking dominate this 22-episode reboot of one of the Eighties’ silliest US soap operas. Once again it follows the boardroom and bedroom escapades of Denver’s super-rich Carrington clan.  PGA Tour Golf: The CIMB Classic Sky Sports Main Event, 6.00am Coverage of the opening day’s play at the annual event from the Kuala Lumpur Golf & Country Club in Malaysia, where Justin Thomas has won the last two titles.  Council House Crackdown BBC One, 8.00pm Michelle Ackerley uncovers more tales of social housing fraud as council investigators stake out a woman suspected of faking a disability and a tenant alleged to be illegally subletting housing association property. Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm; BBC Two Wales, 9.00pm The final programme in this affecting series again focuses on the tough decisions the London Ambulance Service faces when its slim resources are stretched to capacity and calls must be prioritised. Russia with Simon Reeve BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 11.15pm This is by far the best travelogue Reeve has done for a while, and for this final leg, the adventurer starts in Crimea, where he weighs up the political and economic costs of its annexation by Russia. From there, he travels north through the vast plains of western Russia to where the country’s real power has always resided, Moscow and St Petersburg.  Educating Greater Manchester Channel 4, 9.00pm In tonight’s episode, it’s Valentine’s Day and romance is in the air for even the school’s youngest pupils. Plus, a recently qualified teacher who’s come to Harrop Fold looking for a new challenge gets more than he bargained for. GO The History of Comedy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This new documentary has an overambitious title for a series that focuses almost entirely on US comedy of fairly recent vintage. Still, it’s an interesting thematic survey of how certain types of laughter making have evolved in the last century. GO Titanic (1997) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Eleven Oscars won and more than a billion dollars taken worldwide in ticket sales. James Cameron deserved his success with this opulent blockbuster about the sinking of the RMS Titanic, a story that has a grand romance between penniless artist Jack (Leonardo DiCaprio) and rich American girl Rose (Kate Winslet) at its heart. Even viewers determined to find it soppy are liable to be swept along by the emotion. Heist (2001) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 10.50pm  Prepare to be triple-crossed, duped and bewildered by this piece of con-artistry, which pulls the rug out from under your feet with such regularity that it’s tempting just to give up and lie down. Gene Hackman, Danny DeVito and Rebecca Pidgeon set out to steal some gold; needless to say, it does not go smoothly. There are excellent performances, plus endless twists and cracking dialogue. Just Go with It (2011) ★★☆☆☆ 5STAR, 11.00pm  Adam Sandler stars in this remake of the 1971 comedy Cactus Flower (itself adapted from a Broadway stage play by Abe Burrows), as Danny, a single plastic surgeon in Los Angeles who feigns an unhappy marriage in order to have no-strings-attached flings with women. What follows is a complex low-grade romantic farce which is saved by a sparky performance from Jennifer Aniston as Danny’s office manager and best friend. Friday 13 October Life on the edge: Ray Mears is in Australia Credit: ITV Australian Wilderness with Ray Mears ITV, 8.00pm; not STV/UTV/Wales The great appeal of Ray Mears’s wildlife documentaries is his no-nonsense approach. Where other presenters rush around telling you how exciting and amazing and wonderful everything is, Mears tends to amble gently through it, explaining a few facts and otherwise allowing you to gaze at the beauty unfurling across your TV screen. It’s an approach that pays high dividends in this new series about the Australian wilderness, a landscape that is vast, beautiful and oddly eerie.  The opening episode focuses more on sea than land (although there is time for a quick trek through rocky desert towards the Indian Ocean) as Mears dives on Ningaloo Reef, the longest fringing coral reef in the world. After a pleasant meeting with some friendly stingrays and a few “wish you were here” shots of the turquoise sea, the real star of the show heaves into sight as Mears and his companions find themselves swimming alongside a passing whale shark, the largest fish in the world. “This is what we’ve all been waiting for,” says Mears as the fish floats into view. It’s a breathtaking, beautiful moment and one which manages to shake even Mears out of his habitual calm. Sarah Hughes Lore Amazon Prime, from today Not for the faint of heart, this disquieting new documentary series is based on Aaron Mahnke’s popular podcast of the same name, with each episode exploring the story behind pop culture’s most legendary horror myths, from vampires and werewolves to possessed dolls.  Mindhunter Netflix, from today Imagine Se7en crossed with Zodiac and Silence of the Lambs and you’ll get the gist of this excellent new detective drama executive produced by David Fincher and Charlize Theron. Based on the non-fiction book Mind Hunter: Inside the FBI’s Elite Serial Crime Unit and set in the late Seventies, it follows a pair of FBI agents (Jonathan Groff and Holt McCallany) who interview and analyse imprisoned mass murderers in order to better understand serial killers. The first episode, which is shot by master of murk Fincher, moves languidly – but is no less absorbing. PS International T20 Cricket: India v Australia Friday, Sky Sports Main Event, 2.20pm The Rajiv Gandhi International Stadium in Hyderabad is the setting as India and Australia contest the final game in a three-match T20 series. Unreported World Channel 4, 7.30pm On August 14, a mudslide in Sierra Leone, caused by torrential rain, destroyed the small town of Regent on the outskirts of the capital, Freetown. Hundreds lost their lives. In this affecting report, Seyi Rhodes talks to the survivors and the rescue teams desperately trying to find those still missing.  Crystal Maze / Have I Got News for You Channel 4, 8.00pm / BBC One, 9.00pm Richard Ayoade fans, rejoice: tonight you can see him twice – somewhat fitting given that he once wrote and directed a black comedy called The Double. First up, he continues to add warmth and irony to a rousing revamp of The Crystal Maze, as the current series concludes. Then, in HIGNFY, he puts that bone-dry wit to good use yet again, as he guest presents the long-running news quiz.  Cold Feet ITV, 9.00pm Affectionate writing and a great ensemble are the foundations on which Mark Bullen’s middle-aged comedy drama are built. Tonight, as this Nineties-show revival continues, Adam (James Nesbitt) and Pete (John Thomson) throw a joint 50th birthday dinner.  Porridge BBC One, 9.30pm  On the subject of revivals, this sort-of sequel to the classic Seventies comedy continues to be so-so. Tonight, there’s a new prison officer on the scene. Patrick Smith The Meyerowitz Stories (2017) ★★★★☆ Netflix, from today  It’s been a long time coming but Adam Sandler is finally in a good film. He plays Danny, a New Yorker whose unemployment and divorce has left him defined purely in terms of his bloodline. The narrative arc is about Danny, sister Jean and half-brother Matthew reconciling themselves with their curmudgeon father Harold (Dustin Hoffman). Emma Thompson is woozily uproarious as Harold’s wife. Lion (2016) ★★★★☆ Amazon Prime, from today Derived from a 2012 memoir by the grown Saroo Brierley, called A Long Way Home, this is the story of a lost boy: a five-year-old Indian who grew up in the Eighties in the area around Khandwa. With no paper trail or family name, he becomes a lost cause, eventually shipped off to kindly foster parents in Tasmania, played by Nicole Kidman and David Wenham. The excellent script, by Luke Davies, sticks rigidly to Saroo’s own point of view. Good Will Hunting (1997) ★★★★☆ W, 9.00pm  Matt Damon and Ben Affleck won an Oscar for Best Screenplay with this stirring if occasionally gloopy story. Will Hunting (Damon) is a hot-headed, 20-year-old janitor with a photographic memory and an untapped genius for mathematics. Robin Williams plays the inspiring therapist who channels Will’s rage into solving quadratics, and Minnie Driver is his brainy, Harvard graduate love interest.   Television previewers Catherine Gee, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: Basquiat: Rage to Riches and Strictly Come Dancing

Saturday 7 October  Basquiat: Rage to Riches BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 10.30pm “If you want to know what there is to know about Jean-Michel, then the place is his work,” says Lisane Basquiat, the sister of the self-taught, Brooklyn-born painter who became a star of the Eighties New York art scene. In the space of a few years, he morphed from a freewheeling, underground graffiti artist, going by the tag name of Samo, into an enigmatic and incessant painter who commanded thousands of dollars for his works: by the age of 21 he was a millionaire. This comprehensive profile digs deep into the life of a young man who was inspired by Gray’s Anatomy, dated Madonna, collaborated with Andy Warhol, and shaved his head in public. Of course, some critics find his cartoonish work hard to take seriously (his rock star persona, which led to his death at 27, did him no favours), while others have an immediate response to his vibrant canvases.  Friends, lovers and contemporaries talk about how he came to rank alongside the likes of Pablo Picasso, Jackson Pollock and Francis Bacon, and muse on how important he still is to the legacy of American art – one of his skull paintings recently sold at Sotheby’s for over $ 100 million and his work is currently the subject of an exhibition at the Barbican in London. Rachel Ward Strictly Come Dancing BBC One, 6.35pm In previous years Movie Week has given us Kellie Bright’s out-of-this-world Star Wars Charleston, Jay McGuiness’s eye-popping Pulp Fiction jive, and the delight of Ed Balls in green face paint and a yellow suit for his smokin’ Mask routine. Can the remaining 14 duos match those memorable homages? Surely Susan Calman’s Wonder Woman samba and Gemma Atkinson’s Jungle Book Charleston will be contenders? The pros will dance a La La Land group performance. Britain’s Ancient Tracks with Tony Robinson Channel 4, 7.00pm The Time Team presenter continues to travel down some of the UK’s oldest roads. Tonight, he’s in the Peak District, venturing along the Derbyshire Portway and taking a tour of D H Lawrence’s mountain retreat.  The X Factor: Bootcamp ITV, 8.15pm The bootcamp stages, in front of a live audience, are an efficient way of shining a light on which acts have potential. The last few try to impress before tomorrow’s brutal Six Chair Challenge.   Black Lake BBC Four, 9.00pm and 9.40pm This Swedish ghost series has been terrific fun as well as serving up its fair share of scares. In tonight’s double-bill finale, Mette’s (Mathilde Norholt) suspicions about Dag (Anderz Eide) grow following a fire in the ski lodge, but Hanne (Sarah-Sofie Boussnina) is still convinced that the resort is cursed, and her salvation appears to lie within the hidden room in the cellar. But time is running out…  XTC: This Is Pop Sky Arts, 9.00pm Of all the bands that emerged from the British post-punk scene, XTC are one of the hardest to pigeon hole. The ever-evolving group had its biggest success in the Eighties with off-kilter, witty pop songs containing sharp, Beatles-like guitar hooks before they moved into psychedelia. This sprightly documentary takes a look at the group, led by Andy Partridge and Colin Moulding, who formed in Swindon in 1972, and who have perhaps become one of Britain’s most unsung bands. RW Boxing: Anthony Crolla v Ricky Burns Sky Sports Main Event, 10.00pm The Manchester Arena hosts this lightweight bout between two former world champions. Anthony Crolla and Ricky Burns are vastly experienced at the highest level, and are both hoping to bounce back from defeats in their most recent contests. Crolla was beaten for the second time by Jorge Linares in March, while Burns lost to Julius Indongo a month later. Performance Live: Missing Episode BBC Two, 10.30pm; Wales, 12.00midnight Twenty years ago, Ross Sutherland was watching EastEnders when a knock at the door led to a chain of events. Here, he remixes that episode into a poem to tell his story. RW Muppets Most Wanted (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 2.45pm  The Muppets tour Europe, where Kermit (Steve Whitmire) is kidnapped and replaced by a doppelgänger. Masterminding the plot is a sleazy Ricky Gervais. Though this contains moments of joy with its fun musical numbers and clever gags, the Muppets themselves are crowded out by cameo overkill from the likes of Lady Gaga, Sean “Diddy” Combs and Céline Dion. Escape Plan (2013) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm  If, even at a then 67 and 66 respectively, Sylvester Stallone and Arnold Schwarzenegger can’t bust out of a high-security prison, you don’t really fancy anyone else’s chances. Stallone’s character, Breslin, is an expert in prison weak spots, hired to test their pregnability by going undercover as an inmate. The two stars bring brains and brawn to this film, but it could do with a tighter plot and a bit more pace. Bright Days Ahead (2013) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.05am  In this charming French romance from director Marion Vernoux, recently retired dentist Caro (Fanny Ardant) is depressed and underappreciated by her family. She falls in love with her computer class lecturer, who’s 20 years younger than her. Their affair reawakens her sense of purpose, and the consequences on her marriage are unexpected. The performances are strong, but a flat script  lets the film down. Sunday 8 October Louis Theroux with heroin user Petty Betty Credit: BBC  Louis Theroux: Dark States – Heroin Town BBC Two, 9.00pm Louis Theroux’s second coming as a chronicler of society’s underdogs, outcasts and victims continues with this examination of life and death on the fringes (documentaries on murder and sex trafficking are to come). He is in Huntington, West Virginia, a former industrial town in the grip of a drug epidemic fuelled by Big Pharma’s record of encouraging doctors to overmedicate workplace injuries: here fatal-overdose rates are 13 times the national average and one in 10 babies are born with an opiate addiction. Such is the extent of the problem that local efforts are focused on containment as much as prevention, and the emergency services are overstretched while the rehab centres struggling. As ever, Theroux’s combination of apparent guilelessness and fearlessness bears fruit in the intimate encounters. Whether teasing out the distressing realities of one addict and the partner who assists her, or prodding away at the motives of another who seems superficially content, he gleans genuinely valuable insights. One thing is clear in this incisive and troubling film, their spirits crushed, any potential is strangled and optimism is in diminishing supply. Gabriel Tate Formula 1: Japanese Grand Prix Sky Sports F1, 5.30am Despite Max Verstappen’s impressive victory in the Malaysian Grand Prix, Lewis Hamilton has plenty to be cheerful about as F1 heads to Japan. Indeed, by finishing second last weekend, having toiled with his Mercedes all weekend, Hamilton extended his lead in the drivers’ championship to 34 points, with five races of the season remaining. His nearest rival, Sebastian Vettel, on the other hand, is out of sorts: having not finished in Singapore, then started at the back of the grid in Malaysia but finished in fourth place. He’ll need to be much improved at the Suzuka Circuit. Premiership Rugby Union: Saracens v Wasps BT Sport 1, 2.30pm Having lost three of their opening five matches, the most recent of which was a 25-9 defeat at home to Bath, Wasps need a win to boost morale. The problem is they’re away at Saracens, who’ve won four from five and are looking imperious, as anyone who witnessed their 25-3 trouncing of Worcester last weekend will attest. Among the scorers that day was England full-back Alex Goode.  International Football: Lithuania v England ITV, 4.30pm England round off an eventful qualifying campaign that began with them replacing Sam Allardyce as manager with Gareth Southgate. Since then Wayne Rooney, England’s top scorer, has called time on his international career, while younger players such as Harry Kane and Dele Alli have grown in stature. The former, who has been in sublime form for Spurs this season, has been named captain and will be confident of adding to tally this afternoon at the LFF Stadium in Vilnius. When these sides met in Match, goals from Jermain Defoe – his first for England since 2013 – and Jamie Vardy gave Southgate’s side a 2-0 victory.  The Last Post BBC One, 9.00pm Peter Moffat’s evocative Sixties drama continues with the arrival of an American war reporter, Martha Franklin (Essie Davis), which disrupts the delicate dynamic on the military base, while insurgent leader Abdul-Kadir Hakim is targeted for the murder of Captain Page (Joseph Kennedy). Electric Dreams: Crazy Diamond Channel 4, 9.00pm In this episode of the Philip K Dick adaptations, Ed Morris (Steve Buscemi) is offered a chance to inject some excitement into his drab life with wife Sally (Julia Davis) by Jill (Sidse Babbett Knudsen), a synthetic human. The plot is cluttered, but the ending is satisfying indeed. The Gifted Fox, 9.00pm Marvel’s colonisation of the small screen continues with this entry in the X-Men universe. While The Gifted is a far cry from the mind-bending visions of Noah Hawley’s Legion, it provides plenty of bang for your buck in its tales of a family, headed by True Blood’s Stephen Moyer, that is rocked by revelations that its children have mutant abilities and go on the run from dastardly government forces. Festival No 6 Sky Arts, 9.00pm Highlights from the deeply eccentric beanfeast in Portmeirion, the Italianate Welsh coastal home of The Prisoner TV series. Expect music from Mogwai, Bloc Party and the wonderful Flaming Lips. The Sky at Night BBC Four, 10.00pm Maggie Aderin-Pocock considers the renewal of interest in manned missions to the moon, and the role of tech companies in funding and driving these new initiatives. GT Snowfall BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI This new 10-parter from John Singleton (Boyz N the Hood) traces the shockwaves from the crack cocaine epidemic that ravaged Los Angeles in the Eighties. In the first episode, we meet Franklin Saint (Damson Idris), who is living with his mum and senses an opportunity that will change his life, and his city. It’s a notch below Narcos, but it’s still compelling and sharp. Sir Bobby Charlton at 80 BBC One, 10.30pm Alex Ferguson, Eric Cantona and more pay tribute to an Old Trafford great in a hagiography, yet Charlton is a man of such decency and dignity that it’s hard to object. GT Dial M for Murder (1954) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 1.15pm  It’s not quite on the same plane of brilliance as Vertigo, but Hitchcock’s adaptation of Frederick Knott’s stage play is still a briskly efficient exercise in suspense. Tony Wendice (Ray Milland) is trying to have his socialite wife Margot (Grace Kelly) murdered, after she has an affair with a writer. When Tony’s first plan fails, he dreams up another that’s even more devious. This Sporting Life (1963) ★★★★ London Live, 8.00pm  It’s Yorkshire accents and monochrome realism as Richard Harris goes down the mines, plays rugby and has an affair. As an uncompromising portrait of male attitudes, Lindsay Anderson’s stunning adaptation of David Storey’s novel is like a punch to the gut, and a direct antecedent of Scorsese’s Raging Bull. Rachel Roberts (star of earlier kitchen sink drama Saturday Night and Sunday Morning) co-stars. The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (2013) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 11.05pm  Mild-mannered Walter Mitty’s life is controlled  by his overbearing mother. He finds his escape by imagining himself living in the worlds pictured on the covers of Life magazine  and becoming a pilot, a sea captain and couturier.  Ben Stiller directs and stars in this loose revamping of the James Thurber’s story: the result is a flawed but  still entertaining and enjoyable adventure. Monday 9 October At your service: Steph and Dom Parker Credit: Channel 4 Steph and Dom’s One Star to Five Star Channel 4, 5.30pm Daytime programming isn’t normally where we look for originality, so it comes as no surprise to find little in this new weekday show hosted by Steph and Dom Parker, those once, seemingly ever-sozzled breakout stars from Gogglebox. What there is, though, is fun and lots of it, even if at times it can be hard to tell whether it is intentional or not. Like the illegitimate offspring of Four in a Bed and any number of hackneyed Hotel Inspector-style shows, this series sees the Parkers take their own limited experience as B & B owners in Kent as proof that they know everything there is to know about the international hospitality industry and descend on an ailing hotel for a week with a view to making it marginally more appealing.  They begin with the dowdy Ransdale Hotel in Bridlington, a slightly tatty, underperforming establishment where they reckon seaside-themed rooms, kedgeree for breakfast and a party atmosphere in the bar will get the occupancy levels up from the current “negligible”. Could getting the clientele drunk cause the approval ratings to peak? It’s probably more likely than the kedgeree. Gerard O’Donovan The Human Body: Secrets of Your Life Revealed BBC Two, 9.00pm In the series’ concluding part, Chris and Xand van Tulleken explore how experiences shape our minds and bodies, and show for the very first time how memories are formed in the brain and continue to influence us throughout our lives.  Tunes for Tyrants: Music and Power with Suzy Klein BBC Four, 9.00pm In this edition of the documentary series, Suzy Klein explores the Thirties and how classical music, while it was exploited to idealise violent nationalism and prop up the totalitarian regimes of the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany, was also be a source of coded resistance. Liar ITV, 9.00pm In a torrid penultimate episode, Laura (Joanne Froggatt) convinces ex-boyfriend Tom (Warren Brown) to help bring Andrew Earlham (Ioan Gruffudd) to justice as she’s forced to resort to a somewhat unusual method of forcing a confession out of him. W1A BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI This is a terrific edition of the sitcom. As the crisis over the axing of the BBC’s Big Swing Band goes viral, Head of Values Ian Fletcher (Hugh Bonneville) once again finds himself caught in the media cross-hairs.  The Vietnam War BBC Four, 10.00pm & 10.55pm Another double helping of Ken Burns’s stately and impeccably researched history of the Vietnam War rolls us on through 1967 when, with casualties mounting and the Viet Cong striking back in the infamous Tet offensive, a US victory looked increasingly beyond reach. Timewasters ITV2, 10.00pm & 10.30pm ITV2 launches a season of new comedies with this sharply scripted sitcom about a struggling four-piece jazz band who get stuck in Twenties London when their time machine breaks down. GO After the News ITV, 10.45pm; NI, 12.45am; not STV; Wales, 11.15pm Current affairs presenters Emma Barnett and Nick Ferrari are hot tickets just now following some hard-hitting “holiday cover” hosting on Newsnight this summer. Now ITV has signed them up for this new nightly debate show that takes its subject matter straight from ITV News at Ten. After the unmitigated flop of The Nightly Show, ITV will be keen to for this to shine. GO Pimpernel Smith (1941, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 3.50pm  Leslie Howard, famed for his role in Gone with the Wind, directs and stars in this deft drama set in 1939 Berlin. An academic (Howard) recruits students to go to Europe under the guise of an archaeological dig. However, his real mission is to smuggle victims of Nazi persecution out of Germany. An absorbing film and, retrospectively, quite haunting since Howard was shot down in the war by a Nazi plane two years later. The Birth of a Nation (2016) ★★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 4.10pm and daily  Writer-director-star Nate Parker’s attempt to reappropriate the notorious racism of DW Griffith’s 1915 foundation myth and spin it on its axis is a graceless, pretentious mallet to the head of history. Parker (whose galvanising performance is much the strongest) tells the story of Nat Turner’s 1831 slave rebellion from the side of the true victims. Se7en (1995) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm  Gluttony, avarice, envy, sloth, wrath, lust and pride; the seven deadly sins are explored graphically, and imaginatively, in this gloomy thriller from director David Fincher. It follows a detective (an outstanding Morgan Freeman) and his rookie partner (Brad Pitt) on the hunt for a maniac who kills those guilty of the above vices. Brutal and gripping, with an ending you won’t forget in a hurry. Gwyneth Paltrow and Kevin Spacey co-star. Tuesday 10 October In the field: Michelle Keegan as Georgie Lane Credit: BBC Our Girl: Nepal Tour BBC One, 9.00pm Michelle Keegan returns as dedicated army medic Georgie Lane in Tony Grounds’s entertaining if soapy army drama. This time the main action is in Nepal, where Georgie and the rest of 2 Section, including Ben Aldridge’s patrician Captain Charles James, are posted to provide humanitarian relief following an earthquake.  This being Our Girl, the personal relationships are as important as the action and Georgie soon finds herself having a perfectly arched eyebrow-off with new recruit Maisie Richards (the excellent Shalom Brune-Franklin). Yet behind the jokes there are serious points raised about the way in which the army operates, and whether individualism ever has a place. Fans of the will they/won’t they romance between Georgie and her slick former fiancé Elvis (Luke Pasqualino) will be disappointed by how little the latter features in this opening episode (just one brief scene in Syria before the main action begins), although Rudi Dharmalingam gallantly steps into the breach as impassioned NGO worker Milan. The real joy, however, comes not from the plot twists but from the expert way in which Grounds captures both the banter and boredom of army life. Sarah Hughes Once Upon a Time Netflix, from today This popular fantasy series that follows fairy-tale characters living in the real world returns for its seventh season. It marks a reboot of sorts, with our now-adult hero Henry Mills (Jared S Gilmore) finding himself in the same position as when the story began. The Great British Bake Off Channel 4, 8.00pm The cooking competition continues to roll out new themes, with this episode marking the first Italian Week. But you can be sure that it won’t have anything to do with making a bog-standard spag bol. Unfortunately the weather is not on their side, as the contestants suffer in the hottest temperatures ever recorded in the tent. Russia 1917: Countdown to Revolution BBC Two, 9.00pm Juliet Stevenson narrates this insightful documentary made to mark the centenary of the Russian Revolution. Martin Amis, Orlando Figes and Helen Rappaport are among those discussing and recounting how Russia transitioned from a tsarist autocracy to become the first communist state – and the roles played by Lenin, Trotsky and Stalin. Concorde: A Supersonic Story BBC Four, 9.00pm The Concorde was considered the “most glamorous plane ever built” – until it was retired in 2003 following the crash of Air France Flight 4590. But its story is a fascinating one. Sophie Okonedo narrates this tale of rows between French and British governments, while former passengers recount queuing for the lavatory with celebrities.  The Deuce Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Vincent (James Franco) is putting the finishing touches to his new bar, in this third episode of the gritty, Seventies New York-set drama. But then an unexpected silent partner turns up. CG Celebrity Hunted Channel 4, 9.15pm The real-life thriller returns for a celebrity charity edition. Anneka Rice and former Strictly winner Jay McGuiness are among those attempting to avoid detection.  Later Live… with Jools Holland BBC Two, 10.00pm; N Ireland, 11.15pm Former Led Zeppelin singer Robert Plant performs live with his band Sensational Space Shifters. He’s joined by Beck, with songs from his first new album in three years. Catherine Gee Ice Age: Continental Drift (2012) ★★☆☆☆ E4, 8.00pm Surprisingly, the Ice Age series has accrued more lucre than Pixar’s Toy Story trilogy. But this fourth film is the thinnest and redeemed only by a demented squirrel. Once again, the story revolves around Manny the mammoth (Ray Romano), Sid the sloth (John Leguizamo) and Diego the smilodon (Denis Leary), who are separated from their herd thanks to the shifting of the Earth’s land masses. Southpaw (2015) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Jake Gyllenhaal lays his body on the line for 0a boxing drama so predictable that you could set your watch by it. If only someone had devoted equivalent stamina to the screenplay, we might have an actual movie on our hands. Nevertheless, it’s rousingly entertaining as Gyllenhaal’s Billy “The Great” Hope learns the art of subterfuge from a new coach (Forest Whitaker). Rachel McAdams co-stars. I Origins (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film 4, 11.25pm  Eyes and souls have been cinematically intertwined since at least 1929, when, in Un Chien Andalou, Buñuel and Dalí carved out their visionary manifesto with the quick swipe of a razor blade across a plump and oozing eyeball. In Mike Cahill’s film, the metaphor trots off down a strange and lyrical new trail when a biology student (Michael Pitt) encounters a model (Astrid Bergès-Frisbey) who makes him question scientific fact. Wednesday 11 October Not sitting well: David Mitchell as Stephen Credit: Channel 4 Back Channel 4, 10.00pm The ratings may have been a little underwhelming, but in contrast to David Mitchell and Robert Webb’s tonally uncertain and muddled Ambassadors, Back has been a triumph. Simon Blackwell’s often brutal, witheringly funny script has granted the leading men roles that riff on their Peep Show personas of Mark and Jez without ever becoming beholden to them. Prodigal foster son Andrew’s (Webb) victory over biological offspring Stephen (Mitchell) is apparently complete, as the former struts around his flourishing gastropub, bragging about his chef’s clafoutis while the latter moulders in a caravan. “He’s stolen my life and he’s living it better than me,” Stephen fumes, impotently. Their father’s memorial party – and the associated speeches – offer Stephen one final shot at redemption: when a clutch of other returning foster children eclipse Andrew’s efforts to ingratiate himself, Stephen has a revelation that sends him on a demented trip of vengeance to fill the gaps in his rival’s life story. Finding profound bathos in often gasp-inducing misanthropy and reuniting the best British double act around (pace Vic and Bob), Back undoubtedly merits a return. Gabriel Tate The Apprentice BBC One, 9.00pm Enjoying a new lease of life after a disappointing series last year, reality TV’s version of an extended job interview this week unleashes the candidates’ aesthetic pretensions by asking them to turn interior designers at a five-star hotel. The mind boggles at the bills that needed settling at the end of this particular stay. The Detectives: Murder on the Streets BBC Two, 9.00pm This utterly involving and consistently impressive documentary series comes to a climax with the arrival of the trial in the case of the murder of young homeless man Daniel Smith. This is true crime of the most empathetic and socially responsible kind. Britain’s Lost Masterpieces BBC Four, 9.00pm Dr Bendor Grosvenor and Emma Dabiri visit Carmathenshire County Museum, home to a damaged portrait of a 16th-century Earl whose provenance is disputed. Doc Martin ITV, 9.00pm Receptionist Morwenna’s (Jessica Ransom) parents pay her a surprise visit and present Doc Martin (Martin Clunes) with a dilemma as the amiable comedy drama ambles through another hour. Ray Donovan Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Susan Sarandon has been both a welcome addition and much-needed counterpart to this occasionally testosterone-heavy series, with Liev Schreiber’s eponymous heavy facing the repercussions of years of making enemies in high places. Norskov Channel 4, 10.35pm The titular Danish industrial port is blighted by a drug problem. Enter ace detective Tom Noack (Thomas Levin), an old acquaintance of the city’s mayor to clean the place up and, inevitably, disturb a few ghosts. It’s a slick Nordic noir – the whole series will be available on C4’s online service Walter Presents after this episode airs. GT Inside Birmingham Children’s Hospital More4, 10.00pm The BBC and Channel 4 continue to match each other, blow for blow, with medical documentaries. This latest series follows a girl diagnosed with a life-changing condition, a boy with leukaemia and a five-year-old whose epilepsy is proving increasingly hard to manage. As so often, their stoicism and resilience are humbling and very affecting. GT Charade (1963) ★★★★☆ Film4, 4.35pm Audrey Hepburn as a temperamental-but-alluring damsel in distress and Cary Grant as a shadowy charmer are characters that the two actors played over and over during their careers. But they do so exceptionally in this suspense comedy from Stanley Donen, often referred to as the best Hitchcock movie that Hitchcock never made. Hepburn is the widow being trailed by four men hunting for her late husband’s stolen fortune. Starship Troopers (1997) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 10.00pm  On first appearances, this Oscar-nominated sci-fi action thriller looks distressingly silly: in the distant future, a group of American high-school friends join the armed forces to do intergalactic war with some malicious insectoid aliens, or “Bugs”. The whole of humanity is at risk. Thankfully director Paul Verhoeven deftly underpins the whole thing with wicked satirical verve and no-nonsense action. Dying Laughing (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Arts, 10.30pm  Dozens of stand-up comics, including Kevin Hart, Jerry Seinfeld and Amy Schumer, contribute to this understated but rather wonderful documentary film about the infrequent highs and relentless lows of trying to make people laugh. It can be painful – one anecdote about “bombing” on stage is particularly uncomfortable – but then a comic will recall that first great gig and you can just tell that all the anguish has been worth it. Thursday 12 October Every second counts: McDonald follows a murder investigation Credit: ITV An Hour to Catch a Killer with Trevor McDonald ITV, 9.00pm Trevor McDonald’s abiding fascination with such murky matters as serial murder and organised crime, especially in the United States, is well established. For the first programme in ITV’s new Crime and Punishment season, McDonald examines a key concept of modern crime detection: how the decisions made by investigating officers in the so-called “Golden Hour” – the first 60 minutes of a murder inquiry – have a vital impact on whether or not a killer is caught and successfully prosecuted. And here he examines a case much closer to home. With full access to the Northumbria Police Homicide Unit’s investigation into the murder of 24-year-old graduate Alice Ruggles last October, the film follows the case from the moment the murder was reported, through every layer of the investigation as it develops, to the moment the all-too-obvious prime suspect is located and charged.  Later in this series, Susannah Reid, Piers Morgan, Ross Kemp and, more randomly, Gordon Ramsay will present reports on subjects as diverse as the lucrative international cocaine trade and gang warfare inside the notorious Barlinnie Prison in Glasgow. Gerard O’Donovan Mr Robot Amazon Prime, from today Techno-paranoia is still the name of the game as the US hacker drama returns for a much-anticipated third series. With 10 new episodes to get through, clearly the first thing to sort out is the fate of the not-always-reliable narrator Elliot Alderson (Rami Malek), who was shot in last season’s cliffhanger. Dynasty Netflix, from today As in the original, bling, bubbles and bonking dominate this 22-episode reboot of one of the Eighties’ silliest US soap operas. Once again it follows the boardroom and bedroom escapades of Denver’s super-rich Carrington clan.  PGA Tour Golf: The CIMB Classic Sky Sports Main Event, 6.00am Coverage of the opening day’s play at the annual event from the Kuala Lumpur Golf & Country Club in Malaysia, where Justin Thomas has won the last two titles.  Council House Crackdown BBC One, 8.00pm Michelle Ackerley uncovers more tales of social housing fraud as council investigators stake out a woman suspected of faking a disability and a tenant alleged to be illegally subletting housing association property. Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm; BBC Two Wales, 9.00pm The final programme in this affecting series again focuses on the tough decisions the London Ambulance Service faces when its slim resources are stretched to capacity and calls must be prioritised. Russia with Simon Reeve BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 11.15pm This is by far the best travelogue Reeve has done for a while, and for this final leg, the adventurer starts in Crimea, where he weighs up the political and economic costs of its annexation by Russia. From there, he travels north through the vast plains of western Russia to where the country’s real power has always resided, Moscow and St Petersburg.  Educating Greater Manchester Channel 4, 9.00pm In tonight’s episode, it’s Valentine’s Day and romance is in the air for even the school’s youngest pupils. Plus, a recently qualified teacher who’s come to Harrop Fold looking for a new challenge gets more than he bargained for. GO The History of Comedy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This new documentary has an overambitious title for a series that focuses almost entirely on US comedy of fairly recent vintage. Still, it’s an interesting thematic survey of how certain types of laughter making have evolved in the last century. GO Titanic (1997) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Eleven Oscars won and more than a billion dollars taken worldwide in ticket sales. James Cameron deserved his success with this opulent blockbuster about the sinking of the RMS Titanic, a story that has a grand romance between penniless artist Jack (Leonardo DiCaprio) and rich American girl Rose (Kate Winslet) at its heart. Even viewers determined to find it soppy are liable to be swept along by the emotion. Heist (2001) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 10.50pm  Prepare to be triple-crossed, duped and bewildered by this piece of con-artistry, which pulls the rug out from under your feet with such regularity that it’s tempting just to give up and lie down. Gene Hackman, Danny DeVito and Rebecca Pidgeon set out to steal some gold; needless to say, it does not go smoothly. There are excellent performances, plus endless twists and cracking dialogue. Just Go with It (2011) ★★☆☆☆ 5STAR, 11.00pm  Adam Sandler stars in this remake of the 1971 comedy Cactus Flower (itself adapted from a Broadway stage play by Abe Burrows), as Danny, a single plastic surgeon in Los Angeles who feigns an unhappy marriage in order to have no-strings-attached flings with women. What follows is a complex low-grade romantic farce which is saved by a sparky performance from Jennifer Aniston as Danny’s office manager and best friend. Friday 13 October Life on the edge: Ray Mears is in Australia Credit: ITV Australian Wilderness with Ray Mears ITV, 8.00pm; not STV/UTV/Wales The great appeal of Ray Mears’s wildlife documentaries is his no-nonsense approach. Where other presenters rush around telling you how exciting and amazing and wonderful everything is, Mears tends to amble gently through it, explaining a few facts and otherwise allowing you to gaze at the beauty unfurling across your TV screen. It’s an approach that pays high dividends in this new series about the Australian wilderness, a landscape that is vast, beautiful and oddly eerie.  The opening episode focuses more on sea than land (although there is time for a quick trek through rocky desert towards the Indian Ocean) as Mears dives on Ningaloo Reef, the longest fringing coral reef in the world. After a pleasant meeting with some friendly stingrays and a few “wish you were here” shots of the turquoise sea, the real star of the show heaves into sight as Mears and his companions find themselves swimming alongside a passing whale shark, the largest fish in the world. “This is what we’ve all been waiting for,” says Mears as the fish floats into view. It’s a breathtaking, beautiful moment and one which manages to shake even Mears out of his habitual calm. Sarah Hughes Lore Amazon Prime, from today Not for the faint of heart, this disquieting new documentary series is based on Aaron Mahnke’s popular podcast of the same name, with each episode exploring the story behind pop culture’s most legendary horror myths, from vampires and werewolves to possessed dolls.  Mindhunter Netflix, from today Imagine Se7en crossed with Zodiac and Silence of the Lambs and you’ll get the gist of this excellent new detective drama executive produced by David Fincher and Charlize Theron. Based on the non-fiction book Mind Hunter: Inside the FBI’s Elite Serial Crime Unit and set in the late Seventies, it follows a pair of FBI agents (Jonathan Groff and Holt McCallany) who interview and analyse imprisoned mass murderers in order to better understand serial killers. The first episode, which is shot by master of murk Fincher, moves languidly – but is no less absorbing. PS International T20 Cricket: India v Australia Friday, Sky Sports Main Event, 2.20pm The Rajiv Gandhi International Stadium in Hyderabad is the setting as India and Australia contest the final game in a three-match T20 series. Unreported World Channel 4, 7.30pm On August 14, a mudslide in Sierra Leone, caused by torrential rain, destroyed the small town of Regent on the outskirts of the capital, Freetown. Hundreds lost their lives. In this affecting report, Seyi Rhodes talks to the survivors and the rescue teams desperately trying to find those still missing.  Crystal Maze / Have I Got News for You Channel 4, 8.00pm / BBC One, 9.00pm Richard Ayoade fans, rejoice: tonight you can see him twice – somewhat fitting given that he once wrote and directed a black comedy called The Double. First up, he continues to add warmth and irony to a rousing revamp of The Crystal Maze, as the current series concludes. Then, in HIGNFY, he puts that bone-dry wit to good use yet again, as he guest presents the long-running news quiz.  Cold Feet ITV, 9.00pm Affectionate writing and a great ensemble are the foundations on which Mark Bullen’s middle-aged comedy drama are built. Tonight, as this Nineties-show revival continues, Adam (James Nesbitt) and Pete (John Thomson) throw a joint 50th birthday dinner.  Porridge BBC One, 9.30pm  On the subject of revivals, this sort-of sequel to the classic Seventies comedy continues to be so-so. Tonight, there’s a new prison officer on the scene. Patrick Smith The Meyerowitz Stories (2017) ★★★★☆ Netflix, from today  It’s been a long time coming but Adam Sandler is finally in a good film. He plays Danny, a New Yorker whose unemployment and divorce has left him defined purely in terms of his bloodline. The narrative arc is about Danny, sister Jean and half-brother Matthew reconciling themselves with their curmudgeon father Harold (Dustin Hoffman). Emma Thompson is woozily uproarious as Harold’s wife. Lion (2016) ★★★★☆ Amazon Prime, from today Derived from a 2012 memoir by the grown Saroo Brierley, called A Long Way Home, this is the story of a lost boy: a five-year-old Indian who grew up in the Eighties in the area around Khandwa. With no paper trail or family name, he becomes a lost cause, eventually shipped off to kindly foster parents in Tasmania, played by Nicole Kidman and David Wenham. The excellent script, by Luke Davies, sticks rigidly to Saroo’s own point of view. Good Will Hunting (1997) ★★★★☆ W, 9.00pm  Matt Damon and Ben Affleck won an Oscar for Best Screenplay with this stirring if occasionally gloopy story. Will Hunting (Damon) is a hot-headed, 20-year-old janitor with a photographic memory and an untapped genius for mathematics. Robin Williams plays the inspiring therapist who channels Will’s rage into solving quadratics, and Minnie Driver is his brainy, Harvard graduate love interest.   Television previewers Catherine Gee, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: Basquiat: Rage to Riches and Strictly Come Dancing

Saturday 7 October  Basquiat: Rage to Riches BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 10.30pm “If you want to know what there is to know about Jean-Michel, then the place is his work,” says Lisane Basquiat, the sister of the self-taught, Brooklyn-born painter who became a star of the Eighties New York art scene. In the space of a few years, he morphed from a freewheeling, underground graffiti artist, going by the tag name of Samo, into an enigmatic and incessant painter who commanded thousands of dollars for his works: by the age of 21 he was a millionaire. This comprehensive profile digs deep into the life of a young man who was inspired by Gray’s Anatomy, dated Madonna, collaborated with Andy Warhol, and shaved his head in public. Of course, some critics find his cartoonish work hard to take seriously (his rock star persona, which led to his death at 27, did him no favours), while others have an immediate response to his vibrant canvases.  Friends, lovers and contemporaries talk about how he came to rank alongside the likes of Pablo Picasso, Jackson Pollock and Francis Bacon, and muse on how important he still is to the legacy of American art – one of his skull paintings recently sold at Sotheby’s for over $ 100 million and his work is currently the subject of an exhibition at the Barbican in London. Rachel Ward Strictly Come Dancing BBC One, 6.35pm In previous years Movie Week has given us Kellie Bright’s out-of-this-world Star Wars Charleston, Jay McGuiness’s eye-popping Pulp Fiction jive, and the delight of Ed Balls in green face paint and a yellow suit for his smokin’ Mask routine. Can the remaining 14 duos match those memorable homages? Surely Susan Calman’s Wonder Woman samba and Gemma Atkinson’s Jungle Book Charleston will be contenders? The pros will dance a La La Land group performance. Britain’s Ancient Tracks with Tony Robinson Channel 4, 7.00pm The Time Team presenter continues to travel down some of the UK’s oldest roads. Tonight, he’s in the Peak District, venturing along the Derbyshire Portway and taking a tour of D H Lawrence’s mountain retreat.  The X Factor: Bootcamp ITV, 8.15pm The bootcamp stages, in front of a live audience, are an efficient way of shining a light on which acts have potential. The last few try to impress before tomorrow’s brutal Six Chair Challenge.   Black Lake BBC Four, 9.00pm and 9.40pm This Swedish ghost series has been terrific fun as well as serving up its fair share of scares. In tonight’s double-bill finale, Mette’s (Mathilde Norholt) suspicions about Dag (Anderz Eide) grow following a fire in the ski lodge, but Hanne (Sarah-Sofie Boussnina) is still convinced that the resort is cursed, and her salvation appears to lie within the hidden room in the cellar. But time is running out…  XTC: This Is Pop Sky Arts, 9.00pm Of all the bands that emerged from the British post-punk scene, XTC are one of the hardest to pigeon hole. The ever-evolving group had its biggest success in the Eighties with off-kilter, witty pop songs containing sharp, Beatles-like guitar hooks before they moved into psychedelia. This sprightly documentary takes a look at the group, led by Andy Partridge and Colin Moulding, who formed in Swindon in 1972, and who have perhaps become one of Britain’s most unsung bands. RW Boxing: Anthony Crolla v Ricky Burns Sky Sports Main Event, 10.00pm The Manchester Arena hosts this lightweight bout between two former world champions. Anthony Crolla and Ricky Burns are vastly experienced at the highest level, and are both hoping to bounce back from defeats in their most recent contests. Crolla was beaten for the second time by Jorge Linares in March, while Burns lost to Julius Indongo a month later. Performance Live: Missing Episode BBC Two, 10.30pm; Wales, 12.00midnight Twenty years ago, Ross Sutherland was watching EastEnders when a knock at the door led to a chain of events. Here, he remixes that episode into a poem to tell his story. RW Muppets Most Wanted (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 2.45pm  The Muppets tour Europe, where Kermit (Steve Whitmire) is kidnapped and replaced by a doppelgänger. Masterminding the plot is a sleazy Ricky Gervais. Though this contains moments of joy with its fun musical numbers and clever gags, the Muppets themselves are crowded out by cameo overkill from the likes of Lady Gaga, Sean “Diddy” Combs and Céline Dion. Escape Plan (2013) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm  If, even at a then 67 and 66 respectively, Sylvester Stallone and Arnold Schwarzenegger can’t bust out of a high-security prison, you don’t really fancy anyone else’s chances. Stallone’s character, Breslin, is an expert in prison weak spots, hired to test their pregnability by going undercover as an inmate. The two stars bring brains and brawn to this film, but it could do with a tighter plot and a bit more pace. Bright Days Ahead (2013) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.05am  In this charming French romance from director Marion Vernoux, recently retired dentist Caro (Fanny Ardant) is depressed and underappreciated by her family. She falls in love with her computer class lecturer, who’s 20 years younger than her. Their affair reawakens her sense of purpose, and the consequences on her marriage are unexpected. The performances are strong, but a flat script  lets the film down. Sunday 8 October Louis Theroux with heroin user Petty Betty Credit: BBC  Louis Theroux: Dark States – Heroin Town BBC Two, 9.00pm Louis Theroux’s second coming as a chronicler of society’s underdogs, outcasts and victims continues with this examination of life and death on the fringes (documentaries on murder and sex trafficking are to come). He is in Huntington, West Virginia, a former industrial town in the grip of a drug epidemic fuelled by Big Pharma’s record of encouraging doctors to overmedicate workplace injuries: here fatal-overdose rates are 13 times the national average and one in 10 babies are born with an opiate addiction. Such is the extent of the problem that local efforts are focused on containment as much as prevention, and the emergency services are overstretched while the rehab centres struggling. As ever, Theroux’s combination of apparent guilelessness and fearlessness bears fruit in the intimate encounters. Whether teasing out the distressing realities of one addict and the partner who assists her, or prodding away at the motives of another who seems superficially content, he gleans genuinely valuable insights. One thing is clear in this incisive and troubling film, their spirits crushed, any potential is strangled and optimism is in diminishing supply. Gabriel Tate Formula 1: Japanese Grand Prix Sky Sports F1, 5.30am Despite Max Verstappen’s impressive victory in the Malaysian Grand Prix, Lewis Hamilton has plenty to be cheerful about as F1 heads to Japan. Indeed, by finishing second last weekend, having toiled with his Mercedes all weekend, Hamilton extended his lead in the drivers’ championship to 34 points, with five races of the season remaining. His nearest rival, Sebastian Vettel, on the other hand, is out of sorts: having not finished in Singapore, then started at the back of the grid in Malaysia but finished in fourth place. He’ll need to be much improved at the Suzuka Circuit. Premiership Rugby Union: Saracens v Wasps BT Sport 1, 2.30pm Having lost three of their opening five matches, the most recent of which was a 25-9 defeat at home to Bath, Wasps need a win to boost morale. The problem is they’re away at Saracens, who’ve won four from five and are looking imperious, as anyone who witnessed their 25-3 trouncing of Worcester last weekend will attest. Among the scorers that day was England full-back Alex Goode.  International Football: Lithuania v England ITV, 4.30pm England round off an eventful qualifying campaign that began with them replacing Sam Allardyce as manager with Gareth Southgate. Since then Wayne Rooney, England’s top scorer, has called time on his international career, while younger players such as Harry Kane and Dele Alli have grown in stature. The former, who has been in sublime form for Spurs this season, has been named captain and will be confident of adding to tally this afternoon at the LFF Stadium in Vilnius. When these sides met in Match, goals from Jermain Defoe – his first for England since 2013 – and Jamie Vardy gave Southgate’s side a 2-0 victory.  The Last Post BBC One, 9.00pm Peter Moffat’s evocative Sixties drama continues with the arrival of an American war reporter, Martha Franklin (Essie Davis), which disrupts the delicate dynamic on the military base, while insurgent leader Abdul-Kadir Hakim is targeted for the murder of Captain Page (Joseph Kennedy). Electric Dreams: Crazy Diamond Channel 4, 9.00pm In this episode of the Philip K Dick adaptations, Ed Morris (Steve Buscemi) is offered a chance to inject some excitement into his drab life with wife Sally (Julia Davis) by Jill (Sidse Babbett Knudsen), a synthetic human. The plot is cluttered, but the ending is satisfying indeed. The Gifted Fox, 9.00pm Marvel’s colonisation of the small screen continues with this entry in the X-Men universe. While The Gifted is a far cry from the mind-bending visions of Noah Hawley’s Legion, it provides plenty of bang for your buck in its tales of a family, headed by True Blood’s Stephen Moyer, that is rocked by revelations that its children have mutant abilities and go on the run from dastardly government forces. Festival No 6 Sky Arts, 9.00pm Highlights from the deeply eccentric beanfeast in Portmeirion, the Italianate Welsh coastal home of The Prisoner TV series. Expect music from Mogwai, Bloc Party and the wonderful Flaming Lips. The Sky at Night BBC Four, 10.00pm Maggie Aderin-Pocock considers the renewal of interest in manned missions to the moon, and the role of tech companies in funding and driving these new initiatives. GT Snowfall BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI This new 10-parter from John Singleton (Boyz N the Hood) traces the shockwaves from the crack cocaine epidemic that ravaged Los Angeles in the Eighties. In the first episode, we meet Franklin Saint (Damson Idris), who is living with his mum and senses an opportunity that will change his life, and his city. It’s a notch below Narcos, but it’s still compelling and sharp. Sir Bobby Charlton at 80 BBC One, 10.30pm Alex Ferguson, Eric Cantona and more pay tribute to an Old Trafford great in a hagiography, yet Charlton is a man of such decency and dignity that it’s hard to object. GT Dial M for Murder (1954) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 1.15pm  It’s not quite on the same plane of brilliance as Vertigo, but Hitchcock’s adaptation of Frederick Knott’s stage play is still a briskly efficient exercise in suspense. Tony Wendice (Ray Milland) is trying to have his socialite wife Margot (Grace Kelly) murdered, after she has an affair with a writer. When Tony’s first plan fails, he dreams up another that’s even more devious. This Sporting Life (1963) ★★★★ London Live, 8.00pm  It’s Yorkshire accents and monochrome realism as Richard Harris goes down the mines, plays rugby and has an affair. As an uncompromising portrait of male attitudes, Lindsay Anderson’s stunning adaptation of David Storey’s novel is like a punch to the gut, and a direct antecedent of Scorsese’s Raging Bull. Rachel Roberts (star of earlier kitchen sink drama Saturday Night and Sunday Morning) co-stars. The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (2013) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 11.05pm  Mild-mannered Walter Mitty’s life is controlled  by his overbearing mother. He finds his escape by imagining himself living in the worlds pictured on the covers of Life magazine  and becoming a pilot, a sea captain and couturier.  Ben Stiller directs and stars in this loose revamping of the James Thurber’s story: the result is a flawed but  still entertaining and enjoyable adventure. Monday 9 October At your service: Steph and Dom Parker Credit: Channel 4 Steph and Dom’s One Star to Five Star Channel 4, 5.30pm Daytime programming isn’t normally where we look for originality, so it comes as no surprise to find little in this new weekday show hosted by Steph and Dom Parker, those once, seemingly ever-sozzled breakout stars from Gogglebox. What there is, though, is fun and lots of it, even if at times it can be hard to tell whether it is intentional or not. Like the illegitimate offspring of Four in a Bed and any number of hackneyed Hotel Inspector-style shows, this series sees the Parkers take their own limited experience as B & B owners in Kent as proof that they know everything there is to know about the international hospitality industry and descend on an ailing hotel for a week with a view to making it marginally more appealing.  They begin with the dowdy Ransdale Hotel in Bridlington, a slightly tatty, underperforming establishment where they reckon seaside-themed rooms, kedgeree for breakfast and a party atmosphere in the bar will get the occupancy levels up from the current “negligible”. Could getting the clientele drunk cause the approval ratings to peak? It’s probably more likely than the kedgeree. Gerard O’Donovan The Human Body: Secrets of Your Life Revealed BBC Two, 9.00pm In the series’ concluding part, Chris and Xand van Tulleken explore how experiences shape our minds and bodies, and show for the very first time how memories are formed in the brain and continue to influence us throughout our lives.  Tunes for Tyrants: Music and Power with Suzy Klein BBC Four, 9.00pm In this edition of the documentary series, Suzy Klein explores the Thirties and how classical music, while it was exploited to idealise violent nationalism and prop up the totalitarian regimes of the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany, was also be a source of coded resistance. Liar ITV, 9.00pm In a torrid penultimate episode, Laura (Joanne Froggatt) convinces ex-boyfriend Tom (Warren Brown) to help bring Andrew Earlham (Ioan Gruffudd) to justice as she’s forced to resort to a somewhat unusual method of forcing a confession out of him. W1A BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI This is a terrific edition of the sitcom. As the crisis over the axing of the BBC’s Big Swing Band goes viral, Head of Values Ian Fletcher (Hugh Bonneville) once again finds himself caught in the media cross-hairs.  The Vietnam War BBC Four, 10.00pm & 10.55pm Another double helping of Ken Burns’s stately and impeccably researched history of the Vietnam War rolls us on through 1967 when, with casualties mounting and the Viet Cong striking back in the infamous Tet offensive, a US victory looked increasingly beyond reach. Timewasters ITV2, 10.00pm & 10.30pm ITV2 launches a season of new comedies with this sharply scripted sitcom about a struggling four-piece jazz band who get stuck in Twenties London when their time machine breaks down. GO After the News ITV, 10.45pm; NI, 12.45am; not STV; Wales, 11.15pm Current affairs presenters Emma Barnett and Nick Ferrari are hot tickets just now following some hard-hitting “holiday cover” hosting on Newsnight this summer. Now ITV has signed them up for this new nightly debate show that takes its subject matter straight from ITV News at Ten. After the unmitigated flop of The Nightly Show, ITV will be keen to for this to shine. GO Pimpernel Smith (1941, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 3.50pm  Leslie Howard, famed for his role in Gone with the Wind, directs and stars in this deft drama set in 1939 Berlin. An academic (Howard) recruits students to go to Europe under the guise of an archaeological dig. However, his real mission is to smuggle victims of Nazi persecution out of Germany. An absorbing film and, retrospectively, quite haunting since Howard was shot down in the war by a Nazi plane two years later. The Birth of a Nation (2016) ★★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 4.10pm and daily  Writer-director-star Nate Parker’s attempt to reappropriate the notorious racism of DW Griffith’s 1915 foundation myth and spin it on its axis is a graceless, pretentious mallet to the head of history. Parker (whose galvanising performance is much the strongest) tells the story of Nat Turner’s 1831 slave rebellion from the side of the true victims. Se7en (1995) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm  Gluttony, avarice, envy, sloth, wrath, lust and pride; the seven deadly sins are explored graphically, and imaginatively, in this gloomy thriller from director David Fincher. It follows a detective (an outstanding Morgan Freeman) and his rookie partner (Brad Pitt) on the hunt for a maniac who kills those guilty of the above vices. Brutal and gripping, with an ending you won’t forget in a hurry. Gwyneth Paltrow and Kevin Spacey co-star. Tuesday 10 October In the field: Michelle Keegan as Georgie Lane Credit: BBC Our Girl: Nepal Tour BBC One, 9.00pm Michelle Keegan returns as dedicated army medic Georgie Lane in Tony Grounds’s entertaining if soapy army drama. This time the main action is in Nepal, where Georgie and the rest of 2 Section, including Ben Aldridge’s patrician Captain Charles James, are posted to provide humanitarian relief following an earthquake.  This being Our Girl, the personal relationships are as important as the action and Georgie soon finds herself having a perfectly arched eyebrow-off with new recruit Maisie Richards (the excellent Shalom Brune-Franklin). Yet behind the jokes there are serious points raised about the way in which the army operates, and whether individualism ever has a place. Fans of the will they/won’t they romance between Georgie and her slick former fiancé Elvis (Luke Pasqualino) will be disappointed by how little the latter features in this opening episode (just one brief scene in Syria before the main action begins), although Rudi Dharmalingam gallantly steps into the breach as impassioned NGO worker Milan. The real joy, however, comes not from the plot twists but from the expert way in which Grounds captures both the banter and boredom of army life. Sarah Hughes Once Upon a Time Netflix, from today This popular fantasy series that follows fairy-tale characters living in the real world returns for its seventh season. It marks a reboot of sorts, with our now-adult hero Henry Mills (Jared S Gilmore) finding himself in the same position as when the story began. The Great British Bake Off Channel 4, 8.00pm The cooking competition continues to roll out new themes, with this episode marking the first Italian Week. But you can be sure that it won’t have anything to do with making a bog-standard spag bol. Unfortunately the weather is not on their side, as the contestants suffer in the hottest temperatures ever recorded in the tent. Russia 1917: Countdown to Revolution BBC Two, 9.00pm Juliet Stevenson narrates this insightful documentary made to mark the centenary of the Russian Revolution. Martin Amis, Orlando Figes and Helen Rappaport are among those discussing and recounting how Russia transitioned from a tsarist autocracy to become the first communist state – and the roles played by Lenin, Trotsky and Stalin. Concorde: A Supersonic Story BBC Four, 9.00pm The Concorde was considered the “most glamorous plane ever built” – until it was retired in 2003 following the crash of Air France Flight 4590. But its story is a fascinating one. Sophie Okonedo narrates this tale of rows between French and British governments, while former passengers recount queuing for the lavatory with celebrities.  The Deuce Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Vincent (James Franco) is putting the finishing touches to his new bar, in this third episode of the gritty, Seventies New York-set drama. But then an unexpected silent partner turns up. CG Celebrity Hunted Channel 4, 9.15pm The real-life thriller returns for a celebrity charity edition. Anneka Rice and former Strictly winner Jay McGuiness are among those attempting to avoid detection.  Later Live… with Jools Holland BBC Two, 10.00pm; N Ireland, 11.15pm Former Led Zeppelin singer Robert Plant performs live with his band Sensational Space Shifters. He’s joined by Beck, with songs from his first new album in three years. Catherine Gee Ice Age: Continental Drift (2012) ★★☆☆☆ E4, 8.00pm Surprisingly, the Ice Age series has accrued more lucre than Pixar’s Toy Story trilogy. But this fourth film is the thinnest and redeemed only by a demented squirrel. Once again, the story revolves around Manny the mammoth (Ray Romano), Sid the sloth (John Leguizamo) and Diego the smilodon (Denis Leary), who are separated from their herd thanks to the shifting of the Earth’s land masses. Southpaw (2015) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Jake Gyllenhaal lays his body on the line for 0a boxing drama so predictable that you could set your watch by it. If only someone had devoted equivalent stamina to the screenplay, we might have an actual movie on our hands. Nevertheless, it’s rousingly entertaining as Gyllenhaal’s Billy “The Great” Hope learns the art of subterfuge from a new coach (Forest Whitaker). Rachel McAdams co-stars. I Origins (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film 4, 11.25pm  Eyes and souls have been cinematically intertwined since at least 1929, when, in Un Chien Andalou, Buñuel and Dalí carved out their visionary manifesto with the quick swipe of a razor blade across a plump and oozing eyeball. In Mike Cahill’s film, the metaphor trots off down a strange and lyrical new trail when a biology student (Michael Pitt) encounters a model (Astrid Bergès-Frisbey) who makes him question scientific fact. Wednesday 11 October Not sitting well: David Mitchell as Stephen Credit: Channel 4 Back Channel 4, 10.00pm The ratings may have been a little underwhelming, but in contrast to David Mitchell and Robert Webb’s tonally uncertain and muddled Ambassadors, Back has been a triumph. Simon Blackwell’s often brutal, witheringly funny script has granted the leading men roles that riff on their Peep Show personas of Mark and Jez without ever becoming beholden to them. Prodigal foster son Andrew’s (Webb) victory over biological offspring Stephen (Mitchell) is apparently complete, as the former struts around his flourishing gastropub, bragging about his chef’s clafoutis while the latter moulders in a caravan. “He’s stolen my life and he’s living it better than me,” Stephen fumes, impotently. Their father’s memorial party – and the associated speeches – offer Stephen one final shot at redemption: when a clutch of other returning foster children eclipse Andrew’s efforts to ingratiate himself, Stephen has a revelation that sends him on a demented trip of vengeance to fill the gaps in his rival’s life story. Finding profound bathos in often gasp-inducing misanthropy and reuniting the best British double act around (pace Vic and Bob), Back undoubtedly merits a return. Gabriel Tate The Apprentice BBC One, 9.00pm Enjoying a new lease of life after a disappointing series last year, reality TV’s version of an extended job interview this week unleashes the candidates’ aesthetic pretensions by asking them to turn interior designers at a five-star hotel. The mind boggles at the bills that needed settling at the end of this particular stay. The Detectives: Murder on the Streets BBC Two, 9.00pm This utterly involving and consistently impressive documentary series comes to a climax with the arrival of the trial in the case of the murder of young homeless man Daniel Smith. This is true crime of the most empathetic and socially responsible kind. Britain’s Lost Masterpieces BBC Four, 9.00pm Dr Bendor Grosvenor and Emma Dabiri visit Carmathenshire County Museum, home to a damaged portrait of a 16th-century Earl whose provenance is disputed. Doc Martin ITV, 9.00pm Receptionist Morwenna’s (Jessica Ransom) parents pay her a surprise visit and present Doc Martin (Martin Clunes) with a dilemma as the amiable comedy drama ambles through another hour. Ray Donovan Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Susan Sarandon has been both a welcome addition and much-needed counterpart to this occasionally testosterone-heavy series, with Liev Schreiber’s eponymous heavy facing the repercussions of years of making enemies in high places. Norskov Channel 4, 10.35pm The titular Danish industrial port is blighted by a drug problem. Enter ace detective Tom Noack (Thomas Levin), an old acquaintance of the city’s mayor to clean the place up and, inevitably, disturb a few ghosts. It’s a slick Nordic noir – the whole series will be available on C4’s online service Walter Presents after this episode airs. GT Inside Birmingham Children’s Hospital More4, 10.00pm The BBC and Channel 4 continue to match each other, blow for blow, with medical documentaries. This latest series follows a girl diagnosed with a life-changing condition, a boy with leukaemia and a five-year-old whose epilepsy is proving increasingly hard to manage. As so often, their stoicism and resilience are humbling and very affecting. GT Charade (1963) ★★★★☆ Film4, 4.35pm Audrey Hepburn as a temperamental-but-alluring damsel in distress and Cary Grant as a shadowy charmer are characters that the two actors played over and over during their careers. But they do so exceptionally in this suspense comedy from Stanley Donen, often referred to as the best Hitchcock movie that Hitchcock never made. Hepburn is the widow being trailed by four men hunting for her late husband’s stolen fortune. Starship Troopers (1997) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 10.00pm  On first appearances, this Oscar-nominated sci-fi action thriller looks distressingly silly: in the distant future, a group of American high-school friends join the armed forces to do intergalactic war with some malicious insectoid aliens, or “Bugs”. The whole of humanity is at risk. Thankfully director Paul Verhoeven deftly underpins the whole thing with wicked satirical verve and no-nonsense action. Dying Laughing (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Arts, 10.30pm  Dozens of stand-up comics, including Kevin Hart, Jerry Seinfeld and Amy Schumer, contribute to this understated but rather wonderful documentary film about the infrequent highs and relentless lows of trying to make people laugh. It can be painful – one anecdote about “bombing” on stage is particularly uncomfortable – but then a comic will recall that first great gig and you can just tell that all the anguish has been worth it. Thursday 12 October Every second counts: McDonald follows a murder investigation Credit: ITV An Hour to Catch a Killer with Trevor McDonald ITV, 9.00pm Trevor McDonald’s abiding fascination with such murky matters as serial murder and organised crime, especially in the United States, is well established. For the first programme in ITV’s new Crime and Punishment season, McDonald examines a key concept of modern crime detection: how the decisions made by investigating officers in the so-called “Golden Hour” – the first 60 minutes of a murder inquiry – have a vital impact on whether or not a killer is caught and successfully prosecuted. And here he examines a case much closer to home. With full access to the Northumbria Police Homicide Unit’s investigation into the murder of 24-year-old graduate Alice Ruggles last October, the film follows the case from the moment the murder was reported, through every layer of the investigation as it develops, to the moment the all-too-obvious prime suspect is located and charged.  Later in this series, Susannah Reid, Piers Morgan, Ross Kemp and, more randomly, Gordon Ramsay will present reports on subjects as diverse as the lucrative international cocaine trade and gang warfare inside the notorious Barlinnie Prison in Glasgow. Gerard O’Donovan Mr Robot Amazon Prime, from today Techno-paranoia is still the name of the game as the US hacker drama returns for a much-anticipated third series. With 10 new episodes to get through, clearly the first thing to sort out is the fate of the not-always-reliable narrator Elliot Alderson (Rami Malek), who was shot in last season’s cliffhanger. Dynasty Netflix, from today As in the original, bling, bubbles and bonking dominate this 22-episode reboot of one of the Eighties’ silliest US soap operas. Once again it follows the boardroom and bedroom escapades of Denver’s super-rich Carrington clan.  PGA Tour Golf: The CIMB Classic Sky Sports Main Event, 6.00am Coverage of the opening day’s play at the annual event from the Kuala Lumpur Golf & Country Club in Malaysia, where Justin Thomas has won the last two titles.  Council House Crackdown BBC One, 8.00pm Michelle Ackerley uncovers more tales of social housing fraud as council investigators stake out a woman suspected of faking a disability and a tenant alleged to be illegally subletting housing association property. Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm; BBC Two Wales, 9.00pm The final programme in this affecting series again focuses on the tough decisions the London Ambulance Service faces when its slim resources are stretched to capacity and calls must be prioritised. Russia with Simon Reeve BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 11.15pm This is by far the best travelogue Reeve has done for a while, and for this final leg, the adventurer starts in Crimea, where he weighs up the political and economic costs of its annexation by Russia. From there, he travels north through the vast plains of western Russia to where the country’s real power has always resided, Moscow and St Petersburg.  Educating Greater Manchester Channel 4, 9.00pm In tonight’s episode, it’s Valentine’s Day and romance is in the air for even the school’s youngest pupils. Plus, a recently qualified teacher who’s come to Harrop Fold looking for a new challenge gets more than he bargained for. GO The History of Comedy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This new documentary has an overambitious title for a series that focuses almost entirely on US comedy of fairly recent vintage. Still, it’s an interesting thematic survey of how certain types of laughter making have evolved in the last century. GO Titanic (1997) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Eleven Oscars won and more than a billion dollars taken worldwide in ticket sales. James Cameron deserved his success with this opulent blockbuster about the sinking of the RMS Titanic, a story that has a grand romance between penniless artist Jack (Leonardo DiCaprio) and rich American girl Rose (Kate Winslet) at its heart. Even viewers determined to find it soppy are liable to be swept along by the emotion. Heist (2001) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 10.50pm  Prepare to be triple-crossed, duped and bewildered by this piece of con-artistry, which pulls the rug out from under your feet with such regularity that it’s tempting just to give up and lie down. Gene Hackman, Danny DeVito and Rebecca Pidgeon set out to steal some gold; needless to say, it does not go smoothly. There are excellent performances, plus endless twists and cracking dialogue. Just Go with It (2011) ★★☆☆☆ 5STAR, 11.00pm  Adam Sandler stars in this remake of the 1971 comedy Cactus Flower (itself adapted from a Broadway stage play by Abe Burrows), as Danny, a single plastic surgeon in Los Angeles who feigns an unhappy marriage in order to have no-strings-attached flings with women. What follows is a complex low-grade romantic farce which is saved by a sparky performance from Jennifer Aniston as Danny’s office manager and best friend. Friday 13 October Life on the edge: Ray Mears is in Australia Credit: ITV Australian Wilderness with Ray Mears ITV, 8.00pm; not STV/UTV/Wales The great appeal of Ray Mears’s wildlife documentaries is his no-nonsense approach. Where other presenters rush around telling you how exciting and amazing and wonderful everything is, Mears tends to amble gently through it, explaining a few facts and otherwise allowing you to gaze at the beauty unfurling across your TV screen. It’s an approach that pays high dividends in this new series about the Australian wilderness, a landscape that is vast, beautiful and oddly eerie.  The opening episode focuses more on sea than land (although there is time for a quick trek through rocky desert towards the Indian Ocean) as Mears dives on Ningaloo Reef, the longest fringing coral reef in the world. After a pleasant meeting with some friendly stingrays and a few “wish you were here” shots of the turquoise sea, the real star of the show heaves into sight as Mears and his companions find themselves swimming alongside a passing whale shark, the largest fish in the world. “This is what we’ve all been waiting for,” says Mears as the fish floats into view. It’s a breathtaking, beautiful moment and one which manages to shake even Mears out of his habitual calm. Sarah Hughes Lore Amazon Prime, from today Not for the faint of heart, this disquieting new documentary series is based on Aaron Mahnke’s popular podcast of the same name, with each episode exploring the story behind pop culture’s most legendary horror myths, from vampires and werewolves to possessed dolls.  Mindhunter Netflix, from today Imagine Se7en crossed with Zodiac and Silence of the Lambs and you’ll get the gist of this excellent new detective drama executive produced by David Fincher and Charlize Theron. Based on the non-fiction book Mind Hunter: Inside the FBI’s Elite Serial Crime Unit and set in the late Seventies, it follows a pair of FBI agents (Jonathan Groff and Holt McCallany) who interview and analyse imprisoned mass murderers in order to better understand serial killers. The first episode, which is shot by master of murk Fincher, moves languidly – but is no less absorbing. PS International T20 Cricket: India v Australia Friday, Sky Sports Main Event, 2.20pm The Rajiv Gandhi International Stadium in Hyderabad is the setting as India and Australia contest the final game in a three-match T20 series. Unreported World Channel 4, 7.30pm On August 14, a mudslide in Sierra Leone, caused by torrential rain, destroyed the small town of Regent on the outskirts of the capital, Freetown. Hundreds lost their lives. In this affecting report, Seyi Rhodes talks to the survivors and the rescue teams desperately trying to find those still missing.  Crystal Maze / Have I Got News for You Channel 4, 8.00pm / BBC One, 9.00pm Richard Ayoade fans, rejoice: tonight you can see him twice – somewhat fitting given that he once wrote and directed a black comedy called The Double. First up, he continues to add warmth and irony to a rousing revamp of The Crystal Maze, as the current series concludes. Then, in HIGNFY, he puts that bone-dry wit to good use yet again, as he guest presents the long-running news quiz.  Cold Feet ITV, 9.00pm Affectionate writing and a great ensemble are the foundations on which Mark Bullen’s middle-aged comedy drama are built. Tonight, as this Nineties-show revival continues, Adam (James Nesbitt) and Pete (John Thomson) throw a joint 50th birthday dinner.  Porridge BBC One, 9.30pm  On the subject of revivals, this sort-of sequel to the classic Seventies comedy continues to be so-so. Tonight, there’s a new prison officer on the scene. Patrick Smith The Meyerowitz Stories (2017) ★★★★☆ Netflix, from today  It’s been a long time coming but Adam Sandler is finally in a good film. He plays Danny, a New Yorker whose unemployment and divorce has left him defined purely in terms of his bloodline. The narrative arc is about Danny, sister Jean and half-brother Matthew reconciling themselves with their curmudgeon father Harold (Dustin Hoffman). Emma Thompson is woozily uproarious as Harold’s wife. Lion (2016) ★★★★☆ Amazon Prime, from today Derived from a 2012 memoir by the grown Saroo Brierley, called A Long Way Home, this is the story of a lost boy: a five-year-old Indian who grew up in the Eighties in the area around Khandwa. With no paper trail or family name, he becomes a lost cause, eventually shipped off to kindly foster parents in Tasmania, played by Nicole Kidman and David Wenham. The excellent script, by Luke Davies, sticks rigidly to Saroo’s own point of view. Good Will Hunting (1997) ★★★★☆ W, 9.00pm  Matt Damon and Ben Affleck won an Oscar for Best Screenplay with this stirring if occasionally gloopy story. Will Hunting (Damon) is a hot-headed, 20-year-old janitor with a photographic memory and an untapped genius for mathematics. Robin Williams plays the inspiring therapist who channels Will’s rage into solving quadratics, and Minnie Driver is his brainy, Harvard graduate love interest.   Television previewers Catherine Gee, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: The Housing Enforcers and England v Slovenia

Thursday 5 October The Housing Enforcers BBC One, 8.00pm; BBC Two Wales, 7.00pm “Everyone has a right to a safe place to live, no matter who you are, where you live or how much rent you pay. It’s non-negotiable.” So concludes Matt Allwright at the end of this programme focusing on the importance of fire safety.  The format is straightforward: Allwright travels across the country meeting with housing officers and examining the myriad ways in which fires can destroy lives. What makes this really hit home, however, is the presenter’s quiet fury at the way in which some lives are considered less worthy than others. Inevitably, the shadow of Grenfell Tower hangs heavy over the hour. It’s notable that many of those worst affected are elderly and living alone: the story of fiercely independent Ali who refuses to acknowledge, even to his family, quite how much he is struggling is particularly poignant. Allwright, however, saves his most righteous rage for the landlords squeezing tenants in wherever they can and failing to meet even the minimum health and safety standards. The result is a hard-hitting and often hard-to-watch documentary, which also offers solid advice on how to deal both with fires and bad landlords. Sarah Hughes Live International Football: England v Slovenia ITV, 7.30pm Having drawn 0-0 last October, with Joe Hart forced to make a string of fine saves, England and Slovenia reconvene at Wembley. Victory today for Gareth Southgate’s men will ensure their qualification for next year’s World Cup in Russia. And having beaten second-placed Slovakia 2-1 last month, thanks to a strike from tyro Marcus Rashford, they’ll be confident of doing just that. The Big Family Cooking Showdown BBC Two, 8.00pm Two last families go head to head for a place in the finals. Their £10 challenge is a Friday night takeaway, so naturally curry is on the menu. There’s talk of “fusion” cooking, some mushy spinach and a 34-year-old rolling pin.   Discovering: Laurence Olivier Sky Arts, 8.00pm The spotlight turns on Laurence Olivier, who, in 1937, described cinema as an “anaemic little medium which could not stand great acting”.   Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm The work of the West Midlands Ambulance Service continues as a specialist trauma team are dispatched to a motorbike accident where a man has suffered a catastrophic chest injury. “I’ve got nothing…” declares the doctor. It’s a stark reminder of the fragility of life and the increasing compassion of the services in times of chaos.    Russia with Simon Reeve BBC Two, 9.00pm Simon Reeve continues his fascinating journey, meeting Tuvan children in Siberia who practice the Mongolian tradition of throat singing.  Educating Greater Manchester Channel 4, 9.00pm Ah, that old chestnut – ignoring school uniform rules. This week, the teachers at Harrop Fold are on the back foot when a message is spread on Snapchat encouraging pupils to come in wearing trainers. Social media also causes friction between Year 11 girls Serena and Lelo when one talks to the other’s boyfriend on FaceTime. Rachel Ward Law & Order True Crime: The Menendez murders Sky Living, 9.00pm This series, similar to The People v OJ Simpson, takes a closer look at the two trials of brothers Lyle and Erik Menendez, who were convicted of murdering their parents in their Beverly Hills home in 1989. It focuses on the attorney (Edie Falco), who was one of their few defenders. Dimension 404 Syfy, 9.00pm Each episode of this new sci-fi anthology features a form of technology gone wrong. But there’s nothing unnerving about it, rather it’s a camp pastiche of The Twilight Zone, complete with Star Wars’ Mark Hamill providing the voice-over. Glee’s Lea Michele stars in the first episode about online dating. It’s weird, but it doesn’t overplay it. RW Robin and Marian (1976) ★★★★☆ Film4, 1.10pm  Sean Connery gives one of his best performances as a middle-aged Robin Hood, who heads home to Sherwood Forest after the death of Richard I. He finds that scaling a castle wall isn’t as easy as it used to be, Maid Marian (Audrey Hepburn) is still miffed at being left in the lurch, and the Sheriff (Robert Shaw) is up to his old tricks in Richard Lester’s good-natured romance. Look out for Ronnie Barker as Friar Tuck. Jerry Maguire (1996) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 5.40pm  In Cameron Crowe’s macho romcom, Tom Cruise plays a sports agent who has an attack of conscience and urges his colleagues to think about the welfare of their clients. He’s duly fired but announces that he’ll start his own agency. A washed-up footballer (Cuba Gooding Jr) and a single mother (Renée Zellweger) are the only ones who agree to go with him. Here, the classic quote, “You had me at ‘hello’” was born. The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.10pm Clint Eastwood directs and stars in this marvellous warm-hearted western adapted from Forrest Carter’s novel and set during the American Civil War. Eastwood plays the eponymous Missouri farmer who, driven by memories of his family’s slaughter, becomes an outlaw when he refuses to join his Confederate comrades in surrender, in favour of seeking revenge on the men who murdered his kin. Friday 6 October Penal colony: Harry Peacock, Kevin Bishop and Ricky Grover Credit: BBC Porridge BBC One, 9.30pm The most successful of the BBC’s classic sitcom revivals from last year, Porridge returns for a full series with the series’ creators Dick Clement and Ian La Frenais once again on board. It finds Nigel Norman Fletcher (Kevin Bishop as the grandson of Ronnie Barker’s character, Norman Stanley) locking horns with officer Meekie (Mark Bonnar) while aiding or outsmarting the prison’s ne’er-do-wells. In a canny twist, it is Fletch who is now the relative ingénue in his cell, seeking counsel from veteran lag Joe Lotterby (Dave Hill). We find Fletch as the prison’s resident Cyrano de Bergerac, writing letters to keep the flame of romance alive between assorted inmates and their partners on the outside. All goes well until Fletch suffers a crisis of conscience that threatens the whole operation. Some of the gags are groanworthy, but Clement and La Frenais’s mastery of sitcom mechanics remains complete; their presence keeps the spirit of the original intact, while the update means that no one is attempting to emulate the cast of the Seventies series. Fletch has a five-year sentence to serve; unlikely as it might seem, a similar term for Porridge might not be unwelcome. Gabriel Tate Suburra: the Series Netflix, from 12.01am Like Romanzo Criminale and Gomorrah before it, Suburra began life as a book before becoming a gripping, multifaceted Italian-language political thriller. This 10-part series, set in the dying days of Berlusconi’s regime, explores the themes of politics, the Church and corruption during 20 tumultuous days in Rome. Unreported World Channel 4, 7.30pm Ireland faces a pivotal referendum on the decriminalisation of abortion in certain circumstances; Kate Hardie-Buckley meets those on both sides of the debate in a deeply affecting edition of the current-affairs series. Modern Family Sky1, 8.30pm It may have tailed off since its peak, but Modern Family is still good for a few laughs. The ninth series begins with Jay (Ty Burrell) taking the family on a houseboat holiday, and Mitchell (Jesse Tyler Ferguson) encountering an old flame. Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm; not N Ireland or Wales Monty Don begins preparations for 2018 by advising others on how to use leaf mould as a mulch. Elsewhere, Adam Frost visits a community allotment in Manchester, and Nick Bailey learns from a zoologist about the life teeming in the soil. Nile Rodgers: How to Make It in the Music Business BBC Four, 9.00pm Guitar genius and pop producer Nile Rodgers shares the wisdom he’s acquired over decades in the music business. In the first episode, he discusses the founding of Chic and his influence on today’s hitmakers. GT Cold Feet ITV, 9.00pm Karen (Hermione Norris) is on the brink of financial disaster in spite of David’s (Robert Bathurst) assistance, while Adam (James Nesbitt) gets out of his depth on a night out in Mike Bullen’s assured comedy-drama revival. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm Another line-up of heavy-hitters assembles on the red sofa tonight: comedian Chris Rock plugs his first UK stand-up tour in a decade, actors Idris Elba and Kate Winslet discuss their niche genre movie, “disaster-romance” The Mountain Between Us (about a surgeon and a journalist who survive a plane crash), and Liam Gallagher performs songs from his debut album, As You Were. GT The Twilight Saga: Eclipse (2010) ★★★☆☆ E4, 8.00pm  The third instalment of the teenage vampire franchise is better than the second and will please its fan base, though Melissa Rosenberg’s script is full of clichés and relies on a shirtless Taylor Lautner for distraction. Girl-next-door Bella Swan (Kristen Stewart) must choose between 100-year-old vampire Edward Cullen (Robert Pattinson) and hunky werewolf Jacob Black (Lautner). T2: Trainspotting (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.00pm  Danny Boyle’s sequel is more than just a trip down memory lane. Back in 1996, Trainspotting’s gallery of junkies and rogues (Ewan McGregor, Jonny Lee Miller) proudly and raucously chose not to choose life. But now, all have come to terms with the gnawing possibility that life may have in fact not chosen them. There’s no chance of it matching the legacy of the first film, but it doesn’t tarnish it either. American Hustle (2013) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 12.10am  David O Russell’s caper feels like the film he has spent his career warming up for and is a serious piece of film-making that delights in its own silliness. Irving (Christian Bale) and his partner Sydney (Amy Adams) are con artists blackmailed by FBI agent Richie DiMaso (Bradley Cooper) into aiding his investigation. “Some of this actually happened,” reads a title card, and to be more specific would spoil the fun. Saturday 7 October  Off-the-wall brilliance: artist Jean-Michel Basquiat Credit: BBC Basquiat: Rage to Riches BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 10.30pm “If you want to know what there is to know about Jean-Michel, then the place is his work,” says Lisane Basquiat, the sister of the self-taught, Brooklyn-born painter who became a star of the Eighties New York art scene. In the space of a few years, he morphed from a freewheeling, underground graffiti artist, going by the tag name of Samo, into an enigmatic and incessant painter who commanded thousands of dollars for his works: by the age of 21 he was a millionaire. This comprehensive profile digs deep into the life of a young man who was inspired by Gray’s Anatomy, dated Madonna, collaborated with Andy Warhol, and shaved his head in public. Of course, some critics find his cartoonish work hard to take seriously (his rock star persona, which led to his death at 27, did him no favours), while others have an immediate response to his vibrant canvases.  Friends, lovers and contemporaries talk about how he came to rank alongside the likes of Pablo Picasso, Jackson Pollock and Francis Bacon, and muse on how important he still is to the legacy of American art – one of his skull paintings recently sold at Sotheby’s for over $ 100 million and his work is currently the subject of an exhibition at the Barbican in London. Rachel Ward Strictly Come Dancing BBC One, 6.35pm In previous years Movie Week has given us Kellie Bright’s out-of-this-world Star Wars Charleston, Jay McGuiness’s eye-popping Pulp Fiction jive, and the delight of Ed Balls in green face paint and a yellow suit for his smokin’ Mask routine. Can the remaining 14 duos match those memorable homages? Surely Susan Calman’s Wonder Woman samba and Gemma Atkinson’s Jungle Book Charleston will be contenders? The pros will dance a La La Land group performance. Britain’s Ancient Tracks with Tony Robinson Channel 4, 7.00pm The Time Team presenter continues to travel down some of the UK’s oldest roads. Tonight, he’s in the Peak District, venturing along the Derbyshire Portway and taking a tour of D H Lawrence’s mountain retreat.  The X Factor: Bootcamp ITV, 8.15pm The bootcamp stages, in front of a live audience, are an efficient way of shining a light on which acts have potential. The last few try to impress before tomorrow’s brutal Six Chair Challenge.   Black Lake BBC Four, 9.00pm and 9.40pm This Swedish ghost series has been terrific fun as well as serving up its fair share of scares. In tonight’s double-bill finale, Mette’s (Mathilde Norholt) suspicions about Dag (Anderz Eide) grow following a fire in the ski lodge, but Hanne (Sarah-Sofie Boussnina) is still convinced that the resort is cursed, and her salvation appears to lie within the hidden room in the cellar. But time is running out…  XTC: This Is Pop Sky Arts, 9.00pm Of all the bands that emerged from the British post-punk scene, XTC are one of the hardest to pigeon hole. The ever-evolving group had its biggest success in the Eighties with off-kilter, witty pop songs containing sharp, Beatles-like guitar hooks before they moved into psychedelia. This sprightly documentary takes a look at the group, led by Andy Partridge and Colin Moulding, who formed in Swindon in 1972, and who have perhaps become one of Britain’s most unsung bands. RW Boxing: Anthony Crolla v Ricky Burns Sky Sports Main Event, 10.00pm The Manchester Arena hosts this lightweight bout between two former world champions. Anthony Crolla and Ricky Burns are vastly experienced at the highest level, and are both hoping to bounce back from defeats in their most recent contests. Crolla was beaten for the second time by Jorge Linares in March, while Burns lost to Julius Indongo a month later. Performance Live: Missing Episode BBC Two, 10.30pm; Wales, 12.00midnight Twenty years ago, Ross Sutherland was watching EastEnders when a knock at the door led to a chain of events. Here, he remixes that episode into a poem to tell his story. RW Muppets Most Wanted (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 2.45pm  The Muppets tour Europe, where Kermit (Steve Whitmire) is kidnapped and replaced by a doppelgänger. Masterminding the plot is a sleazy Ricky Gervais. Though this contains moments of joy with its fun musical numbers and clever gags, the Muppets themselves are crowded out by cameo overkill from the likes of Lady Gaga, Sean “Diddy” Combs and Céline Dion. Escape Plan (2013) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm  If, even at a then 67 and 66 respectively, Sylvester Stallone and Arnold Schwarzenegger can’t bust out of a high-security prison, you don’t really fancy anyone else’s chances. Stallone’s character, Breslin, is an expert in prison weak spots, hired to test their pregnability by going undercover as an inmate. The two stars bring brains and brawn to this film, but it could do with a tighter plot and a bit more pace. Bright Days Ahead (2013) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.05am  In this charming French romance from director Marion Vernoux, recently retired dentist Caro (Fanny Ardant) is depressed and underappreciated by her family. She falls in love with her computer class lecturer, who’s 20 years younger than her. Their affair reawakens her sense of purpose, and the consequences on her marriage are unexpected. The performances are strong, but a flat script  lets the film down. Sunday 8 October Louis Theroux with heroin user Petty Betty Credit: BBC  Louis Theroux: Dark States – Heroin Town BBC Two, 9.00pm Louis Theroux’s second coming as a chronicler of society’s underdogs, outcasts and victims continues with this examination of life and death on the fringes (documentaries on murder and sex trafficking are to come). He is in Huntington, West Virginia, a former industrial town in the grip of a drug epidemic fuelled by Big Pharma’s record of encouraging doctors to overmedicate workplace injuries: here fatal-overdose rates are 13 times the national average and one in 10 babies are born with an opiate addiction. Such is the extent of the problem that local efforts are focused on containment as much as prevention, and the emergency services are overstretched while the rehab centres struggling. As ever, Theroux’s combination of apparent guilelessness and fearlessness bears fruit in the intimate encounters. Whether teasing out the distressing realities of one addict and the partner who assists her, or prodding away at the motives of another who seems superficially content, he gleans genuinely valuable insights. One thing is clear in this incisive and troubling film, their spirits crushed, any potential is strangled and optimism is in diminishing supply. Gabriel Tate Formula 1: Japanese Grand Prix Sky Sports F1, 5.30am Despite Max Verstappen’s impressive victory in the Malaysian Grand Prix, Lewis Hamilton has plenty to be cheerful about as F1 heads to Japan. Indeed, by finishing second last weekend, having toiled with his Mercedes all weekend, Hamilton extended his lead in the drivers’ championship to 34 points, with five races of the season remaining. His nearest rival, Sebastian Vettel, on the other hand, is out of sorts: having not finished in Singapore, then started at the back of the grid in Malaysia but finished in fourth place. He’ll need to be much improved at the Suzuka Circuit. Premiership Rugby Union: Saracens v Wasps BT Sport 1, 2.30pm Having lost three of their opening five matches, the most recent of which was a 25-9 defeat at home to Bath, Wasps need a win to boost morale. The problem is they’re away at Saracens, who’ve won four from five and are looking imperious, as anyone who witnessed their 25-3 trouncing of Worcester last weekend will attest. Among the scorers that day was England full-back Alex Goode.  International Football: Lithuania v England ITV, 4.30pm England round off an eventful qualifying campaign that began with them replacing Sam Allardyce as manager with Gareth Southgate. Since then Wayne Rooney, England’s top scorer, has called time on his international career, while younger players such as Harry Kane and Dele Alli have grown in stature. The former, who has been in sublime form for Spurs this season, has been named captain and will be confident of adding to tally this afternoon at the LFF Stadium in Vilnius. When these sides met in Match, goals from Jermain Defoe – his first for England since 2013 – and Jamie Vardy gave Southgate’s side a 2-0 victory.  The Last Post BBC One, 9.00pm Peter Moffat’s evocative Sixties drama continues with the arrival of an American war reporter, Martha Franklin (Essie Davis), which disrupts the delicate dynamic on the military base, while insurgent leader Abdul-Kadir Hakim is targeted for the murder of Captain Page (Joseph Kennedy). Electric Dreams: Crazy Diamond Channel 4, 9.00pm In this episode of the Philip K Dick adaptations, Ed Morris (Steve Buscemi) is offered a chance to inject some excitement into his drab life with wife Sally (Julia Davis) by Jill (Sidse Babbett Knudsen), a synthetic human. The plot is cluttered, but the ending is satisfying indeed. The Gifted Fox, 9.00pm Marvel’s colonisation of the small screen continues with this entry in the X-Men universe. While The Gifted is a far cry from the mind-bending visions of Noah Hawley’s Legion, it provides plenty of bang for your buck in its tales of a family, headed by True Blood’s Stephen Moyer, that is rocked by revelations that its children have mutant abilities and go on the run from dastardly government forces. Festival No 6 Sky Arts, 9.00pm Highlights from the deeply eccentric beanfeast in Portmeirion, the Italianate Welsh coastal home of The Prisoner TV series. Expect music from Mogwai, Bloc Party and the wonderful Flaming Lips. The Sky at Night BBC Four, 10.00pm Maggie Aderin-Pocock considers the renewal of interest in manned missions to the moon, and the role of tech companies in funding and driving these new initiatives. GT Snowfall BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI This new 10-parter from John Singleton (Boyz N the Hood) traces the shockwaves from the crack cocaine epidemic that ravaged Los Angeles in the Eighties. In the first episode, we meet Franklin Saint (Damson Idris), who is living with his mum and senses an opportunity that will change his life, and his city. It’s a notch below Narcos, but it’s still compelling and sharp. Sir Bobby Charlton at 80 BBC One, 10.30pm Alex Ferguson, Eric Cantona and more pay tribute to an Old Trafford great in a hagiography, yet Charlton is a man of such decency and dignity that it’s hard to object. GT Dial M for Murder (1954) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 1.15pm  It’s not quite on the same plane of brilliance as Vertigo, but Hitchcock’s adaptation of Frederick Knott’s stage play is still a briskly efficient exercise in suspense. Tony Wendice (Ray Milland) is trying to have his socialite wife Margot (Grace Kelly) murdered, after she has an affair with a writer. When Tony’s first plan fails, he dreams up another that’s even more devious. This Sporting Life (1963) ★★★★ London Live, 8.00pm  It’s Yorkshire accents and monochrome realism as Richard Harris goes down the mines, plays rugby and has an affair. As an uncompromising portrait of male attitudes, Lindsay Anderson’s stunning adaptation of David Storey’s novel is like a punch to the gut, and a direct antecedent of Scorsese’s Raging Bull. Rachel Roberts (star of earlier kitchen sink drama Saturday Night and Sunday Morning) co-stars. The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (2013) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 11.05pm  Mild-mannered Walter Mitty’s life is controlled  by his overbearing mother. He finds his escape by imagining himself living in the worlds pictured on the covers of Life magazine  and becoming a pilot, a sea captain and couturier.  Ben Stiller directs and stars in this loose revamping of the James Thurber’s story: the result is a flawed but  still entertaining and enjoyable adventure. Monday 9 October At your service: Steph and Dom Parker Credit: Channel 4 Steph and Dom’s One Star to Five Star Channel 4, 5.30pm Daytime programming isn’t normally where we look for originality, so it comes as no surprise to find little in this new weekday show hosted by Steph and Dom Parker, those once, seemingly ever-sozzled breakout stars from Gogglebox. What there is, though, is fun and lots of it, even if at times it can be hard to tell whether it is intentional or not. Like the illegitimate offspring of Four in a Bed and any number of hackneyed Hotel Inspector-style shows, this series sees the Parkers take their own limited experience as B & B owners in Kent as proof that they know everything there is to know about the international hospitality industry and descend on an ailing hotel for a week with a view to making it marginally more appealing.  They begin with the dowdy Ransdale Hotel in Bridlington, a slightly tatty, underperforming establishment where they reckon seaside-themed rooms, kedgeree for breakfast and a party atmosphere in the bar will get the occupancy levels up from the current “negligible”. Could getting the clientele drunk cause the approval ratings to peak? It’s probably more likely than the kedgeree. Gerard O’Donovan The Human Body: Secrets of Your Life Revealed BBC Two, 9.00pm In the series’ concluding part, Chris and Xand van Tulleken explore how experiences shape our minds and bodies, and show for the very first time how memories are formed in the brain and continue to influence us throughout our lives.  Tunes for Tyrants: Music and Power with Suzy Klein BBC Four, 9.00pm In this edition of the documentary series, Suzy Klein explores the Thirties and how classical music, while it was exploited to idealise violent nationalism and prop up the totalitarian regimes of the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany, was also be a source of coded resistance. Liar ITV, 9.00pm In a torrid penultimate episode, Laura (Joanne Froggatt) convinces ex-boyfriend Tom (Warren Brown) to help bring Andrew Earlham (Ioan Gruffudd) to justice as she’s forced to resort to a somewhat unusual method of forcing a confession out of him. W1A BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI This is a terrific edition of the sitcom. As the crisis over the axing of the BBC’s Big Swing Band goes viral, Head of Values Ian Fletcher (Hugh Bonneville) once again finds himself caught in the media cross-hairs.  The Vietnam War BBC Four, 10.00pm & 10.55pm Another double helping of Ken Burns’s stately and impeccably researched history of the Vietnam War rolls us on through 1967 when, with casualties mounting and the Viet Cong striking back in the infamous Tet offensive, a US victory looked increasingly beyond reach. Timewasters ITV2, 10.00pm & 10.30pm ITV2 launches a season of new comedies with this sharply scripted sitcom about a struggling four-piece jazz band who get stuck in Twenties London when their time machine breaks down. GO After the News ITV, 10.45pm; NI, 12.45am; not STV; Wales, 11.15pm Current affairs presenters Emma Barnett and Nick Ferrari are hot tickets just now following some hard-hitting “holiday cover” hosting on Newsnight this summer. Now ITV has signed them up for this new nightly debate show that takes its subject matter straight from ITV News at Ten. After the unmitigated flop of The Nightly Show, ITV will be keen to for this to shine. GO Pimpernel Smith (1941, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 3.50pm  Leslie Howard, famed for his role in Gone with the Wind, directs and stars in this deft drama set in 1939 Berlin. An academic (Howard) recruits students to go to Europe under the guise of an archaeological dig. However, his real mission is to smuggle victims of Nazi persecution out of Germany. An absorbing film and, retrospectively, quite haunting since Howard was shot down in the war by a Nazi plane two years later. The Birth of a Nation (2016) ★★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 4.10pm and daily  Writer-director-star Nate Parker’s attempt to reappropriate the notorious racism of DW Griffith’s 1915 foundation myth and spin it on its axis is a graceless, pretentious mallet to the head of history. Parker (whose galvanising performance is much the strongest) tells the story of Nat Turner’s 1831 slave rebellion from the side of the true victims. Se7en (1995) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm  Gluttony, avarice, envy, sloth, wrath, lust and pride; the seven deadly sins are explored graphically, and imaginatively, in this gloomy thriller from director David Fincher. It follows a detective (an outstanding Morgan Freeman) and his rookie partner (Brad Pitt) on the hunt for a maniac who kills those guilty of the above vices. Brutal and gripping, with an ending you won’t forget in a hurry. Gwyneth Paltrow and Kevin Spacey co-star. Tuesday 10 October In the field: Michelle Keegan as Georgie Lane Credit: BBC Our Girl: Nepal Tour BBC One, 9.00pm Michelle Keegan returns as dedicated army medic Georgie Lane in Tony Grounds’s entertaining if soapy army drama. This time the main action is in Nepal, where Georgie and the rest of 2 Section, including Ben Aldridge’s patrician Captain Charles James, are posted to provide humanitarian relief following an earthquake.  This being Our Girl, the personal relationships are as important as the action and Georgie soon finds herself having a perfectly arched eyebrow-off with new recruit Maisie Richards (the excellent Shalom Brune-Franklin). Yet behind the jokes there are serious points raised about the way in which the army operates, and whether individualism ever has a place. Fans of the will they/won’t they romance between Georgie and her slick former fiancé Elvis (Luke Pasqualino) will be disappointed by how little the latter features in this opening episode (just one brief scene in Syria before the main action begins), although Rudi Dharmalingam gallantly steps into the breach as impassioned NGO worker Milan. The real joy, however, comes not from the plot twists but from the expert way in which Grounds captures both the banter and boredom of army life. Sarah Hughes Once Upon a Time Netflix, from today This popular fantasy series that follows fairy-tale characters living in the real world returns for its seventh season. It marks a reboot of sorts, with our now-adult hero Henry Mills (Jared S Gilmore) finding himself in the same position as when the story began. The Great British Bake Off Channel 4, 8.00pm The cooking competition continues to roll out new themes, with this episode marking the first Italian Week. But you can be sure that it won’t have anything to do with making a bog-standard spag bol. Unfortunately the weather is not on their side, as the contestants suffer in the hottest temperatures ever recorded in the tent. Russia 1917: Countdown to Revolution BBC Two, 9.00pm Juliet Stevenson narrates this insightful documentary made to mark the centenary of the Russian Revolution. Martin Amis, Orlando Figes and Helen Rappaport are among those discussing and recounting how Russia transitioned from a tsarist autocracy to become the first communist state – and the roles played by Lenin, Trotsky and Stalin. Concorde: A Supersonic Story BBC Four, 9.00pm The Concorde was considered the “most glamorous plane ever built” – until it was retired in 2003 following the crash of Air France Flight 4590. But its story is a fascinating one. Sophie Okonedo narrates this tale of rows between French and British governments, while former passengers recount queuing for the lavatory with celebrities.  The Deuce Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Vincent (James Franco) is putting the finishing touches to his new bar, in this third episode of the gritty, Seventies New York-set drama. But then an unexpected silent partner turns up. CG Celebrity Hunted Channel 4, 9.15pm The real-life thriller returns for a celebrity charity edition. Anneka Rice and former Strictly winner Jay McGuiness are among those attempting to avoid detection.  Later Live… with Jools Holland BBC Two, 10.00pm; N Ireland, 11.15pm Former Led Zeppelin singer Robert Plant performs live with his band Sensational Space Shifters. He’s joined by Beck, with songs from his first new album in three years. Catherine Gee Ice Age: Continental Drift (2012) ★★☆☆☆ E4, 8.00pm Surprisingly, the Ice Age series has accrued more lucre than Pixar’s Toy Story trilogy. But this fourth film is the thinnest and redeemed only by a demented squirrel. Once again, the story revolves around Manny the mammoth (Ray Romano), Sid the sloth (John Leguizamo) and Diego the smilodon (Denis Leary), who are separated from their herd thanks to the shifting of the Earth’s land masses. Southpaw (2015) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Jake Gyllenhaal lays his body on the line for 0a boxing drama so predictable that you could set your watch by it. If only someone had devoted equivalent stamina to the screenplay, we might have an actual movie on our hands. Nevertheless, it’s rousingly entertaining as Gyllenhaal’s Billy “The Great” Hope learns the art of subterfuge from a new coach (Forest Whitaker). Rachel McAdams co-stars. I Origins (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film 4, 11.25pm  Eyes and souls have been cinematically intertwined since at least 1929, when, in Un Chien Andalou, Buñuel and Dalí carved out their visionary manifesto with the quick swipe of a razor blade across a plump and oozing eyeball. In Mike Cahill’s film, the metaphor trots off down a strange and lyrical new trail when a biology student (Michael Pitt) encounters a model (Astrid Bergès-Frisbey) who makes him question scientific fact. Wednesday 11 October Not sitting well: David Mitchell as Stephen Credit: Channel 4 Back Channel 4, 10.00pm The ratings may have been a little underwhelming, but in contrast to David Mitchell and Robert Webb’s tonally uncertain and muddled Ambassadors, Back has been a triumph. Simon Blackwell’s often brutal, witheringly funny script has granted the leading men roles that riff on their Peep Show personas of Mark and Jez without ever becoming beholden to them. Prodigal foster son Andrew’s (Webb) victory over biological offspring Stephen (Mitchell) is apparently complete, as the former struts around his flourishing gastropub, bragging about his chef’s clafoutis while the latter moulders in a caravan. “He’s stolen my life and he’s living it better than me,” Stephen fumes, impotently. Their father’s memorial party – and the associated speeches – offer Stephen one final shot at redemption: when a clutch of other returning foster children eclipse Andrew’s efforts to ingratiate himself, Stephen has a revelation that sends him on a demented trip of vengeance to fill the gaps in his rival’s life story. Finding profound bathos in often gasp-inducing misanthropy and reuniting the best British double act around (pace Vic and Bob), Back undoubtedly merits a return. Gabriel Tate The Apprentice BBC One, 9.00pm Enjoying a new lease of life after a disappointing series last year, reality TV’s version of an extended job interview this week unleashes the candidates’ aesthetic pretensions by asking them to turn interior designers at a five-star hotel. The mind boggles at the bills that needed settling at the end of this particular stay. The Detectives: Murder on the Streets BBC Two, 9.00pm This utterly involving and consistently impressive documentary series comes to a climax with the arrival of the trial in the case of the murder of young homeless man Daniel Smith. This is true crime of the most empathetic and socially responsible kind. Britain’s Lost Masterpieces BBC Four, 9.00pm Dr Bendor Grosvenor and Emma Dabiri visit Carmathenshire County Museum, home to a damaged portrait of a 16th-century Earl whose provenance is disputed. Doc Martin ITV, 9.00pm Receptionist Morwenna’s (Jessica Ransom) parents pay her a surprise visit and present Doc Martin (Martin Clunes) with a dilemma as the amiable comedy drama ambles through another hour. Ray Donovan Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Susan Sarandon has been both a welcome addition and much-needed counterpart to this occasionally testosterone-heavy series, with Liev Schreiber’s eponymous heavy facing the repercussions of years of making enemies in high places. Norskov Channel 4, 10.35pm The titular Danish industrial port is blighted by a drug problem. Enter ace detective Tom Noack (Thomas Levin), an old acquaintance of the city’s mayor to clean the place up and, inevitably, disturb a few ghosts. It’s a slick Nordic noir – the whole series will be available on C4’s online service Walter Presents after this episode airs. GT Inside Birmingham Children’s Hospital More4, 10.00pm The BBC and Channel 4 continue to match each other, blow for blow, with medical documentaries. This latest series follows a girl diagnosed with a life-changing condition, a boy with leukaemia and a five-year-old whose epilepsy is proving increasingly hard to manage. As so often, their stoicism and resilience are humbling and very affecting. GT Charade (1963) ★★★★☆ Film4, 4.35pm Audrey Hepburn as a temperamental-but-alluring damsel in distress and Cary Grant as a shadowy charmer are characters that the two actors played over and over during their careers. But they do so exceptionally in this suspense comedy from Stanley Donen, often referred to as the best Hitchcock movie that Hitchcock never made. Hepburn is the widow being trailed by four men hunting for her late husband’s stolen fortune. Starship Troopers (1997) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 10.00pm  On first appearances, this Oscar-nominated sci-fi action thriller looks distressingly silly: in the distant future, a group of American high-school friends join the armed forces to do intergalactic war with some malicious insectoid aliens, or “Bugs”. The whole of humanity is at risk. Thankfully director Paul Verhoeven deftly underpins the whole thing with wicked satirical verve and no-nonsense action. Dying Laughing (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Arts, 10.30pm  Dozens of stand-up comics, including Kevin Hart, Jerry Seinfeld and Amy Schumer, contribute to this understated but rather wonderful documentary film about the infrequent highs and relentless lows of trying to make people laugh. It can be painful – one anecdote about “bombing” on stage is particularly uncomfortable – but then a comic will recall that first great gig and you can just tell that all the anguish has been worth it. Thursday 12 October Every second counts: McDonald follows a murder investigation Credit: ITV An Hour to Catch a Killer with Trevor McDonald ITV, 9.00pm Trevor McDonald’s abiding fascination with such murky matters as serial murder and organised crime, especially in the United States, is well established. For the first programme in ITV’s new Crime and Punishment season, McDonald examines a key concept of modern crime detection: how the decisions made by investigating officers in the so-called “Golden Hour” – the first 60 minutes of a murder inquiry – have a vital impact on whether or not a killer is caught and successfully prosecuted. And here he examines a case much closer to home. With full access to the Northumbria Police Homicide Unit’s investigation into the murder of 24-year-old graduate Alice Ruggles last October, the film follows the case from the moment the murder was reported, through every layer of the investigation as it develops, to the moment the all-too-obvious prime suspect is located and charged.  Later in this series, Susannah Reid, Piers Morgan, Ross Kemp and, more randomly, Gordon Ramsay will present reports on subjects as diverse as the lucrative international cocaine trade and gang warfare inside the notorious Barlinnie Prison in Glasgow. Gerard O’Donovan Mr Robot Amazon Prime, from today Techno-paranoia is still the name of the game as the US hacker drama returns for a much-anticipated third series. With 10 new episodes to get through, clearly the first thing to sort out is the fate of the not-always-reliable narrator Elliot Alderson (Rami Malek), who was shot in last season’s cliffhanger. Dynasty Netflix, from today As in the original, bling, bubbles and bonking dominate this 22-episode reboot of one of the Eighties’ silliest US soap operas. Once again it follows the boardroom and bedroom escapades of Denver’s super-rich Carrington clan.  PGA Tour Golf: The CIMB Classic Sky Sports Main Event, 6.00am Coverage of the opening day’s play at the annual event from the Kuala Lumpur Golf & Country Club in Malaysia, where Justin Thomas has won the last two titles.  Council House Crackdown BBC One, 8.00pm Michelle Ackerley uncovers more tales of social housing fraud as council investigators stake out a woman suspected of faking a disability and a tenant alleged to be illegally subletting housing association property. Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm; BBC Two Wales, 9.00pm The final programme in this affecting series again focuses on the tough decisions the London Ambulance Service faces when its slim resources are stretched to capacity and calls must be prioritised. Russia with Simon Reeve BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 11.15pm This is by far the best travelogue Reeve has done for a while, and for this final leg, the adventurer starts in Crimea, where he weighs up the political and economic costs of its annexation by Russia. From there, he travels north through the vast plains of western Russia to where the country’s real power has always resided, Moscow and St Petersburg.  Educating Greater Manchester Channel 4, 9.00pm In tonight’s episode, it’s Valentine’s Day and romance is in the air for even the school’s youngest pupils. Plus, a recently qualified teacher who’s come to Harrop Fold looking for a new challenge gets more than he bargained for. GO The History of Comedy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This new documentary has an overambitious title for a series that focuses almost entirely on US comedy of fairly recent vintage. Still, it’s an interesting thematic survey of how certain types of laughter making have evolved in the last century. GO Titanic (1997) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Eleven Oscars won and more than a billion dollars taken worldwide in ticket sales. James Cameron deserved his success with this opulent blockbuster about the sinking of the RMS Titanic, a story that has a grand romance between penniless artist Jack (Leonardo DiCaprio) and rich American girl Rose (Kate Winslet) at its heart. Even viewers determined to find it soppy are liable to be swept along by the emotion. Heist (2001) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 10.50pm  Prepare to be triple-crossed, duped and bewildered by this piece of con-artistry, which pulls the rug out from under your feet with such regularity that it’s tempting just to give up and lie down. Gene Hackman, Danny DeVito and Rebecca Pidgeon set out to steal some gold; needless to say, it does not go smoothly. There are excellent performances, plus endless twists and cracking dialogue. Just Go with It (2011) ★★☆☆☆ 5STAR, 11.00pm  Adam Sandler stars in this remake of the 1971 comedy Cactus Flower (itself adapted from a Broadway stage play by Abe Burrows), as Danny, a single plastic surgeon in Los Angeles who feigns an unhappy marriage in order to have no-strings-attached flings with women. What follows is a complex low-grade romantic farce which is saved by a sparky performance from Jennifer Aniston as Danny’s office manager and best friend. Friday 13 October Life on the edge: Ray Mears is in Australia Credit: ITV Australian Wilderness with Ray Mears ITV, 8.00pm; not STV/UTV/Wales The great appeal of Ray Mears’s wildlife documentaries is his no-nonsense approach. Where other presenters rush around telling you how exciting and amazing and wonderful everything is, Mears tends to amble gently through it, explaining a few facts and otherwise allowing you to gaze at the beauty unfurling across your TV screen. It’s an approach that pays high dividends in this new series about the Australian wilderness, a landscape that is vast, beautiful and oddly eerie.  The opening episode focuses more on sea than land (although there is time for a quick trek through rocky desert towards the Indian Ocean) as Mears dives on Ningaloo Reef, the longest fringing coral reef in the world. After a pleasant meeting with some friendly stingrays and a few “wish you were here” shots of the turquoise sea, the real star of the show heaves into sight as Mears and his companions find themselves swimming alongside a passing whale shark, the largest fish in the world. “This is what we’ve all been waiting for,” says Mears as the fish floats into view. It’s a breathtaking, beautiful moment and one which manages to shake even Mears out of his habitual calm. Sarah Hughes Lore Amazon Prime, from today Not for the faint of heart, this disquieting new documentary series is based on Aaron Mahnke’s popular podcast of the same name, with each episode exploring the story behind pop culture’s most legendary horror myths, from vampires and werewolves to possessed dolls.  Mindhunter Netflix, from today Imagine Se7en crossed with Zodiac and Silence of the Lambs and you’ll get the gist of this excellent new detective drama executive produced by David Fincher and Charlize Theron. Based on the non-fiction book Mind Hunter: Inside the FBI’s Elite Serial Crime Unit and set in the late Seventies, it follows a pair of FBI agents (Jonathan Groff and Holt McCallany) who interview and analyse imprisoned mass murderers in order to better understand serial killers. The first episode, which is shot by master of murk Fincher, moves languidly – but is no less absorbing. PS International T20 Cricket: India v Australia Friday, Sky Sports Main Event, 2.20pm The Rajiv Gandhi International Stadium in Hyderabad is the setting as India and Australia contest the final game in a three-match T20 series. Unreported World Channel 4, 7.30pm On August 14, a mudslide in Sierra Leone, caused by torrential rain, destroyed the small town of Regent on the outskirts of the capital, Freetown. Hundreds lost their lives. In this affecting report, Seyi Rhodes talks to the survivors and the rescue teams desperately trying to find those still missing.  Crystal Maze / Have I Got News for You Channel 4, 8.00pm / BBC One, 9.00pm Richard Ayoade fans, rejoice: tonight you can see him twice – somewhat fitting given that he once wrote and directed a black comedy called The Double. First up, he continues to add warmth and irony to a rousing revamp of The Crystal Maze, as the current series concludes. Then, in HIGNFY, he puts that bone-dry wit to good use yet again, as he guest presents the long-running news quiz.  Cold Feet ITV, 9.00pm Affectionate writing and a great ensemble are the foundations on which Mark Bullen’s middle-aged comedy drama are built. Tonight, as this Nineties-show revival continues, Adam (James Nesbitt) and Pete (John Thomson) throw a joint 50th birthday dinner.  Porridge BBC One, 9.30pm  On the subject of revivals, this sort-of sequel to the classic Seventies comedy continues to be so-so. Tonight, there’s a new prison officer on the scene. Patrick Smith The Meyerowitz Stories (2017) ★★★★☆ Netflix, from today  It’s been a long time coming but Adam Sandler is finally in a good film. He plays Danny, a New Yorker whose unemployment and divorce has left him defined purely in terms of his bloodline. The narrative arc is about Danny, sister Jean and half-brother Matthew reconciling themselves with their curmudgeon father Harold (Dustin Hoffman). Emma Thompson is woozily uproarious as Harold’s wife. Lion (2016) ★★★★☆ Amazon Prime, from today Derived from a 2012 memoir by the grown Saroo Brierley, called A Long Way Home, this is the story of a lost boy: a five-year-old Indian who grew up in the Eighties in the area around Khandwa. With no paper trail or family name, he becomes a lost cause, eventually shipped off to kindly foster parents in Tasmania, played by Nicole Kidman and David Wenham. The excellent script, by Luke Davies, sticks rigidly to Saroo’s own point of view. Good Will Hunting (1997) ★★★★☆ W, 9.00pm  Matt Damon and Ben Affleck won an Oscar for Best Screenplay with this stirring if occasionally gloopy story. Will Hunting (Damon) is a hot-headed, 20-year-old janitor with a photographic memory and an untapped genius for mathematics. Robin Williams plays the inspiring therapist who channels Will’s rage into solving quadratics, and Minnie Driver is his brainy, Harvard graduate love interest.   Television previewers Catherine Gee, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: The Housing Enforcers and England v Slovenia

