Scotland RU

Scotland slideshow

Scotland's captain John Barclay holds the winner's trophy after the Six Nations international rugby union match against France February 11, 2018
Scotland's captain John Barclay holds the winner's trophy after the Six Nations international rugby union match against France February 11, 2018
Scotland's captain John Barclay holds the winner's trophy after the Six Nations international rugby union match against France February 11, 2018
Friday 23 February Gogglebox Channel 4, 9.00pm We all know that Gogglebox won’t be the same this time around. One of the great joys of watching the armchair TV critic show, which returns for its 11th series, was the always warm, occasionally bickering relationship between straight-talking Liverpudlian couple, Leon and June Bernicoff. But, sadly, Leon died last December following a short illness and June recently confirmed that she won’t be taking part without him. So, in the absence of Leon’s notoriously unvarnished views (on chef Jamie Oliver: “‘Oh he’s a d---head”), what can we expect? Probably business as usual. After all, the show has survived the loss of popular families before, from everyone’s favourite posh couple, Steph and Dom, to the gloriously opinionated Scarlett Moffatt. Our guesses: the lovely Siddiquis will continue to be the most well-adjusted family, hairdressers Stephen and Christopher will trot out the most-pointed one-liners, Welsh couple Dave and Shirley will bring the giggles, even though it remains a mystery just how Dave watches TV in that very uncomfortable-looking position, and we still won’t be able to work out how many dogs the Malones actually have. SH Live Winter Olympics 2018 BBC One and BBC Two, from 6.00am Day 14 sees the semi-finals of the men’s ice hockey and the women’s curling competition, plus the final of the men’s 1,000 m speed skating. SH An Island Parish: After the Hurricane BBC Two, 9.00pm Sophie Okonedo narrates this special edition of the series which looks at the long-term effects of Hurricane Irma on the Caribbean island of Anguilla. Among those who lost everything are Simone Connor and her father Neville, who ran a restaurant and leisure complex on the island. SH Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm Now is the perfect time to jump back on the Will & Grace bandwagon as the wonderful Nick Offerman (the real-life husband of Megan Mullally, who plays Karen) guest stars as baker Jackson Boudreaux, aka the Bad Boy of Bread. Offerman is a scene-stealing delight and the final moments offer a lovely pay-off. SH Joan Rivers: By Her friends Channel 5, 10.30pm Anyone who saw the brilliant comedy The Marvellous Mrs Maisel, which was inspired by the late Joan Rivers’s early career, will know that the comedian’s domestic-focused stand-up routines were unlike anything that the audiences of that time had heard before. This tribute puts that ground-breaking career in context. SH The Tick Amazon Prime, from today Peter Serafinowicz’s goofy blue superhero returns for another series of misadventures. As with the last time, the series stands and falls with Serafinowicz’s performance: his morally upstanding but bizarre caped crusader has enough charm to paper over plot cracks. SH Seven Seconds Netflix, from today This new crime-drama series from Veena Sud, the writer behind the US version of The Killing, explores grief, deceit and social injustice. Starring Regina King, it focuses on the fallout from the death of a young boy who was injured by a police officer. SH The Old Grey Whistle Test Live: For One Night Only BBC Four, 9.00pm Bob Harris, who fronted The Old Grey Whistle Test from 1972-1978, returns with this event marking 30 years since the end of music show. This one-off includes live performances and interviews with fans and former presenters. SH Mute (2018) Netflix, from today True Blood alumnus Alexander Skarsgård plays Leo, the titular mute in Duncan Jones’s sci-fi thriller, which the director describes as a spiritual sequel to 2009’s Moon. Leo Beiler, a bartender with a violent past, searches for his missing girlfriend Naadirah (Seyneb Saleh) in a futuristic, neon-lit Berlin. He crosses paths with a pair of US army surgeons, brilliantly named Cactus Bill and Duck Teddington (played by Paul Rudd and Justin Theroux), on a mission of their own. X-Men: First Class (2011) ★★★☆☆ E4, 9.00pm Telepathic Charles Xavier (James McAvoy) bonds with metal-bending death camp survivor Erik Lehnsherr (Michael Fassbender) and the two of them track down other mutants to confront evil Nazi Sebastian Shaw (Kevin Bacon) when he triggers the Cuban Missile Crisis. Matthew Vaughn is much more comfortable with the small-scale character stuff than the action climax, but this prequel is mostly a lot of fun. While We’re Young (2014) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm A couple’s doomed attempt to recapture their youth gives Ben Stiller and Naomi Watts a new lease of comic life in Noah Baumbach’s sparkling film. Baumbach packs it with the wit and vigour of a polished one-act play as co-stars Adam Driver and Amanda Seyfried, playing hat-wearing hipsters, deliver punchlines that can’t help but remind you of Woody Allen at his peak. Saturday 24 February Loadsa laughs: Ant McPartlin and Declan Donnelly Credit: ITV Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway ITV, 7.00pm Anthony McPartlin and Declan Donnelly, the undisputed kings of Saturday night TV – never more so since they won the inaugural Bruce Forsyth Entertainment gong, among others, at the National Television Awards last month – return with a 16th series of their popular show. Packed full of comedy, audience participation, prize giveaways, celebrity guests, exclusive performances and madcap stunts, this is high-octane entertainment, with barely time to draw breath between items. Tonight, Kylie Minogue gives a first performance of her latest single and revisits some of her biggest hits, Britain’s Got Talent judge Amanda Holden falls victim to the first Undercover prank of the series and Olly Murs takes on the role of guest announcer in the End of Show Show. The hosts themselves, meanwhile, put the pedal to the floor for a daredevil Ant vs Dec monster truck challenge, and reprise their roles as super sleuths in a new comedy whodunit (with an all-star cast that includes Joanna Lumley, Michael Sheen, Emilia Fox and David Walliams) while sidekicks Scarlett Moffatt and Stephen Mulhern are out on the streets looking for people to plays games with. And that’s just for starters. Gerard O’Donovan Live Winter Olympics 2018 BBC One and BBC Two, from 6.00am It’s the penultimate day and there’s major Team GB interest as the four-man bobsleigh gets under way. However, most eyes will be on the curling, which has proved rather popular in these Games, as the men’s gold and women’s bronze medals are decided. There’s also action in the snowboarding and skiing. Six Nations Rugby Union: Ireland v Wales ITV, 1.30pm After their 12-6 defeat against England at Twickenham, Wales travel to Ireland, with Dan Biggar starting at fly-half, and Liam Williams and Leigh Halfpenny also returning after injury. Ireland have won two from two, beating France in Paris, before enjoying an eight-try buffet at Italy’s expense in a 56-19 victory. The visitors are unbeaten in their last three Six Nations matches against Ireland, but were held to a 16-16 draw when the sides last met here two years ago. Six Nations Rugby Union: Scotland v England BBC One, 4.00pm Tough one for England, this. Yes, they’ve won nine of the last 10 matches against Scotland, drawing the other one, but the pressure cauldron that is Murrayfield is never an easy place to visit, and they’ll have their tails up after an impressive 32-26 win against France. Still, according to head coach Gregor Townsend, Scotland will need to produce their “best-ever performance” if they are to triumph against England in the Calcutta Cup. Eddie Jones’s team beat Wales 12-6 thanks to two first-half tries by Jonny May, but were forced to hang on grimly in the frenetic closing stages as they set a new championship record for consecutive home wins (15, dating back to 2012). When these sides met in the tournament last year, England thrashed Scotland 61-21 at Twickenham. Churchill’s Darkest Decision More4, 7.55pm Fans of the hit film Darkest Hour will appreciate this documentary about another big Churchill dilemma. In 1940, following the fall of France, Germany was poised to seize the entire French fleet, making Hitler’s threat to invade Britain ever graver. Drastic measures were called for, but at a tragically high cost. David Attenborough’s Natural Curiosities BBC Two, 8.00pm Creatures with remarkable navigation skills are the focus of tonight’s edition, looking at how dung beetles use the Sun, Moon and stars as compass points, and how pigeons recall complex routes. Britain at Low Tide Channel 4, 8.00pm More stories from our shoreline as Tori Herridge visits Dorset, where she finds the home of the world’s first aircraft carrier and searches for an Iron Age monument that can only be seen for a few hours each year. Troy: Fall of a City BBC One, 9.10pm All hell breaks loose in this second episode when Helen’s (Bella Dayne) husband Menelaus finds out what Paris (Louis Hunter) took back to Troy. His enraged brother Agamemnon (Johnny Harris) calls all Greece to war, but when they fail to propitiate the gods, there’s a shocking price to pay. GO Mosaic Sky Atlantic, 10.00pm Steven Soderbergh’s crime drama starring Sharon Stone provoked a blizzard of publicity on its release last year in mobile app format. HBO’s six-part “linear” TV version is obviously less innovative (the app works like an interactive movie where the user can choose from which perspective the plot is viewed), but it still has plenty to offer. In this second episode, the backstory continues to play out as author Olivia Lake’s (Stone) relationships with lover Eric (Frederick Weller) and lodger Joel (Garrett Hedlund) become ever more tangled. GO Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2 (2013) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 5.00pm In this sequel to the 2009 animation based on the 1978 children’s book, inventor Flint Lockwood (voiced by Bill Hader) and friends must rescue the island of Swallow Falls from being overrun by food-mutated animals. It’s no triumph of screenwriting or subtext, but it’s a feast of ingeniously rendered gastronomic insanity and kids will absolutely love it. The Heat (2013) ★★★★☆ E4, 9.00pm Bridesmaids director Paul Feig brings back one of that film’s stars, Melissa McCarthy, as a foul-mouthed Boston cop whose policing style, aided by a fridge full of armaments, makes Dirty Harry look like Thumbelina. She’s paired with a goody-two-shoes FBI agent (Sandra Bullock reminding us what a pro she is at comedy). Together, they’re dynamite, plus the film has an emotional clout that hits you seemingly from nowhere. Philomena (2013) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.00pm; not Northern Ireland This true story is based on the experiences of journalist Martin Sixsmith (Steve Coogan), who helped Philomena Lee (Judi Dench), an Irish woman in her seventies, search for the son that she was forced to put up for adoption 50 years earlier. Stephen Frears’s film is charming and hard-hitting, delivering some tough emotional blows as well as some harsh truths about the Catholic Church’s past. Sunday 25 February Curiouser and curiouser: Holliday Grainger and Tom Burke Credit: BBC Strike: Career of Evil BBC One, 9.00pm Rumpled PI Cormoran Strike (Tom Burke) and his trusty Girl Friday Robin Ellacott (Holliday Grainger) return for the third of JK Rowling’s Robert Galbraith novels. It’s a few months after the events of The Silkworm and Strike and Robin have settled into an easy working partnership, albeit one that remains a little too cosy for Robin’s smarmy fiancé Matthew (Kerr Logan). Then Robin receives a gruesome present in the post and our intrepid duo found themselves caught up in an investigation that swiftly hits far too close to home. Career of Evil is the most tightly plotted of the Galbraith books and this well-paced opening episode neatly sets up the (plentiful) twists to come. That said, the real enjoyment comes not from the story but from the fantastic chemistry between Grainger and Burke, who bring an immense amount of warmth and charm to their scenes. Indeed, so successfully do they inhabit the roles that it’s frustrating to realise that, with no more Galbraith books currently published, this will be the last Strike for a while. It’s a genuine shame: if ever a TV adaptation deserved to be spun away from its source material it’s this one. Sarah Hughes ODI cricket: New Zealand v England Sky Sports Main Event, 12.30am You’ll have to stay up late to see this opening one-day international of the five-match series. England, having beaten the Aussies in their last ODI series, will fancy their chances. Young, Welsh and Pretty Minted BBC Three, from 10.00am The makers of Young, Welsh and Pretty Skint return with a new series focusing on a group of would-be entrepreneurs, including a YouTuber with 1.7 million subscribers and an image-obsessed Instagram influencer. Live Winter Olympics 2018 Closing Ceremony BBC Two, from 11.00am The Olympics bow out, allowing us to recall the heartbreak (Team GB’s Elise Christie’s wipeout in the speedskating final) and joy (American snowboarder Chloe Kim’s megawatt smile). K-pop star CL and boy band EXO take part in the ceremony which has a fusion theme, before the flag is handed over to Beijing for 2022. Premier League Football: Manchester United v Chelsea Sky Sports Main Event, 1.00pm With both sides struggling for consistency – United lost at Newcastle a fortnight ago, while Chelsea were trounced 4-1 by Watford earlier this month – today’s match at Old Trafford should be a tentative affair. Carabao Cup Final: Arsenal v Manchester City Sky Sports Main Event, 4.00pm Proving that the League Cup is having something of a resurgence, Arsenal and Manchester City are this year’s finalists, with the former aiming to win the trophy for the first time since 1993. City are favourites, though: imperious in the league, they also have form in the Carabao Cup, having won it in 2014 and 2016. Top Gear BBC Two, 8.00pm The petrolhead’s special returns with Matt LeBlanc promising increased family appeal. The new team of LeBlanc, Chris Harris and Rory Reid have decent chemistry and if this was your sort of thing then it probably remains so. Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble BBC Four, 8.00pm Few programmes are as inspiring as this one about cellist Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble, an ever-changing group of over 50 artists who perform alongside Ma. In addition to highlighting some phenomenal talents – Galician bagpiper Cristina Pato almost steals the show – the film details the hardships that they’ve faced, including revolution and exile. Anchoring it all is former child prodigy Ma: “I think when I was a kid a lot of things just happened,” he notes as footage shows him performing as a child for President Kennedy. “I’m always trying to figure out who I am and where I fit in the world.” SH Hannibal’s Elephant Army: The New Evidence Channel 4, 8.00pm Why did Carthaginian general Hannibal cross the Alps on a seemingly impossible journey with an army of 40,000 soldiers, 9,000 cavalry officers and 37 elephants? This fascinating film examines the evidence. Life and Death Row: The Mass Execution BBC Two, 9.00pm The harrowing series continues to turn a microscopic eye on all aspects of the death penalty. Tonight it’s the case of Stacey Johnson, on death row for 23 years. His stepdaughter insists on his innocence; his victim’s daughter says she’s sure that he’s a guilty man. SH Clouds of Sils Maria (2014) ★★★★☆ BBC Four, 9.30pm A complex, bewitching and fearlessly intelligent psychological fondue from France’s Olivier Assayas, with Juliet Binoche and Kristen Stewart as a famous actress and her diligent and devoted personal assistant, prepping for a play that shapes the drama of their own lives in its likeness. Playful and addictively strange, with career-best work from Stewart. Shutter Island (2010) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 11.05pm Martin Scorsese’s follow-up to The Departed, is, like that film, based on a novel by Dennis Lehane. He delves into gothic noir in this mystery thriller as detective Daniels (Leonardo DiCaprio) investigates the disappearance of an inmate from a prison for the clinically insane with the help of his partner (played brilliantly by Mark Ruffalo). This is a gripping story with some bold twists, although it eventually loses momentum. Point Break (1991) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 11.30pm; Scotland, 12.30am Kathryn Bigelow’s cult surfing/crime film elevated Patrick Swayze’s actor status to true action hero. Keanu Reeves plays Johnny Utah, an FBI agent who goes undercover to infiltrate a gang of bankrobbing surfers led by the charismatic Bodhi (Swayze). The action heats up when Bodhi and Utah find they share a similar attitude towards danger. Lori Petty is the surfer who catches Johnny’s eye. Monday 26 February Body snatched? Greg Kinnear as the father Credit: Channel 4 Electric Dreams: The Father Thing Channel 4, 10.00pm After a first run split pretty evenly between stunners and misfires, the final four adaptations of short stories from pulp sci-fi icon Philip K Dick begins with a heavily derivative but entertaining piece from Michael Dinner, showrunner of excellent modern western Justified. The setting is an unnamed Midwest town, where young baseball-loving Charlie (Jack Gore) lives with his parents, hangs out with three other misfits and avoids the bullies; it’s as cosily familiar a slice of apple-pie Americana as you could find. And then the aftermath of a meteor shower causes Charlie to suspect that some of the town’s inhabitants may have been replaced by aliens, his own father (Greg Kinnear) included. Based more directly than some of its predecessors on Dick’s original story, this cannot help but nod to Invasion of the Body Snatchers, although the Cold War paranoia replaced by… what, exactly? There’s a parable of father-son relations in here, along with an allegory of divorce and a Stranger Things-influenced romp, but it shows its hand a little early, never settles on a tone and features a climax that will split opinion down the middle. That said, it’s never less than diverting. Gabriel Tate This Country BBC Three, from 10.00am Series one of Charlie and Daisy May Cooper’s mockumentary transcended its obvious debt to The Office to become a touching, acutely observed and defiant portrait of life on the margins in rural Britain. Importantly, it was also very funny, finding bathos and humour in the efforts of gormless cousins Kurtan and Kerry Mucklowe (played by the Coopers) to amuse themselves in a Cotswolds village. Thankfully, almost nothing has changed for this second series, although Kurtan has found a girlfriend and Kerry hitherto unknown charitable instincts. Shakespeare & Hathaway: Private Investigators BBC One, 2.15pm Jo Joyner and Mark Benton are perfectly cast in this amiable new 10-part series as Lu Shakespeare, wrongly suspected of killing her fiancé, and Frank Hathaway, the slobbish PI she ropes in to clear her name. The odd-couple chemistry is there from the start and Stratford-upon-Avon looks glorious – making this a welcome addition to the afternoon schedules. Hollywood in Vienna: the Sound of Space & Alexandre Desplat Sky Arts, 8.00pm This gala performance loosely based on a journey through the universe includes Parisian composer Alexandre Desplat’s melodies for movies, including Twilight and The Grand Budapest Hotel, as well as legendary scores from Star Wars to E.T. GT Classic Mary Berry BBC One, 8.30pm Cherish the unlikely sight of the former Bake Off judge partaking in a little “caveman cooking” in this latest rebranding of Mary Berry’s line in home-cooking, with the opener focusing on comfort food. MasterChef BBC One, 9.00pm The 11th run of the enduringly popular cooking contest begins with the first seven contestants creating dishes using ingredients including beef mince and duck breasts for John Torode, Gregg Wallace and some former finalists. The Unstoppable Flying Scotsman Channel 5, 9.00pm The world’s most famous steam locomotive is profiled in this two-parter from Rob Bell, always a reassuring translator of technical geekery for a mainstream audience. Here, he explores its origins and enduring appeal. GT Ice Cold in Alex (1958, b/w) ★★★★☆ Film4, 4.20pm J Lee Thompson’s tense British wartime thriller is one of the classics of the black-and-white era and richly entertaining. John Mills shines as Captain Anson, who dreams of an ice-cold glass of lager while escorting Britons across the desert to Alexandria during the Second World War. The film makes some interesting points about patriotism, as we learn Anson is unaware that he’s harbouring a traitor. Alien Resurrection (1997) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Sigourney Weaver returns as heroine Ellen Ripley for this fourth film in the franchise. Two hundred years have passed since Alien 3, and Ripley has now been cloned by scientists, which gives her greater strength but also conflicting loyalties, meaning we’re not sure that we can trust her. Despite the talent on board (Weaver, screenwriter Joss Whedon and director Jean-Pierre Jeunot), this is a poor effort. Elysium (2013) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 11.00pm Neill Blomkamp’s (District 9) intelligent sci-fi thriller has a fire in its belly and stars a brawny Matt Damon as a factory worker who scrapes out a living on the Earth’s crust. He’s involved in an accident but the medical care that he needs is on space station Elysium. Blomkamp focuses on faith, capitalism and private healthcare – in lesser hands, the film might have played out like a Lib Dem manifesto with spaceships. Tuesday 27 February Surrounded by splendour: Alan Titchmarsh Secrets of the National Trust with Alan Titchmarsh Channel 5, 8.00pm A tale of “female empowerment, politics and a fight for the throne of England itself” is how Alan Titchmarsh, opening a second series showcasing the National Trust’s finest properties, describes the history of Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire. Certainly, the story of Elizabeth Talbot, Countess of Shrewsbury (aka Bess of Hardwick), and how four strategic marriages helped her to become one of the most powerful women in Elizabethan England, is a fascinating one. And the glorious house she built in the 1590s, with vast facades of glass and sumptuous decor, was doubtless a marvel of the age. Whether you think Titchmarsh does either of them justice will depend on how much detail you like in a documentary, and how much repetition (you won’t possess enough fingers to count how often he mentions that Bess’s initials and coat of arms decorate the high parapet of the house) and “coming up next” you can bear. Either way, there are plenty of glories to gaze upon, so if you’re unlikely to get a chance to visit Hardwick Hall in person, the fine filming shows off the house and its grounds in considerable splendour. Gerard O’Donovan How to Get Fit Fast Channel 4, 8.00pm Anna Richardson and Amar Latif put the emphasis on fitness rather than weight loss in this new series exploring the off-the-shelf plans available, hoping to point viewers towards the exercise regime that suits them best. 100 Years Younger in 21 Days ITV, 9.00pm Eight well-worn famous faces attempt to turn the clock back at a “rejuvenation” clinic in Sardinia. June Brown, Sherrie Hewson, Claire King, Sid Owen, Roy Walker, Russell Grant, Googlebox’s Sandra Martin and music legend Shaun Ryder are among thoses hoping to knock off years without going under the knife. The FGM Detectives Channel 4, 10.00pm Despite the global efforts to ban the practice, female genital mutilation (FGM) continues to affect millions of women. Here Cathy Newman leads a two-year investigation into FGM in the UK, which is estimated to put 20,000 young British women at risk every year. Acid Attack: My Story BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm Naomi Oni recounts the horrific acid attack that left her with life-altering injuries in 2012, and how the police investigation (which, unbelievably, initially focused on whether she had inflicted the wounds on herself) proved the attacker to be a childhood friend. GO Unreal Amazon Prime, from today A drama playing on the fakeness, dubious ethics and behind-the-scenes manipulation of a hit reality TV dating show, UnREAL is nothing if not a series for our times. As the third season begins, Everlasting’s producer Rachel (Shiri Appleby) is getting her life back on track, despite her ruthless boss Quinn (Constance Zimmer) ramping up the pressure to deliver the show’s most outrageous season yet. Divorce Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm Sarah Jessica Parker returns with a second season of the bleak and bitingly funny comedy about the painful break-up of an American middle-class couple’s marriage. At least that’s what series one, created and partly written by the Sharon Horgan, was about. Season two, minus Horgan’s input, takes on a distinctly lighter tone as both Frances (Parker) and her now ex-husband Robert (Thomas Haden Church) begin tentatively to negotiate the possibilities of life post divorce. GO Charade (1963) ★★★★☆ Film4, 2.25pm Audrey Hepburn as a temperamental-but-alluring damsel in distress and Cary Grant as a shadowy charmer are characters that the actors played many times. But they do so exceptionally in this suspense comedy from Stanley Donen, often referred to as the best Hitchcock movie that Hitchcock never made. Hepburn is the widow being trailed by four men hunting for her late husband’s stolen fortune. Black Swan (2010) ★★★★★ Film4, 11.25pm Darren Aronofsky’s film is delirious hokum and high-class trash. Natalie Portman stars as Nina Sayers, a young dancer with the New York City Ballet preparing for a production of Swan Lake choreographed by the charismatic Thomas Leroy (Vincent Cassel). He is unconvinced by Nina’s ability to portray the passion of the Black Swan and her efforts to convince him lead her towards madness. Christine (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 11.50pm The story of Christine Chubbuck, a Florida newsreader who shot herself on air in 1974, is shocking and unfathomably sad. But it wouldn’t be worth retelling on film if it didn’t illuminate something. It asks a top-notch Rebecca Hall to play out the last days of Chubbuck’s life and dares us to hope that it’s about a different woman – one who made it out the other side of her own tragedy. Wednesday 28 February Victim: Édgar Ramírez as Versace Credit: BBC The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story BBC Two, 9.00pm Ryan Murphy’s true crime series follows up 2016’s dramatisation of the OJ Simpson trial with the story of serial killer Andrew Cunanan, who murdered at least five people over a three-month period, including the fashion designer Gianni Versace. Murphy and scriptwriter Tom Rob Smith use the word assassination very carefully here: the operatic opening scenes depict Versace (Édgar Ramírez) as a modern-day Medici prince, dispensing cheerful patronage to all in his Miami Beach fiefdom. By contrast, Cunanan (Darren Criss) is portrayed as a man so insecure in his own skin that he is almost physically incapable of telling the truth: “You tell gay people you’re gay and straight people you’re straight,” exclaims an exasperated friend. “I tell people what they need to hear,” comes the too-calm reply. Both Criss and Ramirez are excellent and there’s strong support from Ricky Martin as Versace’s bewildered live-in boyfriend and a perhaps slightly too-camp Penélope Cruz as Donatella. Smith’s solid script does a good job of juggling various timelines to show how this particular killer came to be. Sarah Hughes Ellie Undercover: Rent for Sex BBC Three, from 10.00am Investigative journalist Ellie Flynn presents this look at the growing number of unscrupulous landlords who offer rent-free accommodation in exchange for sex. It’s hard not to feel utterly dispirited as Flynn meets vulnerable women such as Chloe, who feels so trapped by her homelessness that she’s in no position to say no to these men. Athletics: The World Indoor Championships BBC Two, 7.00pm The four-day World Indoor Championships, which takes place at Arena Birmingham, kicks off on Thursday, featuring three events in the first evening session – including Team GB’s Laura Muir and Eilish McColgan in the final of the women’s 3,000 m. Events continue from 9.00am on Friday, with Greg Rutherford’s long jump bid among the highlights. The World’s Most Extraordinary Homes BBC Two, 8.00pm For those of us who enjoy gawping at other people’s homes, few programmes are more satisfying than this series presented by Caroline Quentin and architect Piers Taylor. Tonight the duo are in Portugal poking their noses into four very different properties. The Supervet Channel 4, 8.00pm Professor Noel Fitzpatrick and the team returns for a new round of veterinary problems, including a very excitable Labrador who requires elbow replacement surgery and a Jackahuahua puppy who needs to have spinal surgery after an attack in the park. Benidorm ITV, 9.00pm Hold on to your sunhats as ITV’s long-running Costa Blanca comedy returns for a 10th series with comedians Hale & Pace joining the cast as a pair of undercover cops. Elsewhere, Joyce (Sherrie Hewson) and Monty’s (John Challis) big day arrives. Save Me Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Don’t let the fact that it features yet another missing child put you off the week’s best new drama. Written by and starring Lennie James, Save Me tells the tale of Nelly (James), an ageing wide-boy of suspect charms, who finds himself in trouble after his estranged teenage daughter disappears. We’ve all met people like Nelly, the easy smiles hiding their sharp edges, and James does a wonderful job of making us warm to him despite the distrust. There’s strong support, too, from Suranne Jones as the missing girl’s mother. SH Film 2018 BBC One, 11.15pm; Wales, 11.35pm; NI, 12.10am The BBC’s long-running film series returns with an opening episode hosted by Radio 1’s Clara Amfo alongside critics Ellen E Jones and Larushka Ivan-Zadeh. The focus this week is on next Sunday’s Academy Awards, plus an interview with Lady Bird’s Oscar-nominated director, Greta Gerwig. SH The Quiet Man (1952) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.00pm Best known for his sombre westerns, John Ford turns personal for this wonderful romantic comedy which was considered a risky venture but went on to win the director his fourth Oscar. It tells the story of a boxer who falls in love with the sister of a bully. The famous grab-and-kiss scene between the smouldering John Wayne and love interest Maureen O’Hara (the “Queen of Technicolour”) also appears in E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. Big Eyes (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Amy Adams is ideally cast as the browbeaten artist Margaret Keane who, for eight years, churned out iconic, highly sought after paintings, only for her con artist husband (Christoph Waltz) to take all the credit. Tim Burton’s take on this curious real-life tale of curdled suburbia sadly lacks Adams’s subtlety: even the usually restrained Waltz is caught up in the blunt, overly stylised kookiness. Good (2008) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.50pm Viggo Mortensen gives a thoughtful performance as a German professor whose ideas about euthanasia are adopted by the Nazis. It’s only when he becomes a concentration camp inspector that he grasps the horror of his ideas. Vicente Amorim’s adaptation of CP Taylor’s play doesn’t shirk big questions, but he tends to fall back on clichés – hammerings on the piano, etc – and it plays a bit like a Nazi version of Rising Damp. Thursday 1 March A landmark return: David Olusoga, Mary Beard and Simon Schama Credit: BBC Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm Almost 50 years after changing the face of arts programming with the landmark series Civilisation, BBC Two returns with an expanded brief and all the bells and whistles of modern film-making, from drone cameras to infra-red photography. With nine episodes split between presenters Simon Schama (five), David Olusoga and Mary Beard (two each), Civilisations promises an opinionated overview of global art and culture. It opens with a striking sequence in which Schama – helming this first part – explores what has been lost and salvaged from the Isil pillage of Palmyra. From there, we’re whisked to Africa’s Cape coast and the first evidence of mankind’s creativity 77,000 years ago. Then it’s a breathless gallop through the millennia, alighting at the first settlements and depictions of the human face. Among the cave art, Mayan stairways and fertility fetishes, the real treasure is an astonishing Mycenaean Sealstone, jaw-dropping in its anatomical detail and artistic accomplishment. While it won’t have the same impact as the original series (what could?), Civilisations looks to be just as learned, accessible and thrilling as its predecessor – the whole series will be available on BBC iPlayer at 10.00pm. Gabriel Tate The Cruise: Voyage to Alaska ITV, 8.30pm; not Wales Over three episodes, the five-star luxury liner Star Princess and its redoubtable crew travels to the northernmost American state – where they encounter difficult weather, navigational challenges and problem passengers. Weinstein: the Inside Story BBC One, 9.00pm In collaboration with PBS America’s Frontline current-affairs strand, Panorama examines the fall of Harvey Weinstein and the lengths to which the disgraced Hollywood producer would go to keep his alleged bullying, threats and sexual assaults private. Speaking to insiders, the team builds a troubling picture of industry complicity. From Ice to Fire: the Incredible Science of Temperature BBC Four, 9.00pm Dr Helen Czerski concludes her excellent series with fire, and how its harnessing played a pivotal role in human evolution and survival, from essentials such as toolmaking and mining to relative fripperies such as hot-air balloons. The moment that Czerski triggers a lightning strike at a high-voltage laboratory carries a genuine frisson; as is customary with most BBC Four films, the presentation is lively and the science deftly handled. Serial Killer with Piers Morgan ITV, 9.00pm How do you follow interviewing Donald Trump? Piers Morgan returns to the less contentious turf of more one-to-ones with convicted murderers behind bars. He begins with Lorenzo Gilyard, the so-called Kansas City Strangler, who remains unremorseful after allegedly killing 13 women and girls over almost two decades. Panic at 30,000 Feet: Airline Emergency Channel 5, 9.00pm This nightmare-inducing new series explores what happens when flights go wrong, from mid-air collisions to runway explosions. GT Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 11.45pm The penultimate episode of this often disturbing and insightful series revisits Oak Creek, Wisconsin, where white supremacist Michael Page killed six and injured four at a Sikh temple, before killing himself, in 2012. For once, there is a vaguely positive denouement: Page’s brutality had the opposite to its intended effect and brought the community closer together. GT Jubal (1956) ★★★★☆ Film4, 12.40pm Ernest Borgnine stars in this brooding western shot in the Grand Teton mountains of Wyoming, which reworks the plot of Othello. Borgnine stars as a cattle rancher with a much younger wife (Valerie French), who is driven into a jealous rage when cattlehand Rod Steiger suggests that she is having an affair with young drifter Jubal (a magnificent Glenn Ford). Murder is most definitely on the cards. Pitch Perfect (2012) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm The world of collegiate a cappella singing contests can’t be as heartless as Jason Moore’s sour comedy would have us believe. Anna Kendrick stars as Beca, an angst-ridden outsider who must shake up her uninspiring and monotonous group, while trying to handle how weird they all are. And, of course, there’s a handsome man (Skylar Astin) who catches her eye. It’s a little like Glee but without the schmaltz. The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Clint Eastwood directs and stars in this warm-hearted marvellous western adapted from Forrest Carter’s novel and set during the American Civil War. Eastwood plays the Missouri farmer who, driven by memories of his family’s slaughter, becomes an outlaw when he refuses to join his Confederate comrades in surrender, in favour of seeking revenge on the men who murdered his kin. Friday 2 March Searching for the truth: Lydia Wilson as Matilda Credit: BBC Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm After last week’s hiatus because of the Six Nations rugby, it’s back to small-town Wales for another dose of supernatural country-house shenanigans. When we last saw fragile but determined musician Matilda (Lydia Wilson), she’d suffered the double whammy of finding her would-be mother Rose (Claire Rushbrook) unconscious in the bath and learning that mute Aunt Meredith (Jane Thorne) had died on the verge of offering up her secrets. How did Matilda react? By mysteriously blacking out and bashing her beloved cello against a cupboard. In the fourth episode then, she looks for connections between her mental health and Carys’s disappearance. And some clues emerge: Matilda meets dishevelled local Laura (Anastasia Hille), who claims to hear voices informing her of Carys’s fate, and back at the mansion, she comes across some old tomes detailing rituals to unlock the past. Even with its heavily scored bumps and shudders, Requiem can’t quite sustain its early Hammer Horror appeal. The strong performances and some genuinely chilling moments keep things compelling however, not least in the spine-tingling climax of this episode. Toby Dantzic Flint Town Netflix, from today Back in 2014, a cost-cutting exercise left thousands of homes in Flint, Michigan, with contaminated drinking water for years. This new eight-part documentary looks at the fallout from the crisis through the eyes of Flint’s beleaguered police force, who face an uphill struggle – the community needs their support but are also deeply mistrustful of those in authority, plus dwindling resources makes the officers’ jobs harder still. MasterChef BBC One, 7.30pm Having survived the cooking contest’s opening week, the six heat winners face food critic William Sitwell in this first quarter-final. He challenges them to conjure up a standout pudding showcasing either alcohol or spices. Love Your Garden ITV, 8.00pm; not STV/UTV/Wales This week, Alan Titchmarsh and his team are in Bidewell, Devon, helping Tamsyn and Alex Wood who returned to the UK from France after Alex suffered a brain injury. The aim is to turn the Woods’ garden into a coastal sanctuary inspired by Alex’s passion for surfing. The Yorkshire Steam Railway: All Aboard Channel 5, 8.00pm As amiable as its title suggests, this new documentary series follows the lives of those who work on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, one of the country’s most popular steam railways. In this series’ opener, the new season begins with the arrival of star engine Royal Scot, on loan from London. Tones, Drones and Arpeggios: The Magic of Minimalism BBC Four, 9.00pm Conductor Charles Hazlewood explores minimalism, which he argues is the most important musical form of the 20th century. In the fascinating opener of this two-part series, he unpicks the construction of these sometimes confounding sounds and tracks down the genre’s avant-garde pioneers, who brought their mesmeric, spirituality-inspired compositions from California to New York in the Sixties. TD Jo Brand: Secrets of Her Success Channel 5, 10.30pm Channel 5’s celebration of funny women continues with this absorbing profile of the pioneering doyenne of deadpan, Jo Brand. This charts her career from its rocky start on the male-dominated stand-up circuit to her much-admired hospital sitcom Getting On. TD Gladiator (2000) ★★★★★ Film4, 9.00pm This take on the traditional swords-and-sandals epic proved that Russell Crowe deserved to be recognised as a mainstream star, and reaffirmed Ridley Scott’s reputation as a first-rate director. Crowe is Maximus, a former Roman general who rebuilds his career as a gladiator. His bid for vengeance against a vile emperor (Joaquin Phoenix) is compelling. Plus there’s a last hurrah from Oliver Reed. Blades of Glory (2007) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm;N Ireland, 12.05am You might think that the sequinned world of figure skating is beyond parody, but here Will Ferrell and Jon Heder serve up a zestfully preposterous comedy. Both play rival Olympic ice skaters, Ferrell a loose-living maverick, Heder a prissy perfectionist, who are slung out of the sport but use a loophole to return as an erotic all-male pairing. Amy Poehler co-stars. A Hijacking (2012) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.55pm Tobias Lindholm’s vigorously intelligent hostage thriller, set on board a besieged ship in the Indian Ocean, deftly moves his story between the boat and the shipping company’s offices, where Søren Malling’s frazzled CEO attempts to thrash out a bargain. On the other end of the line is the Somalis’ translator. Flies buzz, sweat trickles, negotiations continue, and you feel your breath dry up. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