Thursday 5 October The Housing Enforcers BBC One, 8.00pm; BBC Two Wales, 7.00pm “Everyone has a right to a safe place to live, no matter who you are, where you live or how much rent you pay. It’s non-negotiable.” So concludes Matt Allwright at the end of this programme focusing on the importance of fire safety.  The format is straightforward: Allwright travels across the country meeting with housing officers and examining the myriad ways in which fires can destroy lives. What makes this really hit home, however, is the presenter’s quiet fury at the way in which some lives are considered less worthy than others. Inevitably, the shadow of Grenfell Tower hangs heavy over the hour. It’s notable that many of those worst affected are elderly and living alone: the story of fiercely independent Ali who refuses to acknowledge, even to his family, quite how much he is struggling is particularly poignant. Allwright, however, saves his most righteous rage for the landlords squeezing tenants in wherever they can and failing to meet even the minimum health and safety standards. The result is a hard-hitting and often hard-to-watch documentary, which also offers solid advice on how to deal both with fires and bad landlords. Sarah Hughes Live International Football: England v Slovenia ITV, 7.30pm Having drawn 0-0 last October, with Joe Hart forced to make a string of fine saves, England and Slovenia reconvene at Wembley. Victory today for Gareth Southgate’s men will ensure their qualification for next year’s World Cup in Russia. And having beaten second-placed Slovakia 2-1 last month, thanks to a strike from tyro Marcus Rashford, they’ll be confident of doing just that. The Big Family Cooking Showdown BBC Two, 8.00pm Two last families go head to head for a place in the finals. Their £10 challenge is a Friday night takeaway, so naturally curry is on the menu. There’s talk of “fusion” cooking, some mushy spinach and a 34-year-old rolling pin.   Discovering: Laurence Olivier Sky Arts, 8.00pm The spotlight turns on Laurence Olivier, who, in 1937, described cinema as an “anaemic little medium which could not stand great acting”.   Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm The work of the West Midlands Ambulance Service continues as a specialist trauma team are dispatched to a motorbike accident where a man has suffered a catastrophic chest injury. “I’ve got nothing…” declares the doctor. It’s a stark reminder of the fragility of life and the increasing compassion of the services in times of chaos.    Russia with Simon Reeve BBC Two, 9.00pm Simon Reeve continues his fascinating journey, meeting Tuvan children in Siberia who practice the Mongolian tradition of throat singing.  Educating Greater Manchester Channel 4, 9.00pm Ah, that old chestnut – ignoring school uniform rules. This week, the teachers at Harrop Fold are on the back foot when a message is spread on Snapchat encouraging pupils to come in wearing trainers. Social media also causes friction between Year 11 girls Serena and Lelo when one talks to the other’s boyfriend on FaceTime. Rachel Ward Law & Order True Crime: The Menendez murders Sky Living, 9.00pm This series, similar to The People v OJ Simpson, takes a closer look at the two trials of brothers Lyle and Erik Menendez, who were convicted of murdering their parents in their Beverly Hills home in 1989. It focuses on the attorney (Edie Falco), who was one of their few defenders. Dimension 404 Syfy, 9.00pm Each episode of this new sci-fi anthology features a form of technology gone wrong. But there’s nothing unnerving about it, rather it’s a camp pastiche of The Twilight Zone, complete with Star Wars’ Mark Hamill providing the voice-over. Glee’s Lea Michele stars in the first episode about online dating. It’s weird, but it doesn’t overplay it. RW Robin and Marian (1976) ★★★★☆ Film4, 1.10pm  Sean Connery gives one of his best performances as a middle-aged Robin Hood, who heads home to Sherwood Forest after the death of Richard I. He finds that scaling a castle wall isn’t as easy as it used to be, Maid Marian (Audrey Hepburn) is still miffed at being left in the lurch, and the Sheriff (Robert Shaw) is up to his old tricks in Richard Lester’s good-natured romance. Look out for Ronnie Barker as Friar Tuck. Jerry Maguire (1996) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 5.40pm  In Cameron Crowe’s macho romcom, Tom Cruise plays a sports agent who has an attack of conscience and urges his colleagues to think about the welfare of their clients. He’s duly fired but announces that he’ll start his own agency. A washed-up footballer (Cuba Gooding Jr) and a single mother (Renée Zellweger) are the only ones who agree to go with him. Here, the classic quote, “You had me at ‘hello’” was born. The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.10pm Clint Eastwood directs and stars in this marvellous warm-hearted western adapted from Forrest Carter’s novel and set during the American Civil War. Eastwood plays the eponymous Missouri farmer who, driven by memories of his family’s slaughter, becomes an outlaw when he refuses to join his Confederate comrades in surrender, in favour of seeking revenge on the men who murdered his kin. Friday 6 October Penal colony: Harry Peacock, Kevin Bishop and Ricky Grover Credit: BBC Porridge BBC One, 9.30pm The most successful of the BBC’s classic sitcom revivals from last year, Porridge returns for a full series with the series’ creators Dick Clement and Ian La Frenais once again on board. It finds Nigel Norman Fletcher (Kevin Bishop as the grandson of Ronnie Barker’s character, Norman Stanley) locking horns with officer Meekie (Mark Bonnar) while aiding or outsmarting the prison’s ne’er-do-wells. In a canny twist, it is Fletch who is now the relative ingénue in his cell, seeking counsel from veteran lag Joe Lotterby (Dave Hill). We find Fletch as the prison’s resident Cyrano de Bergerac, writing letters to keep the flame of romance alive between assorted inmates and their partners on the outside. All goes well until Fletch suffers a crisis of conscience that threatens the whole operation. Some of the gags are groanworthy, but Clement and La Frenais’s mastery of sitcom mechanics remains complete; their presence keeps the spirit of the original intact, while the update means that no one is attempting to emulate the cast of the Seventies series. Fletch has a five-year sentence to serve; unlikely as it might seem, a similar term for Porridge might not be unwelcome. Gabriel Tate Suburra: the Series Netflix, from 12.01am Like Romanzo Criminale and Gomorrah before it, Suburra began life as a book before becoming a gripping, multifaceted Italian-language political thriller. This 10-part series, set in the dying days of Berlusconi’s regime, explores the themes of politics, the Church and corruption during 20 tumultuous days in Rome. Unreported World Channel 4, 7.30pm Ireland faces a pivotal referendum on the decriminalisation of abortion in certain circumstances; Kate Hardie-Buckley meets those on both sides of the debate in a deeply affecting edition of the current-affairs series. Modern Family Sky1, 8.30pm It may have tailed off since its peak, but Modern Family is still good for a few laughs. The ninth series begins with Jay (Ty Burrell) taking the family on a houseboat holiday, and Mitchell (Jesse Tyler Ferguson) encountering an old flame. Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm; not N Ireland or Wales Monty Don begins preparations for 2018 by advising others on how to use leaf mould as a mulch. Elsewhere, Adam Frost visits a community allotment in Manchester, and Nick Bailey learns from a zoologist about the life teeming in the soil. Nile Rodgers: How to Make It in the Music Business BBC Four, 9.00pm Guitar genius and pop producer Nile Rodgers shares the wisdom he’s acquired over decades in the music business. In the first episode, he discusses the founding of Chic and his influence on today’s hitmakers. GT Cold Feet ITV, 9.00pm Karen (Hermione Norris) is on the brink of financial disaster in spite of David’s (Robert Bathurst) assistance, while Adam (James Nesbitt) gets out of his depth on a night out in Mike Bullen’s assured comedy-drama revival. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm Another line-up of heavy-hitters assembles on the red sofa tonight: comedian Chris Rock plugs his first UK stand-up tour in a decade, actors Idris Elba and Kate Winslet discuss their niche genre movie, “disaster-romance” The Mountain Between Us (about a surgeon and a journalist who survive a plane crash), and Liam Gallagher performs songs from his debut album, As You Were. GT The Twilight Saga: Eclipse (2010) ★★★☆☆ E4, 8.00pm  The third instalment of the teenage vampire franchise is better than the second and will please its fan base, though Melissa Rosenberg’s script is full of clichés and relies on a shirtless Taylor Lautner for distraction. Girl-next-door Bella Swan (Kristen Stewart) must choose between 100-year-old vampire Edward Cullen (Robert Pattinson) and hunky werewolf Jacob Black (Lautner). T2: Trainspotting (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.00pm  Danny Boyle’s sequel is more than just a trip down memory lane. Back in 1996, Trainspotting’s gallery of junkies and rogues (Ewan McGregor, Jonny Lee Miller) proudly and raucously chose not to choose life. But now, all have come to terms with the gnawing possibility that life may have in fact not chosen them. There’s no chance of it matching the legacy of the first film, but it doesn’t tarnish it either. American Hustle (2013) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 12.10am  David O Russell’s caper feels like the film he has spent his career warming up for and is a serious piece of film-making that delights in its own silliness. Irving (Christian Bale) and his partner Sydney (Amy Adams) are con artists blackmailed by FBI agent Richie DiMaso (Bradley Cooper) into aiding his investigation. “Some of this actually happened,” reads a title card, and to be more specific would spoil the fun. Saturday 7 October  Off-the-wall brilliance: artist Jean-Michel Basquiat Credit: BBC Basquiat: Rage to Riches BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 10.30pm “If you want to know what there is to know about Jean-Michel, then the place is his work,” says Lisane Basquiat, the sister of the self-taught, Brooklyn-born painter who became a star of the Eighties New York art scene. In the space of a few years, he morphed from a freewheeling, underground graffiti artist, going by the tag name of Samo, into an enigmatic and incessant painter who commanded thousands of dollars for his works: by the age of 21 he was a millionaire. This comprehensive profile digs deep into the life of a young man who was inspired by Gray’s Anatomy, dated Madonna, collaborated with Andy Warhol, and shaved his head in public. Of course, some critics find his cartoonish work hard to take seriously (his rock star persona, which led to his death at 27, did him no favours), while others have an immediate response to his vibrant canvases.  Friends, lovers and contemporaries talk about how he came to rank alongside the likes of Pablo Picasso, Jackson Pollock and Francis Bacon, and muse on how important he still is to the legacy of American art – one of his skull paintings recently sold at Sotheby’s for over $ 100 million and his work is currently the subject of an exhibition at the Barbican in London. Rachel Ward Strictly Come Dancing BBC One, 6.35pm In previous years Movie Week has given us Kellie Bright’s out-of-this-world Star Wars Charleston, Jay McGuiness’s eye-popping Pulp Fiction jive, and the delight of Ed Balls in green face paint and a yellow suit for his smokin’ Mask routine. Can the remaining 14 duos match those memorable homages? Surely Susan Calman’s Wonder Woman samba and Gemma Atkinson’s Jungle Book Charleston will be contenders? The pros will dance a La La Land group performance. Britain’s Ancient Tracks with Tony Robinson Channel 4, 7.00pm The Time Team presenter continues to travel down some of the UK’s oldest roads. Tonight, he’s in the Peak District, venturing along the Derbyshire Portway and taking a tour of D H Lawrence’s mountain retreat.  The X Factor: Bootcamp ITV, 8.15pm The bootcamp stages, in front of a live audience, are an efficient way of shining a light on which acts have potential. The last few try to impress before tomorrow’s brutal Six Chair Challenge.   Black Lake BBC Four, 9.00pm and 9.40pm This Swedish ghost series has been terrific fun as well as serving up its fair share of scares. In tonight’s double-bill finale, Mette’s (Mathilde Norholt) suspicions about Dag (Anderz Eide) grow following a fire in the ski lodge, but Hanne (Sarah-Sofie Boussnina) is still convinced that the resort is cursed, and her salvation appears to lie within the hidden room in the cellar. But time is running out…  XTC: This Is Pop Sky Arts, 9.00pm Of all the bands that emerged from the British post-punk scene, XTC are one of the hardest to pigeon hole. The ever-evolving group had its biggest success in the Eighties with off-kilter, witty pop songs containing sharp, Beatles-like guitar hooks before they moved into psychedelia. This sprightly documentary takes a look at the group, led by Andy Partridge and Colin Moulding, who formed in Swindon in 1972, and who have perhaps become one of Britain’s most unsung bands. RW Boxing: Anthony Crolla v Ricky Burns Sky Sports Main Event, 10.00pm The Manchester Arena hosts this lightweight bout between two former world champions. Anthony Crolla and Ricky Burns are vastly experienced at the highest level, and are both hoping to bounce back from defeats in their most recent contests. Crolla was beaten for the second time by Jorge Linares in March, while Burns lost to Julius Indongo a month later. Performance Live: Missing Episode BBC Two, 10.30pm; Wales, 12.00midnight Twenty years ago, Ross Sutherland was watching EastEnders when a knock at the door led to a chain of events. Here, he remixes that episode into a poem to tell his story. RW Muppets Most Wanted (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 2.45pm  The Muppets tour Europe, where Kermit (Steve Whitmire) is kidnapped and replaced by a doppelgänger. Masterminding the plot is a sleazy Ricky Gervais. Though this contains moments of joy with its fun musical numbers and clever gags, the Muppets themselves are crowded out by cameo overkill from the likes of Lady Gaga, Sean “Diddy” Combs and Céline Dion. Escape Plan (2013) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm  If, even at a then 67 and 66 respectively, Sylvester Stallone and Arnold Schwarzenegger can’t bust out of a high-security prison, you don’t really fancy anyone else’s chances. Stallone’s character, Breslin, is an expert in prison weak spots, hired to test their pregnability by going undercover as an inmate. The two stars bring brains and brawn to this film, but it could do with a tighter plot and a bit more pace. Bright Days Ahead (2013) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.05am  In this charming French romance from director Marion Vernoux, recently retired dentist Caro (Fanny Ardant) is depressed and underappreciated by her family. She falls in love with her computer class lecturer, who’s 20 years younger than her. Their affair reawakens her sense of purpose, and the consequences on her marriage are unexpected. The performances are strong, but a flat script  lets the film down. Sunday 8 October Louis Theroux with heroin user Petty Betty Credit: BBC  Louis Theroux: Dark States – Heroin Town BBC Two, 9.00pm Louis Theroux’s second coming as a chronicler of society’s underdogs, outcasts and victims continues with this examination of life and death on the fringes (documentaries on murder and sex trafficking are to come). He is in Huntington, West Virginia, a former industrial town in the grip of a drug epidemic fuelled by Big Pharma’s record of encouraging doctors to overmedicate workplace injuries: here fatal-overdose rates are 13 times the national average and one in 10 babies are born with an opiate addiction. Such is the extent of the problem that local efforts are focused on containment as much as prevention, and the emergency services are overstretched while the rehab centres struggling. As ever, Theroux’s combination of apparent guilelessness and fearlessness bears fruit in the intimate encounters. Whether teasing out the distressing realities of one addict and the partner who assists her, or prodding away at the motives of another who seems superficially content, he gleans genuinely valuable insights. One thing is clear in this incisive and troubling film, their spirits crushed, any potential is strangled and optimism is in diminishing supply. Gabriel Tate Formula 1: Japanese Grand Prix Sky Sports F1, 5.30am Despite Max Verstappen’s impressive victory in the Malaysian Grand Prix, Lewis Hamilton has plenty to be cheerful about as F1 heads to Japan. Indeed, by finishing second last weekend, having toiled with his Mercedes all weekend, Hamilton extended his lead in the drivers’ championship to 34 points, with five races of the season remaining. His nearest rival, Sebastian Vettel, on the other hand, is out of sorts: having not finished in Singapore, then started at the back of the grid in Malaysia but finished in fourth place. He’ll need to be much improved at the Suzuka Circuit. Premiership Rugby Union: Saracens v Wasps BT Sport 1, 2.30pm Having lost three of their opening five matches, the most recent of which was a 25-9 defeat at home to Bath, Wasps need a win to boost morale. The problem is they’re away at Saracens, who’ve won four from five and are looking imperious, as anyone who witnessed their 25-3 trouncing of Worcester last weekend will attest. Among the scorers that day was England full-back Alex Goode.  International Football: Lithuania v England ITV, 4.30pm England round off an eventful qualifying campaign that began with them replacing Sam Allardyce as manager with Gareth Southgate. Since then Wayne Rooney, England’s top scorer, has called time on his international career, while younger players such as Harry Kane and Dele Alli have grown in stature. The former, who has been in sublime form for Spurs this season, has been named captain and will be confident of adding to tally this afternoon at the LFF Stadium in Vilnius. When these sides met in Match, goals from Jermain Defoe – his first for England since 2013 – and Jamie Vardy gave Southgate’s side a 2-0 victory.  The Last Post BBC One, 9.00pm Peter Moffat’s evocative Sixties drama continues with the arrival of an American war reporter, Martha Franklin (Essie Davis), which disrupts the delicate dynamic on the military base, while insurgent leader Abdul-Kadir Hakim is targeted for the murder of Captain Page (Joseph Kennedy). Electric Dreams: Crazy Diamond Channel 4, 9.00pm In this episode of the Philip K Dick adaptations, Ed Morris (Steve Buscemi) is offered a chance to inject some excitement into his drab life with wife Sally (Julia Davis) by Jill (Sidse Babbett Knudsen), a synthetic human. The plot is cluttered, but the ending is satisfying indeed. The Gifted Fox, 9.00pm Marvel’s colonisation of the small screen continues with this entry in the X-Men universe. While The Gifted is a far cry from the mind-bending visions of Noah Hawley’s Legion, it provides plenty of bang for your buck in its tales of a family, headed by True Blood’s Stephen Moyer, that is rocked by revelations that its children have mutant abilities and go on the run from dastardly government forces. Festival No 6 Sky Arts, 9.00pm Highlights from the deeply eccentric beanfeast in Portmeirion, the Italianate Welsh coastal home of The Prisoner TV series. Expect music from Mogwai, Bloc Party and the wonderful Flaming Lips. The Sky at Night BBC Four, 10.00pm Maggie Aderin-Pocock considers the renewal of interest in manned missions to the moon, and the role of tech companies in funding and driving these new initiatives. GT Snowfall BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI This new 10-parter from John Singleton (Boyz N the Hood) traces the shockwaves from the crack cocaine epidemic that ravaged Los Angeles in the Eighties. In the first episode, we meet Franklin Saint (Damson Idris), who is living with his mum and senses an opportunity that will change his life, and his city. It’s a notch below Narcos, but it’s still compelling and sharp. Sir Bobby Charlton at 80 BBC One, 10.30pm Alex Ferguson, Eric Cantona and more pay tribute to an Old Trafford great in a hagiography, yet Charlton is a man of such decency and dignity that it’s hard to object. GT Dial M for Murder (1954) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 1.15pm  It’s not quite on the same plane of brilliance as Vertigo, but Hitchcock’s adaptation of Frederick Knott’s stage play is still a briskly efficient exercise in suspense. Tony Wendice (Ray Milland) is trying to have his socialite wife Margot (Grace Kelly) murdered, after she has an affair with a writer. When Tony’s first plan fails, he dreams up another that’s even more devious. This Sporting Life (1963) ★★★★ London Live, 8.00pm  It’s Yorkshire accents and monochrome realism as Richard Harris goes down the mines, plays rugby and has an affair. As an uncompromising portrait of male attitudes, Lindsay Anderson’s stunning adaptation of David Storey’s novel is like a punch to the gut, and a direct antecedent of Scorsese’s Raging Bull. Rachel Roberts (star of earlier kitchen sink drama Saturday Night and Sunday Morning) co-stars. The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (2013) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 11.05pm  Mild-mannered Walter Mitty’s life is controlled  by his overbearing mother. He finds his escape by imagining himself living in the worlds pictured on the covers of Life magazine  and becoming a pilot, a sea captain and couturier.  Ben Stiller directs and stars in this loose revamping of the James Thurber’s story: the result is a flawed but  still entertaining and enjoyable adventure. Monday 9 October At your service: Steph and Dom Parker Credit: Channel 4 Steph and Dom’s One Star to Five Star Channel 4, 5.30pm Daytime programming isn’t normally where we look for originality, so it comes as no surprise to find little in this new weekday show hosted by Steph and Dom Parker, those once, seemingly ever-sozzled breakout stars from Gogglebox. What there is, though, is fun and lots of it, even if at times it can be hard to tell whether it is intentional or not. Like the illegitimate offspring of Four in a Bed and any number of hackneyed Hotel Inspector-style shows, this series sees the Parkers take their own limited experience as B & B owners in Kent as proof that they know everything there is to know about the international hospitality industry and descend on an ailing hotel for a week with a view to making it marginally more appealing.  They begin with the dowdy Ransdale Hotel in Bridlington, a slightly tatty, underperforming establishment where they reckon seaside-themed rooms, kedgeree for breakfast and a party atmosphere in the bar will get the occupancy levels up from the current “negligible”. Could getting the clientele drunk cause the approval ratings to peak? It’s probably more likely than the kedgeree. Gerard O’Donovan The Human Body: Secrets of Your Life Revealed BBC Two, 9.00pm In the series’ concluding part, Chris and Xand van Tulleken explore how experiences shape our minds and bodies, and show for the very first time how memories are formed in the brain and continue to influence us throughout our lives.  Tunes for Tyrants: Music and Power with Suzy Klein BBC Four, 9.00pm In this edition of the documentary series, Suzy Klein explores the Thirties and how classical music, while it was exploited to idealise violent nationalism and prop up the totalitarian regimes of the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany, was also be a source of coded resistance. Liar ITV, 9.00pm In a torrid penultimate episode, Laura (Joanne Froggatt) convinces ex-boyfriend Tom (Warren Brown) to help bring Andrew Earlham (Ioan Gruffudd) to justice as she’s forced to resort to a somewhat unusual method of forcing a confession out of him. W1A BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI This is a terrific edition of the sitcom. As the crisis over the axing of the BBC’s Big Swing Band goes viral, Head of Values Ian Fletcher (Hugh Bonneville) once again finds himself caught in the media cross-hairs.  The Vietnam War BBC Four, 10.00pm & 10.55pm Another double helping of Ken Burns’s stately and impeccably researched history of the Vietnam War rolls us on through 1967 when, with casualties mounting and the Viet Cong striking back in the infamous Tet offensive, a US victory looked increasingly beyond reach. Timewasters ITV2, 10.00pm & 10.30pm ITV2 launches a season of new comedies with this sharply scripted sitcom about a struggling four-piece jazz band who get stuck in Twenties London when their time machine breaks down. GO After the News ITV, 10.45pm; NI, 12.45am; not STV; Wales, 11.15pm Current affairs presenters Emma Barnett and Nick Ferrari are hot tickets just now following some hard-hitting “holiday cover” hosting on Newsnight this summer. Now ITV has signed them up for this new nightly debate show that takes its subject matter straight from ITV News at Ten. After the unmitigated flop of The Nightly Show, ITV will be keen to for this to shine. GO Pimpernel Smith (1941, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 3.50pm  Leslie Howard, famed for his role in Gone with the Wind, directs and stars in this deft drama set in 1939 Berlin. An academic (Howard) recruits students to go to Europe under the guise of an archaeological dig. However, his real mission is to smuggle victims of Nazi persecution out of Germany. An absorbing film and, retrospectively, quite haunting since Howard was shot down in the war by a Nazi plane two years later. The Birth of a Nation (2016) ★★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 4.10pm and daily  Writer-director-star Nate Parker’s attempt to reappropriate the notorious racism of DW Griffith’s 1915 foundation myth and spin it on its axis is a graceless, pretentious mallet to the head of history. Parker (whose galvanising performance is much the strongest) tells the story of Nat Turner’s 1831 slave rebellion from the side of the true victims. Se7en (1995) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm  Gluttony, avarice, envy, sloth, wrath, lust and pride; the seven deadly sins are explored graphically, and imaginatively, in this gloomy thriller from director David Fincher. It follows a detective (an outstanding Morgan Freeman) and his rookie partner (Brad Pitt) on the hunt for a maniac who kills those guilty of the above vices. Brutal and gripping, with an ending you won’t forget in a hurry. Gwyneth Paltrow and Kevin Spacey co-star. Tuesday 10 October In the field: Michelle Keegan as Georgie Lane Credit: BBC Our Girl: Nepal Tour BBC One, 9.00pm Michelle Keegan returns as dedicated army medic Georgie Lane in Tony Grounds’s entertaining if soapy army drama. This time the main action is in Nepal, where Georgie and the rest of 2 Section, including Ben Aldridge’s patrician Captain Charles James, are posted to provide humanitarian relief following an earthquake.  This being Our Girl, the personal relationships are as important as the action and Georgie soon finds herself having a perfectly arched eyebrow-off with new recruit Maisie Richards (the excellent Shalom Brune-Franklin). Yet behind the jokes there are serious points raised about the way in which the army operates, and whether individualism ever has a place. Fans of the will they/won’t they romance between Georgie and her slick former fiancé Elvis (Luke Pasqualino) will be disappointed by how little the latter features in this opening episode (just one brief scene in Syria before the main action begins), although Rudi Dharmalingam gallantly steps into the breach as impassioned NGO worker Milan. The real joy, however, comes not from the plot twists but from the expert way in which Grounds captures both the banter and boredom of army life. Sarah Hughes Once Upon a Time Netflix, from today This popular fantasy series that follows fairy-tale characters living in the real world returns for its seventh season. It marks a reboot of sorts, with our now-adult hero Henry Mills (Jared S Gilmore) finding himself in the same position as when the story began. The Great British Bake Off Channel 4, 8.00pm The cooking competition continues to roll out new themes, with this episode marking the first Italian Week. But you can be sure that it won’t have anything to do with making a bog-standard spag bol. Unfortunately the weather is not on their side, as the contestants suffer in the hottest temperatures ever recorded in the tent. Russia 1917: Countdown to Revolution BBC Two, 9.00pm Juliet Stevenson narrates this insightful documentary made to mark the centenary of the Russian Revolution. Martin Amis, Orlando Figes and Helen Rappaport are among those discussing and recounting how Russia transitioned from a tsarist autocracy to become the first communist state – and the roles played by Lenin, Trotsky and Stalin. Concorde: A Supersonic Story BBC Four, 9.00pm The Concorde was considered the “most glamorous plane ever built” – until it was retired in 2003 following the crash of Air France Flight 4590. But its story is a fascinating one. Sophie Okonedo narrates this tale of rows between French and British governments, while former passengers recount queuing for the lavatory with celebrities.  The Deuce Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Vincent (James Franco) is putting the finishing touches to his new bar, in this third episode of the gritty, Seventies New York-set drama. But then an unexpected silent partner turns up. CG Celebrity Hunted Channel 4, 9.15pm The real-life thriller returns for a celebrity charity edition. Anneka Rice and former Strictly winner Jay McGuiness are among those attempting to avoid detection.  Later Live… with Jools Holland BBC Two, 10.00pm; N Ireland, 11.15pm Former Led Zeppelin singer Robert Plant performs live with his band Sensational Space Shifters. He’s joined by Beck, with songs from his first new album in three years. Catherine Gee Ice Age: Continental Drift (2012) ★★☆☆☆ E4, 8.00pm Surprisingly, the Ice Age series has accrued more lucre than Pixar’s Toy Story trilogy. But this fourth film is the thinnest and redeemed only by a demented squirrel. Once again, the story revolves around Manny the mammoth (Ray Romano), Sid the sloth (John Leguizamo) and Diego the smilodon (Denis Leary), who are separated from their herd thanks to the shifting of the Earth’s land masses. Southpaw (2015) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Jake Gyllenhaal lays his body on the line for 0a boxing drama so predictable that you could set your watch by it. If only someone had devoted equivalent stamina to the screenplay, we might have an actual movie on our hands. Nevertheless, it’s rousingly entertaining as Gyllenhaal’s Billy “The Great” Hope learns the art of subterfuge from a new coach (Forest Whitaker). Rachel McAdams co-stars. I Origins (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film 4, 11.25pm  Eyes and souls have been cinematically intertwined since at least 1929, when, in Un Chien Andalou, Buñuel and Dalí carved out their visionary manifesto with the quick swipe of a razor blade across a plump and oozing eyeball. In Mike Cahill’s film, the metaphor trots off down a strange and lyrical new trail when a biology student (Michael Pitt) encounters a model (Astrid Bergès-Frisbey) who makes him question scientific fact. Wednesday 11 October Not sitting well: David Mitchell as Stephen Credit: Channel 4 Back Channel 4, 10.00pm The ratings may have been a little underwhelming, but in contrast to David Mitchell and Robert Webb’s tonally uncertain and muddled Ambassadors, Back has been a triumph. Simon Blackwell’s often brutal, witheringly funny script has granted the leading men roles that riff on their Peep Show personas of Mark and Jez without ever becoming beholden to them. Prodigal foster son Andrew’s (Webb) victory over biological offspring Stephen (Mitchell) is apparently complete, as the former struts around his flourishing gastropub, bragging about his chef’s clafoutis while the latter moulders in a caravan. “He’s stolen my life and he’s living it better than me,” Stephen fumes, impotently. Their father’s memorial party – and the associated speeches – offer Stephen one final shot at redemption: when a clutch of other returning foster children eclipse Andrew’s efforts to ingratiate himself, Stephen has a revelation that sends him on a demented trip of vengeance to fill the gaps in his rival’s life story. Finding profound bathos in often gasp-inducing misanthropy and reuniting the best British double act around (pace Vic and Bob), Back undoubtedly merits a return. Gabriel Tate The Apprentice BBC One, 9.00pm Enjoying a new lease of life after a disappointing series last year, reality TV’s version of an extended job interview this week unleashes the candidates’ aesthetic pretensions by asking them to turn interior designers at a five-star hotel. The mind boggles at the bills that needed settling at the end of this particular stay. The Detectives: Murder on the Streets BBC Two, 9.00pm This utterly involving and consistently impressive documentary series comes to a climax with the arrival of the trial in the case of the murder of young homeless man Daniel Smith. This is true crime of the most empathetic and socially responsible kind. Britain’s Lost Masterpieces BBC Four, 9.00pm Dr Bendor Grosvenor and Emma Dabiri visit Carmathenshire County Museum, home to a damaged portrait of a 16th-century Earl whose provenance is disputed. Doc Martin ITV, 9.00pm Receptionist Morwenna’s (Jessica Ransom) parents pay her a surprise visit and present Doc Martin (Martin Clunes) with a dilemma as the amiable comedy drama ambles through another hour. Ray Donovan Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Susan Sarandon has been both a welcome addition and much-needed counterpart to this occasionally testosterone-heavy series, with Liev Schreiber’s eponymous heavy facing the repercussions of years of making enemies in high places. Norskov Channel 4, 10.35pm The titular Danish industrial port is blighted by a drug problem. Enter ace detective Tom Noack (Thomas Levin), an old acquaintance of the city’s mayor to clean the place up and, inevitably, disturb a few ghosts. It’s a slick Nordic noir – the whole series will be available on C4’s online service Walter Presents after this episode airs. GT Inside Birmingham Children’s Hospital More4, 10.00pm The BBC and Channel 4 continue to match each other, blow for blow, with medical documentaries. This latest series follows a girl diagnosed with a life-changing condition, a boy with leukaemia and a five-year-old whose epilepsy is proving increasingly hard to manage. As so often, their stoicism and resilience are humbling and very affecting. GT Charade (1963) ★★★★☆ Film4, 4.35pm Audrey Hepburn as a temperamental-but-alluring damsel in distress and Cary Grant as a shadowy charmer are characters that the two actors played over and over during their careers. But they do so exceptionally in this suspense comedy from Stanley Donen, often referred to as the best Hitchcock movie that Hitchcock never made. Hepburn is the widow being trailed by four men hunting for her late husband’s stolen fortune. Starship Troopers (1997) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 10.00pm  On first appearances, this Oscar-nominated sci-fi action thriller looks distressingly silly: in the distant future, a group of American high-school friends join the armed forces to do intergalactic war with some malicious insectoid aliens, or “Bugs”. The whole of humanity is at risk. Thankfully director Paul Verhoeven deftly underpins the whole thing with wicked satirical verve and no-nonsense action. Dying Laughing (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Arts, 10.30pm  Dozens of stand-up comics, including Kevin Hart, Jerry Seinfeld and Amy Schumer, contribute to this understated but rather wonderful documentary film about the infrequent highs and relentless lows of trying to make people laugh. It can be painful – one anecdote about “bombing” on stage is particularly uncomfortable – but then a comic will recall that first great gig and you can just tell that all the anguish has been worth it. Thursday 12 October Every second counts: McDonald follows a murder investigation Credit: ITV An Hour to Catch a Killer with Trevor McDonald ITV, 9.00pm Trevor McDonald’s abiding fascination with such murky matters as serial murder and organised crime, especially in the United States, is well established. For the first programme in ITV’s new Crime and Punishment season, McDonald examines a key concept of modern crime detection: how the decisions made by investigating officers in the so-called “Golden Hour” – the first 60 minutes of a murder inquiry – have a vital impact on whether or not a killer is caught and successfully prosecuted. And here he examines a case much closer to home. With full access to the Northumbria Police Homicide Unit’s investigation into the murder of 24-year-old graduate Alice Ruggles last October, the film follows the case from the moment the murder was reported, through every layer of the investigation as it develops, to the moment the all-too-obvious prime suspect is located and charged.  Later in this series, Susannah Reid, Piers Morgan, Ross Kemp and, more randomly, Gordon Ramsay will present reports on subjects as diverse as the lucrative international cocaine trade and gang warfare inside the notorious Barlinnie Prison in Glasgow. Gerard O’Donovan Mr Robot Amazon Prime, from today Techno-paranoia is still the name of the game as the US hacker drama returns for a much-anticipated third series. With 10 new episodes to get through, clearly the first thing to sort out is the fate of the not-always-reliable narrator Elliot Alderson (Rami Malek), who was shot in last season’s cliffhanger. Dynasty Netflix, from today As in the original, bling, bubbles and bonking dominate this 22-episode reboot of one of the Eighties’ silliest US soap operas. Once again it follows the boardroom and bedroom escapades of Denver’s super-rich Carrington clan.  PGA Tour Golf: The CIMB Classic Sky Sports Main Event, 6.00am Coverage of the opening day’s play at the annual event from the Kuala Lumpur Golf & Country Club in Malaysia, where Justin Thomas has won the last two titles.  Council House Crackdown BBC One, 8.00pm Michelle Ackerley uncovers more tales of social housing fraud as council investigators stake out a woman suspected of faking a disability and a tenant alleged to be illegally subletting housing association property. Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm; BBC Two Wales, 9.00pm The final programme in this affecting series again focuses on the tough decisions the London Ambulance Service faces when its slim resources are stretched to capacity and calls must be prioritised. Russia with Simon Reeve BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 11.15pm This is by far the best travelogue Reeve has done for a while, and for this final leg, the adventurer starts in Crimea, where he weighs up the political and economic costs of its annexation by Russia. From there, he travels north through the vast plains of western Russia to where the country’s real power has always resided, Moscow and St Petersburg.  Educating Greater Manchester Channel 4, 9.00pm In tonight’s episode, it’s Valentine’s Day and romance is in the air for even the school’s youngest pupils. Plus, a recently qualified teacher who’s come to Harrop Fold looking for a new challenge gets more than he bargained for. GO The History of Comedy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This new documentary has an overambitious title for a series that focuses almost entirely on US comedy of fairly recent vintage. Still, it’s an interesting thematic survey of how certain types of laughter making have evolved in the last century. GO Titanic (1997) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Eleven Oscars won and more than a billion dollars taken worldwide in ticket sales. James Cameron deserved his success with this opulent blockbuster about the sinking of the RMS Titanic, a story that has a grand romance between penniless artist Jack (Leonardo DiCaprio) and rich American girl Rose (Kate Winslet) at its heart. Even viewers determined to find it soppy are liable to be swept along by the emotion. Heist (2001) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 10.50pm  Prepare to be triple-crossed, duped and bewildered by this piece of con-artistry, which pulls the rug out from under your feet with such regularity that it’s tempting just to give up and lie down. Gene Hackman, Danny DeVito and Rebecca Pidgeon set out to steal some gold; needless to say, it does not go smoothly. There are excellent performances, plus endless twists and cracking dialogue. Just Go with It (2011) ★★☆☆☆ 5STAR, 11.00pm  Adam Sandler stars in this remake of the 1971 comedy Cactus Flower (itself adapted from a Broadway stage play by Abe Burrows), as Danny, a single plastic surgeon in Los Angeles who feigns an unhappy marriage in order to have no-strings-attached flings with women. What follows is a complex low-grade romantic farce which is saved by a sparky performance from Jennifer Aniston as Danny’s office manager and best friend. Friday 13 October Life on the edge: Ray Mears is in Australia Credit: ITV Australian Wilderness with Ray Mears ITV, 8.00pm; not STV/UTV/Wales The great appeal of Ray Mears’s wildlife documentaries is his no-nonsense approach. Where other presenters rush around telling you how exciting and amazing and wonderful everything is, Mears tends to amble gently through it, explaining a few facts and otherwise allowing you to gaze at the beauty unfurling across your TV screen. It’s an approach that pays high dividends in this new series about the Australian wilderness, a landscape that is vast, beautiful and oddly eerie.  The opening episode focuses more on sea than land (although there is time for a quick trek through rocky desert towards the Indian Ocean) as Mears dives on Ningaloo Reef, the longest fringing coral reef in the world. After a pleasant meeting with some friendly stingrays and a few “wish you were here” shots of the turquoise sea, the real star of the show heaves into sight as Mears and his companions find themselves swimming alongside a passing whale shark, the largest fish in the world. “This is what we’ve all been waiting for,” says Mears as the fish floats into view. It’s a breathtaking, beautiful moment and one which manages to shake even Mears out of his habitual calm. Sarah Hughes Lore Amazon Prime, from today Not for the faint of heart, this disquieting new documentary series is based on Aaron Mahnke’s popular podcast of the same name, with each episode exploring the story behind pop culture’s most legendary horror myths, from vampires and werewolves to possessed dolls.  Mindhunter Netflix, from today Imagine Se7en crossed with Zodiac and Silence of the Lambs and you’ll get the gist of this excellent new detective drama executive produced by David Fincher and Charlize Theron. Based on the non-fiction book Mind Hunter: Inside the FBI’s Elite Serial Crime Unit and set in the late Seventies, it follows a pair of FBI agents (Jonathan Groff and Holt McCallany) who interview and analyse imprisoned mass murderers in order to better understand serial killers. The first episode, which is shot by master of murk Fincher, moves languidly – but is no less absorbing. PS International T20 Cricket: India v Australia Friday, Sky Sports Main Event, 2.20pm The Rajiv Gandhi International Stadium in Hyderabad is the setting as India and Australia contest the final game in a three-match T20 series. Unreported World Channel 4, 7.30pm On August 14, a mudslide in Sierra Leone, caused by torrential rain, destroyed the small town of Regent on the outskirts of the capital, Freetown. Hundreds lost their lives. In this affecting report, Seyi Rhodes talks to the survivors and the rescue teams desperately trying to find those still missing.  Crystal Maze / Have I Got News for You Channel 4, 8.00pm / BBC One, 9.00pm Richard Ayoade fans, rejoice: tonight you can see him twice – somewhat fitting given that he once wrote and directed a black comedy called The Double. First up, he continues to add warmth and irony to a rousing revamp of The Crystal Maze, as the current series concludes. Then, in HIGNFY, he puts that bone-dry wit to good use yet again, as he guest presents the long-running news quiz.  Cold Feet ITV, 9.00pm Affectionate writing and a great ensemble are the foundations on which Mark Bullen’s middle-aged comedy drama are built. Tonight, as this Nineties-show revival continues, Adam (James Nesbitt) and Pete (John Thomson) throw a joint 50th birthday dinner.  Porridge BBC One, 9.30pm  On the subject of revivals, this sort-of sequel to the classic Seventies comedy continues to be so-so. Tonight, there’s a new prison officer on the scene. Patrick Smith The Meyerowitz Stories (2017) ★★★★☆ Netflix, from today  It’s been a long time coming but Adam Sandler is finally in a good film. He plays Danny, a New Yorker whose unemployment and divorce has left him defined purely in terms of his bloodline. The narrative arc is about Danny, sister Jean and half-brother Matthew reconciling themselves with their curmudgeon father Harold (Dustin Hoffman). Emma Thompson is woozily uproarious as Harold’s wife. Lion (2016) ★★★★☆ Amazon Prime, from today Derived from a 2012 memoir by the grown Saroo Brierley, called A Long Way Home, this is the story of a lost boy: a five-year-old Indian who grew up in the Eighties in the area around Khandwa. With no paper trail or family name, he becomes a lost cause, eventually shipped off to kindly foster parents in Tasmania, played by Nicole Kidman and David Wenham. The excellent script, by Luke Davies, sticks rigidly to Saroo’s own point of view. Good Will Hunting (1997) ★★★★☆ W, 9.00pm  Matt Damon and Ben Affleck won an Oscar for Best Screenplay with this stirring if occasionally gloopy story. Will Hunting (Damon) is a hot-headed, 20-year-old janitor with a photographic memory and an untapped genius for mathematics. Robin Williams plays the inspiring therapist who channels Will’s rage into solving quadratics, and Minnie Driver is his brainy, Harvard graduate love interest.   Television previewers Catherine Gee, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: The Housing Enforcers and England v Slovenia

Thursday 5 October The Housing Enforcers BBC One, 8.00pm; BBC Two Wales, 7.00pm “Everyone has a right to a safe place to live, no matter who you are, where you live or how much rent you pay. It’s non-negotiable.” So concludes Matt Allwright at the end of this programme focusing on the importance of fire safety.  The format is straightforward: Allwright travels across the country meeting with housing officers and examining the myriad ways in which fires can destroy lives. What makes this really hit home, however, is the presenter’s quiet fury at the way in which some lives are considered less worthy than others. Inevitably, the shadow of Grenfell Tower hangs heavy over the hour. It’s notable that many of those worst affected are elderly and living alone: the story of fiercely independent Ali who refuses to acknowledge, even to his family, quite how much he is struggling is particularly poignant. Allwright, however, saves his most righteous rage for the landlords squeezing tenants in wherever they can and failing to meet even the minimum health and safety standards. The result is a hard-hitting and often hard-to-watch documentary, which also offers solid advice on how to deal both with fires and bad landlords. Sarah Hughes Live International Football: England v Slovenia ITV, 7.30pm Having drawn 0-0 last October, with Joe Hart forced to make a string of fine saves, England and Slovenia reconvene at Wembley. Victory today for Gareth Southgate’s men will ensure their qualification for next year’s World Cup in Russia. And having beaten second-placed Slovakia 2-1 last month, thanks to a strike from tyro Marcus Rashford, they’ll be confident of doing just that. The Big Family Cooking Showdown BBC Two, 8.00pm Two last families go head to head for a place in the finals. Their £10 challenge is a Friday night takeaway, so naturally curry is on the menu. There’s talk of “fusion” cooking, some mushy spinach and a 34-year-old rolling pin.   Discovering: Laurence Olivier Sky Arts, 8.00pm The spotlight turns on Laurence Olivier, who, in 1937, described cinema as an “anaemic little medium which could not stand great acting”.   Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm The work of the West Midlands Ambulance Service continues as a specialist trauma team are dispatched to a motorbike accident where a man has suffered a catastrophic chest injury. “I’ve got nothing…” declares the doctor. It’s a stark reminder of the fragility of life and the increasing compassion of the services in times of chaos.    Russia with Simon Reeve BBC Two, 9.00pm Simon Reeve continues his fascinating journey, meeting Tuvan children in Siberia who practice the Mongolian tradition of throat singing.  Educating Greater Manchester Channel 4, 9.00pm Ah, that old chestnut – ignoring school uniform rules. This week, the teachers at Harrop Fold are on the back foot when a message is spread on Snapchat encouraging pupils to come in wearing trainers. Social media also causes friction between Year 11 girls Serena and Lelo when one talks to the other’s boyfriend on FaceTime. Rachel Ward Law & Order True Crime: The Menendez murders Sky Living, 9.00pm This series, similar to The People v OJ Simpson, takes a closer look at the two trials of brothers Lyle and Erik Menendez, who were convicted of murdering their parents in their Beverly Hills home in 1989. It focuses on the attorney (Edie Falco), who was one of their few defenders. Dimension 404 Syfy, 9.00pm Each episode of this new sci-fi anthology features a form of technology gone wrong. But there’s nothing unnerving about it, rather it’s a camp pastiche of The Twilight Zone, complete with Star Wars’ Mark Hamill providing the voice-over. Glee’s Lea Michele stars in the first episode about online dating. It’s weird, but it doesn’t overplay it. RW Robin and Marian (1976) ★★★★☆ Film4, 1.10pm  Sean Connery gives one of his best performances as a middle-aged Robin Hood, who heads home to Sherwood Forest after the death of Richard I. He finds that scaling a castle wall isn’t as easy as it used to be, Maid Marian (Audrey Hepburn) is still miffed at being left in the lurch, and the Sheriff (Robert Shaw) is up to his old tricks in Richard Lester’s good-natured romance. Look out for Ronnie Barker as Friar Tuck. Jerry Maguire (1996) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 5.40pm  In Cameron Crowe’s macho romcom, Tom Cruise plays a sports agent who has an attack of conscience and urges his colleagues to think about the welfare of their clients. He’s duly fired but announces that he’ll start his own agency. A washed-up footballer (Cuba Gooding Jr) and a single mother (Renée Zellweger) are the only ones who agree to go with him. Here, the classic quote, “You had me at ‘hello’” was born. The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.10pm Clint Eastwood directs and stars in this marvellous warm-hearted western adapted from Forrest Carter’s novel and set during the American Civil War. Eastwood plays the eponymous Missouri farmer who, driven by memories of his family’s slaughter, becomes an outlaw when he refuses to join his Confederate comrades in surrender, in favour of seeking revenge on the men who murdered his kin. Friday 6 October Penal colony: Harry Peacock, Kevin Bishop and Ricky Grover Credit: BBC Porridge BBC One, 9.30pm The most successful of the BBC’s classic sitcom revivals from last year, Porridge returns for a full series with the series’ creators Dick Clement and Ian La Frenais once again on board. It finds Nigel Norman Fletcher (Kevin Bishop as the grandson of Ronnie Barker’s character, Norman Stanley) locking horns with officer Meekie (Mark Bonnar) while aiding or outsmarting the prison’s ne’er-do-wells. In a canny twist, it is Fletch who is now the relative ingénue in his cell, seeking counsel from veteran lag Joe Lotterby (Dave Hill). We find Fletch as the prison’s resident Cyrano de Bergerac, writing letters to keep the flame of romance alive between assorted inmates and their partners on the outside. All goes well until Fletch suffers a crisis of conscience that threatens the whole operation. Some of the gags are groanworthy, but Clement and La Frenais’s mastery of sitcom mechanics remains complete; their presence keeps the spirit of the original intact, while the update means that no one is attempting to emulate the cast of the Seventies series. Fletch has a five-year sentence to serve; unlikely as it might seem, a similar term for Porridge might not be unwelcome. Gabriel Tate Suburra: the Series Netflix, from 12.01am Like Romanzo Criminale and Gomorrah before it, Suburra began life as a book before becoming a gripping, multifaceted Italian-language political thriller. This 10-part series, set in the dying days of Berlusconi’s regime, explores the themes of politics, the Church and corruption during 20 tumultuous days in Rome. Unreported World Channel 4, 7.30pm Ireland faces a pivotal referendum on the decriminalisation of abortion in certain circumstances; Kate Hardie-Buckley meets those on both sides of the debate in a deeply affecting edition of the current-affairs series. Modern Family Sky1, 8.30pm It may have tailed off since its peak, but Modern Family is still good for a few laughs. The ninth series begins with Jay (Ty Burrell) taking the family on a houseboat holiday, and Mitchell (Jesse Tyler Ferguson) encountering an old flame. Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm; not N Ireland or Wales Monty Don begins preparations for 2018 by advising others on how to use leaf mould as a mulch. Elsewhere, Adam Frost visits a community allotment in Manchester, and Nick Bailey learns from a zoologist about the life teeming in the soil. Nile Rodgers: How to Make It in the Music Business BBC Four, 9.00pm Guitar genius and pop producer Nile Rodgers shares the wisdom he’s acquired over decades in the music business. In the first episode, he discusses the founding of Chic and his influence on today’s hitmakers. GT Cold Feet ITV, 9.00pm Karen (Hermione Norris) is on the brink of financial disaster in spite of David’s (Robert Bathurst) assistance, while Adam (James Nesbitt) gets out of his depth on a night out in Mike Bullen’s assured comedy-drama revival. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm Another line-up of heavy-hitters assembles on the red sofa tonight: comedian Chris Rock plugs his first UK stand-up tour in a decade, actors Idris Elba and Kate Winslet discuss their niche genre movie, “disaster-romance” The Mountain Between Us (about a surgeon and a journalist who survive a plane crash), and Liam Gallagher performs songs from his debut album, As You Were. GT The Twilight Saga: Eclipse (2010) ★★★☆☆ E4, 8.00pm  The third instalment of the teenage vampire franchise is better than the second and will please its fan base, though Melissa Rosenberg’s script is full of clichés and relies on a shirtless Taylor Lautner for distraction. Girl-next-door Bella Swan (Kristen Stewart) must choose between 100-year-old vampire Edward Cullen (Robert Pattinson) and hunky werewolf Jacob Black (Lautner). T2: Trainspotting (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.00pm  Danny Boyle’s sequel is more than just a trip down memory lane. Back in 1996, Trainspotting’s gallery of junkies and rogues (Ewan McGregor, Jonny Lee Miller) proudly and raucously chose not to choose life. But now, all have come to terms with the gnawing possibility that life may have in fact not chosen them. There’s no chance of it matching the legacy of the first film, but it doesn’t tarnish it either. American Hustle (2013) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 12.10am  David O Russell’s caper feels like the film he has spent his career warming up for and is a serious piece of film-making that delights in its own silliness. Irving (Christian Bale) and his partner Sydney (Amy Adams) are con artists blackmailed by FBI agent Richie DiMaso (Bradley Cooper) into aiding his investigation. “Some of this actually happened,” reads a title card, and to be more specific would spoil the fun. Saturday 7 October  Off-the-wall brilliance: artist Jean-Michel Basquiat Credit: BBC Basquiat: Rage to Riches BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 10.30pm “If you want to know what there is to know about Jean-Michel, then the place is his work,” says Lisane Basquiat, the sister of the self-taught, Brooklyn-born painter who became a star of the Eighties New York art scene. In the space of a few years, he morphed from a freewheeling, underground graffiti artist, going by the tag name of Samo, into an enigmatic and incessant painter who commanded thousands of dollars for his works: by the age of 21 he was a millionaire. This comprehensive profile digs deep into the life of a young man who was inspired by Gray’s Anatomy, dated Madonna, collaborated with Andy Warhol, and shaved his head in public. Of course, some critics find his cartoonish work hard to take seriously (his rock star persona, which led to his death at 27, did him no favours), while others have an immediate response to his vibrant canvases.  Friends, lovers and contemporaries talk about how he came to rank alongside the likes of Pablo Picasso, Jackson Pollock and Francis Bacon, and muse on how important he still is to the legacy of American art – one of his skull paintings recently sold at Sotheby’s for over $ 100 million and his work is currently the subject of an exhibition at the Barbican in London. Rachel Ward Strictly Come Dancing BBC One, 6.35pm In previous years Movie Week has given us Kellie Bright’s out-of-this-world Star Wars Charleston, Jay McGuiness’s eye-popping Pulp Fiction jive, and the delight of Ed Balls in green face paint and a yellow suit for his smokin’ Mask routine. Can the remaining 14 duos match those memorable homages? Surely Susan Calman’s Wonder Woman samba and Gemma Atkinson’s Jungle Book Charleston will be contenders? The pros will dance a La La Land group performance. Britain’s Ancient Tracks with Tony Robinson Channel 4, 7.00pm The Time Team presenter continues to travel down some of the UK’s oldest roads. Tonight, he’s in the Peak District, venturing along the Derbyshire Portway and taking a tour of D H Lawrence’s mountain retreat.  The X Factor: Bootcamp ITV, 8.15pm The bootcamp stages, in front of a live audience, are an efficient way of shining a light on which acts have potential. The last few try to impress before tomorrow’s brutal Six Chair Challenge.   Black Lake BBC Four, 9.00pm and 9.40pm This Swedish ghost series has been terrific fun as well as serving up its fair share of scares. In tonight’s double-bill finale, Mette’s (Mathilde Norholt) suspicions about Dag (Anderz Eide) grow following a fire in the ski lodge, but Hanne (Sarah-Sofie Boussnina) is still convinced that the resort is cursed, and her salvation appears to lie within the hidden room in the cellar. But time is running out…  XTC: This Is Pop Sky Arts, 9.00pm Of all the bands that emerged from the British post-punk scene, XTC are one of the hardest to pigeon hole. The ever-evolving group had its biggest success in the Eighties with off-kilter, witty pop songs containing sharp, Beatles-like guitar hooks before they moved into psychedelia. This sprightly documentary takes a look at the group, led by Andy Partridge and Colin Moulding, who formed in Swindon in 1972, and who have perhaps become one of Britain’s most unsung bands. RW Boxing: Anthony Crolla v Ricky Burns Sky Sports Main Event, 10.00pm The Manchester Arena hosts this lightweight bout between two former world champions. Anthony Crolla and Ricky Burns are vastly experienced at the highest level, and are both hoping to bounce back from defeats in their most recent contests. Crolla was beaten for the second time by Jorge Linares in March, while Burns lost to Julius Indongo a month later. Performance Live: Missing Episode BBC Two, 10.30pm; Wales, 12.00midnight Twenty years ago, Ross Sutherland was watching EastEnders when a knock at the door led to a chain of events. Here, he remixes that episode into a poem to tell his story. RW Muppets Most Wanted (2014) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 2.45pm  The Muppets tour Europe, where Kermit (Steve Whitmire) is kidnapped and replaced by a doppelgänger. Masterminding the plot is a sleazy Ricky Gervais. Though this contains moments of joy with its fun musical numbers and clever gags, the Muppets themselves are crowded out by cameo overkill from the likes of Lady Gaga, Sean “Diddy” Combs and Céline Dion. Escape Plan (2013) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm  If, even at a then 67 and 66 respectively, Sylvester Stallone and Arnold Schwarzenegger can’t bust out of a high-security prison, you don’t really fancy anyone else’s chances. Stallone’s character, Breslin, is an expert in prison weak spots, hired to test their pregnability by going undercover as an inmate. The two stars bring brains and brawn to this film, but it could do with a tighter plot and a bit more pace. Bright Days Ahead (2013) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 12.05am  In this charming French romance from director Marion Vernoux, recently retired dentist Caro (Fanny Ardant) is depressed and underappreciated by her family. She falls in love with her computer class lecturer, who’s 20 years younger than her. Their affair reawakens her sense of purpose, and the consequences on her marriage are unexpected. The performances are strong, but a flat script  lets the film down. Sunday 8 October Louis Theroux with heroin user Petty Betty Credit: BBC  Louis Theroux: Dark States – Heroin Town BBC Two, 9.00pm Louis Theroux’s second coming as a chronicler of society’s underdogs, outcasts and victims continues with this examination of life and death on the fringes (documentaries on murder and sex trafficking are to come). He is in Huntington, West Virginia, a former industrial town in the grip of a drug epidemic fuelled by Big Pharma’s record of encouraging doctors to overmedicate workplace injuries: here fatal-overdose rates are 13 times the national average and one in 10 babies are born with an opiate addiction. Such is the extent of the problem that local efforts are focused on containment as much as prevention, and the emergency services are overstretched while the rehab centres struggling. As ever, Theroux’s combination of apparent guilelessness and fearlessness bears fruit in the intimate encounters. Whether teasing out the distressing realities of one addict and the partner who assists her, or prodding away at the motives of another who seems superficially content, he gleans genuinely valuable insights. One thing is clear in this incisive and troubling film, their spirits crushed, any potential is strangled and optimism is in diminishing supply. Gabriel Tate Formula 1: Japanese Grand Prix Sky Sports F1, 5.30am Despite Max Verstappen’s impressive victory in the Malaysian Grand Prix, Lewis Hamilton has plenty to be cheerful about as F1 heads to Japan. Indeed, by finishing second last weekend, having toiled with his Mercedes all weekend, Hamilton extended his lead in the drivers’ championship to 34 points, with five races of the season remaining. His nearest rival, Sebastian Vettel, on the other hand, is out of sorts: having not finished in Singapore, then started at the back of the grid in Malaysia but finished in fourth place. He’ll need to be much improved at the Suzuka Circuit. Premiership Rugby Union: Saracens v Wasps BT Sport 1, 2.30pm Having lost three of their opening five matches, the most recent of which was a 25-9 defeat at home to Bath, Wasps need a win to boost morale. The problem is they’re away at Saracens, who’ve won four from five and are looking imperious, as anyone who witnessed their 25-3 trouncing of Worcester last weekend will attest. Among the scorers that day was England full-back Alex Goode.  International Football: Lithuania v England ITV, 4.30pm England round off an eventful qualifying campaign that began with them replacing Sam Allardyce as manager with Gareth Southgate. Since then Wayne Rooney, England’s top scorer, has called time on his international career, while younger players such as Harry Kane and Dele Alli have grown in stature. The former, who has been in sublime form for Spurs this season, has been named captain and will be confident of adding to tally this afternoon at the LFF Stadium in Vilnius. When these sides met in Match, goals from Jermain Defoe – his first for England since 2013 – and Jamie Vardy gave Southgate’s side a 2-0 victory.  The Last Post BBC One, 9.00pm Peter Moffat’s evocative Sixties drama continues with the arrival of an American war reporter, Martha Franklin (Essie Davis), which disrupts the delicate dynamic on the military base, while insurgent leader Abdul-Kadir Hakim is targeted for the murder of Captain Page (Joseph Kennedy). Electric Dreams: Crazy Diamond Channel 4, 9.00pm In this episode of the Philip K Dick adaptations, Ed Morris (Steve Buscemi) is offered a chance to inject some excitement into his drab life with wife Sally (Julia Davis) by Jill (Sidse Babbett Knudsen), a synthetic human. The plot is cluttered, but the ending is satisfying indeed. The Gifted Fox, 9.00pm Marvel’s colonisation of the small screen continues with this entry in the X-Men universe. While The Gifted is a far cry from the mind-bending visions of Noah Hawley’s Legion, it provides plenty of bang for your buck in its tales of a family, headed by True Blood’s Stephen Moyer, that is rocked by revelations that its children have mutant abilities and go on the run from dastardly government forces. Festival No 6 Sky Arts, 9.00pm Highlights from the deeply eccentric beanfeast in Portmeirion, the Italianate Welsh coastal home of The Prisoner TV series. Expect music from Mogwai, Bloc Party and the wonderful Flaming Lips. The Sky at Night BBC Four, 10.00pm Maggie Aderin-Pocock considers the renewal of interest in manned missions to the moon, and the role of tech companies in funding and driving these new initiatives. GT Snowfall BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI This new 10-parter from John Singleton (Boyz N the Hood) traces the shockwaves from the crack cocaine epidemic that ravaged Los Angeles in the Eighties. In the first episode, we meet Franklin Saint (Damson Idris), who is living with his mum and senses an opportunity that will change his life, and his city. It’s a notch below Narcos, but it’s still compelling and sharp. Sir Bobby Charlton at 80 BBC One, 10.30pm Alex Ferguson, Eric Cantona and more pay tribute to an Old Trafford great in a hagiography, yet Charlton is a man of such decency and dignity that it’s hard to object. GT Dial M for Murder (1954) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 1.15pm  It’s not quite on the same plane of brilliance as Vertigo, but Hitchcock’s adaptation of Frederick Knott’s stage play is still a briskly efficient exercise in suspense. Tony Wendice (Ray Milland) is trying to have his socialite wife Margot (Grace Kelly) murdered, after she has an affair with a writer. When Tony’s first plan fails, he dreams up another that’s even more devious. This Sporting Life (1963) ★★★★ London Live, 8.00pm  It’s Yorkshire accents and monochrome realism as Richard Harris goes down the mines, plays rugby and has an affair. As an uncompromising portrait of male attitudes, Lindsay Anderson’s stunning adaptation of David Storey’s novel is like a punch to the gut, and a direct antecedent of Scorsese’s Raging Bull. Rachel Roberts (star of earlier kitchen sink drama Saturday Night and Sunday Morning) co-stars. The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (2013) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 11.05pm  Mild-mannered Walter Mitty’s life is controlled  by his overbearing mother. He finds his escape by imagining himself living in the worlds pictured on the covers of Life magazine  and becoming a pilot, a sea captain and couturier.  Ben Stiller directs and stars in this loose revamping of the James Thurber’s story: the result is a flawed but  still entertaining and enjoyable adventure. Monday 9 October At your service: Steph and Dom Parker Credit: Channel 4 Steph and Dom’s One Star to Five Star Channel 4, 5.30pm Daytime programming isn’t normally where we look for originality, so it comes as no surprise to find little in this new weekday show hosted by Steph and Dom Parker, those once, seemingly ever-sozzled breakout stars from Gogglebox. What there is, though, is fun and lots of it, even if at times it can be hard to tell whether it is intentional or not. Like the illegitimate offspring of Four in a Bed and any number of hackneyed Hotel Inspector-style shows, this series sees the Parkers take their own limited experience as B & B owners in Kent as proof that they know everything there is to know about the international hospitality industry and descend on an ailing hotel for a week with a view to making it marginally more appealing.  They begin with the dowdy Ransdale Hotel in Bridlington, a slightly tatty, underperforming establishment where they reckon seaside-themed rooms, kedgeree for breakfast and a party atmosphere in the bar will get the occupancy levels up from the current “negligible”. Could getting the clientele drunk cause the approval ratings to peak? It’s probably more likely than the kedgeree. Gerard O’Donovan The Human Body: Secrets of Your Life Revealed BBC Two, 9.00pm In the series’ concluding part, Chris and Xand van Tulleken explore how experiences shape our minds and bodies, and show for the very first time how memories are formed in the brain and continue to influence us throughout our lives.  Tunes for Tyrants: Music and Power with Suzy Klein BBC Four, 9.00pm In this edition of the documentary series, Suzy Klein explores the Thirties and how classical music, while it was exploited to idealise violent nationalism and prop up the totalitarian regimes of the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany, was also be a source of coded resistance. Liar ITV, 9.00pm In a torrid penultimate episode, Laura (Joanne Froggatt) convinces ex-boyfriend Tom (Warren Brown) to help bring Andrew Earlham (Ioan Gruffudd) to justice as she’s forced to resort to a somewhat unusual method of forcing a confession out of him. W1A BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI This is a terrific edition of the sitcom. As the crisis over the axing of the BBC’s Big Swing Band goes viral, Head of Values Ian Fletcher (Hugh Bonneville) once again finds himself caught in the media cross-hairs.  The Vietnam War BBC Four, 10.00pm & 10.55pm Another double helping of Ken Burns’s stately and impeccably researched history of the Vietnam War rolls us on through 1967 when, with casualties mounting and the Viet Cong striking back in the infamous Tet offensive, a US victory looked increasingly beyond reach. Timewasters ITV2, 10.00pm & 10.30pm ITV2 launches a season of new comedies with this sharply scripted sitcom about a struggling four-piece jazz band who get stuck in Twenties London when their time machine breaks down. GO After the News ITV, 10.45pm; NI, 12.45am; not STV; Wales, 11.15pm Current affairs presenters Emma Barnett and Nick Ferrari are hot tickets just now following some hard-hitting “holiday cover” hosting on Newsnight this summer. Now ITV has signed them up for this new nightly debate show that takes its subject matter straight from ITV News at Ten. After the unmitigated flop of The Nightly Show, ITV will be keen to for this to shine. GO Pimpernel Smith (1941, b/w) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 3.50pm  Leslie Howard, famed for his role in Gone with the Wind, directs and stars in this deft drama set in 1939 Berlin. An academic (Howard) recruits students to go to Europe under the guise of an archaeological dig. However, his real mission is to smuggle victims of Nazi persecution out of Germany. An absorbing film and, retrospectively, quite haunting since Howard was shot down in the war by a Nazi plane two years later. The Birth of a Nation (2016) ★★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 4.10pm and daily  Writer-director-star Nate Parker’s attempt to reappropriate the notorious racism of DW Griffith’s 1915 foundation myth and spin it on its axis is a graceless, pretentious mallet to the head of history. Parker (whose galvanising performance is much the strongest) tells the story of Nat Turner’s 1831 slave rebellion from the side of the true victims. Se7en (1995) ★★★★★ ITV4, 10.00pm  Gluttony, avarice, envy, sloth, wrath, lust and pride; the seven deadly sins are explored graphically, and imaginatively, in this gloomy thriller from director David Fincher. It follows a detective (an outstanding Morgan Freeman) and his rookie partner (Brad Pitt) on the hunt for a maniac who kills those guilty of the above vices. Brutal and gripping, with an ending you won’t forget in a hurry. Gwyneth Paltrow and Kevin Spacey co-star. Tuesday 10 October In the field: Michelle Keegan as Georgie Lane Credit: BBC Our Girl: Nepal Tour BBC One, 9.00pm Michelle Keegan returns as dedicated army medic Georgie Lane in Tony Grounds’s entertaining if soapy army drama. This time the main action is in Nepal, where Georgie and the rest of 2 Section, including Ben Aldridge’s patrician Captain Charles James, are posted to provide humanitarian relief following an earthquake.  This being Our Girl, the personal relationships are as important as the action and Georgie soon finds herself having a perfectly arched eyebrow-off with new recruit Maisie Richards (the excellent Shalom Brune-Franklin). Yet behind the jokes there are serious points raised about the way in which the army operates, and whether individualism ever has a place. Fans of the will they/won’t they romance between Georgie and her slick former fiancé Elvis (Luke Pasqualino) will be disappointed by how little the latter features in this opening episode (just one brief scene in Syria before the main action begins), although Rudi Dharmalingam gallantly steps into the breach as impassioned NGO worker Milan. The real joy, however, comes not from the plot twists but from the expert way in which Grounds captures both the banter and boredom of army life. Sarah Hughes Once Upon a Time Netflix, from today This popular fantasy series that follows fairy-tale characters living in the real world returns for its seventh season. It marks a reboot of sorts, with our now-adult hero Henry Mills (Jared S Gilmore) finding himself in the same position as when the story began. The Great British Bake Off Channel 4, 8.00pm The cooking competition continues to roll out new themes, with this episode marking the first Italian Week. But you can be sure that it won’t have anything to do with making a bog-standard spag bol. Unfortunately the weather is not on their side, as the contestants suffer in the hottest temperatures ever recorded in the tent. Russia 1917: Countdown to Revolution BBC Two, 9.00pm Juliet Stevenson narrates this insightful documentary made to mark the centenary of the Russian Revolution. Martin Amis, Orlando Figes and Helen Rappaport are among those discussing and recounting how Russia transitioned from a tsarist autocracy to become the first communist state – and the roles played by Lenin, Trotsky and Stalin. Concorde: A Supersonic Story BBC Four, 9.00pm The Concorde was considered the “most glamorous plane ever built” – until it was retired in 2003 following the crash of Air France Flight 4590. But its story is a fascinating one. Sophie Okonedo narrates this tale of rows between French and British governments, while former passengers recount queuing for the lavatory with celebrities.  The Deuce Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Vincent (James Franco) is putting the finishing touches to his new bar, in this third episode of the gritty, Seventies New York-set drama. But then an unexpected silent partner turns up. CG Celebrity Hunted Channel 4, 9.15pm The real-life thriller returns for a celebrity charity edition. Anneka Rice and former Strictly winner Jay McGuiness are among those attempting to avoid detection.  Later Live… with Jools Holland BBC Two, 10.00pm; N Ireland, 11.15pm Former Led Zeppelin singer Robert Plant performs live with his band Sensational Space Shifters. He’s joined by Beck, with songs from his first new album in three years. Catherine Gee Ice Age: Continental Drift (2012) ★★☆☆☆ E4, 8.00pm Surprisingly, the Ice Age series has accrued more lucre than Pixar’s Toy Story trilogy. But this fourth film is the thinnest and redeemed only by a demented squirrel. Once again, the story revolves around Manny the mammoth (Ray Romano), Sid the sloth (John Leguizamo) and Diego the smilodon (Denis Leary), who are separated from their herd thanks to the shifting of the Earth’s land masses. Southpaw (2015) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Jake Gyllenhaal lays his body on the line for 0a boxing drama so predictable that you could set your watch by it. If only someone had devoted equivalent stamina to the screenplay, we might have an actual movie on our hands. Nevertheless, it’s rousingly entertaining as Gyllenhaal’s Billy “The Great” Hope learns the art of subterfuge from a new coach (Forest Whitaker). Rachel McAdams co-stars. I Origins (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film 4, 11.25pm  Eyes and souls have been cinematically intertwined since at least 1929, when, in Un Chien Andalou, Buñuel and Dalí carved out their visionary manifesto with the quick swipe of a razor blade across a plump and oozing eyeball. In Mike Cahill’s film, the metaphor trots off down a strange and lyrical new trail when a biology student (Michael Pitt) encounters a model (Astrid Bergès-Frisbey) who makes him question scientific fact. Wednesday 11 October Not sitting well: David Mitchell as Stephen Credit: Channel 4 Back Channel 4, 10.00pm The ratings may have been a little underwhelming, but in contrast to David Mitchell and Robert Webb’s tonally uncertain and muddled Ambassadors, Back has been a triumph. Simon Blackwell’s often brutal, witheringly funny script has granted the leading men roles that riff on their Peep Show personas of Mark and Jez without ever becoming beholden to them. Prodigal foster son Andrew’s (Webb) victory over biological offspring Stephen (Mitchell) is apparently complete, as the former struts around his flourishing gastropub, bragging about his chef’s clafoutis while the latter moulders in a caravan. “He’s stolen my life and he’s living it better than me,” Stephen fumes, impotently. Their father’s memorial party – and the associated speeches – offer Stephen one final shot at redemption: when a clutch of other returning foster children eclipse Andrew’s efforts to ingratiate himself, Stephen has a revelation that sends him on a demented trip of vengeance to fill the gaps in his rival’s life story. Finding profound bathos in often gasp-inducing misanthropy and reuniting the best British double act around (pace Vic and Bob), Back undoubtedly merits a return. Gabriel Tate The Apprentice BBC One, 9.00pm Enjoying a new lease of life after a disappointing series last year, reality TV’s version of an extended job interview this week unleashes the candidates’ aesthetic pretensions by asking them to turn interior designers at a five-star hotel. The mind boggles at the bills that needed settling at the end of this particular stay. The Detectives: Murder on the Streets BBC Two, 9.00pm This utterly involving and consistently impressive documentary series comes to a climax with the arrival of the trial in the case of the murder of young homeless man Daniel Smith. This is true crime of the most empathetic and socially responsible kind. Britain’s Lost Masterpieces BBC Four, 9.00pm Dr Bendor Grosvenor and Emma Dabiri visit Carmathenshire County Museum, home to a damaged portrait of a 16th-century Earl whose provenance is disputed. Doc Martin ITV, 9.00pm Receptionist Morwenna’s (Jessica Ransom) parents pay her a surprise visit and present Doc Martin (Martin Clunes) with a dilemma as the amiable comedy drama ambles through another hour. Ray Donovan Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Susan Sarandon has been both a welcome addition and much-needed counterpart to this occasionally testosterone-heavy series, with Liev Schreiber’s eponymous heavy facing the repercussions of years of making enemies in high places. Norskov Channel 4, 10.35pm The titular Danish industrial port is blighted by a drug problem. Enter ace detective Tom Noack (Thomas Levin), an old acquaintance of the city’s mayor to clean the place up and, inevitably, disturb a few ghosts. It’s a slick Nordic noir – the whole series will be available on C4’s online service Walter Presents after this episode airs. GT Inside Birmingham Children’s Hospital More4, 10.00pm The BBC and Channel 4 continue to match each other, blow for blow, with medical documentaries. This latest series follows a girl diagnosed with a life-changing condition, a boy with leukaemia and a five-year-old whose epilepsy is proving increasingly hard to manage. As so often, their stoicism and resilience are humbling and very affecting. GT Charade (1963) ★★★★☆ Film4, 4.35pm Audrey Hepburn as a temperamental-but-alluring damsel in distress and Cary Grant as a shadowy charmer are characters that the two actors played over and over during their careers. But they do so exceptionally in this suspense comedy from Stanley Donen, often referred to as the best Hitchcock movie that Hitchcock never made. Hepburn is the widow being trailed by four men hunting for her late husband’s stolen fortune. Starship Troopers (1997) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 10.00pm  On first appearances, this Oscar-nominated sci-fi action thriller looks distressingly silly: in the distant future, a group of American high-school friends join the armed forces to do intergalactic war with some malicious insectoid aliens, or “Bugs”. The whole of humanity is at risk. Thankfully director Paul Verhoeven deftly underpins the whole thing with wicked satirical verve and no-nonsense action. Dying Laughing (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Arts, 10.30pm  Dozens of stand-up comics, including Kevin Hart, Jerry Seinfeld and Amy Schumer, contribute to this understated but rather wonderful documentary film about the infrequent highs and relentless lows of trying to make people laugh. It can be painful – one anecdote about “bombing” on stage is particularly uncomfortable – but then a comic will recall that first great gig and you can just tell that all the anguish has been worth it. Thursday 12 October Every second counts: McDonald follows a murder investigation Credit: ITV An Hour to Catch a Killer with Trevor McDonald ITV, 9.00pm Trevor McDonald’s abiding fascination with such murky matters as serial murder and organised crime, especially in the United States, is well established. For the first programme in ITV’s new Crime and Punishment season, McDonald examines a key concept of modern crime detection: how the decisions made by investigating officers in the so-called “Golden Hour” – the first 60 minutes of a murder inquiry – have a vital impact on whether or not a killer is caught and successfully prosecuted. And here he examines a case much closer to home. With full access to the Northumbria Police Homicide Unit’s investigation into the murder of 24-year-old graduate Alice Ruggles last October, the film follows the case from the moment the murder was reported, through every layer of the investigation as it develops, to the moment the all-too-obvious prime suspect is located and charged.  Later in this series, Susannah Reid, Piers Morgan, Ross Kemp and, more randomly, Gordon Ramsay will present reports on subjects as diverse as the lucrative international cocaine trade and gang warfare inside the notorious Barlinnie Prison in Glasgow. Gerard O’Donovan Mr Robot Amazon Prime, from today Techno-paranoia is still the name of the game as the US hacker drama returns for a much-anticipated third series. With 10 new episodes to get through, clearly the first thing to sort out is the fate of the not-always-reliable narrator Elliot Alderson (Rami Malek), who was shot in last season’s cliffhanger. Dynasty Netflix, from today As in the original, bling, bubbles and bonking dominate this 22-episode reboot of one of the Eighties’ silliest US soap operas. Once again it follows the boardroom and bedroom escapades of Denver’s super-rich Carrington clan.  PGA Tour Golf: The CIMB Classic Sky Sports Main Event, 6.00am Coverage of the opening day’s play at the annual event from the Kuala Lumpur Golf & Country Club in Malaysia, where Justin Thomas has won the last two titles.  Council House Crackdown BBC One, 8.00pm Michelle Ackerley uncovers more tales of social housing fraud as council investigators stake out a woman suspected of faking a disability and a tenant alleged to be illegally subletting housing association property. Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm; BBC Two Wales, 9.00pm The final programme in this affecting series again focuses on the tough decisions the London Ambulance Service faces when its slim resources are stretched to capacity and calls must be prioritised. Russia with Simon Reeve BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 11.15pm This is by far the best travelogue Reeve has done for a while, and for this final leg, the adventurer starts in Crimea, where he weighs up the political and economic costs of its annexation by Russia. From there, he travels north through the vast plains of western Russia to where the country’s real power has always resided, Moscow and St Petersburg.  Educating Greater Manchester Channel 4, 9.00pm In tonight’s episode, it’s Valentine’s Day and romance is in the air for even the school’s youngest pupils. Plus, a recently qualified teacher who’s come to Harrop Fold looking for a new challenge gets more than he bargained for. GO The History of Comedy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This new documentary has an overambitious title for a series that focuses almost entirely on US comedy of fairly recent vintage. Still, it’s an interesting thematic survey of how certain types of laughter making have evolved in the last century. GO Titanic (1997) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm Eleven Oscars won and more than a billion dollars taken worldwide in ticket sales. James Cameron deserved his success with this opulent blockbuster about the sinking of the RMS Titanic, a story that has a grand romance between penniless artist Jack (Leonardo DiCaprio) and rich American girl Rose (Kate Winslet) at its heart. Even viewers determined to find it soppy are liable to be swept along by the emotion. Heist (2001) ★★★★☆ Sony Movie Channel, 10.50pm  Prepare to be triple-crossed, duped and bewildered by this piece of con-artistry, which pulls the rug out from under your feet with such regularity that it’s tempting just to give up and lie down. Gene Hackman, Danny DeVito and Rebecca Pidgeon set out to steal some gold; needless to say, it does not go smoothly. There are excellent performances, plus endless twists and cracking dialogue. Just Go with It (2011) ★★☆☆☆ 5STAR, 11.00pm  Adam Sandler stars in this remake of the 1971 comedy Cactus Flower (itself adapted from a Broadway stage play by Abe Burrows), as Danny, a single plastic surgeon in Los Angeles who feigns an unhappy marriage in order to have no-strings-attached flings with women. What follows is a complex low-grade romantic farce which is saved by a sparky performance from Jennifer Aniston as Danny’s office manager and best friend. Friday 13 October Life on the edge: Ray Mears is in Australia Credit: ITV Australian Wilderness with Ray Mears ITV, 8.00pm; not STV/UTV/Wales The great appeal of Ray Mears’s wildlife documentaries is his no-nonsense approach. Where other presenters rush around telling you how exciting and amazing and wonderful everything is, Mears tends to amble gently through it, explaining a few facts and otherwise allowing you to gaze at the beauty unfurling across your TV screen. It’s an approach that pays high dividends in this new series about the Australian wilderness, a landscape that is vast, beautiful and oddly eerie.  The opening episode focuses more on sea than land (although there is time for a quick trek through rocky desert towards the Indian Ocean) as Mears dives on Ningaloo Reef, the longest fringing coral reef in the world. After a pleasant meeting with some friendly stingrays and a few “wish you were here” shots of the turquoise sea, the real star of the show heaves into sight as Mears and his companions find themselves swimming alongside a passing whale shark, the largest fish in the world. “This is what we’ve all been waiting for,” says Mears as the fish floats into view. It’s a breathtaking, beautiful moment and one which manages to shake even Mears out of his habitual calm. Sarah Hughes Lore Amazon Prime, from today Not for the faint of heart, this disquieting new documentary series is based on Aaron Mahnke’s popular podcast of the same name, with each episode exploring the story behind pop culture’s most legendary horror myths, from vampires and werewolves to possessed dolls.  Mindhunter Netflix, from today Imagine Se7en crossed with Zodiac and Silence of the Lambs and you’ll get the gist of this excellent new detective drama executive produced by David Fincher and Charlize Theron. Based on the non-fiction book Mind Hunter: Inside the FBI’s Elite Serial Crime Unit and set in the late Seventies, it follows a pair of FBI agents (Jonathan Groff and Holt McCallany) who interview and analyse imprisoned mass murderers in order to better understand serial killers. The first episode, which is shot by master of murk Fincher, moves languidly – but is no less absorbing. PS International T20 Cricket: India v Australia Friday, Sky Sports Main Event, 2.20pm The Rajiv Gandhi International Stadium in Hyderabad is the setting as India and Australia contest the final game in a three-match T20 series. Unreported World Channel 4, 7.30pm On August 14, a mudslide in Sierra Leone, caused by torrential rain, destroyed the small town of Regent on the outskirts of the capital, Freetown. Hundreds lost their lives. In this affecting report, Seyi Rhodes talks to the survivors and the rescue teams desperately trying to find those still missing.  Crystal Maze / Have I Got News for You Channel 4, 8.00pm / BBC One, 9.00pm Richard Ayoade fans, rejoice: tonight you can see him twice – somewhat fitting given that he once wrote and directed a black comedy called The Double. First up, he continues to add warmth and irony to a rousing revamp of The Crystal Maze, as the current series concludes. Then, in HIGNFY, he puts that bone-dry wit to good use yet again, as he guest presents the long-running news quiz.  Cold Feet ITV, 9.00pm Affectionate writing and a great ensemble are the foundations on which Mark Bullen’s middle-aged comedy drama are built. Tonight, as this Nineties-show revival continues, Adam (James Nesbitt) and Pete (John Thomson) throw a joint 50th birthday dinner.  Porridge BBC One, 9.30pm  On the subject of revivals, this sort-of sequel to the classic Seventies comedy continues to be so-so. Tonight, there’s a new prison officer on the scene. Patrick Smith The Meyerowitz Stories (2017) ★★★★☆ Netflix, from today  It’s been a long time coming but Adam Sandler is finally in a good film. He plays Danny, a New Yorker whose unemployment and divorce has left him defined purely in terms of his bloodline. The narrative arc is about Danny, sister Jean and half-brother Matthew reconciling themselves with their curmudgeon father Harold (Dustin Hoffman). Emma Thompson is woozily uproarious as Harold’s wife. Lion (2016) ★★★★☆ Amazon Prime, from today Derived from a 2012 memoir by the grown Saroo Brierley, called A Long Way Home, this is the story of a lost boy: a five-year-old Indian who grew up in the Eighties in the area around Khandwa. With no paper trail or family name, he becomes a lost cause, eventually shipped off to kindly foster parents in Tasmania, played by Nicole Kidman and David Wenham. The excellent script, by Luke Davies, sticks rigidly to Saroo’s own point of view. Good Will Hunting (1997) ★★★★☆ W, 9.00pm  Matt Damon and Ben Affleck won an Oscar for Best Screenplay with this stirring if occasionally gloopy story. Will Hunting (Damon) is a hot-headed, 20-year-old janitor with a photographic memory and an untapped genius for mathematics. Robin Williams plays the inspiring therapist who channels Will’s rage into solving quadratics, and Minnie Driver is his brainy, Harvard graduate love interest.   Television previewers Catherine Gee, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV: The Last Post and Live Formula 1: Malaysia Grand Prix