What's on TV tonight: Gogglebox and The Old Grey Whistle Test Live
Friday 23 February Gogglebox Channel 4, 9.00pm We all know that Gogglebox won’t be the same this time around. One of the great joys of watching the armchair TV critic show, which returns for its 11th series, was the always warm, occasionally bickering relationship between straight-talking Liverpudlian couple, Leon and June Bernicoff. But, sadly, Leon died last December following a short illness and June recently confirmed that she won’t be taking part without him. So, in the absence of Leon’s notoriously unvarnished views (on chef Jamie Oliver: “‘Oh he’s a d---head”), what can we expect? Probably business as usual. After all, the show has survived the loss of popular families before, from everyone’s favourite posh couple, Steph and Dom, to the gloriously opinionated Scarlett Moffatt. Our guesses: the lovely Siddiquis will continue to be the most well-adjusted family, hairdressers Stephen and Christopher will trot out the most-pointed one-liners, Welsh couple Dave and Shirley will bring the giggles, even though it remains a mystery just how Dave watches TV in that very uncomfortable-looking position, and we still won’t be able to work out how many dogs the Malones actually have. SH Live Winter Olympics 2018 BBC One and BBC Two, from 6.00am Day 14 sees the semi-finals of the men’s ice hockey and the women’s curling competition, plus the final of the men’s 1,000 m speed skating. SH An Island Parish: After the Hurricane BBC Two, 9.00pm Sophie Okonedo narrates this special edition of the series which looks at the long-term effects of Hurricane Irma on the Caribbean island of Anguilla. Among those who lost everything are Simone Connor and her father Neville, who ran a restaurant and leisure complex on the island. SH Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm Now is the perfect time to jump back on the Will & Grace bandwagon as the wonderful Nick Offerman (the real-life husband of Megan Mullally, who plays Karen) guest stars as baker Jackson Boudreaux, aka the Bad Boy of Bread. Offerman is a scene-stealing delight and the final moments offer a lovely pay-off. SH Joan Rivers: By Her friends Channel 5, 10.30pm Anyone who saw the brilliant comedy The Marvellous Mrs Maisel, which was inspired by the late Joan Rivers’s early career, will know that the comedian’s domestic-focused stand-up routines were unlike anything that the audiences of that time had heard before. This tribute puts that ground-breaking career in context. SH The Tick Amazon Prime, from today Peter Serafinowicz’s goofy blue superhero returns for another series of misadventures. As with the last time, the series stands and falls with Serafinowicz’s performance: his morally upstanding but bizarre caped crusader has enough charm to paper over plot cracks. SH Seven Seconds Netflix, from today This new crime-drama series from Veena Sud, the writer behind the US version of The Killing, explores grief, deceit and social injustice. Starring Regina King, it focuses on the fallout from the death of a young boy who was injured by a police officer. SH The Old Grey Whistle Test Live: For One Night Only BBC Four, 9.00pm Bob Harris, who fronted The Old Grey Whistle Test from 1972-1978, returns with this event marking 30 years since the end of music show. This one-off includes live performances and interviews with fans and former presenters. SH Mute (2018) Netflix, from today True Blood alumnus Alexander Skarsgård plays Leo, the titular mute in Duncan Jones’s sci-fi thriller, which the director describes as a spiritual sequel to 2009’s Moon. Leo Beiler, a bartender with a violent past, searches for his missing girlfriend Naadirah (Seyneb Saleh) in a futuristic, neon-lit Berlin. He crosses paths with a pair of US army surgeons, brilliantly named Cactus Bill and Duck Teddington (played by Paul Rudd and Justin Theroux), on a mission of their own. X-Men: First Class (2011) ★★★☆☆ E4, 9.00pm Telepathic Charles Xavier (James McAvoy) bonds with metal-bending death camp survivor Erik Lehnsherr (Michael Fassbender) and the two of them track down other mutants to confront evil Nazi Sebastian Shaw (Kevin Bacon) when he triggers the Cuban Missile Crisis. Matthew Vaughn is much more comfortable with the small-scale character stuff than the action climax, but this prequel is mostly a lot of fun. While We’re Young (2014) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm A couple’s doomed attempt to recapture their youth gives Ben Stiller and Naomi Watts a new lease of comic life in Noah Baumbach’s sparkling film. Baumbach packs it with the wit and vigour of a polished one-act play as co-stars Adam Driver and Amanda Seyfried, playing hat-wearing hipsters, deliver punchlines that can’t help but remind you of Woody Allen at his peak. Saturday 24 February Loadsa laughs: Ant McPartlin and Declan Donnelly Credit: ITV Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway ITV, 7.00pm Anthony McPartlin and Declan Donnelly, the undisputed kings of Saturday night TV – never more so since they won the inaugural Bruce Forsyth Entertainment gong, among others, at the National Television Awards last month – return with a 16th series of their popular show. Packed full of comedy, audience participation, prize giveaways, celebrity guests, exclusive performances and madcap stunts, this is high-octane entertainment, with barely time to draw breath between items. Tonight, Kylie Minogue gives a first performance of her latest single and revisits some of her biggest hits, Britain’s Got Talent judge Amanda Holden falls victim to the first Undercover prank of the series and Olly Murs takes on the role of guest announcer in the End of Show Show. The hosts themselves, meanwhile, put the pedal to the floor for a daredevil Ant vs Dec monster truck challenge, and reprise their roles as super sleuths in a new comedy whodunit (with an all-star cast that includes Joanna Lumley, Michael Sheen, Emilia Fox and David Walliams) while sidekicks Scarlett Moffatt and Stephen Mulhern are out on the streets looking for people to plays games with. And that’s just for starters. Gerard O’Donovan Live Winter Olympics 2018 BBC One and BBC Two, from 6.00am It’s the penultimate day and there’s major Team GB interest as the four-man bobsleigh gets under way. However, most eyes will be on the curling, which has proved rather popular in these Games, as the men’s gold and women’s bronze medals are decided. There’s also action in the snowboarding and skiing. Six Nations Rugby Union: Ireland v Wales ITV, 1.30pm After their 12-6 defeat against England at Twickenham, Wales travel to Ireland, with Dan Biggar starting at fly-half, and Liam Williams and Leigh Halfpenny also returning after injury. Ireland have won two from two, beating France in Paris, before enjoying an eight-try buffet at Italy’s expense in a 56-19 victory. The visitors are unbeaten in their last three Six Nations matches against Ireland, but were held to a 16-16 draw when the sides last met here two years ago. Six Nations Rugby Union: Scotland v England BBC One, 4.00pm Tough one for England, this. Yes, they’ve won nine of the last 10 matches against Scotland, drawing the other one, but the pressure cauldron that is Murrayfield is never an easy place to visit, and they’ll have their tails up after an impressive 32-26 win against France. Still, according to head coach Gregor Townsend, Scotland will need to produce their “best-ever performance” if they are to triumph against England in the Calcutta Cup. Eddie Jones’s team beat Wales 12-6 thanks to two first-half tries by Jonny May, but were forced to hang on grimly in the frenetic closing stages as they set a new championship record for consecutive home wins (15, dating back to 2012). When these sides met in the tournament last year, England thrashed Scotland 61-21 at Twickenham. Churchill’s Darkest Decision More4, 7.55pm Fans of the hit film Darkest Hour will appreciate this documentary about another big Churchill dilemma. In 1940, following the fall of France, Germany was poised to seize the entire French fleet, making Hitler’s threat to invade Britain ever graver. Drastic measures were called for, but at a tragically high cost. David Attenborough’s Natural Curiosities BBC Two, 8.00pm Creatures with remarkable navigation skills are the focus of tonight’s edition, looking at how dung beetles use the Sun, Moon and stars as compass points, and how pigeons recall complex routes. Britain at Low Tide Channel 4, 8.00pm More stories from our shoreline as Tori Herridge visits Dorset, where she finds the home of the world’s first aircraft carrier and searches for an Iron Age monument that can only be seen for a few hours each year. Troy: Fall of a City BBC One, 9.10pm All hell breaks loose in this second episode when Helen’s (Bella Dayne) husband Menelaus finds out what Paris (Louis Hunter) took back to Troy. His enraged brother Agamemnon (Johnny Harris) calls all Greece to war, but when they fail to propitiate the gods, there’s a shocking price to pay. GO Mosaic Sky Atlantic, 10.00pm Steven Soderbergh’s crime drama starring Sharon Stone provoked a blizzard of publicity on its release last year in mobile app format. HBO’s six-part “linear” TV version is obviously less innovative (the app works like an interactive movie where the user can choose from which perspective the plot is viewed), but it still has plenty to offer. In this second episode, the backstory continues to play out as author Olivia Lake’s (Stone) relationships with lover Eric (Frederick Weller) and lodger Joel (Garrett Hedlund) become ever more tangled. GO Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2 (2013) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 5.00pm In this sequel to the 2009 animation based on the 1978 children’s book, inventor Flint Lockwood (voiced by Bill Hader) and friends must rescue the island of Swallow Falls from being overrun by food-mutated animals. It’s no triumph of screenwriting or subtext, but it’s a feast of ingeniously rendered gastronomic insanity and kids will absolutely love it. The Heat (2013) ★★★★☆ E4, 9.00pm Bridesmaids director Paul Feig brings back one of that film’s stars, Melissa McCarthy, as a foul-mouthed Boston cop whose policing style, aided by a fridge full of armaments, makes Dirty Harry look like Thumbelina. She’s paired with a goody-two-shoes FBI agent (Sandra Bullock reminding us what a pro she is at comedy). Together, they’re dynamite, plus the film has an emotional clout that hits you seemingly from nowhere. Philomena (2013) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.00pm; not Northern Ireland This true story is based on the experiences of journalist Martin Sixsmith (Steve Coogan), who helped Philomena Lee (Judi Dench), an Irish woman in her seventies, search for the son that she was forced to put up for adoption 50 years earlier. Stephen Frears’s film is charming and hard-hitting, delivering some tough emotional blows as well as some harsh truths about the Catholic Church’s past. Sunday 25 February Curiouser and curiouser: Holliday Grainger and Tom Burke Credit: BBC Strike: Career of Evil BBC One, 9.00pm Rumpled PI Cormoran Strike (Tom Burke) and his trusty Girl Friday Robin Ellacott (Holliday Grainger) return for the third of JK Rowling’s Robert Galbraith novels. It’s a few months after the events of The Silkworm and Strike and Robin have settled into an easy working partnership, albeit one that remains a little too cosy for Robin’s smarmy fiancé Matthew (Kerr Logan). Then Robin receives a gruesome present in the post and our intrepid duo found themselves caught up in an investigation that swiftly hits far too close to home. Career of Evil is the most tightly plotted of the Galbraith books and this well-paced opening episode neatly sets up the (plentiful) twists to come. That said, the real enjoyment comes not from the story but from the fantastic chemistry between Grainger and Burke, who bring an immense amount of warmth and charm to their scenes. Indeed, so successfully do they inhabit the roles that it’s frustrating to realise that, with no more Galbraith books currently published, this will be the last Strike for a while. It’s a genuine shame: if ever a TV adaptation deserved to be spun away from its source material it’s this one. Sarah Hughes ODI cricket: New Zealand v England Sky Sports Main Event, 12.30am You’ll have to stay up late to see this opening one-day international of the five-match series. England, having beaten the Aussies in their last ODI series, will fancy their chances. Young, Welsh and Pretty Minted BBC Three, from 10.00am The makers of Young, Welsh and Pretty Skint return with a new series focusing on a group of would-be entrepreneurs, including a YouTuber with 1.7 million subscribers and an image-obsessed Instagram influencer. Live Winter Olympics 2018 Closing Ceremony BBC Two, from 11.00am The Olympics bow out, allowing us to recall the heartbreak (Team GB’s Elise Christie’s wipeout in the speedskating final) and joy (American snowboarder Chloe Kim’s megawatt smile). K-pop star CL and boy band EXO take part in the ceremony which has a fusion theme, before the flag is handed over to Beijing for 2022. Premier League Football: Manchester United v Chelsea Sky Sports Main Event, 1.00pm With both sides struggling for consistency – United lost at Newcastle a fortnight ago, while Chelsea were trounced 4-1 by Watford earlier this month – today’s match at Old Trafford should be a tentative affair. Carabao Cup Final: Arsenal v Manchester City Sky Sports Main Event, 4.00pm Proving that the League Cup is having something of a resurgence, Arsenal and Manchester City are this year’s finalists, with the former aiming to win the trophy for the first time since 1993. City are favourites, though: imperious in the league, they also have form in the Carabao Cup, having won it in 2014 and 2016. Top Gear BBC Two, 8.00pm The petrolhead’s special returns with Matt LeBlanc promising increased family appeal. The new team of LeBlanc, Chris Harris and Rory Reid have decent chemistry and if this was your sort of thing then it probably remains so. Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble BBC Four, 8.00pm Few programmes are as inspiring as this one about cellist Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble, an ever-changing group of over 50 artists who perform alongside Ma. In addition to highlighting some phenomenal talents – Galician bagpiper Cristina Pato almost steals the show – the film details the hardships that they’ve faced, including revolution and exile. Anchoring it all is former child prodigy Ma: “I think when I was a kid a lot of things just happened,” he notes as footage shows him performing as a child for President Kennedy. “I’m always trying to figure out who I am and where I fit in the world.” SH Hannibal’s Elephant Army: The New Evidence Channel 4, 8.00pm Why did Carthaginian general Hannibal cross the Alps on a seemingly impossible journey with an army of 40,000 soldiers, 9,000 cavalry officers and 37 elephants? This fascinating film examines the evidence. Life and Death Row: The Mass Execution BBC Two, 9.00pm The harrowing series continues to turn a microscopic eye on all aspects of the death penalty. Tonight it’s the case of Stacey Johnson, on death row for 23 years. His stepdaughter insists on his innocence; his victim’s daughter says she’s sure that he’s a guilty man. SH Clouds of Sils Maria (2014) ★★★★☆ BBC Four, 9.30pm A complex, bewitching and fearlessly intelligent psychological fondue from France’s Olivier Assayas, with Juliet Binoche and Kristen Stewart as a famous actress and her diligent and devoted personal assistant, prepping for a play that shapes the drama of their own lives in its likeness. Playful and addictively strange, with career-best work from Stewart. Shutter Island (2010) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 11.05pm Martin Scorsese’s follow-up to The Departed, is, like that film, based on a novel by Dennis Lehane. He delves into gothic noir in this mystery thriller as detective Daniels (Leonardo DiCaprio) investigates the disappearance of an inmate from a prison for the clinically insane with the help of his partner (played brilliantly by Mark Ruffalo). This is a gripping story with some bold twists, although it eventually loses momentum. Point Break (1991) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 11.30pm; Scotland, 12.30am Kathryn Bigelow’s cult surfing/crime film elevated Patrick Swayze’s actor status to true action hero. Keanu Reeves plays Johnny Utah, an FBI agent who goes undercover to infiltrate a gang of bankrobbing surfers led by the charismatic Bodhi (Swayze). The action heats up when Bodhi and Utah find they share a similar attitude towards danger. Lori Petty is the surfer who catches Johnny’s eye. Monday 26 February Body snatched? Greg Kinnear as the father Credit: Channel 4 Electric Dreams: The Father Thing Channel 4, 10.00pm After a first run split pretty evenly between stunners and misfires, the final four adaptations of short stories from pulp sci-fi icon Philip K Dick begins with a heavily derivative but entertaining piece from Michael Dinner, showrunner of excellent modern western Justified. The setting is an unnamed Midwest town, where young baseball-loving Charlie (Jack Gore) lives with his parents, hangs out with three other misfits and avoids the bullies; it’s as cosily familiar a slice of apple-pie Americana as you could find. And then the aftermath of a meteor shower causes Charlie to suspect that some of the town’s inhabitants may have been replaced by aliens, his own father (Greg Kinnear) included. Based more directly than some of its predecessors on Dick’s original story, this cannot help but nod to Invasion of the Body Snatchers, although the Cold War paranoia replaced by… what, exactly? There’s a parable of father-son relations in here, along with an allegory of divorce and a Stranger Things-influenced romp, but it shows its hand a little early, never settles on a tone and features a climax that will split opinion down the middle. That said, it’s never less than diverting. Gabriel Tate This Country BBC Three, from 10.00am Series one of Charlie and Daisy May Cooper’s mockumentary transcended its obvious debt to The Office to become a touching, acutely observed and defiant portrait of life on the margins in rural Britain. Importantly, it was also very funny, finding bathos and humour in the efforts of gormless cousins Kurtan and Kerry Mucklowe (played by the Coopers) to amuse themselves in a Cotswolds village. Thankfully, almost nothing has changed for this second series, although Kurtan has found a girlfriend and Kerry hitherto unknown charitable instincts. Shakespeare & Hathaway: Private Investigators BBC One, 2.15pm Jo Joyner and Mark Benton are perfectly cast in this amiable new 10-part series as Lu Shakespeare, wrongly suspected of killing her fiancé, and Frank Hathaway, the slobbish PI she ropes in to clear her name. The odd-couple chemistry is there from the start and Stratford-upon-Avon looks glorious – making this a welcome addition to the afternoon schedules. Hollywood in Vienna: the Sound of Space & Alexandre Desplat Sky Arts, 8.00pm This gala performance loosely based on a journey through the universe includes Parisian composer Alexandre Desplat’s melodies for movies, including Twilight and The Grand Budapest Hotel, as well as legendary scores from Star Wars to E.T. GT Classic Mary Berry BBC One, 8.30pm Cherish the unlikely sight of the former Bake Off judge partaking in a little “caveman cooking” in this latest rebranding of Mary Berry’s line in home-cooking, with the opener focusing on comfort food. MasterChef BBC One, 9.00pm The 11th run of the enduringly popular cooking contest begins with the first seven contestants creating dishes using ingredients including beef mince and duck breasts for John Torode, Gregg Wallace and some former finalists. The Unstoppable Flying Scotsman Channel 5, 9.00pm The world’s most famous steam locomotive is profiled in this two-parter from Rob Bell, always a reassuring translator of technical geekery for a mainstream audience. Here, he explores its origins and enduring appeal. GT Ice Cold in Alex (1958, b/w) ★★★★☆ Film4, 4.20pm J Lee Thompson’s tense British wartime thriller is one of the classics of the black-and-white era and richly entertaining. John Mills shines as Captain Anson, who dreams of an ice-cold glass of lager while escorting Britons across the desert to Alexandria during the Second World War. The film makes some interesting points about patriotism, as we learn Anson is unaware that he’s harbouring a traitor. Alien Resurrection (1997) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Sigourney Weaver returns as heroine Ellen Ripley for this fourth film in the franchise. Two hundred years have passed since Alien 3, and Ripley has now been cloned by scientists, which gives her greater strength but also conflicting loyalties, meaning we’re not sure that we can trust her. Despite the talent on board (Weaver, screenwriter Joss Whedon and director Jean-Pierre Jeunot), this is a poor effort. Elysium (2013) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 11.00pm Neill Blomkamp’s (District 9) intelligent sci-fi thriller has a fire in its belly and stars a brawny Matt Damon as a factory worker who scrapes out a living on the Earth’s crust. He’s involved in an accident but the medical care that he needs is on space station Elysium. Blomkamp focuses on faith, capitalism and private healthcare – in lesser hands, the film might have played out like a Lib Dem manifesto with spaceships. Tuesday 27 February Surrounded by splendour: Alan Titchmarsh Secrets of the National Trust with Alan Titchmarsh Channel 5, 8.00pm A tale of “female empowerment, politics and a fight for the throne of England itself” is how Alan Titchmarsh, opening a second series showcasing the National Trust’s finest properties, describes the history of Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire. Certainly, the story of Elizabeth Talbot, Countess of Shrewsbury (aka Bess of Hardwick), and how four strategic marriages helped her to become one of the most powerful women in Elizabethan England, is a fascinating one. And the glorious house she built in the 1590s, with vast facades of glass and sumptuous decor, was doubtless a marvel of the age. Whether you think Titchmarsh does either of them justice will depend on how much detail you like in a documentary, and how much repetition (you won’t possess enough fingers to count how often he mentions that Bess’s initials and coat of arms decorate the high parapet of the house) and “coming up next” you can bear. Either way, there are plenty of glories to gaze upon, so if you’re unlikely to get a chance to visit Hardwick Hall in person, the fine filming shows off the house and its grounds in considerable splendour. Gerard O’Donovan How to Get Fit Fast Channel 4, 8.00pm Anna Richardson and Amar Latif put the emphasis on fitness rather than weight loss in this new series exploring the off-the-shelf plans available, hoping to point viewers towards the exercise regime that suits them best. 100 Years Younger in 21 Days ITV, 9.00pm Eight well-worn famous faces attempt to turn the clock back at a “rejuvenation” clinic in Sardinia. June Brown, Sherrie Hewson, Claire King, Sid Owen, Roy Walker, Russell Grant, Googlebox’s Sandra Martin and music legend Shaun Ryder are among thoses hoping to knock off years without going under the knife. The FGM Detectives Channel 4, 10.00pm Despite the global efforts to ban the practice, female genital mutilation (FGM) continues to affect millions of women. Here Cathy Newman leads a two-year investigation into FGM in the UK, which is estimated to put 20,000 young British women at risk every year. Acid Attack: My Story BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm Naomi Oni recounts the horrific acid attack that left her with life-altering injuries in 2012, and how the police investigation (which, unbelievably, initially focused on whether she had inflicted the wounds on herself) proved the attacker to be a childhood friend. GO Unreal Amazon Prime, from today A drama playing on the fakeness, dubious ethics and behind-the-scenes manipulation of a hit reality TV dating show, UnREAL is nothing if not a series for our times. As the third season begins, Everlasting’s producer Rachel (Shiri Appleby) is getting her life back on track, despite her ruthless boss Quinn (Constance Zimmer) ramping up the pressure to deliver the show’s most outrageous season yet. Divorce Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm Sarah Jessica Parker returns with a second season of the bleak and bitingly funny comedy about the painful break-up of an American middle-class couple’s marriage. At least that’s what series one, created and partly written by the Sharon Horgan, was about. Season two, minus Horgan’s input, takes on a distinctly lighter tone as both Frances (Parker) and her now ex-husband Robert (Thomas Haden Church) begin tentatively to negotiate the possibilities of life post divorce. GO Charade (1963) ★★★★☆ Film4, 2.25pm Audrey Hepburn as a temperamental-but-alluring damsel in distress and Cary Grant as a shadowy charmer are characters that the actors played many times. But they do so exceptionally in this suspense comedy from Stanley Donen, often referred to as the best Hitchcock movie that Hitchcock never made. Hepburn is the widow being trailed by four men hunting for her late husband’s stolen fortune. Black Swan (2010) ★★★★★ Film4, 11.25pm Darren Aronofsky’s film is delirious hokum and high-class trash. Natalie Portman stars as Nina Sayers, a young dancer with the New York City Ballet preparing for a production of Swan Lake choreographed by the charismatic Thomas Leroy (Vincent Cassel). He is unconvinced by Nina’s ability to portray the passion of the Black Swan and her efforts to convince him lead her towards madness. Christine (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 11.50pm The story of Christine Chubbuck, a Florida newsreader who shot herself on air in 1974, is shocking and unfathomably sad. But it wouldn’t be worth retelling on film if it didn’t illuminate something. It asks a top-notch Rebecca Hall to play out the last days of Chubbuck’s life and dares us to hope that it’s about a different woman – one who made it out the other side of her own tragedy. Wednesday 28 February Victim: Édgar Ramírez as Versace Credit: BBC The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story BBC Two, 9.00pm Ryan Murphy’s true crime series follows up 2016’s dramatisation of the OJ Simpson trial with the story of serial killer Andrew Cunanan, who murdered at least five people over a three-month period, including the fashion designer Gianni Versace. Murphy and scriptwriter Tom Rob Smith use the word assassination very carefully here: the operatic opening scenes depict Versace (Édgar Ramírez) as a modern-day Medici prince, dispensing cheerful patronage to all in his Miami Beach fiefdom. By contrast, Cunanan (Darren Criss) is portrayed as a man so insecure in his own skin that he is almost physically incapable of telling the truth: “You tell gay people you’re gay and straight people you’re straight,” exclaims an exasperated friend. “I tell people what they need to hear,” comes the too-calm reply. Both Criss and Ramirez are excellent and there’s strong support from Ricky Martin as Versace’s bewildered live-in boyfriend and a perhaps slightly too-camp Penélope Cruz as Donatella. Smith’s solid script does a good job of juggling various timelines to show how this particular killer came to be. Sarah Hughes Ellie Undercover: Rent for Sex BBC Three, from 10.00am Investigative journalist Ellie Flynn presents this look at the growing number of unscrupulous landlords who offer rent-free accommodation in exchange for sex. It’s hard not to feel utterly dispirited as Flynn meets vulnerable women such as Chloe, who feels so trapped by her homelessness that she’s in no position to say no to these men. Athletics: The World Indoor Championships BBC Two, 7.00pm The four-day World Indoor Championships, which takes place at Arena Birmingham, kicks off on Thursday, featuring three events in the first evening session – including Team GB’s Laura Muir and Eilish McColgan in the final of the women’s 3,000 m. Events continue from 9.00am on Friday, with Greg Rutherford’s long jump bid among the highlights. The World’s Most Extraordinary Homes BBC Two, 8.00pm For those of us who enjoy gawping at other people’s homes, few programmes are more satisfying than this series presented by Caroline Quentin and architect Piers Taylor. Tonight the duo are in Portugal poking their noses into four very different properties. The Supervet Channel 4, 8.00pm Professor Noel Fitzpatrick and the team returns for a new round of veterinary problems, including a very excitable Labrador who requires elbow replacement surgery and a Jackahuahua puppy who needs to have spinal surgery after an attack in the park. Benidorm ITV, 9.00pm Hold on to your sunhats as ITV’s long-running Costa Blanca comedy returns for a 10th series with comedians Hale & Pace joining the cast as a pair of undercover cops. Elsewhere, Joyce (Sherrie Hewson) and Monty’s (John Challis) big day arrives. Save Me Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Don’t let the fact that it features yet another missing child put you off the week’s best new drama. Written by and starring Lennie James, Save Me tells the tale of Nelly (James), an ageing wide-boy of suspect charms, who finds himself in trouble after his estranged teenage daughter disappears. We’ve all met people like Nelly, the easy smiles hiding their sharp edges, and James does a wonderful job of making us warm to him despite the distrust. There’s strong support, too, from Suranne Jones as the missing girl’s mother. SH Film 2018 BBC One, 11.15pm; Wales, 11.35pm; NI, 12.10am The BBC’s long-running film series returns with an opening episode hosted by Radio 1’s Clara Amfo alongside critics Ellen E Jones and Larushka Ivan-Zadeh. The focus this week is on next Sunday’s Academy Awards, plus an interview with Lady Bird’s Oscar-nominated director, Greta Gerwig. SH The Quiet Man (1952) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.00pm Best known for his sombre westerns, John Ford turns personal for this wonderful romantic comedy which was considered a risky venture but went on to win the director his fourth Oscar. It tells the story of a boxer who falls in love with the sister of a bully. The famous grab-and-kiss scene between the smouldering John Wayne and love interest Maureen O’Hara (the “Queen of Technicolour”) also appears in E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. Big Eyes (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Amy Adams is ideally cast as the browbeaten artist Margaret Keane who, for eight years, churned out iconic, highly sought after paintings, only for her con artist husband (Christoph Waltz) to take all the credit. Tim Burton’s take on this curious real-life tale of curdled suburbia sadly lacks Adams’s subtlety: even the usually restrained Waltz is caught up in the blunt, overly stylised kookiness. Good (2008) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.50pm Viggo Mortensen gives a thoughtful performance as a German professor whose ideas about euthanasia are adopted by the Nazis. It’s only when he becomes a concentration camp inspector that he grasps the horror of his ideas. Vicente Amorim’s adaptation of CP Taylor’s play doesn’t shirk big questions, but he tends to fall back on clichés – hammerings on the piano, etc – and it plays a bit like a Nazi version of Rising Damp. Thursday 1 March A landmark return: David Olusoga, Mary Beard and Simon Schama Credit: BBC Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm Almost 50 years after changing the face of arts programming with the landmark series Civilisation, BBC Two returns with an expanded brief and all the bells and whistles of modern film-making, from drone cameras to infra-red photography. With nine episodes split between presenters Simon Schama (five), David Olusoga and Mary Beard (two each), Civilisations promises an opinionated overview of global art and culture. It opens with a striking sequence in which Schama – helming this first part – explores what has been lost and salvaged from the Isil pillage of Palmyra. From there, we’re whisked to Africa’s Cape coast and the first evidence of mankind’s creativity 77,000 years ago. Then it’s a breathless gallop through the millennia, alighting at the first settlements and depictions of the human face. Among the cave art, Mayan stairways and fertility fetishes, the real treasure is an astonishing Mycenaean Sealstone, jaw-dropping in its anatomical detail and artistic accomplishment. While it won’t have the same impact as the original series (what could?), Civilisations looks to be just as learned, accessible and thrilling as its predecessor – the whole series will be available on BBC iPlayer at 10.00pm. Gabriel Tate The Cruise: Voyage to Alaska ITV, 8.30pm; not Wales Over three episodes, the five-star luxury liner Star Princess and its redoubtable crew travels to the northernmost American state – where they encounter difficult weather, navigational challenges and problem passengers. Weinstein: the Inside Story BBC One, 9.00pm In collaboration with PBS America’s Frontline current-affairs strand, Panorama examines the fall of Harvey Weinstein and the lengths to which the disgraced Hollywood producer would go to keep his alleged bullying, threats and sexual assaults private. Speaking to insiders, the team builds a troubling picture of industry complicity. From Ice to Fire: the Incredible Science of Temperature BBC Four, 9.00pm Dr Helen Czerski concludes her excellent series with fire, and how its harnessing played a pivotal role in human evolution and survival, from essentials such as toolmaking and mining to relative fripperies such as hot-air balloons. The moment that Czerski triggers a lightning strike at a high-voltage laboratory carries a genuine frisson; as is customary with most BBC Four films, the presentation is lively and the science deftly handled. Serial Killer with Piers Morgan ITV, 9.00pm How do you follow interviewing Donald Trump? Piers Morgan returns to the less contentious turf of more one-to-ones with convicted murderers behind bars. He begins with Lorenzo Gilyard, the so-called Kansas City Strangler, who remains unremorseful after allegedly killing 13 women and girls over almost two decades. Panic at 30,000 Feet: Airline Emergency Channel 5, 9.00pm This nightmare-inducing new series explores what happens when flights go wrong, from mid-air collisions to runway explosions. GT Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 11.45pm The penultimate episode of this often disturbing and insightful series revisits Oak Creek, Wisconsin, where white supremacist Michael Page killed six and injured four at a Sikh temple, before killing himself, in 2012. For once, there is a vaguely positive denouement: Page’s brutality had the opposite to its intended effect and brought the community closer together. GT Jubal (1956) ★★★★☆ Film4, 12.40pm Ernest Borgnine stars in this brooding western shot in the Grand Teton mountains of Wyoming, which reworks the plot of Othello. Borgnine stars as a cattle rancher with a much younger wife (Valerie French), who is driven into a jealous rage when cattlehand Rod Steiger suggests that she is having an affair with young drifter Jubal (a magnificent Glenn Ford). Murder is most definitely on the cards. Pitch Perfect (2012) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm The world of collegiate a cappella singing contests can’t be as heartless as Jason Moore’s sour comedy would have us believe. Anna Kendrick stars as Beca, an angst-ridden outsider who must shake up her uninspiring and monotonous group, while trying to handle how weird they all are. And, of course, there’s a handsome man (Skylar Astin) who catches her eye. It’s a little like Glee but without the schmaltz. The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Clint Eastwood directs and stars in this warm-hearted marvellous western adapted from Forrest Carter’s novel and set during the American Civil War. Eastwood plays the Missouri farmer who, driven by memories of his family’s slaughter, becomes an outlaw when he refuses to join his Confederate comrades in surrender, in favour of seeking revenge on the men who murdered his kin. Friday 2 March Searching for the truth: Lydia Wilson as Matilda Credit: BBC Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm After last week’s hiatus because of the Six Nations rugby, it’s back to small-town Wales for another dose of supernatural country-house shenanigans. When we last saw fragile but determined musician Matilda (Lydia Wilson), she’d suffered the double whammy of finding her would-be mother Rose (Claire Rushbrook) unconscious in the bath and learning that mute Aunt Meredith (Jane Thorne) had died on the verge of offering up her secrets. How did Matilda react? By mysteriously blacking out and bashing her beloved cello against a cupboard. In the fourth episode then, she looks for connections between her mental health and Carys’s disappearance. And some clues emerge: Matilda meets dishevelled local Laura (Anastasia Hille), who claims to hear voices informing her of Carys’s fate, and back at the mansion, she comes across some old tomes detailing rituals to unlock the past. Even with its heavily scored bumps and shudders, Requiem can’t quite sustain its early Hammer Horror appeal. The strong performances and some genuinely chilling moments keep things compelling however, not least in the spine-tingling climax of this episode. Toby Dantzic Flint Town Netflix, from today Back in 2014, a cost-cutting exercise left thousands of homes in Flint, Michigan, with contaminated drinking water for years. This new eight-part documentary looks at the fallout from the crisis through the eyes of Flint’s beleaguered police force, who face an uphill struggle – the community needs their support but are also deeply mistrustful of those in authority, plus dwindling resources makes the officers’ jobs harder still. MasterChef BBC One, 7.30pm Having survived the cooking contest’s opening week, the six heat winners face food critic William Sitwell in this first quarter-final. He challenges them to conjure up a standout pudding showcasing either alcohol or spices. Love Your Garden ITV, 8.00pm; not STV/UTV/Wales This week, Alan Titchmarsh and his team are in Bidewell, Devon, helping Tamsyn and Alex Wood who returned to the UK from France after Alex suffered a brain injury. The aim is to turn the Woods’ garden into a coastal sanctuary inspired by Alex’s passion for surfing. The Yorkshire Steam Railway: All Aboard Channel 5, 8.00pm As amiable as its title suggests, this new documentary series follows the lives of those who work on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, one of the country’s most popular steam railways. In this series’ opener, the new season begins with the arrival of star engine Royal Scot, on loan from London. Tones, Drones and Arpeggios: The Magic of Minimalism BBC Four, 9.00pm Conductor Charles Hazlewood explores minimalism, which he argues is the most important musical form of the 20th century. In the fascinating opener of this two-part series, he unpicks the construction of these sometimes confounding sounds and tracks down the genre’s avant-garde pioneers, who brought their mesmeric, spirituality-inspired compositions from California to New York in the Sixties. TD Jo Brand: Secrets of Her Success Channel 5, 10.30pm Channel 5’s celebration of funny women continues with this absorbing profile of the pioneering doyenne of deadpan, Jo Brand. This charts her career from its rocky start on the male-dominated stand-up circuit to her much-admired hospital sitcom Getting On. TD Gladiator (2000) ★★★★★ Film4, 9.00pm This take on the traditional swords-and-sandals epic proved that Russell Crowe deserved to be recognised as a mainstream star, and reaffirmed Ridley Scott’s reputation as a first-rate director. Crowe is Maximus, a former Roman general who rebuilds his career as a gladiator. His bid for vengeance against a vile emperor (Joaquin Phoenix) is compelling. Plus there’s a last hurrah from Oliver Reed. Blades of Glory (2007) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm;N Ireland, 12.05am You might think that the sequinned world of figure skating is beyond parody, but here Will Ferrell and Jon Heder serve up a zestfully preposterous comedy. Both play rival Olympic ice skaters, Ferrell a loose-living maverick, Heder a prissy perfectionist, who are slung out of the sport but use a loophole to return as an erotic all-male pairing. Amy Poehler co-stars. A Hijacking (2012) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.55pm Tobias Lindholm’s vigorously intelligent hostage thriller, set on board a besieged ship in the Indian Ocean, deftly moves his story between the boat and the shipping company’s offices, where Søren Malling’s frazzled CEO attempts to thrash out a bargain. On the other end of the line is the Somalis’ translator. Flies buzz, sweat trickles, negotiations continue, and you feel your breath dry up. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
Friday 23 February Gogglebox Channel 4, 9.00pm We all know that Gogglebox won’t be the same this time around. One of the great joys of watching the armchair TV critic show, which returns for its 11th series, was the always warm, occasionally bickering relationship between straight-talking Liverpudlian couple, Leon and June Bernicoff. But, sadly, Leon died last December following a short illness and June recently confirmed that she won’t be taking part without him. So, in the absence of Leon’s notoriously unvarnished views (on chef Jamie Oliver: “‘Oh he’s a d---head”), what can we expect? Probably business as usual. After all, the show has survived the loss of popular families before, from everyone’s favourite posh couple, Steph and Dom, to the gloriously opinionated Scarlett Moffatt. Our guesses: the lovely Siddiquis will continue to be the most well-adjusted family, hairdressers Stephen and Christopher will trot out the most-pointed one-liners, Welsh couple Dave and Shirley will bring the giggles, even though it remains a mystery just how Dave watches TV in that very uncomfortable-looking position, and we still won’t be able to work out how many dogs the Malones actually have. SH Live Winter Olympics 2018 BBC One and BBC Two, from 6.00am Day 14 sees the semi-finals of the men’s ice hockey and the women’s curling competition, plus the final of the men’s 1,000 m speed skating. SH An Island Parish: After the Hurricane BBC Two, 9.00pm Sophie Okonedo narrates this special edition of the series which looks at the long-term effects of Hurricane Irma on the Caribbean island of Anguilla. Among those who lost everything are Simone Connor and her father Neville, who ran a restaurant and leisure complex on the island. SH Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm Now is the perfect time to jump back on the Will & Grace bandwagon as the wonderful Nick Offerman (the real-life husband of Megan Mullally, who plays Karen) guest stars as baker Jackson Boudreaux, aka the Bad Boy of Bread. Offerman is a scene-stealing delight and the final moments offer a lovely pay-off. SH Joan Rivers: By Her friends Channel 5, 10.30pm Anyone who saw the brilliant comedy The Marvellous Mrs Maisel, which was inspired by the late Joan Rivers’s early career, will know that the comedian’s domestic-focused stand-up routines were unlike anything that the audiences of that time had heard before. This tribute puts that ground-breaking career in context. SH The Tick Amazon Prime, from today Peter Serafinowicz’s goofy blue superhero returns for another series of misadventures. As with the last time, the series stands and falls with Serafinowicz’s performance: his morally upstanding but bizarre caped crusader has enough charm to paper over plot cracks. SH Seven Seconds Netflix, from today This new crime-drama series from Veena Sud, the writer behind the US version of The Killing, explores grief, deceit and social injustice. Starring Regina King, it focuses on the fallout from the death of a young boy who was injured by a police officer. SH The Old Grey Whistle Test Live: For One Night Only BBC Four, 9.00pm Bob Harris, who fronted The Old Grey Whistle Test from 1972-1978, returns with this event marking 30 years since the end of music show. This one-off includes live performances and interviews with fans and former presenters. SH Mute (2018) Netflix, from today True Blood alumnus Alexander Skarsgård plays Leo, the titular mute in Duncan Jones’s sci-fi thriller, which the director describes as a spiritual sequel to 2009’s Moon. Leo Beiler, a bartender with a violent past, searches for his missing girlfriend Naadirah (Seyneb Saleh) in a futuristic, neon-lit Berlin. He crosses paths with a pair of US army surgeons, brilliantly named Cactus Bill and Duck Teddington (played by Paul Rudd and Justin Theroux), on a mission of their own. X-Men: First Class (2011) ★★★☆☆ E4, 9.00pm Telepathic Charles Xavier (James McAvoy) bonds with metal-bending death camp survivor Erik Lehnsherr (Michael Fassbender) and the two of them track down other mutants to confront evil Nazi Sebastian Shaw (Kevin Bacon) when he triggers the Cuban Missile Crisis. Matthew Vaughn is much more comfortable with the small-scale character stuff than the action climax, but this prequel is mostly a lot of fun. While We’re Young (2014) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm A couple’s doomed attempt to recapture their youth gives Ben Stiller and Naomi Watts a new lease of comic life in Noah Baumbach’s sparkling film. Baumbach packs it with the wit and vigour of a polished one-act play as co-stars Adam Driver and Amanda Seyfried, playing hat-wearing hipsters, deliver punchlines that can’t help but remind you of Woody Allen at his peak. Saturday 24 February Loadsa laughs: Ant McPartlin and Declan Donnelly Credit: ITV Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway ITV, 7.00pm Anthony McPartlin and Declan Donnelly, the undisputed kings of Saturday night TV – never more so since they won the inaugural Bruce Forsyth Entertainment gong, among others, at the National Television Awards last month – return with a 16th series of their popular show. Packed full of comedy, audience participation, prize giveaways, celebrity guests, exclusive performances and madcap stunts, this is high-octane entertainment, with barely time to draw breath between items. Tonight, Kylie Minogue gives a first performance of her latest single and revisits some of her biggest hits, Britain’s Got Talent judge Amanda Holden falls victim to the first Undercover prank of the series and Olly Murs takes on the role of guest announcer in the End of Show Show. The hosts themselves, meanwhile, put the pedal to the floor for a daredevil Ant vs Dec monster truck challenge, and reprise their roles as super sleuths in a new comedy whodunit (with an all-star cast that includes Joanna Lumley, Michael Sheen, Emilia Fox and David Walliams) while sidekicks Scarlett Moffatt and Stephen Mulhern are out on the streets looking for people to plays games with. And that’s just for starters. Gerard O’Donovan Live Winter Olympics 2018 BBC One and BBC Two, from 6.00am It’s the penultimate day and there’s major Team GB interest as the four-man bobsleigh gets under way. However, most eyes will be on the curling, which has proved rather popular in these Games, as the men’s gold and women’s bronze medals are decided. There’s also action in the snowboarding and skiing. Six Nations Rugby Union: Ireland v Wales ITV, 1.30pm After their 12-6 defeat against England at Twickenham, Wales travel to Ireland, with Dan Biggar starting at fly-half, and Liam Williams and Leigh Halfpenny also returning after injury. Ireland have won two from two, beating France in Paris, before enjoying an eight-try buffet at Italy’s expense in a 56-19 victory. The visitors are unbeaten in their last three Six Nations matches against Ireland, but were held to a 16-16 draw when the sides last met here two years ago. Six Nations Rugby Union: Scotland v England BBC One, 4.00pm Tough one for England, this. Yes, they’ve won nine of the last 10 matches against Scotland, drawing the other one, but the pressure cauldron that is Murrayfield is never an easy place to visit, and they’ll have their tails up after an impressive 32-26 win against France. Still, according to head coach Gregor Townsend, Scotland will need to produce their “best-ever performance” if they are to triumph against England in the Calcutta Cup. Eddie Jones’s team beat Wales 12-6 thanks to two first-half tries by Jonny May, but were forced to hang on grimly in the frenetic closing stages as they set a new championship record for consecutive home wins (15, dating back to 2012). When these sides met in the tournament last year, England thrashed Scotland 61-21 at Twickenham. Churchill’s Darkest Decision More4, 7.55pm Fans of the hit film Darkest Hour will appreciate this documentary about another big Churchill dilemma. In 1940, following the fall of France, Germany was poised to seize the entire French fleet, making Hitler’s threat to invade Britain ever graver. Drastic measures were called for, but at a tragically high cost. David Attenborough’s Natural Curiosities BBC Two, 8.00pm Creatures with remarkable navigation skills are the focus of tonight’s edition, looking at how dung beetles use the Sun, Moon and stars as compass points, and how pigeons recall complex routes. Britain at Low Tide Channel 4, 8.00pm More stories from our shoreline as Tori Herridge visits Dorset, where she finds the home of the world’s first aircraft carrier and searches for an Iron Age monument that can only be seen for a few hours each year. Troy: Fall of a City BBC One, 9.10pm All hell breaks loose in this second episode when Helen’s (Bella Dayne) husband Menelaus finds out what Paris (Louis Hunter) took back to Troy. His enraged brother Agamemnon (Johnny Harris) calls all Greece to war, but when they fail to propitiate the gods, there’s a shocking price to pay. GO Mosaic Sky Atlantic, 10.00pm Steven Soderbergh’s crime drama starring Sharon Stone provoked a blizzard of publicity on its release last year in mobile app format. HBO’s six-part “linear” TV version is obviously less innovative (the app works like an interactive movie where the user can choose from which perspective the plot is viewed), but it still has plenty to offer. In this second episode, the backstory continues to play out as author Olivia Lake’s (Stone) relationships with lover Eric (Frederick Weller) and lodger Joel (Garrett Hedlund) become ever more tangled. GO Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2 (2013) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 5.00pm In this sequel to the 2009 animation based on the 1978 children’s book, inventor Flint Lockwood (voiced by Bill Hader) and friends must rescue the island of Swallow Falls from being overrun by food-mutated animals. It’s no triumph of screenwriting or subtext, but it’s a feast of ingeniously rendered gastronomic insanity and kids will absolutely love it. The Heat (2013) ★★★★☆ E4, 9.00pm Bridesmaids director Paul Feig brings back one of that film’s stars, Melissa McCarthy, as a foul-mouthed Boston cop whose policing style, aided by a fridge full of armaments, makes Dirty Harry look like Thumbelina. She’s paired with a goody-two-shoes FBI agent (Sandra Bullock reminding us what a pro she is at comedy). Together, they’re dynamite, plus the film has an emotional clout that hits you seemingly from nowhere. Philomena (2013) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.00pm; not Northern Ireland This true story is based on the experiences of journalist Martin Sixsmith (Steve Coogan), who helped Philomena Lee (Judi Dench), an Irish woman in her seventies, search for the son that she was forced to put up for adoption 50 years earlier. Stephen Frears’s film is charming and hard-hitting, delivering some tough emotional blows as well as some harsh truths about the Catholic Church’s past. Sunday 25 February Curiouser and curiouser: Holliday Grainger and Tom Burke Credit: BBC Strike: Career of Evil BBC One, 9.00pm Rumpled PI Cormoran Strike (Tom Burke) and his trusty Girl Friday Robin Ellacott (Holliday Grainger) return for the third of JK Rowling’s Robert Galbraith novels. It’s a few months after the events of The Silkworm and Strike and Robin have settled into an easy working partnership, albeit one that remains a little too cosy for Robin’s smarmy fiancé Matthew (Kerr Logan). Then Robin receives a gruesome present in the post and our intrepid duo found themselves caught up in an investigation that swiftly hits far too close to home. Career of Evil is the most tightly plotted of the Galbraith books and this well-paced opening episode neatly sets up the (plentiful) twists to come. That said, the real enjoyment comes not from the story but from the fantastic chemistry between Grainger and Burke, who bring an immense amount of warmth and charm to their scenes. Indeed, so successfully do they inhabit the roles that it’s frustrating to realise that, with no more Galbraith books currently published, this will be the last Strike for a while. It’s a genuine shame: if ever a TV adaptation deserved to be spun away from its source material it’s this one. Sarah Hughes ODI cricket: New Zealand v England Sky Sports Main Event, 12.30am You’ll have to stay up late to see this opening one-day international of the five-match series. England, having beaten the Aussies in their last ODI series, will fancy their chances. Young, Welsh and Pretty Minted BBC Three, from 10.00am The makers of Young, Welsh and Pretty Skint return with a new series focusing on a group of would-be entrepreneurs, including a YouTuber with 1.7 million subscribers and an image-obsessed Instagram influencer. Live Winter Olympics 2018 Closing Ceremony BBC Two, from 11.00am The Olympics bow out, allowing us to recall the heartbreak (Team GB’s Elise Christie’s wipeout in the speedskating final) and joy (American snowboarder Chloe Kim’s megawatt smile). K-pop star CL and boy band EXO take part in the ceremony which has a fusion theme, before the flag is handed over to Beijing for 2022. Premier League Football: Manchester United v Chelsea Sky Sports Main Event, 1.00pm With both sides struggling for consistency – United lost at Newcastle a fortnight ago, while Chelsea were trounced 4-1 by Watford earlier this month – today’s match at Old Trafford should be a tentative affair. Carabao Cup Final: Arsenal v Manchester City Sky Sports Main Event, 4.00pm Proving that the League Cup is having something of a resurgence, Arsenal and Manchester City are this year’s finalists, with the former aiming to win the trophy for the first time since 1993. City are favourites, though: imperious in the league, they also have form in the Carabao Cup, having won it in 2014 and 2016. Top Gear BBC Two, 8.00pm The petrolhead’s special returns with Matt LeBlanc promising increased family appeal. The new team of LeBlanc, Chris Harris and Rory Reid have decent chemistry and if this was your sort of thing then it probably remains so. Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble BBC Four, 8.00pm Few programmes are as inspiring as this one about cellist Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble, an ever-changing group of over 50 artists who perform alongside Ma. In addition to highlighting some phenomenal talents – Galician bagpiper Cristina Pato almost steals the show – the film details the hardships that they’ve faced, including revolution and exile. Anchoring it all is former child prodigy Ma: “I think when I was a kid a lot of things just happened,” he notes as footage shows him performing as a child for President Kennedy. “I’m always trying to figure out who I am and where I fit in the world.” SH Hannibal’s Elephant Army: The New Evidence Channel 4, 8.00pm Why did Carthaginian general Hannibal cross the Alps on a seemingly impossible journey with an army of 40,000 soldiers, 9,000 cavalry officers and 37 elephants? This fascinating film examines the evidence. Life and Death Row: The Mass Execution BBC Two, 9.00pm The harrowing series continues to turn a microscopic eye on all aspects of the death penalty. Tonight it’s the case of Stacey Johnson, on death row for 23 years. His stepdaughter insists on his innocence; his victim’s daughter says she’s sure that he’s a guilty man. SH Clouds of Sils Maria (2014) ★★★★☆ BBC Four, 9.30pm A complex, bewitching and fearlessly intelligent psychological fondue from France’s Olivier Assayas, with Juliet Binoche and Kristen Stewart as a famous actress and her diligent and devoted personal assistant, prepping for a play that shapes the drama of their own lives in its likeness. Playful and addictively strange, with career-best work from Stewart. Shutter Island (2010) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 11.05pm Martin Scorsese’s follow-up to The Departed, is, like that film, based on a novel by Dennis Lehane. He delves into gothic noir in this mystery thriller as detective Daniels (Leonardo DiCaprio) investigates the disappearance of an inmate from a prison for the clinically insane with the help of his partner (played brilliantly by Mark Ruffalo). This is a gripping story with some bold twists, although it eventually loses momentum. Point Break (1991) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 11.30pm; Scotland, 12.30am Kathryn Bigelow’s cult surfing/crime film elevated Patrick Swayze’s actor status to true action hero. Keanu Reeves plays Johnny Utah, an FBI agent who goes undercover to infiltrate a gang of bankrobbing surfers led by the charismatic Bodhi (Swayze). The action heats up when Bodhi and Utah find they share a similar attitude towards danger. Lori Petty is the surfer who catches Johnny’s eye. Monday 26 February Body snatched? Greg Kinnear as the father Credit: Channel 4 Electric Dreams: The Father Thing Channel 4, 10.00pm After a first run split pretty evenly between stunners and misfires, the final four adaptations of short stories from pulp sci-fi icon Philip K Dick begins with a heavily derivative but entertaining piece from Michael Dinner, showrunner of excellent modern western Justified. The setting is an unnamed Midwest town, where young baseball-loving Charlie (Jack Gore) lives with his parents, hangs out with three other misfits and avoids the bullies; it’s as cosily familiar a slice of apple-pie Americana as you could find. And then the aftermath of a meteor shower causes Charlie to suspect that some of the town’s inhabitants may have been replaced by aliens, his own father (Greg Kinnear) included. Based more directly than some of its predecessors on Dick’s original story, this cannot help but nod to Invasion of the Body Snatchers, although the Cold War paranoia replaced by… what, exactly? There’s a parable of father-son relations in here, along with an allegory of divorce and a Stranger Things-influenced romp, but it shows its hand a little early, never settles on a tone and features a climax that will split opinion down the middle. That said, it’s never less than diverting. Gabriel Tate This Country BBC Three, from 10.00am Series one of Charlie and Daisy May Cooper’s mockumentary transcended its obvious debt to The Office to become a touching, acutely observed and defiant portrait of life on the margins in rural Britain. Importantly, it was also very funny, finding bathos and humour in the efforts of gormless cousins Kurtan and Kerry Mucklowe (played by the Coopers) to amuse themselves in a Cotswolds village. Thankfully, almost nothing has changed for this second series, although Kurtan has found a girlfriend and Kerry hitherto unknown charitable instincts. Shakespeare & Hathaway: Private Investigators BBC One, 2.15pm Jo Joyner and Mark Benton are perfectly cast in this amiable new 10-part series as Lu Shakespeare, wrongly suspected of killing her fiancé, and Frank Hathaway, the slobbish PI she ropes in to clear her name. The odd-couple chemistry is there from the start and Stratford-upon-Avon looks glorious – making this a welcome addition to the afternoon schedules. Hollywood in Vienna: the Sound of Space & Alexandre Desplat Sky Arts, 8.00pm This gala performance loosely based on a journey through the universe includes Parisian composer Alexandre Desplat’s melodies for movies, including Twilight and The Grand Budapest Hotel, as well as legendary scores from Star Wars to E.T. GT Classic Mary Berry BBC One, 8.30pm Cherish the unlikely sight of the former Bake Off judge partaking in a little “caveman cooking” in this latest rebranding of Mary Berry’s line in home-cooking, with the opener focusing on comfort food. MasterChef BBC One, 9.00pm The 11th run of the enduringly popular cooking contest begins with the first seven contestants creating dishes using ingredients including beef mince and duck breasts for John Torode, Gregg Wallace and some former finalists. The Unstoppable Flying Scotsman Channel 5, 9.00pm The world’s most famous steam locomotive is profiled in this two-parter from Rob Bell, always a reassuring translator of technical geekery for a mainstream audience. Here, he explores its origins and enduring appeal. GT Ice Cold in Alex (1958, b/w) ★★★★☆ Film4, 4.20pm J Lee Thompson’s tense British wartime thriller is one of the classics of the black-and-white era and richly entertaining. John Mills shines as Captain Anson, who dreams of an ice-cold glass of lager while escorting Britons across the desert to Alexandria during the Second World War. The film makes some interesting points about patriotism, as we learn Anson is unaware that he’s harbouring a traitor. Alien Resurrection (1997) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Sigourney Weaver returns as heroine Ellen Ripley for this fourth film in the franchise. Two hundred years have passed since Alien 3, and Ripley has now been cloned by scientists, which gives her greater strength but also conflicting loyalties, meaning we’re not sure that we can trust her. Despite the talent on board (Weaver, screenwriter Joss Whedon and director Jean-Pierre Jeunot), this is a poor effort. Elysium (2013) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 11.00pm Neill Blomkamp’s (District 9) intelligent sci-fi thriller has a fire in its belly and stars a brawny Matt Damon as a factory worker who scrapes out a living on the Earth’s crust. He’s involved in an accident but the medical care that he needs is on space station Elysium. Blomkamp focuses on faith, capitalism and private healthcare – in lesser hands, the film might have played out like a Lib Dem manifesto with spaceships. Tuesday 27 February Surrounded by splendour: Alan Titchmarsh Secrets of the National Trust with Alan Titchmarsh Channel 5, 8.00pm A tale of “female empowerment, politics and a fight for the throne of England itself” is how Alan Titchmarsh, opening a second series showcasing the National Trust’s finest properties, describes the history of Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire. Certainly, the story of Elizabeth Talbot, Countess of Shrewsbury (aka Bess of Hardwick), and how four strategic marriages helped her to become one of the most powerful women in Elizabethan England, is a fascinating one. And the glorious house she built in the 1590s, with vast facades of glass and sumptuous decor, was doubtless a marvel of the age. Whether you think Titchmarsh does either of them justice will depend on how much detail you like in a documentary, and how much repetition (you won’t possess enough fingers to count how often he mentions that Bess’s initials and coat of arms decorate the high parapet of the house) and “coming up next” you can bear. Either way, there are plenty of glories to gaze upon, so if you’re unlikely to get a chance to visit Hardwick Hall in person, the fine filming shows off the house and its grounds in considerable splendour. Gerard O’Donovan How to Get Fit Fast Channel 4, 8.00pm Anna Richardson and Amar Latif put the emphasis on fitness rather than weight loss in this new series exploring the off-the-shelf plans available, hoping to point viewers towards the exercise regime that suits them best. 100 Years Younger in 21 Days ITV, 9.00pm Eight well-worn famous faces attempt to turn the clock back at a “rejuvenation” clinic in Sardinia. June Brown, Sherrie Hewson, Claire King, Sid Owen, Roy Walker, Russell Grant, Googlebox’s Sandra Martin and music legend Shaun Ryder are among thoses hoping to knock off years without going under the knife. The FGM Detectives Channel 4, 10.00pm Despite the global efforts to ban the practice, female genital mutilation (FGM) continues to affect millions of women. Here Cathy Newman leads a two-year investigation into FGM in the UK, which is estimated to put 20,000 young British women at risk every year. Acid Attack: My Story BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm Naomi Oni recounts the horrific acid attack that left her with life-altering injuries in 2012, and how the police investigation (which, unbelievably, initially focused on whether she had inflicted the wounds on herself) proved the attacker to be a childhood friend. GO Unreal Amazon Prime, from today A drama playing on the fakeness, dubious ethics and behind-the-scenes manipulation of a hit reality TV dating show, UnREAL is nothing if not a series for our times. As the third season begins, Everlasting’s producer Rachel (Shiri Appleby) is getting her life back on track, despite her ruthless boss Quinn (Constance Zimmer) ramping up the pressure to deliver the show’s most outrageous season yet. Divorce Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm Sarah Jessica Parker returns with a second season of the bleak and bitingly funny comedy about the painful break-up of an American middle-class couple’s marriage. At least that’s what series one, created and partly written by the Sharon Horgan, was about. Season two, minus Horgan’s input, takes on a distinctly lighter tone as both Frances (Parker) and her now ex-husband Robert (Thomas Haden Church) begin tentatively to negotiate the possibilities of life post divorce. GO Charade (1963) ★★★★☆ Film4, 2.25pm Audrey Hepburn as a temperamental-but-alluring damsel in distress and Cary Grant as a shadowy charmer are characters that the actors played many times. But they do so exceptionally in this suspense comedy from Stanley Donen, often referred to as the best Hitchcock movie that Hitchcock never made. Hepburn is the widow being trailed by four men hunting for her late husband’s stolen fortune. Black Swan (2010) ★★★★★ Film4, 11.25pm Darren Aronofsky’s film is delirious hokum and high-class trash. Natalie Portman stars as Nina Sayers, a young dancer with the New York City Ballet preparing for a production of Swan Lake choreographed by the charismatic Thomas Leroy (Vincent Cassel). He is unconvinced by Nina’s ability to portray the passion of the Black Swan and her efforts to convince him lead her towards madness. Christine (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 11.50pm The story of Christine Chubbuck, a Florida newsreader who shot herself on air in 1974, is shocking and unfathomably sad. But it wouldn’t be worth retelling on film if it didn’t illuminate something. It asks a top-notch Rebecca Hall to play out the last days of Chubbuck’s life and dares us to hope that it’s about a different woman – one who made it out the other side of her own tragedy. Wednesday 28 February Victim: Édgar Ramírez as Versace Credit: BBC The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story BBC Two, 9.00pm Ryan Murphy’s true crime series follows up 2016’s dramatisation of the OJ Simpson trial with the story of serial killer Andrew Cunanan, who murdered at least five people over a three-month period, including the fashion designer Gianni Versace. Murphy and scriptwriter Tom Rob Smith use the word assassination very carefully here: the operatic opening scenes depict Versace (Édgar Ramírez) as a modern-day Medici prince, dispensing cheerful patronage to all in his Miami Beach fiefdom. By contrast, Cunanan (Darren Criss) is portrayed as a man so insecure in his own skin that he is almost physically incapable of telling the truth: “You tell gay people you’re gay and straight people you’re straight,” exclaims an exasperated friend. “I tell people what they need to hear,” comes the too-calm reply. Both Criss and Ramirez are excellent and there’s strong support from Ricky Martin as Versace’s bewildered live-in boyfriend and a perhaps slightly too-camp Penélope Cruz as Donatella. Smith’s solid script does a good job of juggling various timelines to show how this particular killer came to be. Sarah Hughes Ellie Undercover: Rent for Sex BBC Three, from 10.00am Investigative journalist Ellie Flynn presents this look at the growing number of unscrupulous landlords who offer rent-free accommodation in exchange for sex. It’s hard not to feel utterly dispirited as Flynn meets vulnerable women such as Chloe, who feels so trapped by her homelessness that she’s in no position to say no to these men. Athletics: The World Indoor Championships BBC Two, 7.00pm The four-day World Indoor Championships, which takes place at Arena Birmingham, kicks off on Thursday, featuring three events in the first evening session – including Team GB’s Laura Muir and Eilish McColgan in the final of the women’s 3,000 m. Events continue from 9.00am on Friday, with Greg Rutherford’s long jump bid among the highlights. The World’s Most Extraordinary Homes BBC Two, 8.00pm For those of us who enjoy gawping at other people’s homes, few programmes are more satisfying than this series presented by Caroline Quentin and architect Piers Taylor. Tonight the duo are in Portugal poking their noses into four very different properties. The Supervet Channel 4, 8.00pm Professor Noel Fitzpatrick and the team returns for a new round of veterinary problems, including a very excitable Labrador who requires elbow replacement surgery and a Jackahuahua puppy who needs to have spinal surgery after an attack in the park. Benidorm ITV, 9.00pm Hold on to your sunhats as ITV’s long-running Costa Blanca comedy returns for a 10th series with comedians Hale & Pace joining the cast as a pair of undercover cops. Elsewhere, Joyce (Sherrie Hewson) and Monty’s (John Challis) big day arrives. Save Me Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Don’t let the fact that it features yet another missing child put you off the week’s best new drama. Written by and starring Lennie James, Save Me tells the tale of Nelly (James), an ageing wide-boy of suspect charms, who finds himself in trouble after his estranged teenage daughter disappears. We’ve all met people like Nelly, the easy smiles hiding their sharp edges, and James does a wonderful job of making us warm to him despite the distrust. There’s strong support, too, from Suranne Jones as the missing girl’s mother. SH Film 2018 BBC One, 11.15pm; Wales, 11.35pm; NI, 12.10am The BBC’s long-running film series returns with an opening episode hosted by Radio 1’s Clara Amfo alongside critics Ellen E Jones and Larushka Ivan-Zadeh. The focus this week is on next Sunday’s Academy Awards, plus an interview with Lady Bird’s Oscar-nominated director, Greta Gerwig. SH The Quiet Man (1952) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.00pm Best known for his sombre westerns, John Ford turns personal for this wonderful romantic comedy which was considered a risky venture but went on to win the director his fourth Oscar. It tells the story of a boxer who falls in love with the sister of a bully. The famous grab-and-kiss scene between the smouldering John Wayne and love interest Maureen O’Hara (the “Queen of Technicolour”) also appears in E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. Big Eyes (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Amy Adams is ideally cast as the browbeaten artist Margaret Keane who, for eight years, churned out iconic, highly sought after paintings, only for her con artist husband (Christoph Waltz) to take all the credit. Tim Burton’s take on this curious real-life tale of curdled suburbia sadly lacks Adams’s subtlety: even the usually restrained Waltz is caught up in the blunt, overly stylised kookiness. Good (2008) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.50pm Viggo Mortensen gives a thoughtful performance as a German professor whose ideas about euthanasia are adopted by the Nazis. It’s only when he becomes a concentration camp inspector that he grasps the horror of his ideas. Vicente Amorim’s adaptation of CP Taylor’s play doesn’t shirk big questions, but he tends to fall back on clichés – hammerings on the piano, etc – and it plays a bit like a Nazi version of Rising Damp. Thursday 