Sunday 1 October The Last Post BBC One, 9.00pm This intriguing six-part drama, scripted by playwright Peter Moffat, is set against an unusual backdrop – the mid-Sixties conflict that took place in the then British Crown Colony of Aden on the southern Arabian peninsula. Jessica Raine is the star attraction in the bad-girl role of Alison, the drunken, unhappy and unfaithful wife of conscientious but undervalued military policeman Lieutenant Ed Laithwaite (Stephen Campbell Moore).  The atmosphere of unrelenting heat and dust is very well conveyed, as is the day-to-day tedium of life for military wives on a Royal Military Police base and the hierarchies of rank that must be observed. We get the full introduction in this opening episode as newlyweds Captain Joe Martin (Jeremy Neumark Jones) and his wife Honor (Jessie Buckley) arrive on the base as the going-away party for the popular man he’s replacing, Captain Page (Joseph Kennedy), is in full swing. Meanwhile, Laithwaite receives information that an attack on the base by rebel fighters is imminent, but his commanding officer, Major Markham (Ben Miles) refuses to take his warnings seriously. What happens next is not as obvious as you might expect. Gerard O’Donovan Live Formula 1: Malaysia Grand Prix Sky Sports Main Event & Channel 4, 7.35am The 19th Grand Prix in this country will also be its last, as the Malaysian government withdraws funding for the Sepang circuit. Drivers had to endure the challenge of racing in 50-degree heat, with hydration as important as a full tank. Lewis Hamilton will be hoping to increase his lead in the championship with another victory, but a mix of unpredictable weather and a track known for its sharp corners should ensure that this Grand Prix keeps throwing up surprises right until the very end. Live NFL: New Orleans Saints v Miami Dolphins BBC Two, 1.45pm Wembley Stadium is the setting again for the NFL, having hosted Jacksonville Jaguars’ 44-7 demolition of the Baltimore Ravens last weekend. This will be a fourth trip to Wembley for the Dolphins, who appeared in the first International Series game here in 2007 when they lost 13-10 to the New York Giants, while their most recent appearance saw them defeated 27-14 by the New York Jets in 2015. The Saints have less experience of playing at Wembley, but did register a 37-32 win over the then-San Diego Chargers in 2008, in their only previous trip to the UK.  Live Premier League Rugby Union: Wasps v Bath BT Sport 1, 2.15pm The new season has turned sour for both teams, and Wasps are keen to avoid their third successive defeat. If history is an indicator they should have the upper hand, having won their last four matches against Bath – the most recent of which finished 24-3, with two tries from Kurtley Beale helping them on their way. The visitors come into this match on the back of an agonising 33-32 defeat to Newcastle Falcons, who scored twice in the last 15 minutes to come from behind in a nine-try thriller. Cornwall’s Native Poet: Charles Causley BBC Four, 8.00pm This documentary, the first of three films from the BBC’s Contains Strong Language poetry strand, celebrates the life and work of Charles Causley, a Cornish poet so deeply rooted in the county that he only left his home town of Launceston once, for naval service in the Second World War. Escape Channel 4, 8.00pm There are five people stranded in the middle of a desert following a plane crash. They have one chance of survival: creating another vehicle from the plane wreckage. That’s the premise of this new series in which five engineers are challenged to use their ingenuity and skill to escape a tricky situation. Men Who Sleep in Cars BBC Four, 9.00pm Scripted entirely in verse, poet Michael Symmons Roberts’s film is a love song to the city of Manchester. It tells the poignant story of three rough sleepers whose impoverished lives are seen in contrast to the great wealth of the city. With Maxine Peake. Electric Dreams:The Commuter Channel 4, 9.00pm The third story in this enjoyable series based on sci-fi pioneer Philip K Dick’s stories stars Timothy Spall as a railway attendant with a sad home life. But when he meets a mysterious traveller, he is forced to choose between fantasy and reality. Dawn French Live: 30 Million Minutes BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 10.55pm; Wales, 10.45pm Recorded last year in London’s West End, this is the actress and comedian’s live solo show, inspired by the tough but entertaining lessons she’s learnt from life.  Child in Mind BBC Four, 10.00pm Simon Armitage has a talent for making powerfully poetic television. Here he mixes documentary footage and verse to give a voice to the dispossessed women in Britain, the mothers of the 3,000 children placed in care every year. GO Boris Johnson: Blond Ambition Channel 4, 10.05pm After a period of calm, the Boris bandwagon is gathering speed once again following the publication of his vision for a post-Brexit Britain in The Telegraph. Here Channel 4’s political editor Gary Gibbon looks back at Johnson’s 14 months as Foreign Secretary, assessing his impact and success on the world stage. GO Happy Feet (2006) ★★★★☆ ITV2, 3.45pm  Australian director George Miller won a Best Animated Feature Oscar for this entertaining believe-in-yourself animation. Mumble, a misfit emperor penguin (baby voice by Elizabeth Daily, adult voice by Elijah Wood) is causing his parents (voiced by Nicole Kidman and Jackman) concern because he can’t sing and is therefore unable to attract a mate. Mumble can tap-dance, though, and therein lies his salvation. A United Kingdom (2016) ★★★★☆   Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm  Amma Asante’s film retells a true story that took place simultaneously in the corridors of Westminster and the country now known as Botswana just over half a century ago. It’s about the inter-racial romance between English woman Ruth (Rosamund Pike) and Seretse (David Oyelowo), the future king. It’s stirring stuff and a chapter of history that rewards a close reading. Memphis Belle (1990) ★★★☆☆☆ ITV4, 9.05pm  It’s 1943, and the handsome American crew of Second World War B-17 bomber Memphis Belle, who are stationed in England, are anticipating their final mission – to fly over Nazi-occupied Europe. Full of nostalgia, this loosely based-on-real-events story exudes a romanticised view of heroism, but features an endearing cast, including Billy Zane, Sean Astin,John Lithgow, Eric Stoltz, and Harry Connick Jr. Monday 2 October The curmudgeon returns: Larry David is back after six years Credit: HBO/Skt Curb Your Enthusiasm Sky Atlantic, 10.00pm Cometh the hour, cometh the curmudgeon. It’s been six years since we last saw the irascible Larry David and the rest of his gang of malcontents, and this return is something of a surprise delight given that David had previously claimed to have mined every last possible drop from his alter-ego’s grumpy loathing of modern life.  No previews were available for this opening episode, which is not a surprise seeing as David has always run a tight ship regarding spoilers and HBO went into lockdown after episodes were leaked during the summer. So what can we expect? Bryan Cranston joins the cast as Larry’s new therapist, the wonderful double act of Ted Danson and Mary Steenburgen return, and David has promised that we’ll uncover just what happened after Larry left for Paris with perpetual house guest Leon (the scene-stealing J B Smoove). “It’s been a five-year log-jam of indignities and violations of etiquette,” executive producer Jeff Schaffer told Variety and it’s true that Curb’s return seems particularly suited to our current times. “Every day confirms, more and more, he’s right! He’s right about everything,” noted David. One thing is certain: it’ll be fun finding out if that’s true. Sarah Hughes Race and Pace: The West Indians in East Lancashire BBC Four, 7.30pm When West Indian cricketers began to arrive in Lancashire, the Northern county was hit for six. This enlightening documentary, narrated by Death in Paradise’s Don Warrington, tells the story of how initial reticence and racism turned into an unlikely cricketing love affair. Among those recalling their experiences are knights of the cricketing order, Viv Richards and Wes Hall, who also discuss the huge impact West Indian players made on the LCC and the resulting effect it had on both sides of the Atlantic over the past 90 years. Tunes for Tyrants: Music & Power with Suzy Klein BBC Four, 9.00pm Presented by Suzy Klein, this documentary is an exploration of music’s crucial political role in the most turbulent years of the 20th century. It begins with the Radio 3 presenter looking at the years following the Russian Revolution and the First World War when music was seen as a tool to change society. CM Liar ITV, 9.00pm After last week’s revelation, the William brothers’ potboiler continues apace. In the fourth episode, dogged “rape victim” Laura Nielson (Joanne Froggatt) travels to Edinburgh to find out how Andrew Earlham’s (Ioan Gruffudd) wife’s really died. Paddington Station 24/7 Channel 5, 9.00pm Watching this behind-the-scenes look at London’s Paddington Station, you can understand why rail passengers become frustrated by the service. In this episode, the staff have to deal with signal problems during rush hour. Later, a team of engineers race to replace 60 ft of rail hours before the morning rush begins. W1A BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI John Morton’s parody of life inside Broadcasting House always manages to find big laughs in unusual circumstances. Tonight, the Renewal Team propose to get rid of the BBC Big Swing Band, and marketing guru Siobhan (the excellent Jessica Hynes) decides to make a trailer to launch the YouTube-like BBC ME.  Stacey Dooley Investigates: Mums Selling Their Kids for Sex BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm; Scot, 11.45pm In this disturbing film, previously shown on BBC Three, Dooley is in the Philippines to investigate mothers who sexually exploit their children live on the web. Clive Morgan Ace Ventura: Pet Detective (1994) ★★★☆☆☆ 5STAR, 8.00pm  Back in 1994, Jim Carrey went from near obscurity to starring in three hits in a year. The first was this very funny comedy about a zany pet detective who finds himself out of his depth (the others were The Mask and Dumb & Dumber). Here, he’s hired by Miami’s NFL team to track down their mascot, a bottlenose dolphin named Snowflake, before the Super Bowl. Courteney Cox co-stars as the team’s publicist. Moulin Rouge! (2001) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 8.00pm  Baz Luhrmann’s intoxicating spectacle was the first musical to be nominated for the Best Picture Oscar in 22 years. Set in 1899, Montmartre, it follows a poet (Ewan McGregor) who becomes love-struck with the city’s famous courtesan (Nicole Kidman, who enters the film on a bejazzled swing). The mix of period setting and contemporary pop ensure a vivid assault on the senses. The Specialist (1994) ★★☆☆☆ ITV4, 10.00pm  Sharon Stone slinks around Sylvester Stallone in this celebrity vehicle that garnered a lot of attention, at the time of release, for its sex scene. Stallone plays a former CIA bomb expert hired by Stone to destroy the Mob that killed her family. Supporting actor James Woods remains unscathed in a film full of giant explosions, silly plot twists, and Rod Steiger trying out a Cuban accent (indecipherable and hilarious). Tuesday 3 October Caught in the middle: Suranne Jones and Tom Taylor Credit: BBC Doctor Foster BBC One, 9.00pm Handbrake turns have become the norm in the extraordinary second series of Mike Bartlett’s ripe melodrama, with showdown following showdown, passive aggression increasingly supplanted by straightforward aggression, and twists galore threatening a lurch into the territory of Fatal Attraction, only in reverse. The Fosters are in disarray – Simon (Bertie Carvel) is estranged from his second family and income stream, while Gemma (Suranne Jones) is concerned that her actions have pushed away their son (Tom Taylor, the show’s unsung star). We left Gemma driving at speed towards Simon – what happens next remains under wraps, but suffice to say that the most unexpected twist in tonight’s conclusion is one of tone: from operatic melodrama (albeit sustained by brilliant performances) into sombre contemplation – the fallout after the explosion. Flashbacks illustrate both the affection once at the heart of the family and a failure to meet the needs of its most vulnerable member. The door is left wide open for a third series; it’s been fun, but has strained credibility – it might be wise to emulate the Doctor Foster of the nursery rhyme and never go there again. Gabriel Tate Rodney Carrington: Here Comes the Truth Netflix, from 12.01am Rodney Carrington’s stand-up is an unapologetically crude assault on political correctness (his material ranges from Muslims to his manhood), but, undeniably, he has a big following in the US. This recording from his most recent tour will establish whether this acquired taste is also yours. The Great British Bake Off Channel 4, 8.00pm With the chancers and fudgers departed, Prue Leith and Paul Hollywood have a smorgasbord of class acts from which to choose as Pastry Week dawns: the showstopper sees the bakers attempt a pie with a difference. Reformation: Europe’s Holy War BBC Two, 9.00pm Once inescapable, David Starkey now makes infrequent appearances on TV; which is just as well, given a little of his strident controversialism generally goes a long way. Here, he’s on entertaining form exploring the malign forces unleashed by the Protestant Reformation some 500 years ago – and their modern parallels. Sex, Chips and Poetry: 50 Years of the Mersey Sound BBC Four, 9.00pm In 1967, the same year that The Beatles released Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, fellow Liverpudlians Roger McGough, Brian Patten and Adrian Henri took the spoken-word revolution started by the Beat Poets and transformed it into something uniquely British. This amiable and richly deserved tribute documentary, narrated by Isy Suttie, celebrates the 50th anniversary of their work on The Mersey Sound, one of the best-selling poetry anthologies of all time, which is still a mainstay on school syllabuses. GT Barbie: the Most Famous Doll in the World Channel 4, 9.15pm Mary Portas visits toymaker Mattel, attends conventions and talks to children in a bid to make sense of a doll blamed for entrenching everything from everyday sexism to unrealistic body images. How can an apparently outmoded icon be reinvented for the modern age? The Insider: Reggie Yates in a Refugee Camp BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm; Scot, 11.45pm In this documentary, first shown on BBC Three, Reggie Yates spends a week in Iraq’s largest refugee camp, where he lives alongside 30,000 displaced Syrians facing an uncertain future. GT The Karate Kid (2010) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.15pm  To most people’s surprise, this is a more-than-satisfying update on the much-loved original, though also comes across as an extended tourism advert. Jaden Smith (son of Will) plays a 12-year-old who moves from Detroit to Beijing with his mother (Taraji P Henson). There he becomes a punching bag for local bullies, but makes a new friend in a maintenance man and martial arts master Mr Han (Jackie Chan), who teaches him how to fight. Ice Age 3: Dawn of the Dinosaurs (2009) ★★★☆☆ E4, 8.00pm  This is comfortably the best in the Ice Age series and solid children’s entertainment, but you may need to explain that dinosaurs didn’t live in a vast hothouse under the glaciers, and woolly mammoths called Manny probably weren’t on chummy terms with sabre-toothed tigers called Diego. Here, the gang head to a tropical lost world to rescue Sid the Sloth (John Leguizamo). 22 Jump Street (2014) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 9.00pm  Channing Tatum’s charisma and the best malapropisms ever make this sequel to 21 Jump Street a joy. Instead of infiltrating school to arrest the suppliers of a drug, Jonah Hill’s Schmidt and Tatum’s Jenko infiltrate college to do… exactly the same. The film is directed by Phil Lord and Christopher Miller (The Lego Movie) who are becoming the handiest duo since the Coen brothers. Wednesday 4 October Back in business: Lord Sugar (centre) with Karren Brady and Claude Littner Credit: BBC The Apprentice BBC One, 9.00pm Thirteen series in and we all know by now that The Apprentice is not so much a search for the brightest and best new business entrepreneurs, but an exercise in finding the one polishable, er, apple in a barrelful of “pony and trap” as adept cockney rhymer Lord Sugar puts it. And what fun it still is watching all those overinflated young egos being cut down to size by the process.  This time 18 candidates vie for the prize of £250,000 start-up capital, and just to remind the wannabe tycoons what a great opportunity they’re being given, Lord Sugar marches five previous winners into the boardroom to beguile them with tales of success.  The opening challenge, though, couldn’t be more basic: making burgers and flogging them on the street. Which is not to say there isn’t lots of room for error and unfathomably gross stupidity, too. In fact, you’re pretty much guaranteed to spend most of this show slapping your forehead at the unadulterated ineptitude of some of these self-proclaimed geniuses. In other words, a great start to what looks like being another hilarious series with, as ever, The Apprentice: You’re Fired following, at 10pm on BBC Two. Gerard O’Donovan Who Do You Think You Are? BBC One, 8.00pm Some editions of this latest series have felt less like journeys of discovery and more like genetic quests. Here, comedian Ruby Wax sets out to discover whether her mental health issues might have been evident earlier in her family line. Billion Dollar Deals and How They Changed Your World BBC Two, 8.00pm Yes, it’s a conspiracy. In the second programme of his absorbing series about how the world is ruled not by politicians but by decisions made in corporate boardrooms, Jacques Peretti considers why big business is currently so determined to kill off cash.  The Detectives: Murder on the Streets BBC Two, 9.00pm “It not like the Seventies. It’s not about slapping people. It’s about what you disclose to the person.” The art of tripping suspects up in their own lies inches Manchester police ever closer to solving two brutal killings in this nail-biting real-life crime series. Britain’s Lost Masterpieces BBC Four, 9.00pm Bendor Grosvenor and Emma Dabiri head to the Derby Museum to investigate a painting that suffered an unusually poor early restoration. Could it be a work by the great 18th-century British master, Joseph Wright of Derby, and if so can it be returned to its former glory?  The Great War in Numbers Yesterday, 9.00pm Think of the First World War and it’s the millions of lives lost in the trenches that come to mind. But, as this documentary series reveals, everything about the Great War was on a scale previously unparalleled: machine guns in millions, artillery shells in billions, the mind-boggling logistics of keeping vast numbers of men fed, clothed and fighting fit in the field. Tonight’s first film of six explores how the empires of Germany, France, Russia and Britain were able to pour so much wealth into the industrialisation of warfare. GO Back Channel 4, 10.00pm Fate just seems to get crueller for Stephen (David Mitchell) when Andrew (Robert Webb) manages to increase his share in the pub. But then Alison (Olivia Poulet) uncovers information that could yet force the cuckoo out of the family nest. GO Mercury Rising (1998) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm  Bruce Willis is excellent as an undercover FBI agent assigned to protect a nine-year-old autistic boy (Miko Hughes) who is targeted by assassins after cracking a top secret government code in this underrated, if slightly unrealistic, thriller based on the Ryne Douglas Pearson novel Simon Says. The plot moves at breakneck speed yet, ultimately, it’s a touching and heart-warming story. The Football Factory (2004) ★★★☆☆ London Live, 10.00pm  John King’s book The Football Factory is an unnerving and brutal account of hooliganism in the Nineties, centring on a firm of Chelsea boot boys and their clashes with rival “fans”. Nick Love’s film certainly captures the thuggery, with Danny Dyer as Tommy, for whom life is about drink, drugs, sex, thieving and a good ruck – but who begins to question his ways. Made in France (2015) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.00pm  This thriller, about a wave of jihadist attacks on Paris, was pulled from cinemas following its plot’s number of unnerving parallels with recent events in the French capital. In it, an extremist cell plans a series of shootings and bombings across the city “that will shake France” and the world. Director Nicholas Boukhrief said he made the film to counter the “poison” of jihadist propaganda. Thursday 5 October Fire safety: in the wake of the Grenfell Tower disaster Credit: PA The Housing Enforcers BBC One, 8.00pm; BBC Two Wales, 7.00pm “Everyone has a right to a safe place to live, no matter who you are, where you live or how much rent you pay. It’s non-negotiable.” So concludes Matt Allwright at the end of this programme focusing on the importance of fire safety.  The format is straightforward: Allwright travels across the country meeting with housing officers and examining the myriad ways in which fires can destroy lives. What makes this really hit home, however, is the presenter’s quiet fury at the way in which some lives are considered less worthy than others. Inevitably, the shadow of Grenfell Tower hangs heavy over the hour. It’s notable that many of those worst affected are elderly and living alone: the story of fiercely independent Ali who refuses to acknowledge, even to his family, quite how much he is struggling is particularly poignant. Allwright, however, saves his most righteous rage for the landlords squeezing tenants in wherever they can and failing to meet even the minimum health and safety standards. The result is a hard-hitting and often hard-to-watch documentary, which also offers solid advice on how to deal both with fires and bad landlords. Sarah Hughes Live International Football: England v Slovenia ITV, 7.30pm Having drawn 0-0 last October, with Joe Hart forced to make a string of fine saves, England and Slovenia reconvene at Wembley. Victory today for Gareth Southgate’s men will ensure their qualification for next year’s World Cup in Russia. And having beaten second-placed Slovakia 2-1 last month, thanks to a strike from tyro Marcus Rashford, they’ll be confident of doing just that. The Big Family Cooking Showdown BBC Two, 8.00pm Two last families go head to head for a place in the finals. Their £10 challenge is a Friday night takeaway, so naturally curry is on the menu. There’s talk of “fusion” cooking, some mushy spinach and a 34-year-old rolling pin.   Discovering: Laurence Olivier Sky Arts, 8.00pm The spotlight turns on Laurence Olivier, who, in 1937, described cinema as an “anaemic little medium which could not stand great acting”.   Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm The work of the West Midlands Ambulance Service continues as a specialist trauma team are dispatched to a motorbike accident where a man has suffered a catastrophic chest injury. “I’ve got nothing…” declares the doctor. It’s a stark reminder of the fragility of life and the increasing compassion of the services in times of chaos.    Russia with Simon Reeve BBC Two, 9.00pm Simon Reeve continues his fascinating journey, meeting Tuvan children in Siberia who practice the Mongolian tradition of throat singing.  Educating Greater Manchester Channel 4, 9.00pm Ah, that old chestnut – ignoring school uniform rules. This week, the teachers at Harrop Fold are on the back foot when a message is spread on Snapchat encouraging pupils to come in wearing trainers. Social media also causes friction between Year 11 girls Serena and Lelo when one talks to the other’s boyfriend on FaceTime. Rachel Ward Law & Order True Crime: The Menendez murders Sky Living, 9.00pm This series, similar to The People v OJ Simpson, takes a closer look at the two trials of brothers Lyle and Erik Menendez, who were convicted of murdering their parents in their Beverly Hills home in 1989. It focuses on the attorney (Edie Falco), who was one of their few defenders. Dimension 404 Syfy, 9.00pm Each episode of this new sci-fi anthology features a form of technology gone wrong. But there’s nothing unnerving about it, rather it’s a camp pastiche of The Twilight Zone, complete with Star Wars’ Mark Hamill providing the voice-over. Glee’s Lea Michele stars in the first episode about online dating. It’s weird, but it doesn’t overplay it. RW Robin and Marian (1976) ★★★★☆ Film4, 1.10pm  Sean Connery gives one of his best performances as a middle-aged Robin Hood, who heads home to Sherwood Forest after the death of Richard I. He finds that scaling a castle wall isn’t as easy as it used to be, Maid Marian (Audrey Hepburn) is still miffed at being left in the lurch, and the Sheriff (Robert Shaw) is up to his old tricks in Richard Lester’s good-natured romance. Look out for Ronnie Barker as Friar Tuck. Jerry Maguire (1996) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 5.40pm  In Cameron Crowe’s macho romcom, Tom Cruise plays a sports agent who has an attack of conscience and urges his colleagues to think about the welfare of their clients. He’s duly fired but announces that he’ll start his own agency. A washed-up footballer (Cuba Gooding Jr) and a single mother (Renée Zellweger) are the only ones who agree to go with him. Here, the classic quote, “You had me at ‘hello’” was born. The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.10pm Clint Eastwood directs and stars in this marvellous warm-hearted western adapted from Forrest Carter’s novel and set during the American Civil War. Eastwood plays the eponymous Missouri farmer who, driven by memories of his family’s slaughter, becomes an outlaw when he refuses to join his Confederate comrades in surrender, in favour of seeking revenge on the men who murdered his kin. Friday 6 October Penal colony: Harry Peacock, Kevin Bishop and Ricky Grover Credit: BBC Porridge BBC One, 9.30pm The most successful of the BBC’s classic sitcom revivals from last year, Porridge returns for a full series with the series’ creators Dick Clement and Ian La Frenais once again on board. It finds Nigel Norman Fletcher (Kevin Bishop as the grandson of Ronnie Barker’s character, Norman Stanley) locking horns with officer Meekie (Mark Bonnar) while aiding or outsmarting the prison’s ne’er-do-wells. In a canny twist, it is Fletch who is now the relative ingénue in his cell, seeking counsel from veteran lag Joe Lotterby (Dave Hill). We find Fletch as the prison’s resident Cyrano de Bergerac, writing letters to keep the flame of romance alive between assorted inmates and their partners on the outside. All goes well until Fletch suffers a crisis of conscience that threatens the whole operation. Some of the gags are groanworthy, but Clement and La Frenais’s mastery of sitcom mechanics remains complete; their presence keeps the spirit of the original intact, while the update means that no one is attempting to emulate the cast of the Seventies series. Fletch has a five-year sentence to serve; unlikely as it might seem, a similar term for Porridge might not be unwelcome. Gabriel Tate Suburra: the Series Netflix, from 12.01am Like Romanzo Criminale and Gomorrah before it, Suburra began life as a book before becoming a gripping, multifaceted Italian-language political thriller. This 10-part series, set in the dying days of Berlusconi’s regime, explores the themes of politics, the Church and corruption during 20 tumultuous days in Rome. Unreported World Channel 4, 7.30pm Ireland faces a pivotal referendum on the decriminalisation of abortion in certain circumstances; Kate Hardie-Buckley meets those on both sides of the debate in a deeply affecting edition of the current-affairs series. Modern Family Sky1, 8.30pm It may have tailed off since its peak, but Modern Family is still good for a few laughs. The ninth series begins with Jay (Ty Burrell) taking the family on a houseboat holiday, and Mitchell (Jesse Tyler Ferguson) encountering an old flame. Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm; not N Ireland or Wales Monty Don begins preparations for 2018 by advising others on how to use leaf mould as a mulch. Elsewhere, Adam Frost visits a community allotment in Manchester, and Nick Bailey learns from a zoologist about the life teeming in the soil. Nile Rodgers: How to Make It in the Music Business BBC Four, 9.00pm Guitar genius and pop producer Nile Rodgers shares the wisdom he’s acquired over decades in the music business. In the first episode, he discusses the founding of Chic and his influence on today’s hitmakers. GT Cold Feet ITV, 9.00pm Karen (Hermione Norris) is on the brink of financial disaster in spite of David’s (Robert Bathurst) assistance, while Adam (James Nesbitt) gets out of his depth on a night out in Mike Bullen’s assured comedy-drama revival. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm Another line-up of heavy-hitters assembles on the red sofa tonight: comedian Chris Rock plugs his first UK stand-up tour in a decade, actors Idris Elba and Kate Winslet discuss their niche genre movie, “disaster-romance” The Mountain Between Us (about a surgeon and a journalist who survive a plane crash), and Liam Gallagher performs songs from his debut album, As You Were. GT The Twilight Saga: Eclipse (2010) ★★★☆☆ E4, 8.00pm  The third instalment of the teenage vampire franchise is better than the second and will please its fan base, though Melissa Rosenberg’s script is full of clichés and relies on a shirtless Taylor Lautner for distraction. Girl-next-door Bella Swan (Kristen Stewart) must choose between 100-year-old vampire Edward Cullen (Robert Pattinson) and hunky werewolf Jacob Black (Lautner). T2: Trainspotting (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.00pm  Danny Boyle’s sequel is more than just a trip down memory lane. Back in 1996, Trainspotting’s gallery of junkies and rogues (Ewan McGregor, Jonny Lee Miller) proudly and raucously chose not to choose life. But now, all have come to terms with the gnawing possibility that life may have in fact not chosen them. There’s no chance of it matching the legacy of the first film, but it doesn’t tarnish it either. American Hustle (2013) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 12.10am  David O Russell’s caper feels like the film he has spent his career warming up for and is a serious piece of film-making that delights in its own silliness. Irving (Christian Bale) and his partner Sydney (Amy Adams) are con artists blackmailed by FBI agent Richie DiMaso (Bradley Cooper) into aiding his investigation. “Some of this actually happened,” reads a title card, and to be more specific would spoil the fun. Television previewers Catherine Gee, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV: The Last Post and Live Formula 1: Malaysia Grand Prix

Sunday 1 October The Last Post BBC One, 9.00pm This intriguing six-part drama, scripted by playwright Peter Moffat, is set against an unusual backdrop – the mid-Sixties conflict that took place in the then British Crown Colony of Aden on the southern Arabian peninsula. Jessica Raine is the star attraction in the bad-girl role of Alison, the drunken, unhappy and unfaithful wife of conscientious but undervalued military policeman Lieutenant Ed Laithwaite (Stephen Campbell Moore).  The atmosphere of unrelenting heat and dust is very well conveyed, as is the day-to-day tedium of life for military wives on a Royal Military Police base and the hierarchies of rank that must be observed. We get the full introduction in this opening episode as newlyweds Captain Joe Martin (Jeremy Neumark Jones) and his wife Honor (Jessie Buckley) arrive on the base as the going-away party for the popular man he’s replacing, Captain Page (Joseph Kennedy), is in full swing. Meanwhile, Laithwaite receives information that an attack on the base by rebel fighters is imminent, but his commanding officer, Major Markham (Ben Miles) refuses to take his warnings seriously. What happens next is not as obvious as you might expect. Gerard O’Donovan Live Formula 1: Malaysia Grand Prix Sky Sports Main Event & Channel 4, 7.35am The 19th Grand Prix in this country will also be its last, as the Malaysian government withdraws funding for the Sepang circuit. Drivers had to endure the challenge of racing in 50-degree heat, with hydration as important as a full tank. Lewis Hamilton will be hoping to increase his lead in the championship with another victory, but a mix of unpredictable weather and a track known for its sharp corners should ensure that this Grand Prix keeps throwing up surprises right until the very end. Live NFL: New Orleans Saints v Miami Dolphins BBC Two, 1.45pm Wembley Stadium is the setting again for the NFL, having hosted Jacksonville Jaguars’ 44-7 demolition of the Baltimore Ravens last weekend. This will be a fourth trip to Wembley for the Dolphins, who appeared in the first International Series game here in 2007 when they lost 13-10 to the New York Giants, while their most recent appearance saw them defeated 27-14 by the New York Jets in 2015. The Saints have less experience of playing at Wembley, but did register a 37-32 win over the then-San Diego Chargers in 2008, in their only previous trip to the UK.  Live Premier League Rugby Union: Wasps v Bath BT Sport 1, 2.15pm The new season has turned sour for both teams, and Wasps are keen to avoid their third successive defeat. If history is an indicator they should have the upper hand, having won their last four matches against Bath – the most recent of which finished 24-3, with two tries from Kurtley Beale helping them on their way. The visitors come into this match on the back of an agonising 33-32 defeat to Newcastle Falcons, who scored twice in the last 15 minutes to come from behind in a nine-try thriller. Cornwall’s Native Poet: Charles Causley BBC Four, 8.00pm This documentary, the first of three films from the BBC’s Contains Strong Language poetry strand, celebrates the life and work of Charles Causley, a Cornish poet so deeply rooted in the county that he only left his home town of Launceston once, for naval service in the Second World War. Escape Channel 4, 8.00pm There are five people stranded in the middle of a desert following a plane crash. They have one chance of survival: creating another vehicle from the plane wreckage. That’s the premise of this new series in which five engineers are challenged to use their ingenuity and skill to escape a tricky situation. Men Who Sleep in Cars BBC Four, 9.00pm Scripted entirely in verse, poet Michael Symmons Roberts’s film is a love song to the city of Manchester. It tells the poignant story of three rough sleepers whose impoverished lives are seen in contrast to the great wealth of the city. With Maxine Peake. Electric Dreams:The Commuter Channel 4, 9.00pm The third story in this enjoyable series based on sci-fi pioneer Philip K Dick’s stories stars Timothy Spall as a railway attendant with a sad home life. But when he meets a mysterious traveller, he is forced to choose between fantasy and reality. Dawn French Live: 30 Million Minutes BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 10.55pm; Wales, 10.45pm Recorded last year in London’s West End, this is the actress and comedian’s live solo show, inspired by the tough but entertaining lessons she’s learnt from life.  Child in Mind BBC Four, 10.00pm Simon Armitage has a talent for making powerfully poetic television. Here he mixes documentary footage and verse to give a voice to the dispossessed women in Britain, the mothers of the 3,000 children placed in care every year. GO Boris Johnson: Blond Ambition Channel 4, 10.05pm After a period of calm, the Boris bandwagon is gathering speed once again following the publication of his vision for a post-Brexit Britain in The Telegraph. Here Channel 4’s political editor Gary Gibbon looks back at Johnson’s 14 months as Foreign Secretary, assessing his impact and success on the world stage. GO Happy Feet (2006) ★★★★☆ ITV2, 3.45pm  Australian director George Miller won a Best Animated Feature Oscar for this entertaining believe-in-yourself animation. Mumble, a misfit emperor penguin (baby voice by Elizabeth Daily, adult voice by Elijah Wood) is causing his parents (voiced by Nicole Kidman and Jackman) concern because he can’t sing and is therefore unable to attract a mate. Mumble can tap-dance, though, and therein lies his salvation. A United Kingdom (2016) ★★★★☆   Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm  Amma Asante’s film retells a true story that took place simultaneously in the corridors of Westminster and the country now known as Botswana just over half a century ago. It’s about the inter-racial romance between English woman Ruth (Rosamund Pike) and Seretse (David Oyelowo), the future king. It’s stirring stuff and a chapter of history that rewards a close reading. Memphis Belle (1990) ★★★☆☆☆ ITV4, 9.05pm  It’s 1943, and the handsome American crew of Second World War B-17 bomber Memphis Belle, who are stationed in England, are anticipating their final mission – to fly over Nazi-occupied Europe. Full of nostalgia, this loosely based-on-real-events story exudes a romanticised view of heroism, but features an endearing cast, including Billy Zane, Sean Astin,John Lithgow, Eric Stoltz, and Harry Connick Jr. Monday 2 October The curmudgeon returns: Larry David is back after six years Credit: HBO/Skt Curb Your Enthusiasm Sky Atlantic, 10.00pm Cometh the hour, cometh the curmudgeon. It’s been six years since we last saw the irascible Larry David and the rest of his gang of malcontents, and this return is something of a surprise delight given that David had previously claimed to have mined every last possible drop from his alter-ego’s grumpy loathing of modern life.  No previews were available for this opening episode, which is not a surprise seeing as David has always run a tight ship regarding spoilers and HBO went into lockdown after episodes were leaked during the summer. So what can we expect? Bryan Cranston joins the cast as Larry’s new therapist, the wonderful double act of Ted Danson and Mary Steenburgen return, and David has promised that we’ll uncover just what happened after Larry left for Paris with perpetual house guest Leon (the scene-stealing J B Smoove). “It’s been a five-year log-jam of indignities and violations of etiquette,” executive producer Jeff Schaffer told Variety and it’s true that Curb’s return seems particularly suited to our current times. “Every day confirms, more and more, he’s right! He’s right about everything,” noted David. One thing is certain: it’ll be fun finding out if that’s true. Sarah Hughes Race and Pace: The West Indians in East Lancashire BBC Four, 7.30pm When West Indian cricketers began to arrive in Lancashire, the Northern county was hit for six. This enlightening documentary, narrated by Death in Paradise’s Don Warrington, tells the story of how initial reticence and racism turned into an unlikely cricketing love affair. Among those recalling their experiences are knights of the cricketing order, Viv Richards and Wes Hall, who also discuss the huge impact West Indian players made on the LCC and the resulting effect it had on both sides of the Atlantic over the past 90 years. Tunes for Tyrants: Music & Power with Suzy Klein BBC Four, 9.00pm Presented by Suzy Klein, this documentary is an exploration of music’s crucial political role in the most turbulent years of the 20th century. It begins with the Radio 3 presenter looking at the years following the Russian Revolution and the First World War when music was seen as a tool to change society. CM Liar ITV, 9.00pm After last week’s revelation, the William brothers’ potboiler continues apace. In the fourth episode, dogged “rape victim” Laura Nielson (Joanne Froggatt) travels to Edinburgh to find out how Andrew Earlham’s (Ioan Gruffudd) wife’s really died. Paddington Station 24/7 Channel 5, 9.00pm Watching this behind-the-scenes look at London’s Paddington Station, you can understand why rail passengers become frustrated by the service. In this episode, the staff have to deal with signal problems during rush hour. Later, a team of engineers race to replace 60 ft of rail hours before the morning rush begins. W1A BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI John Morton’s parody of life inside Broadcasting House always manages to find big laughs in unusual circumstances. Tonight, the Renewal Team propose to get rid of the BBC Big Swing Band, and marketing guru Siobhan (the excellent Jessica Hynes) decides to make a trailer to launch the YouTube-like BBC ME.  Stacey Dooley Investigates: Mums Selling Their Kids for Sex BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm; Scot, 11.45pm In this disturbing film, previously shown on BBC Three, Dooley is in the Philippines to investigate mothers who sexually exploit their children live on the web. Clive Morgan Ace Ventura: Pet Detective (1994) ★★★☆☆☆ 5STAR, 8.00pm  Back in 1994, Jim Carrey went from near obscurity to starring in three hits in a year. The first was this very funny comedy about a zany pet detective who finds himself out of his depth (the others were The Mask and Dumb & Dumber). Here, he’s hired by Miami’s NFL team to track down their mascot, a bottlenose dolphin named Snowflake, before the Super Bowl. Courteney Cox co-stars as the team’s publicist. Moulin Rouge! (2001) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 8.00pm  Baz Luhrmann’s intoxicating spectacle was the first musical to be nominated for the Best Picture Oscar in 22 years. Set in 1899, Montmartre, it follows a poet (Ewan McGregor) who becomes love-struck with the city’s famous courtesan (Nicole Kidman, who enters the film on a bejazzled swing). The mix of period setting and contemporary pop ensure a vivid assault on the senses. The Specialist (1994) ★★☆☆☆ ITV4, 10.00pm  Sharon Stone slinks around Sylvester Stallone in this celebrity vehicle that garnered a lot of attention, at the time of release, for its sex scene. Stallone plays a former CIA bomb expert hired by Stone to destroy the Mob that killed her family. Supporting actor James Woods remains unscathed in a film full of giant explosions, silly plot twists, and Rod Steiger trying out a Cuban accent (indecipherable and hilarious). Tuesday 3 October Caught in the middle: Suranne Jones and Tom Taylor Credit: BBC Doctor Foster BBC One, 9.00pm Handbrake turns have become the norm in the extraordinary second series of Mike Bartlett’s ripe melodrama, with showdown following showdown, passive aggression increasingly supplanted by straightforward aggression, and twists galore threatening a lurch into the territory of Fatal Attraction, only in reverse. The Fosters are in disarray – Simon (Bertie Carvel) is estranged from his second family and income stream, while Gemma (Suranne Jones) is concerned that her actions have pushed away their son (Tom Taylor, the show’s unsung star). We left Gemma driving at speed towards Simon – what happens next remains under wraps, but suffice to say that the most unexpected twist in tonight’s conclusion is one of tone: from operatic melodrama (albeit sustained by brilliant performances) into sombre contemplation – the fallout after the explosion. Flashbacks illustrate both the affection once at the heart of the family and a failure to meet the needs of its most vulnerable member. The door is left wide open for a third series; it’s been fun, but has strained credibility – it might be wise to emulate the Doctor Foster of the nursery rhyme and never go there again. Gabriel Tate Rodney Carrington: Here Comes the Truth Netflix, from 12.01am Rodney Carrington’s stand-up is an unapologetically crude assault on political correctness (his material ranges from Muslims to his manhood), but, undeniably, he has a big following in the US. This recording from his most recent tour will establish whether this acquired taste is also yours. The Great British Bake Off Channel 4, 8.00pm With the chancers and fudgers departed, Prue Leith and Paul Hollywood have a smorgasbord of class acts from which to choose as Pastry Week dawns: the showstopper sees the bakers attempt a pie with a difference. Reformation: Europe’s Holy War BBC Two, 9.00pm Once inescapable, David Starkey now makes infrequent appearances on TV; which is just as well, given a little of his strident controversialism generally goes a long way. Here, he’s on entertaining form exploring the malign forces unleashed by the Protestant Reformation some 500 years ago – and their modern parallels. Sex, Chips and Poetry: 50 Years of the Mersey Sound BBC Four, 9.00pm In 1967, the same year that The Beatles released Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, fellow Liverpudlians Roger McGough, Brian Patten and Adrian Henri took the spoken-word revolution started by the Beat Poets and transformed it into something uniquely British. This amiable and richly deserved tribute documentary, narrated by Isy Suttie, celebrates the 50th anniversary of their work on The Mersey Sound, one of the best-selling poetry anthologies of all time, which is still a mainstay on school syllabuses. GT Barbie: the Most Famous Doll in the World Channel 4, 9.15pm Mary Portas visits toymaker Mattel, attends conventions and talks to children in a bid to make sense of a doll blamed for entrenching everything from everyday sexism to unrealistic body images. How can an apparently outmoded icon be reinvented for the modern age? The Insider: Reggie Yates in a Refugee Camp BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm; Scot, 11.45pm In this documentary, first shown on BBC Three, Reggie Yates spends a week in Iraq’s largest refugee camp, where he lives alongside 30,000 displaced Syrians facing an uncertain future. GT The Karate Kid (2010) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.15pm  To most people’s surprise, this is a more-than-satisfying update on the much-loved original, though also comes across as an extended tourism advert. Jaden Smith (son of Will) plays a 12-year-old who moves from Detroit to Beijing with his mother (Taraji P Henson). There he becomes a punching bag for local bullies, but makes a new friend in a maintenance man and martial arts master Mr Han (Jackie Chan), who teaches him how to fight. Ice Age 3: Dawn of the Dinosaurs (2009) ★★★☆☆ E4, 8.00pm  This is comfortably the best in the Ice Age series and solid children’s entertainment, but you may need to explain that dinosaurs didn’t live in a vast hothouse under the glaciers, and woolly mammoths called Manny probably weren’t on chummy terms with sabre-toothed tigers called Diego. Here, the gang head to a tropical lost world to rescue Sid the Sloth (John Leguizamo). 22 Jump Street (2014) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 9.00pm  Channing Tatum’s charisma and the best malapropisms ever make this sequel to 21 Jump Street a joy. Instead of infiltrating school to arrest the suppliers of a drug, Jonah Hill’s Schmidt and Tatum’s Jenko infiltrate college to do… exactly the same. The film is directed by Phil Lord and Christopher Miller (The Lego Movie) who are becoming the handiest duo since the Coen brothers. Wednesday 4 October Back in business: Lord Sugar (centre) with Karren Brady and Claude Littner Credit: BBC The Apprentice BBC One, 9.00pm Thirteen series in and we all know by now that The Apprentice is not so much a search for the brightest and best new business entrepreneurs, but an exercise in finding the one polishable, er, apple in a barrelful of “pony and trap” as adept cockney rhymer Lord Sugar puts it. And what fun it still is watching all those overinflated young egos being cut down to size by the process.  This time 18 candidates vie for the prize of £250,000 start-up capital, and just to remind the wannabe tycoons what a great opportunity they’re being given, Lord Sugar marches five previous winners into the boardroom to beguile them with tales of success.  The opening challenge, though, couldn’t be more basic: making burgers and flogging them on the street. Which is not to say there isn’t lots of room for error and unfathomably gross stupidity, too. In fact, you’re pretty much guaranteed to spend most of this show slapping your forehead at the unadulterated ineptitude of some of these self-proclaimed geniuses. In other words, a great start to what looks like being another hilarious series with, as ever, The Apprentice: You’re Fired following, at 10pm on BBC Two. Gerard O’Donovan Who Do You Think You Are? BBC One, 8.00pm Some editions of this latest series have felt less like journeys of discovery and more like genetic quests. Here, comedian Ruby Wax sets out to discover whether her mental health issues might have been evident earlier in her family line. Billion Dollar Deals and How They Changed Your World BBC Two, 8.00pm Yes, it’s a conspiracy. In the second programme of his absorbing series about how the world is ruled not by politicians but by decisions made in corporate boardrooms, Jacques Peretti considers why big business is currently so determined to kill off cash.  The Detectives: Murder on the Streets BBC Two, 9.00pm “It not like the Seventies. It’s not about slapping people. It’s about what you disclose to the person.” The art of tripping suspects up in their own lies inches Manchester police ever closer to solving two brutal killings in this nail-biting real-life crime series. Britain’s Lost Masterpieces BBC Four, 9.00pm Bendor Grosvenor and Emma Dabiri head to the Derby Museum to investigate a painting that suffered an unusually poor early restoration. Could it be a work by the great 18th-century British master, Joseph Wright of Derby, and if so can it be returned to its former glory?  The Great War in Numbers Yesterday, 9.00pm Think of the First World War and it’s the millions of lives lost in the trenches that come to mind. But, as this documentary series reveals, everything about the Great War was on a scale previously unparalleled: machine guns in millions, artillery shells in billions, the mind-boggling logistics of keeping vast numbers of men fed, clothed and fighting fit in the field. Tonight’s first film of six explores how the empires of Germany, France, Russia and Britain were able to pour so much wealth into the industrialisation of warfare. GO Back Channel 4, 10.00pm Fate just seems to get crueller for Stephen (David Mitchell) when Andrew (Robert Webb) manages to increase his share in the pub. But then Alison (Olivia Poulet) uncovers information that could yet force the cuckoo out of the family nest. GO Mercury Rising (1998) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm  Bruce Willis is excellent as an undercover FBI agent assigned to protect a nine-year-old autistic boy (Miko Hughes) who is targeted by assassins after cracking a top secret government code in this underrated, if slightly unrealistic, thriller based on the Ryne Douglas Pearson novel Simon Says. The plot moves at breakneck speed yet, ultimately, it’s a touching and heart-warming story. The Football Factory (2004) ★★★☆☆ London Live, 10.00pm  John King’s book The Football Factory is an unnerving and brutal account of hooliganism in the Nineties, centring on a firm of Chelsea boot boys and their clashes with rival “fans”. Nick Love’s film certainly captures the thuggery, with Danny Dyer as Tommy, for whom life is about drink, drugs, sex, thieving and a good ruck – but who begins to question his ways. Made in France (2015) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.00pm  This thriller, about a wave of jihadist attacks on Paris, was pulled from cinemas following its plot’s number of unnerving parallels with recent events in the French capital. In it, an extremist cell plans a series of shootings and bombings across the city “that will shake France” and the world. Director Nicholas Boukhrief said he made the film to counter the “poison” of jihadist propaganda. Thursday 5 October Fire safety: in the wake of the Grenfell Tower disaster Credit: PA The Housing Enforcers BBC One, 8.00pm; BBC Two Wales, 7.00pm “Everyone has a right to a safe place to live, no matter who you are, where you live or how much rent you pay. It’s non-negotiable.” So concludes Matt Allwright at the end of this programme focusing on the importance of fire safety.  The format is straightforward: Allwright travels across the country meeting with housing officers and examining the myriad ways in which fires can destroy lives. What makes this really hit home, however, is the presenter’s quiet fury at the way in which some lives are considered less worthy than others. Inevitably, the shadow of Grenfell Tower hangs heavy over the hour. It’s notable that many of those worst affected are elderly and living alone: the story of fiercely independent Ali who refuses to acknowledge, even to his family, quite how much he is struggling is particularly poignant. Allwright, however, saves his most righteous rage for the landlords squeezing tenants in wherever they can and failing to meet even the minimum health and safety standards. The result is a hard-hitting and often hard-to-watch documentary, which also offers solid advice on how to deal both with fires and bad landlords. Sarah Hughes Live International Football: England v Slovenia ITV, 7.30pm Having drawn 0-0 last October, with Joe Hart forced to make a string of fine saves, England and Slovenia reconvene at Wembley. Victory today for Gareth Southgate’s men will ensure their qualification for next year’s World Cup in Russia. And having beaten second-placed Slovakia 2-1 last month, thanks to a strike from tyro Marcus Rashford, they’ll be confident of doing just that. The Big Family Cooking Showdown BBC Two, 8.00pm Two last families go head to head for a place in the finals. Their £10 challenge is a Friday night takeaway, so naturally curry is on the menu. There’s talk of “fusion” cooking, some mushy spinach and a 34-year-old rolling pin.   Discovering: Laurence Olivier Sky Arts, 8.00pm The spotlight turns on Laurence Olivier, who, in 1937, described cinema as an “anaemic little medium which could not stand great acting”.   Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm The work of the West Midlands Ambulance Service continues as a specialist trauma team are dispatched to a motorbike accident where a man has suffered a catastrophic chest injury. “I’ve got nothing…” declares the doctor. It’s a stark reminder of the fragility of life and the increasing compassion of the services in times of chaos.    Russia with Simon Reeve BBC Two, 9.00pm Simon Reeve continues his fascinating journey, meeting Tuvan children in Siberia who practice the Mongolian tradition of throat singing.  Educating Greater Manchester Channel 4, 9.00pm Ah, that old chestnut – ignoring school uniform rules. This week, the teachers at Harrop Fold are on the back foot when a message is spread on Snapchat encouraging pupils to come in wearing trainers. Social media also causes friction between Year 11 girls Serena and Lelo when one talks to the other’s boyfriend on FaceTime. Rachel Ward Law & Order True Crime: The Menendez murders Sky Living, 9.00pm This series, similar to The People v OJ Simpson, takes a closer look at the two trials of brothers Lyle and Erik Menendez, who were convicted of murdering their parents in their Beverly Hills home in 1989. It focuses on the attorney (Edie Falco), who was one of their few defenders. Dimension 404 Syfy, 9.00pm Each episode of this new sci-fi anthology features a form of technology gone wrong. But there’s nothing unnerving about it, rather it’s a camp pastiche of The Twilight Zone, complete with Star Wars’ Mark Hamill providing the voice-over. Glee’s Lea Michele stars in the first episode about online dating. It’s weird, but it doesn’t overplay it. RW Robin and Marian (1976) ★★★★☆ Film4, 1.10pm  Sean Connery gives one of his best performances as a middle-aged Robin Hood, who heads home to Sherwood Forest after the death of Richard I. He finds that scaling a castle wall isn’t as easy as it used to be, Maid Marian (Audrey Hepburn) is still miffed at being left in the lurch, and the Sheriff (Robert Shaw) is up to his old tricks in Richard Lester’s good-natured romance. Look out for Ronnie Barker as Friar Tuck. Jerry Maguire (1996) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 5.40pm  In Cameron Crowe’s macho romcom, Tom Cruise plays a sports agent who has an attack of conscience and urges his colleagues to think about the welfare of their clients. He’s duly fired but announces that he’ll start his own agency. A washed-up footballer (Cuba Gooding Jr) and a single mother (Renée Zellweger) are the only ones who agree to go with him. Here, the classic quote, “You had me at ‘hello’” was born. The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.10pm Clint Eastwood directs and stars in this marvellous warm-hearted western adapted from Forrest Carter’s novel and set during the American Civil War. Eastwood plays the eponymous Missouri farmer who, driven by memories of his family’s slaughter, becomes an outlaw when he refuses to join his Confederate comrades in surrender, in favour of seeking revenge on the men who murdered his kin. Friday 6 October Penal colony: Harry Peacock, Kevin Bishop and Ricky Grover Credit: BBC Porridge BBC One, 9.30pm The most successful of the BBC’s classic sitcom revivals from last year, Porridge returns for a full series with the series’ creators Dick Clement and Ian La Frenais once again on board. It finds Nigel Norman Fletcher (Kevin Bishop as the grandson of Ronnie Barker’s character, Norman Stanley) locking horns with officer Meekie (Mark Bonnar) while aiding or outsmarting the prison’s ne’er-do-wells. In a canny twist, it is Fletch who is now the relative ingénue in his cell, seeking counsel from veteran lag Joe Lotterby (Dave Hill). We find Fletch as the prison’s resident Cyrano de Bergerac, writing letters to keep the flame of romance alive between assorted inmates and their partners on the outside. All goes well until Fletch suffers a crisis of conscience that threatens the whole operation. Some of the gags are groanworthy, but Clement and La Frenais’s mastery of sitcom mechanics remains complete; their presence keeps the spirit of the original intact, while the update means that no one is attempting to emulate the cast of the Seventies series. Fletch has a five-year sentence to serve; unlikely as it might seem, a similar term for Porridge might not be unwelcome. Gabriel Tate Suburra: the Series Netflix, from 12.01am Like Romanzo Criminale and Gomorrah before it, Suburra began life as a book before becoming a gripping, multifaceted Italian-language political thriller. This 10-part series, set in the dying days of Berlusconi’s regime, explores the themes of politics, the Church and corruption during 20 tumultuous days in Rome. Unreported World Channel 4, 7.30pm Ireland faces a pivotal referendum on the decriminalisation of abortion in certain circumstances; Kate Hardie-Buckley meets those on both sides of the debate in a deeply affecting edition of the current-affairs series. Modern Family Sky1, 8.30pm It may have tailed off since its peak, but Modern Family is still good for a few laughs. The ninth series begins with Jay (Ty Burrell) taking the family on a houseboat holiday, and Mitchell (Jesse Tyler Ferguson) encountering an old flame. Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm; not N Ireland or Wales Monty Don begins preparations for 2018 by advising others on how to use leaf mould as a mulch. Elsewhere, Adam Frost visits a community allotment in Manchester, and Nick Bailey learns from a zoologist about the life teeming in the soil. Nile Rodgers: How to Make It in the Music Business BBC Four, 9.00pm Guitar genius and pop producer Nile Rodgers shares the wisdom he’s acquired over decades in the music business. In the first episode, he discusses the founding of Chic and his influence on today’s hitmakers. GT Cold Feet ITV, 9.00pm Karen (Hermione Norris) is on the brink of financial disaster in spite of David’s (Robert Bathurst) assistance, while Adam (James Nesbitt) gets out of his depth on a night out in Mike Bullen’s assured comedy-drama revival. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm Another line-up of heavy-hitters assembles on the red sofa tonight: comedian Chris Rock plugs his first UK stand-up tour in a decade, actors Idris Elba and Kate Winslet discuss their niche genre movie, “disaster-romance” The Mountain Between Us (about a surgeon and a journalist who survive a plane crash), and Liam Gallagher performs songs from his debut album, As You Were. GT The Twilight Saga: Eclipse (2010) ★★★☆☆ E4, 8.00pm  The third instalment of the teenage vampire franchise is better than the second and will please its fan base, though Melissa Rosenberg’s script is full of clichés and relies on a shirtless Taylor Lautner for distraction. Girl-next-door Bella Swan (Kristen Stewart) must choose between 100-year-old vampire Edward Cullen (Robert Pattinson) and hunky werewolf Jacob Black (Lautner). T2: Trainspotting (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.00pm  Danny Boyle’s sequel is more than just a trip down memory lane. Back in 1996, Trainspotting’s gallery of junkies and rogues (Ewan McGregor, Jonny Lee Miller) proudly and raucously chose not to choose life. But now, all have come to terms with the gnawing possibility that life may have in fact not chosen them. There’s no chance of it matching the legacy of the first film, but it doesn’t tarnish it either. American Hustle (2013) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 12.10am  David O Russell’s caper feels like the film he has spent his career warming up for and is a serious piece of film-making that delights in its own silliness. Irving (Christian Bale) and his partner Sydney (Amy Adams) are con artists blackmailed by FBI agent Richie DiMaso (Bradley Cooper) into aiding his investigation. “Some of this actually happened,” reads a title card, and to be more specific would spoil the fun. Television previewers Catherine Gee, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: Stop All the Clocks: WH Auden in an Age of Anxiety and The Doors Night

Saturday 30 September Stop All the Clocks: WH Auden in an Age of Anxiety BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 10.30pm As anyone who’s seen Richard Curtis’s film Four Weddings and a Funeral will attest, W H Auden’s poetry has considerable emotional potency. Indeed, those not reduced to tears at the sight of John Hannah reading Stop All the Clocks should consult their doctor as soon as possible. (“He was my North, my South, my East and West/My working week and my Sunday rest/My noon, my midnight, my talk, my song/I thought that love would last for ever: I was wrong.”) His words also provide succour in troubled times: many New Yorkers, in fact, turned to his poem September 1, 1939 – a response to the outbreak of the Second World War – in the aftermath of 9/11.  Launching a season of poetry programmes, this excellent documentary from director Adam Low looks at why the craggy-faced Auden – whose reputation in Britain soured after his decision to move to America in 1939 – still has a great hold on our imaginations. Among those paying tribute to Auden’s words – a mix of humanity, scepticism and unsuppressed honesty – are writers Alan Bennett, Alexander McCall Smith and Curtis, who studied Auden at university. Patrick Smith Live Premier League Football: Chelsea v Manchester City BT Sport 1, 5.00pm The two teams’ last encounter at Stamford Bridge in April ended well for Chelsea, who won 2-1, thanks to a brace from Eden Hazard. But City have looked imperious this season: unbeaten in the league, they’ve won five of their six matches. Third-placed Chelsea go into this game with momentum from an impressive 4-0 victory at Stoke. In terms of their starting line-up, Pep Guardiola’s side must cope without summer signing Benjamin Mendy; the French full-back is currently sidelined with a ligament injury.  Strictly Come Dancing BBC One, 6.45pm This year’s competition is full of characters – from the divine Reverend Richard Coles and his disco-dad dancing to the gleefully giddy Debbie McGee – but tonight they must all impress not just the judges but the viewers, too: the first couple will be voted off in tomorrow’s results show.   Britain Afloat BBC Two, 8.00pm; N Ireland, 8.30pm Throughout our history, boats have played a major role and, in this new six-part series, Mary-Ann Ochota travels Britain’s waterways to see how they shaped our lives. Here, she explores the role boats played at Dunkirk and joins the Thames Barge match. The X Factor: Boot Camp ITV, 8.00pm Now that the auditions are over, it’s time for the lucky hopefuls to take part in Boot Camp. Those who manage to impress judges Simon, Nicole, Sharon and Louis will go through to the dreaded Six Chair Challenge. More tomorrow at 7.30pm.  The Doors Night Sky Arts, from 8.00pm In 1967, The Doors broke on through, releasing a string of hit singles and two platinum albums. With their intoxicating blend of blues, jazz and poetry, they exploded into the public consciousness, becoming one of the soundtracks to the Summer of Love. Now, 50 years later, Sky Arts is dedicating an evening of programming to the quartet, whose name is a reference to Aldous Huxley’s Doors of Perception. First up, in Rock Poet, is a fascinating profile of The Doors’ shamanistic frontman Jim Morrison, who died aged 27. Next is The Doors: Feast of Friends, which follows the band on the road. Rounding off the night is footage of their famous 1968 concert at the Hollywood Bowl. Black Lake BBC Four, 9.00pm and 9.40pm This fun Swedish supernatural chiller reaches its penultimate episodes, and there’s something nasty lurking in the cellar at the ski lodge, leaving the gang in a state of shock. PS The Jonathan Ross Show ITV, 9.30pm US singer Demi Lovato is on Jonathan Ross’s guest list as she promotes her “intimate” documentary Simply Complicated. She is joined by Doc Martin’s Martin Clunes and This Morning’s Holly Willoughby. The music comes from The X Factor 2012 winner James Arthur. Clive Morgan Now You See Me (2013) ★★☆☆☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm  A group of illusionists (Jesse Eisenberg, Woody Harrelson, Isla Fisher and Dave Franco) are encouraged to carry out a string of heists by a mysterious figure, while remaining ahead of FBI agent Rhodes (Mark Ruffalo), who is desperate to bring them to justice. Director Louis Leterrier tries to mimic the complex plots of films such as Inception, but with less success, though it’s reasonably entertaining. Transcendence (2014) ★★☆☆☆ Channel 4, 11.15pm  Johnny Depp and Rebecca Hall star as Will and Evelyn Caster, married artificial-intelligence scientists who download his brain patterns to a hard drive. This isn’t a casual choice: at a state-of-the-future convention, Will is grazed by a would-be assassin’s bullet, which is laced with a radioactive isotope, giving him weeks to live. The film, co-starring Cillian Murphy, is visually stylish but let down by poor storytelling. The Edge of Love (2008) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.35pm; Wales, 1.05am; not Scot  A fascinating story set during the Second World War about poet Dylan Thomas’s (Matthew Rhys) relationships with two women: his hedonistic Irish wife (Sienna Miller) and his Welsh childhood lover (Keira Knightley). An intense Jules et Jim-esque set-up develops, but the film could do with more about the art and less about the artist’s love life. It’s scripted by Knightley’s mother. Sunday 1 October Bad girl: Jessica Raine stars as military wife Alison Credit: BBC The Last Post BBC One, 9.00pm This intriguing six-part drama, scripted by playwright Peter Moffat, is set against an unusual backdrop – the mid-Sixties conflict that took place in the then British Crown Colony of Aden on the southern Arabian peninsula. Jessica Raine is the star attraction in the bad-girl role of Alison, the drunken, unhappy and unfaithful wife of conscientious but undervalued military policeman Lieutenant Ed Laithwaite (Stephen Campbell Moore).  The atmosphere of unrelenting heat and dust is very well conveyed, as is the day-to-day tedium of life for military wives on a Royal Military Police base and the hierarchies of rank that must be observed. We get the full introduction in this opening episode as newlyweds Captain Joe Martin (Jeremy Neumark Jones) and his wife Honor (Jessie Buckley) arrive on the base as the going-away party for the popular man he’s replacing, Captain Page (Joseph Kennedy), is in full swing. Meanwhile, Laithwaite receives information that an attack on the base by rebel fighters is imminent, but his commanding officer, Major Markham (Ben Miles) refuses to take his warnings seriously. What happens next is not as obvious as you might expect. Gerard O’Donovan Live Formula 1: Malaysia Grand Prix Sky Sports Main Event & Channel 4, 7.35am The 19th Grand Prix in this country will also be its last, as the Malaysian government withdraws funding for the Sepang circuit. Drivers had to endure the challenge of racing in 50-degree heat, with hydration as important as a full tank. Lewis Hamilton will be hoping to increase his lead in the championship with another victory, but a mix of unpredictable weather and a track known for its sharp corners should ensure that this Grand Prix keeps throwing up surprises right until the very end. Live NFL: New Orleans Saints v Miami Dolphins BBC Two, 1.45pm Wembley Stadium is the setting again for the NFL, having hosted Jacksonville Jaguars’ 44-7 demolition of the Baltimore Ravens last weekend. This will be a fourth trip to Wembley for the Dolphins, who appeared in the first International Series game here in 2007 when they lost 13-10 to the New York Giants, while their most recent appearance saw them defeated 27-14 by the New York Jets in 2015. The Saints have less experience of playing at Wembley, but did register a 37-32 win over the then-San Diego Chargers in 2008, in their only previous trip to the UK.  Live Premier League Rugby Union: Wasps v Bath BT Sport 1, 2.15pm The new season has turned sour for both teams, and Wasps are keen to avoid their third successive defeat. If history is an indicator they should have the upper hand, having won their last four matches against Bath – the most recent of which finished 24-3, with two tries from Kurtley Beale helping them on their way. The visitors come into this match on the back of an agonising 33-32 defeat to Newcastle Falcons, who scored twice in the last 15 minutes to come from behind in a nine-try thriller. Cornwall’s Native Poet: Charles Causley BBC Four, 8.00pm This documentary, the first of three films from the BBC’s Contains Strong Language poetry strand, celebrates the life and work of Charles Causley, a Cornish poet so deeply rooted in the county that he only left his home town of Launceston once, for naval service in the Second World War. Escape Channel 4, 8.00pm There are five people stranded in the middle of a desert following a plane crash. They have one chance of survival: creating another vehicle from the plane wreckage. That’s the premise of this new series in which five engineers are challenged to use their ingenuity and skill to escape a tricky situation. Men Who Sleep in Cars BBC Four, 9.00pm Scripted entirely in verse, poet Michael Symmons Roberts’s film is a love song to the city of Manchester. It tells the poignant story of three rough sleepers whose impoverished lives are seen in contrast to the great wealth of the city. With Maxine Peake. Electric Dreams:The Commuter Channel 4, 9.00pm The third story in this enjoyable series based on sci-fi pioneer Philip K Dick’s stories stars Timothy Spall as a railway attendant with a sad home life. But when he meets a mysterious traveller, he is forced to choose between fantasy and reality. Dawn French Live: 30 Million Minutes BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 10.55pm; Wales, 10.45pm Recorded last year in London’s West End, this is the actress and comedian’s live solo show, inspired by the tough but entertaining lessons she’s learnt from life.  Child in Mind BBC Four, 10.00pm Simon Armitage has a talent for making powerfully poetic television. Here he mixes documentary footage and verse to give a voice to the dispossessed women in Britain, the mothers of the 3,000 children placed in care every year. GO Boris Johnson: Blond Ambition Channel 4, 10.05pm After a period of calm, the Boris bandwagon is gathering speed once again following the publication of his vision for a post-Brexit Britain in The Telegraph. Here Channel 4’s political editor Gary Gibbon looks back at Johnson’s 14 months as Foreign Secretary, assessing his impact and success on the world stage. GO Happy Feet (2006) ★★★★☆ ITV2, 3.45pm  Australian director George Miller won a Best Animated Feature Oscar for this entertaining believe-in-yourself animation. Mumble, a misfit emperor penguin (baby voice by Elizabeth Daily, adult voice by Elijah Wood) is causing his parents (voiced by Nicole Kidman and Jackman) concern because he can’t sing and is therefore unable to attract a mate. Mumble can tap-dance, though, and therein lies his salvation. A United Kingdom (2016) ★★★★☆   Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm  Amma Asante’s film retells a true story that took place simultaneously in the corridors of Westminster and the country now known as Botswana just over half a century ago. It’s about the inter-racial romance between English woman Ruth (Rosamund Pike) and Seretse (David Oyelowo), the future king. It’s stirring stuff and a chapter of history that rewards a close reading. Memphis Belle (1990) ★★★☆☆☆ ITV4, 9.05pm  It’s 1943, and the handsome American crew of Second World War B-17 bomber Memphis Belle, who are stationed in England, are anticipating their final mission – to fly over Nazi-occupied Europe. Full of nostalgia, this loosely based-on-real-events story exudes a romanticised view of heroism, but features an endearing cast, including Billy Zane, Sean Astin,John Lithgow, Eric Stoltz, and Harry Connick Jr. Monday 2 October The curmudgeon returns: Larry David is back after six years Credit: HBO/Skt Curb Your Enthusiasm Sky Atlantic, 10.00pm Cometh the hour, cometh the curmudgeon. It’s been six years since we last saw the irascible Larry David and the rest of his gang of malcontents, and this return is something of a surprise delight given that David had previously claimed to have mined every last possible drop from his alter-ego’s grumpy loathing of modern life.  No previews were available for this opening episode, which is not a surprise seeing as David has always run a tight ship regarding spoilers and HBO went into lockdown after episodes were leaked during the summer. So what can we expect? Bryan Cranston joins the cast as Larry’s new therapist, the wonderful double act of Ted Danson and Mary Steenburgen return, and David has promised that we’ll uncover just what happened after Larry left for Paris with perpetual house guest Leon (the scene-stealing J B Smoove). “It’s been a five-year log-jam of indignities and violations of etiquette,” executive producer Jeff Schaffer told Variety and it’s true that Curb’s return seems particularly suited to our current times. “Every day confirms, more and more, he’s right! He’s right about everything,” noted David. One thing is certain: it’ll be fun finding out if that’s true. Sarah Hughes Race and Pace: The West Indians in East Lancashire BBC Four, 7.30pm When West Indian cricketers began to arrive in Lancashire, the Northern county was hit for six. This enlightening documentary, narrated by Death in Paradise’s Don Warrington, tells the story of how initial reticence and racism turned into an unlikely cricketing love affair. Among those recalling their experiences are knights of the cricketing order, Viv Richards and Wes Hall, who also discuss the huge impact West Indian players made on the LCC and the resulting effect it had on both sides of the Atlantic over the past 90 years. Tunes for Tyrants: Music & Power with Suzy Klein BBC Four, 9.00pm Presented by Suzy Klein, this documentary is an exploration of music’s crucial political role in the most turbulent years of the 20th century. It begins with the Radio 3 presenter looking at the years following the Russian Revolution and the First World War when music was seen as a tool to change society. CM Liar ITV, 9.00pm After last week’s revelation, the William brothers’ potboiler continues apace. In the fourth episode, dogged “rape victim” Laura Nielson (Joanne Froggatt) travels to Edinburgh to find out how Andrew Earlham’s (Ioan Gruffudd) wife’s really died. Paddington Station 24/7 Channel 5, 9.00pm Watching this behind-the-scenes look at London’s Paddington Station, you can understand why rail passengers become frustrated by the service. In this episode, the staff have to deal with signal problems during rush hour. Later, a team of engineers race to replace 60 ft of rail hours before the morning rush begins. W1A BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI John Morton’s parody of life inside Broadcasting House always manages to find big laughs in unusual circumstances. Tonight, the Renewal Team propose to get rid of the BBC Big Swing Band, and marketing guru Siobhan (the excellent Jessica Hynes) decides to make a trailer to launch the YouTube-like BBC ME.  Stacey Dooley Investigates: Mums Selling Their Kids for Sex BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm; Scot, 11.45pm In this disturbing film, previously shown on BBC Three, Dooley is in the Philippines to investigate mothers who sexually exploit their children live on the web. Clive Morgan Ace Ventura: Pet Detective (1994) ★★★☆☆☆ 5STAR, 8.00pm  Back in 1994, Jim Carrey went from near obscurity to starring in three hits in a year. The first was this very funny comedy about a zany pet detective who finds himself out of his depth (the others were The Mask and Dumb & Dumber). Here, he’s hired by Miami’s NFL team to track down their mascot, a bottlenose dolphin named Snowflake, before the Super Bowl. Courteney Cox co-stars as the team’s publicist. Moulin Rouge! (2001) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 8.00pm  Baz Luhrmann’s intoxicating spectacle was the first musical to be nominated for the Best Picture Oscar in 22 years. Set in 1899, Montmartre, it follows a poet (Ewan McGregor) who becomes love-struck with the city’s famous courtesan (Nicole Kidman, who enters the film on a bejazzled swing). The mix of period setting and contemporary pop ensure a vivid assault on the senses. The Specialist (1994) ★★☆☆☆ ITV4, 10.00pm  Sharon Stone slinks around Sylvester Stallone in this celebrity vehicle that garnered a lot of attention, at the time of release, for its sex scene. Stallone plays a former CIA bomb expert hired by Stone to destroy the Mob that killed her family. Supporting actor James Woods remains unscathed in a film full of giant explosions, silly plot twists, and Rod Steiger trying out a Cuban accent (indecipherable and hilarious). Tuesday 3 October Caught in the middle: Suranne Jones and Tom Taylor Credit: BBC Doctor Foster BBC One, 9.00pm Handbrake turns have become the norm in the extraordinary second series of Mike Bartlett’s ripe melodrama, with showdown following showdown, passive aggression increasingly supplanted by straightforward aggression, and twists galore threatening a lurch into the territory of Fatal Attraction, only in reverse. The Fosters are in disarray – Simon (Bertie Carvel) is estranged from his second family and income stream, while Gemma (Suranne Jones) is concerned that her actions have pushed away their son (Tom Taylor, the show’s unsung star). We left Gemma driving at speed towards Simon – what happens next remains under wraps, but suffice to say that the most unexpected twist in tonight’s conclusion is one of tone: from operatic melodrama (albeit sustained by brilliant performances) into sombre contemplation – the fallout after the explosion. Flashbacks illustrate both the affection once at the heart of the family and a failure to meet the needs of its most vulnerable member. The door is left wide open for a third series; it’s been fun, but has strained credibility – it might be wise to emulate the Doctor Foster of the nursery rhyme and never go there again. Gabriel Tate Rodney Carrington: Here Comes the Truth Netflix, from 12.01am Rodney Carrington’s stand-up is an unapologetically crude assault on political correctness (his material ranges from Muslims to his manhood), but, undeniably, he has a big following in the US. This recording from his most recent tour will establish whether this acquired taste is also yours. The Great British Bake Off Channel 4, 8.00pm With the chancers and fudgers departed, Prue Leith and Paul Hollywood have a smorgasbord of class acts from which to choose as Pastry Week dawns: the showstopper sees the bakers attempt a pie with a difference. Reformation: Europe’s Holy War BBC Two, 9.00pm Once inescapable, David Starkey now makes infrequent appearances on TV; which is just as well, given a little of his strident controversialism generally goes a long way. Here, he’s on entertaining form exploring the malign forces unleashed by the Protestant Reformation some 500 years ago – and their modern parallels. Sex, Chips and Poetry: 50 Years of the Mersey Sound BBC Four, 9.00pm In 1967, the same year that The Beatles released Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, fellow Liverpudlians Roger McGough, Brian Patten and Adrian Henri took the spoken-word revolution started by the Beat Poets and transformed it into something uniquely British. This amiable and richly deserved tribute documentary, narrated by Isy Suttie, celebrates the 50th anniversary of their work on The Mersey Sound, one of the best-selling poetry anthologies of all time, which is still a mainstay on school syllabuses. GT Barbie: the Most Famous Doll in the World Channel 4, 9.15pm Mary Portas visits toymaker Mattel, attends conventions and talks to children in a bid to make sense of a doll blamed for entrenching everything from everyday sexism to unrealistic body images. How can an apparently outmoded icon be reinvented for the modern age? The Insider: Reggie Yates in a Refugee Camp BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm; Scot, 11.45pm In this documentary, first shown on BBC Three, Reggie Yates spends a week in Iraq’s largest refugee camp, where he lives alongside 30,000 displaced Syrians facing an uncertain future. GT The Karate Kid (2010) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.15pm  To most people’s surprise, this is a more-than-satisfying update on the much-loved original, though also comes across as an extended tourism advert. Jaden Smith (son of Will) plays a 12-year-old who moves from Detroit to Beijing with his mother (Taraji P Henson). There he becomes a punching bag for local bullies, but makes a new friend in a maintenance man and martial arts master Mr Han (Jackie Chan), who teaches him how to fight. Ice Age 3: Dawn of the Dinosaurs (2009) ★★★☆☆ E4, 8.00pm  This is comfortably the best in the Ice Age series and solid children’s entertainment, but you may need to explain that dinosaurs didn’t live in a vast hothouse under the glaciers, and woolly mammoths called Manny probably weren’t on chummy terms with sabre-toothed tigers called Diego. Here, the gang head to a tropical lost world to rescue Sid the Sloth (John Leguizamo). 22 Jump Street (2014) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 9.00pm  Channing Tatum’s charisma and the best malapropisms ever make this sequel to 21 Jump Street a joy. Instead of infiltrating school to arrest the suppliers of a drug, Jonah Hill’s Schmidt and Tatum’s Jenko infiltrate college to do… exactly the same. The film is directed by Phil Lord and Christopher Miller (The Lego Movie) who are becoming the handiest duo since the Coen brothers. Wednesday 4 October Back in business: Lord Sugar (centre) with Karren Brady and Claude Littner Credit: BBC The Apprentice BBC One, 9.00pm Thirteen series in and we all know by now that The Apprentice is not so much a search for the brightest and best new business entrepreneurs, but an exercise in finding the one polishable, er, apple in a barrelful of “pony and trap” as adept cockney rhymer Lord Sugar puts it. And what fun it still is watching all those overinflated young egos being cut down to size by the process.  This time 18 candidates vie for the prize of £250,000 start-up capital, and just to remind the wannabe tycoons what a great opportunity they’re being given, Lord Sugar marches five previous winners into the boardroom to beguile them with tales of success.  The opening challenge, though, couldn’t be more basic: making burgers and flogging them on the street. Which is not to say there isn’t lots of room for error and unfathomably gross stupidity, too. In fact, you’re pretty much guaranteed to spend most of this show slapping your forehead at the unadulterated ineptitude of some of these self-proclaimed geniuses. In other words, a great start to what looks like being another hilarious series with, as ever, The Apprentice: You’re Fired following, at 10pm on BBC Two. Gerard O’Donovan Who Do You Think You Are? BBC One, 8.00pm Some editions of this latest series have felt less like journeys of discovery and more like genetic quests. Here, comedian Ruby Wax sets out to discover whether her mental health issues might have been evident earlier in her family line. Billion Dollar Deals and How They Changed Your World BBC Two, 8.00pm Yes, it’s a conspiracy. In the second programme of his absorbing series about how the world is ruled not by politicians but by decisions made in corporate boardrooms, Jacques Peretti considers why big business is currently so determined to kill off cash.  The Detectives: Murder on the Streets BBC Two, 9.00pm “It not like the Seventies. It’s not about slapping people. It’s about what you disclose to the person.” The art of tripping suspects up in their own lies inches Manchester police ever closer to solving two brutal killings in this nail-biting real-life crime series. Britain’s Lost Masterpieces BBC Four, 9.00pm Bendor Grosvenor and Emma Dabiri head to the Derby Museum to investigate a painting that suffered an unusually poor early restoration. Could it be a work by the great 18th-century British master, Joseph Wright of Derby, and if so can it be returned to its former glory?  The Great War in Numbers Yesterday, 9.00pm Think of the First World War and it’s the millions of lives lost in the trenches that come to mind. But, as this documentary series reveals, everything about the Great War was on a scale previously unparalleled: machine guns in millions, artillery shells in billions, the mind-boggling logistics of keeping vast numbers of men fed, clothed and fighting fit in the field. Tonight’s first film of six explores how the empires of Germany, France, Russia and Britain were able to pour so much wealth into the industrialisation of warfare. GO Back Channel 4, 10.00pm Fate just seems to get crueller for Stephen (David Mitchell) when Andrew (Robert Webb) manages to increase his share in the pub. But then Alison (Olivia Poulet) uncovers information that could yet force the cuckoo out of the family nest. GO Mercury Rising (1998) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm  Bruce Willis is excellent as an undercover FBI agent assigned to protect a nine-year-old autistic boy (Miko Hughes) who is targeted by assassins after cracking a top secret government code in this underrated, if slightly unrealistic, thriller based on the Ryne Douglas Pearson novel Simon Says. The plot moves at breakneck speed yet, ultimately, it’s a touching and heart-warming story. The Football Factory (2004) ★★★☆☆ London Live, 10.00pm  John King’s book The Football Factory is an unnerving and brutal account of hooliganism in the Nineties, centring on a firm of Chelsea boot boys and their clashes with rival “fans”. Nick Love’s film certainly captures the thuggery, with Danny Dyer as Tommy, for whom life is about drink, drugs, sex, thieving and a good ruck – but who begins to question his ways. Made in France (2015) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.00pm  This thriller, about a wave of jihadist attacks on Paris, was pulled from cinemas following its plot’s number of unnerving parallels with recent events in the French capital. In it, an extremist cell plans a series of shootings and bombings across the city “that will shake France” and the world. Director Nicholas Boukhrief said he made the film to counter the “poison” of jihadist propaganda. Thursday 5 October Fire safety: in the wake of the Grenfell Tower disaster Credit: PA The Housing Enforcers BBC One, 8.00pm; BBC Two Wales, 7.00pm “Everyone has a right to a safe place to live, no matter who you are, where you live or how much rent you pay. It’s non-negotiable.” So concludes Matt Allwright at the end of this programme focusing on the importance of fire safety.  The format is straightforward: Allwright travels across the country meeting with housing officers and examining the myriad ways in which fires can destroy lives. What makes this really hit home, however, is the presenter’s quiet fury at the way in which some lives are considered less worthy than others. Inevitably, the shadow of Grenfell Tower hangs heavy over the hour. It’s notable that many of those worst affected are elderly and living alone: the story of fiercely independent Ali who refuses to acknowledge, even to his family, quite how much he is struggling is particularly poignant. Allwright, however, saves his most righteous rage for the landlords squeezing tenants in wherever they can and failing to meet even the minimum health and safety standards. The result is a hard-hitting and often hard-to-watch documentary, which also offers solid advice on how to deal both with fires and bad landlords. Sarah Hughes Live International Football: England v Slovenia ITV, 7.30pm Having drawn 0-0 last October, with Joe Hart forced to make a string of fine saves, England and Slovenia reconvene at Wembley. Victory today for Gareth Southgate’s men will ensure their qualification for next year’s World Cup in Russia. And having beaten second-placed Slovakia 2-1 last month, thanks to a strike from tyro Marcus Rashford, they’ll be confident of doing just that. The Big Family Cooking Showdown BBC Two, 8.00pm Two last families go head to head for a place in the finals. Their £10 challenge is a Friday night takeaway, so naturally curry is on the menu. There’s talk of “fusion” cooking, some mushy spinach and a 34-year-old rolling pin.   Discovering: Laurence Olivier Sky Arts, 8.00pm The spotlight turns on Laurence Olivier, who, in 1937, described cinema as an “anaemic little medium which could not stand great acting”.   Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm The work of the West Midlands Ambulance Service continues as a specialist trauma team are dispatched to a motorbike accident where a man has suffered a catastrophic chest injury. “I’ve got nothing…” declares the doctor. It’s a stark reminder of the fragility of life and the increasing compassion of the services in times of chaos.    Russia with Simon Reeve BBC Two, 9.00pm Simon Reeve continues his fascinating journey, meeting Tuvan children in Siberia who practice the Mongolian tradition of throat singing.  Educating Greater Manchester Channel 4, 9.00pm Ah, that old chestnut – ignoring school uniform rules. This week, the teachers at Harrop Fold are on the back foot when a message is spread on Snapchat encouraging pupils to come in wearing trainers. Social media also causes friction between Year 11 girls Serena and Lelo when one talks to the other’s boyfriend on FaceTime. Rachel Ward Law & Order True Crime: The Menendez murders Sky Living, 9.00pm This series, similar to The People v OJ Simpson, takes a closer look at the two trials of brothers Lyle and Erik Menendez, who were convicted of murdering their parents in their Beverly Hills home in 1989. It focuses on the attorney (Edie Falco), who was one of their few defenders. Dimension 404 Syfy, 9.00pm Each episode of this new sci-fi anthology features a form of technology gone wrong. But there’s nothing unnerving about it, rather it’s a camp pastiche of The Twilight Zone, complete with Star Wars’ Mark Hamill providing the voice-over. Glee’s Lea Michele stars in the first episode about online dating. It’s weird, but it doesn’t overplay it. RW Robin and Marian (1976) ★★★★☆ Film4, 1.10pm  Sean Connery gives one of his best performances as a middle-aged Robin Hood, who heads home to Sherwood Forest after the death of Richard I. He finds that scaling a castle wall isn’t as easy as it used to be, Maid Marian (Audrey Hepburn) is still miffed at being left in the lurch, and the Sheriff (Robert Shaw) is up to his old tricks in Richard Lester’s good-natured romance. Look out for Ronnie Barker as Friar Tuck. Jerry Maguire (1996) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 5.40pm  In Cameron Crowe’s macho romcom, Tom Cruise plays a sports agent who has an attack of conscience and urges his colleagues to think about the welfare of their clients. He’s duly fired but announces that he’ll start his own agency. A washed-up footballer (Cuba Gooding Jr) and a single mother (Renée Zellweger) are the only ones who agree to go with him. Here, the classic quote, “You had me at ‘hello’” was born. The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.10pm Clint Eastwood directs and stars in this marvellous warm-hearted western adapted from Forrest Carter’s novel and set during the American Civil War. Eastwood plays the eponymous Missouri farmer who, driven by memories of his family’s slaughter, becomes an outlaw when he refuses to join his Confederate comrades in surrender, in favour of seeking revenge on the men who murdered his kin. Friday 6 October Penal colony: Harry Peacock, Kevin Bishop and Ricky Grover Credit: BBC Porridge BBC One, 9.30pm The most successful of the BBC’s classic sitcom revivals from last year, Porridge returns for a full series with the series’ creators Dick Clement and Ian La Frenais once again on board. It finds Nigel Norman Fletcher (Kevin Bishop as the grandson of Ronnie Barker’s character, Norman Stanley) locking horns with officer Meekie (Mark Bonnar) while aiding or outsmarting the prison’s ne’er-do-wells. In a canny twist, it is Fletch who is now the relative ingénue in his cell, seeking counsel from veteran lag Joe Lotterby (Dave Hill). We find Fletch as the prison’s resident Cyrano de Bergerac, writing letters to keep the flame of romance alive between assorted inmates and their partners on the outside. All goes well until Fletch suffers a crisis of conscience that threatens the whole operation. Some of the gags are groanworthy, but Clement and La Frenais’s mastery of sitcom mechanics remains complete; their presence keeps the spirit of the original intact, while the update means that no one is attempting to emulate the cast of the Seventies series. Fletch has a five-year sentence to serve; unlikely as it might seem, a similar term for Porridge might not be unwelcome. Gabriel Tate Suburra: the Series Netflix, from 12.01am Like Romanzo Criminale and Gomorrah before it, Suburra began life as a book before becoming a gripping, multifaceted Italian-language political thriller. This 10-part series, set in the dying days of Berlusconi’s regime, explores the themes of politics, the Church and corruption during 20 tumultuous days in Rome. Unreported World Channel 4, 7.30pm Ireland faces a pivotal referendum on the decriminalisation of abortion in certain circumstances; Kate Hardie-Buckley meets those on both sides of the debate in a deeply affecting edition of the current-affairs series. Modern Family Sky1, 8.30pm It may have tailed off since its peak, but Modern Family is still good for a few laughs. The ninth series begins with Jay (Ty Burrell) taking the family on a houseboat holiday, and Mitchell (Jesse Tyler Ferguson) encountering an old flame. Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm; not N Ireland or Wales Monty Don begins preparations for 2018 by advising others on how to use leaf mould as a mulch. Elsewhere, Adam Frost visits a community allotment in Manchester, and Nick Bailey learns from a zoologist about the life teeming in the soil. Nile Rodgers: How to Make It in the Music Business BBC Four, 9.00pm Guitar genius and pop producer Nile Rodgers shares the wisdom he’s acquired over decades in the music business. In the first episode, he discusses the founding of Chic and his influence on today’s hitmakers. GT Cold Feet ITV, 9.00pm Karen (Hermione Norris) is on the brink of financial disaster in spite of David’s (Robert Bathurst) assistance, while Adam (James Nesbitt) gets out of his depth on a night out in Mike Bullen’s assured comedy-drama revival. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm Another line-up of heavy-hitters assembles on the red sofa tonight: comedian Chris Rock plugs his first UK stand-up tour in a decade, actors Idris Elba and Kate Winslet discuss their niche genre movie, “disaster-romance” The Mountain Between Us (about a surgeon and a journalist who survive a plane crash), and Liam Gallagher performs songs from his debut album, As You Were. GT The Twilight Saga: Eclipse (2010) ★★★☆☆ E4, 8.00pm  The third instalment of the teenage vampire franchise is better than the second and will please its fan base, though Melissa Rosenberg’s script is full of clichés and relies on a shirtless Taylor Lautner for distraction. Girl-next-door Bella Swan (Kristen Stewart) must choose between 100-year-old vampire Edward Cullen (Robert Pattinson) and hunky werewolf Jacob Black (Lautner). T2: Trainspotting (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.00pm  Danny Boyle’s sequel is more than just a trip down memory lane. Back in 1996, Trainspotting’s gallery of junkies and rogues (Ewan McGregor, Jonny Lee Miller) proudly and raucously chose not to choose life. But now, all have come to terms with the gnawing possibility that life may have in fact not chosen them. There’s no chance of it matching the legacy of the first film, but it doesn’t tarnish it either. American Hustle (2013) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 12.10am  David O Russell’s caper feels like the film he has spent his career warming up for and is a serious piece of film-making that delights in its own silliness. Irving (Christian Bale) and his partner Sydney (Amy Adams) are con artists blackmailed by FBI agent Richie DiMaso (Bradley Cooper) into aiding his investigation. “Some of this actually happened,” reads a title card, and to be more specific would spoil the fun. Television previewers Catherine Gee, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: Stop All the Clocks: WH Auden in an Age of Anxiety and The Doors Night