1 March A landmark return: David Olusoga, Mary Beard and Simon Schama Credit: BBC Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm Almost 50 years after changing the face of arts programming with the landmark series Civilisation, BBC Two returns with an expanded brief and all the bells and whistles of modern film-making, from drone cameras to infra-red photography. With nine episodes split between presenters Simon Schama (five), David Olusoga and Mary Beard (two each), Civilisations promises an opinionated overview of global art and culture. It opens with a striking sequence in which Schama – helming this first part – explores what has been lost and salvaged from the Isil pillage of Palmyra. From there, we’re whisked to Africa’s Cape coast and the first evidence of mankind’s creativity 77,000 years ago. Then it’s a breathless gallop through the millennia, alighting at the first settlements and depictions of the human face. Among the cave art, Mayan stairways and fertility fetishes, the real treasure is an astonishing Mycenaean Sealstone, jaw-dropping in its anatomical detail and artistic accomplishment. While it won’t have the same impact as the original series (what could?), Civilisations looks to be just as learned, accessible and thrilling as its predecessor – the whole series will be available on BBC iPlayer at 10.00pm. Gabriel Tate The Cruise: Voyage to Alaska ITV, 8.30pm; not Wales Over three episodes, the five-star luxury liner Star Princess and its redoubtable crew travels to the northernmost American state – where they encounter difficult weather, navigational challenges and problem passengers. Weinstein: the Inside Story BBC One, 9.00pm In collaboration with PBS America’s Frontline current-affairs strand, Panorama examines the fall of Harvey Weinstein and the lengths to which the disgraced Hollywood producer would go to keep his alleged bullying, threats and sexual assaults private. Speaking to insiders, the team builds a troubling picture of industry complicity. From Ice to Fire: the Incredible Science of Temperature BBC Four, 9.00pm Dr Helen Czerski concludes her excellent series with fire, and how its harnessing played a pivotal role in human evolution and survival, from essentials such as toolmaking and mining to relative fripperies such as hot-air balloons. The moment that Czerski triggers a lightning strike at a high-voltage laboratory carries a genuine frisson; as is customary with most BBC Four films, the presentation is lively and the science deftly handled. Serial Killer with Piers Morgan ITV, 9.00pm How do you follow interviewing Donald Trump? Piers Morgan returns to the less contentious turf of more one-to-ones with convicted murderers behind bars. He begins with Lorenzo Gilyard, the so-called Kansas City Strangler, who remains unremorseful after allegedly killing 13 women and girls over almost two decades. Panic at 30,000 Feet: Airline Emergency Channel 5, 9.00pm This nightmare-inducing new series explores what happens when flights go wrong, from mid-air collisions to runway explosions. GT Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 11.45pm The penultimate episode of this often disturbing and insightful series revisits Oak Creek, Wisconsin, where white supremacist Michael Page killed six and injured four at a Sikh temple, before killing himself, in 2012. For once, there is a vaguely positive denouement: Page’s brutality had the opposite to its intended effect and brought the community closer together. GT Jubal (1956) ★★★★☆ Film4, 12.40pm Ernest Borgnine stars in this brooding western shot in the Grand Teton mountains of Wyoming, which reworks the plot of Othello. Borgnine stars as a cattle rancher with a much younger wife (Valerie French), who is driven into a jealous rage when cattlehand Rod Steiger suggests that she is having an affair with young drifter Jubal (a magnificent Glenn Ford). Murder is most definitely on the cards. Pitch Perfect (2012) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm The world of collegiate a cappella singing contests can’t be as heartless as Jason Moore’s sour comedy would have us believe. Anna Kendrick stars as Beca, an angst-ridden outsider who must shake up her uninspiring and monotonous group, while trying to handle how weird they all are. And, of course, there’s a handsome man (Skylar Astin) who catches her eye. It’s a little like Glee but without the schmaltz. The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Clint Eastwood directs and stars in this warm-hearted marvellous western adapted from Forrest Carter’s novel and set during the American Civil War. Eastwood plays the Missouri farmer who, driven by memories of his family’s slaughter, becomes an outlaw when he refuses to join his Confederate comrades in surrender, in favour of seeking revenge on the men who murdered his kin. Friday 2 March Searching for the truth: Lydia Wilson as Matilda Credit: BBC Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm After last week’s hiatus because of the Six Nations rugby, it’s back to small-town Wales for another dose of supernatural country-house shenanigans. When we last saw fragile but determined musician Matilda (Lydia Wilson), she’d suffered the double whammy of finding her would-be mother Rose (Claire Rushbrook) unconscious in the bath and learning that mute Aunt Meredith (Jane Thorne) had died on the verge of offering up her secrets. How did Matilda react? By mysteriously blacking out and bashing her beloved cello against a cupboard. In the fourth episode then, she looks for connections between her mental health and Carys’s disappearance. And some clues emerge: Matilda meets dishevelled local Laura (Anastasia Hille), who claims to hear voices informing her of Carys’s fate, and back at the mansion, she comes across some old tomes detailing rituals to unlock the past. Even with its heavily scored bumps and shudders, Requiem can’t quite sustain its early Hammer Horror appeal. The strong performances and some genuinely chilling moments keep things compelling however, not least in the spine-tingling climax of this episode. Toby Dantzic Flint Town Netflix, from today Back in 2014, a cost-cutting exercise left thousands of homes in Flint, Michigan, with contaminated drinking water for years. This new eight-part documentary looks at the fallout from the crisis through the eyes of Flint’s beleaguered police force, who face an uphill struggle – the community needs their support but are also deeply mistrustful of those in authority, plus dwindling resources makes the officers’ jobs harder still. MasterChef BBC One, 7.30pm Having survived the cooking contest’s opening week, the six heat winners face food critic William Sitwell in this first quarter-final. He challenges them to conjure up a standout pudding showcasing either alcohol or spices. Love Your Garden ITV, 8.00pm; not STV/UTV/Wales This week, Alan Titchmarsh and his team are in Bidewell, Devon, helping Tamsyn and Alex Wood who returned to the UK from France after Alex suffered a brain injury. The aim is to turn the Woods’ garden into a coastal sanctuary inspired by Alex’s passion for surfing. The Yorkshire Steam Railway: All Aboard Channel 5, 8.00pm As amiable as its title suggests, this new documentary series follows the lives of those who work on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, one of the country’s most popular steam railways. In this series’ opener, the new season begins with the arrival of star engine Royal Scot, on loan from London. Tones, Drones and Arpeggios: The Magic of Minimalism BBC Four, 9.00pm Conductor Charles Hazlewood explores minimalism, which he argues is the most important musical form of the 20th century. In the fascinating opener of this two-part series, he unpicks the construction of these sometimes confounding sounds and tracks down the genre’s avant-garde pioneers, who brought their mesmeric, spirituality-inspired compositions from California to New York in the Sixties. TD Jo Brand: Secrets of Her Success Channel 5, 10.30pm Channel 5’s celebration of funny women continues with this absorbing profile of the pioneering doyenne of deadpan, Jo Brand. This charts her career from its rocky start on the male-dominated stand-up circuit to her much-admired hospital sitcom Getting On. TD Gladiator (2000) ★★★★★ Film4, 9.00pm This take on the traditional swords-and-sandals epic proved that Russell Crowe deserved to be recognised as a mainstream star, and reaffirmed Ridley Scott’s reputation as a first-rate director. Crowe is Maximus, a former Roman general who rebuilds his career as a gladiator. His bid for vengeance against a vile emperor (Joaquin Phoenix) is compelling. Plus there’s a last hurrah from Oliver Reed. Blades of Glory (2007) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm;N Ireland, 12.05am You might think that the sequinned world of figure skating is beyond parody, but here Will Ferrell and Jon Heder serve up a zestfully preposterous comedy. Both play rival Olympic ice skaters, Ferrell a loose-living maverick, Heder a prissy perfectionist, who are slung out of the sport but use a loophole to return as an erotic all-male pairing. Amy Poehler co-stars. A Hijacking (2012) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.55pm Tobias Lindholm’s vigorously intelligent hostage thriller, set on board a besieged ship in the Indian Ocean, deftly moves his story between the boat and the shipping company’s offices, where Søren Malling’s frazzled CEO attempts to thrash out a bargain. On the other end of the line is the Somalis’ translator. Flies buzz, sweat trickles, negotiations continue, and you feel your breath dry up. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
What's on TV tonight: Gogglebox and The Old Grey Whistle Test Live
Friday 23 February Gogglebox Channel 4, 9.00pm We all know that Gogglebox won’t be the same this time around. One of the great joys of watching the armchair TV critic show, which returns for its 11th series, was the always warm, occasionally bickering relationship between straight-talking Liverpudlian couple, Leon and June Bernicoff. But, sadly, Leon died last December following a short illness and June recently confirmed that she won’t be taking part without him. So, in the absence of Leon’s notoriously unvarnished views (on chef Jamie Oliver: “‘Oh he’s a d---head”), what can we expect? Probably business as usual. After all, the show has survived the loss of popular families before, from everyone’s favourite posh couple, Steph and Dom, to the gloriously opinionated Scarlett Moffatt. Our guesses: the lovely Siddiquis will continue to be the most well-adjusted family, hairdressers Stephen and Christopher will trot out the most-pointed one-liners, Welsh couple Dave and Shirley will bring the giggles, even though it remains a mystery just how Dave watches TV in that very uncomfortable-looking position, and we still won’t be able to work out how many dogs the Malones actually have. SH Live Winter Olympics 2018 BBC One and BBC Two, from 6.00am Day 14 sees the semi-finals of the men’s ice hockey and the women’s curling competition, plus the final of the men’s 1,000 m speed skating. SH An Island Parish: After the Hurricane BBC Two, 9.00pm Sophie Okonedo narrates this special edition of the series which looks at the long-term effects of Hurricane Irma on the Caribbean island of Anguilla. Among those who lost everything are Simone Connor and her father Neville, who ran a restaurant and leisure complex on the island. SH Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm Now is the perfect time to jump back on the Will & Grace bandwagon as the wonderful Nick Offerman (the real-life husband of Megan Mullally, who plays Karen) guest stars as baker Jackson Boudreaux, aka the Bad Boy of Bread. Offerman is a scene-stealing delight and the final moments offer a lovely pay-off. SH Joan Rivers: By Her friends Channel 5, 10.30pm Anyone who saw the brilliant comedy The Marvellous Mrs Maisel, which was inspired by the late Joan Rivers’s early career, will know that the comedian’s domestic-focused stand-up routines were unlike anything that the audiences of that time had heard before. This tribute puts that ground-breaking career in context. SH The Tick Amazon Prime, from today Peter Serafinowicz’s goofy blue superhero returns for another series of misadventures. As with the last time, the series stands and falls with Serafinowicz’s performance: his morally upstanding but bizarre caped crusader has enough charm to paper over plot cracks. SH Seven Seconds Netflix, from today This new crime-drama series from Veena Sud, the writer behind the US version of The Killing, explores grief, deceit and social injustice. Starring Regina King, it focuses on the fallout from the death of a young boy who was injured by a police officer. SH The Old Grey Whistle Test Live: For One Night Only BBC Four, 9.00pm Bob Harris, who fronted The Old Grey Whistle Test from 1972-1978, returns with this event marking 30 years since the end of music show. This one-off includes live performances and interviews with fans and former presenters. SH Mute (2018) Netflix, from today True Blood alumnus Alexander Skarsgård plays Leo, the titular mute in Duncan Jones’s sci-fi thriller, which the director describes as a spiritual sequel to 2009’s Moon. Leo Beiler, a bartender with a violent past, searches for his missing girlfriend Naadirah (Seyneb Saleh) in a futuristic, neon-lit Berlin. He crosses paths with a pair of US army surgeons, brilliantly named Cactus Bill and Duck Teddington (played by Paul Rudd and Justin Theroux), on a mission of their own. X-Men: First Class (2011) ★★★☆☆ E4, 9.00pm Telepathic Charles Xavier (James McAvoy) bonds with metal-bending death camp survivor Erik Lehnsherr (Michael Fassbender) and the two of them track down other mutants to confront evil Nazi Sebastian Shaw (Kevin Bacon) when he triggers the Cuban Missile Crisis. Matthew Vaughn is much more comfortable with the small-scale character stuff than the action climax, but this prequel is mostly a lot of fun. While We’re Young (2014) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm A couple’s doomed attempt to recapture their youth gives Ben Stiller and Naomi Watts a new lease of comic life in Noah Baumbach’s sparkling film. Baumbach packs it with the wit and vigour of a polished one-act play as co-stars Adam Driver and Amanda Seyfried, playing hat-wearing hipsters, deliver punchlines that can’t help but remind you of Woody Allen at his peak. Saturday 24 February Loadsa laughs: Ant McPartlin and Declan Donnelly Credit: ITV Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway ITV, 7.00pm Anthony McPartlin and Declan Donnelly, the undisputed kings of Saturday night TV – never more so since they won the inaugural Bruce Forsyth Entertainment gong, among others, at the National Television Awards last month – return with a 16th series of their popular show. Packed full of comedy, audience participation, prize giveaways, celebrity guests, exclusive performances and madcap stunts, this is high-octane entertainment, with barely time to draw breath between items. Tonight, Kylie Minogue gives a first performance of her latest single and revisits some of her biggest hits, Britain’s Got Talent judge Amanda Holden falls victim to the first Undercover prank of the series and Olly Murs takes on the role of guest announcer in the End of Show Show. The hosts themselves, meanwhile, put the pedal to the floor for a daredevil Ant vs Dec monster truck challenge, and reprise their roles as super sleuths in a new comedy whodunit (with an all-star cast that includes Joanna Lumley, Michael Sheen, Emilia Fox and David Walliams) while sidekicks Scarlett Moffatt and Stephen Mulhern are out on the streets looking for people to plays games with. And that’s just for starters. Gerard O’Donovan Live Winter Olympics 2018 BBC One and BBC Two, from 6.00am It’s the penultimate day and there’s major Team GB interest as the four-man bobsleigh gets under way. However, most eyes will be on the curling, which has proved rather popular in these Games, as the men’s gold and women’s bronze medals are decided. There’s also action in the snowboarding and skiing. Six Nations Rugby Union: Ireland v Wales ITV, 1.30pm After their 12-6 defeat against England at Twickenham, Wales travel to Ireland, with Dan Biggar starting at fly-half, and Liam Williams and Leigh Halfpenny also returning after injury. Ireland have won two from two, beating France in Paris, before enjoying an eight-try buffet at Italy’s expense in a 56-19 victory. The visitors are unbeaten in their last three Six Nations matches against Ireland, but were held to a 16-16 draw when the sides last met here two years ago. Six Nations Rugby Union: Scotland v England BBC One, 4.00pm Tough one for England, this. Yes, they’ve won nine of the last 10 matches against Scotland, drawing the other one, but the pressure cauldron that is Murrayfield is never an easy place to visit, and they’ll have their tails up after an impressive 32-26 win against France. Still, according to head coach Gregor Townsend, Scotland will need to produce their “best-ever performance” if they are to triumph against England in the Calcutta Cup. Eddie Jones’s team beat Wales 12-6 thanks to two first-half tries by Jonny May, but were forced to hang on grimly in the frenetic closing stages as they set a new championship record for consecutive home wins (15, dating back to 2012). When these sides met in the tournament last year, England thrashed Scotland 61-21 at Twickenham. Churchill’s Darkest Decision More4, 7.55pm Fans of the hit film Darkest Hour will appreciate this documentary about another big Churchill dilemma. In 1940, following the fall of France, Germany was poised to seize the entire French fleet, making Hitler’s threat to invade Britain ever graver. Drastic measures were called for, but at a tragically high cost. David Attenborough’s Natural Curiosities BBC Two, 8.00pm Creatures with remarkable navigation skills are the focus of tonight’s edition, looking at how dung beetles use the Sun, Moon and stars as compass points, and how pigeons recall complex routes. Britain at Low Tide Channel 4, 8.00pm More stories from our shoreline as Tori Herridge visits Dorset, where she finds the home of the world’s first aircraft carrier and searches for an Iron Age monument that can only be seen for a few hours each year. Troy: Fall of a City BBC One, 9.10pm All hell breaks loose in this second episode when Helen’s (Bella Dayne) husband Menelaus finds out what Paris (Louis Hunter) took back to Troy. His enraged brother Agamemnon (Johnny Harris) calls all Greece to war, but when they fail to propitiate the gods, there’s a shocking price to pay. GO Mosaic Sky Atlantic, 10.00pm Steven Soderbergh’s crime drama starring Sharon Stone provoked a blizzard of publicity on its release last year in mobile app format. HBO’s six-part “linear” TV version is obviously less innovative (the app works like an interactive movie where the user can choose from which perspective the plot is viewed), but it still has plenty to offer. In this second episode, the backstory continues to play out as author Olivia Lake’s (Stone) relationships with lover Eric (Frederick Weller) and lodger Joel (Garrett Hedlund) become ever more tangled. GO Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2 (2013) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 5.00pm In this sequel to the 2009 animation based on the 1978 children’s book, inventor Flint Lockwood (voiced by Bill Hader) and friends must rescue the island of Swallow Falls from being overrun by food-mutated animals. It’s no triumph of screenwriting or subtext, but it’s a feast of ingeniously rendered gastronomic insanity and kids will absolutely love it. The Heat (2013) ★★★★☆ E4, 9.00pm Bridesmaids director Paul Feig brings back one of that film’s stars, Melissa McCarthy, as a foul-mouthed Boston cop whose policing style, aided by a fridge full of armaments, makes Dirty Harry look like Thumbelina. She’s paired with a goody-two-shoes FBI agent (Sandra Bullock reminding us what a pro she is at comedy). Together, they’re dynamite, plus the film has an emotional clout that hits you seemingly from nowhere. Philomena (2013) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.00pm; not Northern Ireland This true story is based on the experiences of journalist Martin Sixsmith (Steve Coogan), who helped Philomena Lee (Judi Dench), an Irish woman in her seventies, search for the son that she was forced to put up for adoption 50 years earlier. Stephen Frears’s film is charming and hard-hitting, delivering some tough emotional blows as well as some harsh truths about the Catholic Church’s past. Sunday 25 February Curiouser and curiouser: Holliday Grainger and Tom Burke Credit: BBC Strike: Career of Evil BBC One, 9.00pm Rumpled PI Cormoran Strike (Tom Burke) and his trusty Girl Friday Robin Ellacott (Holliday Grainger) return for the third of JK Rowling’s Robert Galbraith novels. It’s a few months after the events of The Silkworm and Strike and Robin have settled into an easy working partnership, albeit one that remains a little too cosy for Robin’s smarmy fiancé Matthew (Kerr Logan). Then Robin receives a gruesome present in the post and our intrepid duo found themselves caught up in an investigation that swiftly hits far too close to home. Career of Evil is the most tightly plotted of the Galbraith books and this well-paced opening episode neatly sets up the (plentiful) twists to come. That said, the real enjoyment comes not from the story but from the fantastic chemistry between Grainger and Burke, who bring an immense amount of warmth and charm to their scenes. Indeed, so successfully do they inhabit the roles that it’s frustrating to realise that, with no more Galbraith books currently published, this will be the last Strike for a while. It’s a genuine shame: if ever a TV adaptation deserved to be spun away from its source material it’s this one. Sarah Hughes ODI cricket: New Zealand v England Sky Sports Main Event, 12.30am You’ll have to stay up late to see this opening one-day international of the five-match series. England, having beaten the Aussies in their last ODI series, will fancy their chances. Young, Welsh and Pretty Minted BBC Three, from 10.00am The makers of Young, Welsh and Pretty Skint return with a new series focusing on a group of would-be entrepreneurs, including a YouTuber with 1.7 million subscribers and an image-obsessed Instagram influencer. Live Winter Olympics 2018 Closing Ceremony BBC Two, from 11.00am The Olympics bow out, allowing us to recall the heartbreak (Team GB’s Elise Christie’s wipeout in the speedskating final) and joy (American snowboarder Chloe Kim’s megawatt smile). K-pop star CL and boy band EXO take part in the ceremony which has a fusion theme, before the flag is handed over to Beijing for 2022. Premier League Football: Manchester United v Chelsea Sky Sports Main Event, 1.00pm With both sides struggling for consistency – United lost at Newcastle a fortnight ago, while Chelsea were trounced 4-1 by Watford earlier this month – today’s match at Old Trafford should be a tentative affair. Carabao Cup Final: Arsenal v Manchester City Sky Sports Main Event, 4.00pm Proving that the League Cup is having something of a resurgence, Arsenal and Manchester City are this year’s finalists, with the former aiming to win the trophy for the first time since 1993. City are favourites, though: imperious in the league, they also have form in the Carabao Cup, having won it in 2014 and 2016. Top Gear BBC Two, 8.00pm The petrolhead’s special returns with Matt LeBlanc promising increased family appeal. The new team of LeBlanc, Chris Harris and Rory Reid have decent chemistry and if this was your sort of thing then it probably remains so. Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble BBC Four, 8.00pm Few programmes are as inspiring as this one about cellist Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble, an ever-changing group of over 50 artists who perform alongside Ma. In addition to highlighting some phenomenal talents – Galician bagpiper Cristina Pato almost steals the show – the film details the hardships that they’ve faced, including revolution and exile. Anchoring it all is former child prodigy Ma: “I think when I was a kid a lot of things just happened,” he notes as footage shows him performing as a child for President Kennedy. “I’m always trying to figure out who I am and where I fit in the world.” SH Hannibal’s Elephant Army: The New Evidence Channel 4, 8.00pm Why did Carthaginian general Hannibal cross the Alps on a seemingly impossible journey with an army of 40,000 soldiers, 9,000 cavalry officers and 37 elephants? This fascinating film examines the evidence. Life and Death Row: The Mass Execution BBC Two, 9.00pm The harrowing series continues to turn a microscopic eye on all aspects of the death penalty. Tonight it’s the case of Stacey Johnson, on death row for 23 years. His stepdaughter insists on his innocence; his victim’s daughter says she’s sure that he’s a guilty man. SH Clouds of Sils Maria (2014) ★★★★☆ BBC Four, 9.30pm A complex, bewitching and fearlessly intelligent psychological fondue from France’s Olivier Assayas, with Juliet Binoche and Kristen Stewart as a famous actress and her diligent and devoted personal assistant, prepping for a play that shapes the drama of their own lives in its likeness. Playful and addictively strange, with career-best work from Stewart. Shutter Island (2010) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 11.05pm Martin Scorsese’s follow-up to The Departed, is, like that film, based on a novel by Dennis Lehane. He delves into gothic noir in this mystery thriller as detective Daniels (Leonardo DiCaprio) investigates the disappearance of an inmate from a prison for the clinically insane with the help of his partner (played brilliantly by Mark Ruffalo). This is a gripping story with some bold twists, although it eventually loses momentum. Point Break (1991) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 11.30pm; Scotland, 12.30am Kathryn Bigelow’s cult surfing/crime film elevated Patrick Swayze’s actor status to true action hero. Keanu Reeves plays Johnny Utah, an FBI agent who goes undercover to infiltrate a gang of bankrobbing surfers led by the charismatic Bodhi (Swayze). The action heats up when Bodhi and Utah find they share a similar attitude towards danger. Lori Petty is the surfer who catches Johnny’s eye. Monday 26 February Body snatched? Greg Kinnear as the father Credit: Channel 4 Electric Dreams: The Father Thing Channel 4, 10.00pm After a first run split pretty evenly between stunners and misfires, the final four adaptations of short stories from pulp sci-fi icon Philip K Dick begins with a heavily derivative but entertaining piece from Michael Dinner, showrunner of excellent modern western Justified. The setting is an unnamed Midwest town, where young baseball-loving Charlie (Jack Gore) lives with his parents, hangs out with three other misfits and avoids the bullies; it’s as cosily familiar a slice of apple-pie Americana as you could find. And then the aftermath of a meteor shower causes Charlie to suspect that some of the town’s inhabitants may have been replaced by aliens, his own father (Greg Kinnear) included. Based more directly than some of its predecessors on Dick’s original story, this cannot help but nod to Invasion of the Body Snatchers, although the Cold War paranoia replaced by… what, exactly? There’s a parable of father-son relations in here, along with an allegory of divorce and a Stranger Things-influenced romp, but it shows its hand a little early, never settles on a tone and features a climax that will split opinion down the middle. That said, it’s never less than diverting. Gabriel Tate This Country BBC Three, from 10.00am Series one of Charlie and Daisy May Cooper’s mockumentary transcended its obvious debt to The Office to become a touching, acutely observed and defiant portrait of life on the margins in rural Britain. Importantly, it was also very funny, finding bathos and humour in the efforts of gormless cousins Kurtan and Kerry Mucklowe (played by the Coopers) to amuse themselves in a Cotswolds village. Thankfully, almost nothing has changed for this second series, although Kurtan has found a girlfriend and Kerry hitherto unknown charitable instincts. Shakespeare & Hathaway: Private Investigators BBC One, 2.15pm Jo Joyner and Mark Benton are perfectly cast in this amiable new 10-part series as Lu Shakespeare, wrongly suspected of killing her fiancé, and Frank Hathaway, the slobbish PI she ropes in to clear her name. The odd-couple chemistry is there from the start and Stratford-upon-Avon looks glorious – making this a welcome addition to the afternoon schedules. Hollywood in Vienna: the Sound of Space & Alexandre Desplat Sky Arts, 8.00pm This gala performance loosely based on a journey through the universe includes Parisian composer Alexandre Desplat’s melodies for movies, including Twilight and The Grand Budapest Hotel, as well as legendary scores from Star Wars to E.T. GT Classic Mary Berry BBC One, 8.30pm Cherish the unlikely sight of the former Bake Off judge partaking in a little “caveman cooking” in this latest rebranding of Mary Berry’s line in home-cooking, with the opener focusing on comfort food. MasterChef BBC One, 9.00pm The 11th run of the enduringly popular cooking contest begins with the first seven contestants creating dishes using ingredients including beef mince and duck breasts for John Torode, Gregg Wallace and some former finalists. The Unstoppable Flying Scotsman Channel 5, 9.00pm The world’s most famous steam locomotive is profiled in this two-parter from Rob Bell, always a reassuring translator of technical geekery for a mainstream audience. Here, he explores its origins and enduring appeal. GT Ice Cold in Alex (1958, b/w) ★★★★☆ Film4, 4.20pm J Lee Thompson’s tense British wartime thriller is one of the classics of the black-and-white era and richly entertaining. John Mills shines as Captain Anson, who dreams of an ice-cold glass of lager while escorting Britons across the desert to Alexandria during the Second World War. The film makes some interesting points about patriotism, as we learn Anson is unaware that he’s harbouring a traitor. Alien Resurrection (1997) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Sigourney Weaver returns as heroine Ellen Ripley for this fourth film in the franchise. Two hundred years have passed since Alien 3, and Ripley has now been cloned by scientists, which gives her greater strength but also conflicting loyalties, meaning we’re not sure that we can trust her. Despite the talent on board (Weaver, screenwriter Joss Whedon and director Jean-Pierre Jeunot), this is a poor effort. Elysium (2013) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 11.00pm Neill Blomkamp’s (District 9) intelligent sci-fi thriller has a fire in its belly and stars a brawny Matt Damon as a factory worker who scrapes out a living on the Earth’s crust. He’s involved in an accident but the medical care that he needs is on space station Elysium. Blomkamp focuses on faith, capitalism and private healthcare – in lesser hands, the film might have played out like a Lib Dem manifesto with spaceships. Tuesday 27 February Surrounded by splendour: Alan Titchmarsh Secrets of the National Trust with Alan Titchmarsh Channel 5, 8.00pm A tale of “female empowerment, politics and a fight for the throne of England itself” is how Alan Titchmarsh, opening a second series showcasing the National Trust’s finest properties, describes the history of Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire. Certainly, the story of Elizabeth Talbot, Countess of Shrewsbury (aka Bess of Hardwick), and how four strategic marriages helped her to become one of the most powerful women in Elizabethan England, is a fascinating one. And the glorious house she built in the 1590s, with vast facades of glass and sumptuous decor, was doubtless a marvel of the age. Whether you think Titchmarsh does either of them justice will depend on how much detail you like in a documentary, and how much repetition (you won’t possess enough fingers to count how often he mentions that Bess’s initials and coat of arms decorate the high parapet of the house) and “coming up next” you can bear. Either way, there are plenty of glories to gaze upon, so if you’re unlikely to get a chance to visit Hardwick Hall in person, the fine filming shows off the house and its grounds in considerable splendour. Gerard O’Donovan How to Get Fit Fast Channel 4, 8.00pm Anna Richardson and Amar Latif put the emphasis on fitness rather than weight loss in this new series exploring the off-the-shelf plans available, hoping to point viewers towards the exercise regime that suits them best. 100 Years Younger in 21 Days ITV, 9.00pm Eight well-worn famous faces attempt to turn the clock back at a “rejuvenation” clinic in Sardinia. June Brown, Sherrie Hewson, Claire King, Sid Owen, Roy Walker, Russell Grant, Googlebox’s Sandra Martin and music legend Shaun Ryder are among thoses hoping to knock off years without going under the knife. The FGM Detectives Channel 4, 10.00pm Despite the global efforts to ban the practice, female genital mutilation (FGM) continues to affect millions of women. Here Cathy Newman leads a two-year investigation into FGM in the UK, which is estimated to put 20,000 young British women at risk every year. Acid Attack: My Story BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm Naomi Oni recounts the horrific acid attack that left her with life-altering injuries in 2012, and how the police investigation (which, unbelievably, initially focused on whether she had inflicted the wounds on herself) proved the attacker to be a childhood friend. GO Unreal Amazon Prime, from today A drama playing on the fakeness, dubious ethics and behind-the-scenes manipulation of a hit reality TV dating show, UnREAL is nothing if not a series for our times. As the third season begins, Everlasting’s producer Rachel (Shiri Appleby) is getting her life back on track, despite her ruthless boss Quinn (Constance Zimmer) ramping up the pressure to deliver the show’s most outrageous season yet. Divorce Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm Sarah Jessica Parker returns with a second season of the bleak and bitingly funny comedy about the painful break-up of an American middle-class couple’s marriage. At least that’s what series one, created and partly written by the Sharon Horgan, was about. Season two, minus Horgan’s input, takes on a distinctly lighter tone as both Frances (Parker) and her now ex-husband Robert (Thomas Haden Church) begin tentatively to negotiate the possibilities of life post divorce. GO Charade (1963) ★★★★☆ Film4, 2.25pm Audrey Hepburn as a temperamental-but-alluring damsel in distress and Cary Grant as a shadowy charmer are characters that the actors played many times. But they do so exceptionally in this suspense comedy from Stanley Donen, often referred to as the best Hitchcock movie that Hitchcock never made. Hepburn is the widow being trailed by four men hunting for her late husband’s stolen fortune. Black Swan (2010) ★★★★★ Film4, 11.25pm Darren Aronofsky’s film is delirious hokum and high-class trash. Natalie Portman stars as Nina Sayers, a young dancer with the New York City Ballet preparing for a production of Swan Lake choreographed by the charismatic Thomas Leroy (Vincent Cassel). He is unconvinced by Nina’s ability to portray the passion of the Black Swan and her efforts to convince him lead her towards madness. Christine (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 11.50pm The story of Christine Chubbuck, a Florida newsreader who shot herself on air in 1974, is shocking and unfathomably sad. But it wouldn’t be worth retelling on film if it didn’t illuminate something. It asks a top-notch Rebecca Hall to play out the last days of Chubbuck’s life and dares us to hope that it’s about a different woman – one who made it out the other side of her own tragedy. Wednesday 28 February Victim: Édgar Ramírez as Versace Credit: BBC The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story BBC Two, 9.00pm Ryan Murphy’s true crime series follows up 2016’s dramatisation of the OJ Simpson trial with the story of serial killer Andrew Cunanan, who murdered at least five people over a three-month period, including the fashion designer Gianni Versace. Murphy and scriptwriter Tom Rob Smith use the word assassination very carefully here: the operatic opening scenes depict Versace (Édgar Ramírez) as a modern-day Medici prince, dispensing cheerful patronage to all in his Miami Beach fiefdom. By contrast, Cunanan (Darren Criss) is portrayed as a man so insecure in his own skin that he is almost physically incapable of telling the truth: “You tell gay people you’re gay and straight people you’re straight,” exclaims an exasperated friend. “I tell people what they need to hear,” comes the too-calm reply. Both Criss and Ramirez are excellent and there’s strong support from Ricky Martin as Versace’s bewildered live-in boyfriend and a perhaps slightly too-camp Penélope Cruz as Donatella. Smith’s solid script does a good job of juggling various timelines to show how this particular killer came to be. Sarah Hughes Ellie Undercover: Rent for Sex BBC Three, from 10.00am Investigative journalist Ellie Flynn presents this look at the growing number of unscrupulous landlords who offer rent-free accommodation in exchange for sex. It’s hard not to feel utterly dispirited as Flynn meets vulnerable women such as Chloe, who feels so trapped by her homelessness that she’s in no position to say no to these men. Athletics: The World Indoor Championships BBC Two, 7.00pm The four-day World Indoor Championships, which takes place at Arena Birmingham, kicks off on Thursday, featuring three events in the first evening session – including Team GB’s Laura Muir and Eilish McColgan in the final of the women’s 3,000 m. Events continue from 9.00am on Friday, with Greg Rutherford’s long jump bid among the highlights. The World’s Most Extraordinary Homes BBC Two, 8.00pm For those of us who enjoy gawping at other people’s homes, few programmes are more satisfying than this