Saturday 30 September Stop All the Clocks: WH Auden in an Age of Anxiety BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 10.30pm As anyone who’s seen Richard Curtis’s film Four Weddings and a Funeral will attest, W H Auden’s poetry has considerable emotional potency. Indeed, those not reduced to tears at the sight of John Hannah reading Stop All the Clocks should consult their doctor as soon as possible. (“He was my North, my South, my East and West/My working week and my Sunday rest/My noon, my midnight, my talk, my song/I thought that love would last for ever: I was wrong.”) His words also provide succour in troubled times: many New Yorkers, in fact, turned to his poem September 1, 1939 – a response to the outbreak of the Second World War – in the aftermath of 9/11.  Launching a season of poetry programmes, this excellent documentary from director Adam Low looks at why the craggy-faced Auden – whose reputation in Britain soured after his decision to move to America in 1939 – still has a great hold on our imaginations. Among those paying tribute to Auden’s words – a mix of humanity, scepticism and unsuppressed honesty – are writers Alan Bennett, Alexander McCall Smith and Curtis, who studied Auden at university. Patrick Smith Live Premier League Football: Chelsea v Manchester City BT Sport 1, 5.00pm The two teams’ last encounter at Stamford Bridge in April ended well for Chelsea, who won 2-1, thanks to a brace from Eden Hazard. But City have looked imperious this season: unbeaten in the league, they’ve won five of their six matches. Third-placed Chelsea go into this game with momentum from an impressive 4-0 victory at Stoke. In terms of their starting line-up, Pep Guardiola’s side must cope without summer signing Benjamin Mendy; the French full-back is currently sidelined with a ligament injury.  Strictly Come Dancing BBC One, 6.45pm This year’s competition is full of characters – from the divine Reverend Richard Coles and his disco-dad dancing to the gleefully giddy Debbie McGee – but tonight they must all impress not just the judges but the viewers, too: the first couple will be voted off in tomorrow’s results show.   Britain Afloat BBC Two, 8.00pm; N Ireland, 8.30pm Throughout our history, boats have played a major role and, in this new six-part series, Mary-Ann Ochota travels Britain’s waterways to see how they shaped our lives. Here, she explores the role boats played at Dunkirk and joins the Thames Barge match. The X Factor: Boot Camp ITV, 8.00pm Now that the auditions are over, it’s time for the lucky hopefuls to take part in Boot Camp. Those who manage to impress judges Simon, Nicole, Sharon and Louis will go through to the dreaded Six Chair Challenge. More tomorrow at 7.30pm.  The Doors Night Sky Arts, from 8.00pm In 1967, The Doors broke on through, releasing a string of hit singles and two platinum albums. With their intoxicating blend of blues, jazz and poetry, they exploded into the public consciousness, becoming one of the soundtracks to the Summer of Love. Now, 50 years later, Sky Arts is dedicating an evening of programming to the quartet, whose name is a reference to Aldous Huxley’s Doors of Perception. First up, in Rock Poet, is a fascinating profile of The Doors’ shamanistic frontman Jim Morrison, who died aged 27. Next is The Doors: Feast of Friends, which follows the band on the road. Rounding off the night is footage of their famous 1968 concert at the Hollywood Bowl. Black Lake BBC Four, 9.00pm and 9.40pm This fun Swedish supernatural chiller reaches its penultimate episodes, and there’s something nasty lurking in the cellar at the ski lodge, leaving the gang in a state of shock. PS The Jonathan Ross Show ITV, 9.30pm US singer Demi Lovato is on Jonathan Ross’s guest list as she promotes her “intimate” documentary Simply Complicated. She is joined by Doc Martin’s Martin Clunes and This Morning’s Holly Willoughby. The music comes from The X Factor 2012 winner James Arthur. Clive Morgan Now You See Me (2013) ★★☆☆☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm  A group of illusionists (Jesse Eisenberg, Woody Harrelson, Isla Fisher and Dave Franco) are encouraged to carry out a string of heists by a mysterious figure, while remaining ahead of FBI agent Rhodes (Mark Ruffalo), who is desperate to bring them to justice. Director Louis Leterrier tries to mimic the complex plots of films such as Inception, but with less success, though it’s reasonably entertaining. Transcendence (2014) ★★☆☆☆ Channel 4, 11.15pm  Johnny Depp and Rebecca Hall star as Will and Evelyn Caster, married artificial-intelligence scientists who download his brain patterns to a hard drive. This isn’t a casual choice: at a state-of-the-future convention, Will is grazed by a would-be assassin’s bullet, which is laced with a radioactive isotope, giving him weeks to live. The film, co-starring Cillian Murphy, is visually stylish but let down by poor storytelling. The Edge of Love (2008) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.35pm; Wales, 1.05am; not Scot  A fascinating story set during the Second World War about poet Dylan Thomas’s (Matthew Rhys) relationships with two women: his hedonistic Irish wife (Sienna Miller) and his Welsh childhood lover (Keira Knightley). An intense Jules et Jim-esque set-up develops, but the film could do with more about the art and less about the artist’s love life. It’s scripted by Knightley’s mother. Sunday 1 October Bad girl: Jessica Raine stars as military wife Alison Credit: BBC The Last Post BBC One, 9.00pm This intriguing six-part drama, scripted by playwright Peter Moffat, is set against an unusual backdrop – the mid-Sixties conflict that took place in the then British Crown Colony of Aden on the southern Arabian peninsula. Jessica Raine is the star attraction in the bad-girl role of Alison, the drunken, unhappy and unfaithful wife of conscientious but undervalued military policeman Lieutenant Ed Laithwaite (Stephen Campbell Moore).  The atmosphere of unrelenting heat and dust is very well conveyed, as is the day-to-day tedium of life for military wives on a Royal Military Police base and the hierarchies of rank that must be observed. We get the full introduction in this opening episode as newlyweds Captain Joe Martin (Jeremy Neumark Jones) and his wife Honor (Jessie Buckley) arrive on the base as the going-away party for the popular man he’s replacing, Captain Page (Joseph Kennedy), is in full swing. Meanwhile, Laithwaite receives information that an attack on the base by rebel fighters is imminent, but his commanding officer, Major Markham (Ben Miles) refuses to take his warnings seriously. What happens next is not as obvious as you might expect. Gerard O’Donovan Live Formula 1: Malaysia Grand Prix Sky Sports Main Event & Channel 4, 7.35am The 19th Grand Prix in this country will also be its last, as the Malaysian government withdraws funding for the Sepang circuit. Drivers had to endure the challenge of racing in 50-degree heat, with hydration as important as a full tank. Lewis Hamilton will be hoping to increase his lead in the championship with another victory, but a mix of unpredictable weather and a track known for its sharp corners should ensure that this Grand Prix keeps throwing up surprises right until the very end. Live NFL: New Orleans Saints v Miami Dolphins BBC Two, 1.45pm Wembley Stadium is the setting again for the NFL, having hosted Jacksonville Jaguars’ 44-7 demolition of the Baltimore Ravens last weekend. This will be a fourth trip to Wembley for the Dolphins, who appeared in the first International Series game here in 2007 when they lost 13-10 to the New York Giants, while their most recent appearance saw them defeated 27-14 by the New York Jets in 2015. The Saints have less experience of playing at Wembley, but did register a 37-32 win over the then-San Diego Chargers in 2008, in their only previous trip to the UK.  Live Premier League Rugby Union: Wasps v Bath BT Sport 1, 2.15pm The new season has turned sour for both teams, and Wasps are keen to avoid their third successive defeat. If history is an indicator they should have the upper hand, having won their last four matches against Bath – the most recent of which finished 24-3, with two tries from Kurtley Beale helping them on their way. The visitors come into this match on the back of an agonising 33-32 defeat to Newcastle Falcons, who scored twice in the last 15 minutes to come from behind in a nine-try thriller. Cornwall’s Native Poet: Charles Causley BBC Four, 8.00pm This documentary, the first of three films from the BBC’s Contains Strong Language poetry strand, celebrates the life and work of Charles Causley, a Cornish poet so deeply rooted in the county that he only left his home town of Launceston once, for naval service in the Second World War. Escape Channel 4, 8.00pm There are five people stranded in the middle of a desert following a plane crash. They have one chance of survival: creating another vehicle from the plane wreckage. That’s the premise of this new series in which five engineers are challenged to use their ingenuity and skill to escape a tricky situation. Men Who Sleep in Cars BBC Four, 9.00pm Scripted entirely in verse, poet Michael Symmons Roberts’s film is a love song to the city of Manchester. It tells the poignant story of three rough sleepers whose impoverished lives are seen in contrast to the great wealth of the city. With Maxine Peake. Electric Dreams:The Commuter Channel 4, 9.00pm The third story in this enjoyable series based on sci-fi pioneer Philip K Dick’s stories stars Timothy Spall as a railway attendant with a sad home life. But when he meets a mysterious traveller, he is forced to choose between fantasy and reality. Dawn French Live: 30 Million Minutes BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 10.55pm; Wales, 10.45pm Recorded last year in London’s West End, this is the actress and comedian’s live solo show, inspired by the tough but entertaining lessons she’s learnt from life.  Child in Mind BBC Four, 10.00pm Simon Armitage has a talent for making powerfully poetic television. Here he mixes documentary footage and verse to give a voice to the dispossessed women in Britain, the mothers of the 3,000 children placed in care every year. GO Boris Johnson: Blond Ambition Channel 4, 10.05pm After a period of calm, the Boris bandwagon is gathering speed once again following the publication of his vision for a post-Brexit Britain in The Telegraph. Here Channel 4’s political editor Gary Gibbon looks back at Johnson’s 14 months as Foreign Secretary, assessing his impact and success on the world stage. GO Happy Feet (2006) ★★★★☆ ITV2, 3.45pm  Australian director George Miller won a Best Animated Feature Oscar for this entertaining believe-in-yourself animation. Mumble, a misfit emperor penguin (baby voice by Elizabeth Daily, adult voice by Elijah Wood) is causing his parents (voiced by Nicole Kidman and Jackman) concern because he can’t sing and is therefore unable to attract a mate. Mumble can tap-dance, though, and therein lies his salvation. A United Kingdom (2016) ★★★★☆   Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm  Amma Asante’s film retells a true story that took place simultaneously in the corridors of Westminster and the country now known as Botswana just over half a century ago. It’s about the inter-racial romance between English woman Ruth (Rosamund Pike) and Seretse (David Oyelowo), the future king. It’s stirring stuff and a chapter of history that rewards a close reading. Memphis Belle (1990) ★★★☆☆☆ ITV4, 9.05pm  It’s 1943, and the handsome American crew of Second World War B-17 bomber Memphis Belle, who are stationed in England, are anticipating their final mission – to fly over Nazi-occupied Europe. Full of nostalgia, this loosely based-on-real-events story exudes a romanticised view of heroism, but features an endearing cast, including Billy Zane, Sean Astin,John Lithgow, Eric Stoltz, and Harry Connick Jr. Monday 2 October The curmudgeon returns: Larry David is back after six years Credit: HBO/Skt Curb Your Enthusiasm Sky Atlantic, 10.00pm Cometh the hour, cometh the curmudgeon. It’s been six years since we last saw the irascible Larry David and the rest of his gang of malcontents, and this return is something of a surprise delight given that David had previously claimed to have mined every last possible drop from his alter-ego’s grumpy loathing of modern life.  No previews were available for this opening episode, which is not a surprise seeing as David has always run a tight ship regarding spoilers and HBO went into lockdown after episodes were leaked during the summer. So what can we expect? Bryan Cranston joins the cast as Larry’s new therapist, the wonderful double act of Ted Danson and Mary Steenburgen return, and David has promised that we’ll uncover just what happened after Larry left for Paris with perpetual house guest Leon (the scene-stealing J B Smoove). “It’s been a five-year log-jam of indignities and violations of etiquette,” executive producer Jeff Schaffer told Variety and it’s true that Curb’s return seems particularly suited to our current times. “Every day confirms, more and more, he’s right! He’s right about everything,” noted David. One thing is certain: it’ll be fun finding out if that’s true. Sarah Hughes Race and Pace: The West Indians in East Lancashire BBC Four, 7.30pm When West Indian cricketers began to arrive in Lancashire, the Northern county was hit for six. This enlightening documentary, narrated by Death in Paradise’s Don Warrington, tells the story of how initial reticence and racism turned into an unlikely cricketing love affair. Among those recalling their experiences are knights of the cricketing order, Viv Richards and Wes Hall, who also discuss the huge impact West Indian players made on the LCC and the resulting effect it had on both sides of the Atlantic over the past 90 years. Tunes for Tyrants: Music & Power with Suzy Klein BBC Four, 9.00pm Presented by Suzy Klein, this documentary is an exploration of music’s crucial political role in the most turbulent years of the 20th century. It begins with the Radio 3 presenter looking at the years following the Russian Revolution and the First World War when music was seen as a tool to change society. CM Liar ITV, 9.00pm After last week’s revelation, the William brothers’ potboiler continues apace. In the fourth episode, dogged “rape victim” Laura Nielson (Joanne Froggatt) travels to Edinburgh to find out how Andrew Earlham’s (Ioan Gruffudd) wife’s really died. Paddington Station 24/7 Channel 5, 9.00pm Watching this behind-the-scenes look at London’s Paddington Station, you can understand why rail passengers become frustrated by the service. In this episode, the staff have to deal with signal problems during rush hour. Later, a team of engineers race to replace 60 ft of rail hours before the morning rush begins. W1A BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI John Morton’s parody of life inside Broadcasting House always manages to find big laughs in unusual circumstances. Tonight, the Renewal Team propose to get rid of the BBC Big Swing Band, and marketing guru Siobhan (the excellent Jessica Hynes) decides to make a trailer to launch the YouTube-like BBC ME.  Stacey Dooley Investigates: Mums Selling Their Kids for Sex BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm; Scot, 11.45pm In this disturbing film, previously shown on BBC Three, Dooley is in the Philippines to investigate mothers who sexually exploit their children live on the web. Clive Morgan Ace Ventura: Pet Detective (1994) ★★★☆☆☆ 5STAR, 8.00pm  Back in 1994, Jim Carrey went from near obscurity to starring in three hits in a year. The first was this very funny comedy about a zany pet detective who finds himself out of his depth (the others were The Mask and Dumb & Dumber). Here, he’s hired by Miami’s NFL team to track down their mascot, a bottlenose dolphin named Snowflake, before the Super Bowl. Courteney Cox co-stars as the team’s publicist. Moulin Rouge! (2001) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 8.00pm  Baz Luhrmann’s intoxicating spectacle was the first musical to be nominated for the Best Picture Oscar in 22 years. Set in 1899, Montmartre, it follows a poet (Ewan McGregor) who becomes love-struck with the city’s famous courtesan (Nicole Kidman, who enters the film on a bejazzled swing). The mix of period setting and contemporary pop ensure a vivid assault on the senses. The Specialist (1994) ★★☆☆☆ ITV4, 10.00pm  Sharon Stone slinks around Sylvester Stallone in this celebrity vehicle that garnered a lot of attention, at the time of release, for its sex scene. Stallone plays a former CIA bomb expert hired by Stone to destroy the Mob that killed her family. Supporting actor James Woods remains unscathed in a film full of giant explosions, silly plot twists, and Rod Steiger trying out a Cuban accent (indecipherable and hilarious). Tuesday 3 October Caught in the middle: Suranne Jones and Tom Taylor Credit: BBC Doctor Foster BBC One, 9.00pm Handbrake turns have become the norm in the extraordinary second series of Mike Bartlett’s ripe melodrama, with showdown following showdown, passive aggression increasingly supplanted by straightforward aggression, and twists galore threatening a lurch into the territory of Fatal Attraction, only in reverse. The Fosters are in disarray – Simon (Bertie Carvel) is estranged from his second family and income stream, while Gemma (Suranne Jones) is concerned that her actions have pushed away their son (Tom Taylor, the show’s unsung star). We left Gemma driving at speed towards Simon – what happens next remains under wraps, but suffice to say that the most unexpected twist in tonight’s conclusion is one of tone: from operatic melodrama (albeit sustained by brilliant performances) into sombre contemplation – the fallout after the explosion. Flashbacks illustrate both the affection once at the heart of the family and a failure to meet the needs of its most vulnerable member. The door is left wide open for a third series; it’s been fun, but has strained credibility – it might be wise to emulate the Doctor Foster of the nursery rhyme and never go there again. Gabriel Tate Rodney Carrington: Here Comes the Truth Netflix, from 12.01am Rodney Carrington’s stand-up is an unapologetically crude assault on political correctness (his material ranges from Muslims to his manhood), but, undeniably, he has a big following in the US. This recording from his most recent tour will establish whether this acquired taste is also yours. The Great British Bake Off Channel 4, 8.00pm With the chancers and fudgers departed, Prue Leith and Paul Hollywood have a smorgasbord of class acts from which to choose as Pastry Week dawns: the showstopper sees the bakers attempt a pie with a difference. Reformation: Europe’s Holy War BBC Two, 9.00pm Once inescapable, David Starkey now makes infrequent appearances on TV; which is just as well, given a little of his strident controversialism generally goes a long way. Here, he’s on entertaining form exploring the malign forces unleashed by the Protestant Reformation some 500 years ago – and their modern parallels. Sex, Chips and Poetry: 50 Years of the Mersey Sound BBC Four, 9.00pm In 1967, the same year that The Beatles released Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, fellow Liverpudlians Roger McGough, Brian Patten and Adrian Henri took the spoken-word revolution started by the Beat Poets and transformed it into something uniquely British. This amiable and richly deserved tribute documentary, narrated by Isy Suttie, celebrates the 50th anniversary of their work on The Mersey Sound, one of the best-selling poetry anthologies of all time, which is still a mainstay on school syllabuses. GT Barbie: the Most Famous Doll in the World Channel 4, 9.15pm Mary Portas visits toymaker Mattel, attends conventions and talks to children in a bid to make sense of a doll blamed for entrenching everything from everyday sexism to unrealistic body images. How can an apparently outmoded icon be reinvented for the modern age? The Insider: Reggie Yates in a Refugee Camp BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm; Scot, 11.45pm In this documentary, first shown on BBC Three, Reggie Yates spends a week in Iraq’s largest refugee camp, where he lives alongside 30,000 displaced Syrians facing an uncertain future. GT The Karate Kid (2010) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.15pm  To most people’s surprise, this is a more-than-satisfying update on the much-loved original, though also comes across as an extended tourism advert. Jaden Smith (son of Will) plays a 12-year-old who moves from Detroit to Beijing with his mother (Taraji P Henson). There he becomes a punching bag for local bullies, but makes a new friend in a maintenance man and martial arts master Mr Han (Jackie Chan), who teaches him how to fight. Ice Age 3: Dawn of the Dinosaurs (2009) ★★★☆☆ E4, 8.00pm  This is comfortably the best in the Ice Age series and solid children’s entertainment, but you may need to explain that dinosaurs didn’t live in a vast hothouse under the glaciers, and woolly mammoths called Manny probably weren’t on chummy terms with sabre-toothed tigers called Diego. Here, the gang head to a tropical lost world to rescue Sid the Sloth (John Leguizamo). 22 Jump Street (2014) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 9.00pm  Channing Tatum’s charisma and the best malapropisms ever make this sequel to 21 Jump Street a joy. Instead of infiltrating school to arrest the suppliers of a drug, Jonah Hill’s Schmidt and Tatum’s Jenko infiltrate college to do… exactly the same. The film is directed by Phil Lord and Christopher Miller (The Lego Movie) who are becoming the handiest duo since the Coen brothers. Wednesday 4 October Back in business: Lord Sugar (centre) with Karren Brady and Claude Littner Credit: BBC The Apprentice BBC One, 9.00pm Thirteen series in and we all know by now that The Apprentice is not so much a search for the brightest and best new business entrepreneurs, but an exercise in finding the one polishable, er, apple in a barrelful of “pony and trap” as adept cockney rhymer Lord Sugar puts it. And what fun it still is watching all those overinflated young egos being cut down to size by the process.  This time 18 candidates vie for the prize of £250,000 start-up capital, and just to remind the wannabe tycoons what a great opportunity they’re being given, Lord Sugar marches five previous winners into the boardroom to beguile them with tales of success.  The opening challenge, though, couldn’t be more basic: making burgers and flogging them on the street. Which is not to say there isn’t lots of room for error and unfathomably gross stupidity, too. In fact, you’re pretty much guaranteed to spend most of this show slapping your forehead at the unadulterated ineptitude of some of these self-proclaimed geniuses. In other words, a great start to what looks like being another hilarious series with, as ever, The Apprentice: You’re Fired following, at 10pm on BBC Two. Gerard O’Donovan Who Do You Think You Are? BBC One, 8.00pm Some editions of this latest series have felt less like journeys of discovery and more like genetic quests. Here, comedian Ruby Wax sets out to discover whether her mental health issues might have been evident earlier in her family line. Billion Dollar Deals and How They Changed Your World BBC Two, 8.00pm Yes, it’s a conspiracy. In the second programme of his absorbing series about how the world is ruled not by politicians but by decisions made in corporate boardrooms, Jacques Peretti considers why big business is currently so determined to kill off cash.  The Detectives: Murder on the Streets BBC Two, 9.00pm “It not like the Seventies. It’s not about slapping people. It’s about what you disclose to the person.” The art of tripping suspects up in their own lies inches Manchester police ever closer to solving two brutal killings in this nail-biting real-life crime series. Britain’s Lost Masterpieces BBC Four, 9.00pm Bendor Grosvenor and Emma Dabiri head to the Derby Museum to investigate a painting that suffered an unusually poor early restoration. Could it be a work by the great 18th-century British master, Joseph Wright of Derby, and if so can it be returned to its former glory?  The Great War in Numbers Yesterday, 9.00pm Think of the First World War and it’s the millions of lives lost in the trenches that come to mind. But, as this documentary series reveals, everything about the Great War was on a scale previously unparalleled: machine guns in millions, artillery shells in billions, the mind-boggling logistics of keeping vast numbers of men fed, clothed and fighting fit in the field. Tonight’s first film of six explores how the empires of Germany, France, Russia and Britain were able to pour so much wealth into the industrialisation of warfare. GO Back Channel 4, 10.00pm Fate just seems to get crueller for Stephen (David Mitchell) when Andrew (Robert Webb) manages to increase his share in the pub. But then Alison (Olivia Poulet) uncovers information that could yet force the cuckoo out of the family nest. GO Mercury Rising (1998) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm  Bruce Willis is excellent as an undercover FBI agent assigned to protect a nine-year-old autistic boy (Miko Hughes) who is targeted by assassins after cracking a top secret government code in this underrated, if slightly unrealistic, thriller based on the Ryne Douglas Pearson novel Simon Says. The plot moves at breakneck speed yet, ultimately, it’s a touching and heart-warming story. The Football Factory (2004) ★★★☆☆ London Live, 10.00pm  John King’s book The Football Factory is an unnerving and brutal account of hooliganism in the Nineties, centring on a firm of Chelsea boot boys and their clashes with rival “fans”. Nick Love’s film certainly captures the thuggery, with Danny Dyer as Tommy, for whom life is about drink, drugs, sex, thieving and a good ruck – but who begins to question his ways. Made in France (2015) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.00pm  This thriller, about a wave of jihadist attacks on Paris, was pulled from cinemas following its plot’s number of unnerving parallels with recent events in the French capital. In it, an extremist cell plans a series of shootings and bombings across the city “that will shake France” and the world. Director Nicholas Boukhrief said he made the film to counter the “poison” of jihadist propaganda. Thursday 5 October Fire safety: in the wake of the Grenfell Tower disaster Credit: PA The Housing Enforcers BBC One, 8.00pm; BBC Two Wales, 7.00pm “Everyone has a right to a safe place to live, no matter who you are, where you live or how much rent you pay. It’s non-negotiable.” So concludes Matt Allwright at the end of this programme focusing on the importance of fire safety.  The format is straightforward: Allwright travels across the country meeting with housing officers and examining the myriad ways in which fires can destroy lives. What makes this really hit home, however, is the presenter’s quiet fury at the way in which some lives are considered less worthy than others. Inevitably, the shadow of Grenfell Tower hangs heavy over the hour. It’s notable that many of those worst affected are elderly and living alone: the story of fiercely independent Ali who refuses to acknowledge, even to his family, quite how much he is struggling is particularly poignant. Allwright, however, saves his most righteous rage for the landlords squeezing tenants in wherever they can and failing to meet even the minimum health and safety standards. The result is a hard-hitting and often hard-to-watch documentary, which also offers solid advice on how to deal both with fires and bad landlords. Sarah Hughes Live International Football: England v Slovenia ITV, 7.30pm Having drawn 0-0 last October, with Joe Hart forced to make a string of fine saves, England and Slovenia reconvene at Wembley. Victory today for Gareth Southgate’s men will ensure their qualification for next year’s World Cup in Russia. And having beaten second-placed Slovakia 2-1 last month, thanks to a strike from tyro Marcus Rashford, they’ll be confident of doing just that. The Big Family Cooking Showdown BBC Two, 8.00pm Two last families go head to head for a place in the finals. Their £10 challenge is a Friday night takeaway, so naturally curry is on the menu. There’s talk of “fusion” cooking, some mushy spinach and a 34-year-old rolling pin.   Discovering: Laurence Olivier Sky Arts, 8.00pm The spotlight turns on Laurence Olivier, who, in 1937, described cinema as an “anaemic little medium which could not stand great acting”.   Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm The work of the West Midlands Ambulance Service continues as a specialist trauma team are dispatched to a motorbike accident where a man has suffered a catastrophic chest injury. “I’ve got nothing…” declares the doctor. It’s a stark reminder of the fragility of life and the increasing compassion of the services in times of chaos.    Russia with Simon Reeve BBC Two, 9.00pm Simon Reeve continues his fascinating journey, meeting Tuvan children in Siberia who practice the Mongolian tradition of throat singing.  Educating Greater Manchester Channel 4, 9.00pm Ah, that old chestnut – ignoring school uniform rules. This week, the teachers at Harrop Fold are on the back foot when a message is spread on Snapchat encouraging pupils to come in wearing trainers. Social media also causes friction between Year 11 girls Serena and Lelo when one talks to the other’s boyfriend on FaceTime. Rachel Ward Law & Order True Crime: The Menendez murders Sky Living, 9.00pm This series, similar to The People v OJ Simpson, takes a closer look at the two trials of brothers Lyle and Erik Menendez, who were convicted of murdering their parents in their Beverly Hills home in 1989. It focuses on the attorney (Edie Falco), who was one of their few defenders. Dimension 404 Syfy, 9.00pm Each episode of this new sci-fi anthology features a form of technology gone wrong. But there’s nothing unnerving about it, rather it’s a camp pastiche of The Twilight Zone, complete with Star Wars’ Mark Hamill providing the voice-over. Glee’s Lea Michele stars in the first episode about online dating. It’s weird, but it doesn’t overplay it. RW Robin and Marian (1976) ★★★★☆ Film4, 1.10pm  Sean Connery gives one of his best performances as a middle-aged Robin Hood, who heads home to Sherwood Forest after the death of Richard I. He finds that scaling a castle wall isn’t as easy as it used to be, Maid Marian (Audrey Hepburn) is still miffed at being left in the lurch, and the Sheriff (Robert Shaw) is up to his old tricks in Richard Lester’s good-natured romance. Look out for Ronnie Barker as Friar Tuck. Jerry Maguire (1996) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 5.40pm  In Cameron Crowe’s macho romcom, Tom Cruise plays a sports agent who has an attack of conscience and urges his colleagues to think about the welfare of their clients. He’s duly fired but announces that he’ll start his own agency. A washed-up footballer (Cuba Gooding Jr) and a single mother (Renée Zellweger) are the only ones who agree to go with him. Here, the classic quote, “You had me at ‘hello’” was born. The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.10pm Clint Eastwood directs and stars in this marvellous warm-hearted western adapted from Forrest Carter’s novel and set during the American Civil War. Eastwood plays the eponymous Missouri farmer who, driven by memories of his family’s slaughter, becomes an outlaw when he refuses to join his Confederate comrades in surrender, in favour of seeking revenge on the men who murdered his kin. Friday 6 October Penal colony: Harry Peacock, Kevin Bishop and Ricky Grover Credit: BBC Porridge BBC One, 9.30pm The most successful of the BBC’s classic sitcom revivals from last year, Porridge returns for a full series with the series’ creators Dick Clement and Ian La Frenais once again on board. It finds Nigel Norman Fletcher (Kevin Bishop as the grandson of Ronnie Barker’s character, Norman Stanley) locking horns with officer Meekie (Mark Bonnar) while aiding or outsmarting the prison’s ne’er-do-wells. In a canny twist, it is Fletch who is now the relative ingénue in his cell, seeking counsel from veteran lag Joe Lotterby (Dave Hill). We find Fletch as the prison’s resident Cyrano de Bergerac, writing letters to keep the flame of romance alive between assorted inmates and their partners on the outside. All goes well until Fletch suffers a crisis of conscience that threatens the whole operation. Some of the gags are groanworthy, but Clement and La Frenais’s mastery of sitcom mechanics remains complete; their presence keeps the spirit of the original intact, while the update means that no one is attempting to emulate the cast of the Seventies series. Fletch has a five-year sentence to serve; unlikely as it might seem, a similar term for Porridge might not be unwelcome. Gabriel Tate Suburra: the Series Netflix, from 12.01am Like Romanzo Criminale and Gomorrah before it, Suburra began life as a book before becoming a gripping, multifaceted Italian-language political thriller. This 10-part series, set in the dying days of Berlusconi’s regime, explores the themes of politics, the Church and corruption during 20 tumultuous days in Rome. Unreported World Channel 4, 7.30pm Ireland faces a pivotal referendum on the decriminalisation of abortion in certain circumstances; Kate Hardie-Buckley meets those on both sides of the debate in a deeply affecting edition of the current-affairs series. Modern Family Sky1, 8.30pm It may have tailed off since its peak, but Modern Family is still good for a few laughs. The ninth series begins with Jay (Ty Burrell) taking the family on a houseboat holiday, and Mitchell (Jesse Tyler Ferguson) encountering an old flame. Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm; not N Ireland or Wales Monty Don begins preparations for 2018 by advising others on how to use leaf mould as a mulch. Elsewhere, Adam Frost visits a community allotment in Manchester, and Nick Bailey learns from a zoologist about the life teeming in the soil. Nile Rodgers: How to Make It in the Music Business BBC Four, 9.00pm Guitar genius and pop producer Nile Rodgers shares the wisdom he’s acquired over decades in the music business. In the first episode, he discusses the founding of Chic and his influence on today’s hitmakers. GT Cold Feet ITV, 9.00pm Karen (Hermione Norris) is on the brink of financial disaster in spite of David’s (Robert Bathurst) assistance, while Adam (James Nesbitt) gets out of his depth on a night out in Mike Bullen’s assured comedy-drama revival. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm Another line-up of heavy-hitters assembles on the red sofa tonight: comedian Chris Rock plugs his first UK stand-up tour in a decade, actors Idris Elba and Kate Winslet discuss their niche genre movie, “disaster-romance” The Mountain Between Us (about a surgeon and a journalist who survive a plane crash), and Liam Gallagher performs songs from his debut album, As You Were. GT The Twilight Saga: Eclipse (2010) ★★★☆☆ E4, 8.00pm  The third instalment of the teenage vampire franchise is better than the second and will please its fan base, though Melissa Rosenberg’s script is full of clichés and relies on a shirtless Taylor Lautner for distraction. Girl-next-door Bella Swan (Kristen Stewart) must choose between 100-year-old vampire Edward Cullen (Robert Pattinson) and hunky werewolf Jacob Black (Lautner). T2: Trainspotting (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.00pm  Danny Boyle’s sequel is more than just a trip down memory lane. Back in 1996, Trainspotting’s gallery of junkies and rogues (Ewan McGregor, Jonny Lee Miller) proudly and raucously chose not to choose life. But now, all have come to terms with the gnawing possibility that life may have in fact not chosen them. There’s no chance of it matching the legacy of the first film, but it doesn’t tarnish it either. American Hustle (2013) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 12.10am  David O Russell’s caper feels like the film he has spent his career warming up for and is a serious piece of film-making that delights in its own silliness. Irving (Christian Bale) and his partner Sydney (Amy Adams) are con artists blackmailed by FBI agent Richie DiMaso (Bradley Cooper) into aiding his investigation. “Some of this actually happened,” reads a title card, and to be more specific would spoil the fun. Television previewers Catherine Gee, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: The Graham Norton Show and Cold Feet

FRIDAY 29 SEPTEMBER THE GRAHAM NORTON SHOW BBC One, 10.35pm Third from the top of the BBC’s recently published list of its highest earners (at between £850,000 and £899,000 a year), Graham Norton returns to the Friday evening schedules – as sure a sign that the nights are drawing in as the return of Strictly Come Dancing and The X Factor at the weekends.  The fact is Norton is a big draw not only for audiences but for celebrities, too, and he consistently eclipses every other UK chat show host when it comes to attracting the biggest stars from home and abroad to have a natter on his curvy red sofa.  Visiting Hollywood actors appear to be especially enamoured and that’s certainly the case in tonight’s show as Stars Wars and Indiana Jones star Harrison Ford and La La Land’s Ryan Gosling turn up to talk about their new sci-fi sequel Blade Runner 2049. Also making an appearance is Reese Witherspoon, who, fresh from the success of Big Little Lies at the Emmy Awards, is on hand to plug her latest comedy Home Again, while Margot Robbie (who is in Time magazine’s list of 2017’s most influential people) brings at least a hint of Britishness with talk of her new AA Milne biopic, Goodbye Christopher Robin. GO STARTUP Amazon Prime, from today Series one of this Miami-based drama, about entrepreneurs financing tech start-ups with dirty money, got a mixed reaction. But now it gets a deserved second season, with Martin Freeman returning as the exceedingly nasty FBI agent Phil Rask. Ron Perlman also joins the cast as the mercurial moneyman behind the latest venture.  GO LONG SHOT Netflix, from today A needle-in-haystack documentary, featuring Curb Your Enthusiasm’s Larry David, about how the fate of a man accused of murder rested on proving he was in a crowd of 54,000 people at a baseball game.  GO ONE-DAY INTERNATIONAL CRICKET: England v West Indies Sky Sports Main Event, 12.00noon Action from the fifth and final fixture in the series, which takes place at the Ageas Bowl in Southampton. Can Eoin Morgan’s men bring the curtain down on England’s summer endeavours in style? GO UNREPORTED WORLD Channel 4, 7.30pm The foreign affairs series returns with Marcel Theroux reporting on an unlikely explosion of home-grown pop music in China. These groups are working in defiance of the country’s censorship and against a government crackdown on authority-defying acts. GO BRITAIN BY BIKE WITH LARRY & GEORGE LAMB Channel 5, 8.00pm The father-and-son team of George and Larry Lamb take to two wheels for a convivial trip around Britain’s best national park cycle routes. They begin in the Yorkshire Dales, where they try fly-fishing and rock climbing before tackling a section of the 2014 Tour de France route. GO THE LAST PIRATES: BRITAIN’S REBEL DJS BBC Four, 9.00pm Forget Radio Caroline and Radio Luxembourg – rapper Rodney P tells the story of how, in the Eighties, a new wave of pirate radio stations created a platform for emerging rap artists and changed the soundtrack of Thatcher’s Britain. GO COLD FEET ITV, 9.00pm The focus of Mike Bullen’s entertaining comedy drama returns to the tangled love life of Adam (James Nesbitt) as his girlfriend Tina (Leanne Best) falls victim to online revenge porn. Meanwhile, Karen (Hermione Norris) is aided by an unlikely white knight in her fight against the hostile takeover bid. GO A CELEBRITY TASTE OF ITALY Channel 5, 9.00pm Nice work if you can get it: Ian Lavender, Rula Lenska, Judith Chalmers and Johnny Ball head to a luxury villa in Italy for a masterclass in how to prepare the best local foods and wines. This week, the enticing flavours of Tuscany. GO OUR SOULS AT NIGHT (2017) Netflix, from today  ★★★☆☆ Jane Fonda and Robert Redford – whose three-film partnership in the Sixties and Seventies, across The Chase, Barefoot in the Park and The Electric Horseman, set them apart as one of the most indecently gorgeous screen couples the movies ever produced – are on fizzing form in this cosy autumnal romance as two widowed neighbours who begin sleeping in bed together platonically to alleviate their loneliness. FLETCH (1985) Film4, 6.55pm  ★★★☆☆ Chevy Chase delivers dry one-liners and physical slapstick in this breezy comedy film that saw the peak of the actor’s career. Based on a series of novels by Gregory McDonald, the cult movie, which is one of the more quotable comedies of the Eighties, stars Chase as Fletch, a smart alec investigative reporter for an LA newspaper who is approached by a wealthy man who asks Fletch to kill him. UP IN THE AIR (2009) BBC One, 11.55pm  ★★★★☆ Jason Reitman (whose second film Juno earned him Oscar nominations) directs this witty love story. Ryan (George Clooney) is a downsizing expert, who flies around the US and fires people. That is, until a graduate (Anna Kendrick) proposes to save on airfares by getting staff to carry out sackings via video. Bingham is not happy; he likes the high life, and he likes fellow flyer Alex (Vera Farmiga). Saturday 30 September Popular poetry: how Auden still connects with modern life Credit: Getty Images Stop All the Clocks: WH Auden in an Age of Anxiety BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 10.30pm As anyone who’s seen Richard Curtis’s film Four Weddings and a Funeral will attest, W H Auden’s poetry has considerable emotional potency. Indeed, those not reduced to tears at the sight of John Hannah reading Stop All the Clocks should consult their doctor as soon as possible. (“He was my North, my South, my East and West/My working week and my Sunday rest/My noon, my midnight, my talk, my song/I thought that love would last for ever: I was wrong.”) His words also provide succour in troubled times: many New Yorkers, in fact, turned to his poem September 1, 1939 – a response to the outbreak of the Second World War – in the aftermath of 9/11.  Launching a season of poetry programmes, this excellent documentary from director Adam Low looks at why the craggy-faced Auden – whose reputation in Britain soured after his decision to move to America in 1939 – still has a great hold on our imaginations. Among those paying tribute to Auden’s words – a mix of humanity, scepticism and unsuppressed honesty – are writers Alan Bennett, Alexander McCall Smith and Curtis, who studied Auden at university. Patrick Smith Live Premier League Football: Chelsea v Manchester City BT Sport 1, 5.00pm The two teams’ last encounter at Stamford Bridge in April ended well for Chelsea, who won 2-1, thanks to a brace from Eden Hazard. But City have looked imperious this season: unbeaten in the league, they’ve won five of their six matches. Third-placed Chelsea go into this game with momentum from an impressive 4-0 victory at Stoke. In terms of their starting line-up, Pep Guardiola’s side must cope without summer signing Benjamin Mendy; the French full-back is currently sidelined with a ligament injury.  Strictly Come Dancing BBC One, 6.45pm This year’s competition is full of characters – from the divine Reverend Richard Coles and his disco-dad dancing to the gleefully giddy Debbie McGee – but tonight they must all impress not just the judges but the viewers, too: the first couple will be voted off in tomorrow’s results show.   Britain Afloat BBC Two, 8.00pm; N Ireland, 8.30pm Throughout our history, boats have played a major role and, in this new six-part series, Mary-Ann Ochota travels Britain’s waterways to see how they shaped our lives. Here, she explores the role boats played at Dunkirk and joins the Thames Barge match. The X Factor: Boot Camp ITV, 8.00pm Now that the auditions are over, it’s time for the lucky hopefuls to take part in Boot Camp. Those who manage to impress judges Simon, Nicole, Sharon and Louis will go through to the dreaded Six Chair Challenge. More tomorrow at 7.30pm.  The Doors Night Sky Arts, from 8.00pm In 1967, The Doors broke on through, releasing a string of hit singles and two platinum albums. With their intoxicating blend of blues, jazz and poetry, they exploded into the public consciousness, becoming one of the soundtracks to the Summer of Love. Now, 50 years later, Sky Arts is dedicating an evening of programming to the quartet, whose name is a reference to Aldous Huxley’s Doors of Perception. First up, in Rock Poet, is a fascinating profile of The Doors’ shamanistic frontman Jim Morrison, who died aged 27. Next is The Doors: Feast of Friends, which follows the band on the road. Rounding off the night is footage of their famous 1968 concert at the Hollywood Bowl. Black Lake BBC Four, 9.00pm and 9.40pm This fun Swedish supernatural chiller reaches its penultimate episodes, and there’s something nasty lurking in the cellar at the ski lodge, leaving the gang in a state of shock. PS The Jonathan Ross Show ITV, 9.30pm US singer Demi Lovato is on Jonathan Ross’s guest list as she promotes her “intimate” documentary Simply Complicated. She is joined by Doc Martin’s Martin Clunes and This Morning’s Holly Willoughby. The music comes from The X Factor 2012 winner James Arthur. Clive Morgan Now You See Me (2013) ★★☆☆☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm  A group of illusionists (Jesse Eisenberg, Woody Harrelson, Isla Fisher and Dave Franco) are encouraged to carry out a string of heists by a mysterious figure, while remaining ahead of FBI agent Rhodes (Mark Ruffalo), who is desperate to bring them to justice. Director Louis Leterrier tries to mimic the complex plots of films such as Inception, but with less success, though it’s reasonably entertaining. Transcendence (2014) ★★☆☆☆ Channel 4, 11.15pm  Johnny Depp and Rebecca Hall star as Will and Evelyn Caster, married artificial-intelligence scientists who download his brain patterns to a hard drive. This isn’t a casual choice: at a state-of-the-future convention, Will is grazed by a would-be assassin’s bullet, which is laced with a radioactive isotope, giving him weeks to live. The film, co-starring Cillian Murphy, is visually stylish but let down by poor storytelling. The Edge of Love (2008) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.35pm; Wales, 1.05am; not Scot  A fascinating story set during the Second World War about poet Dylan Thomas’s (Matthew Rhys) relationships with two women: his hedonistic Irish wife (Sienna Miller) and his Welsh childhood lover (Keira Knightley). An intense Jules et Jim-esque set-up develops, but the film could do with more about the art and less about the artist’s love life. It’s scripted by Knightley’s mother. Sunday 1 October Bad girl: Jessica Raine stars as military wife Alison Credit: BBC The Last Post BBC One, 9.00pm This intriguing six-part drama, scripted by playwright Peter Moffat, is set against an unusual backdrop – the mid-Sixties conflict that took place in the then British Crown Colony of Aden on the southern Arabian peninsula. Jessica Raine is the star attraction in the bad-girl role of Alison, the drunken, unhappy and unfaithful wife of conscientious but undervalued military policeman Lieutenant Ed Laithwaite (Stephen Campbell Moore).  The atmosphere of unrelenting heat and dust is very well conveyed, as is the day-to-day tedium of life for military wives on a Royal Military Police base and the hierarchies of rank that must be observed. We get the full introduction in this opening episode as newlyweds Captain Joe Martin (Jeremy Neumark Jones) and his wife Honor (Jessie Buckley) arrive on the base as the going-away party for the popular man he’s replacing, Captain Page (Joseph Kennedy), is in full swing. Meanwhile, Laithwaite receives information that an attack on the base by rebel fighters is imminent, but his commanding officer, Major Markham (Ben Miles) refuses to take his warnings seriously. What happens next is not as obvious as you might expect. Gerard O’Donovan Live Formula 1: Malaysia Grand Prix Sky Sports Main Event & Channel 4, 7.35am The 19th Grand Prix in this country will also be its last, as the Malaysian government withdraws funding for the Sepang circuit. Drivers had to endure the challenge of racing in 50-degree heat, with hydration as important as a full tank. Lewis Hamilton will be hoping to increase his lead in the championship with another victory, but a mix of unpredictable weather and a track known for its sharp corners should ensure that this Grand Prix keeps throwing up surprises right until the very end. Live NFL: New Orleans Saints v Miami Dolphins BBC Two, 1.45pm Wembley Stadium is the setting again for the NFL, having hosted Jacksonville Jaguars’ 44-7 demolition of the Baltimore Ravens last weekend. This will be a fourth trip to Wembley for the Dolphins, who appeared in the first International Series game here in 2007 when they lost 13-10 to the New York Giants, while their most recent appearance saw them defeated 27-14 by the New York Jets in 2015. The Saints have less experience of playing at Wembley, but did register a 37-32 win over the then-San Diego Chargers in 2008, in their only previous trip to the UK.  Live Premier League Rugby Union: Wasps v Bath BT Sport 1, 2.15pm The new season has turned sour for both teams, and Wasps are keen to avoid their third successive defeat. If history is an indicator they should have the upper hand, having won their last four matches against Bath – the most recent of which finished 24-3, with two tries from Kurtley Beale helping them on their way. The visitors come into this match on the back of an agonising 33-32 defeat to Newcastle Falcons, who scored twice in the last 15 minutes to come from behind in a nine-try thriller. Cornwall’s Native Poet: Charles Causley BBC Four, 8.00pm This documentary, the first of three films from the BBC’s Contains Strong Language poetry strand, celebrates the life and work of Charles Causley, a Cornish poet so deeply rooted in the county that he only left his home town of Launceston once, for naval service in the Second World War. Escape Channel 4, 8.00pm There are five people stranded in the middle of a desert following a plane crash. They have one chance of survival: creating another vehicle from the plane wreckage. That’s the premise of this new series in which five engineers are challenged to use their ingenuity and skill to escape a tricky situation. Men Who Sleep in Cars BBC Four, 9.00pm Scripted entirely in verse, poet Michael Symmons Roberts’s film is a love song to the city of Manchester. It tells the poignant story of three rough sleepers whose impoverished lives are seen in contrast to the great wealth of the city. With Maxine Peake. Electric Dreams:The Commuter Channel 4, 9.00pm The third story in this enjoyable series based on sci-fi pioneer Philip K Dick’s stories stars Timothy Spall as a railway attendant with a sad home life. But when he meets a mysterious traveller, he is forced to choose between fantasy and reality. Dawn French Live: 30 Million Minutes BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 10.55pm; Wales, 10.45pm Recorded last year in London’s West End, this is the actress and comedian’s live solo show, inspired by the tough but entertaining lessons she’s learnt from life.  Child in Mind BBC Four, 10.00pm Simon Armitage has a talent for making powerfully poetic television. Here he mixes documentary footage and verse to give a voice to the dispossessed women in Britain, the mothers of the 3,000 children placed in care every year. GO Boris Johnson: Blond Ambition Channel 4, 10.05pm After a period of calm, the Boris bandwagon is gathering speed once again following the publication of his vision for a post-Brexit Britain in The Telegraph. Here Channel 4’s political editor Gary Gibbon looks back at Johnson’s 14 months as Foreign Secretary, assessing his impact and success on the world stage. GO Happy Feet (2006) ★★★★☆ ITV2, 3.45pm  Australian director George Miller won a Best Animated Feature Oscar for this entertaining believe-in-yourself animation. Mumble, a misfit emperor penguin (baby voice by Elizabeth Daily, adult voice by Elijah Wood) is causing his parents (voiced by Nicole Kidman and Jackman) concern because he can’t sing and is therefore unable to attract a mate. Mumble can tap-dance, though, and therein lies his salvation. A United Kingdom (2016) ★★★★☆   Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm  Amma Asante’s film retells a true story that took place simultaneously in the corridors of Westminster and the country now known as Botswana just over half a century ago. It’s about the inter-racial romance between English woman Ruth (Rosamund Pike) and Seretse (David Oyelowo), the future king. It’s stirring stuff and a chapter of history that rewards a close reading. Memphis Belle (1990) ★★★☆☆☆ ITV4, 9.05pm  It’s 1943, and the handsome American crew of Second World War B-17 bomber Memphis Belle, who are stationed in England, are anticipating their final mission – to fly over Nazi-occupied Europe. Full of nostalgia, this loosely based-on-real-events story exudes a romanticised view of heroism, but features an endearing cast, including Billy Zane, Sean Astin,John Lithgow, Eric Stoltz, and Harry Connick Jr. Monday 2 October The curmudgeon returns: Larry David is back after six years Credit: HBO/Skt Curb Your Enthusiasm Sky Atlantic, 10.00pm Cometh the hour, cometh the curmudgeon. It’s been six years since we last saw the irascible Larry David and the rest of his gang of malcontents, and this return is something of a surprise delight given that David had previously claimed to have mined every last possible drop from his alter-ego’s grumpy loathing of modern life.  No previews were available for this opening episode, which is not a surprise seeing as David has always run a tight ship regarding spoilers and HBO went into lockdown after episodes were leaked during the summer. So what can we expect? Bryan Cranston joins the cast as Larry’s new therapist, the wonderful double act of Ted Danson and Mary Steenburgen return, and David has promised that we’ll uncover just what happened after Larry left for Paris with perpetual house guest Leon (the scene-stealing J B Smoove). “It’s been a five-year log-jam of indignities and violations of etiquette,” executive producer Jeff Schaffer told Variety and it’s true that Curb’s return seems particularly suited to our current times. “Every day confirms, more and more, he’s right! He’s right about everything,” noted David. One thing is certain: it’ll be fun finding out if that’s true. Sarah Hughes Race and Pace: The West Indians in East Lancashire BBC Four, 7.30pm When West Indian cricketers began to arrive in Lancashire, the Northern county was hit for six. This enlightening documentary, narrated by Death in Paradise’s Don Warrington, tells the story of how initial reticence and racism turned into an unlikely cricketing love affair. Among those recalling their experiences are knights of the cricketing order, Viv Richards and Wes Hall, who also discuss the huge impact West Indian players made on the LCC and the resulting effect it had on both sides of the Atlantic over the past 90 years. Tunes for Tyrants: Music & Power with Suzy Klein BBC Four, 9.00pm Presented by Suzy Klein, this documentary is an exploration of music’s crucial political role in the most turbulent years of the 20th century. It begins with the Radio 3 presenter looking at the years following the Russian Revolution and the First World War when music was seen as a tool to change society. CM Liar ITV, 9.00pm After last week’s revelation, the William brothers’ potboiler continues apace. In the fourth episode, dogged “rape victim” Laura Nielson (Joanne Froggatt) travels to Edinburgh to find out how Andrew Earlham’s (Ioan Gruffudd) wife’s really died. Paddington Station 24/7 Channel 5, 9.00pm Watching this behind-the-scenes look at London’s Paddington Station, you can understand why rail passengers become frustrated by the service. In this episode, the staff have to deal with signal problems during rush hour. Later, a team of engineers race to replace 60 ft of rail hours before the morning rush begins. W1A BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI John Morton’s parody of life inside Broadcasting House always manages to find big laughs in unusual circumstances. Tonight, the Renewal Team propose to get rid of the BBC Big Swing Band, and marketing guru Siobhan (the excellent Jessica Hynes) decides to make a trailer to launch the YouTube-like BBC ME.  Stacey Dooley Investigates: Mums Selling Their Kids for Sex BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm; Scot, 11.45pm In this disturbing film, previously shown on BBC Three, Dooley is in the Philippines to investigate mothers who sexually exploit their children live on the web. Clive Morgan Ace Ventura: Pet Detective (1994) ★★★☆☆☆ 5STAR, 8.00pm  Back in 1994, Jim Carrey went from near obscurity to starring in three hits in a year. The first was this very funny comedy about a zany pet detective who finds himself out of his depth (the others were The Mask and Dumb & Dumber). Here, he’s hired by Miami’s NFL team to track down their mascot, a bottlenose dolphin named Snowflake, before the Super Bowl. Courteney Cox co-stars as the team’s publicist. Moulin Rouge! (2001) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 8.00pm  Baz Luhrmann’s intoxicating spectacle was the first musical to be nominated for the Best Picture Oscar in 22 years. Set in 1899, Montmartre, it follows a poet (Ewan McGregor) who becomes love-struck with the city’s famous courtesan (Nicole Kidman, who enters the film on a bejazzled swing). The mix of period setting and contemporary pop ensure a vivid assault on the senses. The Specialist (1994) ★★☆☆☆ ITV4, 10.00pm  Sharon Stone slinks around Sylvester Stallone in this celebrity vehicle that garnered a lot of attention, at the time of release, for its sex scene. Stallone plays a former CIA bomb expert hired by Stone to destroy the Mob that killed her family. Supporting actor James Woods remains unscathed in a film full of giant explosions, silly plot twists, and Rod Steiger trying out a Cuban accent (indecipherable and hilarious). Tuesday 3 October Caught in the middle: Suranne Jones and Tom Taylor Credit: BBC Doctor Foster BBC One, 9.00pm Handbrake turns have become the norm in the extraordinary second series of Mike Bartlett’s ripe melodrama, with showdown following showdown, passive aggression increasingly supplanted by straightforward aggression, and twists galore threatening a lurch into the territory of Fatal Attraction, only in reverse. The Fosters are in disarray – Simon (Bertie Carvel) is estranged from his second family and income stream, while Gemma (Suranne Jones) is concerned that her actions have pushed away their son (Tom Taylor, the show’s unsung star). We left Gemma driving at speed towards Simon – what happens next remains under wraps, but suffice to say that the most unexpected twist in tonight’s conclusion is one of tone: from operatic melodrama (albeit sustained by brilliant performances) into sombre contemplation – the fallout after the explosion. Flashbacks illustrate both the affection once at the heart of the family and a failure to meet the needs of its most vulnerable member. The door is left wide open for a third series; it’s been fun, but has strained credibility – it might be wise to emulate the Doctor Foster of the nursery rhyme and never go there again. Gabriel Tate Rodney Carrington: Here Comes the Truth Netflix, from 12.01am Rodney Carrington’s stand-up is an unapologetically crude assault on political correctness (his material ranges from Muslims to his manhood), but, undeniably, he has a big following in the US. This recording from his most recent tour will establish whether this acquired taste is also yours. The Great British Bake Off Channel 4, 8.00pm With the chancers and fudgers departed, Prue Leith and Paul Hollywood have a smorgasbord of class acts from which to choose as Pastry Week dawns: the showstopper sees the bakers attempt a pie with a difference. Reformation: Europe’s Holy War BBC Two, 9.00pm Once inescapable, David Starkey now makes infrequent appearances on TV; which is just as well, given a little of his strident controversialism generally goes a long way. Here, he’s on entertaining form exploring the malign forces unleashed by the Protestant Reformation some 500 years ago – and their modern parallels. Sex, Chips and Poetry: 50 Years of the Mersey Sound BBC Four, 9.00pm In 1967, the same year that The Beatles released Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, fellow Liverpudlians Roger McGough, Brian Patten and Adrian Henri took the spoken-word revolution started by the Beat Poets and transformed it into something uniquely British. This amiable and richly deserved tribute documentary, narrated by Isy Suttie, celebrates the 50th anniversary of their work on The Mersey Sound, one of the best-selling poetry anthologies of all time, which is still a mainstay on school syllabuses. GT Barbie: the Most Famous Doll in the World Channel 4, 9.15pm Mary Portas visits toymaker Mattel, attends conventions and talks to children in a bid to make sense of a doll blamed for entrenching everything from everyday sexism to unrealistic body images. How can an apparently outmoded icon be reinvented for the modern age? The Insider: Reggie Yates in a Refugee Camp BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm; Scot, 11.45pm In this documentary, first shown on BBC Three, Reggie Yates spends a week in Iraq’s largest refugee camp, where he lives alongside 30,000 displaced Syrians facing an uncertain future. GT The Karate Kid (2010) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.15pm  To most people’s surprise, this is a more-than-satisfying update on the much-loved original, though also comes across as an extended tourism advert. Jaden Smith (son of Will) plays a 12-year-old who moves from Detroit to Beijing with his mother (Taraji P Henson). There he becomes a punching bag for local bullies, but makes a new friend in a maintenance man and martial arts master Mr Han (Jackie Chan), who teaches him how to fight. Ice Age 3: Dawn of the Dinosaurs (2009) ★★★☆☆ E4, 8.00pm  This is comfortably the best in the Ice Age series and solid children’s entertainment, but you may need to explain that dinosaurs didn’t live in a vast hothouse under the glaciers, and woolly mammoths called Manny probably weren’t on chummy terms with sabre-toothed tigers called Diego. Here, the gang head to a tropical lost world to rescue Sid the Sloth (John Leguizamo). 22 Jump Street (2014) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 9.00pm  Channing Tatum’s charisma and the best malapropisms ever make this sequel to 21 Jump Street a joy. Instead of infiltrating school to arrest the suppliers of a drug, Jonah Hill’s Schmidt and Tatum’s Jenko infiltrate college to do… exactly the same. The film is directed by Phil Lord and Christopher Miller (The Lego Movie) who are becoming the handiest duo since the Coen brothers. Wednesday 4 October Back in business: Lord Sugar (centre) with Karren Brady and Claude Littner Credit: BBC The Apprentice BBC One, 9.00pm Thirteen series in and we all know by now that The Apprentice is not so much a search for the brightest and best new business entrepreneurs, but an exercise in finding the one polishable, er, apple in a barrelful of “pony and trap” as adept cockney rhymer Lord Sugar puts it. And what fun it still is watching all those overinflated young egos being cut down to size by the process.  This time 18 candidates vie for the prize of £250,000 start-up capital, and just to remind the wannabe tycoons what a great opportunity they’re being given, Lord Sugar marches five previous winners into the boardroom to beguile them with tales of success.  The opening challenge, though, couldn’t be more basic: making burgers and flogging them on the street. Which is not to say there isn’t lots of room for error and unfathomably gross stupidity, too. In fact, you’re pretty much guaranteed to spend most of this show slapping your forehead at the unadulterated ineptitude of some of these self-proclaimed geniuses. In other words, a great start to what looks like being another hilarious series with, as ever, The Apprentice: You’re Fired following, at 10pm on BBC Two. Gerard O’Donovan Who Do You Think You Are? BBC One, 8.00pm Some editions of this latest series have felt less like journeys of discovery and more like genetic quests. Here, comedian Ruby Wax sets out to discover whether her mental health issues might have been evident earlier in her family line. Billion Dollar Deals and How They Changed Your World BBC Two, 8.00pm Yes, it’s a conspiracy. In the second programme of his absorbing series about how the world is ruled not by politicians but by decisions made in corporate boardrooms, Jacques Peretti considers why big business is currently so determined to kill off cash.  The Detectives: Murder on the Streets BBC Two, 9.00pm “It not like the Seventies. It’s not about slapping people. It’s about what you disclose to the person.” The art of tripping suspects up in their own lies inches Manchester police ever closer to solving two brutal killings in this nail-biting real-life crime series. Britain’s Lost Masterpieces BBC Four, 9.00pm Bendor Grosvenor and Emma Dabiri head to the Derby Museum to investigate a painting that suffered an unusually poor early restoration. Could it be a work by the great 18th-century British master, Joseph Wright of Derby, and if so can it be returned to its former glory?  The Great War in Numbers Yesterday, 9.00pm Think of the First World War and it’s the millions of lives lost in the trenches that come to mind. But, as this documentary series reveals, everything about the Great War was on a scale previously unparalleled: machine guns in millions, artillery shells in billions, the mind-boggling logistics of keeping vast numbers of men fed, clothed and fighting fit in the field. Tonight’s first film of six explores how the empires of Germany, France, Russia and Britain were able to pour so much wealth into the industrialisation of warfare. GO Back Channel 4, 10.00pm Fate just seems to get crueller for Stephen (David Mitchell) when Andrew (Robert Webb) manages to increase his share in the pub. But then Alison (Olivia Poulet) uncovers information that could yet force the cuckoo out of the family nest. GO Mercury Rising (1998) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm  Bruce Willis is excellent as an undercover FBI agent assigned to protect a nine-year-old autistic boy (Miko Hughes) who is targeted by assassins after cracking a top secret government code in this underrated, if slightly unrealistic, thriller based on the Ryne Douglas Pearson novel Simon Says. The plot moves at breakneck speed yet, ultimately, it’s a touching and heart-warming story. The Football Factory (2004) ★★★☆☆ London Live, 10.00pm  John King’s book The Football Factory is an unnerving and brutal account of hooliganism in the Nineties, centring on a firm of Chelsea boot boys and their clashes with rival “fans”. Nick Love’s film certainly captures the thuggery, with Danny Dyer as Tommy, for whom life is about drink, drugs, sex, thieving and a good ruck – but who begins to question his ways. Made in France (2015) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.00pm  This thriller, about a wave of jihadist attacks on Paris, was pulled from cinemas following its plot’s number of unnerving parallels with recent events in the French capital. In it, an extremist cell plans a series of shootings and bombings across the city “that will shake France” and the world. Director Nicholas Boukhrief said he made the film to counter the “poison” of jihadist propaganda. Thursday 5 October Fire safety: in the wake of the Grenfell Tower disaster Credit: PA The Housing Enforcers BBC One, 8.00pm; BBC Two Wales, 7.00pm “Everyone has a right to a safe place to live, no matter who you are, where you live or how much rent you pay. It’s non-negotiable.” So concludes Matt Allwright at the end of this programme focusing on the importance of fire safety.  The format is straightforward: Allwright travels across the country meeting with housing officers and examining the myriad ways in which fires can destroy lives. What makes this really hit home, however, is the presenter’s quiet fury at the way in which some lives are considered less worthy than others. Inevitably, the shadow of Grenfell Tower hangs heavy over the hour. It’s notable that many of those worst affected are elderly and living alone: the story of fiercely independent Ali who refuses to acknowledge, even to his family, quite how much he is struggling is particularly poignant. Allwright, however, saves his most righteous rage for the landlords squeezing tenants in wherever they can and failing to meet even the minimum health and safety standards. The result is a hard-hitting and often hard-to-watch documentary, which also offers solid advice on how to deal both with fires and bad landlords. Sarah Hughes Live International Football: England v Slovenia ITV, 7.30pm Having drawn 0-0 last October, with Joe Hart forced to make a string of fine saves, England and Slovenia reconvene at Wembley. Victory today for Gareth Southgate’s men will ensure their qualification for next year’s World Cup in Russia. And having beaten second-placed Slovakia 2-1 last month, thanks to a strike from tyro Marcus Rashford, they’ll be confident of doing just that. The Big Family Cooking Showdown BBC Two, 8.00pm Two last families go head to head for a place in the finals. Their £10 challenge is a Friday night takeaway, so naturally curry is on the menu. There’s talk of “fusion” cooking, some mushy spinach and a 34-year-old rolling pin.   Discovering: Laurence Olivier Sky Arts, 8.00pm The spotlight turns on Laurence Olivier, who, in 1937, described cinema as an “anaemic little medium which could not stand great acting”.   Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm The work of the West Midlands Ambulance Service continues as a specialist trauma team are dispatched to a motorbike accident where a man has suffered a catastrophic chest injury. “I’ve got nothing…” declares the doctor. It’s a stark reminder of the fragility of life and the increasing compassion of the services in times of chaos.    Russia with Simon Reeve BBC Two, 9.00pm Simon Reeve continues his fascinating journey, meeting Tuvan children in Siberia who practice the Mongolian tradition of throat singing.  Educating Greater Manchester Channel 4, 9.00pm Ah, that old chestnut – ignoring school uniform rules. This week, the teachers at Harrop Fold are on the back foot when a message is spread on Snapchat encouraging pupils to come in wearing trainers. Social media also causes friction between Year 11 girls Serena and Lelo when one talks to the other’s boyfriend on FaceTime. Rachel Ward Law & Order True Crime: The Menendez murders Sky Living, 9.00pm This series, similar to The People v OJ Simpson, takes a closer look at the two trials of brothers Lyle and Erik Menendez, who were convicted of murdering their parents in their Beverly Hills home in 1989. It focuses on the attorney (Edie Falco), who was one of their few defenders. Dimension 404 Syfy, 9.00pm Each episode of this new sci-fi anthology features a form of technology gone wrong. But there’s nothing unnerving about it, rather it’s a camp pastiche of The Twilight Zone, complete with Star Wars’ Mark Hamill providing the voice-over. Glee’s Lea Michele stars in the first episode about online dating. It’s weird, but it doesn’t overplay it. RW Robin and Marian (1976) ★★★★☆ Film4, 1.10pm  Sean Connery gives one of his best performances as a middle-aged Robin Hood, who heads home to Sherwood Forest after the death of Richard I. He finds that scaling a castle wall isn’t as easy as it used to be, Maid Marian (Audrey Hepburn) is still miffed at being left in the lurch, and the Sheriff (Robert Shaw) is up to his old tricks in Richard Lester’s good-natured romance. Look out for Ronnie Barker as Friar Tuck. Jerry Maguire (1996) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 5.40pm  In Cameron Crowe’s macho romcom, Tom Cruise plays a sports agent who has an attack of conscience and urges his colleagues to think about the welfare of their clients. He’s duly fired but announces that he’ll start his own agency. A washed-up footballer (Cuba Gooding Jr) and a single mother (Renée Zellweger) are the only ones who agree to go with him. Here, the classic quote, “You had me at ‘hello’” was born. The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.10pm Clint Eastwood directs and stars in this marvellous warm-hearted western adapted from Forrest Carter’s novel and set during the American Civil War. Eastwood plays the eponymous Missouri farmer who, driven by memories of his family’s slaughter, becomes an outlaw when he refuses to join his Confederate comrades in surrender, in favour of seeking revenge on the men who murdered his kin. Friday 6 October Penal colony: Harry Peacock, Kevin Bishop and Ricky Grover Credit: BBC Porridge BBC One, 9.30pm The most successful of the BBC’s classic sitcom revivals from last year, Porridge returns for a full series with the series’ creators Dick Clement and Ian La Frenais once again on board. It finds Nigel Norman Fletcher (Kevin Bishop as the grandson of Ronnie Barker’s character, Norman Stanley) locking horns with officer Meekie (Mark Bonnar) while aiding or outsmarting the prison’s ne’er-do-wells. In a canny twist, it is Fletch who is now the relative ingénue in his cell, seeking counsel from veteran lag Joe Lotterby (Dave Hill). We find Fletch as the prison’s resident Cyrano de Bergerac, writing letters to keep the flame of romance alive between assorted inmates and their partners on the outside. All goes well until Fletch suffers a crisis of conscience that threatens the whole operation. Some of the gags are groanworthy, but Clement and La Frenais’s mastery of sitcom mechanics remains complete; their presence keeps the spirit of the original intact, while the update means that no one is attempting to emulate the cast of the Seventies series. Fletch has a five-year sentence to serve; unlikely as it might seem, a similar term for Porridge might not be unwelcome. Gabriel Tate Suburra: the Series Netflix, from 12.01am Like Romanzo Criminale and Gomorrah before it, Suburra began life as a book before becoming a gripping, multifaceted Italian-language political thriller. This 10-part series, set in the dying days of Berlusconi’s regime, explores the themes of politics, the Church and corruption during 20 tumultuous days in Rome. Unreported World Channel 4, 7.30pm Ireland faces a pivotal referendum on the decriminalisation of abortion in certain circumstances; Kate Hardie-Buckley meets those on both sides of the debate in a deeply affecting edition of the current-affairs series. Modern Family Sky1, 8.30pm It may have tailed off since its peak, but Modern Family is still good for a few laughs. The ninth series begins with Jay (Ty Burrell) taking the family on a houseboat holiday, and Mitchell (Jesse Tyler Ferguson) encountering an old flame. Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm; not N Ireland or Wales Monty Don begins preparations for 2018 by advising others on how to use leaf mould as a mulch. Elsewhere, Adam Frost visits a community allotment in Manchester, and Nick Bailey learns from a zoologist about the life teeming in the soil. Nile Rodgers: How to Make It in the Music Business BBC Four, 9.00pm Guitar genius and pop producer Nile Rodgers shares the wisdom he’s acquired over decades in the music business. In the first episode, he discusses the founding of Chic and his influence on today’s hitmakers. GT Cold Feet ITV, 9.00pm Karen (Hermione Norris) is on the brink of financial disaster in spite of David’s (Robert Bathurst) assistance, while Adam (James Nesbitt) gets out of his depth on a night out in Mike Bullen’s assured comedy-drama revival. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm Another line-up of heavy-hitters assembles on the red sofa tonight: comedian Chris Rock plugs his first UK stand-up tour in a decade, actors Idris Elba and Kate Winslet discuss their niche genre movie, “disaster-romance” The Mountain Between Us (about a surgeon and a journalist who survive a plane crash), and Liam Gallagher performs songs from his debut album, As You Were. GT The Twilight Saga: Eclipse (2010) ★★★☆☆ E4, 8.00pm  The third instalment of the teenage vampire franchise is better than the second and will please its fan base, though Melissa Rosenberg’s script is full of clichés and relies on a shirtless Taylor Lautner for distraction. Girl-next-door Bella Swan (Kristen Stewart) must choose between 100-year-old vampire Edward Cullen (Robert Pattinson) and hunky werewolf Jacob Black (Lautner). T2: Trainspotting (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.00pm  Danny Boyle’s sequel is more than just a trip down memory lane. Back in 1996, Trainspotting’s gallery of junkies and rogues (Ewan McGregor, Jonny Lee Miller) proudly and raucously chose not to choose life. But now, all have come to terms with the gnawing possibility that life may have in fact not chosen them. There’s no chance of it matching the legacy of the first film, but it doesn’t tarnish it either. American Hustle (2013) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 12.10am  David O Russell’s caper feels like the film he has spent his career warming up for and is a serious piece of film-making that delights in its own silliness. Irving (Christian Bale) and his partner Sydney (Amy Adams) are con artists blackmailed by FBI agent Richie DiMaso (Bradley Cooper) into aiding his investigation. “Some of this actually happened,” reads a title card, and to be more specific would spoil the fun. Television previewers Catherine Gee, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: The Graham Norton Show and Cold Feet

FRIDAY 29 SEPTEMBER THE GRAHAM NORTON SHOW BBC One, 10.35pm Third from the top of the BBC’s recently published list of its highest earners (at between £850,000 and £899,000 a year), Graham Norton returns to the Friday evening schedules – as sure a sign that the nights are drawing in as the return of Strictly Come Dancing and The X Factor at the weekends.  The fact is Norton is a big draw not only for audiences but for celebrities, too, and he consistently eclipses every other UK chat show host when it comes to attracting the biggest stars from home and abroad to have a natter on his curvy red sofa.  Visiting Hollywood actors appear to be especially enamoured and that’s certainly the case in tonight’s show as Stars Wars and Indiana Jones star Harrison Ford and La La Land’s Ryan Gosling turn up to talk about their new sci-fi sequel Blade Runner 2049. Also making an appearance is Reese Witherspoon, who, fresh from the success of Big Little Lies at the Emmy Awards, is on hand to plug her latest comedy Home Again, while Margot Robbie (who is in Time magazine’s list of 2017’s most influential people) brings at least a hint of Britishness with talk of her new AA Milne biopic, Goodbye Christopher Robin. GO STARTUP Amazon Prime, from today Series one of this Miami-based drama, about entrepreneurs financing tech start-ups with dirty money, got a mixed reaction. But now it gets a deserved second season, with Martin Freeman returning as the exceedingly nasty FBI agent Phil Rask. Ron Perlman also joins the cast as the mercurial moneyman behind the latest venture.  GO LONG SHOT Netflix, from today A needle-in-haystack documentary, featuring Curb Your Enthusiasm’s Larry David, about how the fate of a man accused of murder rested on proving he was in a crowd of 54,000 people at a baseball game.  GO ONE-DAY INTERNATIONAL CRICKET: England v West Indies Sky Sports Main Event, 12.00noon Action from the fifth and final fixture in the series, which takes place at the Ageas Bowl in Southampton. Can Eoin Morgan’s men bring the curtain down on England’s summer endeavours in style? GO UNREPORTED WORLD Channel 4, 7.30pm The foreign affairs series returns with Marcel Theroux reporting on an unlikely explosion of home-grown pop music in China. These groups are working in defiance of the country’s censorship and against a government crackdown on authority-defying acts. GO BRITAIN BY BIKE WITH LARRY & GEORGE LAMB Channel 5, 8.00pm The father-and-son team of George and Larry Lamb take to two wheels for a convivial trip around Britain’s best national park cycle routes. They begin in the Yorkshire Dales, where they try fly-fishing and rock climbing before tackling a section of the 2014 Tour de France route. GO THE LAST PIRATES: BRITAIN’S REBEL DJS BBC Four, 9.00pm Forget Radio Caroline and Radio Luxembourg – rapper Rodney P tells the story of how, in the Eighties, a new wave of pirate radio stations created a platform for emerging rap artists and changed the soundtrack of Thatcher’s Britain. GO COLD FEET ITV, 9.00pm The focus of Mike Bullen’s entertaining comedy drama returns to the tangled love life of Adam (James Nesbitt) as his girlfriend Tina (Leanne Best) falls victim to online revenge porn. Meanwhile, Karen (Hermione Norris) is aided by an unlikely white knight in her fight against the hostile takeover bid. GO A CELEBRITY TASTE OF ITALY Channel 5, 9.00pm Nice work if you can get it: Ian Lavender, Rula Lenska, Judith Chalmers and Johnny Ball head to a luxury villa in Italy for a masterclass in how to prepare the best local foods and wines. This week, the enticing flavours of Tuscany. GO OUR SOULS AT NIGHT (2017) Netflix, from today  ★★★☆☆ Jane Fonda and Robert Redford – whose three-film partnership in the Sixties and Seventies, across The Chase, Barefoot in the Park and The Electric Horseman, set them apart as one of the most indecently gorgeous screen couples the movies ever produced – are on fizzing form in this cosy autumnal romance as two widowed neighbours who begin sleeping in bed together platonically to alleviate their loneliness. FLETCH (1985) Film4, 6.55pm  ★★★☆☆ Chevy Chase delivers dry one-liners and physical slapstick in this breezy comedy film that saw the peak of the actor’s career. Based on a series of novels by Gregory McDonald, the cult movie, which is one of the more quotable comedies of the Eighties, stars Chase as Fletch, a smart alec investigative reporter for an LA newspaper who is approached by a wealthy man who asks Fletch to kill him. UP IN THE AIR (2009) BBC One, 11.55pm  ★★★★☆ Jason Reitman (whose second film Juno earned him Oscar nominations) directs this witty love story. Ryan (George Clooney) is a downsizing expert, who flies around the US and fires people. That is, until a graduate (Anna Kendrick) proposes to save on airfares by getting staff to carry out sackings via video. Bingham is not happy; he likes the high life, and he likes fellow flyer Alex (Vera Farmiga). Saturday 30 September Popular poetry: how Auden still connects with modern life Credit: Getty Images Stop All the Clocks: WH Auden in an Age of Anxiety BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 10.30pm As anyone who’s seen Richard Curtis’s film Four Weddings and a Funeral will attest, W H Auden’s poetry has considerable emotional potency. Indeed, those not reduced to tears at the sight of John Hannah reading Stop All the Clocks should consult their doctor as soon as possible. (“He was my North, my South, my East and West/My working week and my Sunday rest/My noon, my midnight, my talk, my song/I thought that love would last for ever: I was wrong.”) His words also provide succour in troubled times: many New Yorkers, in fact, turned to his poem September 1, 1939 – a response to the outbreak of the Second World War – in the aftermath of 9/11.  Launching a season of poetry programmes, this excellent documentary from director Adam Low looks at why the craggy-faced Auden – whose reputation in Britain soured after his decision to move to America in 1939 – still has a great hold on our imaginations. Among those paying tribute to Auden’s words – a mix of humanity, scepticism and unsuppressed honesty – are writers Alan Bennett, Alexander McCall Smith and Curtis, who studied Auden at university. Patrick Smith Live Premier League Football: Chelsea v Manchester City BT Sport 1, 5.00pm The two teams’ last encounter at Stamford Bridge in April ended well for Chelsea, who won 2-1, thanks to a brace from Eden Hazard. But City have looked imperious this season: unbeaten in the league, they’ve won five of their six matches. Third-placed Chelsea go into this game with momentum from an impressive 4-0 victory at Stoke. In terms of their starting line-up, Pep Guardiola’s side must cope without summer signing Benjamin Mendy; the French full-back is currently sidelined with a ligament injury.  Strictly Come Dancing BBC One, 6.45pm This year’s competition is full of characters – from the divine Reverend Richard Coles and his disco-dad dancing to the gleefully giddy Debbie McGee – but tonight they must all impress not just the judges but the viewers, too: the first couple will be voted off in tomorrow’s results show.   Britain Afloat BBC Two, 8.00pm; N Ireland, 8.30pm Throughout our history, boats have played a major role and, in this new six-part series, Mary-Ann Ochota travels Britain’s waterways to see how they shaped our lives. Here, she explores the role boats played at Dunkirk and joins the Thames Barge match. The X Factor: Boot Camp ITV, 8.00pm Now that the auditions are over, it’s time for the lucky hopefuls to take part in Boot Camp. Those who manage to impress judges Simon, Nicole, Sharon and Louis will go through to the dreaded Six Chair Challenge. More tomorrow at 7.30pm.  The Doors Night Sky Arts, from 8.00pm In 1967, The Doors broke on through, releasing a string of hit singles and two platinum albums. With their intoxicating blend of blues, jazz and poetry, they exploded into the public consciousness, becoming one of the soundtracks to the Summer of Love. Now, 50 years later, Sky Arts is dedicating an evening of programming to the quartet, whose name is a reference to Aldous Huxley’s Doors of Perception. First up, in Rock Poet, is a fascinating profile of The Doors’ shamanistic frontman Jim Morrison, who died aged 27. Next is The Doors: Feast of Friends, which follows the band on the road. Rounding off the night is footage of their famous 1968 concert at the Hollywood Bowl. Black Lake BBC Four, 9.00pm and 9.40pm This fun Swedish supernatural chiller reaches its penultimate episodes, and there’s something nasty lurking in the cellar at the ski lodge, leaving the gang in a state of shock. PS The Jonathan Ross Show ITV, 9.30pm US singer Demi Lovato is on Jonathan Ross’s guest list as she promotes her “intimate” documentary Simply Complicated. She is joined by Doc Martin’s Martin Clunes and This Morning’s Holly Willoughby. The music comes from The X Factor 2012 winner James Arthur. Clive Morgan Now You See Me (2013) ★★☆☆☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm  A group of illusionists (Jesse Eisenberg, Woody Harrelson, Isla Fisher and Dave Franco) are encouraged to carry out a string of heists by a mysterious figure, while remaining ahead of FBI agent Rhodes (Mark Ruffalo), who is desperate to bring them to justice. Director Louis Leterrier tries to mimic the complex plots of films such as Inception, but with less success, though it’s reasonably entertaining. Transcendence (2014) ★★☆☆☆ Channel 4, 11.15pm  Johnny Depp and Rebecca Hall star as Will and Evelyn Caster, married artificial-intelligence scientists who download his brain patterns to a hard drive. This isn’t a casual choice: at a state-of-the-future convention, Will is grazed by a would-be assassin’s bullet, which is laced with a radioactive isotope, giving him weeks to live. The film, co-starring Cillian Murphy, is visually stylish but let down by poor storytelling. The Edge of Love (2008) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.35pm; Wales, 1.05am; not Scot  A fascinating story set during the Second World War about poet Dylan Thomas’s (Matthew Rhys) relationships with two women: his hedonistic Irish wife (Sienna Miller) and his Welsh childhood lover (Keira Knightley). An intense Jules et Jim-esque set-up develops, but the film could do with more about the art and less about the artist’s love life. It’s scripted by Knightley’s mother. Sunday 1 October Bad girl: Jessica Raine stars as military wife Alison Credit: BBC The Last Post BBC One, 9.00pm This intriguing six-part drama, scripted by playwright Peter Moffat, is set against an unusual backdrop – the mid-Sixties conflict that took place in the then British Crown Colony of Aden on the southern Arabian peninsula. Jessica Raine is the star attraction in the bad-girl role of Alison, the drunken, unhappy and unfaithful wife of conscientious but undervalued military policeman Lieutenant Ed Laithwaite (Stephen Campbell Moore).  The atmosphere of unrelenting heat and dust is very well conveyed, as is the day-to-day tedium of life for military wives on a Royal Military Police base and the hierarchies of rank that must be observed. We get the full introduction in this opening episode as newlyweds Captain Joe Martin (Jeremy Neumark Jones) and his wife Honor (Jessie Buckley) arrive on the base as the going-away party for the popular man he’s replacing, Captain Page (Joseph Kennedy), is in full swing. Meanwhile, Laithwaite receives information that an attack on the base by rebel fighters is imminent, but his commanding officer, Major Markham (Ben Miles) refuses to take his warnings seriously. What happens next is not as obvious as you might expect. Gerard O’Donovan Live Formula 1: Malaysia Grand Prix Sky Sports Main Event & Channel 4, 7.35am The 19th Grand Prix in this country will also be its last, as the Malaysian government withdraws funding for the Sepang circuit. Drivers had to endure the challenge of racing in 50-degree heat, with hydration as important as a full tank. Lewis Hamilton will be hoping to increase his lead in the championship with another victory, but a mix of unpredictable weather and a track known for its sharp corners should ensure that this Grand Prix keeps throwing up surprises right until the very end. Live NFL: New Orleans Saints v Miami Dolphins BBC Two, 1.45pm Wembley Stadium is the setting again for the NFL, having hosted Jacksonville Jaguars’ 44-7 demolition of the Baltimore Ravens last weekend. This will be a fourth trip to Wembley for the Dolphins, who appeared in the first International Series game here in 2007 when they lost 13-10 to the New York Giants, while their most recent appearance saw them defeated 27-14 by the New York Jets in 2015. The Saints have less experience of playing at Wembley, but did register a 37-32 win over the then-San Diego Chargers in 2008, in their only previous trip to the UK.  Live Premier League Rugby Union: Wasps v Bath BT Sport 1, 2.15pm The new season has turned sour for both teams, and Wasps are keen to avoid their third successive defeat. If history is an indicator they should have the upper hand, having won their last four matches against Bath – the most recent of which finished 24-3, with two tries from Kurtley Beale helping them on their way. The visitors come into this match on the back of an agonising 33-32 defeat to Newcastle Falcons, who scored twice in the last 15 minutes to come from behind in a nine-try thriller. Cornwall’s Native Poet: Charles Causley BBC Four, 8.00pm This documentary, the first of three films from the BBC’s Contains Strong Language poetry strand, celebrates the life and work of Charles Causley, a Cornish poet so deeply rooted in the county that he only left his home town of Launceston once, for naval service in the Second World War. Escape Channel 4, 8.00pm There are five people stranded in the middle of a desert following a plane crash. They have one chance of survival: creating another vehicle from the plane wreckage. That’s the premise of this new series in which five engineers are challenged to use their ingenuity and skill to escape a tricky situation. Men Who Sleep in Cars BBC Four, 9.00pm Scripted entirely in verse, poet Michael Symmons Roberts’s film is a love song to the city of Manchester. It tells the poignant story of three rough sleepers whose impoverished lives are seen in contrast to the great wealth of the city. With Maxine Peake. Electric Dreams:The Commuter Channel 4, 9.00pm The third story in this enjoyable series based on sci-fi pioneer Philip K Dick’s stories stars Timothy Spall as a railway attendant with a sad home life. But when he meets a mysterious traveller, he is forced to choose between fantasy and reality. Dawn French Live: 30 Million Minutes BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 10.55pm; Wales, 10.45pm Recorded last year in London’s West End, this is the actress and comedian’s live solo show, inspired by the tough but entertaining lessons she’s learnt from life.  Child in Mind BBC Four, 10.00pm Simon Armitage has a talent for making powerfully poetic television. Here he mixes documentary footage and verse to give a voice to the dispossessed women in Britain, the mothers of the 3,000 children placed in care every year. GO Boris Johnson: Blond Ambition Channel 4, 10.05pm After a period of calm, the Boris bandwagon is gathering speed once again following the publication of his vision for a post-Brexit Britain in The Telegraph. Here Channel 4’s political editor Gary Gibbon looks back at Johnson’s 14 months as Foreign Secretary, assessing his impact and success on the world stage. GO Happy Feet (2006) ★★★★☆ ITV2, 3.45pm  Australian director George Miller won a Best Animated Feature Oscar for this entertaining believe-in-yourself animation. Mumble, a misfit emperor penguin (baby voice by Elizabeth Daily, adult voice by Elijah Wood) is causing his parents (voiced by Nicole Kidman and Jackman) concern because he can’t sing and is therefore unable to attract a mate. Mumble can tap-dance, though, and therein lies his salvation. A United Kingdom (2016) ★★★★☆   Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm  Amma Asante’s film retells a true story that took place simultaneously in the corridors of Westminster and the country now known as Botswana just over half a century ago. It’s about the inter-racial romance between English woman Ruth (Rosamund Pike) and Seretse (David Oyelowo), the future king. It’s stirring stuff and a chapter of history that rewards a close reading. Memphis Belle (1990) ★★★☆☆☆ ITV4, 9.05pm  It’s 1943, and the handsome American crew of Second World War B-17 bomber Memphis Belle, who are stationed in England, are anticipating their final mission – to fly over Nazi-occupied Europe. Full of nostalgia, this loosely based-on-real-events story exudes a romanticised view of heroism, but features an endearing cast, including Billy Zane, Sean Astin,John Lithgow, Eric Stoltz, and Harry Connick Jr. Monday 2 October The curmudgeon returns: Larry David is back after six years Credit: HBO/Skt Curb Your Enthusiasm Sky Atlantic, 10.00pm Cometh the hour, cometh the curmudgeon. It’s been six years since we last saw the irascible Larry David and the rest of his gang of malcontents, and this return is something of a surprise delight given that David had previously claimed to have mined every last possible drop from his alter-ego’s grumpy loathing of modern life.  No previews were available for this opening episode, which is not a surprise seeing as David has always run a tight ship regarding spoilers and HBO went into lockdown after episodes were leaked during the summer. So what can we expect? Bryan Cranston joins the cast as Larry’s new therapist, the wonderful double act of Ted Danson and Mary Steenburgen return, and David has promised that we’ll uncover just what happened after Larry left for Paris with perpetual house guest Leon (the scene-stealing J B Smoove). “It’s been a five-year log-jam of indignities and violations of etiquette,” executive producer Jeff Schaffer told Variety and it’s true that Curb’s return seems particularly suited to our current times. “Every day confirms, more and more, he’s right! He’s right about everything,” noted David. One thing is certain: it’ll be fun finding out if that’s true. Sarah Hughes Race and Pace: The West Indians in East Lancashire BBC Four, 7.30pm When West Indian cricketers began to arrive in Lancashire, the Northern county was hit for six. This enlightening documentary, narrated by Death in Paradise’s Don Warrington, tells the story of how initial reticence and racism turned into an unlikely cricketing love affair. Among those recalling their experiences are knights of the cricketing order, Viv Richards and Wes Hall, who also discuss the huge impact West Indian players made on the LCC and the resulting effect it had on both sides of the Atlantic over the past 90 years. Tunes for Tyrants: Music & Power with Suzy Klein BBC Four, 9.00pm Presented by Suzy Klein, this documentary is an exploration of music’s crucial political role in the most turbulent years of the 20th century. It begins with the Radio 3 presenter looking at the years following the Russian Revolution and the First World War when music was seen as a tool to change society. CM Liar ITV, 9.00pm After last week’s revelation, the William brothers’ potboiler continues apace. In the fourth episode, dogged “rape victim” Laura Nielson (Joanne Froggatt) travels to Edinburgh to find out how Andrew Earlham’s (Ioan Gruffudd) wife’s really died. Paddington Station 24/7 Channel 5, 9.00pm Watching this behind-the-scenes look at London’s Paddington Station, you can understand why rail passengers become frustrated by the service. In this episode, the staff have to deal with signal problems during rush hour. Later, a team of engineers race to replace 60 ft of rail hours before the morning rush begins. W1A BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI John Morton’s parody of life inside Broadcasting House always manages to find big laughs in unusual circumstances. Tonight, the Renewal Team propose to get rid of the BBC Big Swing Band, and marketing guru Siobhan (the excellent Jessica Hynes) decides to make a trailer to launch the YouTube-like BBC ME.  Stacey Dooley Investigates: Mums Selling Their Kids for Sex BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm; Scot, 11.45pm In this disturbing film, previously shown on BBC Three, Dooley is in the Philippines to investigate mothers who sexually exploit their children live on the web. Clive Morgan Ace Ventura: Pet Detective (1994) ★★★☆☆☆ 5STAR, 8.00pm  Back in 1994, Jim Carrey went from near obscurity to starring in three hits in a year. The first was this very funny comedy about a zany pet detective who finds himself out of his depth (the others were The Mask and Dumb & Dumber). Here, he’s hired by Miami’s NFL team to track down their mascot, a bottlenose dolphin named Snowflake, before the Super Bowl. Courteney Cox co-stars as the team’s publicist. Moulin Rouge! (2001) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 8.00pm  Baz Luhrmann’s intoxicating spectacle was the first musical to be nominated for the Best Picture Oscar in 22 years. Set in 1899, Montmartre, it follows a poet (Ewan McGregor) who becomes love-struck with the city’s famous courtesan (Nicole Kidman, who enters the film on a bejazzled swing). The mix of period setting and contemporary pop ensure a vivid assault on the senses. The Specialist (1994) ★★☆☆☆ ITV4, 10.00pm  Sharon Stone slinks around Sylvester Stallone in this celebrity vehicle that garnered a lot of attention, at the time of release, for its sex scene. Stallone plays a former CIA bomb expert hired by Stone to destroy the Mob that killed her family. Supporting actor James Woods remains unscathed in a film full of giant explosions, silly plot twists, and Rod Steiger trying out a Cuban accent (indecipherable and hilarious). Tuesday 3 October Caught in the middle: Suranne Jones and Tom Taylor Credit: BBC Doctor Foster BBC One, 9.00pm Handbrake turns have become the norm in the extraordinary second series of Mike Bartlett’s ripe melodrama, with showdown following showdown, passive aggression increasingly supplanted by straightforward aggression, and twists galore threatening a lurch into the territory of Fatal Attraction, only in reverse. The Fosters are in disarray – Simon (Bertie Carvel) is estranged from his second family and income stream, while Gemma (Suranne Jones) is concerned that her actions have pushed away their son (Tom Taylor, the show’s unsung star). We left Gemma driving at speed towards Simon – what happens next remains under wraps, but suffice to say that the most unexpected twist in tonight’s conclusion is one of tone: from operatic melodrama (albeit sustained by brilliant performances) into sombre contemplation – the fallout after the explosion. Flashbacks illustrate both the affection once at the heart of the family and a failure to meet the needs of its most vulnerable member. The door is left wide open for a third series; it’s been fun, but has strained credibility – it might be wise to emulate the Doctor Foster of the nursery rhyme and never go there again. Gabriel Tate Rodney Carrington: Here Comes the Truth Netflix, from 12.01am Rodney Carrington’s stand-up is an unapologetically crude assault on political correctness (his material ranges from Muslims to his manhood), but, undeniably, he has a big following in the US. This recording from his most recent tour will establish whether this acquired taste is also yours. The Great British Bake Off Channel 4, 8.00pm With the chancers and fudgers departed, Prue Leith and Paul Hollywood have a smorgasbord of class acts from which to choose as Pastry Week dawns: the showstopper sees the bakers attempt a pie with a difference. Reformation: Europe’s Holy War BBC Two, 9.00pm Once inescapable, David Starkey now makes infrequent appearances on TV; which is just as well, given a little of his strident controversialism generally goes a long way. Here, he’s on entertaining form exploring the malign forces unleashed by the Protestant Reformation some 500 years ago – and their modern parallels. Sex, Chips and Poetry: 50 Years of the Mersey Sound BBC Four, 9.00pm In 1967, the same year that The Beatles released Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, fellow Liverpudlians Roger McGough, Brian Patten and Adrian Henri took the spoken-word revolution started by the Beat Poets and transformed it into something uniquely British. This amiable and richly deserved tribute documentary, narrated by Isy Suttie, celebrates the 50th anniversary of their work on The Mersey Sound, one of the best-selling poetry anthologies of all time, which is still a mainstay on school syllabuses. GT Barbie: the Most Famous Doll in the World Channel 4, 9.15pm Mary Portas visits toymaker Mattel, attends conventions and talks to children in a bid to make sense of a doll blamed for entrenching everything from everyday sexism to unrealistic body images. How can an apparently outmoded icon be reinvented for the modern age? The Insider: Reggie Yates in a Refugee Camp BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm; Scot, 11.45pm In this documentary, first shown on BBC Three, Reggie Yates spends a week in Iraq’s largest refugee camp, where he lives alongside 30,000 displaced Syrians facing an uncertain future. GT The Karate Kid (2010) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.15pm  To most people’s surprise, this is a more-than-satisfying update on the much-loved original, though also comes across as an extended tourism advert. Jaden Smith (son of Will) plays a 12-year-old who moves from Detroit to Beijing with his mother (Taraji P Henson). There he becomes a punching bag for local bullies, but makes a new friend in a maintenance man and martial arts master Mr Han (Jackie Chan), who teaches him how to fight. Ice Age 3: Dawn of the Dinosaurs (2009) ★★★☆☆ E4, 8.00pm  This is comfortably the best in the Ice Age series and solid children’s entertainment, but you may need to explain that dinosaurs didn’t live in a vast hothouse under the glaciers, and woolly mammoths called Manny probably weren’t on chummy terms with sabre-toothed tigers called Diego. Here, the gang head to a tropical lost world to rescue Sid the Sloth (John Leguizamo). 22 Jump Street (2014) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 9.00pm  Channing Tatum’s charisma and the best malapropisms ever make this sequel to 21 Jump Street a joy. Instead of infiltrating school to arrest the suppliers of a drug, Jonah Hill’s Schmidt and Tatum’s Jenko infiltrate college to do… exactly the same. The film is directed by Phil Lord and Christopher Miller (The Lego Movie) who are becoming the handiest duo since the Coen brothers. Wednesday 4 October Back in business: Lord Sugar (centre) with Karren Brady and Claude Littner Credit: BBC The Apprentice BBC One, 9.00pm Thirteen series in and we all know by now that The Apprentice is not so much a search for the brightest and best new business entrepreneurs, but an exercise in finding the one polishable, er, apple in a barrelful of “pony and trap” as adept cockney rhymer Lord Sugar puts it. And what fun it still is watching all those overinflated young egos being cut down to size by the process.  This time 18 candidates vie for the prize of £250,000 start-up capital, and just to remind the wannabe tycoons what a great opportunity they’re being given, Lord Sugar marches five previous winners into the boardroom to beguile them with tales of success.  The opening challenge, though, couldn’t be more basic: making burgers and flogging them on the street. Which is not to say there isn’t lots of room for error and unfathomably gross stupidity, too. In fact, you’re pretty much guaranteed to spend most of this show slapping your forehead at the unadulterated ineptitude of some of these self-proclaimed geniuses. In other words, a great start to what looks like being another hilarious series with, as ever, The Apprentice: You’re Fired following, at 10pm on BBC Two. Gerard O’Donovan Who Do You Think You Are? BBC One, 8.00pm Some editions of this latest series have felt less like journeys of discovery and more like genetic quests. Here, comedian Ruby Wax sets out to discover whether her mental health issues might have been evident earlier in her family line. Billion Dollar Deals and How They Changed Your World BBC Two, 8.00pm Yes, it’s a conspiracy. In the second programme of his absorbing series about how the world is ruled not by politicians but by decisions made in corporate boardrooms, Jacques Peretti considers why big business is currently so determined to kill off cash.  The Detectives: Murder on the Streets BBC Two, 9.00pm “It not like the Seventies. It’s not about slapping people. It’s about what you disclose to the person.” The art of tripping suspects up in their own lies inches Manchester police ever closer to solving two brutal killings in this nail-biting real-life crime series. Britain’s Lost Masterpieces BBC Four, 9.00pm Bendor Grosvenor and Emma Dabiri head to the Derby Museum to investigate a painting that suffered an unusually poor early restoration. Could it be a work by the great 18th-century British master, Joseph Wright of Derby, and if so can it be returned to its former glory?  The Great War in Numbers Yesterday, 9.00pm Think of the First World War and it’s the millions of lives lost in the trenches that come to mind. But, as this documentary series reveals, everything about the Great War was on a scale previously unparalleled: machine guns in millions, artillery shells in billions, the mind-boggling logistics of keeping vast numbers of men fed, clothed and fighting fit in the field. Tonight’s first film of six explores how the empires of Germany, France, Russia and Britain were able to pour so much wealth into the industrialisation of warfare. GO Back Channel 4, 10.00pm Fate just seems to get crueller for Stephen (David Mitchell) when Andrew (Robert Webb) manages to increase his share in the pub. But then Alison (Olivia Poulet) uncovers information that could yet force the cuckoo out of the family nest. GO Mercury Rising (1998) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm  Bruce Willis is excellent as an undercover FBI agent assigned to protect a nine-year-old autistic boy (Miko Hughes) who is targeted by assassins after cracking a top secret government code in this underrated, if slightly unrealistic, thriller based on the Ryne Douglas Pearson novel Simon Says. The plot moves at breakneck speed yet, ultimately, it’s a touching and heart-warming story. The Football Factory (2004) ★★★☆☆ London Live, 10.00pm  John King’s book The Football Factory is an unnerving and brutal account of hooliganism in the Nineties, centring on a firm of Chelsea boot boys and their clashes with rival “fans”. Nick Love’s film certainly captures the thuggery, with Danny Dyer as Tommy, for whom life is about drink, drugs, sex, thieving and a good ruck – but who begins to question his ways. Made in France (2015) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.00pm  This thriller, about a wave of jihadist attacks on Paris, was pulled from cinemas following its plot’s number of unnerving parallels with recent events in the French capital. In it, an extremist cell plans a series of shootings and bombings across the city “that will shake France” and the world. Director Nicholas Boukhrief said he made the film to counter the “poison” of jihadist propaganda. Thursday 5 October Fire safety: in the wake of the Grenfell Tower disaster Credit: PA The Housing Enforcers BBC One, 8.00pm; BBC Two Wales, 7.00pm “Everyone has a right to a safe place to live, no matter who you are, where you live or how much rent you pay. It’s non-negotiable.” So concludes Matt Allwright at the end of this programme focusing on the importance of fire safety.  The format is straightforward: Allwright travels across the country meeting with housing officers and examining the myriad ways in which fires can destroy lives. What makes this really hit home, however, is the presenter’s quiet fury at the way in which some lives are considered less worthy than others. Inevitably, the shadow of Grenfell Tower hangs heavy over the hour. It’s notable that many of those worst affected are elderly and living alone: the story of fiercely independent Ali who refuses to acknowledge, even to his family, quite how much he is struggling is particularly poignant. Allwright, however, saves his most righteous rage for the landlords squeezing tenants in wherever they can and failing to meet even the minimum health and safety standards. The result is a hard-hitting and often hard-to-watch documentary, which also offers solid advice on how to deal both with fires and bad landlords. Sarah Hughes Live International Football: England v Slovenia ITV, 7.30pm Having drawn 0-0 last October, with Joe Hart forced to make a string of fine saves, England and Slovenia reconvene at Wembley. Victory today for Gareth Southgate’s men will ensure their qualification for next year’s World Cup in Russia. And having beaten second-placed Slovakia 2-1 last month, thanks to a strike from tyro Marcus Rashford, they’ll be confident of doing just that. The Big Family Cooking Showdown BBC Two, 8.00pm Two last families go head to head for a place in the finals. Their £10 challenge is a Friday night takeaway, so naturally curry is on the menu. There’s talk of “fusion” cooking, some mushy spinach and a 34-year-old rolling pin.   Discovering: Laurence Olivier Sky Arts, 8.00pm The spotlight turns on Laurence Olivier, who, in 1937, described cinema as an “anaemic little medium which could not stand great acting”.   Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm The work of the West Midlands Ambulance Service continues as a specialist trauma team are dispatched to a motorbike accident where a man has suffered a catastrophic chest injury. “I’ve got nothing…” declares the doctor. It’s a stark reminder of the fragility of life and the increasing compassion of the services in times of chaos.    Russia with Simon Reeve BBC Two, 9.00pm Simon Reeve continues his fascinating journey, meeting Tuvan children in Siberia who practice the Mongolian tradition of throat singing.  Educating Greater Manchester Channel 4, 9.00pm Ah, that old chestnut – ignoring school uniform rules. This week, the teachers at Harrop Fold are on the back foot when a message is spread on Snapchat encouraging pupils to come in wearing trainers. Social media also causes friction between Year 11 girls Serena and Lelo when one talks to the other’s boyfriend on FaceTime. Rachel Ward Law & Order True Crime: The Menendez murders Sky Living, 9.00pm This series, similar to The People v OJ Simpson, takes a closer look at the two trials of brothers Lyle and Erik Menendez, who were convicted of murdering their parents in their Beverly Hills home in 1989. It focuses on the attorney (Edie Falco), who was one of their few defenders. Dimension 404 Syfy, 9.00pm Each episode of this new sci-fi anthology features a form of technology gone wrong. But there’s nothing unnerving about it, rather it’s a camp pastiche of The Twilight Zone, complete with Star Wars’ Mark Hamill providing the voice-over. Glee’s Lea Michele stars in the first episode about online dating. It’s weird, but it doesn’t overplay it. RW Robin and Marian (1976) ★★★★☆ Film4, 1.10pm  Sean Connery gives one of his best performances as a middle-aged Robin Hood, who heads home to Sherwood Forest after the death of Richard I. He finds that scaling a castle wall isn’t as easy as it used to be, Maid Marian (Audrey Hepburn) is still miffed at being left in the lurch, and the Sheriff (Robert Shaw) is up to his old tricks in Richard Lester’s good-natured romance. Look out for Ronnie Barker as Friar Tuck. Jerry Maguire (1996) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 5.40pm  In Cameron Crowe’s macho romcom, Tom Cruise plays a sports agent who has an attack of conscience and urges his colleagues to think about the welfare of their clients. He’s duly fired but announces that he’ll start his own agency. A washed-up footballer (Cuba Gooding Jr) and a single mother (Renée Zellweger) are the only ones who agree to go with him. Here, the classic quote, “You had me at ‘hello’” was born. The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.10pm Clint Eastwood directs and stars in this marvellous warm-hearted western adapted from Forrest Carter’s novel and set during the American Civil War. Eastwood plays the eponymous Missouri farmer who, driven by memories of his family’s slaughter, becomes an outlaw when he refuses to join his Confederate comrades in surrender, in favour of seeking revenge on the men who murdered his kin. Friday 6 October Penal colony: Harry Peacock, Kevin Bishop and Ricky Grover Credit: BBC Porridge BBC One, 9.30pm The most successful of the BBC’s classic sitcom revivals from last year, Porridge returns for a full series with the series’ creators Dick Clement and Ian La Frenais once again on board. It finds Nigel Norman Fletcher (Kevin Bishop as the grandson of Ronnie Barker’s character, Norman Stanley) locking horns with officer Meekie (Mark Bonnar) while aiding or outsmarting the prison’s ne’er-do-wells. In a canny twist, it is Fletch who is now the relative ingénue in his cell, seeking counsel from veteran lag Joe Lotterby (Dave Hill). We find Fletch as the prison’s resident Cyrano de Bergerac, writing letters to keep the flame of romance alive between assorted inmates and their partners on the outside. All goes well until Fletch suffers a crisis of conscience that threatens the whole operation. Some of the gags are groanworthy, but Clement and La Frenais’s mastery of sitcom mechanics remains complete; their presence keeps the spirit of the original intact, while the update means that no one is attempting to emulate the cast of the Seventies series. Fletch has a five-year sentence to serve; unlikely as it might seem, a similar term for Porridge might not be unwelcome. Gabriel Tate Suburra: the Series Netflix, from 12.01am Like Romanzo Criminale and Gomorrah before it, Suburra began life as a book before becoming a gripping, multifaceted Italian-language political thriller. This 10-part series, set in the dying days of Berlusconi’s regime, explores the themes of politics, the Church and corruption during 20 tumultuous days in Rome. Unreported World Channel 4, 7.30pm Ireland faces a pivotal referendum on the decriminalisation of abortion in certain circumstances; Kate Hardie-Buckley meets those on both sides of the debate in a deeply affecting edition of the current-affairs series. Modern Family Sky1, 8.30pm It may have tailed off since its peak, but Modern Family is still good for a few laughs. The ninth series begins with Jay (Ty Burrell) taking the family on a houseboat holiday, and Mitchell (Jesse Tyler Ferguson) encountering an old flame. Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm; not N Ireland or Wales Monty Don begins preparations for 2018 by advising others on how to use leaf mould as a mulch. Elsewhere, Adam Frost visits a community allotment in Manchester, and Nick Bailey learns from a zoologist about the life teeming in the soil. Nile Rodgers: How to Make It in the Music Business BBC Four, 9.00pm Guitar genius and pop producer Nile Rodgers shares the wisdom he’s acquired over decades in the music business. In the first episode, he discusses the founding of Chic and his influence on today’s hitmakers. GT Cold Feet ITV, 9.00pm Karen (Hermione Norris) is on the brink of financial disaster in spite of David’s (Robert Bathurst) assistance, while Adam (James Nesbitt) gets out of his depth on a night out in Mike Bullen’s assured comedy-drama revival. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm Another line-up of heavy-hitters assembles on the red sofa tonight: comedian Chris Rock plugs his first UK stand-up tour in a decade, actors Idris Elba and Kate Winslet discuss their niche genre movie, “disaster-romance” The Mountain Between Us (about a surgeon and a journalist who survive a plane crash), and Liam Gallagher performs songs from his debut album, As You Were. GT The Twilight Saga: Eclipse (2010) ★★★☆☆ E4, 8.00pm  The third instalment of the teenage vampire franchise is better than the second and will please its fan base, though Melissa Rosenberg’s script is full of clichés and relies on a shirtless Taylor Lautner for distraction. Girl-next-door Bella Swan (Kristen Stewart) must choose between 100-year-old vampire Edward Cullen (Robert Pattinson) and hunky werewolf Jacob Black (Lautner). T2: Trainspotting (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.00pm  Danny Boyle’s sequel is more than just a trip down memory lane. Back in 1996, Trainspotting’s gallery of junkies and rogues (Ewan McGregor, Jonny Lee Miller) proudly and raucously chose not to choose life. But now, all have come to terms with the gnawing possibility that life may have in fact not chosen them. There’s no chance of it matching the legacy of the first film, but it doesn’t tarnish it either. American Hustle (2013) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 12.10am  David O Russell’s caper feels like the film he has spent his career warming up for and is a serious piece of film-making that delights in its own silliness. Irving (Christian Bale) and his partner Sydney (Amy Adams) are con artists blackmailed by FBI agent Richie DiMaso (Bradley Cooper) into aiding his investigation. “Some of this actually happened,” reads a title card, and to be more specific would spoil the fun. Television previewers Catherine Gee, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: Russia with Simon Reeve and Eamonn and Ruth’s 7 Year Itch