series presented by Caroline Quentin and architect Piers Taylor. Tonight the duo are in Portugal poking their noses into four very different properties. The Supervet Channel 4, 8.00pm Professor Noel Fitzpatrick and the team returns for a new round of veterinary problems, including a very excitable Labrador who requires elbow replacement surgery and a Jackahuahua puppy who needs to have spinal surgery after an attack in the park. Benidorm ITV, 9.00pm Hold on to your sunhats as ITV’s long-running Costa Blanca comedy returns for a 10th series with comedians Hale & Pace joining the cast as a pair of undercover cops. Elsewhere, Joyce (Sherrie Hewson) and Monty’s (John Challis) big day arrives. Save Me Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Don’t let the fact that it features yet another missing child put you off the week’s best new drama. Written by and starring Lennie James, Save Me tells the tale of Nelly (James), an ageing wide-boy of suspect charms, who finds himself in trouble after his estranged teenage daughter disappears. We’ve all met people like Nelly, the easy smiles hiding their sharp edges, and James does a wonderful job of making us warm to him despite the distrust. There’s strong support, too, from Suranne Jones as the missing girl’s mother. SH Film 2018 BBC One, 11.15pm; Wales, 11.35pm; NI, 12.10am The BBC’s long-running film series returns with an opening episode hosted by Radio 1’s Clara Amfo alongside critics Ellen E Jones and Larushka Ivan-Zadeh. The focus this week is on next Sunday’s Academy Awards, plus an interview with Lady Bird’s Oscar-nominated director, Greta Gerwig. SH The Quiet Man (1952) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.00pm Best known for his sombre westerns, John Ford turns personal for this wonderful romantic comedy which was considered a risky venture but went on to win the director his fourth Oscar. It tells the story of a boxer who falls in love with the sister of a bully. The famous grab-and-kiss scene between the smouldering John Wayne and love interest Maureen O’Hara (the “Queen of Technicolour”) also appears in E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. Big Eyes (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Amy Adams is ideally cast as the browbeaten artist Margaret Keane who, for eight years, churned out iconic, highly sought after paintings, only for her con artist husband (Christoph Waltz) to take all the credit. Tim Burton’s take on this curious real-life tale of curdled suburbia sadly lacks Adams’s subtlety: even the usually restrained Waltz is caught up in the blunt, overly stylised kookiness. Good (2008) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.50pm Viggo Mortensen gives a thoughtful performance as a German professor whose ideas about euthanasia are adopted by the Nazis. It’s only when he becomes a concentration camp inspector that he grasps the horror of his ideas. Vicente Amorim’s adaptation of CP Taylor’s play doesn’t shirk big questions, but he tends to fall back on clichés – hammerings on the piano, etc – and it plays a bit like a Nazi version of Rising Damp. Thursday 1 March A landmark return: David Olusoga, Mary Beard and Simon Schama Credit: BBC Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm Almost 50 years after changing the face of arts programming with the landmark series Civilisation, BBC Two returns with an expanded brief and all the bells and whistles of modern film-making, from drone cameras to infra-red photography. With nine episodes split between presenters Simon Schama (five), David Olusoga and Mary Beard (two each), Civilisations promises an opinionated overview of global art and culture. It opens with a striking sequence in which Schama – helming this first part – explores what has been lost and salvaged from the Isil pillage of Palmyra. From there, we’re whisked to Africa’s Cape coast and the first evidence of mankind’s creativity 77,000 years ago. Then it’s a breathless gallop through the millennia, alighting at the first settlements and depictions of the human face. Among the cave art, Mayan stairways and fertility fetishes, the real treasure is an astonishing Mycenaean Sealstone, jaw-dropping in its anatomical detail and artistic accomplishment. While it won’t have the same impact as the original series (what could?), Civilisations looks to be just as learned, accessible and thrilling as its predecessor – the whole series will be available on BBC iPlayer at 10.00pm. Gabriel Tate The Cruise: Voyage to Alaska ITV, 8.30pm; not Wales Over three episodes, the five-star luxury liner Star Princess and its redoubtable crew travels to the northernmost American state – where they encounter difficult weather, navigational challenges and problem passengers. Weinstein: the Inside Story BBC One, 9.00pm In collaboration with PBS America’s Frontline current-affairs strand, Panorama examines the fall of Harvey Weinstein and the lengths to which the disgraced Hollywood producer would go to keep his alleged bullying, threats and sexual assaults private. Speaking to insiders, the team builds a troubling picture of industry complicity. From Ice to Fire: the Incredible Science of Temperature BBC Four, 9.00pm Dr Helen Czerski concludes her excellent series with fire, and how its harnessing played a pivotal role in human evolution and survival, from essentials such as toolmaking and mining to relative fripperies such as hot-air balloons. The moment that Czerski triggers a lightning strike at a high-voltage laboratory carries a genuine frisson; as is customary with most BBC Four films, the presentation is lively and the science deftly handled. Serial Killer with Piers Morgan ITV, 9.00pm How do you follow interviewing Donald Trump? Piers Morgan returns to the less contentious turf of more one-to-ones with convicted murderers behind bars. He begins with Lorenzo Gilyard, the so-called Kansas City Strangler, who remains unremorseful after allegedly killing 13 women and girls over almost two decades. Panic at 30,000 Feet: Airline Emergency Channel 5, 9.00pm This nightmare-inducing new series explores what happens when flights go wrong, from mid-air collisions to runway explosions. GT Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 11.45pm The penultimate episode of this often disturbing and insightful series revisits Oak Creek, Wisconsin, where white supremacist Michael Page killed six and injured four at a Sikh temple, before killing himself, in 2012. For once, there is a vaguely positive denouement: Page’s brutality had the opposite to its intended effect and brought the community closer together. GT Jubal (1956) ★★★★☆ Film4, 12.40pm Ernest Borgnine stars in this brooding western shot in the Grand Teton mountains of Wyoming, which reworks the plot of Othello. Borgnine stars as a cattle rancher with a much younger wife (Valerie French), who is driven into a jealous rage when cattlehand Rod Steiger suggests that she is having an affair with young drifter Jubal (a magnificent Glenn Ford). Murder is most definitely on the cards. Pitch Perfect (2012) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm The world of collegiate a cappella singing contests can’t be as heartless as Jason Moore’s sour comedy would have us believe. Anna Kendrick stars as Beca, an angst-ridden outsider who must shake up her uninspiring and monotonous group, while trying to handle how weird they all are. And, of course, there’s a handsome man (Skylar Astin) who catches her eye. It’s a little like Glee but without the schmaltz. The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Clint Eastwood directs and stars in this warm-hearted marvellous western adapted from Forrest Carter’s novel and set during the American Civil War. Eastwood plays the Missouri farmer who, driven by memories of his family’s slaughter, becomes an outlaw when he refuses to join his Confederate comrades in surrender, in favour of seeking revenge on the men who murdered his kin. Friday 2 March Searching for the truth: Lydia Wilson as Matilda Credit: BBC Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm After last week’s hiatus because of the Six Nations rugby, it’s back to small-town Wales for another dose of supernatural country-house shenanigans. When we last saw fragile but determined musician Matilda (Lydia Wilson), she’d suffered the double whammy of finding her would-be mother Rose (Claire Rushbrook) unconscious in the bath and learning that mute Aunt Meredith (Jane Thorne) had died on the verge of offering up her secrets. How did Matilda react? By mysteriously blacking out and bashing her beloved cello against a cupboard. In the fourth episode then, she looks for connections between her mental health and Carys’s disappearance. And some clues emerge: Matilda meets dishevelled local Laura (Anastasia Hille), who claims to hear voices informing her of Carys’s fate, and back at the mansion, she comes across some old tomes detailing rituals to unlock the past. Even with its heavily scored bumps and shudders, Requiem can’t quite sustain its early Hammer Horror appeal. The strong performances and some genuinely chilling moments keep things compelling however, not least in the spine-tingling climax of this episode. Toby Dantzic Flint Town Netflix, from today Back in 2014, a cost-cutting exercise left thousands of homes in Flint, Michigan, with contaminated drinking water for years. This new eight-part documentary looks at the fallout from the crisis through the eyes of Flint’s beleaguered police force, who face an uphill struggle – the community needs their support but are also deeply mistrustful of those in authority, plus dwindling resources makes the officers’ jobs harder still. MasterChef BBC One, 7.30pm Having survived the cooking contest’s opening week, the six heat winners face food critic William Sitwell in this first quarter-final. He challenges them to conjure up a standout pudding showcasing either alcohol or spices. Love Your Garden ITV, 8.00pm; not STV/UTV/Wales This week, Alan Titchmarsh and his team are in Bidewell, Devon, helping Tamsyn and Alex Wood who returned to the UK from France after Alex suffered a brain injury. The aim is to turn the Woods’ garden into a coastal sanctuary inspired by Alex’s passion for surfing. The Yorkshire Steam Railway: All Aboard Channel 5, 8.00pm As amiable as its title suggests, this new documentary series follows the lives of those who work on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, one of the country’s most popular steam railways. In this series’ opener, the new season begins with the arrival of star engine Royal Scot, on loan from London. Tones, Drones and Arpeggios: The Magic of Minimalism BBC Four, 9.00pm Conductor Charles Hazlewood explores minimalism, which he argues is the most important musical form of the 20th century. In the fascinating opener of this two-part series, he unpicks the construction of these sometimes confounding sounds and tracks down the genre’s avant-garde pioneers, who brought their mesmeric, spirituality-inspired compositions from California to New York in the Sixties. TD Jo Brand: Secrets of Her Success Channel 5, 10.30pm Channel 5’s celebration of funny women continues with this absorbing profile of the pioneering doyenne of deadpan, Jo Brand. This charts her career from its rocky start on the male-dominated stand-up circuit to her much-admired hospital sitcom Getting On. TD Gladiator (2000) ★★★★★ Film4, 9.00pm This take on the traditional swords-and-sandals epic proved that Russell Crowe deserved to be recognised as a mainstream star, and reaffirmed Ridley Scott’s reputation as a first-rate director. Crowe is Maximus, a former Roman general who rebuilds his career as a gladiator. His bid for vengeance against a vile emperor (Joaquin Phoenix) is compelling. Plus there’s a last hurrah from Oliver Reed. Blades of Glory (2007) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm;N Ireland, 12.05am You might think that the sequinned world of figure skating is beyond parody, but here Will Ferrell and Jon Heder serve up a zestfully preposterous comedy. Both play rival Olympic ice skaters, Ferrell a loose-living maverick, Heder a prissy perfectionist, who are slung out of the sport but use a loophole to return as an erotic all-male pairing. Amy Poehler co-stars. A Hijacking (2012) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.55pm Tobias Lindholm’s vigorously intelligent hostage thriller, set on board a besieged ship in the Indian Ocean, deftly moves his story between the boat and the shipping company’s offices, where Søren Malling’s frazzled CEO attempts to thrash out a bargain. On the other end of the line is the Somalis’ translator. Flies buzz, sweat trickles, negotiations continue, and you feel your breath dry up. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
Friday 23 February Gogglebox Channel 4, 9.00pm We all know that Gogglebox won’t be the same this time around. One of the great joys of watching the armchair TV critic show, which returns for its 11th series, was the always warm, occasionally bickering relationship between straight-talking Liverpudlian couple, Leon and June Bernicoff. But, sadly, Leon died last December following a short illness and June recently confirmed that she won’t be taking part without him. So, in the absence of Leon’s notoriously unvarnished views (on chef Jamie Oliver: “‘Oh he’s a d---head”), what can we expect? Probably business as usual. After all, the show has survived the loss of popular families before, from everyone’s favourite posh couple, Steph and Dom, to the gloriously opinionated Scarlett Moffatt. Our guesses: the lovely Siddiquis will continue to be the most well-adjusted family, hairdressers Stephen and Christopher will trot out the most-pointed one-liners, Welsh couple Dave and Shirley will bring the giggles, even though it remains a mystery just how Dave watches TV in that very uncomfortable-looking position, and we still won’t be able to work out how many dogs the Malones actually have. SH Live Winter Olympics 2018 BBC One and BBC Two, from 6.00am Day 14 sees the semi-finals of the men’s ice hockey and the women’s curling competition, plus the final of the men’s 1,000 m speed skating. SH An Island Parish: After the Hurricane BBC Two, 9.00pm Sophie Okonedo narrates this special edition of the series which looks at the long-term effects of Hurricane Irma on the Caribbean island of Anguilla. Among those who lost everything are Simone Connor and her father Neville, who ran a restaurant and leisure complex on the island. SH Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm Now is the perfect time to jump back on the Will & Grace bandwagon as the wonderful Nick Offerman (the real-life husband of Megan Mullally, who plays Karen) guest stars as baker Jackson Boudreaux, aka the Bad Boy of Bread. Offerman is a scene-stealing delight and the final moments offer a lovely pay-off. SH Joan Rivers: By Her friends Channel 5, 10.30pm Anyone who saw the brilliant comedy The Marvellous Mrs Maisel, which was inspired by the late Joan Rivers’s early career, will know that the comedian’s domestic-focused stand-up routines were unlike anything that the audiences of that time had heard before. This tribute puts that ground-breaking career in context. SH The Tick Amazon Prime, from today Peter Serafinowicz’s goofy blue superhero returns for another series of misadventures. As with the last time, the series stands and falls with Serafinowicz’s performance: his morally upstanding but bizarre caped crusader has enough charm to paper over plot cracks. SH Seven Seconds Netflix, from today This new crime-drama series from Veena Sud, the writer behind the US version of The Killing, explores grief, deceit and social injustice. Starring Regina King, it focuses on the fallout from the death of a young boy who was injured by a police officer. SH The Old Grey Whistle Test Live: For One Night Only BBC Four, 9.00pm Bob Harris, who fronted The Old Grey Whistle Test from 1972-1978, returns with this event marking 30 years since the end of music show. This one-off includes live performances and interviews with fans and former presenters. SH Mute (2018) Netflix, from today True Blood alumnus Alexander Skarsgård plays Leo, the titular mute in Duncan Jones’s sci-fi thriller, which the director describes as a spiritual sequel to 2009’s Moon. Leo Beiler, a bartender with a violent past, searches for his missing girlfriend Naadirah (Seyneb Saleh) in a futuristic, neon-lit Berlin. He crosses paths with a pair of US army surgeons, brilliantly named Cactus Bill and Duck Teddington (played by Paul Rudd and Justin Theroux), on a mission of their own. X-Men: First Class (2011) ★★★☆☆ E4, 9.00pm Telepathic Charles Xavier (James McAvoy) bonds with metal-bending death camp survivor Erik Lehnsherr (Michael Fassbender) and the two of them track down other mutants to confront evil Nazi Sebastian Shaw (Kevin Bacon) when he triggers the Cuban Missile Crisis. Matthew Vaughn is much more comfortable with the small-scale character stuff than the action climax, but this prequel is mostly a lot of fun. While We’re Young (2014) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm A couple’s doomed attempt to recapture their youth gives Ben Stiller and Naomi Watts a new lease of comic life in Noah Baumbach’s sparkling film. Baumbach packs it with the wit and vigour of a polished one-act play as co-stars Adam Driver and Amanda Seyfried, playing hat-wearing hipsters, deliver punchlines that can’t help but remind you of Woody Allen at his peak. Saturday 24 February Loadsa laughs: Ant McPartlin and Declan Donnelly Credit: ITV Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway ITV, 7.00pm Anthony McPartlin and Declan Donnelly, the undisputed kings of Saturday night TV – never more so since they won the inaugural Bruce Forsyth Entertainment gong, among others, at the National Television Awards last month – return with a 16th series of their popular show. Packed full of comedy, audience participation, prize giveaways, celebrity guests, exclusive performances and madcap stunts, this is high-octane entertainment, with barely time to draw breath between items. Tonight, Kylie Minogue gives a first performance of her latest single and revisits some of her biggest hits, Britain’s Got Talent judge Amanda Holden falls victim to the first Undercover prank of the series and Olly Murs takes on the role of guest announcer in the End of Show Show. The hosts themselves, meanwhile, put the pedal to the floor for a daredevil Ant vs Dec monster truck challenge, and reprise their roles as super sleuths in a new comedy whodunit (with an all-star cast that includes Joanna Lumley, Michael Sheen, Emilia Fox and David Walliams) while sidekicks Scarlett Moffatt and Stephen Mulhern are out on the streets looking for people to plays games with. And that’s just for starters. Gerard O’Donovan Live Winter Olympics 2018 BBC One and BBC Two, from 6.00am It’s the penultimate day and there’s major Team GB interest as the four-man bobsleigh gets under way. However, most eyes will be on the curling, which has proved rather popular in these Games, as the men’s gold and women’s bronze medals are decided. There’s also action in the snowboarding and skiing. Six Nations Rugby Union: Ireland v Wales ITV, 1.30pm After their 12-6 defeat against England at Twickenham, Wales travel to Ireland, with Dan Biggar starting at fly-half, and Liam Williams and Leigh Halfpenny also returning after injury. Ireland have won two from two, beating France in Paris, before enjoying an eight-try buffet at Italy’s expense in a 56-19 victory. The visitors are unbeaten in their last three Six Nations matches against Ireland, but were held to a 16-16 draw when the sides last met here two years ago. Six Nations Rugby Union: Scotland v England BBC One, 4.00pm Tough one for England, this. Yes, they’ve won nine of the last 10 matches against Scotland, drawing the other one, but the pressure cauldron that is Murrayfield is never an easy place to visit, and they’ll have their tails up after an impressive 32-26 win against France. Still, according to head coach Gregor Townsend, Scotland will need to produce their “best-ever performance” if they are to triumph against England in the Calcutta Cup. Eddie Jones’s team beat Wales 12-6 thanks to two first-half tries by Jonny May, but were forced to hang on grimly in the frenetic closing stages as they set a new championship record for consecutive home wins (15, dating back to 2012). When these sides met in the tournament last year, England thrashed Scotland 61-21 at Twickenham. Churchill’s Darkest Decision More4, 7.55pm Fans of the hit film Darkest Hour will appreciate this documentary about another big Churchill dilemma. In 1940, following the fall of France, Germany was poised to seize the entire French fleet, making Hitler’s threat to invade Britain ever graver. Drastic measures were called for, but at a tragically high cost. David Attenborough’s Natural Curiosities BBC Two, 8.00pm Creatures with remarkable navigation skills are the focus of tonight’s edition, looking at how dung beetles use the Sun, Moon and stars as compass points, and how pigeons recall complex routes. Britain at Low Tide Channel 4, 8.00pm More stories from our shoreline as Tori Herridge visits Dorset, where she finds the home of the world’s first aircraft carrier and searches for an Iron Age monument that can only be seen for a few hours each year. Troy: Fall of a City BBC One, 9.10pm All hell breaks loose in this second episode when Helen’s (Bella Dayne) husband Menelaus finds out what Paris (Louis Hunter) took back to Troy. His enraged brother Agamemnon (Johnny Harris) calls all Greece to war, but when they fail to propitiate the gods, there’s a shocking price to pay. GO Mosaic Sky Atlantic, 10.00pm Steven Soderbergh’s crime drama starring Sharon Stone provoked a blizzard of publicity on its release last year in mobile app format. HBO’s six-part “linear” TV version is obviously less innovative (the app works like an interactive movie where the user can choose from which perspective the plot is viewed), but it still has plenty to offer. In this second episode, the backstory continues to play out as author Olivia Lake’s (Stone) relationships with lover Eric (Frederick Weller) and lodger Joel (Garrett Hedlund) become ever more tangled. GO Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2 (2013) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 5.00pm In this sequel to the 2009 animation based on the 1978 children’s book, inventor Flint Lockwood (voiced by Bill Hader) and friends must rescue the island of Swallow Falls from being overrun by food-mutated animals. It’s no triumph of screenwriting or subtext, but it’s a feast of ingeniously rendered gastronomic insanity and kids will absolutely love it. The Heat (2013) ★★★★☆ E4, 9.00pm Bridesmaids director Paul Feig brings back one of that film’s stars, Melissa McCarthy, as a foul-mouthed Boston cop whose policing style, aided by a fridge full of armaments, makes Dirty Harry look like Thumbelina. She’s paired with a goody-two-shoes FBI agent (Sandra Bullock reminding us what a pro she is at comedy). Together, they’re dynamite, plus the film has an emotional clout that hits you seemingly from nowhere. Philomena (2013) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.00pm; not Northern Ireland This true story is based on the experiences of journalist Martin Sixsmith (Steve Coogan), who helped Philomena Lee (Judi Dench), an Irish woman in her seventies, search for the son that she was forced to put up for adoption 50 years earlier. Stephen Frears’s film is charming and hard-hitting, delivering some tough emotional blows as well as some harsh truths about the Catholic Church’s past. Sunday 25 February Curiouser and curiouser: Holliday Grainger and Tom Burke Credit: BBC Strike: Career of Evil BBC One, 9.00pm Rumpled PI Cormoran Strike (Tom Burke) and his trusty Girl Friday Robin Ellacott (Holliday Grainger) return for the third of JK Rowling’s Robert Galbraith novels. It’s a few months after the events of The Silkworm and Strike and Robin have settled into an easy working partnership, albeit one that remains a little too cosy for Robin’s smarmy fiancé Matthew (Kerr Logan). Then Robin receives a gruesome present in the post and our intrepid duo found themselves caught up in an investigation that swiftly hits far too close to home. Career of Evil is the most tightly plotted of the Galbraith books and this well-paced opening episode neatly sets up the (plentiful) twists to come. That said, the real enjoyment comes not from the story but from the fantastic chemistry between Grainger and Burke, who bring an immense amount of warmth and charm to their scenes. Indeed, so successfully do they inhabit the roles that it’s frustrating to realise that, with no more Galbraith books currently published, this will be the last Strike for a while. It’s a genuine shame: if ever a TV adaptation deserved to be spun away from its source material it’s this one. Sarah Hughes ODI cricket: New Zealand v England Sky Sports Main Event, 12.30am You’ll have to stay up late to see this opening one-day international of the five-match series. England, having beaten the Aussies in their last ODI series, will fancy their chances. Young, Welsh and Pretty Minted BBC Three, from 10.00am The makers of Young, Welsh and Pretty Skint return with a new series focusing on a group of would-be entrepreneurs, including a YouTuber with 1.7 million subscribers and an image-obsessed Instagram influencer. Live Winter Olympics 2018 Closing Ceremony BBC Two, from 11.00am The Olympics bow out, allowing us to recall the heartbreak (Team GB’s Elise Christie’s wipeout in the speedskating final) and joy (American snowboarder Chloe Kim’s megawatt smile). K-pop star CL and boy band EXO take part in the ceremony which has a fusion theme, before the flag is handed over to Beijing for 2022. Premier League Football: Manchester United v Chelsea Sky Sports Main Event, 1.00pm With both sides struggling for consistency – United lost at Newcastle a fortnight ago, while Chelsea were trounced 4-1 by Watford earlier this month – today’s match at Old Trafford should be a tentative affair. Carabao Cup Final: Arsenal v Manchester City Sky Sports Main Event, 4.00pm Proving that the League Cup is having something of a resurgence, Arsenal and Manchester City are this year’s finalists, with the former aiming to win the trophy for the first time since 1993. City are favourites, though: imperious in the league, they also have form in the Carabao Cup, having won it in 2014 and 2016. Top Gear BBC Two, 8.00pm The petrolhead’s special returns with Matt LeBlanc promising increased family appeal. The new team of LeBlanc, Chris Harris and Rory Reid have decent chemistry and if this was your sort of thing then it probably remains so. Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble BBC Four, 8.00pm Few programmes are as inspiring as this one about cellist Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble, an ever-changing group of over 50 artists who perform alongside Ma. In addition to highlighting some phenomenal talents – Galician bagpiper Cristina Pato almost steals the show – the film details the hardships that they’ve faced, including revolution and exile. Anchoring it all is former child prodigy Ma: “I think when I was a kid a lot of things just happened,” he notes as footage shows him performing as a child for President Kennedy. “I’m always trying to figure out who I am and where I fit in the world.” SH Hannibal’s Elephant Army: The New Evidence Channel 4, 8.00pm Why did Carthaginian general Hannibal cross the Alps on a seemingly impossible journey with an army of 40,000 soldiers, 9,000 cavalry officers and 37 elephants? This fascinating film examines the evidence. Life and Death Row: The Mass Execution BBC Two, 9.00pm The harrowing series continues to turn a microscopic eye on all aspects of the death penalty. Tonight it’s the case of Stacey Johnson, on death row for 23 years. His stepdaughter insists on his innocence; his victim’s daughter says she’s sure that he’s a guilty man. SH Clouds of Sils Maria (2014) ★★★★☆ BBC Four, 9.30pm A complex, bewitching and fearlessly intelligent psychological fondue from France’s Olivier Assayas, with Juliet Binoche and Kristen Stewart as a famous actress and her diligent and devoted personal assistant, prepping for a play that shapes the drama of their own lives in its likeness. Playful and addictively strange, with career-best work from Stewart. Shutter Island (2010) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 11.05pm Martin Scorsese’s follow-up to The Departed, is, like that film, based on a novel by Dennis Lehane. He delves into gothic noir in this mystery thriller as detective Daniels (Leonardo DiCaprio) investigates the disappearance of an inmate from a prison for the clinically insane with the help of his partner (played brilliantly by Mark Ruffalo). This is a gripping story with some bold twists, although it eventually loses momentum. Point Break (1991) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 11.30pm; Scotland, 12.30am Kathryn Bigelow’s cult surfing/crime film elevated Patrick Swayze’s actor status to true action hero. Keanu Reeves plays Johnny Utah, an FBI agent who goes undercover to infiltrate a gang of bankrobbing surfers led by the charismatic Bodhi (Swayze). The action heats up when Bodhi and Utah find they share a similar attitude towards danger. Lori Petty is the surfer who catches Johnny’s eye. Monday 26 February Body snatched? Greg Kinnear as the father Credit: Channel 4 Electric Dreams: The Father Thing Channel 4, 10.00pm After a first run split pretty evenly between stunners and misfires, the final four adaptations of short stories from pulp sci-fi icon Philip K Dick begins with a heavily derivative but entertaining piece from Michael Dinner, showrunner of excellent modern western Justified. The setting is an unnamed Midwest town, where young baseball-loving Charlie (Jack Gore) lives with his parents, hangs out with three other misfits and avoids the bullies; it’s as cosily familiar a slice of apple-pie Americana as you could find. And then the aftermath of a meteor shower causes Charlie to suspect that some of the town’s inhabitants may have been replaced by aliens, his own father (Greg Kinnear) included. Based more directly than some of its predecessors on Dick’s original story, this cannot help but nod to Invasion of the Body Snatchers, although the Cold War paranoia replaced by… what, exactly? There’s a parable of father-son relations in here, along with an allegory of divorce and a Stranger Things-influenced romp, but it shows its hand a little early, never settles on a tone and features a climax that will split opinion down the middle. That said, it’s never less than diverting. Gabriel Tate This Country BBC Three, from 10.00am Series one of Charlie and Daisy May Cooper’s mockumentary transcended its obvious debt to The Office to become a touching, acutely observed and defiant portrait of life on the margins in rural Britain. Importantly, it was also very funny, finding bathos and humour in the efforts of gormless cousins Kurtan and Kerry Mucklowe (played by the Coopers) to amuse themselves in a Cotswolds village. Thankfully, almost nothing has changed for this second series, although Kurtan has found a girlfriend and Kerry hitherto unknown charitable instincts. Shakespeare & Hathaway: Private Investigators BBC One, 2.15pm Jo Joyner and Mark Benton are perfectly cast in this amiable new 10-part series as Lu Shakespeare, wrongly suspected of killing her fiancé, and Frank Hathaway, the slobbish PI she ropes in to clear her name. The odd-couple chemistry is there from the start and Stratford-upon-Avon looks glorious – making this a welcome addition to the afternoon schedules. Hollywood in Vienna: the Sound of Space & Alexandre Desplat Sky Arts, 8.00pm This gala performance loosely based on a journey through the universe includes Parisian composer Alexandre Desplat’s melodies for movies, including Twilight and The Grand Budapest Hotel, as well as legendary scores from Star Wars to E.T. GT Classic Mary Berry BBC One, 8.30pm Cherish the unlikely sight of the former Bake Off judge partaking in a little “caveman cooking” in this latest rebranding of Mary Berry’s line in home-cooking, with the opener focusing on comfort food. MasterChef BBC One, 9.00pm The 11th run of the enduringly popular cooking contest begins with the first seven contestants creating dishes using ingredients including beef mince and duck breasts for John Torode, Gregg Wallace and some former finalists. The Unstoppable Flying Scotsman Channel 5, 9.00pm The world’s most famous steam locomotive is profiled in this two-parter from Rob Bell, always a reassuring translator of technical geekery for a mainstream audience. Here, he explores its origins and enduring appeal. GT Ice Cold in Alex (1958, b/w) ★★★★☆ Film4, 4.20pm J Lee Thompson’s tense British wartime thriller is one of the classics of the black-and-white era and richly entertaining. John Mills shines as Captain Anson, who dreams of an ice-cold glass of lager while escorting Britons across the desert to Alexandria during the Second World War. The film makes some interesting points about patriotism, as we learn Anson is unaware that he’s harbouring a traitor. Alien Resurrection (1997) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Sigourney Weaver returns as heroine Ellen Ripley for this fourth film in the franchise. Two hundred years have passed since Alien 3, and Ripley has now been cloned by scientists, which gives her greater strength but also conflicting loyalties, meaning we’re not sure that we can trust her. Despite the talent on board (Weaver, screenwriter Joss Whedon and director Jean-Pierre Jeunot), this is a poor effort. Elysium (2013) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 11.00pm Neill Blomkamp’s (District 9) intelligent sci-fi thriller has a fire in its belly and stars a brawny Matt Damon as a factory worker who scrapes out a living on the Earth’s crust. He’s involved in an accident but the medical care that he needs is on space station Elysium. Blomkamp focuses on faith, capitalism and private healthcare – in lesser hands, the film might have played out like a Lib Dem manifesto with spaceships. Tuesday 27 February Surrounded by splendour: Alan Titchmarsh Secrets of the National Trust with Alan Titchmarsh Channel 5, 8.00pm A tale of “female empowerment, politics and a fight for the throne of England itself” is how Alan Titchmarsh, opening a second series showcasing the National Trust’s finest properties, describes the history of Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire. Certainly, the story of Elizabeth Talbot, Countess of Shrewsbury (aka Bess of Hardwick), and how four strategic marriages helped her to become one of the most powerful women in Elizabethan England, is a fascinating one. And the glorious house she built in the 1590s, with vast facades of glass and sumptuous decor, was doubtless a marvel of the age. Whether you think Titchmarsh does either of them justice will depend on how much detail you like in a documentary, and how much repetition (you won’t possess enough fingers to count how often he mentions that Bess’s initials and coat of arms decorate the high parapet of the house) and “coming up next” you can bear. Either way, there are plenty of glories to gaze upon, so if you’re unlikely to get a chance to visit Hardwick Hall in person, the fine filming shows off the house and its grounds in considerable splendour. Gerard O’Donovan How to Get Fit Fast Channel 4, 8.00pm Anna Richardson and Amar Latif put the emphasis on fitness rather than weight loss in this new series exploring the off-the-shelf plans available, hoping to point viewers towards the exercise regime that suits them best. 100 Years Younger in 21 Days ITV, 9.00pm Eight well-worn famous faces attempt to turn the clock back at a “rejuvenation” clinic in Sardinia. June Brown, Sherrie Hewson, Claire King, Sid Owen, Roy Walker, Russell Grant, Googlebox’s Sandra Martin and music legend Shaun Ryder are among thoses hoping to knock off years without going under the knife. The FGM Detectives Channel 4, 10.00pm Despite the global efforts to ban the practice, female genital mutilation (FGM) continues to affect millions of women. Here Cathy Newman leads a two-year investigation into FGM in the UK, which is estimated to put 20,000 young British women at risk every year. Acid Attack: My Story BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm Naomi Oni recounts the horrific acid attack that left her with life-altering injuries in 2012, and how the police investigation (which, unbelievably, initially focused on whether she had inflicted the wounds on herself) proved the attacker to be a childhood friend. GO Unreal Amazon Prime, from today A drama playing on the fakeness, dubious ethics and behind-the-scenes manipulation of a hit reality TV dating show, UnREAL is nothing if not a series for our times. As the third season begins, Everlasting’s producer Rachel (Shiri Appleby) is getting her life back on track, despite her ruthless boss Quinn (Constance Zimmer) ramping up the pressure to deliver the show’s most outrageous season yet. Divorce Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm Sarah Jessica Parker returns with a second season of the bleak and bitingly funny comedy about the painful break-up of an American middle-class couple’s marriage. At least that’s what series one, created and partly written by the Sharon Horgan, was about. Season two, minus Horgan’s input, takes on a distinctly lighter tone as both Frances (Parker) and her now ex-husband Robert (Thomas Haden Church) begin tentatively to negotiate the possibilities of life post divorce. GO Charade (1963) ★★★★☆ Film4, 2.25pm Audrey Hepburn as a temperamental-but-alluring damsel in distress and Cary Grant as a shadowy charmer are characters that the actors played many times. But they do so exceptionally in this suspense comedy from Stanley Donen, often referred to as the best Hitchcock movie that Hitchcock never made. Hepburn is the widow being trailed by four men hunting for her late husband’s stolen fortune. Black Swan (2010) ★★★★★ Film4, 11.25pm Darren Aronofsky’s film is delirious hokum and high-class trash. Natalie Portman stars as Nina Sayers, a young dancer with the New York City Ballet preparing for a production of Swan Lake choreographed by the charismatic Thomas Leroy (Vincent Cassel). He is unconvinced by Nina’s ability to portray the passion of the Black Swan and her efforts to convince him lead her towards madness. Christine (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 11.50pm The story of Christine Chubbuck, a Florida newsreader who shot herself on air in 1974, is shocking and unfathomably sad. But it wouldn’t be worth retelling on film if it didn’t illuminate something. It asks a top-notch Rebecca Hall to play out the last days of Chubbuck’s life and dares us to hope that it’s about a different woman – one who made it out the other side of her own tragedy. Wednesday 28 February Victim: Édgar Ramírez as Versace Credit: BBC The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story BBC Two, 9.00pm Ryan Murphy’s true crime series follows up 2016’s dramatisation of the OJ Simpson trial with the story of serial killer Andrew Cunanan, who murdered at least five people over a three-month period, including the fashion designer Gianni Versace. Murphy and scriptwriter Tom Rob Smith use the word assassination very carefully here: the operatic opening scenes depict Versace (Édgar Ramírez) as a modern-day Medici prince, dispensing cheerful patronage to all in his Miami Beach fiefdom. By contrast, Cunanan (Darren Criss) is portrayed as a man so insecure in his own skin that he is almost physically incapable of telling the truth: “You tell gay people you’re gay and straight people you’re straight,” exclaims an exasperated friend. “I tell people what they need to hear,” comes the too-calm reply. Both Criss and Ramirez are excellent and there’s strong support from Ricky Martin as Versace’s bewildered live-in boyfriend and a perhaps slightly too-camp Penélope Cruz as Donatella. Smith’s solid script does a good job of juggling various timelines to show how this particular killer came to be. Sarah Hughes Ellie Undercover: Rent for Sex BBC Three, from 10.00am Investigative journalist Ellie Flynn presents this look at the growing number of unscrupulous landlords who offer rent-free accommodation in exchange for sex. It’s hard not to feel utterly dispirited as Flynn meets vulnerable women such as Chloe, who feels so trapped by her homelessness that she’s in no position to say no to these men. Athletics: The World Indoor Championships BBC Two, 7.00pm The four-day World Indoor Championships, which takes place at Arena Birmingham, kicks off on Thursday, featuring three events in the first evening session – including Team GB’s Laura Muir and Eilish McColgan in the final of the women’s 3,000 m. Events continue from 9.00am on Friday, with Greg Rutherford’s long jump bid among the highlights. The World’s Most Extraordinary Homes BBC Two, 8.00pm For those of us who enjoy gawping at other people’s homes, few programmes are more satisfying than this series presented by Caroline Quentin and architect Piers Taylor. Tonight the duo are in Portugal poking their noses into four very different properties. The Supervet Channel 4, 8.00pm Professor Noel Fitzpatrick and the team returns for a new round of veterinary problems, including a very excitable Labrador who requires elbow replacement surgery and a Jackahuahua puppy who needs to have spinal surgery after an attack in the park. Benidorm ITV, 9.00pm Hold on to your sunhats as ITV’s long-running Costa Blanca comedy returns for a 10th series with comedians Hale & Pace joining the cast as a pair of undercover cops. Elsewhere, Joyce (Sherrie Hewson) and Monty’s (John Challis) big day arrives. Save Me Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Don’t let the fact that it features yet another missing child put you off the week’s best new drama. Written by and starring Lennie James, Save Me tells the tale of Nelly (James), an ageing wide-boy of suspect charms, who finds himself in trouble after his estranged teenage daughter disappears. We’ve all met people like Nelly, the easy smiles hiding their sharp edges, and James does a wonderful job of making us warm to him despite the distrust. There’s strong support, too, from Suranne Jones as the missing girl’s mother. SH Film 2018 BBC One, 11.15pm; Wales, 11.35pm; NI, 12.10am The BBC’s long-running film series returns with an opening episode hosted by Radio 1’s Clara Amfo alongside critics Ellen E Jones and Larushka Ivan-Zadeh. The focus this week is on next Sunday’s Academy Awards, plus an interview with Lady Bird’s Oscar-nominated director, Greta Gerwig. SH The Quiet Man (1952) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.00pm Best known for his sombre westerns, John Ford turns personal for this wonderful romantic comedy which was considered a risky venture but went on to win the director his fourth Oscar. It tells the story of a boxer who falls in love with the sister of a bully. The famous grab-and-kiss scene between the smouldering John Wayne and love interest Maureen O’Hara (the “Queen of Technicolour”) also appears in E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. Big Eyes (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Amy Adams is ideally cast as the browbeaten artist Margaret Keane who, for eight years, churned out iconic, highly sought after paintings, only for her con artist husband (Christoph Waltz) to take all the credit. Tim Burton’s take on this curious real-life tale of curdled suburbia sadly lacks Adams’s subtlety: even the usually restrained Waltz is caught up in the blunt, overly stylised kookiness. Good (2008) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.50pm Viggo Mortensen gives a thoughtful performance as a German professor whose ideas about euthanasia are adopted by the Nazis. It’s only when he becomes a concentration camp inspector that he grasps the horror of his ideas. Vicente Amorim’s adaptation of CP Taylor’s play doesn’t shirk big questions, but he tends to fall back on clichés – hammerings on the piano, etc – and it plays a bit like a Nazi version of Rising Damp. Thursday 1 March A landmark return: David Olusoga, Mary Beard and Simon Schama Credit: BBC Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm Almost 50 years after changing the face of arts programming with the landmark series Civilisation, BBC Two returns with an expanded brief and all the bells and whistles of modern film-making, from drone cameras to infra-red photography. With nine episodes split between presenters Simon Schama (five), David Olusoga and Mary Beard (two each), Civilisations promises an opinionated overview of global art and culture. It opens with a striking sequence in which Schama – helming this first part – explores what has been lost and salvaged from the Isil pillage of Palmyra. From there, we’re whisked to Africa’s Cape coast and the first evidence of mankind’s creativity 77,000 years ago. Then it’s a breathless gallop through the millennia, alighting at the first settlements and depictions of the human face. Among the cave art, Mayan stairways and fertility fetishes, the real treasure is an astonishing Mycenaean Sealstone, jaw-dropping in its anatomical detail and artistic accomplishment. While it won’t have the same impact as the original series (what could?), Civilisations looks to be just as learned, accessible and thrilling as its predecessor – the whole series will be available on BBC iPlayer at 10.00pm. Gabriel Tate The Cruise: Voyage to Alaska ITV, 8.30pm; not Wales Over three episodes, the five-star luxury liner Star Princess and its redoubtable crew travels to the northernmost American state – where they encounter difficult weather, navigational challenges and problem passengers. Weinstein: the Inside Story BBC One, 9.00pm In collaboration with PBS America’s Frontline current-affairs strand, Panorama examines the fall of Harvey Weinstein and the lengths to which the disgraced Hollywood producer would go to keep his alleged bullying, threats and sexual assaults private. Speaking to insiders, the team builds a troubling picture of industry complicity. From Ice to Fire: the Incredible Science of Temperature BBC Four, 9.00pm Dr Helen Czerski concludes her excellent series with fire, and how its harnessing played a pivotal role in human evolution and survival, from essentials such as toolmaking and mining to relative fripperies such as hot-air balloons. The moment that Czerski triggers a lightning strike at a high-voltage laboratory carries a genuine frisson; as is customary with most BBC Four films, the presentation is lively and the science deftly handled. Serial Killer with Piers Morgan ITV, 9.00pm How do you follow interviewing Donald Trump? Piers Morgan returns to the less contentious turf of more one-to-ones with convicted murderers behind bars. He begins with Lorenzo Gilyard, the so-called Kansas City Strangler, who remains unremorseful after allegedly killing 13 women and girls over almost two decades. Panic at 30,000 Feet: Airline Emergency Channel 5, 9.00pm This nightmare-inducing new series explores what happens when flights go wrong, from mid-air collisions to runway explosions. GT Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 11.45pm The penultimate episode of this often disturbing and insightful series revisits Oak Creek, Wisconsin, where white supremacist Michael Page killed six and injured four at a Sikh temple, before killing himself, in 2012. For once, there is a vaguely positive denouement: Page’s brutality had the opposite to its intended effect and brought the community closer together. GT Jubal (1956) ★★★★☆ Film4, 12.40pm Ernest Borgnine stars in this brooding western shot in the Grand Teton mountains of Wyoming, which reworks the plot of Othello. Borgnine stars as a cattle rancher with a much younger wife (Valerie French), who is driven into a jealous rage when cattlehand Rod Steiger suggests that she is having an affair with young drifter Jubal (a magnificent Glenn Ford). Murder is most definitely on the cards. Pitch Perfect (2012) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm The world of collegiate a cappella singing contests can’t be as heartless as Jason Moore’s sour comedy would have us believe. Anna Kendrick stars as Beca, an angst-ridden outsider who must shake up her uninspiring and monotonous group, while trying to handle how weird they all are. And, of course, there’s a handsome man (Skylar Astin) who catches her eye. It’s a little like Glee but without the schmaltz. The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Clint Eastwood directs and stars in this warm-hearted marvellous western adapted from Forrest Carter’s novel and set during the American Civil War. Eastwood plays the Missouri farmer who, driven by memories of his family’s slaughter, becomes an outlaw when he refuses to join his Confederate comrades in surrender, in favour of seeking revenge on the men who murdered his kin. Friday 2 March Searching for the truth: Lydia Wilson as Matilda Credit: BBC Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm After last week’s hiatus because of the Six Nations rugby, it’s back to small-town Wales for another dose of supernatural country-house shenanigans. When we last saw fragile but determined musician Matilda (Lydia Wilson), she’d suffered the double whammy of finding her would-be mother Rose (Claire Rushbrook) unconscious in the bath and learning that mute Aunt Meredith (Jane Thorne) had died on the verge of offering up her secrets. How did Matilda react? By mysteriously blacking out and bashing her beloved cello against a cupboard. In the fourth episode then, she looks for connections between her mental health and Carys’s disappearance. And some clues emerge: Matilda meets dishevelled local Laura (Anastasia Hille), who claims to hear voices informing her of Carys’s fate, and back at the mansion, she comes across some old tomes detailing rituals to unlock the past. Even with its heavily scored bumps and shudders, Requiem can’t quite sustain its early Hammer Horror appeal. The strong performances and some genuinely chilling moments keep things compelling however, not least in the spine-tingling climax of this episode. Toby Dantzic Flint Town Netflix, from today Back in 2014, a cost-cutting exercise left thousands of homes in Flint, Michigan, with contaminated drinking water for years. This new eight-part documentary looks at the fallout from the crisis through the eyes of Flint’s beleaguered police force, who face an uphill struggle – the community needs their support but are also deeply mistrustful of those in authority, plus dwindling resources makes the officers’ jobs harder still. MasterChef BBC One, 7.30pm Having survived the cooking contest’s opening week, the six heat winners face food critic William Sitwell in this first quarter-final. He challenges them to conjure up a standout pudding showcasing either alcohol or spices. Love Your Garden ITV, 8.00pm; not STV/UTV/Wales This week, Alan Titchmarsh and his team are in Bidewell, Devon, helping Tamsyn and Alex Wood who returned to the UK from France after Alex suffered a brain injury. The aim is to turn the Woods’ garden into a coastal sanctuary inspired by Alex’s passion for surfing. The Yorkshire Steam Railway: All Aboard Channel 5, 8.00pm As amiable as its title suggests, this new documentary series follows the lives of those who work on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, one of the country’s most popular steam railways. In this series’ opener, the new season begins with the arrival of star engine Royal Scot, on loan from London. Tones, Drones and Arpeggios: The Magic of Minimalism BBC Four, 9.00pm Conductor Charles Hazlewood explores minimalism, which he argues is the most important musical form of the 20th century. In the fascinating opener of this two-part series, he unpicks the construction of these sometimes confounding sounds and tracks down the genre’s avant-garde pioneers, who brought their mesmeric, spirituality-inspired compositions from California to New York in the Sixties. TD Jo Brand: Secrets of Her Success Channel 5, 10.30pm Channel 5’s celebration of funny women continues with this absorbing profile of the pioneering doyenne of deadpan, Jo Brand. This charts her career from its rocky start on the male-dominated stand-up circuit to her much-admired hospital sitcom Getting On. TD Gladiator (2000) ★★★★★ Film4, 9.00pm This take on the traditional swords-and-sandals epic proved that Russell Crowe deserved to be recognised as a mainstream star, and reaffirmed Ridley Scott’s reputation as a first-rate director. Crowe is Maximus, a former Roman general who rebuilds his career as a gladiator. His bid for vengeance against a vile emperor (Joaquin Phoenix) is compelling. Plus there’s a last hurrah from Oliver Reed. Blades of Glory (2007) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm;N Ireland, 12.05am You might think that the sequinned world of figure skating is beyond parody, but here Will Ferrell and Jon Heder serve up a zestfully preposterous comedy. Both play rival Olympic ice skaters, Ferrell a loose-living maverick, Heder a prissy perfectionist, who are slung out of the sport but use a loophole to return as an erotic all-male pairing. Amy Poehler co-stars. A Hijacking (2012) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.55pm Tobias Lindholm’s vigorously intelligent hostage thriller, set on board a besieged ship in the Indian Ocean, deftly moves his story between the boat and the shipping company’s offices, where Søren Malling’s frazzled CEO attempts to thrash out a bargain. On the other end of the line is the Somalis’ translator. Flies buzz, sweat trickles, negotiations continue, and you feel your breath dry up. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
What's on TV tonight: Gogglebox and The Old Grey Whistle Test Live
Friday 23 February Gogglebox Channel 4, 9.00pm We all know that Gogglebox won’t be the same this time around. One of the great joys of watching the armchair TV critic show, which returns for its 11th series, was the always warm, occasionally bickering relationship between straight-talking Liverpudlian couple, Leon and June Bernicoff. But, sadly, Leon died last December following a short illness and June recently confirmed that she won’t be taking part without him. So, in the absence of Leon’s notoriously unvarnished views (on chef Jamie Oliver: “‘Oh he’s a d---head”), what can we expect? Probably business as usual. After all, the show has survived the loss of popular families before, from everyone’s favourite posh couple, Steph and Dom, to the gloriously opinionated Scarlett Moffatt. Our guesses: the lovely Siddiquis will continue to be the most well-adjusted family, hairdressers Stephen and Christopher will trot out the most-pointed one-liners, Welsh couple Dave and Shirley will bring the giggles, even though it remains a mystery just how Dave watches TV in that very uncomfortable-looking position, and we still won’t be able to work out how many dogs the Malones actually have. SH Live Winter Olympics 2018 BBC One and BBC Two, from 6.00am Day 14 sees the semi-finals of the men’s ice hockey and the women’s curling competition, plus the final of the men’s 1,000 m speed skating. SH An Island Parish: After the Hurricane BBC Two, 9.00pm Sophie Okonedo narrates this special edition of the series which looks at the long-term effects of Hurricane Irma on the Caribbean island of Anguilla. Among those who lost everything are Simone Connor and her father Neville, who ran a restaurant and leisure complex on the island. SH Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm Now is the perfect time to jump back on the Will & Grace bandwagon as the wonderful Nick Offerman (the real-life husband of Megan Mullally, who plays Karen) guest stars as baker Jackson Boudreaux, aka the Bad Boy of Bread. Offerman is a scene-stealing delight and the final moments offer a lovely pay-off. SH Joan Rivers: By Her friends Channel 5, 10.30pm Anyone who saw the brilliant comedy The Marvellous Mrs Maisel, which was inspired by the late Joan Rivers’s early career, will know that the comedian’s domestic-focused stand-up routines were unlike anything that the audiences of that time had heard before. This tribute puts that ground-breaking career in context. SH The Tick Amazon Prime, from today Peter Serafinowicz’s goofy blue superhero returns for another series of misadventures. As with the last time, the series stands and falls with Serafinowicz’s performance: his morally upstanding but bizarre caped crusader has enough charm to paper over plot cracks. SH Seven Seconds Netflix, from today This new crime-drama series from Veena Sud, the writer behind the US version of The Killing, explores grief, deceit and social injustice. Starring Regina King, it focuses on the fallout from the death of a young boy who was injured by a police officer. SH The Old Grey Whistle Test Live: For One Night Only BBC Four, 9.00pm Bob Harris, who fronted The Old Grey Whistle Test from 1972-1978, returns with this event marking 30 years since the end of music show. This one-off includes live performances and interviews with fans and former presenters. SH Mute (2018) Netflix, from today True Blood alumnus Alexander Skarsgård plays Leo, the titular mute in Duncan Jones’s sci-fi thriller, which the director describes as a spiritual sequel to 2009’s Moon. Leo Beiler, a bartender with a violent past, searches for his missing girlfriend Naadirah (Seyneb Saleh) in a futuristic, neon-lit Berlin. He crosses paths with a pair of US army surgeons, brilliantly named Cactus Bill and Duck Teddington (played by Paul Rudd and Justin Theroux), on a mission of their own. X-Men: First Class (2011) ★★★☆☆ E4, 9.00pm Telepathic Charles Xavier (James McAvoy) bonds with metal-bending death camp survivor Erik Lehnsherr (Michael Fassbender) and the two of them track down other mutants to confront evil Nazi Sebastian Shaw (Kevin Bacon) when he triggers the Cuban Missile Crisis. Matthew Vaughn is much more comfortable with the small-scale character stuff than the action climax, but this prequel is mostly a lot of fun. While We’re Young (2014) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm A couple’s doomed attempt to recapture their youth gives Ben Stiller and Naomi Watts a new lease of comic life in Noah Baumbach’s sparkling film. Baumbach packs it with the wit and vigour of a polished one-act play as co-stars Adam Driver and Amanda Seyfried, playing hat-wearing hipsters, deliver punchlines that can’t help but remind you of Woody Allen at his peak. Saturday 24 February Loadsa laughs: Ant McPartlin and Declan Donnelly Credit: ITV Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway ITV, 7.00pm Anthony McPartlin and Declan Donnelly, the undisputed kings of Saturday night TV – never more so since they won the inaugural Bruce Forsyth Entertainment gong, among others, at the National Television Awards last month – return with a 16th series of their popular show. Packed full of comedy, audience participation, prize giveaways, celebrity guests, exclusive performances and madcap stunts, this is high-octane entertainment, with barely time to draw breath between items. Tonight, Kylie Minogue gives a first performance of her latest single and revisits some of her biggest hits, Britain’s Got Talent judge Amanda Holden falls victim to the first Undercover prank of the series and Olly Murs takes on the role of guest announcer in the End of Show Show. The hosts themselves, meanwhile, put the pedal to the floor for a daredevil Ant vs Dec monster truck challenge, and reprise their roles as super sleuths in a new comedy whodunit (with an all-star cast that includes Joanna Lumley, Michael Sheen, Emilia Fox and David Walliams) while sidekicks Scarlett Moffatt and Stephen Mulhern are out on the streets looking for people to plays games with. And that’s just for starters. Gerard O’Donovan Live Winter Olympics 2018 BBC One and BBC Two, from 6.00am It’s the penultimate day and there’s major Team GB interest as the four-man bobsleigh gets under way. However, most eyes will be on the curling, which has proved rather popular in these Games, as the men’s gold and women’s bronze medals are decided. There’s also action in the snowboarding and skiing. Six Nations Rugby Union: Ireland v Wales ITV, 1.30pm After their 12-6 defeat against England at Twickenham, Wales travel to Ireland, with Dan Biggar starting at fly-half, and Liam Williams and Leigh Halfpenny also returning after injury. Ireland have won two from two, beating France in Paris, before enjoying an eight-try buffet at Italy’s expense in a 56-19 victory. The visitors are unbeaten in their last three Six Nations matches against Ireland, but were held to a 16-16 draw when the sides last met here two years ago. Six Nations Rugby Union: Scotland v England BBC One, 4.00pm Tough one for England, this. Yes, they’ve won nine of the last 10 matches against Scotland, drawing the other one, but the pressure cauldron that is Murrayfield is never an easy place to visit, and they’ll have their tails up after an impressive 32-26 win against France. Still, according to head coach Gregor Townsend, Scotland will need to produce their “best-ever performance” if they are to triumph against England in the Calcutta Cup. Eddie Jones’s team beat Wales 12-6 thanks to two first-half tries by Jonny May, but were forced to hang on grimly in the frenetic closing stages as they set a new championship record for consecutive home wins (15, dating back to 2012). When these sides met in the tournament last year, England thrashed Scotland 61-21 at Twickenham. Churchill’s Darkest Decision More4, 7.55pm Fans of the hit film Darkest Hour will appreciate this documentary about another big Churchill dilemma. In 1940, following the fall of France, Germany was poised to seize the entire French fleet, making Hitler’s threat to invade Britain ever graver. Drastic measures were called for, but at a tragically high cost. David Attenborough’s Natural Curiosities BBC Two, 8.00pm Creatures with remarkable navigation skills are the focus of tonight’s edition, looking at how dung beetles use the Sun, Moon and stars as compass points, and how pigeons recall complex routes. Britain at Low Tide Channel 4, 8.00pm More stories from our shoreline as Tori Herridge visits Dorset, where she finds the home of the world’s first aircraft carrier and searches for an Iron Age monument that can only be seen for a few hours each year. Troy: Fall of a City BBC One, 9.10pm All hell breaks loose in this second episode when Helen’s (Bella Dayne) husband Menelaus finds out what Paris (Louis Hunter) took back to Troy. His enraged brother Agamemnon (Johnny Harris) calls all Greece to war, but when they fail to propitiate the gods, there’s a shocking price to pay. GO Mosaic Sky Atlantic, 10.00pm Steven Soderbergh’s crime drama starring Sharon Stone provoked a blizzard of publicity on its release last year in mobile app format. HBO’s six-part “linear” TV version is obviously less innovative (the app works like an interactive movie where the user can choose from which perspective the plot is viewed), but it still has plenty to offer. In this second episode, the backstory continues to play out as author Olivia Lake’s (Stone) relationships with lover Eric (Frederick Weller) and lodger Joel (Garrett Hedlund) become ever more tangled. GO Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2 (2013) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 5.00pm In this sequel to the 2009 animation based on the 1978 children’s book, inventor Flint Lockwood (voiced by Bill Hader) and friends must rescue the island of Swallow Falls from being overrun by food-mutated animals. It’s no triumph of screenwriting or subtext, but it’s a feast of ingeniously rendered gastronomic insanity and kids will absolutely love it. The Heat (2013) ★★★★☆ E4, 9.00pm Bridesmaids director Paul Feig brings back one of that film’s stars, Melissa McCarthy, as a foul-mouthed Boston cop whose policing style, aided by a fridge full of armaments, makes Dirty Harry look like Thumbelina. She’s paired with a goody-two-shoes FBI agent (Sandra Bullock reminding us what a pro she is at comedy). Together, they’re dynamite, plus the film has an emotional clout that hits you seemingly from nowhere. Philomena (2013) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.00pm; not Northern Ireland This true story is based on the experiences of journalist Martin Sixsmith (Steve Coogan), who helped Philomena Lee (Judi Dench), an Irish woman in her seventies, search for the son that she was forced to put up for adoption 50 years earlier. Stephen Frears’s film is charming and hard-hitting, delivering some tough emotional blows as well as some harsh truths about the Catholic Church’s past. Sunday 25 February Curiouser and curiouser: Holliday Grainger and Tom Burke Credit: BBC Strike: Career of Evil BBC One, 9.00pm Rumpled PI Cormoran Strike (Tom Burke) and his trusty Girl Friday Robin Ellacott (Holliday Grainger) return for the third of JK Rowling’s Robert Galbraith novels. It’s a few months after the events of The Silkworm and Strike and Robin have settled into an easy working partnership, albeit one that remains a little too cosy for Robin’s smarmy fiancé Matthew (Kerr Logan). Then Robin receives a gruesome present in the post and our intrepid duo found themselves caught up in an investigation that swiftly hits far too close to home. Career of Evil is the most tightly plotted of the Galbraith books and this well-paced opening episode neatly sets up the (plentiful) twists to come. That said, the real enjoyment comes not from the story but from the fantastic chemistry between Grainger and Burke, who bring an immense amount of warmth and charm to their scenes. Indeed, so successfully do they inhabit the roles that it’s frustrating to realise that, with no more Galbraith books currently published, this will be the last Strike for a while. It’s a genuine shame: if ever a TV adaptation deserved to be spun away from its source material it’s this one. Sarah Hughes ODI cricket: New Zealand v England Sky Sports Main Event, 12.30am You’ll have to stay up late to see this opening one-day international of the five-match series. England, having beaten the Aussies in their last ODI series, will fancy their chances. Young, Welsh and Pretty Minted BBC Three, from 10.00am The makers of Young, Welsh and Pretty Skint return with a new series focusing on a group of would-be entrepreneurs, including a YouTuber with 1.7 million subscribers and an image-obsessed Instagram influencer. Live Winter Olympics 2018 Closing Ceremony BBC Two, from 11.00am The Olympics bow out, allowing us to recall the heartbreak (Team GB’s Elise Christie’s wipeout in the speedskating final) and joy (American snowboarder Chloe Kim’s megawatt smile). K-pop star CL and boy band EXO take part in the ceremony which has a fusion theme, before the flag is handed over to Beijing for 2022. Premier League Football: Manchester United v Chelsea Sky Sports Main Event, 1.00pm With both sides struggling for consistency – United lost at Newcastle a fortnight ago, while Chelsea were trounced 4-1 by Watford earlier this month – today’s match at Old Trafford should be a tentative affair. Carabao Cup Final: Arsenal v Manchester City Sky Sports Main Event, 4.00pm Proving that the League Cup is having something of a resurgence, Arsenal and Manchester City are this year’s finalists, with the former aiming to win the trophy for the first time since 1993. City are favourites, though: imperious in the league, they also have form in the Carabao Cup, having won it in 2014 and 2016. Top Gear BBC Two, 8.00pm The petrolhead’s special returns with Matt LeBlanc promising increased family appeal. The new team of LeBlanc, Chris Harris and Rory Reid have decent chemistry and if this was your sort of thing then it probably remains so. Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble BBC Four, 8.00pm Few programmes are as inspiring as this one about cellist Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble, an ever-changing group of over 50 artists who perform alongside Ma. In addition to highlighting some phenomenal talents – Galician bagpiper Cristina Pato almost steals the show – the film details the hardships that they’ve faced, including revolution and exile. Anchoring it all is former child prodigy Ma: “I think when I was a kid a lot of things just happened,” he notes as footage shows him performing as a child for President Kennedy. “I’m always trying to figure out who I am and where I fit in the world.” SH Hannibal’s Elephant Army: The New Evidence Channel 4, 8.00pm Why did Carthaginian general Hannibal cross the Alps on a seemingly impossible journey with an army of 40,000 soldiers, 9,000 cavalry officers and 37 elephants? This fascinating film examines the evidence. Life and Death Row: The Mass Execution BBC Two, 9.00pm The harrowing series continues to turn a microscopic eye on all aspects of the death penalty. Tonight it’s the case of Stacey Johnson, on death row for 23 years. His stepdaughter insists on his innocence; his victim’s daughter says she’s sure that he’s a guilty man. SH Clouds of Sils Maria (2014) ★★★★☆ BBC Four, 9.30pm A complex, bewitching and fearlessly intelligent psychological fondue from France’s Olivier Assayas, with Juliet Binoche and Kristen Stewart as a famous actress and her diligent and devoted personal assistant, prepping for a play that shapes the drama of their own lives in its likeness. Playful and addictively strange, with career-best work from Stewart. Shutter Island (2010) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 11.05pm Martin Scorsese’s follow-up to The Departed, is, like that film, based on a novel by Dennis Lehane. He delves into gothic noir in this mystery thriller as detective Daniels (Leonardo DiCaprio) investigates the disappearance of an inmate from a prison for the clinically insane with the help of his partner (played brilliantly by Mark Ruffalo). This is a gripping story with some bold twists, although it eventually loses momentum. Point Break (1991) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 11.30pm; Scotland, 12.30am Kathryn Bigelow’s cult surfing/crime film elevated Patrick Swayze’s actor status to true action hero. Keanu Reeves plays Johnny Utah, an FBI agent who goes undercover to infiltrate a gang of bankrobbing surfers led by the charismatic Bodhi (Swayze). The action heats up when Bodhi and Utah find they share a similar attitude towards danger. Lori Petty is the surfer who catches Johnny’s eye. Monday 26 February Body snatched? Greg Kinnear as the father Credit: Channel 4 Electric Dreams: The Father Thing Channel 4, 10.00pm After a first run split pretty evenly between stunners and misfires, the final four adaptations of short stories from pulp sci-fi icon Philip K Dick begins with a heavily derivative but entertaining piece from Michael Dinner, showrunner of excellent modern western Justified. The setting is an unnamed Midwest town, where young baseball-loving Charlie (Jack Gore) lives with his parents, hangs out with three other misfits and avoids the bullies; it’s as cosily familiar a slice of apple-pie Americana as you could find. And then the aftermath of a meteor shower causes Charlie to suspect that some of the town’s inhabitants may have been replaced by aliens, his own father (Greg Kinnear) included. Based more directly than some of its predecessors on Dick’s original story, this cannot help but nod to Invasion of the Body Snatchers, although the Cold War paranoia replaced by… what, exactly? There’s a parable of father-son relations in here, along with an allegory of divorce and a Stranger Things-influenced romp, but it shows its hand a little early, never settles on a tone and features a climax that will split opinion down the middle. That said, it’s never less than diverting. Gabriel Tate This Country BBC Three, from 10.00am Series one of Charlie and Daisy May Cooper’s mockumentary transcended its obvious debt to The Office to become a touching, acutely observed and defiant portrait of life on the margins in rural Britain. Importantly, it was also very funny, finding bathos and humour in the efforts of gormless cousins Kurtan and Kerry Mucklowe (played by the Coopers) to amuse themselves in a Cotswolds village. Thankfully, almost nothing has changed for this second series, although Kurtan has found a girlfriend and Kerry hitherto unknown charitable instincts. Shakespeare & Hathaway: Private Investigators BBC One, 2.15pm Jo Joyner and Mark Benton are perfectly cast in this amiable new 10-part series as Lu Shakespeare, wrongly suspected of killing her fiancé, and Frank Hathaway, the slobbish PI she ropes in to clear her name. The odd-couple chemistry is there from the start and Stratford-upon-Avon looks glorious – making this a welcome addition to the afternoon schedules. Hollywood in Vienna: the Sound of Space & Alexandre Desplat Sky Arts, 8.00pm This gala performance loosely based on a journey through the universe includes Parisian composer Alexandre Desplat’s melodies for movies, including Twilight and The Grand Budapest Hotel, as well as legendary scores from Star Wars to E.T. GT Classic Mary Berry BBC One, 8.30pm Cherish the unlikely sight of the former Bake Off judge partaking in a little “caveman cooking” in this latest rebranding of Mary Berry’s line in home-cooking, with the opener focusing on comfort food. MasterChef BBC One, 9.00pm The 11th run of the enduringly popular cooking contest begins with the first seven contestants creating dishes using ingredients including beef mince and duck breasts for John Torode, Gregg Wallace and some former finalists. The Unstoppable Flying Scotsman Channel 5, 9.00pm The world’s most famous steam locomotive is profiled in this two-parter from Rob Bell, always a reassuring translator of technical geekery for a mainstream audience. Here, he explores its origins and enduring appeal. GT Ice Cold in Alex (1958, b/w) ★★★★☆ Film4, 4.20pm J Lee Thompson’s tense British wartime thriller is one of the classics of the black-and-white era and richly entertaining. John Mills shines as Captain Anson, who dreams of an ice-cold glass of lager while escorting Britons across the desert to Alexandria during the Second World War. The film makes some interesting points about patriotism, as we learn Anson is unaware that he’s harbouring a traitor. Alien Resurrection (1997) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Sigourney Weaver returns as heroine Ellen Ripley for this fourth film in the franchise. Two hundred years have passed since Alien 3, and Ripley has now been cloned by scientists, which gives her greater strength but also conflicting loyalties, meaning we’re not sure that we can trust her. Despite the talent on board (Weaver, screenwriter Joss Whedon and director Jean-Pierre Jeunot), this is a poor effort. Elysium (2013) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 11.00pm Neill Blomkamp’s (District 9) intelligent sci-fi thriller has a fire in its belly and stars a brawny Matt Damon as a factory worker who scrapes out a living on the Earth’s crust. He’s involved in an accident but the medical care that he needs is on space station Elysium. Blomkamp focuses on faith, capitalism and private healthcare – in lesser hands, the film might have played out like a Lib Dem manifesto with spaceships. Tuesday 27 February Surrounded by splendour: Alan Titchmarsh Secrets of the National Trust with Alan Titchmarsh Channel 5, 8.00pm A tale of “female empowerment, politics and a fight for the throne of England itself” is how Alan Titchmarsh, opening a second series showcasing the National Trust’s finest properties, describes the history of Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire. Certainly, the story of Elizabeth Talbot, Countess of Shrewsbury (aka Bess of Hardwick), and how four strategic marriages helped her to become one of the most powerful women in Elizabethan England, is a fascinating one. And the glorious house she built in the 1590s, with vast facades of glass and sumptuous decor, was doubtless a marvel of the age. Whether you think Titchmarsh does either of them justice will depend on how much detail