THURSDAY 28 SEPTEMBER RUSSIA WITH SIMON REEVE BBC Two, 9.00pm Explorer Simon Reeve balances an occasional taste for cliché (“a country of utter extremes”, indeed!) with a constant, healthy curiosity and a canny way with locals of all stripes in his latest travelogue – what he calls “the big one”. This three-part epic sends him from Kamchatka in the far east of Russia to St Petersburg, but what elevates it from the lazier celebrity-fronted affairs is our guide’s knack for weighing up history and current affairs, cultural minutiae and global geopolitics. Russia is a nation with plenty of all this so Reeve is in his element, whether nosing around the evocative ruins of a submarine base, tagging along on a twilit recce for a Siberian tiger or hanging out with the remote communities of reindeer herders who are eking out a subsistence and concerned that their children will abandon their traditions. The shadow cast by Putin’s police state is long, with Reeve and his team seriously inconvenienced on more than one occasion by their none-too-subtle attentions of local authorities, but even this is put into sharp perspective by the grim prognosis for Siberia’s permafrost. Melting at an increasing rate, its fate could determine the future of the planet itself. GT DESIGNATED SURVIVOR Netflix, from 12.01am This ludicrous but enjoyable Kiefer Sutherland vehicle enters series two, with unlikely President Tom Kirkman (Sutherland) slowly growing into his role while continuing the hunt for the evildoers behind the explosion that destroyed the Capitol Building and the rest of the Cabinet. GT EUROPEAN TOUR GOLF: The British Masters Sky Sports Golf, 9.30am Coverage of the opening day of the British Masters at Close House in Northumberland, where the field battles to succeed last year’s champion Alexander Norenunt.  GT SAFE HOUSE ITV, 9.00pm The spectacularly daft thriller reaches a hysterical climax as Tom (Stephen Moyer) and Sam (Zoe Tapper) clash over his past, just as The Crow descends on their safe house – but is it Liam (Joel MacCormack), Roger (Andrew Tiernan) or someone else entirely? GT EDUCATING GREATER MANCHESTER Channel 4, 9.00pm A regular staple of the series, it’s the Educating-meets-Apprentice episode of the Head Boy and Head Girl elections. Interviews and live debates are on the agenda. In the running: a popular young boxer and two ambitious boys, alongside a geeky girl and a rival candidate who hangs out with teachers more than her peers. GT EAMONN & RUTH’S 7 YEAR ITCH Channel 5, 9.00pm Holmes and Langsford, who’ve been married for seven years but together for 20, conclude their survey of tricks to keep a marriage alive. They meet two swingers, a couple who role play and a family whose patriarch is transgender. GT  JOHN BISHOP IN CONVERSATION WITH JIMMY CARR W, 9.00pm Bishop once again proves an estimable interviewer, this time prising open Jimmy Carr’s carapace of “irony” to quiz him on his career and a certain financial “error of judgment”. GT GYPSY KIDS: OUR SECRET WORLD Channel 5, 10.00pm This week the series follows traveller children and their experiences of education – 11-year-old Shannon is leaving school to be trained for her future life maintaining the home, while nine-year-old Michael has to choose between study and practical skills. GT ROOM 104 Sky Atlantic, 10.35pm From the Duplass Brothers (Togetherness), comes this inevitably patchy but occasionally inspired anthology series set in one room of a hotel. The characters passing through it vary with each episode, along with the genre: tonight’s lean opener is a horror-tinged venture into the life of a babysitter. GT THE ACCOUNTANT (2016) Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm ★★☆☆☆ The one thing there’s no accounting for in this film is taste. Ben Affleck plays Christian Wolff, an autistic savant whose career in financial services has brought him into the employ of some of the slimiest mobsters around. For reasons that don’t add up, our hero’s father (Robert C Treveiler) decides it’s in the best interests of his disadvantaged son to train him up as a ruthless killer. I LOVE YOU, MAN (2009) 5STAR, 10.00pm  ★★☆☆☆ Paul Rudd, realising he has no best man for his wedding, sets out to find himself a buddy in this contrived bromance from Meet the Parents/Fockers creator John Hamburg. Beer-swilling Jason Segal seems to fit the bill, but of course things go wrong. The results aren’t hilarious, but both leading actors have their amusing moments, particularly Rudd with his James Bond impressions and bad air guitar. HEARTBREAK RIDGE (1986) ITV4, 10.15pm  ★★★☆☆ Producer-director-actor Clint Eastwood casts himself as Sgt Tom Highway (nicknamed Gunney) of the US Marine Corps. Having alienated his superiors, Highway asks to end his career where it began and is transferred to perform gunnery duties in his old outfit in Grenada where he has to rescue students from a Marxist government. Not Eastwood’s best, but still a decent action film and it was nominated for an Oscar. FRIDAY 29 SEPTEMBER Harrison Ford and Ryan Gosling Credit: WireImage THE GRAHAM NORTON SHOW BBC One, 10.35pm Third from the top of the BBC’s recently published list of its highest earners (at between £850,000 and £899,000 a year), Graham Norton returns to the Friday evening schedules – as sure a sign that the nights are drawing in as the return of Strictly Come Dancing and The X Factor at the weekends.  The fact is Norton is a big draw not only for audiences but for celebrities, too, and he consistently eclipses every other UK chat show host when it comes to attracting the biggest stars from home and abroad to have a natter on his curvy red sofa.  Visiting Hollywood actors appear to be especially enamoured and that’s certainly the case in tonight’s show as Stars Wars and Indiana Jones star Harrison Ford and La La Land’s Ryan Gosling turn up to talk about their new sci-fi sequel Blade Runner 2049. Also making an appearance is Reese Witherspoon, who, fresh from the success of Big Little Lies at the Emmy Awards, is on hand to plug her latest comedy Home Again, while Margot Robbie (who is in Time magazine’s list of 2017’s most influential people) brings at least a hint of Britishness with talk of her new AA Milne biopic, Goodbye Christopher Robin. GO STARTUP Amazon Prime, from today Series one of this Miami-based drama, about entrepreneurs financing tech start-ups with dirty money, got a mixed reaction. But now it gets a deserved second season, with Martin Freeman returning as the exceedingly nasty FBI agent Phil Rask. Ron Perlman also joins the cast as the mercurial moneyman behind the latest venture.  GO LONG SHOT Netflix, from today A needle-in-haystack documentary, featuring Curb Your Enthusiasm’s Larry David, about how the fate of a man accused of murder rested on proving he was in a crowd of 54,000 people at a baseball game.  GO ONE-DAY INTERNATIONAL CRICKET: England v West Indies Sky Sports Main Event, 12.00noon Action from the fifth and final fixture in the series, which takes place at the Ageas Bowl in Southampton. Can Eoin Morgan’s men bring the curtain down on England’s summer endeavours in style? GO UNREPORTED WORLD Channel 4, 7.30pm The foreign affairs series returns with Marcel Theroux reporting on an unlikely explosion of home-grown pop music in China. These groups are working in defiance of the country’s censorship and against a government crackdown on authority-defying acts. GO BRITAIN BY BIKE WITH LARRY & GEORGE LAMB Channel 5, 8.00pm The father-and-son team of George and Larry Lamb take to two wheels for a convivial trip around Britain’s best national park cycle routes. They begin in the Yorkshire Dales, where they try fly-fishing and rock climbing before tackling a section of the 2014 Tour de France route. GO THE LAST PIRATES: BRITAIN’S REBEL DJS BBC Four, 9.00pm Forget Radio Caroline and Radio Luxembourg – rapper Rodney P tells the story of how, in the Eighties, a new wave of pirate radio stations created a platform for emerging rap artists and changed the soundtrack of Thatcher’s Britain. GO COLD FEET ITV, 9.00pm The focus of Mike Bullen’s entertaining comedy drama returns to the tangled love life of Adam (James Nesbitt) as his girlfriend Tina (Leanne Best) falls victim to online revenge porn. Meanwhile, Karen (Hermione Norris) is aided by an unlikely white knight in her fight against the hostile takeover bid. GO A CELEBRITY TASTE OF ITALY Channel 5, 9.00pm Nice work if you can get it: Ian Lavender, Rula Lenska, Judith Chalmers and Johnny Ball head to a luxury villa in Italy for a masterclass in how to prepare the best local foods and wines. This week, the enticing flavours of Tuscany. GO OUR SOULS AT NIGHT (2017) Netflix, from today  ★★★☆☆ Jane Fonda and Robert Redford – whose three-film partnership in the Sixties and Seventies, across The Chase, Barefoot in the Park and The Electric Horseman, set them apart as one of the most indecently gorgeous screen couples the movies ever produced – are on fizzing form in this cosy autumnal romance as two widowed neighbours who begin sleeping in bed together platonically to alleviate their loneliness. FLETCH (1985) Film4, 6.55pm  ★★★☆☆ Chevy Chase delivers dry one-liners and physical slapstick in this breezy comedy film that saw the peak of the actor’s career. Based on a series of novels by Gregory McDonald, the cult movie, which is one of the more quotable comedies of the Eighties, stars Chase as Fletch, a smart alec investigative reporter for an LA newspaper who is approached by a wealthy man who asks Fletch to kill him. UP IN THE AIR (2009) BBC One, 11.55pm  ★★★★☆ Jason Reitman (whose second film Juno earned him Oscar nominations) directs this witty love story. Ryan (George Clooney) is a downsizing expert, who flies around the US and fires people. That is, until a graduate (Anna Kendrick) proposes to save on airfares by getting staff to carry out sackings via video. Bingham is not happy; he likes the high life, and he likes fellow flyer Alex (Vera Farmiga). Saturday 30 September Popular poetry: how Auden still connects with modern life Credit: Getty Images Stop All the Clocks: WH Auden in an Age of Anxiety BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 10.30pm As anyone who’s seen Richard Curtis’s film Four Weddings and a Funeral will attest, W H Auden’s poetry has considerable emotional potency. Indeed, those not reduced to tears at the sight of John Hannah reading Stop All the Clocks should consult their doctor as soon as possible. (“He was my North, my South, my East and West/My working week and my Sunday rest/My noon, my midnight, my talk, my song/I thought that love would last for ever: I was wrong.”) His words also provide succour in troubled times: many New Yorkers, in fact, turned to his poem September 1, 1939 – a response to the outbreak of the Second World War – in the aftermath of 9/11.  Launching a season of poetry programmes, this excellent documentary from director Adam Low looks at why the craggy-faced Auden – whose reputation in Britain soured after his decision to move to America in 1939 – still has a great hold on our imaginations. Among those paying tribute to Auden’s words – a mix of humanity, scepticism and unsuppressed honesty – are writers Alan Bennett, Alexander McCall Smith and Curtis, who studied Auden at university. Patrick Smith Live Premier League Football: Chelsea v Manchester City BT Sport 1, 5.00pm The two teams’ last encounter at Stamford Bridge in April ended well for Chelsea, who won 2-1, thanks to a brace from Eden Hazard. But City have looked imperious this season: unbeaten in the league, they’ve won five of their six matches. Third-placed Chelsea go into this game with momentum from an impressive 4-0 victory at Stoke. In terms of their starting line-up, Pep Guardiola’s side must cope without summer signing Benjamin Mendy; the French full-back is currently sidelined with a ligament injury.  Strictly Come Dancing BBC One, 6.45pm This year’s competition is full of characters – from the divine Reverend Richard Coles and his disco-dad dancing to the gleefully giddy Debbie McGee – but tonight they must all impress not just the judges but the viewers, too: the first couple will be voted off in tomorrow’s results show.   Britain Afloat BBC Two, 8.00pm; N Ireland, 8.30pm Throughout our history, boats have played a major role and, in this new six-part series, Mary-Ann Ochota travels Britain’s waterways to see how they shaped our lives. Here, she explores the role boats played at Dunkirk and joins the Thames Barge match. The X Factor: Boot Camp ITV, 8.00pm Now that the auditions are over, it’s time for the lucky hopefuls to take part in Boot Camp. Those who manage to impress judges Simon, Nicole, Sharon and Louis will go through to the dreaded Six Chair Challenge. More tomorrow at 7.30pm.  The Doors Night Sky Arts, from 8.00pm In 1967, The Doors broke on through, releasing a string of hit singles and two platinum albums. With their intoxicating blend of blues, jazz and poetry, they exploded into the public consciousness, becoming one of the soundtracks to the Summer of Love. Now, 50 years later, Sky Arts is dedicating an evening of programming to the quartet, whose name is a reference to Aldous Huxley’s Doors of Perception. First up, in Rock Poet, is a fascinating profile of The Doors’ shamanistic frontman Jim Morrison, who died aged 27. Next is The Doors: Feast of Friends, which follows the band on the road. Rounding off the night is footage of their famous 1968 concert at the Hollywood Bowl. Black Lake BBC Four, 9.00pm and 9.40pm This fun Swedish supernatural chiller reaches its penultimate episodes, and there’s something nasty lurking in the cellar at the ski lodge, leaving the gang in a state of shock. PS The Jonathan Ross Show ITV, 9.30pm US singer Demi Lovato is on Jonathan Ross’s guest list as she promotes her “intimate” documentary Simply Complicated. She is joined by Doc Martin’s Martin Clunes and This Morning’s Holly Willoughby. The music comes from The X Factor 2012 winner James Arthur. Clive Morgan Now You See Me (2013) ★★☆☆☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm  A group of illusionists (Jesse Eisenberg, Woody Harrelson, Isla Fisher and Dave Franco) are encouraged to carry out a string of heists by a mysterious figure, while remaining ahead of FBI agent Rhodes (Mark Ruffalo), who is desperate to bring them to justice. Director Louis Leterrier tries to mimic the complex plots of films such as Inception, but with less success, though it’s reasonably entertaining. Transcendence (2014) ★★☆☆☆ Channel 4, 11.15pm  Johnny Depp and Rebecca Hall star as Will and Evelyn Caster, married artificial-intelligence scientists who download his brain patterns to a hard drive. This isn’t a casual choice: at a state-of-the-future convention, Will is grazed by a would-be assassin’s bullet, which is laced with a radioactive isotope, giving him weeks to live. The film, co-starring Cillian Murphy, is visually stylish but let down by poor storytelling. The Edge of Love (2008) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.35pm; Wales, 1.05am; not Scot  A fascinating story set during the Second World War about poet Dylan Thomas’s (Matthew Rhys) relationships with two women: his hedonistic Irish wife (Sienna Miller) and his Welsh childhood lover (Keira Knightley). An intense Jules et Jim-esque set-up develops, but the film could do with more about the art and less about the artist’s love life. It’s scripted by Knightley’s mother. Sunday 1 October Bad girl: Jessica Raine stars as military wife Alison Credit: BBC The Last Post BBC One, 9.00pm This intriguing six-part drama, scripted by playwright Peter Moffat, is set against an unusual backdrop – the mid-Sixties conflict that took place in the then British Crown Colony of Aden on the southern Arabian peninsula. Jessica Raine is the star attraction in the bad-girl role of Alison, the drunken, unhappy and unfaithful wife of conscientious but undervalued military policeman Lieutenant Ed Laithwaite (Stephen Campbell Moore).  The atmosphere of unrelenting heat and dust is very well conveyed, as is the day-to-day tedium of life for military wives on a Royal Military Police base and the hierarchies of rank that must be observed. We get the full introduction in this opening episode as newlyweds Captain Joe Martin (Jeremy Neumark Jones) and his wife Honor (Jessie Buckley) arrive on the base as the going-away party for the popular man he’s replacing, Captain Page (Joseph Kennedy), is in full swing. Meanwhile, Laithwaite receives information that an attack on the base by rebel fighters is imminent, but his commanding officer, Major Markham (Ben Miles) refuses to take his warnings seriously. What happens next is not as obvious as you might expect. Gerard O’Donovan Live Formula 1: Malaysia Grand Prix Sky Sports Main Event & Channel 4, 7.35am The 19th Grand Prix in this country will also be its last, as the Malaysian government withdraws funding for the Sepang circuit. Drivers had to endure the challenge of racing in 50-degree heat, with hydration as important as a full tank. Lewis Hamilton will be hoping to increase his lead in the championship with another victory, but a mix of unpredictable weather and a track known for its sharp corners should ensure that this Grand Prix keeps throwing up surprises right until the very end. Live NFL: New Orleans Saints v Miami Dolphins BBC Two, 1.45pm Wembley Stadium is the setting again for the NFL, having hosted Jacksonville Jaguars’ 44-7 demolition of the Baltimore Ravens last weekend. This will be a fourth trip to Wembley for the Dolphins, who appeared in the first International Series game here in 2007 when they lost 13-10 to the New York Giants, while their most recent appearance saw them defeated 27-14 by the New York Jets in 2015. The Saints have less experience of playing at Wembley, but did register a 37-32 win over the then-San Diego Chargers in 2008, in their only previous trip to the UK.  Live Premier League Rugby Union: Wasps v Bath BT Sport 1, 2.15pm The new season has turned sour for both teams, and Wasps are keen to avoid their third successive defeat. If history is an indicator they should have the upper hand, having won their last four matches against Bath – the most recent of which finished 24-3, with two tries from Kurtley Beale helping them on their way. The visitors come into this match on the back of an agonising 33-32 defeat to Newcastle Falcons, who scored twice in the last 15 minutes to come from behind in a nine-try thriller. Cornwall’s Native Poet: Charles Causley BBC Four, 8.00pm This documentary, the first of three films from the BBC’s Contains Strong Language poetry strand, celebrates the life and work of Charles Causley, a Cornish poet so deeply rooted in the county that he only left his home town of Launceston once, for naval service in the Second World War. Escape Channel 4, 8.00pm There are five people stranded in the middle of a desert following a plane crash. They have one chance of survival: creating another vehicle from the plane wreckage. That’s the premise of this new series in which five engineers are challenged to use their ingenuity and skill to escape a tricky situation. Men Who Sleep in Cars BBC Four, 9.00pm Scripted entirely in verse, poet Michael Symmons Roberts’s film is a love song to the city of Manchester. It tells the poignant story of three rough sleepers whose impoverished lives are seen in contrast to the great wealth of the city. With Maxine Peake. Electric Dreams:The Commuter Channel 4, 9.00pm The third story in this enjoyable series based on sci-fi pioneer Philip K Dick’s stories stars Timothy Spall as a railway attendant with a sad home life. But when he meets a mysterious traveller, he is forced to choose between fantasy and reality. Dawn French Live: 30 Million Minutes BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 10.55pm; Wales, 10.45pm Recorded last year in London’s West End, this is the actress and comedian’s live solo show, inspired by the tough but entertaining lessons she’s learnt from life.  Child in Mind BBC Four, 10.00pm Simon Armitage has a talent for making powerfully poetic television. Here he mixes documentary footage and verse to give a voice to the dispossessed women in Britain, the mothers of the 3,000 children placed in care every year. GO Boris Johnson: Blond Ambition Channel 4, 10.05pm After a period of calm, the Boris bandwagon is gathering speed once again following the publication of his vision for a post-Brexit Britain in The Telegraph. Here Channel 4’s political editor Gary Gibbon looks back at Johnson’s 14 months as Foreign Secretary, assessing his impact and success on the world stage. GO Happy Feet (2006) ★★★★☆ ITV2, 3.45pm  Australian director George Miller won a Best Animated Feature Oscar for this entertaining believe-in-yourself animation. Mumble, a misfit emperor penguin (baby voice by Elizabeth Daily, adult voice by Elijah Wood) is causing his parents (voiced by Nicole Kidman and Jackman) concern because he can’t sing and is therefore unable to attract a mate. Mumble can tap-dance, though, and therein lies his salvation. A United Kingdom (2016) ★★★★☆   Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm  Amma Asante’s film retells a true story that took place simultaneously in the corridors of Westminster and the country now known as Botswana just over half a century ago. It’s about the inter-racial romance between English woman Ruth (Rosamund Pike) and Seretse (David Oyelowo), the future king. It’s stirring stuff and a chapter of history that rewards a close reading. Memphis Belle (1990) ★★★☆☆☆ ITV4, 9.05pm  It’s 1943, and the handsome American crew of Second World War B-17 bomber Memphis Belle, who are stationed in England, are anticipating their final mission – to fly over Nazi-occupied Europe. Full of nostalgia, this loosely based-on-real-events story exudes a romanticised view of heroism, but features an endearing cast, including Billy Zane, Sean Astin,John Lithgow, Eric Stoltz, and Harry Connick Jr. Monday 2 October The curmudgeon returns: Larry David is back after six years Credit: HBO/Skt Curb Your Enthusiasm Sky Atlantic, 10.00pm Cometh the hour, cometh the curmudgeon. It’s been six years since we last saw the irascible Larry David and the rest of his gang of malcontents, and this return is something of a surprise delight given that David had previously claimed to have mined every last possible drop from his alter-ego’s grumpy loathing of modern life.  No previews were available for this opening episode, which is not a surprise seeing as David has always run a tight ship regarding spoilers and HBO went into lockdown after episodes were leaked during the summer. So what can we expect? Bryan Cranston joins the cast as Larry’s new therapist, the wonderful double act of Ted Danson and Mary Steenburgen return, and David has promised that we’ll uncover just what happened after Larry left for Paris with perpetual house guest Leon (the scene-stealing J B Smoove). “It’s been a five-year log-jam of indignities and violations of etiquette,” executive producer Jeff Schaffer told Variety and it’s true that Curb’s return seems particularly suited to our current times. “Every day confirms, more and more, he’s right! He’s right about everything,” noted David. One thing is certain: it’ll be fun finding out if that’s true. Sarah Hughes Race and Pace: The West Indians in East Lancashire BBC Four, 7.30pm When West Indian cricketers began to arrive in Lancashire, the Northern county was hit for six. This enlightening documentary, narrated by Death in Paradise’s Don Warrington, tells the story of how initial reticence and racism turned into an unlikely cricketing love affair. Among those recalling their experiences are knights of the cricketing order, Viv Richards and Wes Hall, who also discuss the huge impact West Indian players made on the LCC and the resulting effect it had on both sides of the Atlantic over the past 90 years. Tunes for Tyrants: Music & Power with Suzy Klein BBC Four, 9.00pm Presented by Suzy Klein, this documentary is an exploration of music’s crucial political role in the most turbulent years of the 20th century. It begins with the Radio 3 presenter looking at the years following the Russian Revolution and the First World War when music was seen as a tool to change society. CM Liar ITV, 9.00pm After last week’s revelation, the William brothers’ potboiler continues apace. In the fourth episode, dogged “rape victim” Laura Nielson (Joanne Froggatt) travels to Edinburgh to find out how Andrew Earlham’s (Ioan Gruffudd) wife’s really died. Paddington Station 24/7 Channel 5, 9.00pm Watching this behind-the-scenes look at London’s Paddington Station, you can understand why rail passengers become frustrated by the service. In this episode, the staff have to deal with signal problems during rush hour. Later, a team of engineers race to replace 60 ft of rail hours before the morning rush begins. W1A BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI John Morton’s parody of life inside Broadcasting House always manages to find big laughs in unusual circumstances. Tonight, the Renewal Team propose to get rid of the BBC Big Swing Band, and marketing guru Siobhan (the excellent Jessica Hynes) decides to make a trailer to launch the YouTube-like BBC ME.  Stacey Dooley Investigates: Mums Selling Their Kids for Sex BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm; Scot, 11.45pm In this disturbing film, previously shown on BBC Three, Dooley is in the Philippines to investigate mothers who sexually exploit their children live on the web. Clive Morgan Ace Ventura: Pet Detective (1994) ★★★☆☆☆ 5STAR, 8.00pm  Back in 1994, Jim Carrey went from near obscurity to starring in three hits in a year. The first was this very funny comedy about a zany pet detective who finds himself out of his depth (the others were The Mask and Dumb & Dumber). Here, he’s hired by Miami’s NFL team to track down their mascot, a bottlenose dolphin named Snowflake, before the Super Bowl. Courteney Cox co-stars as the team’s publicist. Moulin Rouge! (2001) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 8.00pm  Baz Luhrmann’s intoxicating spectacle was the first musical to be nominated for the Best Picture Oscar in 22 years. Set in 1899, Montmartre, it follows a poet (Ewan McGregor) who becomes love-struck with the city’s famous courtesan (Nicole Kidman, who enters the film on a bejazzled swing). The mix of period setting and contemporary pop ensure a vivid assault on the senses. The Specialist (1994) ★★☆☆☆ ITV4, 10.00pm  Sharon Stone slinks around Sylvester Stallone in this celebrity vehicle that garnered a lot of attention, at the time of release, for its sex scene. Stallone plays a former CIA bomb expert hired by Stone to destroy the Mob that killed her family. Supporting actor James Woods remains unscathed in a film full of giant explosions, silly plot twists, and Rod Steiger trying out a Cuban accent (indecipherable and hilarious). Tuesday 3 October Caught in the middle: Suranne Jones and Tom Taylor Credit: BBC Doctor Foster BBC One, 9.00pm Handbrake turns have become the norm in the extraordinary second series of Mike Bartlett’s ripe melodrama, with showdown following showdown, passive aggression increasingly supplanted by straightforward aggression, and twists galore threatening a lurch into the territory of Fatal Attraction, only in reverse. The Fosters are in disarray – Simon (Bertie Carvel) is estranged from his second family and income stream, while Gemma (Suranne Jones) is concerned that her actions have pushed away their son (Tom Taylor, the show’s unsung star). We left Gemma driving at speed towards Simon – what happens next remains under wraps, but suffice to say that the most unexpected twist in tonight’s conclusion is one of tone: from operatic melodrama (albeit sustained by brilliant performances) into sombre contemplation – the fallout after the explosion. Flashbacks illustrate both the affection once at the heart of the family and a failure to meet the needs of its most vulnerable member. The door is left wide open for a third series; it’s been fun, but has strained credibility – it might be wise to emulate the Doctor Foster of the nursery rhyme and never go there again. Gabriel Tate Rodney Carrington: Here Comes the Truth Netflix, from 12.01am Rodney Carrington’s stand-up is an unapologetically crude assault on political correctness (his material ranges from Muslims to his manhood), but, undeniably, he has a big following in the US. This recording from his most recent tour will establish whether this acquired taste is also yours. The Great British Bake Off Channel 4, 8.00pm With the chancers and fudgers departed, Prue Leith and Paul Hollywood have a smorgasbord of class acts from which to choose as Pastry Week dawns: the showstopper sees the bakers attempt a pie with a difference. Reformation: Europe’s Holy War BBC Two, 9.00pm Once inescapable, David Starkey now makes infrequent appearances on TV; which is just as well, given a little of his strident controversialism generally goes a long way. Here, he’s on entertaining form exploring the malign forces unleashed by the Protestant Reformation some 500 years ago – and their modern parallels. Sex, Chips and Poetry: 50 Years of the Mersey Sound BBC Four, 9.00pm In 1967, the same year that The Beatles released Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, fellow Liverpudlians Roger McGough, Brian Patten and Adrian Henri took the spoken-word revolution started by the Beat Poets and transformed it into something uniquely British. This amiable and richly deserved tribute documentary, narrated by Isy Suttie, celebrates the 50th anniversary of their work on The Mersey Sound, one of the best-selling poetry anthologies of all time, which is still a mainstay on school syllabuses. GT Barbie: the Most Famous Doll in the World Channel 4, 9.15pm Mary Portas visits toymaker Mattel, attends conventions and talks to children in a bid to make sense of a doll blamed for entrenching everything from everyday sexism to unrealistic body images. How can an apparently outmoded icon be reinvented for the modern age? The Insider: Reggie Yates in a Refugee Camp BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm; Scot, 11.45pm In this documentary, first shown on BBC Three, Reggie Yates spends a week in Iraq’s largest refugee camp, where he lives alongside 30,000 displaced Syrians facing an uncertain future. GT The Karate Kid (2010) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.15pm  To most people’s surprise, this is a more-than-satisfying update on the much-loved original, though also comes across as an extended tourism advert. Jaden Smith (son of Will) plays a 12-year-old who moves from Detroit to Beijing with his mother (Taraji P Henson). There he becomes a punching bag for local bullies, but makes a new friend in a maintenance man and martial arts master Mr Han (Jackie Chan), who teaches him how to fight. Ice Age 3: Dawn of the Dinosaurs (2009) ★★★☆☆ E4, 8.00pm  This is comfortably the best in the Ice Age series and solid children’s entertainment, but you may need to explain that dinosaurs didn’t live in a vast hothouse under the glaciers, and woolly mammoths called Manny probably weren’t on chummy terms with sabre-toothed tigers called Diego. Here, the gang head to a tropical lost world to rescue Sid the Sloth (John Leguizamo). 22 Jump Street (2014) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 9.00pm  Channing Tatum’s charisma and the best malapropisms ever make this sequel to 21 Jump Street a joy. Instead of infiltrating school to arrest the suppliers of a drug, Jonah Hill’s Schmidt and Tatum’s Jenko infiltrate college to do… exactly the same. The film is directed by Phil Lord and Christopher Miller (The Lego Movie) who are becoming the handiest duo since the Coen brothers. Wednesday 4 October Back in business: Lord Sugar (centre) with Karren Brady and Claude Littner Credit: BBC The Apprentice BBC One, 9.00pm Thirteen series in and we all know by now that The Apprentice is not so much a search for the brightest and best new business entrepreneurs, but an exercise in finding the one polishable, er, apple in a barrelful of “pony and trap” as adept cockney rhymer Lord Sugar puts it. And what fun it still is watching all those overinflated young egos being cut down to size by the process.  This time 18 candidates vie for the prize of £250,000 start-up capital, and just to remind the wannabe tycoons what a great opportunity they’re being given, Lord Sugar marches five previous winners into the boardroom to beguile them with tales of success.  The opening challenge, though, couldn’t be more basic: making burgers and flogging them on the street. Which is not to say there isn’t lots of room for error and unfathomably gross stupidity, too. In fact, you’re pretty much guaranteed to spend most of this show slapping your forehead at the unadulterated ineptitude of some of these self-proclaimed geniuses. In other words, a great start to what looks like being another hilarious series with, as ever, The Apprentice: You’re Fired following, at 10pm on BBC Two. Gerard O’Donovan Who Do You Think You Are? BBC One, 8.00pm Some editions of this latest series have felt less like journeys of discovery and more like genetic quests. Here, comedian Ruby Wax sets out to discover whether her mental health issues might have been evident earlier in her family line. Billion Dollar Deals and How They Changed Your World BBC Two, 8.00pm Yes, it’s a conspiracy. In the second programme of his absorbing series about how the world is ruled not by politicians but by decisions made in corporate boardrooms, Jacques Peretti considers why big business is currently so determined to kill off cash.  The Detectives: Murder on the Streets BBC Two, 9.00pm “It not like the Seventies. It’s not about slapping people. It’s about what you disclose to the person.” The art of tripping suspects up in their own lies inches Manchester police ever closer to solving two brutal killings in this nail-biting real-life crime series. Britain’s Lost Masterpieces BBC Four, 9.00pm Bendor Grosvenor and Emma Dabiri head to the Derby Museum to investigate a painting that suffered an unusually poor early restoration. Could it be a work by the great 18th-century British master, Joseph Wright of Derby, and if so can it be returned to its former glory?  The Great War in Numbers Yesterday, 9.00pm Think of the First World War and it’s the millions of lives lost in the trenches that come to mind. But, as this documentary series reveals, everything about the Great War was on a scale previously unparalleled: machine guns in millions, artillery shells in billions, the mind-boggling logistics of keeping vast numbers of men fed, clothed and fighting fit in the field. Tonight’s first film of six explores how the empires of Germany, France, Russia and Britain were able to pour so much wealth into the industrialisation of warfare. GO Back Channel 4, 10.00pm Fate just seems to get crueller for Stephen (David Mitchell) when Andrew (Robert Webb) manages to increase his share in the pub. But then Alison (Olivia Poulet) uncovers information that could yet force the cuckoo out of the family nest. GO Mercury Rising (1998) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm  Bruce Willis is excellent as an undercover FBI agent assigned to protect a nine-year-old autistic boy (Miko Hughes) who is targeted by assassins after cracking a top secret government code in this underrated, if slightly unrealistic, thriller based on the Ryne Douglas Pearson novel Simon Says. The plot moves at breakneck speed yet, ultimately, it’s a touching and heart-warming story. The Football Factory (2004) ★★★☆☆ London Live, 10.00pm  John King’s book The Football Factory is an unnerving and brutal account of hooliganism in the Nineties, centring on a firm of Chelsea boot boys and their clashes with rival “fans”. Nick Love’s film certainly captures the thuggery, with Danny Dyer as Tommy, for whom life is about drink, drugs, sex, thieving and a good ruck – but who begins to question his ways. Made in France (2015) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.00pm  This thriller, about a wave of jihadist attacks on Paris, was pulled from cinemas following its plot’s number of unnerving parallels with recent events in the French capital. In it, an extremist cell plans a series of shootings and bombings across the city “that will shake France” and the world. Director Nicholas Boukhrief said he made the film to counter the “poison” of jihadist propaganda. Thursday 5 October Fire safety: in the wake of the Grenfell Tower disaster Credit: PA The Housing Enforcers BBC One, 8.00pm; BBC Two Wales, 7.00pm “Everyone has a right to a safe place to live, no matter who you are, where you live or how much rent you pay. It’s non-negotiable.” So concludes Matt Allwright at the end of this programme focusing on the importance of fire safety.  The format is straightforward: Allwright travels across the country meeting with housing officers and examining the myriad ways in which fires can destroy lives. What makes this really hit home, however, is the presenter’s quiet fury at the way in which some lives are considered less worthy than others. Inevitably, the shadow of Grenfell Tower hangs heavy over the hour. It’s notable that many of those worst affected are elderly and living alone: the story of fiercely independent Ali who refuses to acknowledge, even to his family, quite how much he is struggling is particularly poignant. Allwright, however, saves his most righteous rage for the landlords squeezing tenants in wherever they can and failing to meet even the minimum health and safety standards. The result is a hard-hitting and often hard-to-watch documentary, which also offers solid advice on how to deal both with fires and bad landlords. Sarah Hughes Live International Football: England v Slovenia ITV, 7.30pm Having drawn 0-0 last October, with Joe Hart forced to make a string of fine saves, England and Slovenia reconvene at Wembley. Victory today for Gareth Southgate’s men will ensure their qualification for next year’s World Cup in Russia. And having beaten second-placed Slovakia 2-1 last month, thanks to a strike from tyro Marcus Rashford, they’ll be confident of doing just that. The Big Family Cooking Showdown BBC Two, 8.00pm Two last families go head to head for a place in the finals. Their £10 challenge is a Friday night takeaway, so naturally curry is on the menu. There’s talk of “fusion” cooking, some mushy spinach and a 34-year-old rolling pin.   Discovering: Laurence Olivier Sky Arts, 8.00pm The spotlight turns on Laurence Olivier, who, in 1937, described cinema as an “anaemic little medium which could not stand great acting”.   Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm The work of the West Midlands Ambulance Service continues as a specialist trauma team are dispatched to a motorbike accident where a man has suffered a catastrophic chest injury. “I’ve got nothing…” declares the doctor. It’s a stark reminder of the fragility of life and the increasing compassion of the services in times of chaos.    Russia with Simon Reeve BBC Two, 9.00pm Simon Reeve continues his fascinating journey, meeting Tuvan children in Siberia who practice the Mongolian tradition of throat singing.  Educating Greater Manchester Channel 4, 9.00pm Ah, that old chestnut – ignoring school uniform rules. This week, the teachers at Harrop Fold are on the back foot when a message is spread on Snapchat encouraging pupils to come in wearing trainers. Social media also causes friction between Year 11 girls Serena and Lelo when one talks to the other’s boyfriend on FaceTime. Rachel Ward Law & Order True Crime: The Menendez murders Sky Living, 9.00pm This series, similar to The People v OJ Simpson, takes a closer look at the two trials of brothers Lyle and Erik Menendez, who were convicted of murdering their parents in their Beverly Hills home in 1989. It focuses on the attorney (Edie Falco), who was one of their few defenders. Dimension 404 Syfy, 9.00pm Each episode of this new sci-fi anthology features a form of technology gone wrong. But there’s nothing unnerving about it, rather it’s a camp pastiche of The Twilight Zone, complete with Star Wars’ Mark Hamill providing the voice-over. Glee’s Lea Michele stars in the first episode about online dating. It’s weird, but it doesn’t overplay it. RW Robin and Marian (1976) ★★★★☆ Film4, 1.10pm  Sean Connery gives one of his best performances as a middle-aged Robin Hood, who heads home to Sherwood Forest after the death of Richard I. He finds that scaling a castle wall isn’t as easy as it used to be, Maid Marian (Audrey Hepburn) is still miffed at being left in the lurch, and the Sheriff (Robert Shaw) is up to his old tricks in Richard Lester’s good-natured romance. Look out for Ronnie Barker as Friar Tuck. Jerry Maguire (1996) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 5.40pm  In Cameron Crowe’s macho romcom, Tom Cruise plays a sports agent who has an attack of conscience and urges his colleagues to think about the welfare of their clients. He’s duly fired but announces that he’ll start his own agency. A washed-up footballer (Cuba Gooding Jr) and a single mother (Renée Zellweger) are the only ones who agree to go with him. Here, the classic quote, “You had me at ‘hello’” was born. The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.10pm Clint Eastwood directs and stars in this marvellous warm-hearted western adapted from Forrest Carter’s novel and set during the American Civil War. Eastwood plays the eponymous Missouri farmer who, driven by memories of his family’s slaughter, becomes an outlaw when he refuses to join his Confederate comrades in surrender, in favour of seeking revenge on the men who murdered his kin. Friday 6 October Penal colony: Harry Peacock, Kevin Bishop and Ricky Grover Credit: BBC Porridge BBC One, 9.30pm The most successful of the BBC’s classic sitcom revivals from last year, Porridge returns for a full series with the series’ creators Dick Clement and Ian La Frenais once again on board. It finds Nigel Norman Fletcher (Kevin Bishop as the grandson of Ronnie Barker’s character, Norman Stanley) locking horns with officer Meekie (Mark Bonnar) while aiding or outsmarting the prison’s ne’er-do-wells. In a canny twist, it is Fletch who is now the relative ingénue in his cell, seeking counsel from veteran lag Joe Lotterby (Dave Hill). We find Fletch as the prison’s resident Cyrano de Bergerac, writing letters to keep the flame of romance alive between assorted inmates and their partners on the outside. All goes well until Fletch suffers a crisis of conscience that threatens the whole operation. Some of the gags are groanworthy, but Clement and La Frenais’s mastery of sitcom mechanics remains complete; their presence keeps the spirit of the original intact, while the update means that no one is attempting to emulate the cast of the Seventies series. Fletch has a five-year sentence to serve; unlikely as it might seem, a similar term for Porridge might not be unwelcome. Gabriel Tate Suburra: the Series Netflix, from 12.01am Like Romanzo Criminale and Gomorrah before it, Suburra began life as a book before becoming a gripping, multifaceted Italian-language political thriller. This 10-part series, set in the dying days of Berlusconi’s regime, explores the themes of politics, the Church and corruption during 20 tumultuous days in Rome. Unreported World Channel 4, 7.30pm Ireland faces a pivotal referendum on the decriminalisation of abortion in certain circumstances; Kate Hardie-Buckley meets those on both sides of the debate in a deeply affecting edition of the current-affairs series. Modern Family Sky1, 8.30pm It may have tailed off since its peak, but Modern Family is still good for a few laughs. The ninth series begins with Jay (Ty Burrell) taking the family on a houseboat holiday, and Mitchell (Jesse Tyler Ferguson) encountering an old flame. Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm; not N Ireland or Wales Monty Don begins preparations for 2018 by advising others on how to use leaf mould as a mulch. Elsewhere, Adam Frost visits a community allotment in Manchester, and Nick Bailey learns from a zoologist about the life teeming in the soil. Nile Rodgers: How to Make It in the Music Business BBC Four, 9.00pm Guitar genius and pop producer Nile Rodgers shares the wisdom he’s acquired over decades in the music business. In the first episode, he discusses the founding of Chic and his influence on today’s hitmakers. GT Cold Feet ITV, 9.00pm Karen (Hermione Norris) is on the brink of financial disaster in spite of David’s (Robert Bathurst) assistance, while Adam (James Nesbitt) gets out of his depth on a night out in Mike Bullen’s assured comedy-drama revival. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm Another line-up of heavy-hitters assembles on the red sofa tonight: comedian Chris Rock plugs his first UK stand-up tour in a decade, actors Idris Elba and Kate Winslet discuss their niche genre movie, “disaster-romance” The Mountain Between Us (about a surgeon and a journalist who survive a plane crash), and Liam Gallagher performs songs from his debut album, As You Were. GT The Twilight Saga: Eclipse (2010) ★★★☆☆ E4, 8.00pm  The third instalment of the teenage vampire franchise is better than the second and will please its fan base, though Melissa Rosenberg’s script is full of clichés and relies on a shirtless Taylor Lautner for distraction. Girl-next-door Bella Swan (Kristen Stewart) must choose between 100-year-old vampire Edward Cullen (Robert Pattinson) and hunky werewolf Jacob Black (Lautner). T2: Trainspotting (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.00pm  Danny Boyle’s sequel is more than just a trip down memory lane. Back in 1996, Trainspotting’s gallery of junkies and rogues (Ewan McGregor, Jonny Lee Miller) proudly and raucously chose not to choose life. But now, all have come to terms with the gnawing possibility that life may have in fact not chosen them. There’s no chance of it matching the legacy of the first film, but it doesn’t tarnish it either. American Hustle (2013) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 12.10am  David O Russell’s caper feels like the film he has spent his career warming up for and is a serious piece of film-making that delights in its own silliness. Irving (Christian Bale) and his partner Sydney (Amy Adams) are con artists blackmailed by FBI agent Richie DiMaso (Bradley Cooper) into aiding his investigation. “Some of this actually happened,” reads a title card, and to be more specific would spoil the fun. Television previewers Catherine Gee, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: Russia with Simon Reeve and Eamonn and Ruth’s 7 Year Itch

THURSDAY 28 SEPTEMBER RUSSIA WITH SIMON REEVE BBC Two, 9.00pm Explorer Simon Reeve balances an occasional taste for cliché (“a country of utter extremes”, indeed!) with a constant, healthy curiosity and a canny way with locals of all stripes in his latest travelogue – what he calls “the big one”. This three-part epic sends him from Kamchatka in the far east of Russia to St Petersburg, but what elevates it from the lazier celebrity-fronted affairs is our guide’s knack for weighing up history and current affairs, cultural minutiae and global geopolitics. Russia is a nation with plenty of all this so Reeve is in his element, whether nosing around the evocative ruins of a submarine base, tagging along on a twilit recce for a Siberian tiger or hanging out with the remote communities of reindeer herders who are eking out a subsistence and concerned that their children will abandon their traditions. The shadow cast by Putin’s police state is long, with Reeve and his team seriously inconvenienced on more than one occasion by their none-too-subtle attentions of local authorities, but even this is put into sharp perspective by the grim prognosis for Siberia’s permafrost. Melting at an increasing rate, its fate could determine the future of the planet itself. GT DESIGNATED SURVIVOR Netflix, from 12.01am This ludicrous but enjoyable Kiefer Sutherland vehicle enters series two, with unlikely President Tom Kirkman (Sutherland) slowly growing into his role while continuing the hunt for the evildoers behind the explosion that destroyed the Capitol Building and the rest of the Cabinet. GT EUROPEAN TOUR GOLF: The British Masters Sky Sports Golf, 9.30am Coverage of the opening day of the British Masters at Close House in Northumberland, where the field battles to succeed last year’s champion Alexander Norenunt.  GT SAFE HOUSE ITV, 9.00pm The spectacularly daft thriller reaches a hysterical climax as Tom (Stephen Moyer) and Sam (Zoe Tapper) clash over his past, just as The Crow descends on their safe house – but is it Liam (Joel MacCormack), Roger (Andrew Tiernan) or someone else entirely? GT EDUCATING GREATER MANCHESTER Channel 4, 9.00pm A regular staple of the series, it’s the Educating-meets-Apprentice episode of the Head Boy and Head Girl elections. Interviews and live debates are on the agenda. In the running: a popular young boxer and two ambitious boys, alongside a geeky girl and a rival candidate who hangs out with teachers more than her peers. GT EAMONN & RUTH’S 7 YEAR ITCH Channel 5, 9.00pm Holmes and Langsford, who’ve been married for seven years but together for 20, conclude their survey of tricks to keep a marriage alive. They meet two swingers, a couple who role play and a family whose patriarch is transgender. GT  JOHN BISHOP IN CONVERSATION WITH JIMMY CARR W, 9.00pm Bishop once again proves an estimable interviewer, this time prising open Jimmy Carr’s carapace of “irony” to quiz him on his career and a certain financial “error of judgment”. GT GYPSY KIDS: OUR SECRET WORLD Channel 5, 10.00pm This week the series follows traveller children and their experiences of education – 11-year-old Shannon is leaving school to be trained for her future life maintaining the home, while nine-year-old Michael has to choose between study and practical skills. GT ROOM 104 Sky Atlantic, 10.35pm From the Duplass Brothers (Togetherness), comes this inevitably patchy but occasionally inspired anthology series set in one room of a hotel. The characters passing through it vary with each episode, along with the genre: tonight’s lean opener is a horror-tinged venture into the life of a babysitter. GT THE ACCOUNTANT (2016) Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm ★★☆☆☆ The one thing there’s no accounting for in this film is taste. Ben Affleck plays Christian Wolff, an autistic savant whose career in financial services has brought him into the employ of some of the slimiest mobsters around. For reasons that don’t add up, our hero’s father (Robert C Treveiler) decides it’s in the best interests of his disadvantaged son to train him up as a ruthless killer. I LOVE YOU, MAN (2009) 5STAR, 10.00pm  ★★☆☆☆ Paul Rudd, realising he has no best man for his wedding, sets out to find himself a buddy in this contrived bromance from Meet the Parents/Fockers creator John Hamburg. Beer-swilling Jason Segal seems to fit the bill, but of course things go wrong. The results aren’t hilarious, but both leading actors have their amusing moments, particularly Rudd with his James Bond impressions and bad air guitar. HEARTBREAK RIDGE (1986) ITV4, 10.15pm  ★★★☆☆ Producer-director-actor Clint Eastwood casts himself as Sgt Tom Highway (nicknamed Gunney) of the US Marine Corps. Having alienated his superiors, Highway asks to end his career where it began and is transferred to perform gunnery duties in his old outfit in Grenada where he has to rescue students from a Marxist government. Not Eastwood’s best, but still a decent action film and it was nominated for an Oscar. FRIDAY 29 SEPTEMBER Harrison Ford and Ryan Gosling Credit: WireImage THE GRAHAM NORTON SHOW BBC One, 10.35pm Third from the top of the BBC’s recently published list of its highest earners (at between £850,000 and £899,000 a year), Graham Norton returns to the Friday evening schedules – as sure a sign that the nights are drawing in as the return of Strictly Come Dancing and The X Factor at the weekends.  The fact is Norton is a big draw not only for audiences but for celebrities, too, and he consistently eclipses every other UK chat show host when it comes to attracting the biggest stars from home and abroad to have a natter on his curvy red sofa.  Visiting Hollywood actors appear to be especially enamoured and that’s certainly the case in tonight’s show as Stars Wars and Indiana Jones star Harrison Ford and La La Land’s Ryan Gosling turn up to talk about their new sci-fi sequel Blade Runner 2049. Also making an appearance is Reese Witherspoon, who, fresh from the success of Big Little Lies at the Emmy Awards, is on hand to plug her latest comedy Home Again, while Margot Robbie (who is in Time magazine’s list of 2017’s most influential people) brings at least a hint of Britishness with talk of her new AA Milne biopic, Goodbye Christopher Robin. GO STARTUP Amazon Prime, from today Series one of this Miami-based drama, about entrepreneurs financing tech start-ups with dirty money, got a mixed reaction. But now it gets a deserved second season, with Martin Freeman returning as the exceedingly nasty FBI agent Phil Rask. Ron Perlman also joins the cast as the mercurial moneyman behind the latest venture.  GO LONG SHOT Netflix, from today A needle-in-haystack documentary, featuring Curb Your Enthusiasm’s Larry David, about how the fate of a man accused of murder rested on proving he was in a crowd of 54,000 people at a baseball game.  GO ONE-DAY INTERNATIONAL CRICKET: England v West Indies Sky Sports Main Event, 12.00noon Action from the fifth and final fixture in the series, which takes place at the Ageas Bowl in Southampton. Can Eoin Morgan’s men bring the curtain down on England’s summer endeavours in style? GO UNREPORTED WORLD Channel 4, 7.30pm The foreign affairs series returns with Marcel Theroux reporting on an unlikely explosion of home-grown pop music in China. These groups are working in defiance of the country’s censorship and against a government crackdown on authority-defying acts. GO BRITAIN BY BIKE WITH LARRY & GEORGE LAMB Channel 5, 8.00pm The father-and-son team of George and Larry Lamb take to two wheels for a convivial trip around Britain’s best national park cycle routes. They begin in the Yorkshire Dales, where they try fly-fishing and rock climbing before tackling a section of the 2014 Tour de France route. GO THE LAST PIRATES: BRITAIN’S REBEL DJS BBC Four, 9.00pm Forget Radio Caroline and Radio Luxembourg – rapper Rodney P tells the story of how, in the Eighties, a new wave of pirate radio stations created a platform for emerging rap artists and changed the soundtrack of Thatcher’s Britain. GO COLD FEET ITV, 9.00pm The focus of Mike Bullen’s entertaining comedy drama returns to the tangled love life of Adam (James Nesbitt) as his girlfriend Tina (Leanne Best) falls victim to online revenge porn. Meanwhile, Karen (Hermione Norris) is aided by an unlikely white knight in her fight against the hostile takeover bid. GO A CELEBRITY TASTE OF ITALY Channel 5, 9.00pm Nice work if you can get it: Ian Lavender, Rula Lenska, Judith Chalmers and Johnny Ball head to a luxury villa in Italy for a masterclass in how to prepare the best local foods and wines. This week, the enticing flavours of Tuscany. GO OUR SOULS AT NIGHT (2017) Netflix, from today  ★★★☆☆ Jane Fonda and Robert Redford – whose three-film partnership in the Sixties and Seventies, across The Chase, Barefoot in the Park and The Electric Horseman, set them apart as one of the most indecently gorgeous screen couples the movies ever produced – are on fizzing form in this cosy autumnal romance as two widowed neighbours who begin sleeping in bed together platonically to alleviate their loneliness. FLETCH (1985) Film4, 6.55pm  ★★★☆☆ Chevy Chase delivers dry one-liners and physical slapstick in this breezy comedy film that saw the peak of the actor’s career. Based on a series of novels by Gregory McDonald, the cult movie, which is one of the more quotable comedies of the Eighties, stars Chase as Fletch, a smart alec investigative reporter for an LA newspaper who is approached by a wealthy man who asks Fletch to kill him. UP IN THE AIR (2009) BBC One, 11.55pm  ★★★★☆ Jason Reitman (whose second film Juno earned him Oscar nominations) directs this witty love story. Ryan (George Clooney) is a downsizing expert, who flies around the US and fires people. That is, until a graduate (Anna Kendrick) proposes to save on airfares by getting staff to carry out sackings via video. Bingham is not happy; he likes the high life, and he likes fellow flyer Alex (Vera Farmiga). Saturday 30 September Popular poetry: how Auden still connects with modern life Credit: Getty Images Stop All the Clocks: WH Auden in an Age of Anxiety BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 10.30pm As anyone who’s seen Richard Curtis’s film Four Weddings and a Funeral will attest, W H Auden’s poetry has considerable emotional potency. Indeed, those not reduced to tears at the sight of John Hannah reading Stop All the Clocks should consult their doctor as soon as possible. (“He was my North, my South, my East and West/My working week and my Sunday rest/My noon, my midnight, my talk, my song/I thought that love would last for ever: I was wrong.”) His words also provide succour in troubled times: many New Yorkers, in fact, turned to his poem September 1, 1939 – a response to the outbreak of the Second World War – in the aftermath of 9/11.  Launching a season of poetry programmes, this excellent documentary from director Adam Low looks at why the craggy-faced Auden – whose reputation in Britain soured after his decision to move to America in 1939 – still has a great hold on our imaginations. Among those paying tribute to Auden’s words – a mix of humanity, scepticism and unsuppressed honesty – are writers Alan Bennett, Alexander McCall Smith and Curtis, who studied Auden at university. Patrick Smith Live Premier League Football: Chelsea v Manchester City BT Sport 1, 5.00pm The two teams’ last encounter at Stamford Bridge in April ended well for Chelsea, who won 2-1, thanks to a brace from Eden Hazard. But City have looked imperious this season: unbeaten in the league, they’ve won five of their six matches. Third-placed Chelsea go into this game with momentum from an impressive 4-0 victory at Stoke. In terms of their starting line-up, Pep Guardiola’s side must cope without summer signing Benjamin Mendy; the French full-back is currently sidelined with a ligament injury.  Strictly Come Dancing BBC One, 6.45pm This year’s competition is full of characters – from the divine Reverend Richard Coles and his disco-dad dancing to the gleefully giddy Debbie McGee – but tonight they must all impress not just the judges but the viewers, too: the first couple will be voted off in tomorrow’s results show.   Britain Afloat BBC Two, 8.00pm; N Ireland, 8.30pm Throughout our history, boats have played a major role and, in this new six-part series, Mary-Ann Ochota travels Britain’s waterways to see how they shaped our lives. Here, she explores the role boats played at Dunkirk and joins the Thames Barge match. The X Factor: Boot Camp ITV, 8.00pm Now that the auditions are over, it’s time for the lucky hopefuls to take part in Boot Camp. Those who manage to impress judges Simon, Nicole, Sharon and Louis will go through to the dreaded Six Chair Challenge. More tomorrow at 7.30pm.  The Doors Night Sky Arts, from 8.00pm In 1967, The Doors broke on through, releasing a string of hit singles and two platinum albums. With their intoxicating blend of blues, jazz and poetry, they exploded into the public consciousness, becoming one of the soundtracks to the Summer of Love. Now, 50 years later, Sky Arts is dedicating an evening of programming to the quartet, whose name is a reference to Aldous Huxley’s Doors of Perception. First up, in Rock Poet, is a fascinating profile of The Doors’ shamanistic frontman Jim Morrison, who died aged 27. Next is The Doors: Feast of Friends, which follows the band on the road. Rounding off the night is footage of their famous 1968 concert at the Hollywood Bowl. Black Lake BBC Four, 9.00pm and 9.40pm This fun Swedish supernatural chiller reaches its penultimate episodes, and there’s something nasty lurking in the cellar at the ski lodge, leaving the gang in a state of shock. PS The Jonathan Ross Show ITV, 9.30pm US singer Demi Lovato is on Jonathan Ross’s guest list as she promotes her “intimate” documentary Simply Complicated. She is joined by Doc Martin’s Martin Clunes and This Morning’s Holly Willoughby. The music comes from The X Factor 2012 winner James Arthur. Clive Morgan Now You See Me (2013) ★★☆☆☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm  A group of illusionists (Jesse Eisenberg, Woody Harrelson, Isla Fisher and Dave Franco) are encouraged to carry out a string of heists by a mysterious figure, while remaining ahead of FBI agent Rhodes (Mark Ruffalo), who is desperate to bring them to justice. Director Louis Leterrier tries to mimic the complex plots of films such as Inception, but with less success, though it’s reasonably entertaining. Transcendence (2014) ★★☆☆☆ Channel 4, 11.15pm  Johnny Depp and Rebecca Hall star as Will and Evelyn Caster, married artificial-intelligence scientists who download his brain patterns to a hard drive. This isn’t a casual choice: at a state-of-the-future convention, Will is grazed by a would-be assassin’s bullet, which is laced with a radioactive isotope, giving him weeks to live. The film, co-starring Cillian Murphy, is visually stylish but let down by poor storytelling. The Edge of Love (2008) ★★★☆☆ BBC Two, 11.35pm; Wales, 1.05am; not Scot  A fascinating story set during the Second World War about poet Dylan Thomas’s (Matthew Rhys) relationships with two women: his hedonistic Irish wife (Sienna Miller) and his Welsh childhood lover (Keira Knightley). An intense Jules et Jim-esque set-up develops, but the film could do with more about the art and less about the artist’s love life. It’s scripted by Knightley’s mother. Sunday 1 October Bad girl: Jessica Raine stars as military wife Alison Credit: BBC The Last Post BBC One, 9.00pm This intriguing six-part drama, scripted by playwright Peter Moffat, is set against an unusual backdrop – the mid-Sixties conflict that took place in the then British Crown Colony of Aden on the southern Arabian peninsula. Jessica Raine is the star attraction in the bad-girl role of Alison, the drunken, unhappy and unfaithful wife of conscientious but undervalued military policeman Lieutenant Ed Laithwaite (Stephen Campbell Moore).  The atmosphere of unrelenting heat and dust is very well conveyed, as is the day-to-day tedium of life for military wives on a Royal Military Police base and the hierarchies of rank that must be observed. We get the full introduction in this opening episode as newlyweds Captain Joe Martin (Jeremy Neumark Jones) and his wife Honor (Jessie Buckley) arrive on the base as the going-away party for the popular man he’s replacing, Captain Page (Joseph Kennedy), is in full swing. Meanwhile, Laithwaite receives information that an attack on the base by rebel fighters is imminent, but his commanding officer, Major Markham (Ben Miles) refuses to take his warnings seriously. What happens next is not as obvious as you might expect. Gerard O’Donovan Live Formula 1: Malaysia Grand Prix Sky Sports Main Event & Channel 4, 7.35am The 19th Grand Prix in this country will also be its last, as the Malaysian government withdraws funding for the Sepang circuit. Drivers had to endure the challenge of racing in 50-degree heat, with hydration as important as a full tank. Lewis Hamilton will be hoping to increase his lead in the championship with another victory, but a mix of unpredictable weather and a track known for its sharp corners should ensure that this Grand Prix keeps throwing up surprises right until the very end. Live NFL: New Orleans Saints v Miami Dolphins BBC Two, 1.45pm Wembley Stadium is the setting again for the NFL, having hosted Jacksonville Jaguars’ 44-7 demolition of the Baltimore Ravens last weekend. This will be a fourth trip to Wembley for the Dolphins, who appeared in the first International Series game here in 2007 when they lost 13-10 to the New York Giants, while their most recent appearance saw them defeated 27-14 by the New York Jets in 2015. The Saints have less experience of playing at Wembley, but did register a 37-32 win over the then-San Diego Chargers in 2008, in their only previous trip to the UK.  Live Premier League Rugby Union: Wasps v Bath BT Sport 1, 2.15pm The new season has turned sour for both teams, and Wasps are keen to avoid their third successive defeat. If history is an indicator they should have the upper hand, having won their last four matches against Bath – the most recent of which finished 24-3, with two tries from Kurtley Beale helping them on their way. The visitors come into this match on the back of an agonising 33-32 defeat to Newcastle Falcons, who scored twice in the last 15 minutes to come from behind in a nine-try thriller. Cornwall’s Native Poet: Charles Causley BBC Four, 8.00pm This documentary, the first of three films from the BBC’s Contains Strong Language poetry strand, celebrates the life and work of Charles Causley, a Cornish poet so deeply rooted in the county that he only left his home town of Launceston once, for naval service in the Second World War. Escape Channel 4, 8.00pm There are five people stranded in the middle of a desert following a plane crash. They have one chance of survival: creating another vehicle from the plane wreckage. That’s the premise of this new series in which five engineers are challenged to use their ingenuity and skill to escape a tricky situation. Men Who Sleep in Cars BBC Four, 9.00pm Scripted entirely in verse, poet Michael Symmons Roberts’s film is a love song to the city of Manchester. It tells the poignant story of three rough sleepers whose impoverished lives are seen in contrast to the great wealth of the city. With Maxine Peake. Electric Dreams:The Commuter Channel 4, 9.00pm The third story in this enjoyable series based on sci-fi pioneer Philip K Dick’s stories stars Timothy Spall as a railway attendant with a sad home life. But when he meets a mysterious traveller, he is forced to choose between fantasy and reality. Dawn French Live: 30 Million Minutes BBC Two, 10.00pm; NI, 10.55pm; Wales, 10.45pm Recorded last year in London’s West End, this is the actress and comedian’s live solo show, inspired by the tough but entertaining lessons she’s learnt from life.  Child in Mind BBC Four, 10.00pm Simon Armitage has a talent for making powerfully poetic television. Here he mixes documentary footage and verse to give a voice to the dispossessed women in Britain, the mothers of the 3,000 children placed in care every year. GO Boris Johnson: Blond Ambition Channel 4, 10.05pm After a period of calm, the Boris bandwagon is gathering speed once again following the publication of his vision for a post-Brexit Britain in The Telegraph. Here Channel 4’s political editor Gary Gibbon looks back at Johnson’s 14 months as Foreign Secretary, assessing his impact and success on the world stage. GO Happy Feet (2006) ★★★★☆ ITV2, 3.45pm  Australian director George Miller won a Best Animated Feature Oscar for this entertaining believe-in-yourself animation. Mumble, a misfit emperor penguin (baby voice by Elizabeth Daily, adult voice by Elijah Wood) is causing his parents (voiced by Nicole Kidman and Jackman) concern because he can’t sing and is therefore unable to attract a mate. Mumble can tap-dance, though, and therein lies his salvation. A United Kingdom (2016) ★★★★☆   Sky Movies Premiere, 8.00pm  Amma Asante’s film retells a true story that took place simultaneously in the corridors of Westminster and the country now known as Botswana just over half a century ago. It’s about the inter-racial romance between English woman Ruth (Rosamund Pike) and Seretse (David Oyelowo), the future king. It’s stirring stuff and a chapter of history that rewards a close reading. Memphis Belle (1990) ★★★☆☆☆ ITV4, 9.05pm  It’s 1943, and the handsome American crew of Second World War B-17 bomber Memphis Belle, who are stationed in England, are anticipating their final mission – to fly over Nazi-occupied Europe. Full of nostalgia, this loosely based-on-real-events story exudes a romanticised view of heroism, but features an endearing cast, including Billy Zane, Sean Astin,John Lithgow, Eric Stoltz, and Harry Connick Jr. Monday 2 October The curmudgeon returns: Larry David is back after six years Credit: HBO/Skt Curb Your Enthusiasm Sky Atlantic, 10.00pm Cometh the hour, cometh the curmudgeon. It’s been six years since we last saw the irascible Larry David and the rest of his gang of malcontents, and this return is something of a surprise delight given that David had previously claimed to have mined every last possible drop from his alter-ego’s grumpy loathing of modern life.  No previews were available for this opening episode, which is not a surprise seeing as David has always run a tight ship regarding spoilers and HBO went into lockdown after episodes were leaked during the summer. So what can we expect? Bryan Cranston joins the cast as Larry’s new therapist, the wonderful double act of Ted Danson and Mary Steenburgen return, and David has promised that we’ll uncover just what happened after Larry left for Paris with perpetual house guest Leon (the scene-stealing J B Smoove). “It’s been a five-year log-jam of indignities and violations of etiquette,” executive producer Jeff Schaffer told Variety and it’s true that Curb’s return seems particularly suited to our current times. “Every day confirms, more and more, he’s right! He’s right about everything,” noted David. One thing is certain: it’ll be fun finding out if that’s true. Sarah Hughes Race and Pace: The West Indians in East Lancashire BBC Four, 7.30pm When West Indian cricketers began to arrive in Lancashire, the Northern county was hit for six. This enlightening documentary, narrated by Death in Paradise’s Don Warrington, tells the story of how initial reticence and racism turned into an unlikely cricketing love affair. Among those recalling their experiences are knights of the cricketing order, Viv Richards and Wes Hall, who also discuss the huge impact West Indian players made on the LCC and the resulting effect it had on both sides of the Atlantic over the past 90 years. Tunes for Tyrants: Music & Power with Suzy Klein BBC Four, 9.00pm Presented by Suzy Klein, this documentary is an exploration of music’s crucial political role in the most turbulent years of the 20th century. It begins with the Radio 3 presenter looking at the years following the Russian Revolution and the First World War when music was seen as a tool to change society. CM Liar ITV, 9.00pm After last week’s revelation, the William brothers’ potboiler continues apace. In the fourth episode, dogged “rape victim” Laura Nielson (Joanne Froggatt) travels to Edinburgh to find out how Andrew Earlham’s (Ioan Gruffudd) wife’s really died. Paddington Station 24/7 Channel 5, 9.00pm Watching this behind-the-scenes look at London’s Paddington Station, you can understand why rail passengers become frustrated by the service. In this episode, the staff have to deal with signal problems during rush hour. Later, a team of engineers race to replace 60 ft of rail hours before the morning rush begins. W1A BBC Two, 10.00pm; not NI John Morton’s parody of life inside Broadcasting House always manages to find big laughs in unusual circumstances. Tonight, the Renewal Team propose to get rid of the BBC Big Swing Band, and marketing guru Siobhan (the excellent Jessica Hynes) decides to make a trailer to launch the YouTube-like BBC ME.  Stacey Dooley Investigates: Mums Selling Their Kids for Sex BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm; Scot, 11.45pm In this disturbing film, previously shown on BBC Three, Dooley is in the Philippines to investigate mothers who sexually exploit their children live on the web. Clive Morgan Ace Ventura: Pet Detective (1994) ★★★☆☆☆ 5STAR, 8.00pm  Back in 1994, Jim Carrey went from near obscurity to starring in three hits in a year. The first was this very funny comedy about a zany pet detective who finds himself out of his depth (the others were The Mask and Dumb & Dumber). Here, he’s hired by Miami’s NFL team to track down their mascot, a bottlenose dolphin named Snowflake, before the Super Bowl. Courteney Cox co-stars as the team’s publicist. Moulin Rouge! (2001) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 8.00pm  Baz Luhrmann’s intoxicating spectacle was the first musical to be nominated for the Best Picture Oscar in 22 years. Set in 1899, Montmartre, it follows a poet (Ewan McGregor) who becomes love-struck with the city’s famous courtesan (Nicole Kidman, who enters the film on a bejazzled swing). The mix of period setting and contemporary pop ensure a vivid assault on the senses. The Specialist (1994) ★★☆☆☆ ITV4, 10.00pm  Sharon Stone slinks around Sylvester Stallone in this celebrity vehicle that garnered a lot of attention, at the time of release, for its sex scene. Stallone plays a former CIA bomb expert hired by Stone to destroy the Mob that killed her family. Supporting actor James Woods remains unscathed in a film full of giant explosions, silly plot twists, and Rod Steiger trying out a Cuban accent (indecipherable and hilarious). Tuesday 3 October Caught in the middle: Suranne Jones and Tom Taylor Credit: BBC Doctor Foster BBC One, 9.00pm Handbrake turns have become the norm in the extraordinary second series of Mike Bartlett’s ripe melodrama, with showdown following showdown, passive aggression increasingly supplanted by straightforward aggression, and twists galore threatening a lurch into the territory of Fatal Attraction, only in reverse. The Fosters are in disarray – Simon (Bertie Carvel) is estranged from his second family and income stream, while Gemma (Suranne Jones) is concerned that her actions have pushed away their son (Tom Taylor, the show’s unsung star). We left Gemma driving at speed towards Simon – what happens next remains under wraps, but suffice to say that the most unexpected twist in tonight’s conclusion is one of tone: from operatic melodrama (albeit sustained by brilliant performances) into sombre contemplation – the fallout after the explosion. Flashbacks illustrate both the affection once at the heart of the family and a failure to meet the needs of its most vulnerable member. The door is left wide open for a third series; it’s been fun, but has strained credibility – it might be wise to emulate the Doctor Foster of the nursery rhyme and never go there again. Gabriel Tate Rodney Carrington: Here Comes the Truth Netflix, from 12.01am Rodney Carrington’s stand-up is an unapologetically crude assault on political correctness (his material ranges from Muslims to his manhood), but, undeniably, he has a big following in the US. This recording from his most recent tour will establish whether this acquired taste is also yours. The Great British Bake Off Channel 4, 8.00pm With the chancers and fudgers departed, Prue Leith and Paul Hollywood have a smorgasbord of class acts from which to choose as Pastry Week dawns: the showstopper sees the bakers attempt a pie with a difference. Reformation: Europe’s Holy War BBC Two, 9.00pm Once inescapable, David Starkey now makes infrequent appearances on TV; which is just as well, given a little of his strident controversialism generally goes a long way. Here, he’s on entertaining form exploring the malign forces unleashed by the Protestant Reformation some 500 years ago – and their modern parallels. Sex, Chips and Poetry: 50 Years of the Mersey Sound BBC Four, 9.00pm In 1967, the same year that The Beatles released Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, fellow Liverpudlians Roger McGough, Brian Patten and Adrian Henri took the spoken-word revolution started by the Beat Poets and transformed it into something uniquely British. This amiable and richly deserved tribute documentary, narrated by Isy Suttie, celebrates the 50th anniversary of their work on The Mersey Sound, one of the best-selling poetry anthologies of all time, which is still a mainstay on school syllabuses. GT Barbie: the Most Famous Doll in the World Channel 4, 9.15pm Mary Portas visits toymaker Mattel, attends conventions and talks to children in a bid to make sense of a doll blamed for entrenching everything from everyday sexism to unrealistic body images. How can an apparently outmoded icon be reinvented for the modern age? The Insider: Reggie Yates in a Refugee Camp BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm; Scot, 11.45pm In this documentary, first shown on BBC Three, Reggie Yates spends a week in Iraq’s largest refugee camp, where he lives alongside 30,000 displaced Syrians facing an uncertain future. GT The Karate Kid (2010) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.15pm  To most people’s surprise, this is a more-than-satisfying update on the much-loved original, though also comes across as an extended tourism advert. Jaden Smith (son of Will) plays a 12-year-old who moves from Detroit to Beijing with his mother (Taraji P Henson). There he becomes a punching bag for local bullies, but makes a new friend in a maintenance man and martial arts master Mr Han (Jackie Chan), who teaches him how to fight. Ice Age 3: Dawn of the Dinosaurs (2009) ★★★☆☆ E4, 8.00pm  This is comfortably the best in the Ice Age series and solid children’s entertainment, but you may need to explain that dinosaurs didn’t live in a vast hothouse under the glaciers, and woolly mammoths called Manny probably weren’t on chummy terms with sabre-toothed tigers called Diego. Here, the gang head to a tropical lost world to rescue Sid the Sloth (John Leguizamo). 22 Jump Street (2014) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 9.00pm  Channing Tatum’s charisma and the best malapropisms ever make this sequel to 21 Jump Street a joy. Instead of infiltrating school to arrest the suppliers of a drug, Jonah Hill’s Schmidt and Tatum’s Jenko infiltrate college to do… exactly the same. The film is directed by Phil Lord and Christopher Miller (The Lego Movie) who are becoming the handiest duo since the Coen brothers. Wednesday 4 October Back in business: Lord Sugar (centre) with Karren Brady and Claude Littner Credit: BBC The Apprentice BBC One, 9.00pm Thirteen series in and we all know by now that The Apprentice is not so much a search for the brightest and best new business entrepreneurs, but an exercise in finding the one polishable, er, apple in a barrelful of “pony and trap” as adept cockney rhymer Lord Sugar puts it. And what fun it still is watching all those overinflated young egos being cut down to size by the process.  This time 18 candidates vie for the prize of £250,000 start-up capital, and just to remind the wannabe tycoons what a great opportunity they’re being given, Lord Sugar marches five previous winners into the boardroom to beguile them with tales of success.  The opening challenge, though, couldn’t be more basic: making burgers and flogging them on the street. Which is not to say there isn’t lots of room for error and unfathomably gross stupidity, too. In fact, you’re pretty much guaranteed to spend most of this show slapping your forehead at the unadulterated ineptitude of some of these self-proclaimed geniuses. In other words, a great start to what looks like being another hilarious series with, as ever, The Apprentice: You’re Fired following, at 10pm on BBC Two. Gerard O’Donovan Who Do You Think You Are? BBC One, 8.00pm Some editions of this latest series have felt less like journeys of discovery and more like genetic quests. Here, comedian Ruby Wax sets out to discover whether her mental health issues might have been evident earlier in her family line. Billion Dollar Deals and How They Changed Your World BBC Two, 8.00pm Yes, it’s a conspiracy. In the second programme of his absorbing series about how the world is ruled not by politicians but by decisions made in corporate boardrooms, Jacques Peretti considers why big business is currently so determined to kill off cash.  The Detectives: Murder on the Streets BBC Two, 9.00pm “It not like the Seventies. It’s not about slapping people. It’s about what you disclose to the person.” The art of tripping suspects up in their own lies inches Manchester police ever closer to solving two brutal killings in this nail-biting real-life crime series. Britain’s Lost Masterpieces BBC Four, 9.00pm Bendor Grosvenor and Emma Dabiri head to the Derby Museum to investigate a painting that suffered an unusually poor early restoration. Could it be a work by the great 18th-century British master, Joseph Wright of Derby, and if so can it be returned to its former glory?  The Great War in Numbers Yesterday, 9.00pm Think of the First World War and it’s the millions of lives lost in the trenches that come to mind. But, as this documentary series reveals, everything about the Great War was on a scale previously unparalleled: machine guns in millions, artillery shells in billions, the mind-boggling logistics of keeping vast numbers of men fed, clothed and fighting fit in the field. Tonight’s first film of six explores how the empires of Germany, France, Russia and Britain were able to pour so much wealth into the industrialisation of warfare. GO Back Channel 4, 10.00pm Fate just seems to get crueller for Stephen (David Mitchell) when Andrew (Robert Webb) manages to increase his share in the pub. But then Alison (Olivia Poulet) uncovers information that could yet force the cuckoo out of the family nest. GO Mercury Rising (1998) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm  Bruce Willis is excellent as an undercover FBI agent assigned to protect a nine-year-old autistic boy (Miko Hughes) who is targeted by assassins after cracking a top secret government code in this underrated, if slightly unrealistic, thriller based on the Ryne Douglas Pearson novel Simon Says. The plot moves at breakneck speed yet, ultimately, it’s a touching and heart-warming story. The Football Factory (2004) ★★★☆☆ London Live, 10.00pm  John King’s book The Football Factory is an unnerving and brutal account of hooliganism in the Nineties, centring on a firm of Chelsea boot boys and their clashes with rival “fans”. Nick Love’s film certainly captures the thuggery, with Danny Dyer as Tommy, for whom life is about drink, drugs, sex, thieving and a good ruck – but who begins to question his ways. Made in France (2015) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.00pm  This thriller, about a wave of jihadist attacks on Paris, was pulled from cinemas following its plot’s number of unnerving parallels with recent events in the French capital. In it, an extremist cell plans a series of shootings and bombings across the city “that will shake France” and the world. Director Nicholas Boukhrief said he made the film to counter the “poison” of jihadist propaganda. Thursday 5 October Fire safety: in the wake of the Grenfell Tower disaster Credit: PA The Housing Enforcers BBC One, 8.00pm; BBC Two Wales, 7.00pm “Everyone has a right to a safe place to live, no matter who you are, where you live or how much rent you pay. It’s non-negotiable.” So concludes Matt Allwright at the end of this programme focusing on the importance of fire safety.  The format is straightforward: Allwright travels across the country meeting with housing officers and examining the myriad ways in which fires can destroy lives. What makes this really hit home, however, is the presenter’s quiet fury at the way in which some lives are considered less worthy than others. Inevitably, the shadow of Grenfell Tower hangs heavy over the hour. It’s notable that many of those worst affected are elderly and living alone: the story of fiercely independent Ali who refuses to acknowledge, even to his family, quite how much he is struggling is particularly poignant. Allwright, however, saves his most righteous rage for the landlords squeezing tenants in wherever they can and failing to meet even the minimum health and safety standards. The result is a hard-hitting and often hard-to-watch documentary, which also offers solid advice on how to deal both with fires and bad landlords. Sarah Hughes Live International Football: England v Slovenia ITV, 7.30pm Having drawn 0-0 last October, with Joe Hart forced to make a string of fine saves, England and Slovenia reconvene at Wembley. Victory today for Gareth Southgate’s men will ensure their qualification for next year’s World Cup in Russia. And having beaten second-placed Slovakia 2-1 last month, thanks to a strike from tyro Marcus Rashford, they’ll be confident of doing just that. The Big Family Cooking Showdown BBC Two, 8.00pm Two last families go head to head for a place in the finals. Their £10 challenge is a Friday night takeaway, so naturally curry is on the menu. There’s talk of “fusion” cooking, some mushy spinach and a 34-year-old rolling pin.   Discovering: Laurence Olivier Sky Arts, 8.00pm The spotlight turns on Laurence Olivier, who, in 1937, described cinema as an “anaemic little medium which could not stand great acting”.   Ambulance BBC One, 9.00pm The work of the West Midlands Ambulance Service continues as a specialist trauma team are dispatched to a motorbike accident where a man has suffered a catastrophic chest injury. “I’ve got nothing…” declares the doctor. It’s a stark reminder of the fragility of life and the increasing compassion of the services in times of chaos.    Russia with Simon Reeve BBC Two, 9.00pm Simon Reeve continues his fascinating journey, meeting Tuvan children in Siberia who practice the Mongolian tradition of throat singing.  Educating Greater Manchester Channel 4, 9.00pm Ah, that old chestnut – ignoring school uniform rules. This week, the teachers at Harrop Fold are on the back foot when a message is spread on Snapchat encouraging pupils to come in wearing trainers. Social media also causes friction between Year 11 girls Serena and Lelo when one talks to the other’s boyfriend on FaceTime. Rachel Ward Law & Order True Crime: The Menendez murders Sky Living, 9.00pm This series, similar to The People v OJ Simpson, takes a closer look at the two trials of brothers Lyle and Erik Menendez, who were convicted of murdering their parents in their Beverly Hills home in 1989. It focuses on the attorney (Edie Falco), who was one of their few defenders. Dimension 404 Syfy, 9.00pm Each episode of this new sci-fi anthology features a form of technology gone wrong. But there’s nothing unnerving about it, rather it’s a camp pastiche of The Twilight Zone, complete with Star Wars’ Mark Hamill providing the voice-over. Glee’s Lea Michele stars in the first episode about online dating. It’s weird, but it doesn’t overplay it. RW Robin and Marian (1976) ★★★★☆ Film4, 1.10pm  Sean Connery gives one of his best performances as a middle-aged Robin Hood, who heads home to Sherwood Forest after the death of Richard I. He finds that scaling a castle wall isn’t as easy as it used to be, Maid Marian (Audrey Hepburn) is still miffed at being left in the lurch, and the Sheriff (Robert Shaw) is up to his old tricks in Richard Lester’s good-natured romance. Look out for Ronnie Barker as Friar Tuck. Jerry Maguire (1996) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Greats, 5.40pm  In Cameron Crowe’s macho romcom, Tom Cruise plays a sports agent who has an attack of conscience and urges his colleagues to think about the welfare of their clients. He’s duly fired but announces that he’ll start his own agency. A washed-up footballer (Cuba Gooding Jr) and a single mother (Renée Zellweger) are the only ones who agree to go with him. Here, the classic quote, “You had me at ‘hello’” was born. The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.10pm Clint Eastwood directs and stars in this marvellous warm-hearted western adapted from Forrest Carter’s novel and set during the American Civil War. Eastwood plays the eponymous Missouri farmer who, driven by memories of his family’s slaughter, becomes an outlaw when he refuses to join his Confederate comrades in surrender, in favour of seeking revenge on the men who murdered his kin. Friday 6 October Penal colony: Harry Peacock, Kevin Bishop and Ricky Grover Credit: BBC Porridge BBC One, 9.30pm The most successful of the BBC’s classic sitcom revivals from last year, Porridge returns for a full series with the series’ creators Dick Clement and Ian La Frenais once again on board. It finds Nigel Norman Fletcher (Kevin Bishop as the grandson of Ronnie Barker’s character, Norman Stanley) locking horns with officer Meekie (Mark Bonnar) while aiding or outsmarting the prison’s ne’er-do-wells. In a canny twist, it is Fletch who is now the relative ingénue in his cell, seeking counsel from veteran lag Joe Lotterby (Dave Hill). We find Fletch as the prison’s resident Cyrano de Bergerac, writing letters to keep the flame of romance alive between assorted inmates and their partners on the outside. All goes well until Fletch suffers a crisis of conscience that threatens the whole operation. Some of the gags are groanworthy, but Clement and La Frenais’s mastery of sitcom mechanics remains complete; their presence keeps the spirit of the original intact, while the update means that no one is attempting to emulate the cast of the Seventies series. Fletch has a five-year sentence to serve; unlikely as it might seem, a similar term for Porridge might not be unwelcome. Gabriel Tate Suburra: the Series Netflix, from 12.01am Like Romanzo Criminale and Gomorrah before it, Suburra began life as a book before becoming a gripping, multifaceted Italian-language political thriller. This 10-part series, set in the dying days of Berlusconi’s regime, explores the themes of politics, the Church and corruption during 20 tumultuous days in Rome. Unreported World Channel 4, 7.30pm Ireland faces a pivotal referendum on the decriminalisation of abortion in certain circumstances; Kate Hardie-Buckley meets those on both sides of the debate in a deeply affecting edition of the current-affairs series. Modern Family Sky1, 8.30pm It may have tailed off since its peak, but Modern Family is still good for a few laughs. The ninth series begins with Jay (Ty Burrell) taking the family on a houseboat holiday, and Mitchell (Jesse Tyler Ferguson) encountering an old flame. Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm; not N Ireland or Wales Monty Don begins preparations for 2018 by advising others on how to use leaf mould as a mulch. Elsewhere, Adam Frost visits a community allotment in Manchester, and Nick Bailey learns from a zoologist about the life teeming in the soil. Nile Rodgers: How to Make It in the Music Business BBC Four, 9.00pm Guitar genius and pop producer Nile Rodgers shares the wisdom he’s acquired over decades in the music business. In the first episode, he discusses the founding of Chic and his influence on today’s hitmakers. GT Cold Feet ITV, 9.00pm Karen (Hermione Norris) is on the brink of financial disaster in spite of David’s (Robert Bathurst) assistance, while Adam (James Nesbitt) gets out of his depth on a night out in Mike Bullen’s assured comedy-drama revival. The Graham Norton Show BBC One, 10.35pm Another line-up of heavy-hitters assembles on the red sofa tonight: comedian Chris Rock plugs his first UK stand-up tour in a decade, actors Idris Elba and Kate Winslet discuss their niche genre movie, “disaster-romance” The Mountain Between Us (about a surgeon and a journalist who survive a plane crash), and Liam Gallagher performs songs from his debut album, As You Were. GT The Twilight Saga: Eclipse (2010) ★★★☆☆ E4, 8.00pm  The third instalment of the teenage vampire franchise is better than the second and will please its fan base, though Melissa Rosenberg’s script is full of clichés and relies on a shirtless Taylor Lautner for distraction. Girl-next-door Bella Swan (Kristen Stewart) must choose between 100-year-old vampire Edward Cullen (Robert Pattinson) and hunky werewolf Jacob Black (Lautner). T2: Trainspotting (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 10.00pm  Danny Boyle’s sequel is more than just a trip down memory lane. Back in 1996, Trainspotting’s gallery of junkies and rogues (Ewan McGregor, Jonny Lee Miller) proudly and raucously chose not to choose life. But now, all have come to terms with the gnawing possibility that life may have in fact not chosen them. There’s no chance of it matching the legacy of the first film, but it doesn’t tarnish it either. American Hustle (2013) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 12.10am  David O Russell’s caper feels like the film he has spent his career warming up for and is a serious piece of film-making that delights in its own silliness. Irving (Christian Bale) and his partner Sydney (Amy Adams) are con artists blackmailed by FBI agent Richie DiMaso (Bradley Cooper) into aiding his investigation. “Some of this actually happened,” reads a title card, and to be more specific would spoil the fun. Television previewers Catherine Gee, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

Football Association fear that Russian hackers will spy on Gareth Southgate's World Cup tactics

England fear Russian hackers will attempt to break into computers containing Gareth Southgate’s tactical masterplan during next summer’s World Cup. Concerns confidential data may be vulnerable to cyber-attack at the tournament has prompted the Football Association to invest heavily in improving its IT defences in time for the Three Lions’ matches there. It is common for Southgate and his staff to store strategic information on laptops and tablets, information which could be used against England to devastating effect in Russia next year if it fell into the wrong hands. The threat had already been identified before Russian hacking group Fancy Bears leaked the medical files of dozens of footballers last month, including those of former Premier League stars Carlos Tevez, Dirk Kuyt and Gabriel Heinze. The FA fears that the England staff's laptops could be vulnerable to hacking Credit: EYEEM Also leaked was correspondence between the FA and Fifa about ongoing investigations into alleged doping in the English game. The FA has since written to Fifa to express concern about the hack, which appeared to be of files the world governing body would have held on its own database. In a bid not to fall victim to a similar attack during the World Cup, the FA will also issue strict guidance to players and support staff ahead of the tournament. All members of the England party will be warned not to use public wifi networks and will be given advice on their use of social media sites from a cyber-security perspective. The ease with which such websites could be hacked was laid bare last month after a post appeared on Real Madrid’s official Twitter account welcoming Lionel Messi to the club and Barcelona’s account was hijacked to announce the signing of Angel Di Maria from Paris Saint-Germain. The FA has contacted Fifa about earlier hacks Credit: AFP Those incidents were dismissed as pranks, something that would not have been the case had any tactical or other confidential information been obtained as a result of the hacks. Earlier this year, the St Louis Cardinals were punished after being found to have broken into the email system and scouting database of Major League Baseball rivals the Houston Astros. Sporting history is also littered with scandals of when teams have resorted to espionage to gain an edge. The most infamous of those was even branded ‘Spygate’ and saw the McLaren Formula One team hit with the biggest fine in sporting history - $100 million - after being found in possession of confidential information from Ferrari. Another spying row ended up in court this year when a former security consultant for New Zealand’s rugby union team was acquitted of lying to police over the discovery of a listening device in the team’s hotel ahead of their Bledisloe Cup clash with Australia. No evidence was found that any sensitive information had been passed to the Wallabies, who were themselves the alleged victims of spying ahead of their World Cup encounter with England two years ago in a brief controversy that also came to nought.

Football Association fear that Russian hackers will spy on Gareth Southgate's World Cup tactics

England fear Russian hackers will attempt to break into computers containing Gareth Southgate’s tactical masterplan during next summer’s World Cup. Concerns confidential data may be vulnerable to cyber-attack at the tournament has prompted the Football Association to invest heavily in improving its IT defences in time for the Three Lions’ matches there. It is common for Southgate and his staff to store strategic information on laptops and tablets, information which could be used against England to devastating effect in Russia next year if it fell into the wrong hands. The threat had already been identified before Russian hacking group Fancy Bears leaked the medical files of dozens of footballers last month, including those of former Premier League stars Carlos Tevez, Dirk Kuyt and Gabriel Heinze. The FA fears that the England staff's laptops could be vulnerable to hacking Credit: EYEEM Also leaked was correspondence between the FA and Fifa about ongoing investigations into alleged doping in the English game. The FA has since written to Fifa to express concern about the hack, which appeared to be of files the world governing body would have held on its own database. In a bid not to fall victim to a similar attack during the World Cup, the FA will also issue strict guidance to players and support staff ahead of the tournament. All members of the England party will be warned not to use public wifi networks and will be given advice on their use of social media sites from a cyber-security perspective. The ease with which such websites could be hacked was laid bare last month after a post appeared on Real Madrid’s official Twitter account welcoming Lionel Messi to the club and Barcelona’s account was hijacked to announce the signing of Angel Di Maria from Paris Saint-Germain. The FA has contacted Fifa about earlier hacks Credit: AFP Those incidents were dismissed as pranks, something that would not have been the case had any tactical or other confidential information been obtained as a result of the hacks. Earlier this year, the St Louis Cardinals were punished after being found to have broken into the email system and scouting database of Major League Baseball rivals the Houston Astros. Sporting history is also littered with scandals of when teams have resorted to espionage to gain an edge. The most infamous of those was even branded ‘Spygate’ and saw the McLaren Formula One team hit with the biggest fine in sporting history - $100 million - after being found in possession of confidential information from Ferrari. Another spying row ended up in court this year when a former security consultant for New Zealand’s rugby union team was acquitted of lying to police over the discovery of a listening device in the team’s hotel ahead of their Bledisloe Cup clash with Australia. No evidence was found that any sensitive information had been passed to the Wallabies, who were themselves the alleged victims of spying ahead of their World Cup encounter with England two years ago in a brief controversy that also came to nought.

Football Association fear that Russian hackers will spy on Gareth Southgate's World Cup tactics

England fear Russian hackers will attempt to break into computers containing Gareth Southgate’s tactical masterplan during next summer’s World Cup. Concerns confidential data may be vulnerable to cyber-attack at the tournament has prompted the Football Association to invest heavily in improving its IT defences in time for the Three Lions’ matches there. It is common for Southgate and his staff to store strategic information on laptops and tablets, information which could be used against England to devastating effect in Russia next year if it fell into the wrong hands. The threat had already been identified before Russian hacking group Fancy Bears leaked the medical files of dozens of footballers last month, including those of former Premier League stars Carlos Tevez, Dirk Kuyt and Gabriel Heinze. The FA fears that the England staff's laptops could be vulnerable to hacking Credit: EYEEM Also leaked was correspondence between the FA and Fifa about ongoing investigations into alleged doping in the English game. The FA has since written to Fifa to express concern about the hack, which appeared to be of files the world governing body would have held on its own database. In a bid not to fall victim to a similar attack during the World Cup, the FA will also issue strict guidance to players and support staff ahead of the tournament. All members of the England party will be warned not to use public wifi networks and will be given advice on their use of social media sites from a cyber-security perspective. The ease with which such websites could be hacked was laid bare last month after a post appeared on Real Madrid’s official Twitter account welcoming Lionel Messi to the club and Barcelona’s account was hijacked to announce the signing of Angel Di Maria from Paris Saint-Germain. The FA has contacted Fifa about earlier hacks Credit: AFP Those incidents were dismissed as pranks, something that would not have been the case had any tactical or other confidential information been obtained as a result of the hacks. Earlier this year, the St Louis Cardinals were punished after being found to have broken into the email system and scouting database of Major League Baseball rivals the Houston Astros. Sporting history is also littered with scandals of when teams have resorted to espionage to gain an edge. The most infamous of those was even branded ‘Spygate’ and saw the McLaren Formula One team hit with the biggest fine in sporting history - $100 million - after being found in possession of confidential information from Ferrari. Another spying row ended up in court this year when a former security consultant for New Zealand’s rugby union team was acquitted of lying to police over the discovery of a listening device in the team’s hotel ahead of their Bledisloe Cup clash with Australia. No evidence was found that any sensitive information had been passed to the Wallabies, who were themselves the alleged victims of spying ahead of their World Cup encounter with England two years ago in a brief controversy that also came to nought.

What's on TV tonight: Billy Connolly: Portrait of a Lifetime and Paul O’Grady’s Hollywood

Saturday 5 August Billy Connolly: Portrait of a Lifetime BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 10.30pm “Glasgow belongs to me,” says Billy Connolly of his hometown in this heart-warming documentary to mark the comedian’s 75th birthday in November. And he’s not wrong as three imposing 50ft tribute portraits have recently been unveiled on wallends in the city. They were created by Scottish artists John Byrne, Jack Vettriano and Rachel MacLean, and this accompanying film not only gives a neat history of the area, but serves as a celebration of the Big Yin’s career.  Interspersed with clips of his stand-up routines, including his cheeky first appearance on Parkinson in 1975 when he told the bum joke that turned him into a star, the programme see Connolly sit quietly for the artists – not one of his strong points as he admits: “I’ve been very patient. I think I’m due an episode.” Watching them at work in their studios is inspiring and Connolly is taken aback by the results. “It’s like looking into a mirror. You know my soul,” he says to Byrne, who used to design album covers for Connolly’s band The Humblebums. “I’m amazed at the effect these have had on me, they’ve stunned me.” From tomorrow, the original portraits will be hung in the People’s Palace. Rachel Ward Athletics: World Championships BBC Two, 9.30am & BBC One, 6.30pm Day two at the London Stadium in Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park sees Usain Bolt – in all likeliness – going for gold in the men’s 100 m final (9.45pm) as he makes his final individual appearance at a major championships. His main threats are expected to come from former champions Justin Gatlin and Yohan Blake, as well as emerging star Christian Coleman. Earlier in the day, British medal hope Katarina Johnson-Thompson gets her heptathlon bid under way with the 100 m hurdles at 10.05am. Sadly not in action today is Greg Rutherford, who, because of an ankle injury, won’t be competing in the men’s long jump final (8.05pm).  Little Big Shots USA ITV, 5.00pm Steve Harvey showcases more talented youngsters while mocking his own stupidity in this family friendly show exec-produced by Ellen DeGeneres. Tonight, there’s a maths genius and a Motown singer. Royal Cousins at War BBC Two, 7.30pm; NI, 8.00pm A welcome repeat for this riveting analysis of the relationship between Kaiser Bill, Tsar Nicholas II of Russia and our own King George V, and the disastrous effect that their rivalry had on the First World War.  Paul O’Grady’s Hollywood Channel 4, 8.00pm This new series sees Paul O’Grady delve into cinematic history to find out what it takes to make a masterpiece. He begins with “weepies”, where the host’s caustic wit serves as the perfect antidote as talking heads, including Sigourney Weaver and Celine Dion, reach for the tissues as they relate films such as Brief Encounter, Titanic and, quite possibly the saddest in movie history, The Champ.    Dad’s Army BBC Two, 8.30pm; not NI This is a gem of an episode loaded with slapstick fun from 1970. It’s the one where Corporal Jones (Clive Dunn) dresses as a tree trunk during an exercise pitting Mainwaring (Arthur Lowe) and his crew against their pompous arch-rival Captain Square. RW The L.A. Riots: 25 Years Later History, 9.00pm Twenty-five years after Los Angeles erupted into one of the most destructive civil disturbances in US history (11,000 people were arrested and an estimated 63 people were killed), this documentary looks back at the decades of racial injustice that led to the incident and the history of police relations with LA’s black community. Citizens, council members and even those who committed crimes talk about how South Central was beset by mass riots, looting, and fires.  Cambridge Folk Festival 2017 Sky Arts, 9.00pm Broadcaster Mark Radcliffe and musician Julie Fowlis present highlights from this year’s festival, an event that attracts 10,000 visitors. These include Jon Boden, formerly of Bellowhead, performing new material with his band The Remnant Kings. There’s also music from Jake Bugg, electric punk stars Oysterband and Lisa Hannigan, once as a member of Damien Rice’s band. RW The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies (2014) ★★☆☆☆ ITV, 8.00pm  The battle of the title was barely mentioned by JRR Tolkein in The Hobbit, but it was seemingly enough for Peter Jackson to pad out his franchise even further. Picking up where the last film left off, our heroes had just unleashed the wrath of dragon Smaug (Benedict Cumberbatch). But there’s another battle looming, one between themselves which is fuelled by greed. Red (2010) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm  A starry line-up of actors of pensionable age is the attraction of this light-hearted adaptation of Warren Ellis’s graphic novel, and it’s hard to resist Helen Mirren with a submachine gun. RED stands for “Retired Extremely Dangerous”, which is what the CIA has labelled former agents Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich and Mirren, who team up to find out who has marked them for assassination, and why. I Know What You Did Last Summer (1997) ★★☆☆☆ BBC One, 11.55pm  This routine slasher flick, written by Kevin Williamson of Scream fame, will certainly make you jump but it’s unlikely to give you many sleepless nights. When a carful of American teenagers hits and kills a man, they panic and dump the body. Months later, the inevitable slaughter begins. A hapless cast, featuring Sarah Michelle Gellar, brings unintentional levity to proceedings. Sunday 6 August Diana, Princess of Wales Credit: Rex Diana: In Her Own Words Channel 4, 8.00pm Much controversy has surrounded this documentary, which broadcasts – for the first time in the UK – video footage recorded in 1992 and 1993 by Diana, Princess of Wales’s voice coach, Peter Settelen. Hired to help Diana reframe her public image and put forward her own side of the story regarding her marriage, Settelen saw his work bear fruit in his client’s Panorama interview. Now there is undoubted interest in watching Diana recount key events in her life unmediated, with candour and a seductive mix of charm and steel. “He chatted me up like a bad rash,” she recalls of her future husband at one point; at another, she remembers being “completely thrown” by the Prince of Wales’s peculiar response to a question about them being in love. In truth, director Kevin Sim rather crams the at-times uncomfortably intimate footage into the first and final thirds of the documentary, leaving assorted friends and confidants to tell the rest of the very familiar story, and the melodrama is laid on a little thick at times. Exploitative? Perhaps. Fascinating? In patches, although it probably won’t entirely satisfy either those looking for genuinely fresh insights or an opportunity to be outraged. Gabriel Tate Community Shield Football: Arsenal v Chelsea BT Sport 1, 1.00pm Arsenal and Chelsea meet for the second time in as many weeks, with Antonio Conte’s Blues favourites to lift the Community Shield today having won 3-0 in Beijing thanks to a brace from Michy Batshuayi.  Women’s Football: Euro 2017 Channel 4, 3.00pm After a thrilling tournament – during which a record 3.3 million people tuned in to watch England’s Lionesses beat France 1-0 – we’re at the FC Twente Stadion in Enschede, Holland, as the successors to Germany are crowned.   LSO Sky Arts, 6.00pm Originally, and rather impishly, hinting at a “greatest hits” of Haydn, Simon Rattle and his Imaginary Orchestral Journey instead took movements from 11 of the Austrian composer’s works, many of them rarely performed, and realigned them joyfully and perceptively in this concert with the London Symphony Orchestra. Works from Bartók and an extract from Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde provide the hors d’oeuvre for this enticing programme.   BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 7.00pm One of the most anticipated events of every Prom season, the National Youth Orchestra of Great Britain brings its energy and drive to the Royal Albert Hall. First comes the London premiere of Francisco Coll’s “grotesque symphony” Mural and Thomas Adès conducting his own work, Polaris, for the first time in the capital. The climax comes courtesy of Igor Stravinsky and his agelessly thrilling Rite of Spring. It is introduced by Suzy Klein and Lloyd Coleman. GT Secrets of Silicon Valley BBC Two, 8.00pm Blogger Jamie Bartlett investigates whether technological progress should be made at any cost. On the one side, he meets those tackling climate change; on the other, those paying the price for the success of Uber and, somewhere in the middle, the pioneers of self-driving cars.    Poldark BBC One, 9.00pm Having barrelled along entertainingly, with the undercurrent of hardscrabble misery intact, this third series concludes with sightings of French sails spotted on the horizon and Cornwall put on high alert. Meanwhile, Cap’n Ross (Aidan Turner) contends with a broadside from George Warleggan  (Jack Farthing).   The Last Days of Patrick Swayze Channel 5, 10.00pm Given the fact that he died from pancreatic cancer aged 57, we can reasonably surmise that the Dirty Dancing star’s final hours were not wholly pleasant. So, what can forensic pathologist Jason Payne-James, perusing Swayze’s medical records, add to the story?   Gareth Thomas: Hate in the Beautiful Game BBC Two, 10.30pm; not NI Former Welsh rugby union captain Gareth Thomas, who came out in 2009 while still playing, asks why football has shamefully remained a bastion of open homophobia – perhaps the last in sport. GT Frozen (2013) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 1.40pm  Disney’s 53rd feature is an enchanting combination of fairytale derring-do and heart-popping musical numbers that has left children and adults powerless to its charms (even if some parents may have grown rather tired of it). Elsa (Idina Menzel) is a shy princess driven into exile when her magical powers are discovered. Her sister Anna (Kristen Bell) gallops off to fetch her from her beautiful ice palace. The King’s Speech (2010) ★★★★★ Channel 4, 9.50pm  Tom Hooper’s film about the future George VI’s struggle to overcome his stammer in the nation’s hour of need won multiple Academy Awards, including a deserved Best Actor gong for Colin Firth. But it’s his double-act with Geoffrey Rush as his speech therapist Lionel Logue that gives the film its heart, and the doublehanders between them are fraught and fascinating. Point Break (1991) ★★★☆☆ Channel 5, 11.05pm Kathryn Bigelow’s cult surfing/crime film elevated Patrick Swayze’s actor status to true action hero. Keanu Reeves plays Johnny Utah, an FBI agent who goes undercover to infiltrate the Ex-Presidents, a gang of bankrobbing surfers led by the charismatic Bodhi (Swayze). The action heats up when Bodhi and Utah find they share a similar attitude towards danger. Lori Petty is the surfer who catches Johnny’s eye. Monday 7 August Eden: Paradise Lost - the participants Credit: Channel 4 Eden: Paradise Lost Channel 4, 10.00pm In March 2016, 23 idealists set out to take part in Channel 4’s Eden experiment, which, a touch grandiosely, sought to establish “a new society” from scratch, cut off from the modern world on a remote Scottish peninsula for an entire year. “What if we could start again?” was the much-hyped tag line. And the answer was… well, we never got to find out the answer because the series was pulled last summer, after just four episodes, when viewing figures took a dive from 1.7 million to less than 800,000.  Not that Channel 4 or production company Keo Films thought to tell the participants that. Instead they were left to get on with it. Rumours swirled of Lord of the Flies levels of acrimony, mass defections, starvation, health problems, people eating chicken feed to survive. So it could make for absorbing viewing in this five-part update, which airs every night this week. Although probably the greatest fascination will be in seeing the reactions of the 10 participants who suffered through to the end as they emerged from the nightmare in March this year only to discover that their efforts have mostly been in vain – and that the political landscape has drastically altered while they were gone. Gerard O’Donovan Stacey Dooley Investigates: Divide and National Pride in Northern Ireland  BBC Three, from 10.00am The intrepid reporter discovers that bitter political divisions persist in Northern Ireland as she seeks to discover more about Prime Minister Theresa May’s new allies in the Democratic Unionist Party. The Bug Grub Couple BBC One, 7.30pm Bug burger or beef burger? That’s the choice at the Grub restaurant in Pembrokeshire, part of entomologist Dr Sarah Beynon and chef Andy Holcroft’s Bug Farm – an insect zoo, research centre and insect eaterie. Here they struggle to convince us why we all should learn to love eating insect protein.   Masters Tennis: The Rogers Cup Sky Sports Main Event, 7.00pm The Uniprix Stadium in Montreal is the setting, as the Rogers Cup gets under way. Novak Djokovic lifted the trophy in 2016 for the fourth time, defeating Kei Nishikori in the final. The Serbian misses out this time around, though, due to injury.  Tornado: The 100mph Steam Engine BBC Four, 8.00pm If phrases like “it’s a Peppercorn class A1 Pacific” get you all steamed up you’ll be in heaven with this account of how a bunch of engineering enthusiasts got the massive locomotive they took 18 years to build from scratch to take on the ultimate test: hitting 100 miles per hour, a speed no British steam train has achieved since 1967.    Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm This new, live, animal rescue show with Steve Jones, Kate Quilton and Noel Fitzpatrick attempts to rehome a whole shelter’s worth of dogs, cats and assorted other species. Among the celebs espousing the joy of pets in this opener is pop singer Leona Lewis. Continues until Friday.   Man in an Orange Shirt BBC Two, 9.00pm In part two of novelist Patrick Gale’s drama for the Gay Britannia season, more than half a century on, Flora (Vanessa Redgrave) gives her late husband’s cottage to their grandson Adam (Julian Morris), who finds himself drawn to his architect, Steve (David Gyasi).   Inside Heston’s World Good Food, 9.00pm This four-part series chronicles chef Heston Blumenthal’s attempt to bring a flavour of his Fat Duck restaurant to Australia, in a multi-million pound move to Melbourne last year. GO Make or Break? Channel 5, 10.00pm A new reality series, stripped across the week, in which eight troubled couples test the strength of their relationships at a Mexican holiday resort, where alongside counselling and therapy sessions, they have to swap partners every two days. GO Doctor Dolittle (1967) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 5.05pm  This is not the Eddie Murphy comedy version from 1998 but the charming Sixties musical directed by Richard Fleischer. Rex Harrison stars as the terse, eponymous doctor who has the uncanny ability to speak to animals and so embarks on a voyage to find an elusive pink sea snail and a giant lunar moth. Samantha Egger, 20 years Harrison’s junior, co-stars as the adventurous stowaway who falls in love with the doctor.  Storks (2016) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 6.20pm  Warner Animation Group’s first film since 2014’s The Lego Movie is spectacularly daft but manages to be both moving and very fun. Here the storks of the title have moved on from delivering babies to big business and now transport products for an Amazon-style website. But then the old baby-making machine, gathering dust in the corner, is accidentally reactivated and suddenly they have a baby to get home.  American History X (1998) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm  Tony Kaye directs this compellingly violent and brutal examination of white supremacism in America. Edward Norton is both mesmerising and terrifying as Derek, a student drawn into the Neo-Nazi movement who mercilessly kills two black youths. After a stint in prison he’s reformed but returns  home to find his younger brother Danny (Edward Furlong) on the same track he was. Tuesday 8 August Jodie Whittaker and Emun Elliott Credit: BBC Trust Me BBC One, 9.00pm Before she becomes the Doctor in Doctor Who, Jodie Whittaker stars in a drama about… pretending to be a doctor. No doubt there will soon be many jokes about that floating around. In this new four-part drama, written by real-life doctor Dan Sefton, Whittaker stars as Cath, a downtrodden ward sister who is fired when she takes her concerns about the conditions in her Sheffield hospital to the trust. Then, when at the leaving party for her best friend Alison – who’s about to begin a new life in New Zealand – she spots Alison’s CV and medical degree certificate in a bin.  So Cath decides to adopt Alison’s identity and, hoping that her nursing skills will be enough to get by, find a job as a doctor far away in Edinburgh. Though the premise may sound a little daft, it’s actually surprisingly – and worryingly – common. Sefton uses his hospital know-how to bring a sense of authenticity to what is a really quite gripping drama.  Whittaker, rather than channelling a cocky Leonardo DiCaprio in Catch Me if You Can, is every inch the terrified woman flying by the seat of her pants. Excellent, too, is Emun Elliot as the colleague who catches her eye. Catherine Gee EastEnders BBC One, 7.30pm Mick’s (Danny Dyer) dastardly behaviour comes to a head in this special three-hander episode. He decides to tell wife Linda (Kellie Bright) the truth about what he’s been up to while she was away: namely cheating on her with their daughter-in-law Whitney (Shona McGarty).    Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm It’s the second nightly visit to this admirable project, which seeks to rehouse all the animals  in a Newcastle shelter in just a week. While we meet the wide range of animals and see how many still remain, Dom Joly also learns what happens to micropigs when they grow up.     The Dog Rescuers with Alan Davies Channel 5, 8.00pm Among the five unlucky pups needing some loving care from the team this week are an abandoned staffie who’s given a second chance and a young spaniel with a nasty neck wound.     Get a House for Free Channel 4, 9.00pm Marco Robinson is a very rich man – £25 million rich, in fact. He made his fortune through a business and property empire and now he wants to give back. So he’s decided to give away a three-bed flat in Preston to the person who he thinks will benefit the most. This film follows him as he attempts to sift through 8,000 applications. CG Utopia: In Search of the Dream BBC Four, 9.00pm It’s 500 years since the term “utopia” was coined by Sir Thomas More in 1516. In this documentary, art historian Professor Richard Clay examines five centuries of the concept of utopia and the impact it has had on our way of thinking. Often used as a method of criticism of the current system, it is a powerful vision. Clay considers some of our “greatest utopian dreamers”, including Jonathan Swift, author of Gulliver’s Travels, and Gene Roddenberry, creator of Star Trek, and the common themes that run through the ideal.     The Yorkshire Dales and the Lakes More4, 9.00pm The cosy documentary series continues with a farmer finding an unusual method to keep track of his sheep: day-glo paint. Elsewhere in the Dales, we follow the Dent Brewery boys as they create their own craft ales and in the Lake District we see Jon Bennett make his daily ascent to the summit of Helvellyn. CG The Parent Trap (1961) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am   In a film that helped pioneer the split-screen technique, Hayley Mills plays both Susan Evers and Sharon McKendrick, twins unaware of each other’s existence and separated as babies following their parents’ divorce. When they meet, years later, at summer camp, the pair scheme to reunite their parents. This classic Disney comedy spawned three sequels and a 1998 remake starring a young Lindsay Lohan. Tootsie (1982) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.30pm  When actor Michael Dorsey transforms himself into Dorothy Michaels in a desperate attempt to get work, complications arise as he falls for a female friend (Jessica Lange) and her father (Charles Durning)  falls for him. Although you never quite believe that Dustin Hoffman in drag would convince everyone that he’s a woman, it doesn’t matter: Tootsie is lots of fun – and it’s a sharply observed social satire, too. Groundhog Day (1993) ★★★★☆ Sky1, 9.00pm  In this wonderful comedy drama, a surly, sardonic weatherman (Bill Murray) is sent to the small US town of Punxsutawney to cover the annual groundhog festival, but finds himself experiencing precisely the same events over and over – then realises that he can free himself from the loop only by being a nicer person. One criticism: as always, Murray is so much more likeable as the malevolent grouch… Wednesday 9 August My Family, Partition and Me: India 1947 - Anita Rani  Credit: BBC My Family, Partition and Me: India 1947 BBC One, 9.00pm Two years ago, Anita Rani learnt how her family history was forever marked by the 1947 Partition of India in a memorable episode of Who Do You Think You Are? Now, she has wrangled three members of the public – one Hindu, one Christian and one Muslim – to explore how their own lives, and those of their ancestors, were affected by the appalling and widespread outbreaks of religious violence in the wake of Britain’s messy, compromised withdrawal, and the troubled legacy left by the Empire. In addition to eyewitness testimonies, the descendants of the survivors travel back to India, Pakistan and Bangladesh to retrace the journeys their relatives were forced to make. Their discoveries are in equal parts shocking, distressing and uplifting, and its treatment is rightly sensitive for events still in living memory: tears flow freely, yet it’s never sentimental. If there isn’t much space to dig into the wider political situation, the complex reasons behind the violence and longer-term implications, the detail of the personal recollections and anecdotes tells its own powerful tale. Rani returns to her own ancestral story in next week’s concluding part. Gabriel Tate Super Small Animals BBC One, 8.00pm Biologist Patrick Aryee demonstrates that size isn’t everything in the natural world, observing the extraordinary feats of strength, endurance and ingenuity of everything from hummingbirds  and seahorses to beetles and armadillos. Love Your Garden ITV, 8.00pm Alan Titchmarsh and his team turn an uninspiring patch of lumpy lawn and uneven paving into a sensory garden for a four-year-old girl with a very rare degenerative eye disease. Long Lost Family ITV, 9.00pm This episode of the always engaging and emotionally gruelling series reuniting long-estranged relatives charts the story of a woman who gave up her son only to adopt two boys herself, and a man whose mother put him up for adoption through an advert in the local press. My Big Gay Jewish Conversion BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.20pm First shown on BBC Three, this smart and sobering documentary follows Simon Atkins – who is Catholic and gay – as he looks at convert to Judaism, a religion that would allow him to marry his boyfriend, Matthew. Atkin’s journey is both spiritual and literal, as he travels to relatively tolerant Tel Aviv and more conservative Jerusalem, hoping to reconcile his sexuality with his religious beliefs. GT The South Bank Show Sky Arts, 8.00pm Singer-songwriter Benjamin Clementine, who won the Mercury Prize in 2015, talks to Melvyn Bragg about his early years on the streets and being hailed perhaps the brightest musical talent of his generation. In Search of Arcadia BBC Four, 9.00pm This contemplative documentary sees Dr Janina Ramirez and John Bailey explore the roots of the Arcadian cultural revolutionaries that sprang up along the Thames in the 17th and 18th centuries. Citizen Jane: Battle for the City BBC Four, 10.00pm When she saw the controversial development projects proposed by Robert Moses in Sixties New York, Jane Jacobs decided to take him on. Matt Tyrnauer’s punchy documentary pulls together an inspiring tale out of unlikely material – the debate of community culture versus “slum clearance”, one which continues to this day in cities across the world. GT Bridge to Terabithia (2007) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.10pm  Talented child stars AnnaSophia Robb and Josh Hutcherson (who went on to star in The Hunger Games) play two young misfits who become friends and create a magical world of the imagination in a remote part of the forest. This quality Disney production, adapted from Katherine Paterson’s classic novel, ventures into unexpectedly dark territory and packs an emotional punch that will have you reaching for your hankie. Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief (2015) ★★★★☆ Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Based on a book by the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Lawrence Wright, director Alex Gibney’s documentary about the Church of Scientology is a gripping, painstakingly researched exposé of one of the world’s most enigmatic organisations. At its core are a series of chilling allegations by former Scientology members, who describe a culture of abuse. The Lost Boys (1987) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 9.00pm Teen flick meets horror in this Eighties hit about two boys (Jason Patric and Corey Haim) who move to a quiet, northern California town where they become involved with a group of bloodthirsty vampires. These days it has to compete with the likes of Twilight and The Vampire Diaries, but there’s still enough action, intrigue, danger and romance to keep you hooked. Kiefer Sutherland and Corey Feldman also star. Thursday 10 July Princess Diana with Raine, Comtesse De Chambrun  Credit: Channel 4 Princess Diana’s “Wicked” Stepmother Channel 4, 9.00pm A gossipy, full-throttle and altogether naughty documentary about Diana, Princess of Wales’s stepmother Raine, Countess Spencer, who died last October. The daughter of romantic novelist Barbara Cartland, Raine was a prodigious social climber described here as “a famous socialite, a feisty politician and all-round force of nature” (“Nobody gets to be a countess three times by accident,” says one contributor). It seems like an accurate fit.  Named “Debutante of the Year” in 1947, Raine went on to bag a future Earl for a husband at the age of 18, became the youngest member of Westminster City Council at 23, before going on to become a noted conservation campaigner. The main focus here, though, is how she went on to marry a second Earl, John Spencer, in circumstances that earned her the entrenched enmity of his children, prime among them being his then 15-year-old daughter, Lady Diana. Yet when Diana’s own marriage ran into trouble it was Raine, so it’s claimed, that she turned to for support; the once “sworn enemy was transformed into her closest confidante”. The contributors include Downton Abbey writer Julian Fellowes and royal biographer Penny Junor. Gerard O’Donovan Natwest T20 Blast Cricket: Hampshire v Glamorgan Sky Sports Cricket, 6.00pm All the action from the Ageas Bowl for this South Division match. The home side are one of the most successful in the history of domestic T20 cricket, having won the competition twice and appeared in another four Finals Days. 10 Puppies and Us BBC Two, 8.00pm Here are more tales of new dog owners and their pups. This week, a mother seeks a canine companion for her son who has Down’s syndrome; the conflict between rival Chihuahuas Rocky and Chloe deepens; and a newlywed couple call in the behaviourist when a pug objects to their connubial bliss.  James Martin’s French Adventure ITV, 8.30pm Chef James Martin heads to the hilly Jura region, where a pear orchard proves to be the source of the perfect chutney for barbecued duck, and a visit to the citadel at Fort des Rousses shows why dungeons make the best cheese cellars. Top of the Lake: China Girl BBC Two, 9.00pm In the wake of last week’s shock revelation, Jane Campion’s off-kilter crime drama continues, with troubled detective Robin Griffin (Elisabeth Moss) pointing the China Girl investigation in a new direction, that of a surrogacy deal gone wrong. Meanwhile, Robin must face demons from her past when her former police chief Al Parker (David Wenham) arrives from New Zealand. Inside London Fire Brigade ITV, 9.00pm As the documentary series concludes, retiring crew manager Al passes the baton on to 25-year-old rookie Joe, who faces a tough test fighting his first big fire. GO A Premier League of Their Own Sky1, 9.00pm Ahead of next weekend’s opening matches in the Premier League, James Corden and pals begin the new season of the panel show with a special edition. Guests Thierry Henry, Jeff Stelling and Kelly Cates will be celebrating all things football alongside the show’s regulars Freddie Flintoff, Jack Whitehall and Jamie Redknapp. Plus McFly’s Danny Jones, singer Kate Nash and R&B star Lemar will be stepping up to the spot for Popstar Penalties. Laurel and Hardy: Their Lives and Magic Sky Arts, 9.00pm Fans of Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy will enjoy this superb assemblage of clips and out-takes. This enthralling documentary follows the life and work of the world’s most beloved comedy duo, and includes rare footage of Laurel in his later years, as well as an even rarer interview with his daughter, Lois. There’s also a tribute to the unusually strong friendship that the two stars enjoyed throughout their working lives. GO Dr Seuss’ The Lorax (2012) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 2.55pm This animated adaptation of Dr Seuss’s quirky story follows a boy (voiced by Zac Efron) who goes in search of a tree to impress a nature-loving girl (Taylor Swift). But he stumbles on the Once-ler (Ed Helms), the man responsible for harvesting all the world’s plant life. Children will enjoy it, even if the film does sacrifice a measure of its literary magic to the god of cinematic entertainment. Wild (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm  The Pacific Crest Trail, which runs up the entire western spine of the United States, is a challenge of fabled arduousness and rugged beauty. In 1995, aged 26, Cheryl Strayed (played by a superb Reese Witherspoon) walked it, to get clearance in her head after a decade of loss and personal meltdown. Wild powerfully reveals Strayed’s terrors and pleasures as she forges ahead on the journey. Wilde (1996) ★★★☆☆ BBC Four, 10.00pm  Many feel that Stephen Fry was born to play the part of the tragic and devastatingly brilliant Oscar Wilde. He’s terrific, but is only one of several superb players in a film which is held together by its performances. There’s Tom Wilkinson as the odious bully Queensberry and Jude Law on wonderfully petulant form as Bosie, the cause of Wilde’s downfall. Wilde’s story The Selfish Giant is woven throughout the film. Friday 11 August The Royal Albert Hall Credit: BBC BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 8.00pm Swapping tuxes for cowboy hats, the Proms continues tonight with a staging of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s beloved 1943 musical Oklahoma!  Expect plenty of whip-cracking, thigh-slapping, wild-west antics at the Royal Albert Hall, as conductor John Wilson and his orchestra add their signature élan to this story of a love affair between dashing cowboy Curly McLain (Nathaniel Hackmann) and farmer’s daughter Laurey Williams (Scarlett Strallen). Playing Jud Fy, the brooding, bestial social misfit with designs on Laurey himself, meanwhile, is David Seadon-Young. Elsewhere, Belinda Lang stars as the clucking Aunt Eller, and comedian Marcus Brigstocke is Ali Hakim, the Persian huckster battling with the cowboy Will Parker (Robert Fairchild) for the affections of fickle Ado Annie (Lizzy Connolly). The dance routines are balletic and fast, the hits frequent: the jaunty Surrey With the Fringe on Top, the romantic People Will Say We’re in Love, the lovely I Cain’t Say No, and, of course, the unmistakable opening song, Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin’. Rachel Kavanaugh, who directed an acclaimed touring production of Oklahoma! in 2015, is at the helm again here. Patrick Smith Premier League Football: Arsenal v Leicester City Sky Sports Premier League/Sky Sports Main Event, 7.00pm After three months of bluster and big-spending in the transfer market, the Premier League returns – and for the first time, the season gets under way on a Friday. All eyes tonight will be on Arsenal’s Alexandre Lacazette, the French striker who joined the Gunners for a club record fee of £52 million. Can he be the man to fire Arsenal back into the top four? Leicester City, meanwhile, will be keen to bounce back from a disappointing season that saw Claudio Ranieri sacked as manager despite having won them the league nine months previously. When these sides last met, at the end of April, a late own goal from Robert Huth handed Arsenal a 1-0 victory. Teach My Pet to Do That ITV, 8.00pm Arriving in the dog days of summer, this fluffy new series is presented by Alexander Amstrong, who asks such questions as: can a cat be trained to ride a labrador? Helping him teach tricks to the pets – among them, a dachshund labrador cross called Eric and a miniature horse called Aslan – are animal trainers Nando Brown and Jo-Rosie Haffenden.  Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm Throughout this week Steve Jones, Kate Quilton and Supervet Noel Fitzpatrick have been trying to find permanent homes for every animal in the Newcastle Dog and Cat Shelter. Tonight, they make one final push.  Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm Green fingers at the ready as Monty Don advises on how to cut and maintain hedges, while Adam Frost reveals the secrets of successful planting combinations. The Street ITV3, 9.00pm Previously shown in 2009, Jimmy McGovern’s gloom-ridden series comprised six stand-alone episodes focusing on the lives of the inhabitants of a single street in Liverpool. In this instalment, Anna Friel, recently seen in McGovern’s latest drama Broken, plays a single mother trying to hold down two jobs, pay the mortgage and get her two sons into a better school. Starring opposite her is Daniel Mays – with whom she also appeared in Tony Marchant’s similarly bleak drama Public Enemies – as the plumber whom she begins dating. What unfolds is expertly crafted and at times gut-wrenching to watch.  The Agony & the Ecstasy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This entertainingly nostalgic four-part series looks at how the UK’s rave scene exploded in the Eighties, fuelled by the party drug ecstasy. With the help of DJs such as Goldie, Paul Oakenfold and Annie Mac, it also explores how the genre evolved over the next three decades. Reach for the lasers. PS Eden: Paradise Lost Channel 4, 10.00pm The off-grid experiment – in which 23 people were stranded on the west coast of Scotland to fend for themselves – arrived on Channel 4 a year ago amid great fanfare but ended up being an unmitigated flop, with only 10 participants making it through to the end. In tonight’s finale, the action takes us from Christmas Day through to March, when those who remained were finally released. PS Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm  This first of a potentially limitless spin-off series of “Star Wars Stories” follows rebel live-wire Jyn Erso (Felicity Jones), who leads a band of self-styled “spies, saboteurs and assassins” on a death-or-glory mission to steal the Death Star plans from an Imperial stronghold, via some genuinely breathtaking planetary vistas and earth-ripping set-pieces.  The Firm (1993) ★★★☆☆ W, 9.00pm  Sydney Pollack directed this accomplished yet curiously uninvolving adaptation of John Grisham’s legal potboiler. Tom Cruise plays Mitch McDeere, an ambitious young lawyer who takes a well-paid job at a Memphis law firm that sounds too good to be true. And it is: the firm launders money for the Mob. Can Mitch escape with his morals and marriage intact? Gene Hackman co-stars as Cruise’s father figure. Strictly Ballroom (1992) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 11.05pm  Paul Mercurio plays a rebellious ballroom dancer who breaks all the rules and paso dobles his way to victory in this crowd-pleasing Australian comedy. Baz Luhrmann’s writing and directing debut is just as brash as Moulin Rouge! but a lot less pleased with itself. There’s romance between our hero and his ugly duckling partner, and it’s set against an enjoyable parade of sequin-decked caricatures and high camp. Watch here on TVPlayer Television previewers Catherine Gee, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: Billy Connolly: Portrait of a Lifetime and Paul O’Grady’s Hollywood

Saturday 5 August Billy Connolly: Portrait of a Lifetime BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 10.30pm “Glasgow belongs to me,” says Billy Connolly of his hometown in this heart-warming documentary to mark the comedian’s 75th birthday in November. And he’s not wrong as three imposing 50ft tribute portraits have recently been unveiled on wallends in the city. They were created by Scottish artists John Byrne, Jack Vettriano and Rachel MacLean, and this accompanying film not only gives a neat history of the area, but serves as a celebration of the Big Yin’s career.  Interspersed with clips of his stand-up routines, including his cheeky first appearance on Parkinson in 1975 when he told the bum joke that turned him into a star, the programme see Connolly sit quietly for the artists – not one of his strong points as he admits: “I’ve been very patient. I think I’m due an episode.” Watching them at work in their studios is inspiring and Connolly is taken aback by the results. “It’s like looking into a mirror. You know my soul,” he says to Byrne, who used to design album covers for Connolly’s band The Humblebums. “I’m amazed at the effect these have had on me, they’ve stunned me.” From tomorrow, the original portraits will be hung in the People’s Palace. Rachel Ward Athletics: World Championships BBC Two, 9.30am & BBC One, 6.30pm Day two at the London Stadium in Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park sees Usain Bolt – in all likeliness – going for gold in the men’s 100 m final (9.45pm) as he makes his final individual appearance at a major championships. His main threats are expected to come from former champions Justin Gatlin and Yohan Blake, as well as emerging star Christian Coleman. Earlier in the day, British medal hope Katarina Johnson-Thompson gets her heptathlon bid under way with the 100 m hurdles at 10.05am. Sadly not in action today is Greg Rutherford, who, because of an ankle injury, won’t be competing in the men’s long jump final (8.05pm).  Little Big Shots USA ITV, 5.00pm Steve Harvey showcases more talented youngsters while mocking his own stupidity in this family friendly show exec-produced by Ellen DeGeneres. Tonight, there’s a maths genius and a Motown singer. Royal Cousins at War BBC Two, 7.30pm; NI, 8.00pm A welcome repeat for this riveting analysis of the relationship between Kaiser Bill, Tsar Nicholas II of Russia and our own King George V, and the disastrous effect that their rivalry had on the First World War.  Paul O’Grady’s Hollywood Channel 4, 8.00pm This new series sees Paul O’Grady delve into cinematic history to find out what it takes to make a masterpiece. He begins with “weepies”, where the host’s caustic wit serves as the perfect antidote as talking heads, including Sigourney Weaver and Celine Dion, reach for the tissues as they relate films such as Brief Encounter, Titanic and, quite possibly the saddest in movie history, The Champ.    Dad’s Army BBC Two, 8.30pm; not NI This is a gem of an episode loaded with slapstick fun from 1970. It’s the one where Corporal Jones (Clive Dunn) dresses as a tree trunk during an exercise pitting Mainwaring (Arthur Lowe) and his crew against their pompous arch-rival Captain Square. RW The L.A. Riots: 25 Years Later History, 9.00pm Twenty-five years after Los Angeles erupted into one of the most destructive civil disturbances in US history (11,000 people were arrested and an estimated 63 people were killed), this documentary looks back at the decades of racial injustice that led to the incident and the history of police relations with LA’s black community. Citizens, council members and even those who committed crimes talk about how South Central was beset by mass riots, looting, and fires.  Cambridge Folk Festival 2017 Sky Arts, 9.00pm Broadcaster Mark Radcliffe and musician Julie Fowlis present highlights from this year’s festival, an event that attracts 10,000 visitors. These include Jon Boden, formerly of Bellowhead, performing new material with his band The Remnant Kings. There’s also music from Jake Bugg, electric punk stars Oysterband and Lisa Hannigan, once as a member of Damien Rice’s band. RW The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies (2014) ★★☆☆☆ ITV, 8.00pm  The battle of the title was barely mentioned by JRR Tolkein in The Hobbit, but it was seemingly enough for Peter Jackson to pad out his franchise even further. Picking up where the last film left off, our heroes had just unleashed the wrath of dragon Smaug (Benedict Cumberbatch). But there’s another battle looming, one between themselves which is fuelled by greed. Red (2010) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm  A starry line-up of actors of pensionable age is the attraction of this light-hearted adaptation of Warren Ellis’s graphic novel, and it’s hard to resist Helen Mirren with a submachine gun. RED stands for “Retired Extremely Dangerous”, which is what the CIA has labelled former agents Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich and Mirren, who team up to find out who has marked them for assassination, and why. I Know What You Did Last Summer (1997) ★★☆☆☆ BBC One, 11.55pm  This routine slasher flick, written by Kevin Williamson of Scream fame, will certainly make you jump but it’s unlikely to give you many sleepless nights. When a carful of American teenagers hits and kills a man, they panic and dump the body. Months later, the inevitable slaughter begins. A hapless cast, featuring Sarah Michelle Gellar, brings unintentional levity to proceedings. Sunday 6 August Diana, Princess of Wales Credit: Rex Diana: In Her Own Words Channel 4, 8.00pm Much controversy has surrounded this documentary, which broadcasts – for the first time in the UK – video footage recorded in 1992 and 1993 by Diana, Princess of Wales’s voice coach, Peter Settelen. Hired to help Diana reframe her public image and put forward her own side of the story regarding her marriage, Settelen saw his work bear fruit in his client’s Panorama interview. Now there is undoubted interest in watching Diana recount key events in her life unmediated, with candour and a seductive mix of charm and steel. “He chatted me up like a bad rash,” she recalls of her future husband at one point; at another, she remembers being “completely thrown” by the Prince of Wales’s peculiar response to a question about them being in love. In truth, director Kevin Sim rather crams the at-times uncomfortably intimate footage into the first and final thirds of the documentary, leaving assorted friends and confidants to tell the rest of the very familiar story, and the melodrama is laid on a little thick at times. Exploitative? Perhaps. Fascinating? In patches, although it probably won’t entirely satisfy either those looking for genuinely fresh insights or an opportunity to be outraged. Gabriel Tate Community Shield Football: Arsenal v Chelsea BT Sport 1, 1.00pm Arsenal and Chelsea meet for the second time in as many weeks, with Antonio Conte’s Blues favourites to lift the Community Shield today having won 3-0 in Beijing thanks to a brace from Michy Batshuayi.  Women’s Football: Euro 2017 Channel 4, 3.00pm After a thrilling tournament – during which a record 3.3 million people tuned in to watch England’s Lionesses beat France 1-0 – we’re at the FC Twente Stadion in Enschede, Holland, as the successors to Germany are crowned.   LSO Sky Arts, 6.00pm Originally, and rather impishly, hinting at a “greatest hits” of Haydn, Simon Rattle and his Imaginary Orchestral Journey instead took movements from 11 of the Austrian composer’s works, many of them rarely performed, and realigned them joyfully and perceptively in this concert with the London Symphony Orchestra. Works from Bartók and an extract from Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde provide the hors d’oeuvre for this enticing programme.   BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 7.00pm One of the most anticipated events of every Prom season, the National Youth Orchestra of Great Britain brings its energy and drive to the Royal Albert Hall. First comes the London premiere of Francisco Coll’s “grotesque symphony” Mural and Thomas Adès conducting his own work, Polaris, for the first time in the capital. The climax comes courtesy of Igor Stravinsky and his agelessly thrilling Rite of Spring. It is introduced by Suzy Klein and Lloyd Coleman. GT Secrets of Silicon Valley BBC Two, 8.00pm Blogger Jamie Bartlett investigates whether technological progress should be made at any cost. On the one side, he meets those tackling climate change; on the other, those paying the price for the success of Uber and, somewhere in the middle, the pioneers of self-driving cars.    Poldark BBC One, 9.00pm Having barrelled along entertainingly, with the undercurrent of hardscrabble misery intact, this third series concludes with sightings of French sails spotted on the horizon and Cornwall put on high alert. Meanwhile, Cap’n Ross (Aidan Turner) contends with a broadside from George Warleggan  (Jack Farthing).   The Last Days of Patrick Swayze Channel 5, 10.00pm Given the fact that he died from pancreatic cancer aged 57, we can reasonably surmise that the Dirty Dancing star’s final hours were not wholly pleasant. So, what can forensic pathologist Jason Payne-James, perusing Swayze’s medical records, add to the story?   Gareth Thomas: Hate in the Beautiful Game BBC Two, 10.30pm; not NI Former Welsh rugby union captain Gareth Thomas, who came out in 2009 while still playing, asks why football has shamefully remained a bastion of open homophobia – perhaps the last in sport. GT Frozen (2013) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 1.40pm  Disney’s 53rd feature is an enchanting combination of fairytale derring-do and heart-popping musical numbers that has left children and adults powerless to its charms (even if some parents may have grown rather tired of it). Elsa (Idina Menzel) is a shy princess driven into exile when her magical powers are discovered. Her sister Anna (Kristen Bell) gallops off to fetch her from her beautiful ice palace. The King’s Speech (2010) ★★★★★ Channel 4, 9.50pm  Tom Hooper’s film about the future George VI’s struggle to overcome his stammer in the nation’s hour of need won multiple Academy Awards, including a deserved Best Actor gong for Colin Firth. But it’s his double-act with Geoffrey Rush as his speech therapist Lionel Logue that gives the film its heart, and the doublehanders between them are fraught and fascinating. Point Break (1991) ★★★☆☆ Channel 5, 11.05pm Kathryn Bigelow’s cult surfing/crime film elevated Patrick Swayze’s actor status to true action hero. Keanu Reeves plays Johnny Utah, an FBI agent who goes undercover to infiltrate the Ex-Presidents, a gang of bankrobbing surfers led by the charismatic Bodhi (Swayze). The action heats up when Bodhi and Utah find they share a similar attitude towards danger. Lori Petty is the surfer who catches Johnny’s eye. Monday 7 August Eden: Paradise Lost - the participants Credit: Channel 4 Eden: Paradise Lost Channel 4, 10.00pm In March 2016, 23 idealists set out to take part in Channel 4’s Eden experiment, which, a touch grandiosely, sought to establish “a new society” from scratch, cut off from the modern world on a remote Scottish peninsula for an entire year. “What if we could start again?” was the much-hyped tag line. And the answer was… well, we never got to find out the answer because the series was pulled last summer, after just four episodes, when viewing figures took a dive from 1.7 million to less than 800,000.  Not that Channel 4 or production company Keo Films thought to tell the participants that. Instead they were left to get on with it. Rumours swirled of Lord of the Flies levels of acrimony, mass defections, starvation, health problems, people eating chicken feed to survive. So it could make for absorbing viewing in this five-part update, which airs every night this week. Although probably the greatest fascination will be in seeing the reactions of the 10 participants who suffered through to the end as they emerged from the nightmare in March this year only to discover that their efforts have mostly been in vain – and that the political landscape has drastically altered while they were gone. Gerard O’Donovan Stacey Dooley Investigates: Divide and National Pride in Northern Ireland  BBC Three, from 10.00am The intrepid reporter discovers that bitter political divisions persist in Northern Ireland as she seeks to discover more about Prime Minister Theresa May’s new allies in the Democratic Unionist Party. The Bug Grub Couple BBC One, 7.30pm Bug burger or beef burger? That’s the choice at the Grub restaurant in Pembrokeshire, part of entomologist Dr Sarah Beynon and chef Andy Holcroft’s Bug Farm – an insect zoo, research centre and insect eaterie. Here they struggle to convince us why we all should learn to love eating insect protein.   Masters Tennis: The Rogers Cup Sky Sports Main Event, 7.00pm The Uniprix Stadium in Montreal is the setting, as the Rogers Cup gets under way. Novak Djokovic lifted the trophy in 2016 for the fourth time, defeating Kei Nishikori in the final. The Serbian misses out this time around, though, due to injury.  Tornado: The 100mph Steam Engine BBC Four, 8.00pm If phrases like “it’s a Peppercorn class A1 Pacific” get you all steamed up you’ll be in heaven with this account of how a bunch of engineering enthusiasts got the massive locomotive they took 18 years to build from scratch to take on the ultimate test: hitting 100 miles per hour, a speed no British steam train has achieved since 1967.    Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm This new, live, animal rescue show with Steve Jones, Kate Quilton and Noel Fitzpatrick attempts to rehome a whole shelter’s worth of dogs, cats and assorted other species. Among the celebs espousing the joy of pets in this opener is pop singer Leona Lewis. Continues until Friday.   Man in an Orange Shirt BBC Two, 9.00pm In part two of novelist Patrick Gale’s drama for the Gay Britannia season, more than half a century on, Flora (Vanessa Redgrave) gives her late husband’s cottage to their grandson Adam (Julian Morris), who finds himself drawn to his architect, Steve (David Gyasi).   Inside Heston’s World Good Food, 9.00pm This four-part series chronicles chef Heston Blumenthal’s attempt to bring a flavour of his Fat Duck restaurant to Australia, in a multi-million pound move to Melbourne last year. GO Make or Break? Channel 5, 10.00pm A new reality series, stripped across the week, in which eight troubled couples test the strength of their relationships at a Mexican holiday resort, where alongside counselling and therapy sessions, they have to swap partners every two days. GO Doctor Dolittle (1967) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 5.05pm  This is not the Eddie Murphy comedy version from 1998 but the charming Sixties musical directed by Richard Fleischer. Rex Harrison stars as the terse, eponymous doctor who has the uncanny ability to speak to animals and so embarks on a voyage to find an elusive pink sea snail and a giant lunar moth. Samantha Egger, 20 years Harrison’s junior, co-stars as the adventurous stowaway who falls in love with the doctor.  Storks (2016) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 6.20pm  Warner Animation Group’s first film since 2014’s The Lego Movie is spectacularly daft but manages to be both moving and very fun. Here the storks of the title have moved on from delivering babies to big business and now transport products for an Amazon-style website. But then the old baby-making machine, gathering dust in the corner, is accidentally reactivated and suddenly they have a baby to get home.  American History X (1998) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm  Tony Kaye directs this compellingly violent and brutal examination of white supremacism in America. Edward Norton is both mesmerising and terrifying as Derek, a student drawn into the Neo-Nazi movement who mercilessly kills two black youths. After a stint in prison he’s reformed but returns  home to find his younger brother Danny (Edward Furlong) on the same track he was. Tuesday 8 August Jodie Whittaker and Emun Elliott Credit: BBC Trust Me BBC One, 9.00pm Before she becomes the Doctor in Doctor Who, Jodie Whittaker stars in a drama about… pretending to be a doctor. No doubt there will soon be many jokes about that floating around. In this new four-part drama, written by real-life doctor Dan Sefton, Whittaker stars as Cath, a downtrodden ward sister who is fired when she takes her concerns about the conditions in her Sheffield hospital to the trust. Then, when at the leaving party for her best friend Alison – who’s about to begin a new life in New Zealand – she spots Alison’s CV and medical degree certificate in a bin.  So Cath decides to adopt Alison’s identity and, hoping that her nursing skills will be enough to get by, find a job as a doctor far away in Edinburgh. Though the premise may sound a little daft, it’s actually surprisingly – and worryingly – common. Sefton uses his hospital know-how to bring a sense of authenticity to what is a really quite gripping drama.  Whittaker, rather than channelling a cocky Leonardo DiCaprio in Catch Me if You Can, is every inch the terrified woman flying by the seat of her pants. Excellent, too, is Emun Elliot as the colleague who catches her eye. Catherine Gee EastEnders BBC One, 7.30pm Mick’s (Danny Dyer) dastardly behaviour comes to a head in this special three-hander episode. He decides to tell wife Linda (Kellie Bright) the truth about what he’s been up to while she was away: namely cheating on her with their daughter-in-law Whitney (Shona McGarty).    Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm It’s the second nightly visit to this admirable project, which seeks to rehouse all the animals  in a Newcastle shelter in just a week. While we meet the wide range of animals and see how many still remain, Dom Joly also learns what happens to micropigs when they grow up.     The Dog Rescuers with Alan Davies Channel 5, 8.00pm Among the five unlucky pups needing some loving care from the team this week are an abandoned staffie who’s given a second chance and a young spaniel with a nasty neck wound.     Get a House for Free Channel 4, 9.00pm Marco Robinson is a very rich man – £25 million rich, in fact. He made his fortune through a business and property empire and now he wants to give back. So he’s decided to give away a three-bed flat in Preston to the person who he thinks will benefit the most. This film follows him as he attempts to sift through 8,000 applications. CG Utopia: In Search of the Dream BBC Four, 9.00pm It’s 500 years since the term “utopia” was coined by Sir Thomas More in 1516. In this documentary, art historian Professor Richard Clay examines five centuries of the concept of utopia and the impact it has had on our way of thinking. Often used as a method of criticism of the current system, it is a powerful vision. Clay considers some of our “greatest utopian dreamers”, including Jonathan Swift, author of Gulliver’s Travels, and Gene Roddenberry, creator of Star Trek, and the common themes that run through the ideal.     The Yorkshire Dales and the Lakes More4, 9.00pm The cosy documentary series continues with a farmer finding an unusual method to keep track of his sheep: day-glo paint. Elsewhere in the Dales, we follow the Dent Brewery boys as they create their own craft ales and in the Lake District we see Jon Bennett make his daily ascent to the summit of Helvellyn. CG The Parent Trap (1961) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am   In a film that helped pioneer the split-screen technique, Hayley Mills plays both Susan Evers and Sharon McKendrick, twins unaware of each other’s existence and separated as babies following their parents’ divorce. When they meet, years later, at summer camp, the pair scheme to reunite their parents. This classic Disney comedy spawned three sequels and a 1998 remake starring a young Lindsay Lohan. Tootsie (1982) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.30pm  When actor Michael Dorsey transforms himself into Dorothy Michaels in a desperate attempt to get work, complications arise as he falls for a female friend (Jessica Lange) and her father (Charles Durning)  falls for him. Although you never quite believe that Dustin Hoffman in drag would convince everyone that he’s a woman, it doesn’t matter: Tootsie is lots of fun – and it’s a sharply observed social satire, too. Groundhog Day (1993) ★★★★☆ Sky1, 9.00pm  In this wonderful comedy drama, a surly, sardonic weatherman (Bill Murray) is sent to the small US town of Punxsutawney to cover the annual groundhog festival, but finds himself experiencing precisely the same events over and over – then realises that he can free himself from the loop only by being a nicer person. One criticism: as always, Murray is so much more likeable as the malevolent grouch… Wednesday 9 August My Family, Partition and Me: India 1947 - Anita Rani  Credit: BBC My Family, Partition and Me: India 1947 BBC One, 9.00pm Two years ago, Anita Rani learnt how her family history was forever marked by the 1947 Partition of India in a memorable episode of Who Do You Think You Are? Now, she has wrangled three members of the public – one Hindu, one Christian and one Muslim – to explore how their own lives, and those of their ancestors, were affected by the appalling and widespread outbreaks of religious violence in the wake of Britain’s messy, compromised withdrawal, and the troubled legacy left by the Empire. In addition to eyewitness testimonies, the descendants of the survivors travel back to India, Pakistan and Bangladesh to retrace the journeys their relatives were forced to make. Their discoveries are in equal parts shocking, distressing and uplifting, and its treatment is rightly sensitive for events still in living memory: tears flow freely, yet it’s never sentimental. If there isn’t much space to dig into the wider political situation, the complex reasons behind the violence and longer-term implications, the detail of the personal recollections and anecdotes tells its own powerful tale. Rani returns to her own ancestral story in next week’s concluding part. Gabriel Tate Super Small Animals BBC One, 8.00pm Biologist Patrick Aryee demonstrates that size isn’t everything in the natural world, observing the extraordinary feats of strength, endurance and ingenuity of everything from hummingbirds  and seahorses to beetles and armadillos. Love Your Garden ITV, 8.00pm Alan Titchmarsh and his team turn an uninspiring patch of lumpy lawn and uneven paving into a sensory garden for a four-year-old girl with a very rare degenerative eye disease. Long Lost Family ITV, 9.00pm This episode of the always engaging and emotionally gruelling series reuniting long-estranged relatives charts the story of a woman who gave up her son only to adopt two boys herself, and a man whose mother put him up for adoption through an advert in the local press. My Big Gay Jewish Conversion BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.20pm First shown on BBC Three, this smart and sobering documentary follows Simon Atkins – who is Catholic and gay – as he looks at convert to Judaism, a religion that would allow him to marry his boyfriend, Matthew. Atkin’s journey is both spiritual and literal, as he travels to relatively tolerant Tel Aviv and more conservative Jerusalem, hoping to reconcile his sexuality with his religious beliefs. GT The South Bank Show Sky Arts, 8.00pm Singer-songwriter Benjamin Clementine, who won the Mercury Prize in 2015, talks to Melvyn Bragg about his early years on the streets and being hailed perhaps the brightest musical talent of his generation. In Search of Arcadia BBC Four, 9.00pm This contemplative documentary sees Dr Janina Ramirez and John Bailey explore the roots of the Arcadian cultural revolutionaries that sprang up along the Thames in the 17th and 18th centuries. Citizen Jane: Battle for the City BBC Four, 10.00pm When she saw the controversial development projects proposed by Robert Moses in Sixties New York, Jane Jacobs decided to take him on. Matt Tyrnauer’s punchy documentary pulls together an inspiring tale out of unlikely material – the debate of community culture versus “slum clearance”, one which continues to this day in cities across the world. GT Bridge to Terabithia (2007) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.10pm  Talented child stars AnnaSophia Robb and Josh Hutcherson (who went on to star in The Hunger Games) play two young misfits who become friends and create a magical world of the imagination in a remote part of the forest. This quality Disney production, adapted from Katherine Paterson’s classic novel, ventures into unexpectedly dark territory and packs an emotional punch that will have you reaching for your hankie. Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief (2015) ★★★★☆ Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Based on a book by the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Lawrence Wright, director Alex Gibney’s documentary about the Church of Scientology is a gripping, painstakingly researched exposé of one of the world’s most enigmatic organisations. At its core are a series of chilling allegations by former Scientology members, who describe a culture of abuse. The Lost Boys (1987) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 9.00pm Teen flick meets horror in this Eighties hit about two boys (Jason Patric and Corey Haim) who move to a quiet, northern California town where they become involved with a group of bloodthirsty vampires. These days it has to compete with the likes of Twilight and The Vampire Diaries, but there’s still enough action, intrigue, danger and romance to keep you hooked. Kiefer Sutherland and Corey Feldman also star. Thursday 10 July Princess Diana with Raine, Comtesse De Chambrun  Credit: Channel 4 Princess Diana’s “Wicked” Stepmother Channel 4, 9.00pm A gossipy, full-throttle and altogether naughty documentary about Diana, Princess of Wales’s stepmother Raine, Countess Spencer, who died last October. The daughter of romantic novelist Barbara Cartland, Raine was a prodigious social climber described here as “a famous socialite, a feisty politician and all-round force of nature” (“Nobody gets to be a countess three times by accident,” says one contributor). It seems like an accurate fit.  Named “Debutante of the Year” in 1947, Raine went on to bag a future Earl for a husband at the age of 18, became the youngest member of Westminster City Council at 23, before going on to become a noted conservation campaigner. The main focus here, though, is how she went on to marry a second Earl, John Spencer, in circumstances that earned her the entrenched enmity of his children, prime among them being his then 15-year-old daughter, Lady Diana. Yet when Diana’s own marriage ran into trouble it was Raine, so it’s claimed, that she turned to for support; the once “sworn enemy was transformed into her closest confidante”. The contributors include Downton Abbey writer Julian Fellowes and royal biographer Penny Junor. Gerard O’Donovan Natwest T20 Blast Cricket: Hampshire v Glamorgan Sky Sports Cricket, 6.00pm All the action from the Ageas Bowl for this South Division match. The home side are one of the most successful in the history of domestic T20 cricket, having won the competition twice and appeared in another four Finals Days. 10 Puppies and Us BBC Two, 8.00pm Here are more tales of new dog owners and their pups. This week, a mother seeks a canine companion for her son who has Down’s syndrome; the conflict between rival Chihuahuas Rocky and Chloe deepens; and a newlywed couple call in the behaviourist when a pug objects to their connubial bliss.  James Martin’s French Adventure ITV, 8.30pm Chef James Martin heads to the hilly Jura region, where a pear orchard proves to be the source of the perfect chutney for barbecued duck, and a visit to the citadel at Fort des Rousses shows why dungeons make the best cheese cellars. Top of the Lake: China Girl BBC Two, 9.00pm In the wake of last week’s shock revelation, Jane Campion’s off-kilter crime drama continues, with troubled detective Robin Griffin (Elisabeth Moss) pointing the China Girl investigation in a new direction, that of a surrogacy deal gone wrong. Meanwhile, Robin must face demons from her past when her former police chief Al Parker (David Wenham) arrives from New Zealand. Inside London Fire Brigade ITV, 9.00pm As the documentary series concludes, retiring crew manager Al passes the baton on to 25-year-old rookie Joe, who faces a tough test fighting his first big fire. GO A Premier League of Their Own Sky1, 9.00pm Ahead of next weekend’s opening matches in the Premier League, James Corden and pals begin the new season of the panel show with a special edition. Guests Thierry Henry, Jeff Stelling and Kelly Cates will be celebrating all things football alongside the show’s regulars Freddie Flintoff, Jack Whitehall and Jamie Redknapp. Plus McFly’s Danny Jones, singer Kate Nash and R&B star Lemar will be stepping up to the spot for Popstar Penalties. Laurel and Hardy: Their Lives and Magic Sky Arts, 9.00pm Fans of Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy will enjoy this superb assemblage of clips and out-takes. This enthralling documentary follows the life and work of the world’s most beloved comedy duo, and includes rare footage of Laurel in his later years, as well as an even rarer interview with his daughter, Lois. There’s also a tribute to the unusually strong friendship that the two stars enjoyed throughout their working lives. GO Dr Seuss’ The Lorax (2012) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 2.55pm This animated adaptation of Dr Seuss’s quirky story follows a boy (voiced by Zac Efron) who goes in search of a tree to impress a nature-loving girl (Taylor Swift). But he stumbles on the Once-ler (Ed Helms), the man responsible for harvesting all the world’s plant life. Children will enjoy it, even if the film does sacrifice a measure of its literary magic to the god of cinematic entertainment. Wild (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm  The Pacific Crest Trail, which runs up the entire western spine of the United States, is a challenge of fabled arduousness and rugged beauty. In 1995, aged 26, Cheryl Strayed (played by a superb Reese Witherspoon) walked it, to get clearance in her head after a decade of loss and personal meltdown. Wild powerfully reveals Strayed’s terrors and pleasures as she forges ahead on the journey. Wilde (1996) ★★★☆☆ BBC Four, 10.00pm  Many feel that Stephen Fry was born to play the part of the tragic and devastatingly brilliant Oscar Wilde. He’s terrific, but is only one of several superb players in a film which is held together by its performances. There’s Tom Wilkinson as the odious bully Queensberry and Jude Law on wonderfully petulant form as Bosie, the cause of Wilde’s downfall. Wilde’s story The Selfish Giant is woven throughout the film. Friday 11 August The Royal Albert Hall Credit: BBC BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 8.00pm Swapping tuxes for cowboy hats, the Proms continues tonight with a staging of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s beloved 1943 musical Oklahoma!  Expect plenty of whip-cracking, thigh-slapping, wild-west antics at the Royal Albert Hall, as conductor John Wilson and his orchestra add their signature élan to this story of a love affair between dashing cowboy Curly McLain (Nathaniel Hackmann) and farmer’s daughter Laurey Williams (Scarlett Strallen). Playing Jud Fy, the brooding, bestial social misfit with designs on Laurey himself, meanwhile, is David Seadon-Young. Elsewhere, Belinda Lang stars as the clucking Aunt Eller, and comedian Marcus Brigstocke is Ali Hakim, the Persian huckster battling with the cowboy Will Parker (Robert Fairchild) for the affections of fickle Ado Annie (Lizzy Connolly). The dance routines are balletic and fast, the hits frequent: the jaunty Surrey With the Fringe on Top, the romantic People Will Say We’re in Love, the lovely I Cain’t Say No, and, of course, the unmistakable opening song, Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin’. Rachel Kavanaugh, who directed an acclaimed touring production of Oklahoma! in 2015, is at the helm again here. Patrick Smith Premier League Football: Arsenal v Leicester City Sky Sports Premier League/Sky Sports Main Event, 7.00pm After three months of bluster and big-spending in the transfer market, the Premier League returns – and for the first time, the season gets under way on a Friday. All eyes tonight will be on Arsenal’s Alexandre Lacazette, the French striker who joined the Gunners for a club record fee of £52 million. Can he be the man to fire Arsenal back into the top four? Leicester City, meanwhile, will be keen to bounce back from a disappointing season that saw Claudio Ranieri sacked as manager despite having won them the league nine months previously. When these sides last met, at the end of April, a late own goal from Robert Huth handed Arsenal a 1-0 victory. Teach My Pet to Do That ITV, 8.00pm Arriving in the dog days of summer, this fluffy new series is presented by Alexander Amstrong, who asks such questions as: can a cat be trained to ride a labrador? Helping him teach tricks to the pets – among them, a dachshund labrador cross called Eric and a miniature horse called Aslan – are animal trainers Nando Brown and Jo-Rosie Haffenden.  Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm Throughout this week Steve Jones, Kate Quilton and Supervet Noel Fitzpatrick have been trying to find permanent homes for every animal in the Newcastle Dog and Cat Shelter. Tonight, they make one final push.  Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm Green fingers at the ready as Monty Don advises on how to cut and maintain hedges, while Adam Frost reveals the secrets of successful planting combinations. The Street ITV3, 9.00pm Previously shown in 2009, Jimmy McGovern’s gloom-ridden series comprised six stand-alone episodes focusing on the lives of the inhabitants of a single street in Liverpool. In this instalment, Anna Friel, recently seen in McGovern’s latest drama Broken, plays a single mother trying to hold down two jobs, pay the mortgage and get her two sons into a better school. Starring opposite her is Daniel Mays – with whom she also appeared in Tony Marchant’s similarly bleak drama Public Enemies – as the plumber whom she begins dating. What unfolds is expertly crafted and at times gut-wrenching to watch.  The Agony & the Ecstasy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This entertainingly nostalgic four-part series looks at how the UK’s rave scene exploded in the Eighties, fuelled by the party drug ecstasy. With the help of DJs such as Goldie, Paul Oakenfold and Annie Mac, it also explores how the genre evolved over the next three decades. Reach for the lasers. PS Eden: Paradise Lost Channel 4, 10.00pm The off-grid experiment – in which 23 people were stranded on the west coast of Scotland to fend for themselves – arrived on Channel 4 a year ago amid great fanfare but ended up being an unmitigated flop, with only 10 participants making it through to the end. In tonight’s finale, the action takes us from Christmas Day through to March, when those who remained were finally released. PS Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm  This first of a potentially limitless spin-off series of “Star Wars Stories” follows rebel live-wire Jyn Erso (Felicity Jones), who leads a band of self-styled “spies, saboteurs and assassins” on a death-or-glory mission to steal the Death Star plans from an Imperial stronghold, via some genuinely breathtaking planetary vistas and earth-ripping set-pieces.  The Firm (1993) ★★★☆☆ W, 9.00pm  Sydney Pollack directed this accomplished yet curiously uninvolving adaptation of John Grisham’s legal potboiler. Tom Cruise plays Mitch McDeere, an ambitious young lawyer who takes a well-paid job at a Memphis law firm that sounds too good to be true. And it is: the firm launders money for the Mob. Can Mitch escape with his morals and marriage intact? Gene Hackman co-stars as Cruise’s father figure. Strictly Ballroom (1992) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 11.05pm  Paul Mercurio plays a rebellious ballroom dancer who breaks all the rules and paso dobles his way to victory in this crowd-pleasing Australian comedy. Baz Luhrmann’s writing and directing debut is just as brash as Moulin Rouge! but a lot less pleased with itself. There’s romance between our hero and his ugly duckling partner, and it’s set against an enjoyable parade of sequin-decked caricatures and high camp. Watch here on TVPlayer Television previewers Catherine Gee, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: The Secret Life of the Holiday Resort and Icarus

  Friday 4 August The Secret Life of the Holiday Resort Channel 4, 8.00pm Spain hosted 10 million British holidaymakers in 2016, two million more than in the previous year. With the package holiday one of the main beneficiaries of this apparent rekindling of Anglo-Spanish love in the wake of Brexit, Katherine Patrick’s documentary travels to Holidayworld, the biggest all-inclusive resort on the Costa del Sol, where three-quarters of the 3,000 guests are from the UK. There, we meet three four-person families seeking brief respite from the gruelling jobs that generally keep them apart, and some of the 500 heroic staff. The Secret Life of the Holiday Resort is rather harmless, unenlightening stuff, propped up by an exhausting procession of vague statistics and meaningless survey results (“a third of parents say the most frequent rows abroad are between them and their kids”, that sort of thing) reeled off by narrator Blake Harrison (of The Inbetweeners). All the expected boxes are ticked – techniques for bagging sunbeds, the artery-clogging buffets, the pros and cons of families spending a week in such proximity – but it’s good-natured throughout, even during the inevitable and perfunctory drift into Brexit chat. The very essence of silly season programming. GT Icarus Netflix, from today In what is a coup for Netflix, this award-winning documentary from Bryan Fogel began as a Supersize Me-style experiment into the effects of doping. But after Fogel connected with renegade scientist Dr Grigory Rodchenkov, it became a lid-lifting investigation into a widespread Russian scandal that seemingly goes as high as Putin. GT Cleverman BBC Three, from 10.00am Series two of the fun, if labyrinthine, dystopian drama from Australia will be made available today in its entirety. Wearing X-Men’s influence on its sleeve, it follows the leader of the “Hairies”, superpowered people trying to live alongside humans that persecute and subjugate them. GT BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 8.00pm The music of Ella Fitzgerald and Dizzy Gillespie is celebrated in the centenary year of their births, with musicians, including singer Diane Reeves, performing with the BBC Concert Orchestra. GT The Secret World of Posh Pets ITV, 8.00pm; not UTV/STV/Wales This final part finds 21-year-old Rory roping in his father to expand his niche business of exporting jellyfish, while there’s evidence that horse-grooming has reached genuinely berserk levels, with unicorn horns and nail polish the latest must-haves for those benighted equine attractions at children’s parties. GT Only Connect BBC Two, 8.30pm Viking experts take on geocachers (participants in a GPS-driven treasure hunt), with one (relatively straightforward) challenge involving finding the link between exhibit, salt and pepper, outcast and roots manoeuvre. GT Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm Irises, pelargonium cuttings, growing plants inside and managing a shaded, sloping town garden are among the challenges facing Monty Don and his team in tonight’s edition of the hardy perennial. GT Autopsy: Kurt Cobain Channel 5, 10.05pm Forensic pathologist Dr Jason Payne-James turns his attention to the alleged suicide of Kurt Cobain. Alleged, because certain conspiracy theorists assert that he had too much heroin in his system to be able to have inflicted the gunshot wound to his head. Probably best not to expect any definitive results here, however. GT This Is 40 (2012) ★★★☆☆ E4, 9.00pm  Judd Apatow revisits two characters from his 2007 hit Knocked Up. Leslie Mann, Apatow’s wife, and Paul Rudd play a stressed-out Los Angeles couple whose 40th birthdays bookend the film. Apatow and Mann’s real-life daughters also play their children. It’s a perceptive comedy on middle-age and one that guarantees big laughs alongside some of Apatow’s most pertinent observations on love. The Green Mile (1999) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm  Tom Hanks stars in this Oscar-nominated adaptation of Stephen King’s entrancingly strange novel. Stolid prison guard Paul Edgecomb (Hanks) is shaken by the arrival of a convict (Michael Clarke Duncan) who has supernatural powers. Although a little lightweight compared with director Frank Darabont’s previous prison film, The Shawshank Redemption, it’s pleasingly creepy. The Help (2011) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm  Emma Stone sparkles among the fine female cast in this enjoyable adaptation of Kathryn Stockett’s bestselling 2009 novel. She stars as a budding journalist working in Sixties Jackson, Mississippi, who convinces two black maids (Viola Davis and the Oscar-winning Octavia Spencer) to work secretly with her on a book and reveal the hardships inflicted on them. Bryce Dallas Howard is a delightfully hissable villain. Saturday 5 August Billy Connolly in front of John Byrne's portrait in mural form in Glasgow's Osborne Street Credit: BBC Billy Connolly: Portrait of a Lifetime BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 10.30pm “Glasgow belongs to me,” says Billy Connolly of his hometown in this heart-warming documentary to mark the comedian’s 75th birthday in November. And he’s not wrong as three imposing 50ft tribute portraits have recently been unveiled on wallends in the city. They were created by Scottish artists John Byrne, Jack Vettriano and Rachel MacLean, and this accompanying film not only gives a neat history of the area, but serves as a celebration of the Big Yin’s career.  Interspersed with clips of his stand-up routines, including his cheeky first appearance on Parkinson in 1975 when he told the bum joke that turned him into a star, the programme see Connolly sit quietly for the artists – not one of his strong points as he admits: “I’ve been very patient. I think I’m due an episode.” Watching them at work in their studios is inspiring and Connolly is taken aback by the results. “It’s like looking into a mirror. You know my soul,” he says to Byrne, who used to design album covers for Connolly’s band The Humblebums. “I’m amazed at the effect these have had on me, they’ve stunned me.” From tomorrow, the original portraits will be hung in the People’s Palace. Rachel Ward Athletics: World Championships BBC Two, 9.30am & BBC One, 6.30pm Day two at the London Stadium in Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park sees Usain Bolt – in all likeliness – going for gold in the men’s 100 m final (9.45pm) as he makes his final individual appearance at a major championships. His main threats are expected to come from former champions Justin Gatlin and Yohan Blake, as well as emerging star Christian Coleman. Earlier in the day, British medal hope Katarina Johnson-Thompson gets her heptathlon bid under way with the 100 m hurdles at 10.05am. Sadly not in action today is Greg Rutherford, who, because of an ankle injury, won’t be competing in the men’s long jump final (8.05pm).  Little Big Shots USA ITV, 5.00pm Steve Harvey showcases more talented youngsters while mocking his own stupidity in this family friendly show exec-produced by Ellen DeGeneres. Tonight, there’s a maths genius and a Motown singer. Royal Cousins at War BBC Two, 7.30pm; NI, 8.00pm A welcome repeat for this riveting analysis of the relationship between Kaiser Bill, Tsar Nicholas II of Russia and our own King George V, and the disastrous effect that their rivalry had on the First World War.  Paul O’Grady’s Hollywood Channel 4, 8.00pm This new series sees Paul O’Grady delve into cinematic history to find out what it takes to make a masterpiece. He begins with “weepies”, where the host’s caustic wit serves as the perfect antidote as talking heads, including Sigourney Weaver and Celine Dion, reach for the tissues as they relate films such as Brief Encounter, Titanic and, quite possibly the saddest in movie history, The Champ.    Dad’s Army BBC Two, 8.30pm; not NI This is a gem of an episode loaded with slapstick fun from 1970. It’s the one where Corporal Jones (Clive Dunn) dresses as a tree trunk during an exercise pitting Mainwaring (Arthur Lowe) and his crew against their pompous arch-rival Captain Square. RW The L.A. Riots: 25 Years Later History, 9.00pm Twenty-five years after Los Angeles erupted into one of the most destructive civil disturbances in US history (11,000 people were arrested and an estimated 63 people were killed), this documentary looks back at the decades of racial injustice that led to the incident and the history of police relations with LA’s black community. Citizens, council members and even those who committed crimes talk about how South Central was beset by mass riots, looting, and fires.  Cambridge Folk Festival 2017 Sky Arts, 9.00pm Broadcaster Mark Radcliffe and musician Julie Fowlis present highlights from this year’s festival, an event that attracts 10,000 visitors. These include Jon Boden, formerly of Bellowhead, performing new material with his band The Remnant Kings. There’s also music from Jake Bugg, electric punk stars Oysterband and Lisa Hannigan, once as a member of Damien Rice’s band. RW The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies (2014) ★★☆☆☆ ITV, 8.00pm  The battle of the title was barely mentioned by JRR Tolkein in The Hobbit, but it was seemingly enough for Peter Jackson to pad out his franchise even further. Picking up where the last film left off, our heroes had just unleashed the wrath of dragon Smaug (Benedict Cumberbatch). But there’s another battle looming, one between themselves which is fuelled by greed. Red (2010) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm  A starry line-up of actors of pensionable age is the attraction of this light-hearted adaptation of Warren Ellis’s graphic novel, and it’s hard to resist Helen Mirren with a submachine gun. RED stands for “Retired Extremely Dangerous”, which is what the CIA has labelled former agents Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich and Mirren, who team up to find out who has marked them for assassination, and why. I Know What You Did Last Summer (1997) ★★☆☆☆ BBC One, 11.55pm  This routine slasher flick, written by Kevin Williamson of Scream fame, will certainly make you jump but it’s unlikely to give you many sleepless nights. When a carful of American teenagers hits and kills a man, they panic and dump the body. Months later, the inevitable slaughter begins. A hapless cast, featuring Sarah Michelle Gellar, brings unintentional levity to proceedings. Sunday 6 August Diana, Princess of Wales Credit: Rex Diana: In Her Own Words Channel 4, 8.00pm Much controversy has surrounded this documentary, which broadcasts – for the first time in the UK – video footage recorded in 1992 and 1993 by Diana, Princess of Wales’s voice coach, Peter Settelen. Hired to help Diana reframe her public image and put forward her own side of the story regarding her marriage, Settelen saw his work bear fruit in his client’s Panorama interview. Now there is undoubted interest in watching Diana recount key events in her life unmediated, with candour and a seductive mix of charm and steel. “He chatted me up like a bad rash,” she recalls of her future husband at one point; at another, she remembers being “completely thrown” by the Prince of Wales’s peculiar response to a question about them being in love. In truth, director Kevin Sim rather crams the at-times uncomfortably intimate footage into the first and final thirds of the documentary, leaving assorted friends and confidants to tell the rest of the very familiar story, and the melodrama is laid on a little thick at times. Exploitative? Perhaps. Fascinating? In patches, although it probably won’t entirely satisfy either those looking for genuinely fresh insights or an opportunity to be outraged. Gabriel Tate Community Shield Football: Arsenal v Chelsea BT Sport 1, 1.00pm Arsenal and Chelsea meet for the second time in as many weeks, with Antonio Conte’s Blues favourites to lift the Community Shield today having won 3-0 in Beijing thanks to a brace from Michy Batshuayi.  Women’s Football: Euro 2017 Channel 4, 3.00pm After a thrilling tournament – during which a record 3.3 million people tuned in to watch England’s Lionesses beat France 1-0 – we’re at the FC Twente Stadion in Enschede, Holland, as the successors to Germany are crowned.   LSO Sky Arts, 6.00pm Originally, and rather impishly, hinting at a “greatest hits” of Haydn, Simon Rattle and his Imaginary Orchestral Journey instead took movements from 11 of the Austrian composer’s works, many of them rarely performed, and realigned them joyfully and perceptively in this concert with the London Symphony Orchestra. Works from Bartók and an extract from Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde provide the hors d’oeuvre for this enticing programme.   BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 7.00pm One of the most anticipated events of every Prom season, the National Youth Orchestra of Great Britain brings its energy and drive to the Royal Albert Hall. First comes the London premiere of Francisco Coll’s “grotesque symphony” Mural and Thomas Adès conducting his own work, Polaris, for the first time in the capital. The climax comes courtesy of Igor Stravinsky and his agelessly thrilling Rite of Spring. It is introduced by Suzy Klein and Lloyd Coleman. GT Secrets of Silicon Valley BBC Two, 8.00pm Blogger Jamie Bartlett investigates whether technological progress should be made at any cost. On the one side, he meets those tackling climate change; on the other, those paying the price for the success of Uber and, somewhere in the middle, the pioneers of self-driving cars.    Poldark BBC One, 9.00pm Having barrelled along entertainingly, with the undercurrent of hardscrabble misery intact, this third series concludes with sightings of French sails spotted on the horizon and Cornwall put on high alert. Meanwhile, Cap’n Ross (Aidan Turner) contends with a broadside from George Warleggan  (Jack Farthing).   The Last Days of Patrick Swayze Channel 5, 10.00pm Given the fact that he died from pancreatic cancer aged 57, we can reasonably surmise that the Dirty Dancing star’s final hours were not wholly pleasant. So, what can forensic pathologist Jason Payne-James, perusing Swayze’s medical records, add to the story?   Gareth Thomas: Hate in the Beautiful Game BBC Two, 10.30pm; not NI Former Welsh rugby union captain Gareth Thomas, who came out in 2009 while still playing, asks why football has shamefully remained a bastion of open homophobia – perhaps the last in sport. GT Frozen (2013) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 1.40pm  Disney’s 53rd feature is an enchanting combination of fairytale derring-do and heart-popping musical numbers that has left children and adults powerless to its charms (even if some parents may have grown rather tired of it). Elsa (Idina Menzel) is a shy princess driven into exile when her magical powers are discovered. Her sister Anna (Kristen Bell) gallops off to fetch her from her beautiful ice palace. The King’s Speech (2010) ★★★★★ Channel 4, 9.50pm  Tom Hooper’s film about the future George VI’s struggle to overcome his stammer in the nation’s hour of need won multiple Academy Awards, including a deserved Best Actor gong for Colin Firth. But it’s his double-act with Geoffrey Rush as his speech therapist Lionel Logue that gives the film its heart, and the doublehanders between them are fraught and fascinating. Point Break (1991) ★★★☆☆ Channel 5, 11.05pm Kathryn Bigelow’s cult surfing/crime film elevated Patrick Swayze’s actor status to true action hero. Keanu Reeves plays Johnny Utah, an FBI agent who goes undercover to infiltrate the Ex-Presidents, a gang of bankrobbing surfers led by the charismatic Bodhi (Swayze). The action heats up when Bodhi and Utah find they share a similar attitude towards danger. Lori Petty is the surfer who catches Johnny’s eye. Monday 7 August Eden: Paradise Lost - the participants Credit: Channel 4 Eden: Paradise Lost Channel 4, 10.00pm In March 2016, 23 idealists set out to take part in Channel 4’s Eden experiment, which, a touch grandiosely, sought to establish “a new society” from scratch, cut off from the modern world on a remote Scottish peninsula for an entire year. “What if we could start again?” was the much-hyped tag line. And the answer was… well, we never got to find out the answer because the series was pulled last summer, after just four episodes, when viewing figures took a dive from 1.7 million to less than 800,000.  Not that Channel 4 or production company Keo Films thought to tell the participants that. Instead they were left to get on with it. Rumours swirled of Lord of the Flies levels of acrimony, mass defections, starvation, health problems, people eating chicken feed to survive. So it could make for absorbing viewing in this five-part update, which airs every night this week. Although probably the greatest fascination will be in seeing the reactions of the 10 participants who suffered through to the end as they emerged from the nightmare in March this year only to discover that their efforts have mostly been in vain – and that the political landscape has drastically altered while they were gone. Gerard O’Donovan Stacey Dooley Investigates: Divide and National Pride in Northern Ireland  BBC Three, from 10.00am The intrepid reporter discovers that bitter political divisions persist in Northern Ireland as she seeks to discover more about Prime Minister Theresa May’s new allies in the Democratic Unionist Party. The Bug Grub Couple BBC One, 7.30pm Bug burger or beef burger? That’s the choice at the Grub restaurant in Pembrokeshire, part of entomologist Dr Sarah Beynon and chef Andy Holcroft’s Bug Farm – an insect zoo, research centre and insect eaterie. Here they struggle to convince us why we all should learn to love eating insect protein.   Masters Tennis: The Rogers Cup Sky Sports Main Event, 7.00pm The Uniprix Stadium in Montreal is the setting, as the Rogers Cup gets under way. Novak Djokovic lifted the trophy in 2016 for the fourth time, defeating Kei Nishikori in the final. The Serbian misses out this time around, though, due to injury.  Tornado: The 100mph Steam Engine BBC Four, 8.00pm If phrases like “it’s a Peppercorn class A1 Pacific” get you all steamed up you’ll be in heaven with this account of how a bunch of engineering enthusiasts got the massive locomotive they took 18 years to build from scratch to take on the ultimate test: hitting 100 miles per hour, a speed no British steam train has achieved since 1967.    Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm This new, live, animal rescue show with Steve Jones, Kate Quilton and Noel Fitzpatrick attempts to rehome a whole shelter’s worth of dogs, cats and assorted other species. Among the celebs espousing the joy of pets in this opener is pop singer Leona Lewis. Continues until Friday.   Man in an Orange Shirt BBC Two, 9.00pm In part two of novelist Patrick Gale’s drama for the Gay Britannia season, more than half a century on, Flora (Vanessa Redgrave) gives her late husband’s cottage to their grandson Adam (Julian Morris), who finds himself drawn to his architect, Steve (David Gyasi).   Inside Heston’s World Good Food, 9.00pm This four-part series chronicles chef Heston Blumenthal’s attempt to bring a flavour of his Fat Duck restaurant to Australia, in a multi-million pound move to Melbourne last year. GO Make or Break? Channel 5, 10.00pm A new reality series, stripped across the week, in which eight troubled couples test the strength of their relationships at a Mexican holiday resort, where alongside counselling and therapy sessions, they have to swap partners every two days. GO Doctor Dolittle (1967) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 5.05pm  This is not the Eddie Murphy comedy version from 1998 but the charming Sixties musical directed by Richard Fleischer. Rex Harrison stars as the terse, eponymous doctor who has the uncanny ability to speak to animals and so embarks on a voyage to find an elusive pink sea snail and a giant lunar moth. Samantha Egger, 20 years Harrison’s junior, co-stars as the adventurous stowaway who falls in love with the doctor.  Storks (2016) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 6.20pm  Warner Animation Group’s first film since 2014’s The Lego Movie is spectacularly daft but manages to be both moving and very fun. Here the storks of the title have moved on from delivering babies to big business and now transport products for an Amazon-style website. But then the old baby-making machine, gathering dust in the corner, is accidentally reactivated and suddenly they have a baby to get home.  American History X (1998) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm  Tony Kaye directs this compellingly violent and brutal examination of white supremacism in America. Edward Norton is both mesmerising and terrifying as Derek, a student drawn into the Neo-Nazi movement who mercilessly kills two black youths. After a stint in prison he’s reformed but returns  home to find his younger brother Danny (Edward Furlong) on the same track he was. Tuesday 8 August Jodie Whittaker and Emun Elliott Credit: BBC Trust Me BBC One, 9.00pm Before she becomes the Doctor in Doctor Who, Jodie Whittaker stars in a drama about… pretending to be a doctor. No doubt there will soon be many jokes about that floating around. In this new four-part drama, written by real-life doctor Dan Sefton, Whittaker stars as Cath, a downtrodden ward sister who is fired when she takes her concerns about the conditions in her Sheffield hospital to the trust. Then, when at the leaving party for her best friend Alison – who’s about to begin a new life in New Zealand – she spots Alison’s CV and medical degree certificate in a bin.  So Cath decides to adopt Alison’s identity and, hoping that her nursing skills will be enough to get by, find a job as a doctor far away in Edinburgh. Though the premise may sound a little daft, it’s actually surprisingly – and worryingly – common. Sefton uses his hospital know-how to bring a sense of authenticity to what is a really quite gripping drama.  Whittaker, rather than channelling a cocky Leonardo DiCaprio in Catch Me if You Can, is every inch the terrified woman flying by the seat of her pants. Excellent, too, is Emun Elliot as the colleague who catches her eye. Catherine Gee EastEnders BBC One, 7.30pm Mick’s (Danny Dyer) dastardly behaviour comes to a head in this special three-hander episode. He decides to tell wife Linda (Kellie Bright) the truth about what he’s been up to while she was away: namely cheating on her with their daughter-in-law Whitney (Shona McGarty).    Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm It’s the second nightly visit to this admirable project, which seeks to rehouse all the animals  in a Newcastle shelter in just a week. While we meet the wide range of animals and see how many still remain, Dom Joly also learns what happens to micropigs when they grow up.     The Dog Rescuers with Alan Davies Channel 5, 8.00pm Among the five unlucky pups needing some loving care from the team this week are an abandoned staffie who’s given a second chance and a young spaniel with a nasty neck wound.     Get a House for Free Channel 4, 9.00pm Marco Robinson is a very rich man – £25 million rich, in fact. He made his fortune through a business and property empire and now he wants to give back. So he’s decided to give away a three-bed flat in Preston to the person who he thinks will benefit the most. This film follows him as he attempts to sift through 8,000 applications. CG Utopia: In Search of the Dream BBC Four, 9.00pm It’s 500 years since the term “utopia” was coined by Sir Thomas More in 1516. In this documentary, art historian Professor Richard Clay examines five centuries of the concept of utopia and the impact it has had on our way of thinking. Often used as a method of criticism of the current system, it is a powerful vision. Clay considers some of our “greatest utopian dreamers”, including Jonathan Swift, author of Gulliver’s Travels, and Gene Roddenberry, creator of Star Trek, and the common themes that run through the ideal.     The Yorkshire Dales and the Lakes More4, 9.00pm The cosy documentary series continues with a farmer finding an unusual method to keep track of his sheep: day-glo paint. Elsewhere in the Dales, we follow the Dent Brewery boys as they create their own craft ales and in the Lake District we see Jon Bennett make his daily ascent to the summit of Helvellyn. CG The Parent Trap (1961) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am   In a film that helped pioneer the split-screen technique, Hayley Mills plays both Susan Evers and Sharon McKendrick, twins unaware of each other’s existence and separated as babies following their parents’ divorce. When they meet, years later, at summer camp, the pair scheme to reunite their parents. This classic Disney comedy spawned three sequels and a 1998 remake starring a young Lindsay Lohan. Tootsie (1982) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.30pm  When actor Michael Dorsey transforms himself into Dorothy Michaels in a desperate attempt to get work, complications arise as he falls for a female friend (Jessica Lange) and her father (Charles Durning)  falls for him. Although you never quite believe that Dustin Hoffman in drag would convince everyone that he’s a woman, it doesn’t matter: Tootsie is lots of fun – and it’s a sharply observed social satire, too. Groundhog Day (1993) ★★★★☆ Sky1, 9.00pm  In this wonderful comedy drama, a surly, sardonic weatherman (Bill Murray) is sent to the small US town of Punxsutawney to cover the annual groundhog festival, but finds himself experiencing precisely the same events over and over – then realises that he can free himself from the loop only by being a nicer person. One criticism: as always, Murray is so much more likeable as the malevolent grouch… Wednesday 9 August My Family, Partition and Me: India 1947 - Anita Rani  Credit: BBC My Family, Partition and Me: India 1947 BBC One, 9.00pm Two years ago, Anita Rani learnt how her family history was forever marked by the 1947 Partition of India in a memorable episode of Who Do You Think You Are? Now, she has wrangled three members of the public – one Hindu, one Christian and one Muslim – to explore how their own lives, and those of their ancestors, were affected by the appalling and widespread outbreaks of religious violence in the wake of Britain’s messy, compromised withdrawal, and the troubled legacy left by the Empire. In addition to eyewitness testimonies, the descendants of the survivors travel back to India, Pakistan and Bangladesh to retrace the journeys their relatives were forced to make. Their discoveries are in equal parts shocking, distressing and uplifting, and its treatment is rightly sensitive for events still in living memory: tears flow freely, yet it’s never sentimental. If there isn’t much space to dig into the wider political situation, the complex reasons behind the violence and longer-term implications, the detail of the personal recollections and anecdotes tells its own powerful tale. Rani returns to her own ancestral story in next week’s concluding part. Gabriel Tate Super Small Animals BBC One, 8.00pm Biologist Patrick Aryee demonstrates that size isn’t everything in the natural world, observing the extraordinary feats of strength, endurance and ingenuity of everything from hummingbirds  and seahorses to beetles and armadillos. Love Your Garden ITV, 8.00pm Alan Titchmarsh and his team turn an uninspiring patch of lumpy lawn and uneven paving into a sensory garden for a four-year-old girl with a very rare degenerative eye disease. Long Lost Family ITV, 9.00pm This episode of the always engaging and emotionally gruelling series reuniting long-estranged relatives charts the story of a woman who gave up her son only to adopt two boys herself, and a man whose mother put him up for adoption through an advert in the local press. My Big Gay Jewish Conversion BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.20pm First shown on BBC Three, this smart and sobering documentary follows Simon Atkins – who is Catholic and gay – as he looks at convert to Judaism, a religion that would allow him to marry his boyfriend, Matthew. Atkin’s journey is both spiritual and literal, as he travels to relatively tolerant Tel Aviv and more conservative Jerusalem, hoping to reconcile his sexuality with his religious beliefs. GT The South Bank Show Sky Arts, 8.00pm Singer-songwriter Benjamin Clementine, who won the Mercury Prize in 2015, talks to Melvyn Bragg about his early years on the streets and being hailed perhaps the brightest musical talent of his generation. In Search of Arcadia BBC Four, 9.00pm This contemplative documentary sees Dr Janina Ramirez and John Bailey explore the roots of the Arcadian cultural revolutionaries that sprang up along the Thames in the 17th and 18th centuries. Citizen Jane: Battle for the City BBC Four, 10.00pm When she saw the controversial development projects proposed by Robert Moses in Sixties New York, Jane Jacobs decided to take him on. Matt Tyrnauer’s punchy documentary pulls together an inspiring tale out of unlikely material – the debate of community culture versus “slum clearance”, one which continues to this day in cities across the world. GT Bridge to Terabithia (2007) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.10pm  Talented child stars AnnaSophia Robb and Josh Hutcherson (who went on to star in The Hunger Games) play two young misfits who become friends and create a magical world of the imagination in a remote part of the forest. This quality Disney production, adapted from Katherine Paterson’s classic novel, ventures into unexpectedly dark territory and packs an emotional punch that will have you reaching for your hankie. Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief (2015) ★★★★☆ Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Based on a book by the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Lawrence Wright, director Alex Gibney’s documentary about the Church of Scientology is a gripping, painstakingly researched exposé of one of the world’s most enigmatic organisations. At its core are a series of chilling allegations by former Scientology members, who describe a culture of abuse. The Lost Boys (1987) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 9.00pm Teen flick meets horror in this Eighties hit about two boys (Jason Patric and Corey Haim) who move to a quiet, northern California town where they become involved with a group of bloodthirsty vampires. These days it has to compete with the likes of Twilight and The Vampire Diaries, but there’s still enough action, intrigue, danger and romance to keep you hooked. Kiefer Sutherland and Corey Feldman also star. Thursday 10 July Princess Diana with Raine, Comtesse De Chambrun  Credit: Channel 4 Princess Diana’s “Wicked” Stepmother Channel 4, 9.00pm A gossipy, full-throttle and altogether naughty documentary about Diana, Princess of Wales’s stepmother Raine, Countess Spencer, who died last October. The daughter of romantic novelist Barbara Cartland, Raine was a prodigious social climber described here as “a famous socialite, a feisty politician and all-round force of nature” (“Nobody gets to be a countess three times by accident,” says one contributor). It seems like an accurate fit.  Named “Debutante of the Year” in 1947, Raine went on to bag a future Earl for a husband at the age of 18, became the youngest member of Westminster City Council at 23, before going on to become a noted conservation campaigner. The main focus here, though, is how she went on to marry a second Earl, John Spencer, in circumstances that earned her the entrenched enmity of his children, prime among them being his then 15-year-old daughter, Lady Diana. Yet when Diana’s own marriage ran into trouble it was Raine, so it’s claimed, that she turned to for support; the once “sworn enemy was transformed into her closest confidante”. The contributors include Downton Abbey writer Julian Fellowes and royal biographer Penny Junor. Gerard O’Donovan Natwest T20 Blast Cricket: Hampshire v Glamorgan Sky Sports Cricket, 6.00pm All the action from the Ageas Bowl for this South Division match. The home side are one of the most successful in the history of domestic T20 cricket, having won the competition twice and appeared in another four Finals Days. 10 Puppies and Us BBC Two, 8.00pm Here are more tales of new dog owners and their pups. This week, a mother seeks a canine companion for her son who has Down’s syndrome; the conflict between rival Chihuahuas Rocky and Chloe deepens; and a newlywed couple call in the behaviourist when a pug objects to their connubial bliss.  James Martin’s French Adventure ITV, 8.30pm Chef James Martin heads to the hilly Jura region, where a pear orchard proves to be the source of the perfect chutney for barbecued duck, and a visit to the citadel at Fort des Rousses shows why dungeons make the best cheese cellars. Top of the Lake: China Girl BBC Two, 9.00pm In the wake of last week’s shock revelation, Jane Campion’s off-kilter crime drama continues, with troubled detective Robin Griffin (Elisabeth Moss) pointing the China Girl investigation in a new direction, that of a surrogacy deal gone wrong. Meanwhile, Robin must face demons from her past when her former police chief Al Parker (David Wenham) arrives from New Zealand. Inside London Fire Brigade ITV, 9.00pm As the documentary series concludes, retiring crew manager Al passes the baton on to 25-year-old rookie Joe, who faces a tough test fighting his first big fire. GO A Premier League of Their Own Sky1, 9.00pm Ahead of next weekend’s opening matches in the Premier League, James Corden and pals begin the new season of the panel show with a special edition. Guests Thierry Henry, Jeff Stelling and Kelly Cates will be celebrating all things football alongside the show’s regulars Freddie Flintoff, Jack Whitehall and Jamie Redknapp. Plus McFly’s Danny Jones, singer Kate Nash and R&B star Lemar will be stepping up to the spot for Popstar Penalties. Laurel and Hardy: Their Lives and Magic Sky Arts, 9.00pm Fans of Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy will enjoy this superb assemblage of clips and out-takes. This enthralling documentary follows the life and work of the world’s most beloved comedy duo, and includes rare footage of Laurel in his later years, as well as an even rarer interview with his daughter, Lois. There’s also a tribute to the unusually strong friendship that the two stars enjoyed throughout their working lives. GO Dr Seuss’ The Lorax (2012) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 2.55pm This animated adaptation of Dr Seuss’s quirky story follows a boy (voiced by Zac Efron) who goes in search of a tree to impress a nature-loving girl (Taylor Swift). But he stumbles on the Once-ler (Ed Helms), the man responsible for harvesting all the world’s plant life. Children will enjoy it, even if the film does sacrifice a measure of its literary magic to the god of cinematic entertainment. Wild (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm  The Pacific Crest Trail, which runs up the entire western spine of the United States, is a challenge of fabled arduousness and rugged beauty. In 1995, aged 26, Cheryl Strayed (played by a superb Reese Witherspoon) walked it, to get clearance in her head after a decade of loss and personal meltdown. Wild powerfully reveals Strayed’s terrors and pleasures as she forges ahead on the journey. Wilde (1996) ★★★☆☆ BBC Four, 10.00pm  Many feel that Stephen Fry was born to play the part of the tragic and devastatingly brilliant Oscar Wilde. He’s terrific, but is only one of several superb players in a film which is held together by its performances. There’s Tom Wilkinson as the odious bully Queensberry and Jude Law on wonderfully petulant form as Bosie, the cause of Wilde’s downfall. Wilde’s story The Selfish Giant is woven throughout the film. Friday 11 August The Royal Albert Hall Credit: BBC BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 8.00pm Swapping tuxes for cowboy hats, the Proms continues tonight with a staging of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s beloved 1943 musical Oklahoma!  Expect plenty of whip-cracking, thigh-slapping, wild-west antics at the Royal Albert Hall, as conductor John Wilson and his orchestra add their signature élan to this story of a love affair between dashing cowboy Curly McLain (Nathaniel Hackmann) and farmer’s daughter Laurey Williams (Scarlett Strallen). Playing Jud Fy, the brooding, bestial social misfit with designs on Laurey himself, meanwhile, is David Seadon-Young. Elsewhere, Belinda Lang stars as the clucking Aunt Eller, and comedian Marcus Brigstocke is Ali Hakim, the Persian huckster battling with the cowboy Will Parker (Robert Fairchild) for the affections of fickle Ado Annie (Lizzy Connolly). The dance routines are balletic and fast, the hits frequent: the jaunty Surrey With the Fringe on Top, the romantic People Will Say We’re in Love, the lovely I Cain’t Say No, and, of course, the unmistakable opening song, Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin’. Rachel Kavanaugh, who directed an acclaimed touring production of Oklahoma! in 2015, is at the helm again here. Patrick Smith Premier League Football: Arsenal v Leicester City Sky Sports Premier League/Sky Sports Main Event, 7.00pm After three months of bluster and big-spending in the transfer market, the Premier League returns – and for the first time, the season gets under way on a Friday. All eyes tonight will be on Arsenal’s Alexandre Lacazette, the French striker who joined the Gunners for a club record fee of £52 million. Can he be the man to fire Arsenal back into the top four? Leicester City, meanwhile, will be keen to bounce back from a disappointing season that saw Claudio Ranieri sacked as manager despite having won them the league nine months previously. When these sides last met, at the end of April, a late own goal from Robert Huth handed Arsenal a 1-0 victory. Teach My Pet to Do That ITV, 8.00pm Arriving in the dog days of summer, this fluffy new series is presented by Alexander Amstrong, who asks such questions as: can a cat be trained to ride a labrador? Helping him teach tricks to the pets – among them, a dachshund labrador cross called Eric and a miniature horse called Aslan – are animal trainers Nando Brown and Jo-Rosie Haffenden.  Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm Throughout this week Steve Jones, Kate Quilton and Supervet Noel Fitzpatrick have been trying to find permanent homes for every animal in the Newcastle Dog and Cat Shelter. Tonight, they make one final push.  Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm Green fingers at the ready as Monty Don advises on how to cut and maintain hedges, while Adam Frost reveals the secrets of successful planting combinations. The Street ITV3, 9.00pm Previously shown in 2009, Jimmy McGovern’s gloom-ridden series comprised six stand-alone episodes focusing on the lives of the inhabitants of a single street in Liverpool. In this instalment, Anna Friel, recently seen in McGovern’s latest drama Broken, plays a single mother trying to hold down two jobs, pay the mortgage and get her two sons into a better school. Starring opposite her is Daniel Mays – with whom she also appeared in Tony Marchant’s similarly bleak drama Public Enemies – as the plumber whom she begins dating. What unfolds is expertly crafted and at times gut-wrenching to watch.  The Agony & the Ecstasy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This entertainingly nostalgic four-part series looks at how the UK’s rave scene exploded in the Eighties, fuelled by the party drug ecstasy. With the help of DJs such as Goldie, Paul Oakenfold and Annie Mac, it also explores how the genre evolved over the next three decades. Reach for the lasers. PS Eden: Paradise Lost Channel 4, 10.00pm The off-grid experiment – in which 23 people were stranded on the west coast of Scotland to fend for themselves – arrived on Channel 4 a year ago amid great fanfare but ended up being an unmitigated flop, with only 10 participants making it through to the end. In tonight’s finale, the action takes us from Christmas Day through to March, when those who remained were finally released. PS Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm  This first of a potentially limitless spin-off series of “Star Wars Stories” follows rebel live-wire Jyn Erso (Felicity Jones), who leads a band of self-styled “spies, saboteurs and assassins” on a death-or-glory mission to steal the Death Star plans from an Imperial stronghold, via some genuinely breathtaking planetary vistas and earth-ripping set-pieces.  The Firm (1993) ★★★☆☆ W, 9.00pm  Sydney Pollack directed this accomplished yet curiously uninvolving adaptation of John Grisham’s legal potboiler. Tom Cruise plays Mitch McDeere, an ambitious young lawyer who takes a well-paid job at a Memphis law firm that sounds too good to be true. And it is: the firm launders money for the Mob. Can Mitch escape with his morals and marriage intact? Gene Hackman co-stars as Cruise’s father figure. Strictly Ballroom (1992) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 11.05pm  Paul Mercurio plays a rebellious ballroom dancer who breaks all the rules and paso dobles his way to victory in this crowd-pleasing Australian comedy. Baz Luhrmann’s writing and directing debut is just as brash as Moulin Rouge! but a lot less pleased with itself. There’s romance between our hero and his ugly duckling partner, and it’s set against an enjoyable parade of sequin-decked caricatures and high camp. Watch here on TVPlayer Television previewers Catherine Gee, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: The Secret Life of the Holiday Resort and Icarus

  Friday 4 August The Secret Life of the Holiday Resort Channel 4, 8.00pm Spain hosted 10 million British holidaymakers in 2016, two million more than in the previous year. With the package holiday one of the main beneficiaries of this apparent rekindling of Anglo-Spanish love in the wake of Brexit, Katherine Patrick’s documentary travels to Holidayworld, the biggest all-inclusive resort on the Costa del Sol, where three-quarters of the 3,000 guests are from the UK. There, we meet three four-person families seeking brief respite from the gruelling jobs that generally keep them apart, and some of the 500 heroic staff. The Secret Life of the Holiday Resort is rather harmless, unenlightening stuff, propped up by an exhausting procession of vague statistics and meaningless survey results (“a third of parents say the most frequent rows abroad are between them and their kids”, that sort of thing) reeled off by narrator Blake Harrison (of The Inbetweeners). All the expected boxes are ticked – techniques for bagging sunbeds, the artery-clogging buffets, the pros and cons of families spending a week in such proximity – but it’s good-natured throughout, even during the inevitable and perfunctory drift into Brexit chat. The very essence of silly season programming. GT Icarus Netflix, from today In what is a coup for Netflix, this award-winning documentary from Bryan Fogel began as a Supersize Me-style experiment into the effects of doping. But after Fogel connected with renegade scientist Dr Grigory Rodchenkov, it became a lid-lifting investigation into a widespread Russian scandal that seemingly goes as high as Putin. GT Cleverman BBC Three, from 10.00am Series two of the fun, if labyrinthine, dystopian drama from Australia will be made available today in its entirety. Wearing X-Men’s influence on its sleeve, it follows the leader of the “Hairies”, superpowered people trying to live alongside humans that persecute and subjugate them. GT BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 8.00pm The music of Ella Fitzgerald and Dizzy Gillespie is celebrated in the centenary year of their births, with musicians, including singer Diane Reeves, performing with the BBC Concert Orchestra. GT The Secret World of Posh Pets ITV, 8.00pm; not UTV/STV/Wales This final part finds 21-year-old Rory roping in his father to expand his niche business of exporting jellyfish, while there’s evidence that horse-grooming has reached genuinely berserk levels, with unicorn horns and nail polish the latest must-haves for those benighted equine attractions at children’s parties. GT Only Connect BBC Two, 8.30pm Viking experts take on geocachers (participants in a GPS-driven treasure hunt), with one (relatively straightforward) challenge involving finding the link between exhibit, salt and pepper, outcast and roots manoeuvre. GT Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm Irises, pelargonium cuttings, growing plants inside and managing a shaded, sloping town garden are among the challenges facing Monty Don and his team in tonight’s edition of the hardy perennial. GT Autopsy: Kurt Cobain Channel 5, 10.05pm Forensic pathologist Dr Jason Payne-James turns his attention to the alleged suicide of Kurt Cobain. Alleged, because certain conspiracy theorists assert that he had too much heroin in his system to be able to have inflicted the gunshot wound to his head. Probably best not to expect any definitive results here, however. GT This Is 40 (2012) ★★★☆☆ E4, 9.00pm  Judd Apatow revisits two characters from his 2007 hit Knocked Up. Leslie Mann, Apatow’s wife, and Paul Rudd play a stressed-out Los Angeles couple whose 40th birthdays bookend the film. Apatow and Mann’s real-life daughters also play their children. It’s a perceptive comedy on middle-age and one that guarantees big laughs alongside some of Apatow’s most pertinent observations on love. The Green Mile (1999) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm  Tom Hanks stars in this Oscar-nominated adaptation of Stephen King’s entrancingly strange novel. Stolid prison guard Paul Edgecomb (Hanks) is shaken by the arrival of a convict (Michael Clarke Duncan) who has supernatural powers. Although a little lightweight compared with director Frank Darabont’s previous prison film, The Shawshank Redemption, it’s pleasingly creepy. The Help (2011) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm  Emma Stone sparkles among the fine female cast in this enjoyable adaptation of Kathryn Stockett’s bestselling 2009 novel. She stars as a budding journalist working in Sixties Jackson, Mississippi, who convinces two black maids (Viola Davis and the Oscar-winning Octavia Spencer) to work secretly with her on a book and reveal the hardships inflicted on them. Bryce Dallas Howard is a delightfully hissable villain. Saturday 5 August Billy Connolly in front of John Byrne's portrait in mural form in Glasgow's Osborne Street Credit: BBC Billy Connolly: Portrait of a Lifetime BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 10.30pm “Glasgow belongs to me,” says Billy Connolly of his hometown in this heart-warming documentary to mark the comedian’s 75th birthday in November. And he’s not wrong as three imposing 50ft tribute portraits have recently been unveiled on wallends in the city. They were created by Scottish artists John Byrne, Jack Vettriano and Rachel MacLean, and this accompanying film not only gives a neat history of the area, but serves as a celebration of the Big Yin’s career.  Interspersed with clips of his stand-up routines, including his cheeky first appearance on Parkinson in 1975 when he told the bum joke that turned him into a star, the programme see Connolly sit quietly for the artists – not one of his strong points as he admits: “I’ve been very patient. I think I’m due an episode.” Watching them at work in their studios is inspiring and Connolly is taken aback by the results. “It’s like looking into a mirror. You know my soul,” he says to Byrne, who used to design album covers for Connolly’s band The Humblebums. “I’m amazed at the effect these have had on me, they’ve stunned me.” From tomorrow, the original portraits will be hung in the People’s Palace. Rachel Ward Athletics: World Championships BBC Two, 9.30am & BBC One, 6.30pm Day two at the London Stadium in Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park sees Usain Bolt – in all likeliness – going for gold in the men’s 100 m final (9.45pm) as he makes his final individual appearance at a major championships. His main threats are expected to come from former champions Justin Gatlin and Yohan Blake, as well as emerging star Christian Coleman. Earlier in the day, British medal hope Katarina Johnson-Thompson gets her heptathlon bid under way with the 100 m hurdles at 10.05am. Sadly not in action today is Greg Rutherford, who, because of an ankle injury, won’t be competing in the men’s long jump final (8.05pm).  Little Big Shots USA ITV, 5.00pm Steve Harvey showcases more talented youngsters while mocking his own stupidity in this family friendly show exec-produced by Ellen DeGeneres. Tonight, there’s a maths genius and a Motown singer. Royal Cousins at War BBC Two, 7.30pm; NI, 8.00pm A welcome repeat for this riveting analysis of the relationship between Kaiser Bill, Tsar Nicholas II of Russia and our own King George V, and the disastrous effect that their rivalry had on the First World War.  Paul O’Grady’s Hollywood Channel 4, 8.00pm This new series sees Paul O’Grady delve into cinematic history to find out what it takes to make a masterpiece. He begins with “weepies”, where the host’s caustic wit serves as the perfect antidote as talking heads, including Sigourney Weaver and Celine Dion, reach for the tissues as they relate films such as Brief Encounter, Titanic and, quite possibly the saddest in movie history, The Champ.    Dad’s Army BBC Two, 8.30pm; not NI This is a gem of an episode loaded with slapstick fun from 1970. It’s the one where Corporal Jones (Clive Dunn) dresses as a tree trunk during an exercise pitting Mainwaring (Arthur Lowe) and his crew against their pompous arch-rival Captain Square. RW The L.A. Riots: 25 Years Later History, 9.00pm Twenty-five years after Los Angeles erupted into one of the most destructive civil disturbances in US history (11,000 people were arrested and an estimated 63 people were killed), this documentary looks back at the decades of racial injustice that led to the incident and the history of police relations with LA’s black community. Citizens, council members and even those who committed crimes talk about how South Central was beset by mass riots, looting, and fires.  Cambridge Folk Festival 2017 Sky Arts, 9.00pm Broadcaster Mark Radcliffe and musician Julie Fowlis present highlights from this year’s festival, an event that attracts 10,000 visitors. These include Jon Boden, formerly of Bellowhead, performing new material with his band The Remnant Kings. There’s also music from Jake Bugg, electric punk stars Oysterband and Lisa Hannigan, once as a member of Damien Rice’s band. RW The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies (2014) ★★☆☆☆ ITV, 8.00pm  The battle of the title was barely mentioned by JRR Tolkein in The Hobbit, but it was seemingly enough for Peter Jackson to pad out his franchise even further. Picking up where the last film left off, our heroes had just unleashed the wrath of dragon Smaug (Benedict Cumberbatch). But there’s another battle looming, one between themselves which is fuelled by greed. Red (2010) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm  A starry line-up of actors of pensionable age is the attraction of this light-hearted adaptation of Warren Ellis’s graphic novel, and it’s hard to resist Helen Mirren with a submachine gun. RED stands for “Retired Extremely Dangerous”, which is what the CIA has labelled former agents Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich and Mirren, who team up to find out who has marked them for assassination, and why. I Know What You Did Last Summer (1997) ★★☆☆☆ BBC One, 11.55pm  This routine slasher flick, written by Kevin Williamson of Scream fame, will certainly make you jump but it’s unlikely to give you many sleepless nights. When a carful of American teenagers hits and kills a man, they panic and dump the body. Months later, the inevitable slaughter begins. A hapless cast, featuring Sarah Michelle Gellar, brings unintentional levity to proceedings. Sunday 6 August Diana, Princess of Wales Credit: Rex Diana: In Her Own Words Channel 4, 8.00pm Much controversy has surrounded this documentary, which broadcasts – for the first time in the UK – video footage recorded in 1992 and 1993 by Diana, Princess of Wales’s voice coach, Peter Settelen. Hired to help Diana reframe her public image and put forward her own side of the story regarding her marriage, Settelen saw his work bear fruit in his client’s Panorama interview. Now there is undoubted interest in watching Diana recount key events in her life unmediated, with candour and a seductive mix of charm and steel. “He chatted me up like a bad rash,” she recalls of her future husband at one point; at another, she remembers being “completely thrown” by the Prince of Wales’s peculiar response to a question about them being in love. In truth, director Kevin Sim rather crams the at-times uncomfortably intimate footage into the first and final thirds of the documentary, leaving assorted friends and confidants to tell the rest of the very familiar story, and the melodrama is laid on a little thick at times. Exploitative? Perhaps. Fascinating? In patches, although it probably won’t entirely satisfy either those looking for genuinely fresh insights or an opportunity to be outraged. Gabriel Tate Community Shield Football: Arsenal v Chelsea BT Sport 1, 1.00pm Arsenal and Chelsea meet for the second time in as many weeks, with Antonio Conte’s Blues favourites to lift the Community Shield today having won 3-0 in Beijing thanks to a brace from Michy Batshuayi.  Women’s Football: Euro 2017 Channel 4, 3.00pm After a thrilling tournament – during which a record 3.3 million people tuned in to watch England’s Lionesses beat France 1-0 – we’re at the FC Twente Stadion in Enschede, Holland, as the successors to Germany are crowned.   LSO Sky Arts, 6.00pm Originally, and rather impishly, hinting at a “greatest hits” of Haydn, Simon Rattle and his Imaginary Orchestral Journey instead took movements from 11 of the Austrian composer’s works, many of them rarely performed, and realigned them joyfully and perceptively in this concert with the London Symphony Orchestra. Works from Bartók and an extract from Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde provide the hors d’oeuvre for this enticing programme.   BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 7.00pm One of the most anticipated events of every Prom season, the National Youth Orchestra of Great Britain brings its energy and drive to the Royal Albert Hall. First comes the London premiere of Francisco Coll’s “grotesque symphony” Mural and Thomas Adès conducting his own work, Polaris, for the first time in the capital. The climax comes courtesy of Igor Stravinsky and his agelessly thrilling Rite of Spring. It is introduced by Suzy Klein and Lloyd Coleman. GT Secrets of Silicon Valley BBC Two, 8.00pm Blogger Jamie Bartlett investigates whether technological progress should be made at any cost. On the one side, he meets those tackling climate change; on the other, those paying the price for the success of Uber and, somewhere in the middle, the pioneers of self-driving cars.    Poldark BBC One, 9.00pm Having barrelled along entertainingly, with the undercurrent of hardscrabble misery intact, this third series concludes with sightings of French sails spotted on the horizon and Cornwall put on high alert. Meanwhile, Cap’n Ross (Aidan Turner) contends with a broadside from George Warleggan  (Jack Farthing).   The Last Days of Patrick Swayze Channel 5, 10.00pm Given the fact that he died from pancreatic cancer aged 57, we can reasonably surmise that the Dirty Dancing star’s final hours were not wholly pleasant. So, what can forensic pathologist Jason Payne-James, perusing Swayze’s medical records, add to the story?   Gareth Thomas: Hate in the Beautiful Game BBC Two, 10.30pm; not NI Former Welsh rugby union captain Gareth Thomas, who came out in 2009 while still playing, asks why football has shamefully remained a bastion of open homophobia – perhaps the last in sport. GT Frozen (2013) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 1.40pm  Disney’s 53rd feature is an enchanting combination of fairytale derring-do and heart-popping musical numbers that has left children and adults powerless to its charms (even if some parents may have grown rather tired of it). Elsa (Idina Menzel) is a shy princess driven into exile when her magical powers are discovered. Her sister Anna (Kristen Bell) gallops off to fetch her from her beautiful ice palace. The King’s Speech (2010) ★★★★★ Channel 4, 9.50pm  Tom Hooper’s film about the future George VI’s struggle to overcome his stammer in the nation’s hour of need won multiple Academy Awards, including a deserved Best Actor gong for Colin Firth. But it’s his double-act with Geoffrey Rush as his speech therapist Lionel Logue that gives the film its heart, and the doublehanders between them are fraught and fascinating. Point Break (1991) ★★★☆☆ Channel 5, 11.05pm Kathryn Bigelow’s cult surfing/crime film elevated Patrick Swayze’s actor status to true action hero. Keanu Reeves plays Johnny Utah, an FBI agent who goes undercover to infiltrate the Ex-Presidents, a gang of bankrobbing surfers led by the charismatic Bodhi (Swayze). The action heats up when Bodhi and Utah find they share a similar attitude towards danger. Lori Petty is the surfer who catches Johnny’s eye. Monday 7 August Eden: Paradise Lost - the participants Credit: Channel 4 Eden: Paradise Lost Channel 4, 10.00pm In March 2016, 23 idealists set out to take part in Channel 4’s Eden experiment, which, a touch grandiosely, sought to establish “a new society” from scratch, cut off from the modern world on a remote Scottish peninsula for an entire year. “What if we could start again?” was the much-hyped tag line. And the answer was… well, we never got to find out the answer because the series was pulled last summer, after just four episodes, when viewing figures took a dive from 1.7 million to less than 800,000.  Not that Channel 4 or production company Keo Films thought to tell the participants that. Instead they were left to get on with it. Rumours swirled of Lord of the Flies levels of acrimony, mass defections, starvation, health problems, people eating chicken feed to survive. So it could make for absorbing viewing in this five-part update, which airs every night this week. Although probably the greatest fascination will be in seeing the reactions of the 10 participants who suffered through to the end as they emerged from the nightmare in March this year only to discover that their efforts have mostly been in vain – and that the political landscape has drastically altered while they were gone. Gerard O’Donovan Stacey Dooley Investigates: Divide and National Pride in Northern Ireland  BBC Three, from 10.00am The intrepid reporter discovers that bitter political divisions persist in Northern Ireland as she seeks to discover more about Prime Minister Theresa May’s new allies in the Democratic Unionist Party. The Bug Grub Couple BBC One, 7.30pm Bug burger or beef burger? That’s the choice at the Grub restaurant in Pembrokeshire, part of entomologist Dr Sarah Beynon and chef Andy Holcroft’s Bug Farm – an insect zoo, research centre and insect eaterie. Here they struggle to convince us why we all should learn to love eating insect protein.   Masters Tennis: The Rogers Cup Sky Sports Main Event, 7.00pm The Uniprix Stadium in Montreal is the setting, as the Rogers Cup gets under way. Novak Djokovic lifted the trophy in 2016 for the fourth time, defeating Kei Nishikori in the final. The Serbian misses out this time around, though, due to injury.  Tornado: The 100mph Steam Engine BBC Four, 8.00pm If phrases like “it’s a Peppercorn class A1 Pacific” get you all steamed up you’ll be in heaven with this account of how a bunch of engineering enthusiasts got the massive locomotive they took 18 years to build from scratch to take on the ultimate test: hitting 100 miles per hour, a speed no British steam train has achieved since 1967.    Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm This new, live, animal rescue show with Steve Jones, Kate Quilton and Noel Fitzpatrick attempts to rehome a whole shelter’s worth of dogs, cats and assorted other species. Among the celebs espousing the joy of pets in this opener is pop singer Leona Lewis. Continues until Friday.   Man in an Orange Shirt BBC Two, 9.00pm In part two of novelist Patrick Gale’s drama for the Gay Britannia season, more than half a century on, Flora (Vanessa Redgrave) gives her late husband’s cottage to their grandson Adam (Julian Morris), who finds himself drawn to his architect, Steve (David Gyasi).   Inside Heston’s World Good Food, 9.00pm This four-part series chronicles chef Heston Blumenthal’s attempt to bring a flavour of his Fat Duck restaurant to Australia, in a multi-million pound move to Melbourne last year. GO Make or Break? Channel 5, 10.00pm A new reality series, stripped across the week, in which eight troubled couples test the strength of their relationships at a Mexican holiday resort, where alongside counselling and therapy sessions, they have to swap partners every two days. GO Doctor Dolittle (1967) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 5.05pm  This is not the Eddie Murphy comedy version from 1998 but the charming Sixties musical directed by Richard Fleischer. Rex Harrison stars as the terse, eponymous doctor who has the uncanny ability to speak to animals and so embarks on a voyage to find an elusive pink sea snail and a giant lunar moth. Samantha Egger, 20 years Harrison’s junior, co-stars as the adventurous stowaway who falls in love with the doctor.  Storks (2016) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 6.20pm  Warner Animation Group’s first film since 2014’s The Lego Movie is spectacularly daft but manages to be both moving and very fun. Here the storks of the title have moved on from delivering babies to big business and now transport products for an Amazon-style website. But then the old baby-making machine, gathering dust in the corner, is accidentally reactivated and suddenly they have a baby to get home.  American History X (1998) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm  Tony Kaye directs this compellingly violent and brutal examination of white supremacism in America. Edward Norton is both mesmerising and terrifying as Derek, a student drawn into the Neo-Nazi movement who mercilessly kills two black youths. After a stint in prison he’s reformed but returns  home to find his younger brother Danny (Edward Furlong) on the same track he was. Tuesday 8 August Jodie Whittaker and Emun Elliott Credit: BBC Trust Me BBC One, 9.00pm Before she becomes the Doctor in Doctor Who, Jodie Whittaker stars in a drama about… pretending to be a doctor. No doubt there will soon be many jokes about that floating around. In this new four-part drama, written by real-life doctor Dan Sefton, Whittaker stars as Cath, a downtrodden ward sister who is fired when she takes her concerns about the conditions in her Sheffield hospital to the trust. Then, when at the leaving party for her best friend Alison – who’s about to begin a new life in New Zealand – she spots Alison’s CV and medical degree certificate in a bin.  So Cath decides to adopt Alison’s identity and, hoping that her nursing skills will be enough to get by, find a job as a doctor far away in Edinburgh. Though the premise may sound a little daft, it’s actually surprisingly – and worryingly – common. Sefton uses his hospital know-how to bring a sense of authenticity to what is a really quite gripping drama.  Whittaker, rather than channelling a cocky Leonardo DiCaprio in Catch Me if You Can, is every inch the terrified woman flying by the seat of her pants. Excellent, too, is Emun Elliot as the colleague who catches her eye. Catherine Gee EastEnders BBC One, 7.30pm Mick’s (Danny Dyer) dastardly behaviour comes to a head in this special three-hander episode. He decides to tell wife Linda (Kellie Bright) the truth about what he’s been up to while she was away: namely cheating on her with their daughter-in-law Whitney (Shona McGarty).    Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm It’s the second nightly visit to this admirable project, which seeks to rehouse all the animals  in a Newcastle shelter in just a week. While we meet the wide range of animals and see how many still remain, Dom Joly also learns what happens to micropigs when they grow up.     The Dog Rescuers with Alan Davies Channel 5, 8.00pm Among the five unlucky pups needing some loving care from the team this week are an abandoned staffie who’s given a second chance and a young spaniel with a nasty neck wound.     Get a House for Free Channel 4, 9.00pm Marco Robinson is a very rich man – £25 million rich, in fact. He made his fortune through a business and property empire and now he wants to give back. So he’s decided to give away a three-bed flat in Preston to the person who he thinks will benefit the most. This film follows him as he attempts to sift through 8,000 applications. CG Utopia: In Search of the Dream BBC Four, 9.00pm It’s 500 years since the term “utopia” was coined by Sir Thomas More in 1516. In this documentary, art historian Professor Richard Clay examines five centuries of the concept of utopia and the impact it has had on our way of thinking. Often used as a method of criticism of the current system, it is a powerful vision. Clay considers some of our “greatest utopian dreamers”, including Jonathan Swift, author of Gulliver’s Travels, and Gene Roddenberry, creator of Star Trek, and the common themes that run through the ideal.     The Yorkshire Dales and the Lakes More4, 9.00pm The cosy documentary series continues with a farmer finding an unusual method to keep track of his sheep: day-glo paint. Elsewhere in the Dales, we follow the Dent Brewery boys as they create their own craft ales and in the Lake District we see Jon Bennett make his daily ascent to the summit of Helvellyn. CG The Parent Trap (1961) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am   In a film that helped pioneer the split-screen technique, Hayley Mills plays both Susan Evers and Sharon McKendrick, twins unaware of each other’s existence and separated as babies following their parents’ divorce. When they meet, years later, at summer camp, the pair scheme to reunite their parents. This classic Disney comedy spawned three sequels and a 1998 remake starring a young Lindsay Lohan. Tootsie (1982) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.30pm  When actor Michael Dorsey transforms himself into Dorothy Michaels in a desperate attempt to get work, complications arise as he falls for a female friend (Jessica Lange) and her father (Charles Durning)  falls for him. Although you never quite believe that Dustin Hoffman in drag would convince everyone that he’s a woman, it doesn’t matter: Tootsie is lots of fun – and it’s a sharply observed social satire, too. Groundhog Day (1993) ★★★★☆ Sky1, 9.00pm  In this wonderful comedy drama, a surly, sardonic weatherman (Bill Murray) is sent to the small US town of Punxsutawney to cover the annual groundhog festival, but finds himself experiencing precisely the same events over and over – then realises that he can free himself from the loop only by being a nicer person. One criticism: as always, Murray is so much more likeable as the malevolent grouch… Wednesday 9 August My Family, Partition and Me: India 1947 - Anita Rani  Credit: BBC My Family, Partition and Me: India 1947 BBC One, 9.00pm Two years ago, Anita Rani learnt how her family history was forever marked by the 1947 Partition of India in a memorable episode of Who Do You Think You Are? Now, she has wrangled three members of the public – one Hindu, one Christian and one Muslim – to explore how their own lives, and those of their ancestors, were affected by the appalling and widespread outbreaks of religious violence in the wake of Britain’s messy, compromised withdrawal, and the troubled legacy left by the Empire. In addition to eyewitness testimonies, the descendants of the survivors travel back to India, Pakistan and Bangladesh to retrace the journeys their relatives were forced to make. Their discoveries are in equal parts shocking, distressing and uplifting, and its treatment is rightly sensitive for events still in living memory: tears flow freely, yet it’s never sentimental. If there isn’t much space to dig into the wider political situation, the complex reasons behind the violence and longer-term implications, the detail of the personal recollections and anecdotes tells its own powerful tale. Rani returns to her own ancestral story in next week’s concluding part. Gabriel Tate Super Small Animals BBC One, 8.00pm Biologist Patrick Aryee demonstrates that size isn’t everything in the natural world, observing the extraordinary feats of strength, endurance and ingenuity of everything from hummingbirds  and seahorses to beetles and armadillos. Love Your Garden ITV, 8.00pm Alan Titchmarsh and his team turn an uninspiring patch of lumpy lawn and uneven paving into a sensory garden for a four-year-old girl with a very rare degenerative eye disease. Long Lost Family ITV, 9.00pm This episode of the always engaging and emotionally gruelling series reuniting long-estranged relatives charts the story of a woman who gave up her son only to adopt two boys herself, and a man whose mother put him up for adoption through an advert in the local press. My Big Gay Jewish Conversion BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.20pm First shown on BBC Three, this smart and sobering documentary follows Simon Atkins – who is Catholic and gay – as he looks at convert to Judaism, a religion that would allow him to marry his boyfriend, Matthew. Atkin’s journey is both spiritual and literal, as he travels to relatively tolerant Tel Aviv and more conservative Jerusalem, hoping to reconcile his sexuality with his religious beliefs. GT The South Bank Show Sky Arts, 8.00pm Singer-songwriter Benjamin Clementine, who won the Mercury Prize in 2015, talks to Melvyn Bragg about his early years on the streets and being hailed perhaps the brightest musical talent of his generation. In Search of Arcadia BBC Four, 9.00pm This contemplative documentary sees Dr Janina Ramirez and John Bailey explore the roots of the Arcadian cultural revolutionaries that sprang up along the Thames in the 17th and 18th centuries. Citizen Jane: Battle for the City BBC Four, 10.00pm When she saw the controversial development projects proposed by Robert Moses in Sixties New York, Jane Jacobs decided to take him on. Matt Tyrnauer’s punchy documentary pulls together an inspiring tale out of unlikely material – the debate of community culture versus “slum clearance”, one which continues to this day in cities across the world. GT Bridge to Terabithia (2007) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.10pm  Talented child stars AnnaSophia Robb and Josh Hutcherson (who went on to star in The Hunger Games) play two young misfits who become friends and create a magical world of the imagination in a remote part of the forest. This quality Disney production, adapted from Katherine Paterson’s classic novel, ventures into unexpectedly dark territory and packs an emotional punch that will have you reaching for your hankie. Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief (2015) ★★★★☆ Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Based on a book by the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Lawrence Wright, director Alex Gibney’s documentary about the Church of Scientology is a gripping, painstakingly researched exposé of one of the world’s most enigmatic organisations. At its core are a series of chilling allegations by former Scientology members, who describe a culture of abuse. The Lost Boys (1987) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 9.00pm Teen flick meets horror in this Eighties hit about two boys (Jason Patric and Corey Haim) who move to a quiet, northern California town where they become involved with a group of bloodthirsty vampires. These days it has to compete with the likes of Twilight and The Vampire Diaries, but there’s still enough action, intrigue, danger and romance to keep you hooked. Kiefer Sutherland and Corey Feldman also star. Thursday 10 July Princess Diana with Raine, Comtesse De Chambrun  Credit: Channel 4 Princess Diana’s “Wicked” Stepmother Channel 4, 9.00pm A gossipy, full-throttle and altogether naughty documentary about Diana, Princess of Wales’s stepmother Raine, Countess Spencer, who died last October. The daughter of romantic novelist Barbara Cartland, Raine was a prodigious social climber described here as “a famous socialite, a feisty politician and all-round force of nature” (“Nobody gets to be a countess three times by accident,” says one contributor). It seems like an accurate fit.  Named “Debutante of the Year” in 1947, Raine went on to bag a future Earl for a husband at the age of 18, became the youngest member of Westminster City Council at 23, before going on to become a noted conservation campaigner. The main focus here, though, is how she went on to marry a second Earl, John Spencer, in circumstances that earned her the entrenched enmity of his children, prime among them being his then 15-year-old daughter, Lady Diana. Yet when Diana’s own marriage ran into trouble it was Raine, so it’s claimed, that she turned to for support; the once “sworn enemy was transformed into her closest confidante”. The contributors include Downton Abbey writer Julian Fellowes and royal biographer Penny Junor. Gerard O’Donovan Natwest T20 Blast Cricket: Hampshire v Glamorgan Sky Sports Cricket, 6.00pm All the action from the Ageas Bowl for this South Division match. The home side are one of the most successful in the history of domestic T20 cricket, having won the competition twice and appeared in another four Finals Days. 10 Puppies and Us BBC Two, 8.00pm Here are more tales of new dog owners and their pups. This week, a mother seeks a canine companion for her son who has Down’s syndrome; the conflict between rival Chihuahuas Rocky and Chloe deepens; and a newlywed couple call in the behaviourist when a pug objects to their connubial bliss.  James Martin’s French Adventure ITV, 8.30pm Chef James Martin heads to the hilly Jura region, where a pear orchard proves to be the source of the perfect chutney for barbecued duck, and a visit to the citadel at Fort des Rousses shows why dungeons make the best cheese cellars. Top of the Lake: China Girl BBC Two, 9.00pm In the wake of last week’s shock revelation, Jane Campion’s off-kilter crime drama continues, with troubled detective Robin Griffin (Elisabeth Moss) pointing the China Girl investigation in a new direction, that of a surrogacy deal gone wrong. Meanwhile, Robin must face demons from her past when her former police chief Al Parker (David Wenham) arrives from New Zealand. Inside London Fire Brigade ITV, 9.00pm As the documentary series concludes, retiring crew manager Al passes the baton on to 25-year-old rookie Joe, who faces a tough test fighting his first big fire. GO A Premier League of Their Own Sky1, 9.00pm Ahead of next weekend’s opening matches in the Premier League, James Corden and pals begin the new season of the panel show with a special edition. Guests Thierry Henry, Jeff Stelling and Kelly Cates will be celebrating all things football alongside the show’s regulars Freddie Flintoff, Jack Whitehall and Jamie Redknapp. Plus McFly’s Danny Jones, singer Kate Nash and R&B star Lemar will be stepping up to the spot for Popstar Penalties. Laurel and Hardy: Their Lives and Magic Sky Arts, 9.00pm Fans of Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy will enjoy this superb assemblage of clips and out-takes. This enthralling documentary follows the life and work of the world’s most beloved comedy duo, and includes rare footage of Laurel in his later years, as well as an even rarer interview with his daughter, Lois. There’s also a tribute to the unusually strong friendship that the two stars enjoyed throughout their working lives. GO Dr Seuss’ The Lorax (2012) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 2.55pm This animated adaptation of Dr Seuss’s quirky story follows a boy (voiced by Zac Efron) who goes in search of a tree to impress a nature-loving girl (Taylor Swift). But he stumbles on the Once-ler (Ed Helms), the man responsible for harvesting all the world’s plant life. Children will enjoy it, even if the film does sacrifice a measure of its literary magic to the god of cinematic entertainment. Wild (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm  The Pacific Crest Trail, which runs up the entire western spine of the United States, is a challenge of fabled arduousness and rugged beauty. In 1995, aged 26, Cheryl Strayed (played by a superb Reese Witherspoon) walked it, to get clearance in her head after a decade of loss and personal meltdown. Wild powerfully reveals Strayed’s terrors and pleasures as she forges ahead on the journey. Wilde (1996) ★★★☆☆ BBC Four, 10.00pm  Many feel that Stephen Fry was born to play the part of the tragic and devastatingly brilliant Oscar Wilde. He’s terrific, but is only one of several superb players in a film which is held together by its performances. There’s Tom Wilkinson as the odious bully Queensberry and Jude Law on wonderfully petulant form as Bosie, the cause of Wilde’s downfall. Wilde’s story The Selfish Giant is woven throughout the film. Friday 11 August The Royal Albert Hall Credit: BBC BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 8.00pm Swapping tuxes for cowboy hats, the Proms continues tonight with a staging of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s beloved 1943 musical Oklahoma!  Expect plenty of whip-cracking, thigh-slapping, wild-west antics at the Royal Albert Hall, as conductor John Wilson and his orchestra add their signature élan to this story of a love affair between dashing cowboy Curly McLain (Nathaniel Hackmann) and farmer’s daughter Laurey Williams (Scarlett Strallen). Playing Jud Fy, the brooding, bestial social misfit with designs on Laurey himself, meanwhile, is David Seadon-Young. Elsewhere, Belinda Lang stars as the clucking Aunt Eller, and comedian Marcus Brigstocke is Ali Hakim, the Persian huckster battling with the cowboy Will Parker (Robert Fairchild) for the affections of fickle Ado Annie (Lizzy Connolly). The dance routines are balletic and fast, the hits frequent: the jaunty Surrey With the Fringe on Top, the romantic People Will Say We’re in Love, the lovely I Cain’t Say No, and, of course, the unmistakable opening song, Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin’. Rachel Kavanaugh, who directed an acclaimed touring production of Oklahoma! in 2015, is at the helm again here. Patrick Smith Premier League Football: Arsenal v Leicester City Sky Sports Premier League/Sky Sports Main Event, 7.00pm After three months of bluster and big-spending in the transfer market, the Premier League returns – and for the first time, the season gets under way on a Friday. All eyes tonight will be on Arsenal’s Alexandre Lacazette, the French striker who joined the Gunners for a club record fee of £52 million. Can he be the man to fire Arsenal back into the top four? Leicester City, meanwhile, will be keen to bounce back from a disappointing season that saw Claudio Ranieri sacked as manager despite having won them the league nine months previously. When these sides last met, at the end of April, a late own goal from Robert Huth handed Arsenal a 1-0 victory. Teach My Pet to Do That ITV, 8.00pm Arriving in the dog days of summer, this fluffy new series is presented by Alexander Amstrong, who asks such questions as: can a cat be trained to ride a labrador? Helping him teach tricks to the pets – among them, a dachshund labrador cross called Eric and a miniature horse called Aslan – are animal trainers Nando Brown and Jo-Rosie Haffenden.  Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm Throughout this week Steve Jones, Kate Quilton and Supervet Noel Fitzpatrick have been trying to find permanent homes for every animal in the Newcastle Dog and Cat Shelter. Tonight, they make one final push.  Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm Green fingers at the ready as Monty Don advises on how to cut and maintain hedges, while Adam Frost reveals the secrets of successful planting combinations. The Street ITV3, 9.00pm Previously shown in 2009, Jimmy McGovern’s gloom-ridden series comprised six stand-alone episodes focusing on the lives of the inhabitants of a single street in Liverpool. In this instalment, Anna Friel, recently seen in McGovern’s latest drama Broken, plays a single mother trying to hold down two jobs, pay the mortgage and get her two sons into a better school. Starring opposite her is Daniel Mays – with whom she also appeared in Tony Marchant’s similarly bleak drama Public Enemies – as the plumber whom she begins dating. What unfolds is expertly crafted and at times gut-wrenching to watch.  The Agony & the Ecstasy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This entertainingly nostalgic four-part series looks at how the UK’s rave scene exploded in the Eighties, fuelled by the party drug ecstasy. With the help of DJs such as Goldie, Paul Oakenfold and Annie Mac, it also explores how the genre evolved over the next three decades. Reach for the lasers. PS Eden: Paradise Lost Channel 4, 10.00pm The off-grid experiment – in which 23 people were stranded on the west coast of Scotland to fend for themselves – arrived on Channel 4 a year ago amid great fanfare but ended up being an unmitigated flop, with only 10 participants making it through to the end. In tonight’s finale, the action takes us from Christmas Day through to March, when those who remained were finally released. PS Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm  This first of a potentially limitless spin-off series of “Star Wars Stories” follows rebel live-wire Jyn Erso (Felicity Jones), who leads a band of self-styled “spies, saboteurs and assassins” on a death-or-glory mission to steal the Death Star plans from an Imperial stronghold, via some genuinely breathtaking planetary vistas and earth-ripping set-pieces.  The Firm (1993) ★★★☆☆ W, 9.00pm  Sydney Pollack directed this accomplished yet curiously uninvolving adaptation of John Grisham’s legal potboiler. Tom Cruise plays Mitch McDeere, an ambitious young lawyer who takes a well-paid job at a Memphis law firm that sounds too good to be true. And it is: the firm launders money for the Mob. Can Mitch escape with his morals and marriage intact? Gene Hackman co-stars as Cruise’s father figure. Strictly Ballroom (1992) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 11.05pm  Paul Mercurio plays a rebellious ballroom dancer who breaks all the rules and paso dobles his way to victory in this crowd-pleasing Australian comedy. Baz Luhrmann’s writing and directing debut is just as brash as Moulin Rouge! but a lot less pleased with itself. There’s romance between our hero and his ugly duckling partner, and it’s set against an enjoyable parade of sequin-decked caricatures and high camp. Watch here on TVPlayer Television previewers Catherine Gee, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: Emma Willis on Who Do You Think You Are? plus Top of the Lake: China Girl

Thursday 3 August Who Do You Think You Are? BBC One, 9.00pm This week’s edition of the genealogy show initially threatens to be one of those pleasant enough hours with no real surprises. Our subject is TV presenter Emma Willis, a proud Birmingham girl and the product of a close-knit, working-class background who explains that she has come from “a kind family” and hopes previous generations will turn out to have been similar.  Initially it seems as though those dreams will come true with an interesting but hardly ground-breaking trawl through generations of hard-working Brummie grafters who lurched from prosperity to the workhouse and back again, but appear to have stuck together through good times and bad. “When I look at that picture I think of Peaky Blinders,” Willis says early on about a family snapshot, but the reality is less criminal and more enterprise. Things take a more interesting, and altogether darker turn, however, once she heads across the sea to Ireland for a tale of violence, abuse of power and ultimately love, which uncovers a true working-class hero in the process. “We all want to have a nice story, right?” notes the likeable Willis. Her pleasure when she finally finds one is infectious. SC 10 Puppies and Us BBC Two, 8.00pm Imagine refusing to do anything unless you’re fed sausages. It’s not a bad way to go about life and certainly one that stubborn golden retriever Lola adopts. Canine behaviourist Louise Glazebrook is on hand to give advice to her struggling new owners.  RW  James Martin’s French Adventure ITV, 8.30pm The likeable chef heads to the lakeside town of Annecy, nicknamed the Pearl of the French Alps, where he selects ingredients from the local market to create a lobster dish. He also meets award-winning pastry chef Philippe Rigollot to sample his desserts. RW Top of the Lake: China Girl BBC Two, 9.00pm This second series of Jane Campion’s mystery drama is shaping up to be better than the first as it homes in on the central story without any wild distractions. Nicole Kidman, too, is chilling as an adoptive mother Julia. Tonight, an autopsy reveals that murdered victim China Girl was a sex worker, sending Detective Robin Griffin (Elisabeth Moss) and sidekick Miranda (Gwendoline Christie) in a new direction. RW Prejudice and Pride: The People’s History of LGBTQ Britain BBC Four, 9.00pm Comedians Susan Calman and Stephen K Amos present the second of two documentaries in which people share the objects that have defined their lives since homosexuality was partially decriminalised in 1967. There’s a pair of Ugg boots, and a racy school book, but for Shaun Duggan, the Brookside writer who gave us the first pre-watershed lesbian kiss on British television, it’s a letter from Morrissey. RW Insecure Sky Atlantic, 10.35pm This smart portrait of the life and friendships of twentysomething black women in LA is based on the internet series The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl by US comedian Issa Rae. Her writing is crisp and insightful and her performance, as the well-meaning member of an outreach programme for inner-city schools, is excellent. Tonight the series returns for a second run and Issa is trying to piece herself together post break-up. RW Kicked Out: From Care to Chaos BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm Rebecca Southworth explores why so many children lead troubled lives after leaving care. RW The Way Way Back (2013) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.00pm  This coming-of-age story feels like familiar terrain, but it’s agreeably done. Duncan (Liam James) learns about life, love and self-esteem from a gang of water-park employees, including the excellent Sam Rockwell, when forced to go on holiday with his mother (Toni Collette) and her boyfriend (Steve Carrell). The script flows and there’s enough melancholy and edge to the overall comic tone for its charm to prevail. The Island (2005) ★★☆☆☆ 5STAR, 9.00pm  Michael Bay’s sci-fi flop humbled Steven Spielberg’s DreamWorks. Not only was the original script scrapped, the film only just recouped the $ 126 million it cost to make, though it’s still a stylish offering. It stars Ewan McGregor as a human clone who lives in a controlled facility and dreams of going to “The Island”, the last uncontaminated place on Earth. Scarlett Johansson and Sean Bean buoy up the cast. Cliffhanger (1993) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 11.45pm  Living up to its title, Cliffhanger is a rollicking rollercoaster of a film. It stars Sylvester Stallone as a hotshot mountain climber, who becomes embroiled in a heist, along with Janine Turner. Set in the Rocky Mountains and featuring some stupendous stunts, it may be big-budget nonsense – but it’s entertaining big-budget nonsense with zesty lines and exhilarating cinematography. Renny Harlin directs.   Friday 4 August Sun-soaked: the biggest resort on the Costa del Sol  The Secret Life of the Holiday Resort Channel 4, 8.00pm Spain hosted 10 million British holidaymakers in 2016, two million more than in the previous year. With the package holiday one of the main beneficiaries of this apparent rekindling of Anglo-Spanish love in the wake of Brexit, Katherine Patrick’s documentary travels to Holidayworld, the biggest all-inclusive resort on the Costa del Sol, where three-quarters of the 3,000 guests are from the UK. There, we meet three four-person families seeking brief respite from the gruelling jobs that generally keep them apart, and some of the 500 heroic staff. The Secret Life of the Holiday Resort is rather harmless, unenlightening stuff, propped up by an exhausting procession of vague statistics and meaningless survey results (“a third of parents say the most frequent rows abroad are between them and their kids”, that sort of thing) reeled off by narrator Blake Harrison (of The Inbetweeners). All the expected boxes are ticked – techniques for bagging sunbeds, the artery-clogging buffets, the pros and cons of families spending a week in such proximity – but it’s good-natured throughout, even during the inevitable and perfunctory drift into Brexit chat. The very essence of silly season programming. GT Icarus Netflix, from today In what is a coup for Netflix, this award-winning documentary from Bryan Fogel began as a Supersize Me-style experiment into the effects of doping. But after Fogel connected with renegade scientist Dr Grigory Rodchenkov, it became a lid-lifting investigation into a widespread Russian scandal that seemingly goes as high as Putin. GT Cleverman BBC Three, from 10.00am Series two of the fun, if labyrinthine, dystopian drama from Australia will be made available today in its entirety. Wearing X-Men’s influence on its sleeve, it follows the leader of the “Hairies”, superpowered people trying to live alongside humans that persecute and subjugate them. GT BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 8.00pm The music of Ella Fitzgerald and Dizzy Gillespie is celebrated in the centenary year of their births, with musicians, including singer Diane Reeves, performing with the BBC Concert Orchestra. GT The Secret World of Posh Pets ITV, 8.00pm; not UTV/STV/Wales This final part finds 21-year-old Rory roping in his father to expand his niche business of exporting jellyfish, while there’s evidence that horse-grooming has reached genuinely berserk levels, with unicorn horns and nail polish the latest must-haves for those benighted equine attractions at children’s parties. GT Only Connect BBC Two, 8.30pm Viking experts take on geocachers (participants in a GPS-driven treasure hunt), with one (relatively straightforward) challenge involving finding the link between exhibit, salt and pepper, outcast and roots manoeuvre. GT Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm Irises, pelargonium cuttings, growing plants inside and managing a shaded, sloping town garden are among the challenges facing Monty Don and his team in tonight’s edition of the hardy perennial. GT Autopsy: Kurt Cobain Channel 5, 10.05pm Forensic pathologist Dr Jason Payne-James turns his attention to the alleged suicide of Kurt Cobain. Alleged, because certain conspiracy theorists assert that he had too much heroin in his system to be able to have inflicted the gunshot wound to his head. Probably best not to expect any definitive results here, however. GT This Is 40 (2012) ★★★☆☆ E4, 9.00pm  Judd Apatow revisits two characters from his 2007 hit Knocked Up. Leslie Mann, Apatow’s wife, and Paul Rudd play a stressed-out Los Angeles couple whose 40th birthdays bookend the film. Apatow and Mann’s real-life daughters also play their children. It’s a perceptive comedy on middle-age and one that guarantees big laughs alongside some of Apatow’s most pertinent observations on love. The Green Mile (1999) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm  Tom Hanks stars in this Oscar-nominated adaptation of Stephen King’s entrancingly strange novel. Stolid prison guard Paul Edgecomb (Hanks) is shaken by the arrival of a convict (Michael Clarke Duncan) who has supernatural powers. Although a little lightweight compared with director Frank Darabont’s previous prison film, The Shawshank Redemption, it’s pleasingly creepy. The Help (2011) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm  Emma Stone sparkles among the fine female cast in this enjoyable adaptation of Kathryn Stockett’s bestselling 2009 novel. She stars as a budding journalist working in Sixties Jackson, Mississippi, who convinces two black maids (Viola Davis and the Oscar-winning Octavia Spencer) to work secretly with her on a book and reveal the hardships inflicted on them. Bryce Dallas Howard is a delightfully hissable villain. Saturday 5 August Billy Connolly in front of John Byrne's portrait in mural form in Glasgow's Osborne Street Credit: BBC Billy Connolly: Portrait of a Lifetime BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 10.30pm “Glasgow belongs to me,” says Billy Connolly of his hometown in this heart-warming documentary to mark the comedian’s 75th birthday in November. And he’s not wrong as three imposing 50ft tribute portraits have recently been unveiled on wallends in the city. They were created by Scottish artists John Byrne, Jack Vettriano and Rachel MacLean, and this accompanying film not only gives a neat history of the area, but serves as a celebration of the Big Yin’s career.  Interspersed with clips of his stand-up routines, including his cheeky first appearance on Parkinson in 1975 when he told the bum joke that turned him into a star, the programme see Connolly sit quietly for the artists – not one of his strong points as he admits: “I’ve been very patient. I think I’m due an episode.” Watching them at work in their studios is inspiring and Connolly is taken aback by the results. “It’s like looking into a mirror. You know my soul,” he says to Byrne, who used to design album covers for Connolly’s band The Humblebums. “I’m amazed at the effect these have had on me, they’ve stunned me.” From tomorrow, the original portraits will be hung in the People’s Palace. Rachel Ward Athletics: World Championships BBC Two, 9.30am & BBC One, 6.30pm Day two at the London Stadium in Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park sees Usain Bolt – in all likeliness – going for gold in the men’s 100 m final (9.45pm) as he makes his final individual appearance at a major championships. His main threats are expected to come from former champions Justin Gatlin and Yohan Blake, as well as emerging star Christian Coleman. Earlier in the day, British medal hope Katarina Johnson-Thompson gets her heptathlon bid under way with the 100 m hurdles at 10.05am. Sadly not in action today is Greg Rutherford, who, because of an ankle injury, won’t be competing in the men’s long jump final (8.05pm).  Little Big Shots USA ITV, 5.00pm Steve Harvey showcases more talented youngsters while mocking his own stupidity in this family friendly show exec-produced by Ellen DeGeneres. Tonight, there’s a maths genius and a Motown singer. Royal Cousins at War BBC Two, 7.30pm; NI, 8.00pm A welcome repeat for this riveting analysis of the relationship between Kaiser Bill, Tsar Nicholas II of Russia and our own King George V, and the disastrous effect that their rivalry had on the First World War.  Paul O’Grady’s Hollywood Channel 4, 8.00pm This new series sees Paul O’Grady delve into cinematic history to find out what it takes to make a masterpiece. He begins with “weepies”, where the host’s caustic wit serves as the perfect antidote as talking heads, including Sigourney Weaver and Celine Dion, reach for the tissues as they relate films such as Brief Encounter, Titanic and, quite possibly the saddest in movie history, The Champ.    Dad’s Army BBC Two, 8.30pm; not NI This is a gem of an episode loaded with slapstick fun from 1970. It’s the one where Corporal Jones (Clive Dunn) dresses as a tree trunk during an exercise pitting Mainwaring (Arthur Lowe) and his crew against their pompous arch-rival Captain Square. RW The L.A. Riots: 25 Years Later History, 9.00pm Twenty-five years after Los Angeles erupted into one of the most destructive civil disturbances in US history (11,000 people were arrested and an estimated 63 people were killed), this documentary looks back at the decades of racial injustice that led to the incident and the history of police relations with LA’s black community. Citizens, council members and even those who committed crimes talk about how South Central was beset by mass riots, looting, and fires.  Cambridge Folk Festival 2017 Sky Arts, 9.00pm Broadcaster Mark Radcliffe and musician Julie Fowlis present highlights from this year’s festival, an event that attracts 10,000 visitors. These include Jon Boden, formerly of Bellowhead, performing new material with his band The Remnant Kings. There’s also music from Jake Bugg, electric punk stars Oysterband and Lisa Hannigan, once as a member of Damien Rice’s band. RW The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies (2014) ★★☆☆☆ ITV, 8.00pm  The battle of the title was barely mentioned by JRR Tolkein in The Hobbit, but it was seemingly enough for Peter Jackson to pad out his franchise even further. Picking up where the last film left off, our heroes had just unleashed the wrath of dragon Smaug (Benedict Cumberbatch). But there’s another battle looming, one between themselves which is fuelled by greed. Red (2010) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm  A starry line-up of actors of pensionable age is the attraction of this light-hearted adaptation of Warren Ellis’s graphic novel, and it’s hard to resist Helen Mirren with a submachine gun. RED stands for “Retired Extremely Dangerous”, which is what the CIA has labelled former agents Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich and Mirren, who team up to find out who has marked them for assassination, and why. I Know What You Did Last Summer (1997) ★★☆☆☆ BBC One, 11.55pm  This routine slasher flick, written by Kevin Williamson of Scream fame, will certainly make you jump but it’s unlikely to give you many sleepless nights. When a carful of American teenagers hits and kills a man, they panic and dump the body. Months later, the inevitable slaughter begins. A hapless cast, featuring Sarah Michelle Gellar, brings unintentional levity to proceedings. Sunday 6 August Diana, Princess of Wales Credit: Rex Diana: In Her Own Words Channel 4, 8.00pm Much controversy has surrounded this documentary, which broadcasts – for the first time in the UK – video footage recorded in 1992 and 1993 by Diana, Princess of Wales’s voice coach, Peter Settelen. Hired to help Diana reframe her public image and put forward her own side of the story regarding her marriage, Settelen saw his work bear fruit in his client’s Panorama interview. Now there is undoubted interest in watching Diana recount key events in her life unmediated, with candour and a seductive mix of charm and steel. “He chatted me up like a bad rash,” she recalls of her future husband at one point; at another, she remembers being “completely thrown” by the Prince of Wales’s peculiar response to a question about them being in love. In truth, director Kevin Sim rather crams the at-times uncomfortably intimate footage into the first and final thirds of the documentary, leaving assorted friends and confidants to tell the rest of the very familiar story, and the melodrama is laid on a little thick at times. Exploitative? Perhaps. Fascinating? In patches, although it probably won’t entirely satisfy either those looking for genuinely fresh insights or an opportunity to be outraged. Gabriel Tate Community Shield Football: Arsenal v Chelsea BT Sport 1, 1.00pm Arsenal and Chelsea meet for the second time in as many weeks, with Antonio Conte’s Blues favourites to lift the Community Shield today having won 3-0 in Beijing thanks to a brace from Michy Batshuayi.  Women’s Football: Euro 2017 Channel 4, 3.00pm After a thrilling tournament – during which a record 3.3 million people tuned in to watch England’s Lionesses beat France 1-0 – we’re at the FC Twente Stadion in Enschede, Holland, as the successors to Germany are crowned.   LSO Sky Arts, 6.00pm Originally, and rather impishly, hinting at a “greatest hits” of Haydn, Simon Rattle and his Imaginary Orchestral Journey instead took movements from 11 of the Austrian composer’s works, many of them rarely performed, and realigned them joyfully and perceptively in this concert with the London Symphony Orchestra. Works from Bartók and an extract from Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde provide the hors d’oeuvre for this enticing programme.   BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 7.00pm One of the most anticipated events of every Prom season, the National Youth Orchestra of Great Britain brings its energy and drive to the Royal Albert Hall. First comes the London premiere of Francisco Coll’s “grotesque symphony” Mural and Thomas Adès conducting his own work, Polaris, for the first time in the capital. The climax comes courtesy of Igor Stravinsky and his agelessly thrilling Rite of Spring. It is introduced by Suzy Klein and Lloyd Coleman. GT Secrets of Silicon Valley BBC Two, 8.00pm Blogger Jamie Bartlett investigates whether technological progress should be made at any cost. On the one side, he meets those tackling climate change; on the other, those paying the price for the success of Uber and, somewhere in the middle, the pioneers of self-driving cars.    Poldark BBC One, 9.00pm Having barrelled along entertainingly, with the undercurrent of hardscrabble misery intact, this third series concludes with sightings of French sails spotted on the horizon and Cornwall put on high alert. Meanwhile, Cap’n Ross (Aidan Turner) contends with a broadside from George Warleggan  (Jack Farthing).   The Last Days of Patrick Swayze Channel 5, 10.00pm Given the fact that he died from pancreatic cancer aged 57, we can reasonably surmise that the Dirty Dancing star’s final hours were not wholly pleasant. So, what can forensic pathologist Jason Payne-James, perusing Swayze’s medical records, add to the story?   Gareth Thomas: Hate in the Beautiful Game BBC Two, 10.30pm; not NI Former Welsh rugby union captain Gareth Thomas, who came out in 2009 while still playing, asks why football has shamefully remained a bastion of open homophobia – perhaps the last in sport. GT Frozen (2013) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 1.40pm  Disney’s 53rd feature is an enchanting combination of fairytale derring-do and heart-popping musical numbers that has left children and adults powerless to its charms (even if some parents may have grown rather tired of it). Elsa (Idina Menzel) is a shy princess driven into exile when her magical powers are discovered. Her sister Anna (Kristen Bell) gallops off to fetch her from her beautiful ice palace. The King’s Speech (2010) ★★★★★ Channel 4, 9.50pm  Tom Hooper’s film about the future George VI’s struggle to overcome his stammer in the nation’s hour of need won multiple Academy Awards, including a deserved Best Actor gong for Colin Firth. But it’s his double-act with Geoffrey Rush as his speech therapist Lionel Logue that gives the film its heart, and the doublehanders between them are fraught and fascinating. Point Break (1991) ★★★☆☆ Channel 5, 11.05pm Kathryn Bigelow’s cult surfing/crime film elevated Patrick Swayze’s actor status to true action hero. Keanu Reeves plays Johnny Utah, an FBI agent who goes undercover to infiltrate the Ex-Presidents, a gang of bankrobbing surfers led by the charismatic Bodhi (Swayze). The action heats up when Bodhi and Utah find they share a similar attitude towards danger. Lori Petty is the surfer who catches Johnny’s eye. Monday 7 August Eden: Paradise Lost - the participants Credit: Channel 4 Eden: Paradise Lost Channel 4, 10.00pm In March 2016, 23 idealists set out to take part in Channel 4’s Eden experiment, which, a touch grandiosely, sought to establish “a new society” from scratch, cut off from the modern world on a remote Scottish peninsula for an entire year. “What if we could start again?” was the much-hyped tag line. And the answer was… well, we never got to find out the answer because the series was pulled last summer, after just four episodes, when viewing figures took a dive from 1.7 million to less than 800,000.  Not that Channel 4 or production company Keo Films thought to tell the participants that. Instead they were left to get on with it. Rumours swirled of Lord of the Flies levels of acrimony, mass defections, starvation, health problems, people eating chicken feed to survive. So it could make for absorbing viewing in this five-part update, which airs every night this week. Although probably the greatest fascination will be in seeing the reactions of the 10 participants who suffered through to the end as they emerged from the nightmare in March this year only to discover that their efforts have mostly been in vain – and that the political landscape has drastically altered while they were gone. Gerard O’Donovan Stacey Dooley Investigates: Divide and National Pride in Northern Ireland  BBC Three, from 10.00am The intrepid reporter discovers that bitter political divisions persist in Northern Ireland as she seeks to discover more about Prime Minister Theresa May’s new allies in the Democratic Unionist Party. The Bug Grub Couple BBC One, 7.30pm Bug burger or beef burger? That’s the choice at the Grub restaurant in Pembrokeshire, part of entomologist Dr Sarah Beynon and chef Andy Holcroft’s Bug Farm – an insect zoo, research centre and insect eaterie. Here they struggle to convince us why we all should learn to love eating insect protein.   Masters Tennis: The Rogers Cup Sky Sports Main Event, 7.00pm The Uniprix Stadium in Montreal is the setting, as the Rogers Cup gets under way. Novak Djokovic lifted the trophy in 2016 for the fourth time, defeating Kei Nishikori in the final. The Serbian misses out this time around, though, due to injury.  Tornado: The 100mph Steam Engine BBC Four, 8.00pm If phrases like “it’s a Peppercorn class A1 Pacific” get you all steamed up you’ll be in heaven with this account of how a bunch of engineering enthusiasts got the massive locomotive they took 18 years to build from scratch to take on the ultimate test: hitting 100 miles per hour, a speed no British steam train has achieved since 1967.    Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm This new, live, animal rescue show with Steve Jones, Kate Quilton and Noel Fitzpatrick attempts to rehome a whole shelter’s worth of dogs, cats and assorted other species. Among the celebs espousing the joy of pets in this opener is pop singer Leona Lewis. Continues until Friday.   Man in an Orange Shirt BBC Two, 9.00pm In part two of novelist Patrick Gale’s drama for the Gay Britannia season, more than half a century on, Flora (Vanessa Redgrave) gives her late husband’s cottage to their grandson Adam (Julian Morris), who finds himself drawn to his architect, Steve (David Gyasi).   Inside Heston’s World Good Food, 9.00pm This four-part series chronicles chef Heston Blumenthal’s attempt to bring a flavour of his Fat Duck restaurant to Australia, in a multi-million pound move to Melbourne last year. GO Make or Break? Channel 5, 10.00pm A new reality series, stripped across the week, in which eight troubled couples test the strength of their relationships at a Mexican holiday resort, where alongside counselling and therapy sessions, they have to swap partners every two days. GO Doctor Dolittle (1967) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 5.05pm  This is not the Eddie Murphy comedy version from 1998 but the charming Sixties musical directed by Richard Fleischer. Rex Harrison stars as the terse, eponymous doctor who has the uncanny ability to speak to animals and so embarks on a voyage to find an elusive pink sea snail and a giant lunar moth. Samantha Egger, 20 years Harrison’s junior, co-stars as the adventurous stowaway who falls in love with the doctor.  Storks (2016) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 6.20pm  Warner Animation Group’s first film since 2014’s The Lego Movie is spectacularly daft but manages to be both moving and very fun. Here the storks of the title have moved on from delivering babies to big business and now transport products for an Amazon-style website. But then the old baby-making machine, gathering dust in the corner, is accidentally reactivated and suddenly they have a baby to get home.  American History X (1998) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm  Tony Kaye directs this compellingly violent and brutal examination of white supremacism in America. Edward Norton is both mesmerising and terrifying as Derek, a student drawn into the Neo-Nazi movement who mercilessly kills two black youths. After a stint in prison he’s reformed but returns  home to find his younger brother Danny (Edward Furlong) on the same track he was. Tuesday 8 August Jodie Whittaker and Emun Elliott Credit: BBC Trust Me BBC One, 9.00pm Before she becomes the Doctor in Doctor Who, Jodie Whittaker stars in a drama about… pretending to be a doctor. No doubt there will soon be many jokes about that floating around. In this new four-part drama, written by real-life doctor Dan Sefton, Whittaker stars as Cath, a downtrodden ward sister who is fired when she takes her concerns about the conditions in her Sheffield hospital to the trust. Then, when at the leaving party for her best friend Alison – who’s about to begin a new life in New Zealand – she spots Alison’s CV and medical degree certificate in a bin.  So Cath decides to adopt Alison’s identity and, hoping that her nursing skills will be enough to get by, find a job as a doctor far away in Edinburgh. Though the premise may sound a little daft, it’s actually surprisingly – and worryingly – common. Sefton uses his hospital know-how to bring a sense of authenticity to what is a really quite gripping drama.  Whittaker, rather than channelling a cocky Leonardo DiCaprio in Catch Me if You Can, is every inch the terrified woman flying by the seat of her pants. Excellent, too, is Emun Elliot as the colleague who catches her eye. Catherine Gee EastEnders BBC One, 7.30pm Mick’s (Danny Dyer) dastardly behaviour comes to a head in this special three-hander episode. He decides to tell wife Linda (Kellie Bright) the truth about what he’s been up to while she was away: namely cheating on her with their daughter-in-law Whitney (Shona McGarty).    Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm It’s the second nightly visit to this admirable project, which seeks to rehouse all the animals  in a Newcastle shelter in just a week. While we meet the wide range of animals and see how many still remain, Dom Joly also learns what happens to micropigs when they grow up.     The Dog Rescuers with Alan Davies Channel 5, 8.00pm Among the five unlucky pups needing some loving care from the team this week are an abandoned staffie who’s given a second chance and a young spaniel with a nasty neck wound.     Get a House for Free Channel 4, 9.00pm Marco Robinson is a very rich man – £25 million rich, in fact. He made his fortune through a business and property empire and now he wants to give back. So he’s decided to give away a three-bed flat in Preston to the person who he thinks will benefit the most. This film follows him as he attempts to sift through 8,000 applications. CG Utopia: In Search of the Dream BBC Four, 9.00pm It’s 500 years since the term “utopia” was coined by Sir Thomas More in 1516. In this documentary, art historian Professor Richard Clay examines five centuries of the concept of utopia and the impact it has had on our way of thinking. Often used as a method of criticism of the current system, it is a powerful vision. Clay considers some of our “greatest utopian dreamers”, including Jonathan Swift, author of Gulliver’s Travels, and Gene Roddenberry, creator of Star Trek, and the common themes that run through the ideal.     The Yorkshire Dales and the Lakes More4, 9.00pm The cosy documentary series continues with a farmer finding an unusual method to keep track of his sheep: day-glo paint. Elsewhere in the Dales, we follow the Dent Brewery boys as they create their own craft ales and in the Lake District we see Jon Bennett make his daily ascent to the summit of Helvellyn. CG The Parent Trap (1961) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am   In a film that helped pioneer the split-screen technique, Hayley Mills plays both Susan Evers and Sharon McKendrick, twins unaware of each other’s existence and separated as babies following their parents’ divorce. When they meet, years later, at summer camp, the pair scheme to reunite their parents. This classic Disney comedy spawned three sequels and a 1998 remake starring a young Lindsay Lohan. Tootsie (1982) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.30pm  When actor Michael Dorsey transforms himself into Dorothy Michaels in a desperate attempt to get work, complications arise as he falls for a female friend (Jessica Lange) and her father (Charles Durning)  falls for him. Although you never quite believe that Dustin Hoffman in drag would convince everyone that he’s a woman, it doesn’t matter: Tootsie is lots of fun – and it’s a sharply observed social satire, too. Groundhog Day (1993) ★★★★☆ Sky1, 9.00pm  In this wonderful comedy drama, a surly, sardonic weatherman (Bill Murray) is sent to the small US town of Punxsutawney to cover the annual groundhog festival, but finds himself experiencing precisely the same events over and over – then realises that he can free himself from the loop only by being a nicer person. One criticism: as always, Murray is so much more likeable as the malevolent grouch… Wednesday 9 August My Family, Partition and Me: India 1947 - Anita Rani  Credit: BBC My Family, Partition and Me: India 1947 BBC One, 9.00pm Two years ago, Anita Rani learnt how her family history was forever marked by the 1947 Partition of India in a memorable episode of Who Do You Think You Are? Now, she has wrangled three members of the public – one Hindu, one Christian and one Muslim – to explore how their own lives, and those of their ancestors, were affected by the appalling and widespread outbreaks of religious violence in the wake of Britain’s messy, compromised withdrawal, and the troubled legacy left by the Empire. In addition to eyewitness testimonies, the descendants of the survivors travel back to India, Pakistan and Bangladesh to retrace the journeys their relatives were forced to make. Their discoveries are in equal parts shocking, distressing and uplifting, and its treatment is rightly sensitive for events still in living memory: tears flow freely, yet it’s never sentimental. If there isn’t much space to dig into the wider political situation, the complex reasons behind the violence and longer-term implications, the detail of the personal recollections and anecdotes tells its own powerful tale. Rani returns to her own ancestral story in next week’s concluding part. Gabriel Tate Super Small Animals BBC One, 8.00pm Biologist Patrick Aryee demonstrates that size isn’t everything in the natural world, observing the extraordinary feats of strength, endurance and ingenuity of everything from hummingbirds  and seahorses to beetles and armadillos. Love Your Garden ITV, 8.00pm Alan Titchmarsh and his team turn an uninspiring patch of lumpy lawn and uneven paving into a sensory garden for a four-year-old girl with a very rare degenerative eye disease. Long Lost Family ITV, 9.00pm This episode of the always engaging and emotionally gruelling series reuniting long-estranged relatives charts the story of a woman who gave up her son only to adopt two boys herself, and a man whose mother put him up for adoption through an advert in the local press. My Big Gay Jewish Conversion BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.20pm First shown on BBC Three, this smart and sobering documentary follows Simon Atkins – who is Catholic and gay – as he looks at convert to Judaism, a religion that would allow him to marry his boyfriend, Matthew. Atkin’s journey is both spiritual and literal, as he travels to relatively tolerant Tel Aviv and more conservative Jerusalem, hoping to reconcile his sexuality with his religious beliefs. GT The South Bank Show Sky Arts, 8.00pm Singer-songwriter Benjamin Clementine, who won the Mercury Prize in 2015, talks to Melvyn Bragg about his early years on the streets and being hailed perhaps the brightest musical talent of his generation. In Search of Arcadia BBC Four, 9.00pm This contemplative documentary sees Dr Janina Ramirez and John Bailey explore the roots of the Arcadian cultural revolutionaries that sprang up along the Thames in the 17th and 18th centuries. Citizen Jane: Battle for the City BBC Four, 10.00pm When she saw the controversial development projects proposed by Robert Moses in Sixties New York, Jane Jacobs decided to take him on. Matt Tyrnauer’s punchy documentary pulls together an inspiring tale out of unlikely material – the debate of community culture versus “slum clearance”, one which continues to this day in cities across the world. GT Bridge to Terabithia (2007) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.10pm  Talented child stars AnnaSophia Robb and Josh Hutcherson (who went on to star in The Hunger Games) play two young misfits who become friends and create a magical world of the imagination in a remote part of the forest. This quality Disney production, adapted from Katherine Paterson’s classic novel, ventures into unexpectedly dark territory and packs an emotional punch that will have you reaching for your hankie. Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief (2015) ★★★★☆ Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Based on a book by the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Lawrence Wright, director Alex Gibney’s documentary about the Church of Scientology is a gripping, painstakingly researched exposé of one of the world’s most enigmatic organisations. At its core are a series of chilling allegations by former Scientology members, who describe a culture of abuse. The Lost Boys (1987) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 9.00pm Teen flick meets horror in this Eighties hit about two boys (Jason Patric and Corey Haim) who move to a quiet, northern California town where they become involved with a group of bloodthirsty vampires. These days it has to compete with the likes of Twilight and The Vampire Diaries, but there’s still enough action, intrigue, danger and romance to keep you hooked. Kiefer Sutherland and Corey Feldman also star. Thursday 10 July Princess Diana with Raine, Comtesse De Chambrun  Credit: Channel 4 Princess Diana’s “Wicked” Stepmother Channel 4, 9.00pm A gossipy, full-throttle and altogether naughty documentary about Diana, Princess of Wales’s stepmother Raine, Countess Spencer, who died last October. The daughter of romantic novelist Barbara Cartland, Raine was a prodigious social climber described here as “a famous socialite, a feisty politician and all-round force of nature” (“Nobody gets to be a countess three times by accident,” says one contributor). It seems like an accurate fit.  Named “Debutante of the Year” in 1947, Raine went on to bag a future Earl for a husband at the age of 18, became the youngest member of Westminster City Council at 23, before going on to become a noted conservation campaigner. The main focus here, though, is how she went on to marry a second Earl, John Spencer, in circumstances that earned her the entrenched enmity of his children, prime among them being his then 15-year-old daughter, Lady Diana. Yet when Diana’s own marriage ran into trouble it was Raine, so it’s claimed, that she turned to for support; the once “sworn enemy was transformed into her closest confidante”. The contributors include Downton Abbey writer Julian Fellowes and royal biographer Penny Junor. Gerard O’Donovan Natwest T20 Blast Cricket: Hampshire v Glamorgan Sky Sports Cricket, 6.00pm All the action from the Ageas Bowl for this South Division match. The home side are one of the most successful in the history of domestic T20 cricket, having won the competition twice and appeared in another four Finals Days. 10 Puppies and Us BBC Two, 8.00pm Here are more tales of new dog owners and their pups. This week, a mother seeks a canine companion for her son who has Down’s syndrome; the conflict between rival Chihuahuas Rocky and Chloe deepens; and a newlywed couple call in the behaviourist when a pug objects to their connubial bliss.  James Martin’s French Adventure ITV, 8.30pm Chef James Martin heads to the hilly Jura region, where a pear orchard proves to be the source of the perfect chutney for barbecued duck, and a visit to the citadel at Fort des Rousses shows why dungeons make the best cheese cellars. Top of the Lake: China Girl BBC Two, 9.00pm In the wake of last week’s shock revelation, Jane Campion’s off-kilter crime drama continues, with troubled detective Robin Griffin (Elisabeth Moss) pointing the China Girl investigation in a new direction, that of a surrogacy deal gone wrong. Meanwhile, Robin must face demons from her past when her former police chief Al Parker (David Wenham) arrives from New Zealand. Inside London Fire Brigade ITV, 9.00pm As the documentary series concludes, retiring crew manager Al passes the baton on to 25-year-old rookie Joe, who faces a tough test fighting his first big fire. GO A Premier League of Their Own Sky1, 9.00pm Ahead of next weekend’s opening matches in the Premier League, James Corden and pals begin the new season of the panel show with a special edition. Guests Thierry Henry, Jeff Stelling and Kelly Cates will be celebrating all things football alongside the show’s regulars Freddie Flintoff, Jack Whitehall and Jamie Redknapp. Plus McFly’s Danny Jones, singer Kate Nash and R&B star Lemar will be stepping up to the spot for Popstar Penalties. Laurel and Hardy: Their Lives and Magic Sky Arts, 9.00pm Fans of Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy will enjoy this superb assemblage of clips and out-takes. This enthralling documentary follows the life and work of the world’s most beloved comedy duo, and includes rare footage of Laurel in his later years, as well as an even rarer interview with his daughter, Lois. There’s also a tribute to the unusually strong friendship that the two stars enjoyed throughout their working lives. GO Dr Seuss’ The Lorax (2012) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 2.55pm This animated adaptation of Dr Seuss’s quirky story follows a boy (voiced by Zac Efron) who goes in search of a tree to impress a nature-loving girl (Taylor Swift). But he stumbles on the Once-ler (Ed Helms), the man responsible for harvesting all the world’s plant life. Children will enjoy it, even if the film does sacrifice a measure of its literary magic to the god of cinematic entertainment. Wild (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm  The Pacific Crest Trail, which runs up the entire western spine of the United States, is a challenge of fabled arduousness and rugged beauty. In 1995, aged 26, Cheryl Strayed (played by a superb Reese Witherspoon) walked it, to get clearance in her head after a decade of loss and personal meltdown. Wild powerfully reveals Strayed’s terrors and pleasures as she forges ahead on the journey. Wilde (1996) ★★★☆☆ BBC Four, 10.00pm  Many feel that Stephen Fry was born to play the part of the tragic and devastatingly brilliant Oscar Wilde. He’s terrific, but is only one of several superb players in a film which is held together by its performances. There’s Tom Wilkinson as the odious bully Queensberry and Jude Law on wonderfully petulant form as Bosie, the cause of Wilde’s downfall. Wilde’s story The Selfish Giant is woven throughout the film. Friday 11 August The Royal Albert Hall Credit: BBC BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 8.00pm Swapping tuxes for cowboy hats, the Proms continues tonight with a staging of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s beloved 1943 musical Oklahoma!  Expect plenty of whip-cracking, thigh-slapping, wild-west antics at the Royal Albert Hall, as conductor John Wilson and his orchestra add their signature élan to this story of a love affair between dashing cowboy Curly McLain (Nathaniel Hackmann) and farmer’s daughter Laurey Williams (Scarlett Strallen). Playing Jud Fy, the brooding, bestial social misfit with designs on Laurey himself, meanwhile, is David Seadon-Young. Elsewhere, Belinda Lang stars as the clucking Aunt Eller, and comedian Marcus Brigstocke is Ali Hakim, the Persian huckster battling with the cowboy Will Parker (Robert Fairchild) for the affections of fickle Ado Annie (Lizzy Connolly). The dance routines are balletic and fast, the hits frequent: the jaunty Surrey With the Fringe on Top, the romantic People Will Say We’re in Love, the lovely I Cain’t Say No, and, of course, the unmistakable opening song, Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin’. Rachel Kavanaugh, who directed an acclaimed touring production of Oklahoma! in 2015, is at the helm again here. Patrick Smith Premier League Football: Arsenal v Leicester City Sky Sports Premier League/Sky Sports Main Event, 7.00pm After three months of bluster and big-spending in the transfer market, the Premier League returns – and for the first time, the season gets under way on a Friday. All eyes tonight will be on Arsenal’s Alexandre Lacazette, the French striker who joined the Gunners for a club record fee of £52 million. Can he be the man to fire Arsenal back into the top four? Leicester City, meanwhile, will be keen to bounce back from a disappointing season that saw Claudio Ranieri sacked as manager despite having won them the league nine months previously. When these sides last met, at the end of April, a late own goal from Robert Huth handed Arsenal a 1-0 victory. Teach My Pet to Do That ITV, 8.00pm Arriving in the dog days of summer, this fluffy new series is presented by Alexander Amstrong, who asks such questions as: can a cat be trained to ride a labrador? Helping him teach tricks to the pets – among them, a dachshund labrador cross called Eric and a miniature horse called Aslan – are animal trainers Nando Brown and Jo-Rosie Haffenden.  Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm Throughout this week Steve Jones, Kate Quilton and Supervet Noel Fitzpatrick have been trying to find permanent homes for every animal in the Newcastle Dog and Cat Shelter. Tonight, they make one final push.  Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm Green fingers at the ready as Monty Don advises on how to cut and maintain hedges, while Adam Frost reveals the secrets of successful planting combinations. The Street ITV3, 9.00pm Previously shown in 2009, Jimmy McGovern’s gloom-ridden series comprised six stand-alone episodes focusing on the lives of the inhabitants of a single street in Liverpool. In this instalment, Anna Friel, recently seen in McGovern’s latest drama Broken, plays a single mother trying to hold down two jobs, pay the mortgage and get her two sons into a better school. Starring opposite her is Daniel Mays – with whom she also appeared in Tony Marchant’s similarly bleak drama Public Enemies – as the plumber whom she begins dating. What unfolds is expertly crafted and at times gut-wrenching to watch.  The Agony & the Ecstasy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This entertainingly nostalgic four-part series looks at how the UK’s rave scene exploded in the Eighties, fuelled by the party drug ecstasy. With the help of DJs such as Goldie, Paul Oakenfold and Annie Mac, it also explores how the genre evolved over the next three decades. Reach for the lasers. PS Eden: Paradise Lost Channel 4, 10.00pm The off-grid experiment – in which 23 people were stranded on the west coast of Scotland to fend for themselves – arrived on Channel 4 a year ago amid great fanfare but ended up being an unmitigated flop, with only 10 participants making it through to the end. In tonight’s finale, the action takes us from Christmas Day through to March, when those who remained were finally released. PS Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm  This first of a potentially limitless spin-off series of “Star Wars Stories” follows rebel live-wire Jyn Erso (Felicity Jones), who leads a band of self-styled “spies, saboteurs and assassins” on a death-or-glory mission to steal the Death Star plans from an Imperial stronghold, via some genuinely breathtaking planetary vistas and earth-ripping set-pieces.  The Firm (1993) ★★★☆☆ W, 9.00pm  Sydney Pollack directed this accomplished yet curiously uninvolving adaptation of John Grisham’s legal potboiler. Tom Cruise plays Mitch McDeere, an ambitious young lawyer who takes a well-paid job at a Memphis law firm that sounds too good to be true. And it is: the firm launders money for the Mob. Can Mitch escape with his morals and marriage intact? Gene Hackman co-stars as Cruise’s father figure. Strictly Ballroom (1992) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 11.05pm  Paul Mercurio plays a rebellious ballroom dancer who breaks all the rules and paso dobles his way to victory in this crowd-pleasing Australian comedy. Baz Luhrmann’s writing and directing debut is just as brash as Moulin Rouge! but a lot less pleased with itself. There’s romance between our hero and his ugly duckling partner, and it’s set against an enjoyable parade of sequin-decked caricatures and high camp. Watch here on TVPlayer Television previewers Catherine Gee, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: Emma Willis on Who Do You Think You Are? plus Top of the Lake: China Girl

Thursday 3 August Who Do You Think You Are? BBC One, 9.00pm This week’s edition of the genealogy show initially threatens to be one of those pleasant enough hours with no real surprises. Our subject is TV presenter Emma Willis, a proud Birmingham girl and the product of a close-knit, working-class background who explains that she has come from “a kind family” and hopes previous generations will turn out to have been similar.  Initially it seems as though those dreams will come true with an interesting but hardly ground-breaking trawl through generations of hard-working Brummie grafters who lurched from prosperity to the workhouse and back again, but appear to have stuck together through good times and bad. “When I look at that picture I think of Peaky Blinders,” Willis says early on about a family snapshot, but the reality is less criminal and more enterprise. Things take a more interesting, and altogether darker turn, however, once she heads across the sea to Ireland for a tale of violence, abuse of power and ultimately love, which uncovers a true working-class hero in the process. “We all want to have a nice story, right?” notes the likeable Willis. Her pleasure when she finally finds one is infectious. SC 10 Puppies and Us BBC Two, 8.00pm Imagine refusing to do anything unless you’re fed sausages. It’s not a bad way to go about life and certainly one that stubborn golden retriever Lola adopts. Canine behaviourist Louise Glazebrook is on hand to give advice to her struggling new owners.  RW  James Martin’s French Adventure ITV, 8.30pm The likeable chef heads to the lakeside town of Annecy, nicknamed the Pearl of the French Alps, where he selects ingredients from the local market to create a lobster dish. He also meets award-winning pastry chef Philippe Rigollot to sample his desserts. RW Top of the Lake: China Girl BBC Two, 9.00pm This second series of Jane Campion’s mystery drama is shaping up to be better than the first as it homes in on the central story without any wild distractions. Nicole Kidman, too, is chilling as an adoptive mother Julia. Tonight, an autopsy reveals that murdered victim China Girl was a sex worker, sending Detective Robin Griffin (Elisabeth Moss) and sidekick Miranda (Gwendoline Christie) in a new direction. RW Prejudice and Pride: The People’s History of LGBTQ Britain BBC Four, 9.00pm Comedians Susan Calman and Stephen K Amos present the second of two documentaries in which people share the objects that have defined their lives since homosexuality was partially decriminalised in 1967. There’s a pair of Ugg boots, and a racy school book, but for Shaun Duggan, the Brookside writer who gave us the first pre-watershed lesbian kiss on British television, it’s a letter from Morrissey. RW Insecure Sky Atlantic, 10.35pm This smart portrait of the life and friendships of twentysomething black women in LA is based on the internet series The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl by US comedian Issa Rae. Her writing is crisp and insightful and her performance, as the well-meaning member of an outreach programme for inner-city schools, is excellent. Tonight the series returns for a second run and Issa is trying to piece herself together post break-up. RW Kicked Out: From Care to Chaos BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm Rebecca Southworth explores why so many children lead troubled lives after leaving care. RW The Way Way Back (2013) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.00pm  This coming-of-age story feels like familiar terrain, but it’s agreeably done. Duncan (Liam James) learns about life, love and self-esteem from a gang of water-park employees, including the excellent Sam Rockwell, when forced to go on holiday with his mother (Toni Collette) and her boyfriend (Steve Carrell). The script flows and there’s enough melancholy and edge to the overall comic tone for its charm to prevail. The Island (2005) ★★☆☆☆ 5STAR, 9.00pm  Michael Bay’s sci-fi flop humbled Steven Spielberg’s DreamWorks. Not only was the original script scrapped, the film only just recouped the $ 126 million it cost to make, though it’s still a stylish offering. It stars Ewan McGregor as a human clone who lives in a controlled facility and dreams of going to “The Island”, the last uncontaminated place on Earth. Scarlett Johansson and Sean Bean buoy up the cast. Cliffhanger (1993) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 11.45pm  Living up to its title, Cliffhanger is a rollicking rollercoaster of a film. It stars Sylvester Stallone as a hotshot mountain climber, who becomes embroiled in a heist, along with Janine Turner. Set in the Rocky Mountains and featuring some stupendous stunts, it may be big-budget nonsense – but it’s entertaining big-budget nonsense with zesty lines and exhilarating cinematography. Renny Harlin directs.   Friday 4 August Sun-soaked: the biggest resort on the Costa del Sol  The Secret Life of the Holiday Resort Channel 4, 8.00pm Spain hosted 10 million British holidaymakers in 2016, two million more than in the previous year. With the package holiday one of the main beneficiaries of this apparent rekindling of Anglo-Spanish love in the wake of Brexit, Katherine Patrick’s documentary travels to Holidayworld, the biggest all-inclusive resort on the Costa del Sol, where three-quarters of the 3,000 guests are from the UK. There, we meet three four-person families seeking brief respite from the gruelling jobs that generally keep them apart, and some of the 500 heroic staff. The Secret Life of the Holiday Resort is rather harmless, unenlightening stuff, propped up by an exhausting procession of vague statistics and meaningless survey results (“a third of parents say the most frequent rows abroad are between them and their kids”, that sort of thing) reeled off by narrator Blake Harrison (of The Inbetweeners). All the expected boxes are ticked – techniques for bagging sunbeds, the artery-clogging buffets, the pros and cons of families spending a week in such proximity – but it’s good-natured throughout, even during the inevitable and perfunctory drift into Brexit chat. The very essence of silly season programming. GT Icarus Netflix, from today In what is a coup for Netflix, this award-winning documentary from Bryan Fogel began as a Supersize Me-style experiment into the effects of doping. But after Fogel connected with renegade scientist Dr Grigory Rodchenkov, it became a lid-lifting investigation into a widespread Russian scandal that seemingly goes as high as Putin. GT Cleverman BBC Three, from 10.00am Series two of the fun, if labyrinthine, dystopian drama from Australia will be made available today in its entirety. Wearing X-Men’s influence on its sleeve, it follows the leader of the “Hairies”, superpowered people trying to live alongside humans that persecute and subjugate them. GT BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 8.00pm The music of Ella Fitzgerald and Dizzy Gillespie is celebrated in the centenary year of their births, with musicians, including singer Diane Reeves, performing with the BBC Concert Orchestra. GT The Secret World of Posh Pets ITV, 8.00pm; not UTV/STV/Wales This final part finds 21-year-old Rory roping in his father to expand his niche business of exporting jellyfish, while there’s evidence that horse-grooming has reached genuinely berserk levels, with unicorn horns and nail polish the latest must-haves for those benighted equine attractions at children’s parties. GT Only Connect BBC Two, 8.30pm Viking experts take on geocachers (participants in a GPS-driven treasure hunt), with one (relatively straightforward) challenge involving finding the link between exhibit, salt and pepper, outcast and roots manoeuvre. GT Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm Irises, pelargonium cuttings, growing plants inside and managing a shaded, sloping town garden are among the challenges facing Monty Don and his team in tonight’s edition of the hardy perennial. GT Autopsy: Kurt Cobain Channel 5, 10.05pm Forensic pathologist Dr Jason Payne-James turns his attention to the alleged suicide of Kurt Cobain. Alleged, because certain conspiracy theorists assert that he had too much heroin in his system to be able to have inflicted the gunshot wound to his head. Probably best not to expect any definitive results here, however. GT This Is 40 (2012) ★★★☆☆ E4, 9.00pm  Judd Apatow revisits two characters from his 2007 hit Knocked Up. Leslie Mann, Apatow’s wife, and Paul Rudd play a stressed-out Los Angeles couple whose 40th birthdays bookend the film. Apatow and Mann’s real-life daughters also play their children. It’s a perceptive comedy on middle-age and one that guarantees big laughs alongside some of Apatow’s most pertinent observations on love. The Green Mile (1999) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm  Tom Hanks stars in this Oscar-nominated adaptation of Stephen King’s entrancingly strange novel. Stolid prison guard Paul Edgecomb (Hanks) is shaken by the arrival of a convict (Michael Clarke Duncan) who has supernatural powers. Although a little lightweight compared with director Frank Darabont’s previous prison film, The Shawshank Redemption, it’s pleasingly creepy. The Help (2011) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm  Emma Stone sparkles among the fine female cast in this enjoyable adaptation of Kathryn Stockett’s bestselling 2009 novel. She stars as a budding journalist working in Sixties Jackson, Mississippi, who convinces two black maids (Viola Davis and the Oscar-winning Octavia Spencer) to work secretly with her on a book and reveal the hardships inflicted on them. Bryce Dallas Howard is a delightfully hissable villain. Saturday 5 August Billy Connolly in front of John Byrne's portrait in mural form in Glasgow's Osborne Street Credit: BBC Billy Connolly: Portrait of a Lifetime BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 10.30pm “Glasgow belongs to me,” says Billy Connolly of his hometown in this heart-warming documentary to mark the comedian’s 75th birthday in November. And he’s not wrong as three imposing 50ft tribute portraits have recently been unveiled on wallends in the city. They were created by Scottish artists John Byrne, Jack Vettriano and Rachel MacLean, and this accompanying film not only gives a neat history of the area, but serves as a celebration of the Big Yin’s career.  Interspersed with clips of his stand-up routines, including his cheeky first appearance on Parkinson in 1975 when he told the bum joke that turned him into a star, the programme see Connolly sit quietly for the artists – not one of his strong points as he admits: “I’ve been very patient. I think I’m due an episode.” Watching them at work in their studios is inspiring and Connolly is taken aback by the results. “It’s like looking into a mirror. You know my soul,” he says to Byrne, who used to design album covers for Connolly’s band The Humblebums. “I’m amazed at the effect these have had on me, they’ve stunned me.” From tomorrow, the original portraits will be hung in the People’s Palace. Rachel Ward Athletics: World Championships BBC Two, 9.30am & BBC One, 6.30pm Day two at the London Stadium in Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park sees Usain Bolt – in all likeliness – going for gold in the men’s 100 m final (9.45pm) as he makes his final individual appearance at a major championships. His main threats are expected to come from former champions Justin Gatlin and Yohan Blake, as well as emerging star Christian Coleman. Earlier in the day, British medal hope Katarina Johnson-Thompson gets her heptathlon bid under way with the 100 m hurdles at 10.05am. Sadly not in action today is Greg Rutherford, who, because of an ankle injury, won’t be competing in the men’s long jump final (8.05pm).  Little Big Shots USA ITV, 5.00pm Steve Harvey showcases more talented youngsters while mocking his own stupidity in this family friendly show exec-produced by Ellen DeGeneres. Tonight, there’s a maths genius and a Motown singer. Royal Cousins at War BBC Two, 7.30pm; NI, 8.00pm A welcome repeat for this riveting analysis of the relationship between Kaiser Bill, Tsar Nicholas II of Russia and our own King George V, and the disastrous effect that their rivalry had on the First World War.  Paul O’Grady’s Hollywood Channel 4, 8.00pm This new series sees Paul O’Grady delve into cinematic history to find out what it takes to make a masterpiece. He begins with “weepies”, where the host’s caustic wit serves as the perfect antidote as talking heads, including Sigourney Weaver and Celine Dion, reach for the tissues as they relate films such as Brief Encounter, Titanic and, quite possibly the saddest in movie history, The Champ.    Dad’s Army BBC Two, 8.30pm; not NI This is a gem of an episode loaded with slapstick fun from 1970. It’s the one where Corporal Jones (Clive Dunn) dresses as a tree trunk during an exercise pitting Mainwaring (Arthur Lowe) and his crew against their pompous arch-rival Captain Square. RW The L.A. Riots: 25 Years Later History, 9.00pm Twenty-five years after Los Angeles erupted into one of the most destructive civil disturbances in US history (11,000 people were arrested and an estimated 63 people were killed), this documentary looks back at the decades of racial injustice that led to the incident and the history of police relations with LA’s black community. Citizens, council members and even those who committed crimes talk about how South Central was beset by mass riots, looting, and fires.  Cambridge Folk Festival 2017 Sky Arts, 9.00pm Broadcaster Mark Radcliffe and musician Julie Fowlis present highlights from this year’s festival, an event that attracts 10,000 visitors. These include Jon Boden, formerly of Bellowhead, performing new material with his band The Remnant Kings. There’s also music from Jake Bugg, electric punk stars Oysterband and Lisa Hannigan, once as a member of Damien Rice’s band. RW The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies (2014) ★★☆☆☆ ITV, 8.00pm  The battle of the title was barely mentioned by JRR Tolkein in The Hobbit, but it was seemingly enough for Peter Jackson to pad out his franchise even further. Picking up where the last film left off, our heroes had just unleashed the wrath of dragon Smaug (Benedict Cumberbatch). But there’s another battle looming, one between themselves which is fuelled by greed. Red (2010) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm  A starry line-up of actors of pensionable age is the attraction of this light-hearted adaptation of Warren Ellis’s graphic novel, and it’s hard to resist Helen Mirren with a submachine gun. RED stands for “Retired Extremely Dangerous”, which is what the CIA has labelled former agents Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich and Mirren, who team up to find out who has marked them for assassination, and why. I Know What You Did Last Summer (1997) ★★☆☆☆ BBC One, 11.55pm  This routine slasher flick, written by Kevin Williamson of Scream fame, will certainly make you jump but it’s unlikely to give you many sleepless nights. When a carful of American teenagers hits and kills a man, they panic and dump the body. Months later, the inevitable slaughter begins. A hapless cast, featuring Sarah Michelle Gellar, brings unintentional levity to proceedings. Sunday 6 August Diana, Princess of Wales Credit: Rex Diana: In Her Own Words Channel 4, 8.00pm Much controversy has surrounded this documentary, which broadcasts – for the first time in the UK – video footage recorded in 1992 and 1993 by Diana, Princess of Wales’s voice coach, Peter Settelen. Hired to help Diana reframe her public image and put forward her own side of the story regarding her marriage, Settelen saw his work bear fruit in his client’s Panorama interview. Now there is undoubted interest in watching Diana recount key events in her life unmediated, with candour and a seductive mix of charm and steel. “He chatted me up like a bad rash,” she recalls of her future husband at one point; at another, she remembers being “completely thrown” by the Prince of Wales’s peculiar response to a question about them being in love. In truth, director Kevin Sim rather crams the at-times uncomfortably intimate footage into the first and final thirds of the documentary, leaving assorted friends and confidants to tell the rest of the very familiar story, and the melodrama is laid on a little thick at times. Exploitative? Perhaps. Fascinating? In patches, although it probably won’t entirely satisfy either those looking for genuinely fresh insights or an opportunity to be outraged. Gabriel Tate Community Shield Football: Arsenal v Chelsea BT Sport 1, 1.00pm Arsenal and Chelsea meet for the second time in as many weeks, with Antonio Conte’s Blues favourites to lift the Community Shield today having won 3-0 in Beijing thanks to a brace from Michy Batshuayi.  Women’s Football: Euro 2017 Channel 4, 3.00pm After a thrilling tournament – during which a record 3.3 million people tuned in to watch England’s Lionesses beat France 1-0 – we’re at the FC Twente Stadion in Enschede, Holland, as the successors to Germany are crowned.   LSO Sky Arts, 6.00pm Originally, and rather impishly, hinting at a “greatest hits” of Haydn, Simon Rattle and his Imaginary Orchestral Journey instead took movements from 11 of the Austrian composer’s works, many of them rarely performed, and realigned them joyfully and perceptively in this concert with the London Symphony Orchestra. Works from Bartók and an extract from Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde provide the hors d’oeuvre for this enticing programme.   BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 7.00pm One of the most anticipated events of every Prom season, the National Youth Orchestra of Great Britain brings its energy and drive to the Royal Albert Hall. First comes the London premiere of Francisco Coll’s “grotesque symphony” Mural and Thomas Adès conducting his own work, Polaris, for the first time in the capital. The climax comes courtesy of Igor Stravinsky and his agelessly thrilling Rite of Spring. It is introduced by Suzy Klein and Lloyd Coleman. GT Secrets of Silicon Valley BBC Two, 8.00pm Blogger Jamie Bartlett investigates whether technological progress should be made at any cost. On the one side, he meets those tackling climate change; on the other, those paying the price for the success of Uber and, somewhere in the middle, the pioneers of self-driving cars.    Poldark BBC One, 9.00pm Having barrelled along entertainingly, with the undercurrent of hardscrabble misery intact, this third series concludes with sightings of French sails spotted on the horizon and Cornwall put on high alert. Meanwhile, Cap’n Ross (Aidan Turner) contends with a broadside from George Warleggan  (Jack Farthing).   The Last Days of Patrick Swayze Channel 5, 10.00pm Given the fact that he died from pancreatic cancer aged 57, we can reasonably surmise that the Dirty Dancing star’s final hours were not wholly pleasant. So, what can forensic pathologist Jason Payne-James, perusing Swayze’s medical records, add to the story?   Gareth Thomas: Hate in the Beautiful Game BBC Two, 10.30pm; not NI Former Welsh rugby union captain Gareth Thomas, who came out in 2009 while still playing, asks why football has shamefully remained a bastion of open homophobia – perhaps the last in sport. GT Frozen (2013) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 1.40pm  Disney’s 53rd feature is an enchanting combination of fairytale derring-do and heart-popping musical numbers that has left children and adults powerless to its charms (even if some parents may have grown rather tired of it). Elsa (Idina Menzel) is a shy princess driven into exile when her magical powers are discovered. Her sister Anna (Kristen Bell) gallops off to fetch her from her beautiful ice palace. The King’s Speech (2010) ★★★★★ Channel 4, 9.50pm  Tom Hooper’s film about the future George VI’s struggle to overcome his stammer in the nation’s hour of need won multiple Academy Awards, including a deserved Best Actor gong for Colin Firth. But it’s his double-act with Geoffrey Rush as his speech therapist Lionel Logue that gives the film its heart, and the doublehanders between them are fraught and fascinating. Point Break (1991) ★★★☆☆ Channel 5, 11.05pm Kathryn Bigelow’s cult surfing/crime film elevated Patrick Swayze’s actor status to true action hero. Keanu Reeves plays Johnny Utah, an FBI agent who goes undercover to infiltrate the Ex-Presidents, a gang of bankrobbing surfers led by the charismatic Bodhi (Swayze). The action heats up when Bodhi and Utah find they share a similar attitude towards danger. Lori Petty is the surfer who catches Johnny’s eye. Monday 7 August Eden: Paradise Lost - the participants Credit: Channel 4 Eden: Paradise Lost Channel 4, 10.00pm In March 2016, 23 idealists set out to take part in Channel 4’s Eden experiment, which, a touch grandiosely, sought to establish “a new society” from scratch, cut off from the modern world on a remote Scottish peninsula for an entire year. “What if we could start again?” was the much-hyped tag line. And the answer was… well, we never got to find out the answer because the series was pulled last summer, after just four episodes, when viewing figures took a dive from 1.7 million to less than 800,000.  Not that Channel 4 or production company Keo Films thought to tell the participants that. Instead they were left to get on with it. Rumours swirled of Lord of the Flies levels of acrimony, mass defections, starvation, health problems, people eating chicken feed to survive. So it could make for absorbing viewing in this five-part update, which airs every night this week. Although probably the greatest fascination will be in seeing the reactions of the 10 participants who suffered through to the end as they emerged from the nightmare in March this year only to discover that their efforts have mostly been in vain – and that the political landscape has drastically altered while they were gone. Gerard O’Donovan Stacey Dooley Investigates: Divide and National Pride in Northern Ireland  BBC Three, from 10.00am The intrepid reporter discovers that bitter political divisions persist in Northern Ireland as she seeks to discover more about Prime Minister Theresa May’s new allies in the Democratic Unionist Party. The Bug Grub Couple BBC One, 7.30pm Bug burger or beef burger? That’s the choice at the Grub restaurant in Pembrokeshire, part of entomologist Dr Sarah Beynon and chef Andy Holcroft’s Bug Farm – an insect zoo, research centre and insect eaterie. Here they struggle to convince us why we all should learn to love eating insect protein.   Masters Tennis: The Rogers Cup Sky Sports Main Event, 7.00pm The Uniprix Stadium in Montreal is the setting, as the Rogers Cup gets under way. Novak Djokovic lifted the trophy in 2016 for the fourth time, defeating Kei Nishikori in the final. The Serbian misses out this time around, though, due to injury.  Tornado: The 100mph Steam Engine BBC Four, 8.00pm If phrases like “it’s a Peppercorn class A1 Pacific” get you all steamed up you’ll be in heaven with this account of how a bunch of engineering enthusiasts got the massive locomotive they took 18 years to build from scratch to take on the ultimate test: hitting 100 miles per hour, a speed no British steam train has achieved since 1967.    Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm This new, live, animal rescue show with Steve Jones, Kate Quilton and Noel Fitzpatrick attempts to rehome a whole shelter’s worth of dogs, cats and assorted other species. Among the celebs espousing the joy of pets in this opener is pop singer Leona Lewis. Continues until Friday.   Man in an Orange Shirt BBC Two, 9.00pm In part two of novelist Patrick Gale’s drama for the Gay Britannia season, more than half a century on, Flora (Vanessa Redgrave) gives her late husband’s cottage to their grandson Adam (Julian Morris), who finds himself drawn to his architect, Steve (David Gyasi).   Inside Heston’s World Good Food, 9.00pm This four-part series chronicles chef Heston Blumenthal’s attempt to bring a flavour of his Fat Duck restaurant to Australia, in a multi-million pound move to Melbourne last year. GO Make or Break? Channel 5, 10.00pm A new reality series, stripped across the week, in which eight troubled couples test the strength of their relationships at a Mexican holiday resort, where alongside counselling and therapy sessions, they have to swap partners every two days. GO Doctor Dolittle (1967) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 5.05pm  This is not the Eddie Murphy comedy version from 1998 but the charming Sixties musical directed by Richard Fleischer. Rex Harrison stars as the terse, eponymous doctor who has the uncanny ability to speak to animals and so embarks on a voyage to find an elusive pink sea snail and a giant lunar moth. Samantha Egger, 20 years Harrison’s junior, co-stars as the adventurous stowaway who falls in love with the doctor.  Storks (2016) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 6.20pm  Warner Animation Group’s first film since 2014’s The Lego Movie is spectacularly daft but manages to be both moving and very fun. Here the storks of the title have moved on from delivering babies to big business and now transport products for an Amazon-style website. But then the old baby-making machine, gathering dust in the corner, is accidentally reactivated and suddenly they have a baby to get home.  American History X (1998) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm  Tony Kaye directs this compellingly violent and brutal examination of white supremacism in America. Edward Norton is both mesmerising and terrifying as Derek, a student drawn into the Neo-Nazi movement who mercilessly kills two black youths. After a stint in prison he’s reformed but returns  home to find his younger brother Danny (Edward Furlong) on the same track he was. Tuesday 8 August Jodie Whittaker and Emun Elliott Credit: BBC Trust Me BBC One, 9.00pm Before she becomes the Doctor in Doctor Who, Jodie Whittaker stars in a drama about… pretending to be a doctor. No doubt there will soon be many jokes about that floating around. In this new four-part drama, written by real-life doctor Dan Sefton, Whittaker stars as Cath, a downtrodden ward sister who is fired when she takes her concerns about the conditions in her Sheffield hospital to the trust. Then, when at the leaving party for her best friend Alison – who’s about to begin a new life in New Zealand – she spots Alison’s CV and medical degree certificate in a bin.  So Cath decides to adopt Alison’s identity and, hoping that her nursing skills will be enough to get by, find a job as a doctor far away in Edinburgh. Though the premise may sound a little daft, it’s actually surprisingly – and worryingly – common. Sefton uses his hospital know-how to bring a sense of authenticity to what is a really quite gripping drama.  Whittaker, rather than channelling a cocky Leonardo DiCaprio in Catch Me if You Can, is every inch the terrified woman flying by the seat of her pants. Excellent, too, is Emun Elliot as the colleague who catches her eye. Catherine Gee EastEnders BBC One, 7.30pm Mick’s (Danny Dyer) dastardly behaviour comes to a head in this special three-hander episode. He decides to tell wife Linda (Kellie Bright) the truth about what he’s been up to while she was away: namely cheating on her with their daughter-in-law Whitney (Shona McGarty).    Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm It’s the second nightly visit to this admirable project, which seeks to rehouse all the animals  in a Newcastle shelter in just a week. While we meet the wide range of animals and see how many still remain, Dom Joly also learns what happens to micropigs when they grow up.     The Dog Rescuers with Alan Davies Channel 5, 8.00pm Among the five unlucky pups needing some loving care from the team this week are an abandoned staffie who’s given a second chance and a young spaniel with a nasty neck wound.     Get a House for Free Channel 4, 9.00pm Marco Robinson is a very rich man – £25 million rich, in fact. He made his fortune through a business and property empire and now he wants to give back. So he’s decided to give away a three-bed flat in Preston to the person who he thinks will benefit the most. This film follows him as he attempts to sift through 8,000 applications. CG Utopia: In Search of the Dream BBC Four, 9.00pm It’s 500 years since the term “utopia” was coined by Sir Thomas More in 1516. In this documentary, art historian Professor Richard Clay examines five centuries of the concept of utopia and the impact it has had on our way of thinking. Often used as a method of criticism of the current system, it is a powerful vision. Clay considers some of our “greatest utopian dreamers”, including Jonathan Swift, author of Gulliver’s Travels, and Gene Roddenberry, creator of Star Trek, and the common themes that run through the ideal.     The Yorkshire Dales and the Lakes More4, 9.00pm The cosy documentary series continues with a farmer finding an unusual method to keep track of his sheep: day-glo paint. Elsewhere in the Dales, we follow the Dent Brewery boys as they create their own craft ales and in the Lake District we see Jon Bennett make his daily ascent to the summit of Helvellyn. CG The Parent Trap (1961) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am   In a film that helped pioneer the split-screen technique, Hayley Mills plays both Susan Evers and Sharon McKendrick, twins unaware of each other’s existence and separated as babies following their parents’ divorce. When they meet, years later, at summer camp, the pair scheme to reunite their parents. This classic Disney comedy spawned three sequels and a 1998 remake starring a young Lindsay Lohan. Tootsie (1982) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.30pm  When actor Michael Dorsey transforms himself into Dorothy Michaels in a desperate attempt to get work, complications arise as he falls for a female friend (Jessica Lange) and her father (Charles Durning)  falls for him. Although you never quite believe that Dustin Hoffman in drag would convince everyone that he’s a woman, it doesn’t matter: Tootsie is lots of fun – and it’s a sharply observed social satire, too. Groundhog Day (1993) ★★★★☆ Sky1, 9.00pm  In this wonderful comedy drama, a surly, sardonic weatherman (Bill Murray) is sent to the small US town of Punxsutawney to cover the annual groundhog festival, but finds himself experiencing precisely the same events over and over – then realises that he can free himself from the loop only by being a nicer person. One criticism: as always, Murray is so much more likeable as the malevolent grouch… Wednesday 9 August My Family, Partition and Me: India 1947 - Anita Rani  Credit: BBC My Family, Partition and Me: India 1947 BBC One, 9.00pm Two years ago, Anita Rani learnt how her family history was forever marked by the 1947 Partition of India in a memorable episode of Who Do You Think You Are? Now, she has wrangled three members of the public – one Hindu, one Christian and one Muslim – to explore how their own lives, and those of their ancestors, were affected by the appalling and widespread outbreaks of religious violence in the wake of Britain’s messy, compromised withdrawal, and the troubled legacy left by the Empire. In addition to eyewitness testimonies, the descendants of the survivors travel back to India, Pakistan and Bangladesh to retrace the journeys their relatives were forced to make. Their discoveries are in equal parts shocking, distressing and uplifting, and its treatment is rightly sensitive for events still in living memory: tears flow freely, yet it’s never sentimental. If there isn’t much space to dig into the wider political situation, the complex reasons behind the violence and longer-term implications, the detail of the personal recollections and anecdotes tells its own powerful tale. Rani returns to her own ancestral story in next week’s concluding part. Gabriel Tate Super Small Animals BBC One, 8.00pm Biologist Patrick Aryee demonstrates that size isn’t everything in the natural world, observing the extraordinary feats of strength, endurance and ingenuity of everything from hummingbirds  and seahorses to beetles and armadillos. Love Your Garden ITV, 8.00pm Alan Titchmarsh and his team turn an uninspiring patch of lumpy lawn and uneven paving into a sensory garden for a four-year-old girl with a very rare degenerative eye disease. Long Lost Family ITV, 9.00pm This episode of the always engaging and emotionally gruelling series reuniting long-estranged relatives charts the story of a woman who gave up her son only to adopt two boys herself, and a man whose mother put him up for adoption through an advert in the local press. My Big Gay Jewish Conversion BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.20pm First shown on BBC Three, this smart and sobering documentary follows Simon Atkins – who is Catholic and gay – as he looks at convert to Judaism, a religion that would allow him to marry his boyfriend, Matthew. Atkin’s journey is both spiritual and literal, as he travels to relatively tolerant Tel Aviv and more conservative Jerusalem, hoping to reconcile his sexuality with his religious beliefs. GT The South Bank Show Sky Arts, 8.00pm Singer-songwriter Benjamin Clementine, who won the Mercury Prize in 2015, talks to Melvyn Bragg about his early years on the streets and being hailed perhaps the brightest musical talent of his generation. In Search of Arcadia BBC Four, 9.00pm This contemplative documentary sees Dr Janina Ramirez and John Bailey explore the roots of the Arcadian cultural revolutionaries that sprang up along the Thames in the 17th and 18th centuries. Citizen Jane: Battle for the City BBC Four, 10.00pm When she saw the controversial development projects proposed by Robert Moses in Sixties New York, Jane Jacobs decided to take him on. Matt Tyrnauer’s punchy documentary pulls together an inspiring tale out of unlikely material – the debate of community culture versus “slum clearance”, one which continues to this day in cities across the world. GT Bridge to Terabithia (2007) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.10pm  Talented child stars AnnaSophia Robb and Josh Hutcherson (who went on to star in The Hunger Games) play two young misfits who become friends and create a magical world of the imagination in a remote part of the forest. This quality Disney production, adapted from Katherine Paterson’s classic novel, ventures into unexpectedly dark territory and packs an emotional punch that will have you reaching for your hankie. Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief (2015) ★★★★☆ Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Based on a book by the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Lawrence Wright, director Alex Gibney’s documentary about the Church of Scientology is a gripping, painstakingly researched exposé of one of the world’s most enigmatic organisations. At its core are a series of chilling allegations by former Scientology members, who describe a culture of abuse. The Lost Boys (1987) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 9.00pm Teen flick meets horror in this Eighties hit about two boys (Jason Patric and Corey Haim) who move to a quiet, northern California town where they become involved with a group of bloodthirsty vampires. These days it has to compete with the likes of Twilight and The Vampire Diaries, but there’s still enough action, intrigue, danger and romance to keep you hooked. Kiefer Sutherland and Corey Feldman also star. Thursday 10 July Princess Diana with Raine, Comtesse De Chambrun  Credit: Channel 4 Princess Diana’s “Wicked” Stepmother Channel 4, 9.00pm A gossipy, full-throttle and altogether naughty documentary about Diana, Princess of Wales’s stepmother Raine, Countess Spencer, who died last October. The daughter of romantic novelist Barbara Cartland, Raine was a prodigious social climber described here as “a famous socialite, a feisty politician and all-round force of nature” (“Nobody gets to be a countess three times by accident,” says one contributor). It seems like an accurate fit.  Named “Debutante of the Year” in 1947, Raine went on to bag a future Earl for a husband at the age of 18, became the youngest member of Westminster City Council at 23, before going on to become a noted conservation campaigner. The main focus here, though, is how she went on to marry a second Earl, John Spencer, in circumstances that earned her the entrenched enmity of his children, prime among them being his then 15-year-old daughter, Lady Diana. Yet when Diana’s own marriage ran into trouble it was Raine, so it’s claimed, that she turned to for support; the once “sworn enemy was transformed into her closest confidante”. The contributors include Downton Abbey writer Julian Fellowes and royal biographer Penny Junor. Gerard O’Donovan Natwest T20 Blast Cricket: Hampshire v Glamorgan Sky Sports Cricket, 6.00pm All the action from the Ageas Bowl for this South Division match. The home side are one of the most successful in the history of domestic T20 cricket, having won the competition twice and appeared in another four Finals Days. 10 Puppies and Us BBC Two, 8.00pm Here are more tales of new dog owners and their pups. This week, a mother seeks a canine companion for her son who has Down’s syndrome; the conflict between rival Chihuahuas Rocky and Chloe deepens; and a newlywed couple call in the behaviourist when a pug objects to their connubial bliss.  James Martin’s French Adventure ITV, 8.30pm Chef James Martin heads to the hilly Jura region, where a pear orchard proves to be the source of the perfect chutney for barbecued duck, and a visit to the citadel at Fort des Rousses shows why dungeons make the best cheese cellars. Top of the Lake: China Girl BBC Two, 9.00pm In the wake of last week’s shock revelation, Jane Campion’s off-kilter crime drama continues, with troubled detective Robin Griffin (Elisabeth Moss) pointing the China Girl investigation in a new direction, that of a surrogacy deal gone wrong. Meanwhile, Robin must face demons from her past when her former police chief Al Parker (David Wenham) arrives from New Zealand. Inside London Fire Brigade ITV, 9.00pm As the documentary series concludes, retiring crew manager Al passes the baton on to 25-year-old rookie Joe, who faces a tough test fighting his first big fire. GO A Premier League of Their Own Sky1, 9.00pm Ahead of next weekend’s opening matches in the Premier League, James Corden and pals begin the new season of the panel show with a special edition. Guests Thierry Henry, Jeff Stelling and Kelly Cates will be celebrating all things football alongside the show’s regulars Freddie Flintoff, Jack Whitehall and Jamie Redknapp. Plus McFly’s Danny Jones, singer Kate Nash and R&B star Lemar will be stepping up to the spot for Popstar Penalties. Laurel and Hardy: Their Lives and Magic Sky Arts, 9.00pm Fans of Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy will enjoy this superb assemblage of clips and out-takes. This enthralling documentary follows the life and work of the world’s most beloved comedy duo, and includes rare footage of Laurel in his later years, as well as an even rarer interview with his daughter, Lois. There’s also a tribute to the unusually strong friendship that the two stars enjoyed throughout their working lives. GO Dr Seuss’ The Lorax (2012) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 2.55pm This animated adaptation of Dr Seuss’s quirky story follows a boy (voiced by Zac Efron) who goes in search of a tree to impress a nature-loving girl (Taylor Swift). But he stumbles on the Once-ler (Ed Helms), the man responsible for harvesting all the world’s plant life. Children will enjoy it, even if the film does sacrifice a measure of its literary magic to the god of cinematic entertainment. Wild (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm  The Pacific Crest Trail, which runs up the entire western spine of the United States, is a challenge of fabled arduousness and rugged beauty. In 1995, aged 26, Cheryl Strayed (played by a superb Reese Witherspoon) walked it, to get clearance in her head after a decade of loss and personal meltdown. Wild powerfully reveals Strayed’s terrors and pleasures as she forges ahead on the journey. Wilde (1996) ★★★☆☆ BBC Four, 10.00pm  Many feel that Stephen Fry was born to play the part of the tragic and devastatingly brilliant Oscar Wilde. He’s terrific, but is only one of several superb players in a film which is held together by its performances. There’s Tom Wilkinson as the odious bully Queensberry and Jude Law on wonderfully petulant form as Bosie, the cause of Wilde’s downfall. Wilde’s story The Selfish Giant is woven throughout the film. Friday 11 August The Royal Albert Hall Credit: BBC BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 8.00pm Swapping tuxes for cowboy hats, the Proms continues tonight with a staging of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s beloved 1943 musical Oklahoma!  Expect plenty of whip-cracking, thigh-slapping, wild-west antics at the Royal Albert Hall, as conductor John Wilson and his orchestra add their signature élan to this story of a love affair between dashing cowboy Curly McLain (Nathaniel Hackmann) and farmer’s daughter Laurey Williams (Scarlett Strallen). Playing Jud Fy, the brooding, bestial social misfit with designs on Laurey himself, meanwhile, is David Seadon-Young. Elsewhere, Belinda Lang stars as the clucking Aunt Eller, and comedian Marcus Brigstocke is Ali Hakim, the Persian huckster battling with the cowboy Will Parker (Robert Fairchild) for the affections of fickle Ado Annie (Lizzy Connolly). The dance routines are balletic and fast, the hits frequent: the jaunty Surrey With the Fringe on Top, the romantic People Will Say We’re in Love, the lovely I Cain’t Say No, and, of course, the unmistakable opening song, Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin’. Rachel Kavanaugh, who directed an acclaimed touring production of Oklahoma! in 2015, is at the helm again here. Patrick Smith Premier League Football: Arsenal v Leicester City Sky Sports Premier League/Sky Sports Main Event, 7.00pm After three months of bluster and big-spending in the transfer market, the Premier League returns – and for the first time, the season gets under way on a Friday. All eyes tonight will be on Arsenal’s Alexandre Lacazette, the French striker who joined the Gunners for a club record fee of £52 million. Can he be the man to fire Arsenal back into the top four? Leicester City, meanwhile, will be keen to bounce back from a disappointing season that saw Claudio Ranieri sacked as manager despite having won them the league nine months previously. When these sides last met, at the end of April, a late own goal from Robert Huth handed Arsenal a 1-0 victory. Teach My Pet to Do That ITV, 8.00pm Arriving in the dog days of summer, this fluffy new series is presented by Alexander Amstrong, who asks such questions as: can a cat be trained to ride a labrador? Helping him teach tricks to the pets – among them, a dachshund labrador cross called Eric and a miniature horse called Aslan – are animal trainers Nando Brown and Jo-Rosie Haffenden.  Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm Throughout this week Steve Jones, Kate Quilton and Supervet Noel Fitzpatrick have been trying to find permanent homes for every animal in the Newcastle Dog and Cat Shelter. Tonight, they make one final push.  Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm Green fingers at the ready as Monty Don advises on how to cut and maintain hedges, while Adam Frost reveals the secrets of successful planting combinations. The Street ITV3, 9.00pm Previously shown in 2009, Jimmy McGovern’s gloom-ridden series comprised six stand-alone episodes focusing on the lives of the inhabitants of a single street in Liverpool. In this instalment, Anna Friel, recently seen in McGovern’s latest drama Broken, plays a single mother trying to hold down two jobs, pay the mortgage and get her two sons into a better school. Starring opposite her is Daniel Mays – with whom she also appeared in Tony Marchant’s similarly bleak drama Public Enemies – as the plumber whom she begins dating. What unfolds is expertly crafted and at times gut-wrenching to watch.  The Agony & the Ecstasy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This entertainingly nostalgic four-part series looks at how the UK’s rave scene exploded in the Eighties, fuelled by the party drug ecstasy. With the help of DJs such as Goldie, Paul Oakenfold and Annie Mac, it also explores how the genre evolved over the next three decades. Reach for the lasers. PS Eden: Paradise Lost Channel 4, 10.00pm The off-grid experiment – in which 23 people were stranded on the west coast of Scotland to fend for themselves – arrived on Channel 4 a year ago amid great fanfare but ended up being an unmitigated flop, with only 10 participants making it through to the end. In tonight’s finale, the action takes us from Christmas Day through to March, when those who remained were finally released. PS Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm  This first of a potentially limitless spin-off series of “Star Wars Stories” follows rebel live-wire Jyn Erso (Felicity Jones), who leads a band of self-styled “spies, saboteurs and assassins” on a death-or-glory mission to steal the Death Star plans from an Imperial stronghold, via some genuinely breathtaking planetary vistas and earth-ripping set-pieces.  The Firm (1993) ★★★☆☆ W, 9.00pm  Sydney Pollack directed this accomplished yet curiously uninvolving adaptation of John Grisham’s legal potboiler. Tom Cruise plays Mitch McDeere, an ambitious young lawyer who takes a well-paid job at a Memphis law firm that sounds too good to be true. And it is: the firm launders money for the Mob. Can Mitch escape with his morals and marriage intact? Gene Hackman co-stars as Cruise’s father figure. Strictly Ballroom (1992) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 11.05pm  Paul Mercurio plays a rebellious ballroom dancer who breaks all the rules and paso dobles his way to victory in this crowd-pleasing Australian comedy. Baz Luhrmann’s writing and directing debut is just as brash as Moulin Rouge! but a lot less pleased with itself. There’s romance between our hero and his ugly duckling partner, and it’s set against an enjoyable parade of sequin-decked caricatures and high camp. Watch here on TVPlayer Television previewers Catherine Gee, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: Emma Willis on Who Do You Think You Are? plus Top of the Lake: China Girl

Thursday 3 August Who Do You Think You Are? BBC One, 9.00pm This week’s edition of the genealogy show initially threatens to be one of those pleasant enough hours with no real surprises. Our subject is TV presenter Emma Willis, a proud Birmingham girl and the product of a close-knit, working-class background who explains that she has come from “a kind family” and hopes previous generations will turn out to have been similar.  Initially it seems as though those dreams will come true with an interesting but hardly ground-breaking trawl through generations of hard-working Brummie grafters who lurched from prosperity to the workhouse and back again, but appear to have stuck together through good times and bad. “When I look at that picture I think of Peaky Blinders,” Willis says early on about a family snapshot, but the reality is less criminal and more enterprise. Things take a more interesting, and altogether darker turn, however, once she heads across the sea to Ireland for a tale of violence, abuse of power and ultimately love, which uncovers a true working-class hero in the process. “We all want to have a nice story, right?” notes the likeable Willis. Her pleasure when she finally finds one is infectious. SC 10 Puppies and Us BBC Two, 8.00pm Imagine refusing to do anything unless you’re fed sausages. It’s not a bad way to go about life and certainly one that stubborn golden retriever Lola adopts. Canine behaviourist Louise Glazebrook is on hand to give advice to her struggling new owners.  RW  James Martin’s French Adventure ITV, 8.30pm The likeable chef heads to the lakeside town of Annecy, nicknamed the Pearl of the French Alps, where he selects ingredients from the local market to create a lobster dish. He also meets award-winning pastry chef Philippe Rigollot to sample his desserts. RW Top of the Lake: China Girl BBC Two, 9.00pm This second series of Jane Campion’s mystery drama is shaping up to be better than the first as it homes in on the central story without any wild distractions. Nicole Kidman, too, is chilling as an adoptive mother Julia. Tonight, an autopsy reveals that murdered victim China Girl was a sex worker, sending Detective Robin Griffin (Elisabeth Moss) and sidekick Miranda (Gwendoline Christie) in a new direction. RW Prejudice and Pride: The People’s History of LGBTQ Britain BBC Four, 9.00pm Comedians Susan Calman and Stephen K Amos present the second of two documentaries in which people share the objects that have defined their lives since homosexuality was partially decriminalised in 1967. There’s a pair of Ugg boots, and a racy school book, but for Shaun Duggan, the Brookside writer who gave us the first pre-watershed lesbian kiss on British television, it’s a letter from Morrissey. RW Insecure Sky Atlantic, 10.35pm This smart portrait of the life and friendships of twentysomething black women in LA is based on the internet series The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl by US comedian Issa Rae. Her writing is crisp and insightful and her performance, as the well-meaning member of an outreach programme for inner-city schools, is excellent. Tonight the series returns for a second run and Issa is trying to piece herself together post break-up. RW Kicked Out: From Care to Chaos BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm Rebecca Southworth explores why so many children lead troubled lives after leaving care. RW The Way Way Back (2013) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.00pm  This coming-of-age story feels like familiar terrain, but it’s agreeably done. Duncan (Liam James) learns about life, love and self-esteem from a gang of water-park employees, including the excellent Sam Rockwell, when forced to go on holiday with his mother (Toni Collette) and her boyfriend (Steve Carrell). The script flows and there’s enough melancholy and edge to the overall comic tone for its charm to prevail. The Island (2005) ★★☆☆☆ 5STAR, 9.00pm  Michael Bay’s sci-fi flop humbled Steven Spielberg’s DreamWorks. Not only was the original script scrapped, the film only just recouped the $ 126 million it cost to make, though it’s still a stylish offering. It stars Ewan McGregor as a human clone who lives in a controlled facility and dreams of going to “The Island”, the last uncontaminated place on Earth. Scarlett Johansson and Sean Bean buoy up the cast. Cliffhanger (1993) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 11.45pm  Living up to its title, Cliffhanger is a rollicking rollercoaster of a film. It stars Sylvester Stallone as a hotshot mountain climber, who becomes embroiled in a heist, along with Janine Turner. Set in the Rocky Mountains and featuring some stupendous stunts, it may be big-budget nonsense – but it’s entertaining big-budget nonsense with zesty lines and exhilarating cinematography. Renny Harlin directs.   Friday 4 August Sun-soaked: the biggest resort on the Costa del Sol  The Secret Life of the Holiday Resort Channel 4, 8.00pm Spain hosted 10 million British holidaymakers in 2016, two million more than in the previous year. With the package holiday one of the main beneficiaries of this apparent rekindling of Anglo-Spanish love in the wake of Brexit, Katherine Patrick’s documentary travels to Holidayworld, the biggest all-inclusive resort on the Costa del Sol, where three-quarters of the 3,000 guests are from the UK. There, we meet three four-person families seeking brief respite from the gruelling jobs that generally keep them apart, and some of the 500 heroic staff. The Secret Life of the Holiday Resort is rather harmless, unenlightening stuff, propped up by an exhausting procession of vague statistics and meaningless survey results (“a third of parents say the most frequent rows abroad are between them and their kids”, that sort of thing) reeled off by narrator Blake Harrison (of The Inbetweeners). All the expected boxes are ticked – techniques for bagging sunbeds, the artery-clogging buffets, the pros and cons of families spending a week in such proximity – but it’s good-natured throughout, even during the inevitable and perfunctory drift into Brexit chat. The very essence of silly season programming. GT Icarus Netflix, from today In what is a coup for Netflix, this award-winning documentary from Bryan Fogel began as a Supersize Me-style experiment into the effects of doping. But after Fogel connected with renegade scientist Dr Grigory Rodchenkov, it became a lid-lifting investigation into a widespread Russian scandal that seemingly goes as high as Putin. GT Cleverman BBC Three, from 10.00am Series two of the fun, if labyrinthine, dystopian drama from Australia will be made available today in its entirety. Wearing X-Men’s influence on its sleeve, it follows the leader of the “Hairies”, superpowered people trying to live alongside humans that persecute and subjugate them. GT BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 8.00pm The music of Ella Fitzgerald and Dizzy Gillespie is celebrated in the centenary year of their births, with musicians, including singer Diane Reeves, performing with the BBC Concert Orchestra. GT The Secret World of Posh Pets ITV, 8.00pm; not UTV/STV/Wales This final part finds 21-year-old Rory roping in his father to expand his niche business of exporting jellyfish, while there’s evidence that horse-grooming has reached genuinely berserk levels, with unicorn horns and nail polish the latest must-haves for those benighted equine attractions at children’s parties. GT Only Connect BBC Two, 8.30pm Viking experts take on geocachers (participants in a GPS-driven treasure hunt), with one (relatively straightforward) challenge involving finding the link between exhibit, salt and pepper, outcast and roots manoeuvre. GT Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm Irises, pelargonium cuttings, growing plants inside and managing a shaded, sloping town garden are among the challenges facing Monty Don and his team in tonight’s edition of the hardy perennial. GT Autopsy: Kurt Cobain Channel 5, 10.05pm Forensic pathologist Dr Jason Payne-James turns his attention to the alleged suicide of Kurt Cobain. Alleged, because certain conspiracy theorists assert that he had too much heroin in his system to be able to have inflicted the gunshot wound to his head. Probably best not to expect any definitive results here, however. GT This Is 40 (2012) ★★★☆☆ E4, 9.00pm  Judd Apatow revisits two characters from his 2007 hit Knocked Up. Leslie Mann, Apatow’s wife, and Paul Rudd play a stressed-out Los Angeles couple whose 40th birthdays bookend the film. Apatow and Mann’s real-life daughters also play their children. It’s a perceptive comedy on middle-age and one that guarantees big laughs alongside some of Apatow’s most pertinent observations on love. The Green Mile (1999) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm  Tom Hanks stars in this Oscar-nominated adaptation of Stephen King’s entrancingly strange novel. Stolid prison guard Paul Edgecomb (Hanks) is shaken by the arrival of a convict (Michael Clarke Duncan) who has supernatural powers. Although a little lightweight compared with director Frank Darabont’s previous prison film, The Shawshank Redemption, it’s pleasingly creepy. The Help (2011) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm  Emma Stone sparkles among the fine female cast in this enjoyable adaptation of Kathryn Stockett’s bestselling 2009 novel. She stars as a budding journalist working in Sixties Jackson, Mississippi, who convinces two black maids (Viola Davis and the Oscar-winning Octavia Spencer) to work secretly with her on a book and reveal the hardships inflicted on them. Bryce Dallas Howard is a delightfully hissable villain. Saturday 5 August Billy Connolly in front of John Byrne's portrait in mural form in Glasgow's Osborne Street Credit: BBC Billy Connolly: Portrait of a Lifetime BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 10.30pm “Glasgow belongs to me,” says Billy Connolly of his hometown in this heart-warming documentary to mark the comedian’s 75th birthday in November. And he’s not wrong as three imposing 50ft tribute portraits have recently been unveiled on wallends in the city. They were created by Scottish artists John Byrne, Jack Vettriano and Rachel MacLean, and this accompanying film not only gives a neat history of the area, but serves as a celebration of the Big Yin’s career.  Interspersed with clips of his stand-up routines, including his cheeky first appearance on Parkinson in 1975 when he told the bum joke that turned him into a star, the programme see Connolly sit quietly for the artists – not one of his strong points as he admits: “I’ve been very patient. I think I’m due an episode.” Watching them at work in their studios is inspiring and Connolly is taken aback by the results. “It’s like looking into a mirror. You know my soul,” he says to Byrne, who used to design album covers for Connolly’s band The Humblebums. “I’m amazed at the effect these have had on me, they’ve stunned me.” From tomorrow, the original portraits will be hung in the People’s Palace. Rachel Ward Athletics: World Championships BBC Two, 9.30am & BBC One, 6.30pm Day two at the London Stadium in Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park sees Usain Bolt – in all likeliness – going for gold in the men’s 100 m final (9.45pm) as he makes his final individual appearance at a major championships. His main threats are expected to come from former champions Justin Gatlin and Yohan Blake, as well as emerging star Christian Coleman. Earlier in the day, British medal hope Katarina Johnson-Thompson gets her heptathlon bid under way with the 100 m hurdles at 10.05am. Sadly not in action today is Greg Rutherford, who, because of an ankle injury, won’t be competing in the men’s long jump final (8.05pm).  Little Big Shots USA ITV, 5.00pm Steve Harvey showcases more talented youngsters while mocking his own stupidity in this family friendly show exec-produced by Ellen DeGeneres. Tonight, there’s a maths genius and a Motown singer. Royal Cousins at War BBC Two, 7.30pm; NI, 8.00pm A welcome repeat for this riveting analysis of the relationship between Kaiser Bill, Tsar Nicholas II of Russia and our own King George V, and the disastrous effect that their rivalry had on the First World War.  Paul O’Grady’s Hollywood Channel 4, 8.00pm This new series sees Paul O’Grady delve into cinematic history to find out what it takes to make a masterpiece. He begins with “weepies”, where the host’s caustic wit serves as the perfect antidote as talking heads, including Sigourney Weaver and Celine Dion, reach for the tissues as they relate films such as Brief Encounter, Titanic and, quite possibly the saddest in movie history, The Champ.    Dad’s Army BBC Two, 8.30pm; not NI This is a gem of an episode loaded with slapstick fun from 1970. It’s the one where Corporal Jones (Clive Dunn) dresses as a tree trunk during an exercise pitting Mainwaring (Arthur Lowe) and his crew against their pompous arch-rival Captain Square. RW The L.A. Riots: 25 Years Later History, 9.00pm Twenty-five years after Los Angeles erupted into one of the most destructive civil disturbances in US history (11,000 people were arrested and an estimated 63 people were killed), this documentary looks back at the decades of racial injustice that led to the incident and the history of police relations with LA’s black community. Citizens, council members and even those who committed crimes talk about how South Central was beset by mass riots, looting, and fires.  Cambridge Folk Festival 2017 Sky Arts, 9.00pm Broadcaster Mark Radcliffe and musician Julie Fowlis present highlights from this year’s festival, an event that attracts 10,000 visitors. These include Jon Boden, formerly of Bellowhead, performing new material with his band The Remnant Kings. There’s also music from Jake Bugg, electric punk stars Oysterband and Lisa Hannigan, once as a member of Damien Rice’s band. RW The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies (2014) ★★☆☆☆ ITV, 8.00pm  The battle of the title was barely mentioned by JRR Tolkein in The Hobbit, but it was seemingly enough for Peter Jackson to pad out his franchise even further. Picking up where the last film left off, our heroes had just unleashed the wrath of dragon Smaug (Benedict Cumberbatch). But there’s another battle looming, one between themselves which is fuelled by greed. Red (2010) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm  A starry line-up of actors of pensionable age is the attraction of this light-hearted adaptation of Warren Ellis’s graphic novel, and it’s hard to resist Helen Mirren with a submachine gun. RED stands for “Retired Extremely Dangerous”, which is what the CIA has labelled former agents Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich and Mirren, who team up to find out who has marked them for assassination, and why. I Know What You Did Last Summer (1997) ★★☆☆☆ BBC One, 11.55pm  This routine slasher flick, written by Kevin Williamson of Scream fame, will certainly make you jump but it’s unlikely to give you many sleepless nights. When a carful of American teenagers hits and kills a man, they panic and dump the body. Months later, the inevitable slaughter begins. A hapless cast, featuring Sarah Michelle Gellar, brings unintentional levity to proceedings. Sunday 6 August Diana, Princess of Wales Credit: Rex Diana: In Her Own Words Channel 4, 8.00pm Much controversy has surrounded this documentary, which broadcasts – for the first time in the UK – video footage recorded in 1992 and 1993 by Diana, Princess of Wales’s voice coach, Peter Settelen. Hired to help Diana reframe her public image and put forward her own side of the story regarding her marriage, Settelen saw his work bear fruit in his client’s Panorama interview. Now there is undoubted interest in watching Diana recount key events in her life unmediated, with candour and a seductive mix of charm and steel. “He chatted me up like a bad rash,” she recalls of her future husband at one point; at another, she remembers being “completely thrown” by the Prince of Wales’s peculiar response to a question about them being in love. In truth, director Kevin Sim rather crams the at-times uncomfortably intimate footage into the first and final thirds of the documentary, leaving assorted friends and confidants to tell the rest of the very familiar story, and the melodrama is laid on a little thick at times. Exploitative? Perhaps. Fascinating? In patches, although it probably won’t entirely satisfy either those looking for genuinely fresh insights or an opportunity to be outraged. Gabriel Tate Community Shield Football: Arsenal v Chelsea BT Sport 1, 1.00pm Arsenal and Chelsea meet for the second time in as many weeks, with Antonio Conte’s Blues favourites to lift the Community Shield today having won 3-0 in Beijing thanks to a brace from Michy Batshuayi.  Women’s Football: Euro 2017 Channel 4, 3.00pm After a thrilling tournament – during which a record 3.3 million people tuned in to watch England’s Lionesses beat France 1-0 – we’re at the FC Twente Stadion in Enschede, Holland, as the successors to Germany are crowned.   LSO Sky Arts, 6.00pm Originally, and rather impishly, hinting at a “greatest hits” of Haydn, Simon Rattle and his Imaginary Orchestral Journey instead took movements from 11 of the Austrian composer’s works, many of them rarely performed, and realigned them joyfully and perceptively in this concert with the London Symphony Orchestra. Works from Bartók and an extract from Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde provide the hors d’oeuvre for this enticing programme.   BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 7.00pm One of the most anticipated events of every Prom season, the National Youth Orchestra of Great Britain brings its energy and drive to the Royal Albert Hall. First comes the London premiere of Francisco Coll’s “grotesque symphony” Mural and Thomas Adès conducting his own work, Polaris, for the first time in the capital. The climax comes courtesy of Igor Stravinsky and his agelessly thrilling Rite of Spring. It is introduced by Suzy Klein and Lloyd Coleman. GT Secrets of Silicon Valley BBC Two, 8.00pm Blogger Jamie Bartlett investigates whether technological progress should be made at any cost. On the one side, he meets those tackling climate change; on the other, those paying the price for the success of Uber and, somewhere in the middle, the pioneers of self-driving cars.    Poldark BBC One, 9.00pm Having barrelled along entertainingly, with the undercurrent of hardscrabble misery intact, this third series concludes with sightings of French sails spotted on the horizon and Cornwall put on high alert. Meanwhile, Cap’n Ross (Aidan Turner) contends with a broadside from George Warleggan  (Jack Farthing).   The Last Days of Patrick Swayze Channel 5, 10.00pm Given the fact that he died from pancreatic cancer aged 57, we can reasonably surmise that the Dirty Dancing star’s final hours were not wholly pleasant. So, what can forensic pathologist Jason Payne-James, perusing Swayze’s medical records, add to the story?   Gareth Thomas: Hate in the Beautiful Game BBC Two, 10.30pm; not NI Former Welsh rugby union captain Gareth Thomas, who came out in 2009 while still playing, asks why football has shamefully remained a bastion of open homophobia – perhaps the last in sport. GT Frozen (2013) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 1.40pm  Disney’s 53rd feature is an enchanting combination of fairytale derring-do and heart-popping musical numbers that has left children and adults powerless to its charms (even if some parents may have grown rather tired of it). Elsa (Idina Menzel) is a shy princess driven into exile when her magical powers are discovered. Her sister Anna (Kristen Bell) gallops off to fetch her from her beautiful ice palace. The King’s Speech (2010) ★★★★★ Channel 4, 9.50pm  Tom Hooper’s film about the future George VI’s struggle to overcome his stammer in the nation’s hour of need won multiple Academy Awards, including a deserved Best Actor gong for Colin Firth. But it’s his double-act with Geoffrey Rush as his speech therapist Lionel Logue that gives the film its heart, and the doublehanders between them are fraught and fascinating. Point Break (1991) ★★★☆☆ Channel 5, 11.05pm Kathryn Bigelow’s cult surfing/crime film elevated Patrick Swayze’s actor status to true action hero. Keanu Reeves plays Johnny Utah, an FBI agent who goes undercover to infiltrate the Ex-Presidents, a gang of bankrobbing surfers led by the charismatic Bodhi (Swayze). The action heats up when Bodhi and Utah find they share a similar attitude towards danger. Lori Petty is the surfer who catches Johnny’s eye. Monday 7 August Eden: Paradise Lost - the participants Credit: Channel 4 Eden: Paradise Lost Channel 4, 10.00pm In March 2016, 23 idealists set out to take part in Channel 4’s Eden experiment, which, a touch grandiosely, sought to establish “a new society” from scratch, cut off from the modern world on a remote Scottish peninsula for an entire year. “What if we could start again?” was the much-hyped tag line. And the answer was… well, we never got to find out the answer because the series was pulled last summer, after just four episodes, when viewing figures took a dive from 1.7 million to less than 800,000.  Not that Channel 4 or production company Keo Films thought to tell the participants that. Instead they were left to get on with it. Rumours swirled of Lord of the Flies levels of acrimony, mass defections, starvation, health problems, people eating chicken feed to survive. So it could make for absorbing viewing in this five-part update, which airs every night this week. Although probably the greatest fascination will be in seeing the reactions of the 10 participants who suffered through to the end as they emerged from the nightmare in March this year only to discover that their efforts have mostly been in vain – and that the political landscape has drastically altered while they were gone. Gerard O’Donovan Stacey Dooley Investigates: Divide and National Pride in Northern Ireland  BBC Three, from 10.00am The intrepid reporter discovers that bitter political divisions persist in Northern Ireland as she seeks to discover more about Prime Minister Theresa May’s new allies in the Democratic Unionist Party. The Bug Grub Couple BBC One, 7.30pm Bug burger or beef burger? That’s the choice at the Grub restaurant in Pembrokeshire, part of entomologist Dr Sarah Beynon and chef Andy Holcroft’s Bug Farm – an insect zoo, research centre and insect eaterie. Here they struggle to convince us why we all should learn to love eating insect protein.   Masters Tennis: The Rogers Cup Sky Sports Main Event, 7.00pm The Uniprix Stadium in Montreal is the setting, as the Rogers Cup gets under way. Novak Djokovic lifted the trophy in 2016 for the fourth time, defeating Kei Nishikori in the final. The Serbian misses out this time around, though, due to injury.  Tornado: The 100mph Steam Engine BBC Four, 8.00pm If phrases like “it’s a Peppercorn class A1 Pacific” get you all steamed up you’ll be in heaven with this account of how a bunch of engineering enthusiasts got the massive locomotive they took 18 years to build from scratch to take on the ultimate test: hitting 100 miles per hour, a speed no British steam train has achieved since 1967.    Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm This new, live, animal rescue show with Steve Jones, Kate Quilton and Noel Fitzpatrick attempts to rehome a whole shelter’s worth of dogs, cats and assorted other species. Among the celebs espousing the joy of pets in this opener is pop singer Leona Lewis. Continues until Friday.   Man in an Orange Shirt BBC Two, 9.00pm In part two of novelist Patrick Gale’s drama for the Gay Britannia season, more than half a century on, Flora (Vanessa Redgrave) gives her late husband’s cottage to their grandson Adam (Julian Morris), who finds himself drawn to his architect, Steve (David Gyasi).   Inside Heston’s World Good Food, 9.00pm This four-part series chronicles chef Heston Blumenthal’s attempt to bring a flavour of his Fat Duck restaurant to Australia, in a multi-million pound move to Melbourne last year. GO Make or Break? Channel 5, 10.00pm A new reality series, stripped across the week, in which eight troubled couples test the strength of their relationships at a Mexican holiday resort, where alongside counselling and therapy sessions, they have to swap partners every two days. GO Doctor Dolittle (1967) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 5.05pm  This is not the Eddie Murphy comedy version from 1998 but the charming Sixties musical directed by Richard Fleischer. Rex Harrison stars as the terse, eponymous doctor who has the uncanny ability to speak to animals and so embarks on a voyage to find an elusive pink sea snail and a giant lunar moth. Samantha Egger, 20 years Harrison’s junior, co-stars as the adventurous stowaway who falls in love with the doctor.  Storks (2016) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 6.20pm  Warner Animation Group’s first film since 2014’s The Lego Movie is spectacularly daft but manages to be both moving and very fun. Here the storks of the title have moved on from delivering babies to big business and now transport products for an Amazon-style website. But then the old baby-making machine, gathering dust in the corner, is accidentally reactivated and suddenly they have a baby to get home.  American History X (1998) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm  Tony Kaye directs this compellingly violent and brutal examination of white supremacism in America. Edward Norton is both mesmerising and terrifying as Derek, a student drawn into the Neo-Nazi movement who mercilessly kills two black youths. After a stint in prison he’s reformed but returns  home to find his younger brother Danny (Edward Furlong) on the same track he was. Tuesday 8 August Jodie Whittaker and Emun Elliott Credit: BBC Trust Me BBC One, 9.00pm Before she becomes the Doctor in Doctor Who, Jodie Whittaker stars in a drama about… pretending to be a doctor. No doubt there will soon be many jokes about that floating around. In this new four-part drama, written by real-life doctor Dan Sefton, Whittaker stars as Cath, a downtrodden ward sister who is fired when she takes her concerns about the conditions in her Sheffield hospital to the trust. Then, when at the leaving party for her best friend Alison – who’s about to begin a new life in New Zealand – she spots Alison’s CV and medical degree certificate in a bin.  So Cath decides to adopt Alison’s identity and, hoping that her nursing skills will be enough to get by, find a job as a doctor far away in Edinburgh. Though the premise may sound a little daft, it’s actually surprisingly – and worryingly – common. Sefton uses his hospital know-how to bring a sense of authenticity to what is a really quite gripping drama.  Whittaker, rather than channelling a cocky Leonardo DiCaprio in Catch Me if You Can, is every inch the terrified woman flying by the seat of her pants. Excellent, too, is Emun Elliot as the colleague who catches her eye. Catherine Gee EastEnders BBC One, 7.30pm Mick’s (Danny Dyer) dastardly behaviour comes to a head in this special three-hander episode. He decides to tell wife Linda (Kellie Bright) the truth about what he’s been up to while she was away: namely cheating on her with their daughter-in-law Whitney (Shona McGarty).    Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm It’s the second nightly visit to this admirable project, which seeks to rehouse all the animals  in a Newcastle shelter in just a week. While we meet the wide range of animals and see how many still remain, Dom Joly also learns what happens to micropigs when they grow up.     The Dog Rescuers with Alan Davies Channel 5, 8.00pm Among the five unlucky pups needing some loving care from the team this week are an abandoned staffie who’s given a second chance and a young spaniel with a nasty neck wound.     Get a House for Free Channel 4, 9.00pm Marco Robinson is a very rich man – £25 million rich, in fact. He made his fortune through a business and property empire and now he wants to give back. So he’s decided to give away a three-bed flat in Preston to the person who he thinks will benefit the most. This film follows him as he attempts to sift through 8,000 applications. CG Utopia: In Search of the Dream BBC Four, 9.00pm It’s 500 years since the term “utopia” was coined by Sir Thomas More in 1516. In this documentary, art historian Professor Richard Clay examines five centuries of the concept of utopia and the impact it has had on our way of thinking. Often used as a method of criticism of the current system, it is a powerful vision. Clay considers some of our “greatest utopian dreamers”, including Jonathan Swift, author of Gulliver’s Travels, and Gene Roddenberry, creator of Star Trek, and the common themes that run through the ideal.     The Yorkshire Dales and the Lakes More4, 9.00pm The cosy documentary series continues with a farmer finding an unusual method to keep track of his sheep: day-glo paint. Elsewhere in the Dales, we follow the Dent Brewery boys as they create their own craft ales and in the Lake District we see Jon Bennett make his daily ascent to the summit of Helvellyn. CG The Parent Trap (1961) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am   In a film that helped pioneer the split-screen technique, Hayley Mills plays both Susan Evers and Sharon McKendrick, twins unaware of each other’s existence and separated as babies following their parents’ divorce. When they meet, years later, at summer camp, the pair scheme to reunite their parents. This classic Disney comedy spawned three sequels and a 1998 remake starring a young Lindsay Lohan. Tootsie (1982) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.30pm  When actor Michael Dorsey transforms himself into Dorothy Michaels in a desperate attempt to get work, complications arise as he falls for a female friend (Jessica Lange) and her father (Charles Durning)  falls for him. Although you never quite believe that Dustin Hoffman in drag would convince everyone that he’s a woman, it doesn’t matter: Tootsie is lots of fun – and it’s a sharply observed social satire, too. Groundhog Day (1993) ★★★★☆ Sky1, 9.00pm  In this wonderful comedy drama, a surly, sardonic weatherman (Bill Murray) is sent to the small US town of Punxsutawney to cover the annual groundhog festival, but finds himself experiencing precisely the same events over and over – then realises that he can free himself from the loop only by being a nicer person. One criticism: as always, Murray is so much more likeable as the malevolent grouch… Wednesday 9 August My Family, Partition and Me: India 1947 - Anita Rani  Credit: BBC My Family, Partition and Me: India 1947 BBC One, 9.00pm Two years ago, Anita Rani learnt how her family history was forever marked by the 1947 Partition of India in a memorable episode of Who Do You Think You Are? Now, she has wrangled three members of the public – one Hindu, one Christian and one Muslim – to explore how their own lives, and those of their ancestors, were affected by the appalling and widespread outbreaks of religious violence in the wake of Britain’s messy, compromised withdrawal, and the troubled legacy left by the Empire. In addition to eyewitness testimonies, the descendants of the survivors travel back to India, Pakistan and Bangladesh to retrace the journeys their relatives were forced to make. Their discoveries are in equal parts shocking, distressing and uplifting, and its treatment is rightly sensitive for events still in living memory: tears flow freely, yet it’s never sentimental. If there isn’t much space to dig into the wider political situation, the complex reasons behind the violence and longer-term implications, the detail of the personal recollections and anecdotes tells its own powerful tale. Rani returns to her own ancestral story in next week’s concluding part. Gabriel Tate Super Small Animals BBC One, 8.00pm Biologist Patrick Aryee demonstrates that size isn’t everything in the natural world, observing the extraordinary feats of strength, endurance and ingenuity of everything from hummingbirds  and seahorses to beetles and armadillos. Love Your Garden ITV, 8.00pm Alan Titchmarsh and his team turn an uninspiring patch of lumpy lawn and uneven paving into a sensory garden for a four-year-old girl with a very rare degenerative eye disease. Long Lost Family ITV, 9.00pm This episode of the always engaging and emotionally gruelling series reuniting long-estranged relatives charts the story of a woman who gave up her son only to adopt two boys herself, and a man whose mother put him up for adoption through an advert in the local press. My Big Gay Jewish Conversion BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.20pm First shown on BBC Three, this smart and sobering documentary follows Simon Atkins – who is Catholic and gay – as he looks at convert to Judaism, a religion that would allow him to marry his boyfriend, Matthew. Atkin’s journey is both spiritual and literal, as he travels to relatively tolerant Tel Aviv and more conservative Jerusalem, hoping to reconcile his sexuality with his religious beliefs. GT The South Bank Show Sky Arts, 8.00pm Singer-songwriter Benjamin Clementine, who won the Mercury Prize in 2015, talks to Melvyn Bragg about his early years on the streets and being hailed perhaps the brightest musical talent of his generation. In Search of Arcadia BBC Four, 9.00pm This contemplative documentary sees Dr Janina Ramirez and John Bailey explore the roots of the Arcadian cultural revolutionaries that sprang up along the Thames in the 17th and 18th centuries. Citizen Jane: Battle for the City BBC Four, 10.00pm When she saw the controversial development projects proposed by Robert Moses in Sixties New York, Jane Jacobs decided to take him on. Matt Tyrnauer’s punchy documentary pulls together an inspiring tale out of unlikely material – the debate of community culture versus “slum clearance”, one which continues to this day in cities across the world. GT Bridge to Terabithia (2007) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.10pm  Talented child stars AnnaSophia Robb and Josh Hutcherson (who went on to star in The Hunger Games) play two young misfits who become friends and create a magical world of the imagination in a remote part of the forest. This quality Disney production, adapted from Katherine Paterson’s classic novel, ventures into unexpectedly dark territory and packs an emotional punch that will have you reaching for your hankie. Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief (2015) ★★★★☆ Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Based on a book by the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Lawrence Wright, director Alex Gibney’s documentary about the Church of Scientology is a gripping, painstakingly researched exposé of one of the world’s most enigmatic organisations. At its core are a series of chilling allegations by former Scientology members, who describe a culture of abuse. The Lost Boys (1987) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 9.00pm Teen flick meets horror in this Eighties hit about two boys (Jason Patric and Corey Haim) who move to a quiet, northern California town where they become involved with a group of bloodthirsty vampires. These days it has to compete with the likes of Twilight and The Vampire Diaries, but there’s still enough action, intrigue, danger and romance to keep you hooked. Kiefer Sutherland and Corey Feldman also star. Thursday 10 July Princess Diana with Raine, Comtesse De Chambrun  Credit: Channel 4 Princess Diana’s “Wicked” Stepmother Channel 4, 9.00pm A gossipy, full-throttle and altogether naughty documentary about Diana, Princess of Wales’s stepmother Raine, Countess Spencer, who died last October. The daughter of romantic novelist Barbara Cartland, Raine was a prodigious social climber described here as “a famous socialite, a feisty politician and all-round force of nature” (“Nobody gets to be a countess three times by accident,” says one contributor). It seems like an accurate fit.  Named “Debutante of the Year” in 1947, Raine went on to bag a future Earl for a husband at the age of 18, became the youngest member of Westminster City Council at 23, before going on to become a noted conservation campaigner. The main focus here, though, is how she went on to marry a second Earl, John Spencer, in circumstances that earned her the entrenched enmity of his children, prime among them being his then 15-year-old daughter, Lady Diana. Yet when Diana’s own marriage ran into trouble it was Raine, so it’s claimed, that she turned to for support; the once “sworn enemy was transformed into her closest confidante”. The contributors include Downton Abbey writer Julian Fellowes and royal biographer Penny Junor. Gerard O’Donovan Natwest T20 Blast Cricket: Hampshire v Glamorgan Sky Sports Cricket, 6.00pm All the action from the Ageas Bowl for this South Division match. The home side are one of the most successful in the history of domestic T20 cricket, having won the competition twice and appeared in another four Finals Days. 10 Puppies and Us BBC Two, 8.00pm Here are more tales of new dog owners and their pups. This week, a mother seeks a canine companion for her son who has Down’s syndrome; the conflict between rival Chihuahuas Rocky and Chloe deepens; and a newlywed couple call in the behaviourist when a pug objects to their connubial bliss.  James Martin’s French Adventure ITV, 8.30pm Chef James Martin heads to the hilly Jura region, where a pear orchard proves to be the source of the perfect chutney for barbecued duck, and a visit to the citadel at Fort des Rousses shows why dungeons make the best cheese cellars. Top of the Lake: China Girl BBC Two, 9.00pm In the wake of last week’s shock revelation, Jane Campion’s off-kilter crime drama continues, with troubled detective Robin Griffin (Elisabeth Moss) pointing the China Girl investigation in a new direction, that of a surrogacy deal gone wrong. Meanwhile, Robin must face demons from her past when her former police chief Al Parker (David Wenham) arrives from New Zealand. Inside London Fire Brigade ITV, 9.00pm As the documentary series concludes, retiring crew manager Al passes the baton on to 25-year-old rookie Joe, who faces a tough test fighting his first big fire. GO A Premier League of Their Own Sky1, 9.00pm Ahead of next weekend’s opening matches in the Premier League, James Corden and pals begin the new season of the panel show with a special edition. Guests Thierry Henry, Jeff Stelling and Kelly Cates will be celebrating all things football alongside the show’s regulars Freddie Flintoff, Jack Whitehall and Jamie Redknapp. Plus McFly’s Danny Jones, singer Kate Nash and R&B star Lemar will be stepping up to the spot for Popstar Penalties. Laurel and Hardy: Their Lives and Magic Sky Arts, 9.00pm Fans of Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy will enjoy this superb assemblage of clips and out-takes. This enthralling documentary follows the life and work of the world’s most beloved comedy duo, and includes rare footage of Laurel in his later years, as well as an even rarer interview with his daughter, Lois. There’s also a tribute to the unusually strong friendship that the two stars enjoyed throughout their working lives. GO Dr Seuss’ The Lorax (2012) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 2.55pm This animated adaptation of Dr Seuss’s quirky story follows a boy (voiced by Zac Efron) who goes in search of a tree to impress a nature-loving girl (Taylor Swift). But he stumbles on the Once-ler (Ed Helms), the man responsible for harvesting all the world’s plant life. Children will enjoy it, even if the film does sacrifice a measure of its literary magic to the god of cinematic entertainment. Wild (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm  The Pacific Crest Trail, which runs up the entire western spine of the United States, is a challenge of fabled arduousness and rugged beauty. In 1995, aged 26, Cheryl Strayed (played by a superb Reese Witherspoon) walked it, to get clearance in her head after a decade of loss and personal meltdown. Wild powerfully reveals Strayed’s terrors and pleasures as she forges ahead on the journey. Wilde (1996) ★★★☆☆ BBC Four, 10.00pm  Many feel that Stephen Fry was born to play the part of the tragic and devastatingly brilliant Oscar Wilde. He’s terrific, but is only one of several superb players in a film which is held together by its performances. There’s Tom Wilkinson as the odious bully Queensberry and Jude Law on wonderfully petulant form as Bosie, the cause of Wilde’s downfall. Wilde’s story The Selfish Giant is woven throughout the film. Friday 11 August The Royal Albert Hall Credit: BBC BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 8.00pm Swapping tuxes for cowboy hats, the Proms continues tonight with a staging of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s beloved 1943 musical Oklahoma!  Expect plenty of whip-cracking, thigh-slapping, wild-west antics at the Royal Albert Hall, as conductor John Wilson and his orchestra add their signature élan to this story of a love affair between dashing cowboy Curly McLain (Nathaniel Hackmann) and farmer’s daughter Laurey Williams (Scarlett Strallen). Playing Jud Fy, the brooding, bestial social misfit with designs on Laurey himself, meanwhile, is David Seadon-Young. Elsewhere, Belinda Lang stars as the clucking Aunt Eller, and comedian Marcus Brigstocke is Ali Hakim, the Persian huckster battling with the cowboy Will Parker (Robert Fairchild) for the affections of fickle Ado Annie (Lizzy Connolly). The dance routines are balletic and fast, the hits frequent: the jaunty Surrey With the Fringe on Top, the romantic People Will Say We’re in Love, the lovely I Cain’t Say No, and, of course, the unmistakable opening song, Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin’. Rachel Kavanaugh, who directed an acclaimed touring production of Oklahoma! in 2015, is at the helm again here. Patrick Smith Premier League Football: Arsenal v Leicester City Sky Sports Premier League/Sky Sports Main Event, 7.00pm After three months of bluster and big-spending in the transfer market, the Premier League returns – and for the first time, the season gets under way on a Friday. All eyes tonight will be on Arsenal’s Alexandre Lacazette, the French striker who joined the Gunners for a club record fee of £52 million. Can he be the man to fire Arsenal back into the top four? Leicester City, meanwhile, will be keen to bounce back from a disappointing season that saw Claudio Ranieri sacked as manager despite having won them the league nine months previously. When these sides last met, at the end of April, a late own goal from Robert Huth handed Arsenal a 1-0 victory. Teach My Pet to Do That ITV, 8.00pm Arriving in the dog days of summer, this fluffy new series is presented by Alexander Amstrong, who asks such questions as: can a cat be trained to ride a labrador? Helping him teach tricks to the pets – among them, a dachshund labrador cross called Eric and a miniature horse called Aslan – are animal trainers Nando Brown and Jo-Rosie Haffenden.  Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm Throughout this week Steve Jones, Kate Quilton and Supervet Noel Fitzpatrick have been trying to find permanent homes for every animal in the Newcastle Dog and Cat Shelter. Tonight, they make one final push.  Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm Green fingers at the ready as Monty Don advises on how to cut and maintain hedges, while Adam Frost reveals the secrets of successful planting combinations. The Street ITV3, 9.00pm Previously shown in 2009, Jimmy McGovern’s gloom-ridden series comprised six stand-alone episodes focusing on the lives of the inhabitants of a single street in Liverpool. In this instalment, Anna Friel, recently seen in McGovern’s latest drama Broken, plays a single mother trying to hold down two jobs, pay the mortgage and get her two sons into a better school. Starring opposite her is Daniel Mays – with whom she also appeared in Tony Marchant’s similarly bleak drama Public Enemies – as the plumber whom she begins dating. What unfolds is expertly crafted and at times gut-wrenching to watch.  The Agony & the Ecstasy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This entertainingly nostalgic four-part series looks at how the UK’s rave scene exploded in the Eighties, fuelled by the party drug ecstasy. With the help of DJs such as Goldie, Paul Oakenfold and Annie Mac, it also explores how the genre evolved over the next three decades. Reach for the lasers. PS Eden: Paradise Lost Channel 4, 10.00pm The off-grid experiment – in which 23 people were stranded on the west coast of Scotland to fend for themselves – arrived on Channel 4 a year ago amid great fanfare but ended up being an unmitigated flop, with only 10 participants making it through to the end. In tonight’s finale, the action takes us from Christmas Day through to March, when those who remained were finally released. PS Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm  This first of a potentially limitless spin-off series of “Star Wars Stories” follows rebel live-wire Jyn Erso (Felicity Jones), who leads a band of self-styled “spies, saboteurs and assassins” on a death-or-glory mission to steal the Death Star plans from an Imperial stronghold, via some genuinely breathtaking planetary vistas and earth-ripping set-pieces.  The Firm (1993) ★★★☆☆ W, 9.00pm  Sydney Pollack directed this accomplished yet curiously uninvolving adaptation of John Grisham’s legal potboiler. Tom Cruise plays Mitch McDeere, an ambitious young lawyer who takes a well-paid job at a Memphis law firm that sounds too good to be true. And it is: the firm launders money for the Mob. Can Mitch escape with his morals and marriage intact? Gene Hackman co-stars as Cruise’s father figure. Strictly Ballroom (1992) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 11.05pm  Paul Mercurio plays a rebellious ballroom dancer who breaks all the rules and paso dobles his way to victory in this crowd-pleasing Australian comedy. Baz Luhrmann’s writing and directing debut is just as brash as Moulin Rouge! but a lot less pleased with itself. There’s romance between our hero and his ugly duckling partner, and it’s set against an enjoyable parade of sequin-decked caricatures and high camp. Watch here on TVPlayer Television previewers Catherine Gee, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: Emma Willis on Who Do You Think You Are? plus Top of the Lake: China Girl

Thursday 3 August Who Do You Think You Are? BBC One, 9.00pm This week’s edition of the genealogy show initially threatens to be one of those pleasant enough hours with no real surprises. Our subject is TV presenter Emma Willis, a proud Birmingham girl and the product of a close-knit, working-class background who explains that she has come from “a kind family” and hopes previous generations will turn out to have been similar.  Initially it seems as though those dreams will come true with an interesting but hardly ground-breaking trawl through generations of hard-working Brummie grafters who lurched from prosperity to the workhouse and back again, but appear to have stuck together through good times and bad. “When I look at that picture I think of Peaky Blinders,” Willis says early on about a family snapshot, but the reality is less criminal and more enterprise. Things take a more interesting, and altogether darker turn, however, once she heads across the sea to Ireland for a tale of violence, abuse of power and ultimately love, which uncovers a true working-class hero in the process. “We all want to have a nice story, right?” notes the likeable Willis. Her pleasure when she finally finds one is infectious. SC 10 Puppies and Us BBC Two, 8.00pm Imagine refusing to do anything unless you’re fed sausages. It’s not a bad way to go about life and certainly one that stubborn golden retriever Lola adopts. Canine behaviourist Louise Glazebrook is on hand to give advice to her struggling new owners.  RW  James Martin’s French Adventure ITV, 8.30pm The likeable chef heads to the lakeside town of Annecy, nicknamed the Pearl of the French Alps, where he selects ingredients from the local market to create a lobster dish. He also meets award-winning pastry chef Philippe Rigollot to sample his desserts. RW Top of the Lake: China Girl BBC Two, 9.00pm This second series of Jane Campion’s mystery drama is shaping up to be better than the first as it homes in on the central story without any wild distractions. Nicole Kidman, too, is chilling as an adoptive mother Julia. Tonight, an autopsy reveals that murdered victim China Girl was a sex worker, sending Detective Robin Griffin (Elisabeth Moss) and sidekick Miranda (Gwendoline Christie) in a new direction. RW Prejudice and Pride: The People’s History of LGBTQ Britain BBC Four, 9.00pm Comedians Susan Calman and Stephen K Amos present the second of two documentaries in which people share the objects that have defined their lives since homosexuality was partially decriminalised in 1967. There’s a pair of Ugg boots, and a racy school book, but for Shaun Duggan, the Brookside writer who gave us the first pre-watershed lesbian kiss on British television, it’s a letter from Morrissey. RW Insecure Sky Atlantic, 10.35pm This smart portrait of the life and friendships of twentysomething black women in LA is based on the internet series The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl by US comedian Issa Rae. Her writing is crisp and insightful and her performance, as the well-meaning member of an outreach programme for inner-city schools, is excellent. Tonight the series returns for a second run and Issa is trying to piece herself together post break-up. RW Kicked Out: From Care to Chaos BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm Rebecca Southworth explores why so many children lead troubled lives after leaving care. RW The Way Way Back (2013) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.00pm  This coming-of-age story feels like familiar terrain, but it’s agreeably done. Duncan (Liam James) learns about life, love and self-esteem from a gang of water-park employees, including the excellent Sam Rockwell, when forced to go on holiday with his mother (Toni Collette) and her boyfriend (Steve Carrell). The script flows and there’s enough melancholy and edge to the overall comic tone for its charm to prevail. The Island (2005) ★★☆☆☆ 5STAR, 9.00pm  Michael Bay’s sci-fi flop humbled Steven Spielberg’s DreamWorks. Not only was the original script scrapped, the film only just recouped the $ 126 million it cost to make, though it’s still a stylish offering. It stars Ewan McGregor as a human clone who lives in a controlled facility and dreams of going to “The Island”, the last uncontaminated place on Earth. Scarlett Johansson and Sean Bean buoy up the cast. Cliffhanger (1993) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 11.45pm  Living up to its title, Cliffhanger is a rollicking rollercoaster of a film. It stars Sylvester Stallone as a hotshot mountain climber, who becomes embroiled in a heist, along with Janine Turner. Set in the Rocky Mountains and featuring some stupendous stunts, it may be big-budget nonsense – but it’s entertaining big-budget nonsense with zesty lines and exhilarating cinematography. Renny Harlin directs.   Friday 4 August Sun-soaked: the biggest resort on the Costa del Sol  The Secret Life of the Holiday Resort Channel 4, 8.00pm Spain hosted 10 million British holidaymakers in 2016, two million more than in the previous year. With the package holiday one of the main beneficiaries of this apparent rekindling of Anglo-Spanish love in the wake of Brexit, Katherine Patrick’s documentary travels to Holidayworld, the biggest all-inclusive resort on the Costa del Sol, where three-quarters of the 3,000 guests are from the UK. There, we meet three four-person families seeking brief respite from the gruelling jobs that generally keep them apart, and some of the 500 heroic staff. The Secret Life of the Holiday Resort is rather harmless, unenlightening stuff, propped up by an exhausting procession of vague statistics and meaningless survey results (“a third of parents say the most frequent rows abroad are between them and their kids”, that sort of thing) reeled off by narrator Blake Harrison (of The Inbetweeners). All the expected boxes are ticked – techniques for bagging sunbeds, the artery-clogging buffets, the pros and cons of families spending a week in such proximity – but it’s good-natured throughout, even during the inevitable and perfunctory drift into Brexit chat. The very essence of silly season programming. GT Icarus Netflix, from today In what is a coup for Netflix, this award-winning documentary from Bryan Fogel began as a Supersize Me-style experiment into the effects of doping. But after Fogel connected with renegade scientist Dr Grigory Rodchenkov, it became a lid-lifting investigation into a widespread Russian scandal that seemingly goes as high as Putin. GT Cleverman BBC Three, from 10.00am Series two of the fun, if labyrinthine, dystopian drama from Australia will be made available today in its entirety. Wearing X-Men’s influence on its sleeve, it follows the leader of the “Hairies”, superpowered people trying to live alongside humans that persecute and subjugate them. GT BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 8.00pm The music of Ella Fitzgerald and Dizzy Gillespie is celebrated in the centenary year of their births, with musicians, including singer Diane Reeves, performing with the BBC Concert Orchestra. GT The Secret World of Posh Pets ITV, 8.00pm; not UTV/STV/Wales This final part finds 21-year-old Rory roping in his father to expand his niche business of exporting jellyfish, while there’s evidence that horse-grooming has reached genuinely berserk levels, with unicorn horns and nail polish the latest must-haves for those benighted equine attractions at children’s parties. GT Only Connect BBC Two, 8.30pm Viking experts take on geocachers (participants in a GPS-driven treasure hunt), with one (relatively straightforward) challenge involving finding the link between exhibit, salt and pepper, outcast and roots manoeuvre. GT Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm Irises, pelargonium cuttings, growing plants inside and managing a shaded, sloping town garden are among the challenges facing Monty Don and his team in tonight’s edition of the hardy perennial. GT Autopsy: Kurt Cobain Channel 5, 10.05pm Forensic pathologist Dr Jason Payne-James turns his attention to the alleged suicide of Kurt Cobain. Alleged, because certain conspiracy theorists assert that he had too much heroin in his system to be able to have inflicted the gunshot wound to his head. Probably best not to expect any definitive results here, however. GT This Is 40 (2012) ★★★☆☆ E4, 9.00pm  Judd Apatow revisits two characters from his 2007 hit Knocked Up. Leslie Mann, Apatow’s wife, and Paul Rudd play a stressed-out Los Angeles couple whose 40th birthdays bookend the film. Apatow and Mann’s real-life daughters also play their children. It’s a perceptive comedy on middle-age and one that guarantees big laughs alongside some of Apatow’s most pertinent observations on love. The Green Mile (1999) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm  Tom Hanks stars in this Oscar-nominated adaptation of Stephen King’s entrancingly strange novel. Stolid prison guard Paul Edgecomb (Hanks) is shaken by the arrival of a convict (Michael Clarke Duncan) who has supernatural powers. Although a little lightweight compared with director Frank Darabont’s previous prison film, The Shawshank Redemption, it’s pleasingly creepy. The Help (2011) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm  Emma Stone sparkles among the fine female cast in this enjoyable adaptation of Kathryn Stockett’s bestselling 2009 novel. She stars as a budding journalist working in Sixties Jackson, Mississippi, who convinces two black maids (Viola Davis and the Oscar-winning Octavia Spencer) to work secretly with her on a book and reveal the hardships inflicted on them. Bryce Dallas Howard is a delightfully hissable villain. Saturday 5 August Billy Connolly in front of John Byrne's portrait in mural form in Glasgow's Osborne Street Credit: BBC Billy Connolly: Portrait of a Lifetime BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 10.30pm “Glasgow belongs to me,” says Billy Connolly of his hometown in this heart-warming documentary to mark the comedian’s 75th birthday in November. And he’s not wrong as three imposing 50ft tribute portraits have recently been unveiled on wallends in the city. They were created by Scottish artists John Byrne, Jack Vettriano and Rachel MacLean, and this accompanying film not only gives a neat history of the area, but serves as a celebration of the Big Yin’s career.  Interspersed with clips of his stand-up routines, including his cheeky first appearance on Parkinson in 1975 when he told the bum joke that turned him into a star, the programme see Connolly sit quietly for the artists – not one of his strong points as he admits: “I’ve been very patient. I think I’m due an episode.” Watching them at work in their studios is inspiring and Connolly is taken aback by the results. “It’s like looking into a mirror. You know my soul,” he says to Byrne, who used to design album covers for Connolly’s band The Humblebums. “I’m amazed at the effect these have had on me, they’ve stunned me.” From tomorrow, the original portraits will be hung in the People’s Palace. Rachel Ward Athletics: World Championships BBC Two, 9.30am & BBC One, 6.30pm Day two at the London Stadium in Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park sees Usain Bolt – in all likeliness – going for gold in the men’s 100 m final (9.45pm) as he makes his final individual appearance at a major championships. His main threats are expected to come from former champions Justin Gatlin and Yohan Blake, as well as emerging star Christian Coleman. Earlier in the day, British medal hope Katarina Johnson-Thompson gets her heptathlon bid under way with the 100 m hurdles at 10.05am. Sadly not in action today is Greg Rutherford, who, because of an ankle injury, won’t be competing in the men’s long jump final (8.05pm).  Little Big Shots USA ITV, 5.00pm Steve Harvey showcases more talented youngsters while mocking his own stupidity in this family friendly show exec-produced by Ellen DeGeneres. Tonight, there’s a maths genius and a Motown singer. Royal Cousins at War BBC Two, 7.30pm; NI, 8.00pm A welcome repeat for this riveting analysis of the relationship between Kaiser Bill, Tsar Nicholas II of Russia and our own King George V, and the disastrous effect that their rivalry had on the First World War.  Paul O’Grady’s Hollywood Channel 4, 8.00pm This new series sees Paul O’Grady delve into cinematic history to find out what it takes to make a masterpiece. He begins with “weepies”, where the host’s caustic wit serves as the perfect antidote as talking heads, including Sigourney Weaver and Celine Dion, reach for the tissues as they relate films such as Brief Encounter, Titanic and, quite possibly the saddest in movie history, The Champ.    Dad’s Army BBC Two, 8.30pm; not NI This is a gem of an episode loaded with slapstick fun from 1970. It’s the one where Corporal Jones (Clive Dunn) dresses as a tree trunk during an exercise pitting Mainwaring (Arthur Lowe) and his crew against their pompous arch-rival Captain Square. RW The L.A. Riots: 25 Years Later History, 9.00pm Twenty-five years after Los Angeles erupted into one of the most destructive civil disturbances in US history (11,000 people were arrested and an estimated 63 people were killed), this documentary looks back at the decades of racial injustice that led to the incident and the history of police relations with LA’s black community. Citizens, council members and even those who committed crimes talk about how South Central was beset by mass riots, looting, and fires.  Cambridge Folk Festival 2017 Sky Arts, 9.00pm Broadcaster Mark Radcliffe and musician Julie Fowlis present highlights from this year’s festival, an event that attracts 10,000 visitors. These include Jon Boden, formerly of Bellowhead, performing new material with his band The Remnant Kings. There’s also music from Jake Bugg, electric punk stars Oysterband and Lisa Hannigan, once as a member of Damien Rice’s band. RW The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies (2014) ★★☆☆☆ ITV, 8.00pm  The battle of the title was barely mentioned by JRR Tolkein in The Hobbit, but it was seemingly enough for Peter Jackson to pad out his franchise even further. Picking up where the last film left off, our heroes had just unleashed the wrath of dragon Smaug (Benedict Cumberbatch). But there’s another battle looming, one between themselves which is fuelled by greed. Red (2010) ★★★★☆ Channel 4, 9.00pm  A starry line-up of actors of pensionable age is the attraction of this light-hearted adaptation of Warren Ellis’s graphic novel, and it’s hard to resist Helen Mirren with a submachine gun. RED stands for “Retired Extremely Dangerous”, which is what the CIA has labelled former agents Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich and Mirren, who team up to find out who has marked them for assassination, and why. I Know What You Did Last Summer (1997) ★★☆☆☆ BBC One, 11.55pm  This routine slasher flick, written by Kevin Williamson of Scream fame, will certainly make you jump but it’s unlikely to give you many sleepless nights. When a carful of American teenagers hits and kills a man, they panic and dump the body. Months later, the inevitable slaughter begins. A hapless cast, featuring Sarah Michelle Gellar, brings unintentional levity to proceedings. Sunday 6 August Diana, Princess of Wales Credit: Rex Diana: In Her Own Words Channel 4, 8.00pm Much controversy has surrounded this documentary, which broadcasts – for the first time in the UK – video footage recorded in 1992 and 1993 by Diana, Princess of Wales’s voice coach, Peter Settelen. Hired to help Diana reframe her public image and put forward her own side of the story regarding her marriage, Settelen saw his work bear fruit in his client’s Panorama interview. Now there is undoubted interest in watching Diana recount key events in her life unmediated, with candour and a seductive mix of charm and steel. “He chatted me up like a bad rash,” she recalls of her future husband at one point; at another, she remembers being “completely thrown” by the Prince of Wales’s peculiar response to a question about them being in love. In truth, director Kevin Sim rather crams the at-times uncomfortably intimate footage into the first and final thirds of the documentary, leaving assorted friends and confidants to tell the rest of the very familiar story, and the melodrama is laid on a little thick at times. Exploitative? Perhaps. Fascinating? In patches, although it probably won’t entirely satisfy either those looking for genuinely fresh insights or an opportunity to be outraged. Gabriel Tate Community Shield Football: Arsenal v Chelsea BT Sport 1, 1.00pm Arsenal and Chelsea meet for the second time in as many weeks, with Antonio Conte’s Blues favourites to lift the Community Shield today having won 3-0 in Beijing thanks to a brace from Michy Batshuayi.  Women’s Football: Euro 2017 Channel 4, 3.00pm After a thrilling tournament – during which a record 3.3 million people tuned in to watch England’s Lionesses beat France 1-0 – we’re at the FC Twente Stadion in Enschede, Holland, as the successors to Germany are crowned.   LSO Sky Arts, 6.00pm Originally, and rather impishly, hinting at a “greatest hits” of Haydn, Simon Rattle and his Imaginary Orchestral Journey instead took movements from 11 of the Austrian composer’s works, many of them rarely performed, and realigned them joyfully and perceptively in this concert with the London Symphony Orchestra. Works from Bartók and an extract from Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde provide the hors d’oeuvre for this enticing programme.   BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 7.00pm One of the most anticipated events of every Prom season, the National Youth Orchestra of Great Britain brings its energy and drive to the Royal Albert Hall. First comes the London premiere of Francisco Coll’s “grotesque symphony” Mural and Thomas Adès conducting his own work, Polaris, for the first time in the capital. The climax comes courtesy of Igor Stravinsky and his agelessly thrilling Rite of Spring. It is introduced by Suzy Klein and Lloyd Coleman. GT Secrets of Silicon Valley BBC Two, 8.00pm Blogger Jamie Bartlett investigates whether technological progress should be made at any cost. On the one side, he meets those tackling climate change; on the other, those paying the price for the success of Uber and, somewhere in the middle, the pioneers of self-driving cars.    Poldark BBC One, 9.00pm Having barrelled along entertainingly, with the undercurrent of hardscrabble misery intact, this third series concludes with sightings of French sails spotted on the horizon and Cornwall put on high alert. Meanwhile, Cap’n Ross (Aidan Turner) contends with a broadside from George Warleggan  (Jack Farthing).   The Last Days of Patrick Swayze Channel 5, 10.00pm Given the fact that he died from pancreatic cancer aged 57, we can reasonably surmise that the Dirty Dancing star’s final hours were not wholly pleasant. So, what can forensic pathologist Jason Payne-James, perusing Swayze’s medical records, add to the story?   Gareth Thomas: Hate in the Beautiful Game BBC Two, 10.30pm; not NI Former Welsh rugby union captain Gareth Thomas, who came out in 2009 while still playing, asks why football has shamefully remained a bastion of open homophobia – perhaps the last in sport. GT Frozen (2013) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 1.40pm  Disney’s 53rd feature is an enchanting combination of fairytale derring-do and heart-popping musical numbers that has left children and adults powerless to its charms (even if some parents may have grown rather tired of it). Elsa (Idina Menzel) is a shy princess driven into exile when her magical powers are discovered. Her sister Anna (Kristen Bell) gallops off to fetch her from her beautiful ice palace. The King’s Speech (2010) ★★★★★ Channel 4, 9.50pm  Tom Hooper’s film about the future George VI’s struggle to overcome his stammer in the nation’s hour of need won multiple Academy Awards, including a deserved Best Actor gong for Colin Firth. But it’s his double-act with Geoffrey Rush as his speech therapist Lionel Logue that gives the film its heart, and the doublehanders between them are fraught and fascinating. Point Break (1991) ★★★☆☆ Channel 5, 11.05pm Kathryn Bigelow’s cult surfing/crime film elevated Patrick Swayze’s actor status to true action hero. Keanu Reeves plays Johnny Utah, an FBI agent who goes undercover to infiltrate the Ex-Presidents, a gang of bankrobbing surfers led by the charismatic Bodhi (Swayze). The action heats up when Bodhi and Utah find they share a similar attitude towards danger. Lori Petty is the surfer who catches Johnny’s eye. Monday 7 August Eden: Paradise Lost - the participants Credit: Channel 4 Eden: Paradise Lost Channel 4, 10.00pm In March 2016, 23 idealists set out to take part in Channel 4’s Eden experiment, which, a touch grandiosely, sought to establish “a new society” from scratch, cut off from the modern world on a remote Scottish peninsula for an entire year. “What if we could start again?” was the much-hyped tag line. And the answer was… well, we never got to find out the answer because the series was pulled last summer, after just four episodes, when viewing figures took a dive from 1.7 million to less than 800,000.  Not that Channel 4 or production company Keo Films thought to tell the participants that. Instead they were left to get on with it. Rumours swirled of Lord of the Flies levels of acrimony, mass defections, starvation, health problems, people eating chicken feed to survive. So it could make for absorbing viewing in this five-part update, which airs every night this week. Although probably the greatest fascination will be in seeing the reactions of the 10 participants who suffered through to the end as they emerged from the nightmare in March this year only to discover that their efforts have mostly been in vain – and that the political landscape has drastically altered while they were gone. Gerard O’Donovan Stacey Dooley Investigates: Divide and National Pride in Northern Ireland  BBC Three, from 10.00am The intrepid reporter discovers that bitter political divisions persist in Northern Ireland as she seeks to discover more about Prime Minister Theresa May’s new allies in the Democratic Unionist Party. The Bug Grub Couple BBC One, 7.30pm Bug burger or beef burger? That’s the choice at the Grub restaurant in Pembrokeshire, part of entomologist Dr Sarah Beynon and chef Andy Holcroft’s Bug Farm – an insect zoo, research centre and insect eaterie. Here they struggle to convince us why we all should learn to love eating insect protein.   Masters Tennis: The Rogers Cup Sky Sports Main Event, 7.00pm The Uniprix Stadium in Montreal is the setting, as the Rogers Cup gets under way. Novak Djokovic lifted the trophy in 2016 for the fourth time, defeating Kei Nishikori in the final. The Serbian misses out this time around, though, due to injury.  Tornado: The 100mph Steam Engine BBC Four, 8.00pm If phrases like “it’s a Peppercorn class A1 Pacific” get you all steamed up you’ll be in heaven with this account of how a bunch of engineering enthusiasts got the massive locomotive they took 18 years to build from scratch to take on the ultimate test: hitting 100 miles per hour, a speed no British steam train has achieved since 1967.    Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm This new, live, animal rescue show with Steve Jones, Kate Quilton and Noel Fitzpatrick attempts to rehome a whole shelter’s worth of dogs, cats and assorted other species. Among the celebs espousing the joy of pets in this opener is pop singer Leona Lewis. Continues until Friday.   Man in an Orange Shirt BBC Two, 9.00pm In part two of novelist Patrick Gale’s drama for the Gay Britannia season, more than half a century on, Flora (Vanessa Redgrave) gives her late husband’s cottage to their grandson Adam (Julian Morris), who finds himself drawn to his architect, Steve (David Gyasi).   Inside Heston’s World Good Food, 9.00pm This four-part series chronicles chef Heston Blumenthal’s attempt to bring a flavour of his Fat Duck restaurant to Australia, in a multi-million pound move to Melbourne last year. GO Make or Break? Channel 5, 10.00pm A new reality series, stripped across the week, in which eight troubled couples test the strength of their relationships at a Mexican holiday resort, where alongside counselling and therapy sessions, they have to swap partners every two days. GO Doctor Dolittle (1967) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 5.05pm  This is not the Eddie Murphy comedy version from 1998 but the charming Sixties musical directed by Richard Fleischer. Rex Harrison stars as the terse, eponymous doctor who has the uncanny ability to speak to animals and so embarks on a voyage to find an elusive pink sea snail and a giant lunar moth. Samantha Egger, 20 years Harrison’s junior, co-stars as the adventurous stowaway who falls in love with the doctor.  Storks (2016) ★★★☆☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 6.20pm  Warner Animation Group’s first film since 2014’s The Lego Movie is spectacularly daft but manages to be both moving and very fun. Here the storks of the title have moved on from delivering babies to big business and now transport products for an Amazon-style website. But then the old baby-making machine, gathering dust in the corner, is accidentally reactivated and suddenly they have a baby to get home.  American History X (1998) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 10.00pm  Tony Kaye directs this compellingly violent and brutal examination of white supremacism in America. Edward Norton is both mesmerising and terrifying as Derek, a student drawn into the Neo-Nazi movement who mercilessly kills two black youths. After a stint in prison he’s reformed but returns  home to find his younger brother Danny (Edward Furlong) on the same track he was. Tuesday 8 August Jodie Whittaker and Emun Elliott Credit: BBC Trust Me BBC One, 9.00pm Before she becomes the Doctor in Doctor Who, Jodie Whittaker stars in a drama about… pretending to be a doctor. No doubt there will soon be many jokes about that floating around. In this new four-part drama, written by real-life doctor Dan Sefton, Whittaker stars as Cath, a downtrodden ward sister who is fired when she takes her concerns about the conditions in her Sheffield hospital to the trust. Then, when at the leaving party for her best friend Alison – who’s about to begin a new life in New Zealand – she spots Alison’s CV and medical degree certificate in a bin.  So Cath decides to adopt Alison’s identity and, hoping that her nursing skills will be enough to get by, find a job as a doctor far away in Edinburgh. Though the premise may sound a little daft, it’s actually surprisingly – and worryingly – common. Sefton uses his hospital know-how to bring a sense of authenticity to what is a really quite gripping drama.  Whittaker, rather than channelling a cocky Leonardo DiCaprio in Catch Me if You Can, is every inch the terrified woman flying by the seat of her pants. Excellent, too, is Emun Elliot as the colleague who catches her eye. Catherine Gee EastEnders BBC One, 7.30pm Mick’s (Danny Dyer) dastardly behaviour comes to a head in this special three-hander episode. He decides to tell wife Linda (Kellie Bright) the truth about what he’s been up to while she was away: namely cheating on her with their daughter-in-law Whitney (Shona McGarty).    Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm It’s the second nightly visit to this admirable project, which seeks to rehouse all the animals  in a Newcastle shelter in just a week. While we meet the wide range of animals and see how many still remain, Dom Joly also learns what happens to micropigs when they grow up.     The Dog Rescuers with Alan Davies Channel 5, 8.00pm Among the five unlucky pups needing some loving care from the team this week are an abandoned staffie who’s given a second chance and a young spaniel with a nasty neck wound.     Get a House for Free Channel 4, 9.00pm Marco Robinson is a very rich man – £25 million rich, in fact. He made his fortune through a business and property empire and now he wants to give back. So he’s decided to give away a three-bed flat in Preston to the person who he thinks will benefit the most. This film follows him as he attempts to sift through 8,000 applications. CG Utopia: In Search of the Dream BBC Four, 9.00pm It’s 500 years since the term “utopia” was coined by Sir Thomas More in 1516. In this documentary, art historian Professor Richard Clay examines five centuries of the concept of utopia and the impact it has had on our way of thinking. Often used as a method of criticism of the current system, it is a powerful vision. Clay considers some of our “greatest utopian dreamers”, including Jonathan Swift, author of Gulliver’s Travels, and Gene Roddenberry, creator of Star Trek, and the common themes that run through the ideal.     The Yorkshire Dales and the Lakes More4, 9.00pm The cosy documentary series continues with a farmer finding an unusual method to keep track of his sheep: day-glo paint. Elsewhere in the Dales, we follow the Dent Brewery boys as they create their own craft ales and in the Lake District we see Jon Bennett make his daily ascent to the summit of Helvellyn. CG The Parent Trap (1961) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 11.00am   In a film that helped pioneer the split-screen technique, Hayley Mills plays both Susan Evers and Sharon McKendrick, twins unaware of each other’s existence and separated as babies following their parents’ divorce. When they meet, years later, at summer camp, the pair scheme to reunite their parents. This classic Disney comedy spawned three sequels and a 1998 remake starring a young Lindsay Lohan. Tootsie (1982) ★★★★☆ Film4, 6.30pm  When actor Michael Dorsey transforms himself into Dorothy Michaels in a desperate attempt to get work, complications arise as he falls for a female friend (Jessica Lange) and her father (Charles Durning)  falls for him. Although you never quite believe that Dustin Hoffman in drag would convince everyone that he’s a woman, it doesn’t matter: Tootsie is lots of fun – and it’s a sharply observed social satire, too. Groundhog Day (1993) ★★★★☆ Sky1, 9.00pm  In this wonderful comedy drama, a surly, sardonic weatherman (Bill Murray) is sent to the small US town of Punxsutawney to cover the annual groundhog festival, but finds himself experiencing precisely the same events over and over – then realises that he can free himself from the loop only by being a nicer person. One criticism: as always, Murray is so much more likeable as the malevolent grouch… Wednesday 9 August My Family, Partition and Me: India 1947 - Anita Rani  Credit: BBC My Family, Partition and Me: India 1947 BBC One, 9.00pm Two years ago, Anita Rani learnt how her family history was forever marked by the 1947 Partition of India in a memorable episode of Who Do You Think You Are? Now, she has wrangled three members of the public – one Hindu, one Christian and one Muslim – to explore how their own lives, and those of their ancestors, were affected by the appalling and widespread outbreaks of religious violence in the wake of Britain’s messy, compromised withdrawal, and the troubled legacy left by the Empire. In addition to eyewitness testimonies, the descendants of the survivors travel back to India, Pakistan and Bangladesh to retrace the journeys their relatives were forced to make. Their discoveries are in equal parts shocking, distressing and uplifting, and its treatment is rightly sensitive for events still in living memory: tears flow freely, yet it’s never sentimental. If there isn’t much space to dig into the wider political situation, the complex reasons behind the violence and longer-term implications, the detail of the personal recollections and anecdotes tells its own powerful tale. Rani returns to her own ancestral story in next week’s concluding part. Gabriel Tate Super Small Animals BBC One, 8.00pm Biologist Patrick Aryee demonstrates that size isn’t everything in the natural world, observing the extraordinary feats of strength, endurance and ingenuity of everything from hummingbirds  and seahorses to beetles and armadillos. Love Your Garden ITV, 8.00pm Alan Titchmarsh and his team turn an uninspiring patch of lumpy lawn and uneven paving into a sensory garden for a four-year-old girl with a very rare degenerative eye disease. Long Lost Family ITV, 9.00pm This episode of the always engaging and emotionally gruelling series reuniting long-estranged relatives charts the story of a woman who gave up her son only to adopt two boys herself, and a man whose mother put him up for adoption through an advert in the local press. My Big Gay Jewish Conversion BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.20pm First shown on BBC Three, this smart and sobering documentary follows Simon Atkins – who is Catholic and gay – as he looks at convert to Judaism, a religion that would allow him to marry his boyfriend, Matthew. Atkin’s journey is both spiritual and literal, as he travels to relatively tolerant Tel Aviv and more conservative Jerusalem, hoping to reconcile his sexuality with his religious beliefs. GT The South Bank Show Sky Arts, 8.00pm Singer-songwriter Benjamin Clementine, who won the Mercury Prize in 2015, talks to Melvyn Bragg about his early years on the streets and being hailed perhaps the brightest musical talent of his generation. In Search of Arcadia BBC Four, 9.00pm This contemplative documentary sees Dr Janina Ramirez and John Bailey explore the roots of the Arcadian cultural revolutionaries that sprang up along the Thames in the 17th and 18th centuries. Citizen Jane: Battle for the City BBC Four, 10.00pm When she saw the controversial development projects proposed by Robert Moses in Sixties New York, Jane Jacobs decided to take him on. Matt Tyrnauer’s punchy documentary pulls together an inspiring tale out of unlikely material – the debate of community culture versus “slum clearance”, one which continues to this day in cities across the world. GT Bridge to Terabithia (2007) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.10pm  Talented child stars AnnaSophia Robb and Josh Hutcherson (who went on to star in The Hunger Games) play two young misfits who become friends and create a magical world of the imagination in a remote part of the forest. This quality Disney production, adapted from Katherine Paterson’s classic novel, ventures into unexpectedly dark territory and packs an emotional punch that will have you reaching for your hankie. Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief (2015) ★★★★☆ Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Based on a book by the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Lawrence Wright, director Alex Gibney’s documentary about the Church of Scientology is a gripping, painstakingly researched exposé of one of the world’s most enigmatic organisations. At its core are a series of chilling allegations by former Scientology members, who describe a culture of abuse. The Lost Boys (1987) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 9.00pm Teen flick meets horror in this Eighties hit about two boys (Jason Patric and Corey Haim) who move to a quiet, northern California town where they become involved with a group of bloodthirsty vampires. These days it has to compete with the likes of Twilight and The Vampire Diaries, but there’s still enough action, intrigue, danger and romance to keep you hooked. Kiefer Sutherland and Corey Feldman also star. Thursday 10 July Princess Diana with Raine, Comtesse De Chambrun  Credit: Channel 4 Princess Diana’s “Wicked” Stepmother Channel 4, 9.00pm A gossipy, full-throttle and altogether naughty documentary about Diana, Princess of Wales’s stepmother Raine, Countess Spencer, who died last October. The daughter of romantic novelist Barbara Cartland, Raine was a prodigious social climber described here as “a famous socialite, a feisty politician and all-round force of nature” (“Nobody gets to be a countess three times by accident,” says one contributor). It seems like an accurate fit.  Named “Debutante of the Year” in 1947, Raine went on to bag a future Earl for a husband at the age of 18, became the youngest member of Westminster City Council at 23, before going on to become a noted conservation campaigner. The main focus here, though, is how she went on to marry a second Earl, John Spencer, in circumstances that earned her the entrenched enmity of his children, prime among them being his then 15-year-old daughter, Lady Diana. Yet when Diana’s own marriage ran into trouble it was Raine, so it’s claimed, that she turned to for support; the once “sworn enemy was transformed into her closest confidante”. The contributors include Downton Abbey writer Julian Fellowes and royal biographer Penny Junor. Gerard O’Donovan Natwest T20 Blast Cricket: Hampshire v Glamorgan Sky Sports Cricket, 6.00pm All the action from the Ageas Bowl for this South Division match. The home side are one of the most successful in the history of domestic T20 cricket, having won the competition twice and appeared in another four Finals Days. 10 Puppies and Us BBC Two, 8.00pm Here are more tales of new dog owners and their pups. This week, a mother seeks a canine companion for her son who has Down’s syndrome; the conflict between rival Chihuahuas Rocky and Chloe deepens; and a newlywed couple call in the behaviourist when a pug objects to their connubial bliss.  James Martin’s French Adventure ITV, 8.30pm Chef James Martin heads to the hilly Jura region, where a pear orchard proves to be the source of the perfect chutney for barbecued duck, and a visit to the citadel at Fort des Rousses shows why dungeons make the best cheese cellars. Top of the Lake: China Girl BBC Two, 9.00pm In the wake of last week’s shock revelation, Jane Campion’s off-kilter crime drama continues, with troubled detective Robin Griffin (Elisabeth Moss) pointing the China Girl investigation in a new direction, that of a surrogacy deal gone wrong. Meanwhile, Robin must face demons from her past when her former police chief Al Parker (David Wenham) arrives from New Zealand. Inside London Fire Brigade ITV, 9.00pm As the documentary series concludes, retiring crew manager Al passes the baton on to 25-year-old rookie Joe, who faces a tough test fighting his first big fire. GO A Premier League of Their Own Sky1, 9.00pm Ahead of next weekend’s opening matches in the Premier League, James Corden and pals begin the new season of the panel show with a special edition. Guests Thierry Henry, Jeff Stelling and Kelly Cates will be celebrating all things football alongside the show’s regulars Freddie Flintoff, Jack Whitehall and Jamie Redknapp. Plus McFly’s Danny Jones, singer Kate Nash and R&B star Lemar will be stepping up to the spot for Popstar Penalties. Laurel and Hardy: Their Lives and Magic Sky Arts, 9.00pm Fans of Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy will enjoy this superb assemblage of clips and out-takes. This enthralling documentary follows the life and work of the world’s most beloved comedy duo, and includes rare footage of Laurel in his later years, as well as an even rarer interview with his daughter, Lois. There’s also a tribute to the unusually strong friendship that the two stars enjoyed throughout their working lives. GO Dr Seuss’ The Lorax (2012) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 2.55pm This animated adaptation of Dr Seuss’s quirky story follows a boy (voiced by Zac Efron) who goes in search of a tree to impress a nature-loving girl (Taylor Swift). But he stumbles on the Once-ler (Ed Helms), the man responsible for harvesting all the world’s plant life. Children will enjoy it, even if the film does sacrifice a measure of its literary magic to the god of cinematic entertainment. Wild (2014) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm  The Pacific Crest Trail, which runs up the entire western spine of the United States, is a challenge of fabled arduousness and rugged beauty. In 1995, aged 26, Cheryl Strayed (played by a superb Reese Witherspoon) walked it, to get clearance in her head after a decade of loss and personal meltdown. Wild powerfully reveals Strayed’s terrors and pleasures as she forges ahead on the journey. Wilde (1996) ★★★☆☆ BBC Four, 10.00pm  Many feel that Stephen Fry was born to play the part of the tragic and devastatingly brilliant Oscar Wilde. He’s terrific, but is only one of several superb players in a film which is held together by its performances. There’s Tom Wilkinson as the odious bully Queensberry and Jude Law on wonderfully petulant form as Bosie, the cause of Wilde’s downfall. Wilde’s story The Selfish Giant is woven throughout the film. Friday 11 August The Royal Albert Hall Credit: BBC BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 8.00pm Swapping tuxes for cowboy hats, the Proms continues tonight with a staging of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s beloved 1943 musical Oklahoma!  Expect plenty of whip-cracking, thigh-slapping, wild-west antics at the Royal Albert Hall, as conductor John Wilson and his orchestra add their signature élan to this story of a love affair between dashing cowboy Curly McLain (Nathaniel Hackmann) and farmer’s daughter Laurey Williams (Scarlett Strallen). Playing Jud Fy, the brooding, bestial social misfit with designs on Laurey himself, meanwhile, is David Seadon-Young. Elsewhere, Belinda Lang stars as the clucking Aunt Eller, and comedian Marcus Brigstocke is Ali Hakim, the Persian huckster battling with the cowboy Will Parker (Robert Fairchild) for the affections of fickle Ado Annie (Lizzy Connolly). The dance routines are balletic and fast, the hits frequent: the jaunty Surrey With the Fringe on Top, the romantic People Will Say We’re in Love, the lovely I Cain’t Say No, and, of course, the unmistakable opening song, Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin’. Rachel Kavanaugh, who directed an acclaimed touring production of Oklahoma! in 2015, is at the helm again here. Patrick Smith Premier League Football: Arsenal v Leicester City Sky Sports Premier League/Sky Sports Main Event, 7.00pm After three months of bluster and big-spending in the transfer market, the Premier League returns – and for the first time, the season gets under way on a Friday. All eyes tonight will be on Arsenal’s Alexandre Lacazette, the French striker who joined the Gunners for a club record fee of £52 million. Can he be the man to fire Arsenal back into the top four? Leicester City, meanwhile, will be keen to bounce back from a disappointing season that saw Claudio Ranieri sacked as manager despite having won them the league nine months previously. When these sides last met, at the end of April, a late own goal from Robert Huth handed Arsenal a 1-0 victory. Teach My Pet to Do That ITV, 8.00pm Arriving in the dog days of summer, this fluffy new series is presented by Alexander Amstrong, who asks such questions as: can a cat be trained to ride a labrador? Helping him teach tricks to the pets – among them, a dachshund labrador cross called Eric and a miniature horse called Aslan – are animal trainers Nando Brown and Jo-Rosie Haffenden.  Animal Rescue Live: Supervet Special Channel 4, 8.00pm Throughout this week Steve Jones, Kate Quilton and Supervet Noel Fitzpatrick have been trying to find permanent homes for every animal in the Newcastle Dog and Cat Shelter. Tonight, they make one final push.  Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm Green fingers at the ready as Monty Don advises on how to cut and maintain hedges, while Adam Frost reveals the secrets of successful planting combinations. The Street ITV3, 9.00pm Previously shown in 2009, Jimmy McGovern’s gloom-ridden series comprised six stand-alone episodes focusing on the lives of the inhabitants of a single street in Liverpool. In this instalment, Anna Friel, recently seen in McGovern’s latest drama Broken, plays a single mother trying to hold down two jobs, pay the mortgage and get her two sons into a better school. Starring opposite her is Daniel Mays – with whom she also appeared in Tony Marchant’s similarly bleak drama Public Enemies – as the plumber whom she begins dating. What unfolds is expertly crafted and at times gut-wrenching to watch.  The Agony & the Ecstasy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This entertainingly nostalgic four-part series looks at how the UK’s rave scene exploded in the Eighties, fuelled by the party drug ecstasy. With the help of DJs such as Goldie, Paul Oakenfold and Annie Mac, it also explores how the genre evolved over the next three decades. Reach for the lasers. PS Eden: Paradise Lost Channel 4, 10.00pm The off-grid experiment – in which 23 people were stranded on the west coast of Scotland to fend for themselves – arrived on Channel 4 a year ago amid great fanfare but ended up being an unmitigated flop, with only 10 participants making it through to the end. In tonight’s finale, the action takes us from Christmas Day through to March, when those who remained were finally released. PS Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm  This first of a potentially limitless spin-off series of “Star Wars Stories” follows rebel live-wire Jyn Erso (Felicity Jones), who leads a band of self-styled “spies, saboteurs and assassins” on a death-or-glory mission to steal the Death Star plans from an Imperial stronghold, via some genuinely breathtaking planetary vistas and earth-ripping set-pieces.  The Firm (1993) ★★★☆☆ W, 9.00pm  Sydney Pollack directed this accomplished yet curiously uninvolving adaptation of John Grisham’s legal potboiler. Tom Cruise plays Mitch McDeere, an ambitious young lawyer who takes a well-paid job at a Memphis law firm that sounds too good to be true. And it is: the firm launders money for the Mob. Can Mitch escape with his morals and marriage intact? Gene Hackman co-stars as Cruise’s father figure. Strictly Ballroom (1992) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 11.05pm  Paul Mercurio plays a rebellious ballroom dancer who breaks all the rules and paso dobles his way to victory in this crowd-pleasing Australian comedy. Baz Luhrmann’s writing and directing debut is just as brash as Moulin Rouge! but a lot less pleased with itself. There’s romance between our hero and his ugly duckling partner, and it’s set against an enjoyable parade of sequin-decked caricatures and high camp. Watch here on TVPlayer Television previewers Catherine Gee, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward

What's on TV tonight: Emma Willis on Who Do You Think You Are? plus Top of the Lake: China Girl

Thursday 3 August Who Do You Think You Are? BBC One, 9.00pm This week’s edition of the genealogy show initially threatens to be one of those pleasant enough hours with no real surprises. Our subject is TV presenter Emma Willis, a proud Birmingham girl and the product of a close-knit, working-class background who explains that she has come from “a kind family” and hopes previous generations will turn out to have been similar.  Initially it seems as though those dreams will come true with an interesting but hardly ground-breaking trawl through generations of hard-working Brummie grafters who lurched from prosperity to the workhouse and back again, but appear to have stuck together through good times and bad. “When I look at that picture I think of Peaky Blinders,” Willis says early on about a family snapshot, but the reality is less criminal and more enterprise. Things take a more interesting, and altogether darker turn, however, once she heads across the sea to Ireland for a tale of violence, abuse of power and ultimately love, which uncovers a true working-class hero in the process. “We all want to have a nice story, right?” notes the likeable Willis. Her pleasure when she finally finds one is infectious. SC 10 Puppies and Us BBC Two, 8.00pm Imagine refusing to do anything unless you’re fed sausages. It’s not a bad way to go about life and certainly one that stubborn golden retriever Lola adopts. Canine behaviourist Louise Glazebrook is on hand to give advice to her struggling new owners.  RW  James Martin’s French Adventure ITV, 8.30pm The likeable chef heads to the lakeside town of Annecy, nicknamed the Pearl of the French Alps, where he selects ingredients from the local market to create a lobster dish. He also meets award-winning pastry chef Philippe Rigollot to sample his desserts. RW Top of the Lake: China Girl BBC Two, 9.00pm This second series of Jane Campion’s mystery drama is shaping up to be better than the first as it homes in on the central story without any wild distractions. Nicole Kidman, too, is chilling as an adoptive mother Julia. Tonight, an autopsy reveals that murdered victim China Girl was a sex worker, sending Detective Robin Griffin (Elisabeth Moss) and sidekick Miranda (Gwendoline Christie) in a new direction. RW Prejudice and Pride: The People’s History of LGBTQ Britain BBC Four, 9.00pm Comedians Susan Calman and Stephen K Amos present the second of two documentaries in which people share the objects that have defined their lives since homosexuality was partially decriminalised in 1967. There’s a pair of Ugg boots, and a racy school book, but for Shaun Duggan, the Brookside writer who gave us the first pre-watershed lesbian kiss on British television, it’s a letter from Morrissey. RW Insecure Sky Atlantic, 10.35pm This smart portrait of the life and friendships of twentysomething black women in LA is based on the internet series The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl by US comedian Issa Rae. Her writing is crisp and insightful and her performance, as the well-meaning member of an outreach programme for inner-city schools, is excellent. Tonight the series returns for a second run and Issa is trying to piece herself together post break-up. RW Kicked Out: From Care to Chaos BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm Rebecca Southworth explores why so many children lead troubled lives after leaving care. RW The Way Way Back (2013) ★★★★☆ Film4, 7.00pm  This coming-of-age story feels like familiar terrain, but it’s agreeably done. Duncan (Liam James) learns about life, love and self-esteem from a gang of water-park employees, including the excellent Sam Rockwell, when forced to go on holiday with his mother (Toni Collette) and her boyfriend (Steve Carrell). The script flows and there’s enough melancholy and edge to the overall comic tone for its charm to prevail. The Island (2005) ★★☆☆☆ 5STAR, 9.00pm  Michael Bay’s sci-fi flop humbled Steven Spielberg’s DreamWorks. Not only was the original script scrapped, the film only just recouped the $ 126 million it cost to make, though it’s still a stylish offering. It stars Ewan McGregor as a human clone who lives in a controlled facility and dreams of going to “The Island”, the last uncontaminated place on Earth. Scarlett Johansson and Sean Bean buoy up the cast. Cliffhanger (1993) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 11.45pm  Living up to its title, Cliffhanger is a rollicking rollercoaster of a film. It stars Sylvester Stallone as a hotshot mountain climber, who becomes embroiled in a heist, along with Janine Turner. Set in the Rocky Mountains and featuring some stupendous stunts, it may be big-budget nonsense – but it’s entertaining big-budget nonsense with zesty lines and exhilarating cinematography. Renny Harlin directs.   Friday 4 August Sun-soaked: the biggest resort on the Costa del Sol  The Secret Life of the Holiday Resort Channel 4, 8.00pm Spain hosted 10 million British holidaymakers in 2016, two million more than in the previous year. With the package holiday one of the main beneficiaries of this apparent rekindling of Anglo-Spanish love in the wake of Brexit, Katherine Patrick’s documentary travels to Holidayworld, the biggest all-inclusive resort on the Costa del Sol, where three-quarters of the 3,000 guests are from the UK. There, we meet three four-person families seeking brief respite from the gruelling jobs that generally keep them apart, and some of the 500 heroic staff. The Secret Life of the Holiday Resort is rather harmless, unenlightening stuff, propped up by an exhausting procession of vague statistics and meaningless survey results (“a third of parents say the most frequent rows abroad are between them and their kids”, that sort of thing) reeled off by narrator Blake Harrison (of The Inbetweeners). All the expected boxes are ticked – techniques for bagging sunbeds, the artery-clogging buffets, the pros and cons of families spending a week in such proximity – but it’s good-natured throughout, even during the inevitable and perfunctory drift into Brexit chat. The very essence of silly season programming. GT Icarus Netflix, from today In what is a coup for Netflix, this award-winning documentary from Bryan Fogel began as a Supersize Me-style experiment into the effects of doping. But after Fogel connected with renegade scientist Dr Grigory Rodchenkov, it became a lid-lifting investigation into a widespread Russian scandal that seemingly goes as high as Putin. GT Cleverman BBC Three, from 10.00am Series two of the fun, if labyrinthine, dystopian drama from Australia will be made available today in its entirety. Wearing X-Men’s influence on its sleeve, it follows the leader of the “Hairies”, superpowered people trying to live alongside humans that persecute and subjugate them. GT BBC Proms 2017 BBC Four, 8.00pm The music of Ella Fitzgerald and Dizzy Gillespie is celebrated in the centenary year of their births, with musicians, including singer Diane Reeves, performing with the BBC Concert Orchestra. GT The Secret World of Posh Pets ITV, 8.00pm; not UTV/STV/Wales This final part finds 21-year-old Rory roping in his father to expand his niche business of exporting jellyfish, while there’s evidence that horse-grooming has reached genuinely berserk levels, with unicorn horns and nail polish the latest must-haves for those benighted equine attractions at children’s parties. GT Only Connect BBC Two, 8.30pm Viking experts take on geocachers (participants in a GPS-driven treasure hunt), with one (relatively straightforward) challenge involving finding the link between exhibit, salt and pepper, outcast and roots manoeuvre. GT Gardeners’ World BBC Two, 9.00pm Irises, pelargonium cuttings, growing plants inside and managing a shaded, sloping town garden are among the challenges facing Monty Don and his team in tonight’s edition of the hardy perennial. GT Autopsy: Kurt Cobain Channel 5, 10.05pm Forensic pathologist Dr Jason Payne-James turns his attention to the alleged suicide of Kurt Cobain. Alleged, because certain conspiracy theorists assert that he had too much heroin in his system to be able to have inflicted the gunshot wound to his head. Probably best not to expect any definitive results here, however. GT This Is 40 (2012) ★★★☆☆ E4, 9.00pm  Judd Apatow revisits two characters from his 2007 hit Knocked Up. Leslie Mann, Apatow’s wife, and Paul Rudd play a stressed-out Los Angeles couple whose 40th birthdays bookend the film. Apatow and Mann’s real-life daughters also play their children. It’s a perceptive comedy on middle-age and one that guarantees big laughs alongside some of Apatow’s most pertinent observations on love. The Green Mile (1999) ★★★★☆ Film4, 9.00pm  Tom Hanks stars in this Oscar-nominated adaptation of Stephen King’s entrancingly strange novel. Stolid prison guard Paul Edgecomb (Hanks) is shaken by the arrival of a convict (Michael Clarke Duncan) who has supernatural powers. Although a little lightweight compared with director Frank Darabont’s previous prison film, The Shawshank Redemption, it’s pleasingly creepy. The Help (2011) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm  Emma Stone sparkles among the fine female cast in this enjoyable adaptation of Kathryn Stockett’s bestselling 2009 novel. She stars as a budding journalist working in Sixties Jackson, Mississippi, who convinces two black maids (Viola Davis and the Oscar-winning Octavia Spencer) to work secretly with her on a book and reveal the hardships inflicted on them. Bryce Dallas Howard is a delightfully hissable villain. Saturday 5 August Billy Connolly in front of John Byrne's portrait in mural form in Glasgow's Osborne Street Credit: BBC Billy Connolly: Portrait of a Lifetime BBC Two, 9.00pm; Wales, 10.30pm “Glasgow belongs to me,” says Billy Connolly of his hometown in this heart-warming documentary to mark the comedian’s 75th birthday in November. And he’s not wrong as three imposing 50ft tribute portraits have recently been unveiled on wallends in the city. They were created by Scottish artists John Byrne, Jack Vettriano and Rachel MacLean, and this accompanying film not only gives a neat history of the area, but serves as a celebration of the Big Yin’s career.  Interspersed with clips of his stand-up routines, including his cheeky first appearance on Parkinson in 1975 when he told the bum joke that turned him into a star, the programme see Connolly sit quietly for the artists – not one of his strong points as he admits: “I’ve been very patient. I think I’m due an episode.” Watching them at work in their studios is inspiring and Connolly is taken aback by the results. “It’s like looking into a mirror. You know my soul,” he says to Byrne, who used to design album covers for Connolly’s band The Humblebums. “I’m amazed at the effect these have had on me, they’ve stunned me.” From tomorrow, the original portraits will be hung in the People’s Palace. Rachel Ward Athletics: World Championships BBC Two, 9.30am & BBC One, 6.30pm Day two at the London Stadium in Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park sees Usain Bolt – in all likeliness – going for gold in the men’s 100 m final (9.45pm) as he makes his final individual appearance at a major championships. His main threats are expected to come from former champions Justin Gatlin and Yohan Blake, as well as emerging star Christian Coleman. Earlier in the day, British medal hope Katarina Johnson-Thompson gets her heptathlon bid under way with the 100 m hurdles at 10.05am. Sadly not in action today is Greg Rutherford, who, because of an ankle injury, won’t be competing in the men’s long jump final (8.05pm).  Little Big Shots USA ITV, 5.00pm Steve Harvey showcases more talented youngsters while mocking his own stupidity in this family friendly show exec-produced by Ellen DeGeneres. Tonight, there’s a maths genius and a Motown singer. Royal Cousins at War BBC Two, 7.30pm; NI, 8.00pm A welcome repeat for this riveting analysis of the relationship between Kaiser Bill, Tsar Nicholas II of Russia and our own King George V, and the disastrous effect that their rivalry had on the First World War.  Paul O’Grady’s Hollywood Channel 4, 8.00pm This new series sees Paul O’Grady delve into cinematic history to find out what it takes to make a masterpiece. He begins with “weepies”, where the host’s caustic wit serves as the perfect antidote as talking heads, including Sigourney Weaver and Celine Dion, reach for the tissues as they relate films such as Brief Encounter, Titanic and, quite possibly the saddest in movie history, The Champ.    Dad’s Army BBC Two, 8.30pm; not NI This is a gem of an episode loaded with slapstick fun from 1970. It’s the one where Corporal Jones (Clive Dunn) dresses as a tree trunk during an exercise pitting Mainwaring (Arthur Lowe) and his crew against their pompous arch-rival Captain Square. RW The L.A. Riots: 25 Years Later History, 9.00pm Twenty-five years after Los Angeles erupted into one of the most destructive civil disturbances in US history (11,000 people were arrested and an estimated 63 people were killed), this documentary looks back at the decades of racial injustice that led to the incident and the history of police relations with LA’s black community. Citizens, council members and even those who committed crimes talk about how South Central was beset by mass riots, looting, and fires.  Cambridge Folk Festival 2017 Sky Arts, 9.00pm Broadcaster Mark Radcliffe and musician Julie Fowlis present highlights from this year’s festival, an even