you like in a documentary, and how much repetition (you won’t possess enough fingers to count how often he mentions that Bess’s initials and coat of arms decorate the high parapet of the house) and “coming up next” you can bear. Either way, there are plenty of glories to gaze upon, so if you’re unlikely to get a chance to visit Hardwick Hall in person, the fine filming shows off the house and its grounds in considerable splendour. Gerard O’Donovan How to Get Fit Fast Channel 4, 8.00pm Anna Richardson and Amar Latif put the emphasis on fitness rather than weight loss in this new series exploring the off-the-shelf plans available, hoping to point viewers towards the exercise regime that suits them best. 100 Years Younger in 21 Days ITV, 9.00pm Eight well-worn famous faces attempt to turn the clock back at a “rejuvenation” clinic in Sardinia. June Brown, Sherrie Hewson, Claire King, Sid Owen, Roy Walker, Russell Grant, Googlebox’s Sandra Martin and music legend Shaun Ryder are among thoses hoping to knock off years without going under the knife. The FGM Detectives Channel 4, 10.00pm Despite the global efforts to ban the practice, female genital mutilation (FGM) continues to affect millions of women. Here Cathy Newman leads a two-year investigation into FGM in the UK, which is estimated to put 20,000 young British women at risk every year. Acid Attack: My Story BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm Naomi Oni recounts the horrific acid attack that left her with life-altering injuries in 2012, and how the police investigation (which, unbelievably, initially focused on whether she had inflicted the wounds on herself) proved the attacker to be a childhood friend. GO Unreal Amazon Prime, from today A drama playing on the fakeness, dubious ethics and behind-the-scenes manipulation of a hit reality TV dating show, UnREAL is nothing if not a series for our times. As the third season begins, Everlasting’s producer Rachel (Shiri Appleby) is getting her life back on track, despite her ruthless boss Quinn (Constance Zimmer) ramping up the pressure to deliver the show’s most outrageous season yet. Divorce Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm Sarah Jessica Parker returns with a second season of the bleak and bitingly funny comedy about the painful break-up of an American middle-class couple’s marriage. At least that’s what series one, created and partly written by the Sharon Horgan, was about. Season two, minus Horgan’s input, takes on a distinctly lighter tone as both Frances (Parker) and her now ex-husband Robert (Thomas Haden Church) begin tentatively to negotiate the possibilities of life post divorce. GO Charade (1963) ★★★★☆ Film4, 2.25pm Audrey Hepburn as a temperamental-but-alluring damsel in distress and Cary Grant as a shadowy charmer are characters that the actors played many times. But they do so exceptionally in this suspense comedy from Stanley Donen, often referred to as the best Hitchcock movie that Hitchcock never made. Hepburn is the widow being trailed by four men hunting for her late husband’s stolen fortune. Black Swan (2010) ★★★★★ Film4, 11.25pm Darren Aronofsky’s film is delirious hokum and high-class trash. Natalie Portman stars as Nina Sayers, a young dancer with the New York City Ballet preparing for a production of Swan Lake choreographed by the charismatic Thomas Leroy (Vincent Cassel). He is unconvinced by Nina’s ability to portray the passion of the Black Swan and her efforts to convince him lead her towards madness. Christine (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 11.50pm The story of Christine Chubbuck, a Florida newsreader who shot herself on air in 1974, is shocking and unfathomably sad. But it wouldn’t be worth retelling on film if it didn’t illuminate something. It asks a top-notch Rebecca Hall to play out the last days of Chubbuck’s life and dares us to hope that it’s about a different woman – one who made it out the other side of her own tragedy. Wednesday 28 February Victim: Édgar Ramírez as Versace Credit: BBC The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story BBC Two, 9.00pm Ryan Murphy’s true crime series follows up 2016’s dramatisation of the OJ Simpson trial with the story of serial killer Andrew Cunanan, who murdered at least five people over a three-month period, including the fashion designer Gianni Versace. Murphy and scriptwriter Tom Rob Smith use the word assassination very carefully here: the operatic opening scenes depict Versace (Édgar Ramírez) as a modern-day Medici prince, dispensing cheerful patronage to all in his Miami Beach fiefdom. By contrast, Cunanan (Darren Criss) is portrayed as a man so insecure in his own skin that he is almost physically incapable of telling the truth: “You tell gay people you’re gay and straight people you’re straight,” exclaims an exasperated friend. “I tell people what they need to hear,” comes the too-calm reply. Both Criss and Ramirez are excellent and there’s strong support from Ricky Martin as Versace’s bewildered live-in boyfriend and a perhaps slightly too-camp Penélope Cruz as Donatella. Smith’s solid script does a good job of juggling various timelines to show how this particular killer came to be. Sarah Hughes Ellie Undercover: Rent for Sex BBC Three, from 10.00am Investigative journalist Ellie Flynn presents this look at the growing number of unscrupulous landlords who offer rent-free accommodation in exchange for sex. It’s hard not to feel utterly dispirited as Flynn meets vulnerable women such as Chloe, who feels so trapped by her homelessness that she’s in no position to say no to these men. Athletics: The World Indoor Championships BBC Two, 7.00pm The four-day World Indoor Championships, which takes place at Arena Birmingham, kicks off on Thursday, featuring three events in the first evening session – including Team GB’s Laura Muir and Eilish McColgan in the final of the women’s 3,000 m. Events continue from 9.00am on Friday, with Greg Rutherford’s long jump bid among the highlights. The World’s Most Extraordinary Homes BBC Two, 8.00pm For those of us who enjoy gawping at other people’s homes, few programmes are more satisfying than this series presented by Caroline Quentin and architect Piers Taylor. Tonight the duo are in Portugal poking their noses into four very different properties. The Supervet Channel 4, 8.00pm Professor Noel Fitzpatrick and the team returns for a new round of veterinary problems, including a very excitable Labrador who requires elbow replacement surgery and a Jackahuahua puppy who needs to have spinal surgery after an attack in the park. Benidorm ITV, 9.00pm Hold on to your sunhats as ITV’s long-running Costa Blanca comedy returns for a 10th series with comedians Hale & Pace joining the cast as a pair of undercover cops. Elsewhere, Joyce (Sherrie Hewson) and Monty’s (John Challis) big day arrives. Save Me Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Don’t let the fact that it features yet another missing child put you off the week’s best new drama. Written by and starring Lennie James, Save Me tells the tale of Nelly (James), an ageing wide-boy of suspect charms, who finds himself in trouble after his estranged teenage daughter disappears. We’ve all met people like Nelly, the easy smiles hiding their sharp edges, and James does a wonderful job of making us warm to him despite the distrust. There’s strong support, too, from Suranne Jones as the missing girl’s mother. SH Film 2018 BBC One, 11.15pm; Wales, 11.35pm; NI, 12.10am The BBC’s long-running film series returns with an opening episode hosted by Radio 1’s Clara Amfo alongside critics Ellen E Jones and Larushka Ivan-Zadeh. The focus this week is on next Sunday’s Academy Awards, plus an interview with Lady Bird’s Oscar-nominated director, Greta Gerwig. SH The Quiet Man (1952) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.00pm Best known for his sombre westerns, John Ford turns personal for this wonderful romantic comedy which was considered a risky venture but went on to win the director his fourth Oscar. It tells the story of a boxer who falls in love with the sister of a bully. The famous grab-and-kiss scene between the smouldering John Wayne and love interest Maureen O’Hara (the “Queen of Technicolour”) also appears in E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. Big Eyes (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Amy Adams is ideally cast as the browbeaten artist Margaret Keane who, for eight years, churned out iconic, highly sought after paintings, only for her con artist husband (Christoph Waltz) to take all the credit. Tim Burton’s take on this curious real-life tale of curdled suburbia sadly lacks Adams’s subtlety: even the usually restrained Waltz is caught up in the blunt, overly stylised kookiness. Good (2008) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.50pm Viggo Mortensen gives a thoughtful performance as a German professor whose ideas about euthanasia are adopted by the Nazis. It’s only when he becomes a concentration camp inspector that he grasps the horror of his ideas. Vicente Amorim’s adaptation of CP Taylor’s play doesn’t shirk big questions, but he tends to fall back on clichés – hammerings on the piano, etc – and it plays a bit like a Nazi version of Rising Damp. Thursday 1 March A landmark return: David Olusoga, Mary Beard and Simon Schama Credit: BBC Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm Almost 50 years after changing the face of arts programming with the landmark series Civilisation, BBC Two returns with an expanded brief and all the bells and whistles of modern film-making, from drone cameras to infra-red photography. With nine episodes split between presenters Simon Schama (five), David Olusoga and Mary Beard (two each), Civilisations promises an opinionated overview of global art and culture. It opens with a striking sequence in which Schama – helming this first part – explores what has been lost and salvaged from the Isil pillage of Palmyra. From there, we’re whisked to Africa’s Cape coast and the first evidence of mankind’s creativity 77,000 years ago. Then it’s a breathless gallop through the millennia, alighting at the first settlements and depictions of the human face. Among the cave art, Mayan stairways and fertility fetishes, the real treasure is an astonishing Mycenaean Sealstone, jaw-dropping in its anatomical detail and artistic accomplishment. While it won’t have the same impact as the original series (what could?), Civilisations looks to be just as learned, accessible and thrilling as its predecessor – the whole series will be available on BBC iPlayer at 10.00pm. Gabriel Tate The Cruise: Voyage to Alaska ITV, 8.30pm; not Wales Over three episodes, the five-star luxury liner Star Princess and its redoubtable crew travels to the northernmost American state – where they encounter difficult weather, navigational challenges and problem passengers. Weinstein: the Inside Story BBC One, 9.00pm In collaboration with PBS America’s Frontline current-affairs strand, Panorama examines the fall of Harvey Weinstein and the lengths to which the disgraced Hollywood producer would go to keep his alleged bullying, threats and sexual assaults private. Speaking to insiders, the team builds a troubling picture of industry complicity. From Ice to Fire: the Incredible Science of Temperature BBC Four, 9.00pm Dr Helen Czerski concludes her excellent series with fire, and how its harnessing played a pivotal role in human evolution and survival, from essentials such as toolmaking and mining to relative fripperies such as hot-air balloons. The moment that Czerski triggers a lightning strike at a high-voltage laboratory carries a genuine frisson; as is customary with most BBC Four films, the presentation is lively and the science deftly handled. Serial Killer with Piers Morgan ITV, 9.00pm How do you follow interviewing Donald Trump? Piers Morgan returns to the less contentious turf of more one-to-ones with convicted murderers behind bars. He begins with Lorenzo Gilyard, the so-called Kansas City Strangler, who remains unremorseful after allegedly killing 13 women and girls over almost two decades. Panic at 30,000 Feet: Airline Emergency Channel 5, 9.00pm This nightmare-inducing new series explores what happens when flights go wrong, from mid-air collisions to runway explosions. GT Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 11.45pm The penultimate episode of this often disturbing and insightful series revisits Oak Creek, Wisconsin, where white supremacist Michael Page killed six and injured four at a Sikh temple, before killing himself, in 2012. For once, there is a vaguely positive denouement: Page’s brutality had the opposite to its intended effect and brought the community closer together. GT Jubal (1956) ★★★★☆ Film4, 12.40pm Ernest Borgnine stars in this brooding western shot in the Grand Teton mountains of Wyoming, which reworks the plot of Othello. Borgnine stars as a cattle rancher with a much younger wife (Valerie French), who is driven into a jealous rage when cattlehand Rod Steiger suggests that she is having an affair with young drifter Jubal (a magnificent Glenn Ford). Murder is most definitely on the cards. Pitch Perfect (2012) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm The world of collegiate a cappella singing contests can’t be as heartless as Jason Moore’s sour comedy would have us believe. Anna Kendrick stars as Beca, an angst-ridden outsider who must shake up her uninspiring and monotonous group, while trying to handle how weird they all are. And, of course, there’s a handsome man (Skylar Astin) who catches her eye. It’s a little like Glee but without the schmaltz. The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Clint Eastwood directs and stars in this warm-hearted marvellous western adapted from Forrest Carter’s novel and set during the American Civil War. Eastwood plays the Missouri farmer who, driven by memories of his family’s slaughter, becomes an outlaw when he refuses to join his Confederate comrades in surrender, in favour of seeking revenge on the men who murdered his kin. Friday 2 March Searching for the truth: Lydia Wilson as Matilda Credit: BBC Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm After last week’s hiatus because of the Six Nations rugby, it’s back to small-town Wales for another dose of supernatural country-house shenanigans. When we last saw fragile but determined musician Matilda (Lydia Wilson), she’d suffered the double whammy of finding her would-be mother Rose (Claire Rushbrook) unconscious in the bath and learning that mute Aunt Meredith (Jane Thorne) had died on the verge of offering up her secrets. How did Matilda react? By mysteriously blacking out and bashing her beloved cello against a cupboard. In the fourth episode then, she looks for connections between her mental health and Carys’s disappearance. And some clues emerge: Matilda meets dishevelled local Laura (Anastasia Hille), who claims to hear voices informing her of Carys’s fate, and back at the mansion, she comes across some old tomes detailing rituals to unlock the past. Even with its heavily scored bumps and shudders, Requiem can’t quite sustain its early Hammer Horror appeal. The strong performances and some genuinely chilling moments keep things compelling however, not least in the spine-tingling climax of this episode. Toby Dantzic Flint Town Netflix, from today Back in 2014, a cost-cutting exercise left thousands of homes in Flint, Michigan, with contaminated drinking water for years. This new eight-part documentary looks at the fallout from the crisis through the eyes of Flint’s beleaguered police force, who face an uphill struggle – the community needs their support but are also deeply mistrustful of those in authority, plus dwindling resources makes the officers’ jobs harder still. MasterChef BBC One, 7.30pm Having survived the cooking contest’s opening week, the six heat winners face food critic William Sitwell in this first quarter-final. He challenges them to conjure up a standout pudding showcasing either alcohol or spices. Love Your Garden ITV, 8.00pm; not STV/UTV/Wales This week, Alan Titchmarsh and his team are in Bidewell, Devon, helping Tamsyn and Alex Wood who returned to the UK from France after Alex suffered a brain injury. The aim is to turn the Woods’ garden into a coastal sanctuary inspired by Alex’s passion for surfing. The Yorkshire Steam Railway: All Aboard Channel 5, 8.00pm As amiable as its title suggests, this new documentary series follows the lives of those who work on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, one of the country’s most popular steam railways. In this series’ opener, the new season begins with the arrival of star engine Royal Scot, on loan from London. Tones, Drones and Arpeggios: The Magic of Minimalism BBC Four, 9.00pm Conductor Charles Hazlewood explores minimalism, which he argues is the most important musical form of the 20th century. In the fascinating opener of this two-part series, he unpicks the construction of these sometimes confounding sounds and tracks down the genre’s avant-garde pioneers, who brought their mesmeric, spirituality-inspired compositions from California to New York in the Sixties. TD Jo Brand: Secrets of Her Success Channel 5, 10.30pm Channel 5’s celebration of funny women continues with this absorbing profile of the pioneering doyenne of deadpan, Jo Brand. This charts her career from its rocky start on the male-dominated stand-up circuit to her much-admired hospital sitcom Getting On. TD Gladiator (2000) ★★★★★ Film4, 9.00pm This take on the traditional swords-and-sandals epic proved that Russell Crowe deserved to be recognised as a mainstream star, and reaffirmed Ridley Scott’s reputation as a first-rate director. Crowe is Maximus, a former Roman general who rebuilds his career as a gladiator. His bid for vengeance against a vile emperor (Joaquin Phoenix) is compelling. Plus there’s a last hurrah from Oliver Reed. Blades of Glory (2007) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm;N Ireland, 12.05am You might think that the sequinned world of figure skating is beyond parody, but here Will Ferrell and Jon Heder serve up a zestfully preposterous comedy. Both play rival Olympic ice skaters, Ferrell a loose-living maverick, Heder a prissy perfectionist, who are slung out of the sport but use a loophole to return as an erotic all-male pairing. Amy Poehler co-stars. A Hijacking (2012) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.55pm Tobias Lindholm’s vigorously intelligent hostage thriller, set on board a besieged ship in the Indian Ocean, deftly moves his story between the boat and the shipping company’s offices, where Søren Malling’s frazzled CEO attempts to thrash out a bargain. On the other end of the line is the Somalis’ translator. Flies buzz, sweat trickles, negotiations continue, and you feel your breath dry up. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
Friday 23 February Gogglebox Channel 4, 9.00pm We all know that Gogglebox won’t be the same this time around. One of the great joys of watching the armchair TV critic show, which returns for its 11th series, was the always warm, occasionally bickering relationship between straight-talking Liverpudlian couple, Leon and June Bernicoff. But, sadly, Leon died last December following a short illness and June recently confirmed that she won’t be taking part without him. So, in the absence of Leon’s notoriously unvarnished views (on chef Jamie Oliver: “‘Oh he’s a d---head”), what can we expect? Probably business as usual. After all, the show has survived the loss of popular families before, from everyone’s favourite posh couple, Steph and Dom, to the gloriously opinionated Scarlett Moffatt. Our guesses: the lovely Siddiquis will continue to be the most well-adjusted family, hairdressers Stephen and Christopher will trot out the most-pointed one-liners, Welsh couple Dave and Shirley will bring the giggles, even though it remains a mystery just how Dave watches TV in that very uncomfortable-looking position, and we still won’t be able to work out how many dogs the Malones actually have. SH Live Winter Olympics 2018 BBC One and BBC Two, from 6.00am Day 14 sees the semi-finals of the men’s ice hockey and the women’s curling competition, plus the final of the men’s 1,000 m speed skating. SH An Island Parish: After the Hurricane BBC Two, 9.00pm Sophie Okonedo narrates this special edition of the series which looks at the long-term effects of Hurricane Irma on the Caribbean island of Anguilla. Among those who lost everything are Simone Connor and her father Neville, who ran a restaurant and leisure complex on the island. SH Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm Now is the perfect time to jump back on the Will & Grace bandwagon as the wonderful Nick Offerman (the real-life husband of Megan Mullally, who plays Karen) guest stars as baker Jackson Boudreaux, aka the Bad Boy of Bread. Offerman is a scene-stealing delight and the final moments offer a lovely pay-off. SH Joan Rivers: By Her friends Channel 5, 10.30pm Anyone who saw the brilliant comedy The Marvellous Mrs Maisel, which was inspired by the late Joan Rivers’s early career, will know that the comedian’s domestic-focused stand-up routines were unlike anything that the audiences of that time had heard before. This tribute puts that ground-breaking career in context. SH The Tick Amazon Prime, from today Peter Serafinowicz’s goofy blue superhero returns for another series of misadventures. As with the last time, the series stands and falls with Serafinowicz’s performance: his morally upstanding but bizarre caped crusader has enough charm to paper over plot cracks. SH Seven Seconds Netflix, from today This new crime-drama series from Veena Sud, the writer behind the US version of The Killing, explores grief, deceit and social injustice. Starring Regina King, it focuses on the fallout from the death of a young boy who was injured by a police officer. SH The Old Grey Whistle Test Live: For One Night Only BBC Four, 9.00pm Bob Harris, who fronted The Old Grey Whistle Test from 1972-1978, returns with this event marking 30 years since the end of music show. This one-off includes live performances and interviews with fans and former presenters. SH Mute (2018) Netflix, from today True Blood alumnus Alexander Skarsgård plays Leo, the titular mute in Duncan Jones’s sci-fi thriller, which the director describes as a spiritual sequel to 2009’s Moon. Leo Beiler, a bartender with a violent past, searches for his missing girlfriend Naadirah (Seyneb Saleh) in a futuristic, neon-lit Berlin. He crosses paths with a pair of US army surgeons, brilliantly named Cactus Bill and Duck Teddington (played by Paul Rudd and Justin Theroux), on a mission of their own. X-Men: First Class (2011) ★★★☆☆ E4, 9.00pm Telepathic Charles Xavier (James McAvoy) bonds with metal-bending death camp survivor Erik Lehnsherr (Michael Fassbender) and the two of them track down other mutants to confront evil Nazi Sebastian Shaw (Kevin Bacon) when he triggers the Cuban Missile Crisis. Matthew Vaughn is much more comfortable with the small-scale character stuff than the action climax, but this prequel is mostly a lot of fun. While We’re Young (2014) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm A couple’s doomed attempt to recapture their youth gives Ben Stiller and Naomi Watts a new lease of comic life in Noah Baumbach’s sparkling film. Baumbach packs it with the wit and vigour of a polished one-act play as co-stars Adam Driver and Amanda Seyfried, playing hat-wearing hipsters, deliver punchlines that can’t help but remind you of Woody Allen at his peak. Saturday 24 February Loadsa laughs: Ant McPartlin and Declan Donnelly Credit: ITV Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway ITV, 7.00pm Anthony McPartlin and Declan Donnelly, the undisputed kings of Saturday night TV – never more so since they won the inaugural Bruce Forsyth Entertainment gong, among others, at the National Television Awards last month – return with a 16th series of their popular show. Packed full of comedy, audience participation, prize giveaways, celebrity guests, exclusive performances and madcap stunts, this is high-octane entertainment, with barely time to draw breath between items. Tonight, Kylie Minogue gives a first performance of her latest single and revisits some of her biggest hits, Britain’s Got Talent judge Amanda Holden falls victim to the first Undercover prank of the series and Olly Murs takes on the role of guest announcer in the End of Show Show. The hosts themselves, meanwhile, put the pedal to the floor for a daredevil Ant vs Dec monster truck challenge, and reprise their roles as super sleuths in a new comedy whodunit (with an all-star cast that includes Joanna Lumley, Michael Sheen, Emilia Fox and David Walliams) while sidekicks Scarlett Moffatt and Stephen Mulhern are out on the streets looking for people to plays games with. And that’s just for starters. Gerard O’Donovan Live Winter Olympics 2018 BBC One and BBC Two, from 6.00am It’s the penultimate day and there’s major Team GB interest as the four-man bobsleigh gets under way. However, most eyes will be on the curling, which has proved rather popular in these Games, as the men’s gold and women’s bronze medals are decided. There’s also action in the snowboarding and skiing. Six Nations Rugby Union: Ireland v Wales ITV, 1.30pm After their 12-6 defeat against England at Twickenham, Wales travel to Ireland, with Dan Biggar starting at fly-half, and Liam Williams and Leigh Halfpenny also returning after injury. Ireland have won two from two, beating France in Paris, before enjoying an eight-try buffet at Italy’s expense in a 56-19 victory. The visitors are unbeaten in their last three Six Nations matches against Ireland, but were held to a 16-16 draw when the sides last met here two years ago. Six Nations Rugby Union: Scotland v England BBC One, 4.00pm Tough one for England, this. Yes, they’ve won nine of the last 10 matches against Scotland, drawing the other one, but the pressure cauldron that is Murrayfield is never an easy place to visit, and they’ll have their tails up after an impressive 32-26 win against France. Still, according to head coach Gregor Townsend, Scotland will need to produce their “best-ever performance” if they are to triumph against England in the Calcutta Cup. Eddie Jones’s team beat Wales 12-6 thanks to two first-half tries by Jonny May, but were forced to hang on grimly in the frenetic closing stages as they set a new championship record for consecutive home wins (15, dating back to 2012). When these sides met in the tournament last year, England thrashed Scotland 61-21 at Twickenham. Churchill’s Darkest Decision More4, 7.55pm Fans of the hit film Darkest Hour will appreciate this documentary about another big Churchill dilemma. In 1940, following the fall of France, Germany was poised to seize the entire French fleet, making Hitler’s threat to invade Britain ever graver. Drastic measures were called for, but at a tragically high cost. David Attenborough’s Natural Curiosities BBC Two, 8.00pm Creatures with remarkable navigation skills are the focus of tonight’s edition, looking at how dung beetles use the Sun, Moon and stars as compass points, and how pigeons recall complex routes. Britain at Low Tide Channel 4, 8.00pm More stories from our shoreline as Tori Herridge visits Dorset, where she finds the home of the world’s first aircraft carrier and searches for an Iron Age monument that can only be seen for a few hours each year. Troy: Fall of a City BBC One, 9.10pm All hell breaks loose in this second episode when Helen’s (Bella Dayne) husband Menelaus finds out what Paris (Louis Hunter) took back to Troy. His enraged brother Agamemnon (Johnny Harris) calls all Greece to war, but when they fail to propitiate the gods, there’s a shocking price to pay. GO Mosaic Sky Atlantic, 10.00pm Steven Soderbergh’s crime drama starring Sharon Stone provoked a blizzard of publicity on its release last year in mobile app format. HBO’s six-part “linear” TV version is obviously less innovative (the app works like an interactive movie where the user can choose from which perspective the plot is viewed), but it still has plenty to offer. In this second episode, the backstory continues to play out as author Olivia Lake’s (Stone) relationships with lover Eric (Frederick Weller) and lodger Joel (Garrett Hedlund) become ever more tangled. GO Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2 (2013) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 5.00pm In this sequel to the 2009 animation based on the 1978 children’s book, inventor Flint Lockwood (voiced by Bill Hader) and friends must rescue the island of Swallow Falls from being overrun by food-mutated animals. It’s no triumph of screenwriting or subtext, but it’s a feast of ingeniously rendered gastronomic insanity and kids will absolutely love it. The Heat (2013) ★★★★☆ E4, 9.00pm Bridesmaids director Paul Feig brings back one of that film’s stars, Melissa McCarthy, as a foul-mouthed Boston cop whose policing style, aided by a fridge full of armaments, makes Dirty Harry look like Thumbelina. She’s paired with a goody-two-shoes FBI agent (Sandra Bullock reminding us what a pro she is at comedy). Together, they’re dynamite, plus the film has an emotional clout that hits you seemingly from nowhere. Philomena (2013) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.00pm; not Northern Ireland This true story is based on the experiences of journalist Martin Sixsmith (Steve Coogan), who helped Philomena Lee (Judi Dench), an Irish woman in her seventies, search for the son that she was forced to put up for adoption 50 years earlier. Stephen Frears’s film is charming and hard-hitting, delivering some tough emotional blows as well as some harsh truths about the Catholic Church’s past. Sunday 25 February Curiouser and curiouser: Holliday Grainger and Tom Burke Credit: BBC Strike: Career of Evil BBC One, 9.00pm Rumpled PI Cormoran Strike (Tom Burke) and his trusty Girl Friday Robin Ellacott (Holliday Grainger) return for the third of JK Rowling’s Robert Galbraith novels. It’s a few months after the events of The Silkworm and Strike and Robin have settled into an easy working partnership, albeit one that remains a little too cosy for Robin’s smarmy fiancé Matthew (Kerr Logan). Then Robin receives a gruesome present in the post and our intrepid duo found themselves caught up in an investigation that swiftly hits far too close to home. Career of Evil is the most tightly plotted of the Galbraith books and this well-paced opening episode neatly sets up the (plentiful) twists to come. That said, the real enjoyment comes not from the story but from the fantastic chemistry between Grainger and Burke, who bring an immense amount of warmth and charm to their scenes. Indeed, so successfully do they inhabit the roles that it’s frustrating to realise that, with no more Galbraith books currently published, this will be the last Strike for a while. It’s a genuine shame: if ever a TV adaptation deserved to be spun away from its source material it’s this one. Sarah Hughes ODI cricket: New Zealand v England Sky Sports Main Event, 12.30am You’ll have to stay up late to see this opening one-day international of the five-match series. England, having beaten the Aussies in their last ODI series, will fancy their chances. Young, Welsh and Pretty Minted BBC Three, from 10.00am The makers of Young, Welsh and Pretty Skint return with a new series focusing on a group of would-be entrepreneurs, including a YouTuber with 1.7 million subscribers and an image-obsessed Instagram influencer. Live Winter Olympics 2018 Closing Ceremony BBC Two, from 11.00am The Olympics bow out, allowing us to recall the heartbreak (Team GB’s Elise Christie’s wipeout in the speedskating final) and joy (American snowboarder Chloe Kim’s megawatt smile). K-pop star CL and boy band EXO take part in the ceremony which has a fusion theme, before the flag is handed over to Beijing for 2022. Premier League Football: Manchester United v Chelsea Sky Sports Main Event, 1.00pm With both sides struggling for consistency – United lost at Newcastle a fortnight ago, while Chelsea were trounced 4-1 by Watford earlier this month – today’s match at Old Trafford should be a tentative affair. Carabao Cup Final: Arsenal v Manchester City Sky Sports Main Event, 4.00pm Proving that the League Cup is having something of a resurgence, Arsenal and Manchester City are this year’s finalists, with the former aiming to win the trophy for the first time since 1993. City are favourites, though: imperious in the league, they also have form in the Carabao Cup, having won it in 2014 and 2016. Top Gear BBC Two, 8.00pm The petrolhead’s special returns with Matt LeBlanc promising increased family appeal. The new team of LeBlanc, Chris Harris and Rory Reid have decent chemistry and if this was your sort of thing then it probably remains so. Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble BBC Four, 8.00pm Few programmes are as inspiring as this one about cellist Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble, an ever-changing group of over 50 artists who perform alongside Ma. In addition to highlighting some phenomenal talents – Galician bagpiper Cristina Pato almost steals the show – the film details the hardships that they’ve faced, including revolution and exile. Anchoring it all is former child prodigy Ma: “I think when I was a kid a lot of things just happened,” he notes as footage shows him performing as a child for President Kennedy. “I’m always trying to figure out who I am and where I fit in the world.” SH Hannibal’s Elephant Army: The New Evidence Channel 4, 8.00pm Why did Carthaginian general Hannibal cross the Alps on a seemingly impossible journey with an army of 40,000 soldiers, 9,000 cavalry officers and 37 elephants? This fascinating film examines the evidence. Life and Death Row: The Mass Execution BBC Two, 9.00pm The harrowing series continues to turn a microscopic eye on all aspects of the death penalty. Tonight it’s the case of Stacey Johnson, on death row for 23 years. His stepdaughter insists on his innocence; his victim’s daughter says she’s sure that he’s a guilty man. SH Clouds of Sils Maria (2014) ★★★★☆ BBC Four, 9.30pm A complex, bewitching and fearlessly intelligent psychological fondue from France’s Olivier Assayas, with Juliet Binoche and Kristen Stewart as a famous actress and her diligent and devoted personal assistant, prepping for a play that shapes the drama of their own lives in its likeness. Playful and addictively strange, with career-best work from Stewart. Shutter Island (2010) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 11.05pm Martin Scorsese’s follow-up to The Departed, is, like that film, based on a novel by Dennis Lehane. He delves into gothic noir in this mystery thriller as detective Daniels (Leonardo DiCaprio) investigates the disappearance of an inmate from a prison for the clinically insane with the help of his partner (played brilliantly by Mark Ruffalo). This is a gripping story with some bold twists, although it eventually loses momentum. Point Break (1991) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 11.30pm; Scotland, 12.30am Kathryn Bigelow’s cult surfing/crime film elevated Patrick Swayze’s actor status to true action hero. Keanu Reeves plays Johnny Utah, an FBI agent who goes undercover to infiltrate a gang of bankrobbing surfers led by the charismatic Bodhi (Swayze). The action heats up when Bodhi and Utah find they share a similar attitude towards danger. Lori Petty is the surfer who catches Johnny’s eye. Monday 26 February Body snatched? Greg Kinnear as the father Credit: Channel 4 Electric Dreams: The Father Thing Channel 4, 10.00pm After a first run split pretty evenly between stunners and misfires, the final four adaptations of short stories from pulp sci-fi icon Philip K Dick begins with a heavily derivative but entertaining piece from Michael Dinner, showrunner of excellent modern western Justified. The setting is an unnamed Midwest town, where young baseball-loving Charlie (Jack Gore) lives with his parents, hangs out with three other misfits and avoids the bullies; it’s as cosily familiar a slice of apple-pie Americana as you could find. And then the aftermath of a meteor shower causes Charlie to suspect that some of the town’s inhabitants may have been replaced by aliens, his own father (Greg Kinnear) included. Based more directly than some of its predecessors on Dick’s original story, this cannot help but nod to Invasion of the Body Snatchers, although the Cold War paranoia replaced by… what, exactly? There’s a parable of father-son relations in here, along with an allegory of divorce and a Stranger Things-influenced romp, but it shows its hand a little early, never settles on a tone and features a climax that will split opinion down the middle. That said, it’s never less than diverting. Gabriel Tate This Country BBC Three, from 10.00am Series one of Charlie and Daisy May Cooper’s mockumentary transcended its obvious debt to The Office to become a touching, acutely observed and defiant portrait of life on the margins in rural Britain. Importantly, it was also very funny, finding bathos and humour in the efforts of gormless cousins Kurtan and Kerry Mucklowe (played by the Coopers) to amuse themselves in a Cotswolds village. Thankfully, almost nothing has changed for this second series, although Kurtan has found a girlfriend and Kerry hitherto unknown charitable instincts. Shakespeare & Hathaway: Private Investigators BBC One, 2.15pm Jo Joyner and Mark Benton are perfectly cast in this amiable new 10-part series as Lu Shakespeare, wrongly suspected of killing her fiancé, and Frank Hathaway, the slobbish PI she ropes in to clear her name. The odd-couple chemistry is there from the start and Stratford-upon-Avon looks glorious – making this a welcome addition to the afternoon schedules. Hollywood in Vienna: the Sound of Space & Alexandre Desplat Sky Arts, 8.00pm This gala performance loosely based on a journey through the universe includes Parisian composer Alexandre Desplat’s melodies for movies, including Twilight and The Grand Budapest Hotel, as well as legendary scores from Star Wars to E.T. GT Classic Mary Berry BBC One, 8.30pm Cherish the unlikely sight of the former Bake Off judge partaking in a little “caveman cooking” in this latest rebranding of Mary Berry’s line in home-cooking, with the opener focusing on comfort food. MasterChef BBC One, 9.00pm The 11th run of the enduringly popular cooking contest begins with the first seven contestants creating dishes using ingredients including beef mince and duck breasts for John Torode, Gregg Wallace and some former finalists. The Unstoppable Flying Scotsman Channel 5, 9.00pm The world’s most famous steam locomotive is profiled in this two-parter from Rob Bell, always a reassuring translator of technical geekery for a mainstream audience. Here, he explores its origins and enduring appeal. GT Ice Cold in Alex (1958, b/w) ★★★★☆ Film4, 4.20pm J Lee Thompson’s tense British wartime thriller is one of the classics of the black-and-white era and richly entertaining. John Mills shines as Captain Anson, who dreams of an ice-cold glass of lager while escorting Britons across the desert to Alexandria during the Second World War. The film makes some interesting points about patriotism, as we learn Anson is unaware that he’s harbouring a traitor. Alien Resurrection (1997) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Sigourney Weaver returns as heroine Ellen Ripley for this fourth film in the franchise. Two hundred years have passed since Alien 3, and Ripley has now been cloned by scientists, which gives her greater strength but also conflicting loyalties, meaning we’re not sure that we can trust her. Despite the talent on board (Weaver, screenwriter Joss Whedon and director Jean-Pierre Jeunot), this is a poor effort. Elysium (2013) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 11.00pm Neill Blomkamp’s (District 9) intelligent sci-fi thriller has a fire in its belly and stars a brawny Matt Damon as a factory worker who scrapes out a living on the Earth’s crust. He’s involved in an accident but the medical care that he needs is on space station Elysium. Blomkamp focuses on faith, capitalism and private healthcare – in lesser hands, the film might have played out like a Lib Dem manifesto with spaceships. Tuesday 27 February Surrounded by splendour: Alan Titchmarsh Secrets of the National Trust with Alan Titchmarsh Channel 5, 8.00pm A tale of “female empowerment, politics and a fight for the throne of England itself” is how Alan Titchmarsh, opening a second series showcasing the National Trust’s finest properties, describes the history of Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire. Certainly, the story of Elizabeth Talbot, Countess of Shrewsbury (aka Bess of Hardwick), and how four strategic marriages helped her to become one of the most powerful women in Elizabethan England, is a fascinating one. And the glorious house she built in the 1590s, with vast facades of glass and sumptuous decor, was doubtless a marvel of the age. Whether you think Titchmarsh does either of them justice will depend on how much detail you like in a documentary, and how much repetition (you won’t possess enough fingers to count how often he mentions that Bess’s initials and coat of arms decorate the high parapet of the house) and “coming up next” you can bear. Either way, there are plenty of glories to gaze upon, so if you’re unlikely to get a chance to visit Hardwick Hall in person, the fine filming shows off the house and its grounds in considerable splendour. Gerard O’Donovan How to Get Fit Fast Channel 4, 8.00pm Anna Richardson and Amar Latif put the emphasis on fitness rather than weight loss in this new series exploring the off-the-shelf plans available, hoping to point viewers towards the exercise regime that suits them best. 100 Years Younger in 21 Days ITV, 9.00pm Eight well-worn famous faces attempt to turn the clock back at a “rejuvenation” clinic in Sardinia. June Brown, Sherrie Hewson, Claire King, Sid Owen, Roy Walker, Russell Grant, Googlebox’s Sandra Martin and music legend Shaun Ryder are among thoses hoping to knock off years without going under the knife. The FGM Detectives Channel 4, 10.00pm Despite the global efforts to ban the practice, female genital mutilation (FGM) continues to affect millions of women. Here Cathy Newman leads a two-year investigation into FGM in the UK, which is estimated to put 20,000 young British women at risk every year. Acid Attack: My Story BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm Naomi Oni recounts the horrific acid attack that left her with life-altering injuries in 2012, and how the police investigation (which, unbelievably, initially focused on whether she had inflicted the wounds on herself) proved the attacker to be a childhood friend. GO Unreal Amazon Prime, from today A drama playing on the fakeness, dubious ethics and behind-the-scenes manipulation of a hit reality TV dating show, UnREAL is nothing if not a series for our times. As the third season begins, Everlasting’s producer Rachel (Shiri Appleby) is getting her life back on track, despite her ruthless boss Quinn (Constance Zimmer) ramping up the pressure to deliver the show’s most outrageous season yet. Divorce Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm Sarah Jessica Parker returns with a second season of the bleak and bitingly funny comedy about the painful break-up of an American middle-class couple’s marriage. At least that’s what series one, created and partly written by the Sharon Horgan, was about. Season two, minus Horgan’s input, takes on a distinctly lighter tone as both Frances (Parker) and her now ex-husband Robert (Thomas Haden Church) begin tentatively to negotiate the possibilities of life post divorce. GO Charade (1963) ★★★★☆ Film4, 2.25pm Audrey Hepburn as a temperamental-but-alluring damsel in distress and Cary Grant as a shadowy charmer are characters that the actors played many times. But they do so exceptionally in this suspense comedy from Stanley Donen, often referred to as the best Hitchcock movie that Hitchcock never made. Hepburn is the widow being trailed by four men hunting for her late husband’s stolen fortune. Black Swan (2010) ★★★★★ Film4, 11.25pm Darren Aronofsky’s film is delirious hokum and high-class trash. Natalie Portman stars as Nina Sayers, a young dancer with the New York City Ballet preparing for a production of Swan Lake choreographed by the charismatic Thomas Leroy (Vincent Cassel). He is unconvinced by Nina’s ability to portray the passion of the Black Swan and her efforts to convince him lead her towards madness. Christine (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 11.50pm The story of Christine Chubbuck, a Florida newsreader who shot herself on air in 1974, is shocking and unfathomably sad. But it wouldn’t be worth retelling on film if it didn’t illuminate something. It asks a top-notch Rebecca Hall to play out the last days of Chubbuck’s life and dares us to hope that it’s about a different woman – one who made it out the other side of her own tragedy. Wednesday 28 February Victim: Édgar Ramírez as Versace Credit: BBC The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story BBC Two, 9.00pm Ryan Murphy’s true crime series follows up 2016’s dramatisation of the OJ Simpson trial with the story of serial killer Andrew Cunanan, who murdered at least five people over a three-month period, including the fashion designer Gianni Versace. Murphy and scriptwriter Tom Rob Smith use the word assassination very carefully here: the operatic opening scenes depict Versace (Édgar Ramírez) as a modern-day Medici prince, dispensing cheerful patronage to all in his Miami Beach fiefdom. By contrast, Cunanan (Darren Criss) is portrayed as a man so insecure in his own skin that he is almost physically incapable of telling the truth: “You tell gay people you’re gay and straight people you’re straight,” exclaims an exasperated friend. “I tell people what they need to hear,” comes the too-calm reply. Both Criss and Ramirez are excellent and there’s strong support from Ricky Martin as Versace’s bewildered live-in boyfriend and a perhaps slightly too-camp Penélope Cruz as Donatella. Smith’s solid script does a good job of juggling various timelines to show how this particular killer came to be. Sarah Hughes Ellie Undercover: Rent for Sex BBC Three, from 10.00am Investigative journalist Ellie Flynn presents this look at the growing number of unscrupulous landlords who offer rent-free accommodation in exchange for sex. It’s hard not to feel utterly dispirited as Flynn meets vulnerable women such as Chloe, who feels so trapped by her homelessness that she’s in no position to say no to these men. Athletics: The World Indoor Championships BBC Two, 7.00pm The four-day World Indoor Championships, which takes place at Arena Birmingham, kicks off on Thursday, featuring three events in the first evening session – including Team GB’s Laura Muir and Eilish McColgan in the final of the women’s 3,000 m. Events continue from 9.00am on Friday, with Greg Rutherford’s long jump bid among the highlights. The World’s Most Extraordinary Homes BBC Two, 8.00pm For those of us who enjoy gawping at other people’s homes, few programmes are more satisfying than this series presented by Caroline Quentin and architect Piers Taylor. Tonight the duo are in Portugal poking their noses into four very different properties. The Supervet Channel 4, 8.00pm Professor Noel Fitzpatrick and the team returns for a new round of veterinary problems, including a very excitable Labrador who requires elbow replacement surgery and a Jackahuahua puppy who needs to have spinal surgery after an attack in the park. Benidorm ITV, 9.00pm Hold on to your sunhats as ITV’s long-running Costa Blanca comedy returns for a 10th series with comedians Hale & Pace joining the cast as a pair of undercover cops. Elsewhere, Joyce (Sherrie Hewson) and Monty’s (John Challis) big day arrives. Save Me Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Don’t let the fact that it features yet another missing child put you off the week’s best new drama. Written by and starring Lennie James, Save Me tells the tale of Nelly (James), an ageing wide-boy of suspect charms, who finds himself in trouble after his estranged teenage daughter disappears. We’ve all met people like Nelly, the easy smiles hiding their sharp edges, and James does a wonderful job of making us warm to him despite the distrust. There’s strong support, too, from Suranne Jones as the missing girl’s mother. SH Film 2018 BBC One, 11.15pm; Wales, 11.35pm; NI, 12.10am The BBC’s long-running film series returns with an opening episode hosted by Radio 1’s Clara Amfo alongside critics Ellen E Jones and Larushka Ivan-Zadeh. The focus this week is on next Sunday’s Academy Awards, plus an interview with Lady Bird’s Oscar-nominated director, Greta Gerwig. SH The Quiet Man (1952) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.00pm Best known for his sombre westerns, John Ford turns personal for this wonderful romantic comedy which was considered a risky venture but went on to win the director his fourth Oscar. It tells the story of a boxer who falls in love with the sister of a bully. The famous grab-and-kiss scene between the smouldering John Wayne and love interest Maureen O’Hara (the “Queen of Technicolour”) also appears in E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. Big Eyes (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Amy Adams is ideally cast as the browbeaten artist Margaret Keane who, for eight years, churned out iconic, highly sought after paintings, only for her con artist husband (Christoph Waltz) to take all the credit. Tim Burton’s take on this curious real-life tale of curdled suburbia sadly lacks Adams’s subtlety: even the usually restrained Waltz is caught up in the blunt, overly stylised kookiness. Good (2008) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.50pm Viggo Mortensen gives a thoughtful performance as a German professor whose ideas about euthanasia are adopted by the Nazis. It’s only when he becomes a concentration camp inspector that he grasps the horror of his ideas. Vicente Amorim’s adaptation of CP Taylor’s play doesn’t shirk big questions, but he tends to fall back on clichés – hammerings on the piano, etc – and it plays a bit like a Nazi version of Rising Damp. Thursday 1 March A landmark return: David Olusoga, Mary Beard and Simon Schama Credit: BBC Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm Almost 50 years after changing the face of arts programming with the landmark series Civilisation, BBC Two returns with an expanded brief and all the bells and whistles of modern film-making, from drone cameras to infra-red photography. With nine episodes split between presenters Simon Schama (five), David Olusoga and Mary Beard (two each), Civilisations promises an opinionated overview of global art and culture. It opens with a striking sequence in which Schama – helming this first part – explores what has been lost and salvaged from the Isil pillage of Palmyra. From there, we’re whisked to Africa’s Cape coast and the first evidence of mankind’s creativity 77,000 years ago. Then it’s a breathless gallop through the millennia, alighting at the first settlements and depictions of the human face. Among the cave art, Mayan stairways and fertility fetishes, the real treasure is an astonishing Mycenaean Sealstone, jaw-dropping in its anatomical detail and artistic accomplishment. While it won’t have the same impact as the original series (what could?), Civilisations looks to be just as learned, accessible and thrilling as its predecessor – the whole series will be available on BBC iPlayer at 10.00pm. Gabriel Tate The Cruise: Voyage to Alaska ITV, 8.30pm; not Wales Over three episodes, the five-star luxury liner Star Princess and its redoubtable crew travels to the northernmost American state – where they encounter difficult weather, navigational challenges and problem passengers. Weinstein: the Inside Story BBC One, 9.00pm In collaboration with PBS America’s Frontline current-affairs strand, Panorama examines the fall of Harvey Weinstein and the lengths to which the disgraced Hollywood producer would go to keep his alleged bullying, threats and sexual assaults private. Speaking to insiders, the team builds a troubling picture of industry complicity. From Ice to Fire: the Incredible Science of Temperature BBC Four, 9.00pm Dr Helen Czerski concludes her excellent series with fire, and how its harnessing played a pivotal role in human evolution and survival, from essentials such as toolmaking and mining to relative fripperies such as hot-air balloons. The moment that Czerski triggers a lightning strike at a high-voltage laboratory carries a genuine frisson; as is customary with most BBC Four films, the presentation is lively and the science deftly handled. Serial Killer with Piers Morgan ITV, 9.00pm How do you follow interviewing Donald Trump? Piers Morgan returns to the less contentious turf of more one-to-ones with convicted murderers behind bars. He begins with Lorenzo Gilyard, the so-called Kansas City Strangler, who remains unremorseful after allegedly killing 13 women and girls over almost two decades. Panic at 30,000 Feet: Airline Emergency Channel 5, 9.00pm This nightmare-inducing new series explores what happens when flights go wrong, from mid-air collisions to runway explosions. GT Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 11.45pm The penultimate episode of this often disturbing and insightful series revisits Oak Creek, Wisconsin, where white supremacist Michael Page killed six and injured four at a Sikh temple, before killing himself, in 2012. For once, there is a vaguely positive denouement: Page’s brutality had the opposite to its intended effect and brought the community closer together. GT Jubal (1956) ★★★★☆ Film4, 12.40pm Ernest Borgnine stars in this brooding western shot in the Grand Teton mountains of Wyoming, which reworks the plot of Othello. Borgnine stars as a cattle rancher with a much younger wife (Valerie French), who is driven into a jealous rage when cattlehand Rod Steiger suggests that she is having an affair with young drifter Jubal (a magnificent Glenn Ford). Murder is most definitely on the cards. Pitch Perfect (2012) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm The world of collegiate a cappella singing contests can’t be as heartless as Jason Moore’s sour comedy would have us believe. Anna Kendrick stars as Beca, an angst-ridden outsider who must shake up her uninspiring and monotonous group, while trying to handle how weird they all are. And, of course, there’s a handsome man (Skylar Astin) who catches her eye. It’s a little like Glee but without the schmaltz. The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Clint Eastwood directs and stars in this warm-hearted marvellous western adapted from Forrest Carter’s novel and set during the American Civil War. Eastwood plays the Missouri farmer who, driven by memories of his family’s slaughter, becomes an outlaw when he refuses to join his Confederate comrades in surrender, in favour of seeking revenge on the men who murdered his kin. Friday 2 March Searching for the truth: Lydia Wilson as Matilda Credit: BBC Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm After last week’s hiatus because of the Six Nations rugby, it’s back to small-town Wales for another dose of supernatural country-house shenanigans. When we last saw fragile but determined musician Matilda (Lydia Wilson), she’d suffered the double whammy of finding her would-be mother Rose (Claire Rushbrook) unconscious in the bath and learning that mute Aunt Meredith (Jane Thorne) had died on the verge of offering up her secrets. How did Matilda react? By mysteriously blacking out and bashing her beloved cello against a cupboard. In the fourth episode then, she looks for connections between her mental health and Carys’s disappearance. And some clues emerge: Matilda meets dishevelled local Laura (Anastasia Hille), who claims to hear voices informing her of Carys’s fate, and back at the mansion, she comes across some old tomes detailing rituals to unlock the past. Even with its heavily scored bumps and shudders, Requiem can’t quite sustain its early Hammer Horror appeal. The strong performances and some genuinely chilling moments keep things compelling however, not least in the spine-tingling climax of this episode. Toby Dantzic Flint Town Netflix, from today Back in 2014, a cost-cutting exercise left thousands of homes in Flint, Michigan, with contaminated drinking water for years. This new eight-part documentary looks at the fallout from the crisis through the eyes of Flint’s beleaguered police force, who face an uphill struggle – the community needs their support but are also deeply mistrustful of those in authority, plus dwindling resources makes the officers’ jobs harder still. MasterChef BBC One, 7.30pm Having survived the cooking contest’s opening week, the six heat winners face food critic William Sitwell in this first quarter-final. He challenges them to conjure up a standout pudding showcasing either alcohol or spices. Love Your Garden ITV, 8.00pm; not STV/UTV/Wales This week, Alan Titchmarsh and his team are in Bidewell, Devon, helping Tamsyn and Alex Wood who returned to the UK from France after Alex suffered a brain injury. The aim is to turn the Woods’ garden into a coastal sanctuary inspired by Alex’s passion for surfing. The Yorkshire Steam Railway: All Aboard Channel 5, 8.00pm As amiable as its title suggests, this new documentary series follows the lives of those who work on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, one of the country’s most popular steam railways. In this series’ opener, the new season begins with the arrival of star engine Royal Scot, on loan from London. Tones, Drones and Arpeggios: The Magic of Minimalism BBC Four, 9.00pm Conductor Charles Hazlewood explores minimalism, which he argues is the most important musical form of the 20th century. In the fascinating opener of this two-part series, he unpicks the construction of these sometimes confounding sounds and tracks down the genre’s avant-garde pioneers, who brought their mesmeric, spirituality-inspired compositions from California to New York in the Sixties. TD Jo Brand: Secrets of Her Success Channel 5, 10.30pm Channel 5’s celebration of funny women continues with this absorbing profile of the pioneering doyenne of deadpan, Jo Brand. This charts her career from its rocky start on the male-dominated stand-up circuit to her much-admired hospital sitcom Getting On. TD Gladiator (2000) ★★★★★ Film4, 9.00pm This take on the traditional swords-and-sandals epic proved that Russell Crowe deserved to be recognised as a mainstream star, and reaffirmed Ridley Scott’s reputation as a first-rate director. Crowe is Maximus, a former Roman general who rebuilds his career as a gladiator. His bid for vengeance against a vile emperor (Joaquin Phoenix) is compelling. Plus there’s a last hurrah from Oliver Reed. Blades of Glory (2007) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm;N Ireland, 12.05am You might think that the sequinned world of figure skating is beyond parody, but here Will Ferrell and Jon Heder serve up a zestfully preposterous comedy. Both play rival Olympic ice skaters, Ferrell a loose-living maverick, Heder a prissy perfectionist, who are slung out of the sport but use a loophole to return as an erotic all-male pairing. Amy Poehler co-stars. A Hijacking (2012) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.55pm Tobias Lindholm’s vigorously intelligent hostage thriller, set on board a besieged ship in the Indian Ocean, deftly moves his story between the boat and the shipping company’s offices, where Søren Malling’s frazzled CEO attempts to thrash out a bargain. On the other end of the line is the Somalis’ translator. Flies buzz, sweat trickles, negotiations continue, and you feel your breath dry up. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
What's on TV tonight: Gogglebox and The Old Grey Whistle Test Live
Friday 23 February Gogglebox Channel 4, 9.00pm We all know that Gogglebox won’t be the same this time around. One of the great joys of watching the armchair TV critic show, which returns for its 11th series, was the always warm, occasionally bickering relationship between straight-talking Liverpudlian couple, Leon and June Bernicoff. But, sadly, Leon died last December following a short illness and June recently confirmed that she won’t be taking part without him. So, in the absence of Leon’s notoriously unvarnished views (on chef Jamie Oliver: “‘Oh he’s a d---head”), what can we expect? Probably business as usual. After all, the show has survived the loss of popular families before, from everyone’s favourite posh couple, Steph and Dom, to the gloriously opinionated Scarlett Moffatt. Our guesses: the lovely Siddiquis will continue to be the most well-adjusted family, hairdressers Stephen and Christopher will trot out the most-pointed one-liners, Welsh couple Dave and Shirley will bring the giggles, even though it remains a mystery just how Dave watches TV in that very uncomfortable-looking position, and we still won’t be able to work out how many dogs the Malones actually have. SH Live Winter Olympics 2018 BBC One and BBC Two, from 6.00am Day 14 sees the semi-finals of the men’s ice hockey and the women’s curling competition, plus the final of the men’s 1,000 m speed skating. SH An Island Parish: After the Hurricane BBC Two, 9.00pm Sophie Okonedo narrates this special edition of the series which looks at the long-term effects of Hurricane Irma on the Caribbean island of Anguilla. Among those who lost everything are Simone Connor and her father Neville, who ran a restaurant and leisure complex on the island. SH Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm Now is the perfect time to jump back on the Will & Grace bandwagon as the wonderful Nick Offerman (the real-life husband of Megan Mullally, who plays Karen) guest stars as baker Jackson Boudreaux, aka the Bad Boy of Bread. Offerman is a scene-stealing delight and the final moments offer a lovely pay-off. SH Joan Rivers: By Her friends Channel 5, 10.30pm Anyone who saw the brilliant comedy The Marvellous Mrs Maisel, which was inspired by the late Joan Rivers’s early career, will know that the comedian’s domestic-focused stand-up routines were unlike anything that the audiences of that time had heard before. This tribute puts that ground-breaking career in context. SH The Tick Amazon Prime, from today Peter Serafinowicz’s goofy blue superhero returns for another series of misadventures. As with the last time, the series stands and falls with Serafinowicz’s performance: his morally upstanding but bizarre caped crusader has enough charm to paper over plot cracks. SH Seven Seconds Netflix, from today This new crime-drama series from Veena Sud, the writer behind the US version of The Killing, explores grief, deceit and social injustice. Starring Regina King, it focuses on the fallout from the death of a young boy who was injured by a police officer. SH The Old Grey Whistle Test Live: For One Night Only BBC Four, 9.00pm Bob Harris, who fronted The Old Grey Whistle Test from 1972-1978, returns with this event marking 30 years since the end of music show. This one-off includes live performances and interviews with fans and former presenters. SH Mute (2018) Netflix, from today True Blood alumnus Alexander Skarsgård plays Leo, the titular mute in Duncan Jones’s sci-fi thriller, which the director describes as a spiritual sequel to 2009’s Moon. Leo Beiler, a bartender with a violent past, searches for his missing girlfriend Naadirah (Seyneb Saleh) in a futuristic, neon-lit Berlin. He crosses paths with a pair of US army surgeons, brilliantly named Cactus Bill and Duck Teddington (played by Paul Rudd and Justin Theroux), on a mission of their own. X-Men: First Class (2011) ★★★☆☆ E4, 9.00pm Telepathic Charles Xavier (James McAvoy) bonds with metal-bending death camp survivor Erik Lehnsherr (Michael Fassbender) and the two of them track down other mutants to confront evil Nazi Sebastian Shaw (Kevin Bacon) when he triggers the Cuban Missile Crisis. Matthew Vaughn is much more comfortable with the small-scale character stuff than the action climax, but this prequel is mostly a lot of fun. While We’re Young (2014) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm A couple’s doomed attempt to recapture their youth gives Ben Stiller and Naomi Watts a new lease of comic life in Noah Baumbach’s sparkling film. Baumbach packs it with the wit and vigour of a polished one-act play as co-stars Adam Driver and Amanda Seyfried, playing hat-wearing hipsters, deliver punchlines that can’t help but remind you of Woody Allen at his peak. Saturday 24 February Loadsa laughs: Ant McPartlin and Declan Donnelly Credit: ITV Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway ITV, 7.00pm Anthony McPartlin and Declan Donnelly, the undisputed kings of Saturday night TV – never more so since they won the inaugural Bruce Forsyth Entertainment gong, among others, at the National Television Awards last month – return with a 16th series of their popular show. Packed full of comedy, audience participation, prize giveaways, celebrity guests, exclusive performances and madcap stunts, this is high-octane entertainment, with barely time to draw breath between items. Tonight, Kylie Minogue gives a first performance of her latest single and revisits some of her biggest hits, Britain’s Got Talent judge Amanda Holden falls victim to the first Undercover prank of the series and Olly Murs takes on the role of guest announcer in the End of Show Show. The hosts themselves, meanwhile, put the pedal to the floor for a daredevil Ant vs Dec monster truck challenge, and reprise their roles as super sleuths in a new comedy whodunit (with an all-star cast that includes Joanna Lumley, Michael Sheen, Emilia Fox and David Walliams) while sidekicks Scarlett Moffatt and Stephen Mulhern are out on the streets looking for people to plays games with. And that’s just for starters. Gerard O’Donovan Live Winter Olympics 2018 BBC One and BBC Two, from 6.00am It’s the penultimate day and there’s major Team GB interest as the four-man bobsleigh gets under way. However, most eyes will be on the curling, which has proved rather popular in these Games, as the men’s gold and women’s bronze medals are decided. There’s also action in the snowboarding and skiing. Six Nations Rugby Union: Ireland v Wales ITV, 1.30pm After their 12-6 defeat against England at Twickenham, Wales travel to Ireland, with Dan Biggar starting at fly-half, and Liam Williams and Leigh Halfpenny also returning after injury. Ireland have won two from two, beating France in Paris, before enjoying an eight-try buffet at Italy’s expense in a 56-19 victory. The visitors are unbeaten in their last three Six Nations matches against Ireland, but were held to a 16-16 draw when the sides last met here two years ago. Six Nations Rugby Union: Scotland v England BBC One, 4.00pm Tough one for England, this. Yes, they’ve won nine of the last 10 matches against Scotland, drawing the other one, but the pressure cauldron that is Murrayfield is never an easy place to visit, and they’ll have their tails up after an impressive 32-26 win against France. Still, according to head coach Gregor Townsend, Scotland will need to produce their “best-ever performance” if they are to triumph against England in the Calcutta Cup. Eddie Jones’s team beat Wales 12-6 thanks to two first-half tries by Jonny May, but were forced to hang on grimly in the frenetic closing stages as they set a new championship record for consecutive home wins (15, dating back to 2012). When these sides met in the tournament last year, England thrashed Scotland 61-21 at Twickenham. Churchill’s Darkest Decision More4, 7.55pm Fans of the hit film Darkest Hour will appreciate this documentary about another big Churchill dilemma. In 1940, following the fall of France, Germany was poised to seize the entire French fleet, making Hitler’s threat to invade Britain ever graver. Drastic measures were called for, but at a tragically high cost. David Attenborough’s Natural Curiosities BBC Two, 8.00pm Creatures with remarkable navigation skills are the focus of tonight’s edition, looking at how dung beetles use the Sun, Moon and stars as compass points, and how pigeons recall complex routes. Britain at Low Tide Channel 4, 8.00pm More stories from our shoreline as Tori Herridge visits Dorset, where she finds the home of the world’s first aircraft carrier and searches for an Iron Age monument that can only be seen for a few hours each year. Troy: Fall of a City BBC One, 9.10pm All hell breaks loose in this second episode when Helen’s (Bella Dayne) husband Menelaus finds out what Paris (Louis Hunter) took back to Troy. His enraged brother Agamemnon (Johnny Harris) calls all Greece to war, but when they fail to propitiate the gods, there’s a shocking price to pay. GO Mosaic Sky Atlantic, 10.00pm Steven Soderbergh’s crime drama starring Sharon Stone provoked a blizzard of publicity on its release last year in mobile app format. HBO’s six-part “linear” TV version is obviously less innovative (the app works like an interactive movie where the user can choose from which perspective the plot is viewed), but it still has plenty to offer. In this second episode, the backstory continues to play out as author Olivia Lake’s (Stone) relationships with lover Eric (Frederick Weller) and lodger Joel (Garrett Hedlund) become ever more tangled. GO Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2 (2013) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 5.00pm In this sequel to the 2009 animation based on the 1978 children’s book, inventor Flint Lockwood (voiced by Bill Hader) and friends must rescue the island of Swallow Falls from being overrun by food-mutated animals. It’s no triumph of screenwriting or subtext, but it’s a feast of ingeniously rendered gastronomic insanity and kids will absolutely love it. The Heat (2013) ★★★★☆ E4, 9.00pm Bridesmaids director Paul Feig brings back one of that film’s stars, Melissa McCarthy, as a foul-mouthed Boston cop whose policing style, aided by a fridge full of armaments, makes Dirty Harry look like Thumbelina. She’s paired with a goody-two-shoes FBI agent (Sandra Bullock reminding us what a pro she is at comedy). Together, they’re dynamite, plus the film has an emotional clout that hits you seemingly from nowhere. Philomena (2013) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.00pm; not Northern Ireland This true story is based on the experiences of journalist Martin Sixsmith (Steve Coogan), who helped Philomena Lee (Judi Dench), an Irish woman in her seventies, search for the son that she was forced to put up for adoption 50 years earlier. Stephen Frears’s film is charming and hard-hitting, delivering some tough emotional blows as well as some harsh truths about the Catholic Church’s past. Sunday 25 February Curiouser and curiouser: Holliday Grainger and Tom Burke Credit: BBC Strike: Career of Evil BBC One, 9.00pm Rumpled PI Cormoran Strike (Tom Burke) and his trusty Girl Friday Robin Ellacott (Holliday Grainger) return for the third of JK Rowling’s Robert Galbraith novels. It’s a few months after the events of The Silkworm and Strike and Robin have settled into an easy working partnership, albeit one that remains a little too cosy for Robin’s smarmy fiancé Matthew (Kerr Logan). Then Robin receives a gruesome present in the post and our intrepid duo found themselves caught up in an investigation that swiftly hits far too close to home. Career of Evil is the most tightly plotted of the Galbraith books and this well-paced opening episode neatly sets up the (plentiful) twists to come. That said, the real enjoyment comes not from the story but from the fantastic chemistry between Grainger and Burke, who bring an immense amount of warmth and charm to their scenes. Indeed, so successfully do they inhabit the roles that it’s frustrating to realise that, with no more Galbraith books currently published, this will be the last Strike for a while. It’s a genuine shame: if ever a TV adaptation deserved to be spun away from its source material it’s this one. Sarah Hughes ODI cricket: New Zealand v England Sky Sports Main Event, 12.30am You’ll have to stay up late to see this opening one-day international of the five-match series. England, having beaten the Aussies in their last ODI series, will fancy their chances. Young, Welsh and Pretty Minted BBC Three, from 10.00am The makers of Young, Welsh and Pretty Skint return with a new series focusing on a group of would-be entrepreneurs, including a YouTuber with 1.7 million subscribers and an image-obsessed Instagram influencer. Live Winter Olympics 2018 Closing Ceremony BBC Two, from 11.00am The Olympics bow out, allowing us to recall the heartbreak (Team GB’s Elise Christie’s wipeout in the speedskating final) and joy (American snowboarder Chloe Kim’s megawatt smile). K-pop star CL and boy band EXO take part in the ceremony which has a fusion theme, before the flag is handed over to Beijing for 2022. Premier League Football: Manchester United v Chelsea Sky Sports Main Event, 1.00pm With both sides struggling for consistency – United lost at Newcastle a fortnight ago, while Chelsea were trounced 4-1 by Watford earlier this month – today’s match at Old Trafford should be a tentative affair. Carabao Cup Final: Arsenal v Manchester City Sky Sports Main Event, 4.00pm Proving that the League Cup is having something of a resurgence, Arsenal and Manchester City are this year’s finalists, with the former aiming to win the trophy for the first time since 1993. City are favourites, though: imperious in the league, they also have form in the Carabao Cup, having won it in 2014 and 2016. Top Gear BBC Two, 8.00pm The petrolhead’s special returns with Matt LeBlanc promising increased family appeal. The new team of LeBlanc, Chris Harris and Rory Reid have decent chemistry and if this was your sort of thing then it probably remains so. Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble BBC Four, 8.00pm Few programmes are as inspiring as this one about cellist Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble, an ever-changing group of over 50 artists who perform alongside Ma. In addition to highlighting some phenomenal talents – Galician bagpiper Cristina Pato almost steals the show – the film details the hardships that they’ve faced, including revolution and exile. Anchoring it all is former child prodigy Ma: “I think when I was a kid a lot of things just happened,” he notes as footage shows him performing as a child for President Kennedy. “I’m always trying to figure out who I am and where I fit in the world.” SH Hannibal’s Elephant Army: The New Evidence Channel 4, 8.00pm Why did Carthaginian general Hannibal cross the Alps on a seemingly impossible journey with an army of 40,000 soldiers, 9,000 cavalry officers and 37 elephants? This fascinating film examines the evidence. Life and Death Row: The Mass Execution BBC Two, 9.00pm The harrowing series continues to turn a microscopic eye on all aspects of the death penalty. Tonight it’s the case of Stacey Johnson, on death row for 23 years. His stepdaughter insists on his innocence; his victim’s daughter says she’s sure that he’s a guilty man. SH Clouds of Sils Maria (2014) ★★★★☆ BBC Four, 9.30pm A complex, bewitching and fearlessly intelligent psychological fondue from France’s Olivier Assayas, with Juliet Binoche and Kristen Stewart as a famous actress and her diligent and devoted personal assistant, prepping for a play that shapes the drama of their own lives in its likeness. Playful and addictively strange, with career-best work from Stewart. Shutter Island (2010) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 11.05pm Martin Scorsese’s follow-up to The Departed, is, like that film, based on a novel by Dennis Lehane. He delves into gothic noir in this mystery thriller as detective Daniels (Leonardo DiCaprio) investigates the disappearance of an inmate from a prison for the clinically insane with the help of his partner (played brilliantly by Mark Ruffalo). This is a gripping story with some bold twists, although it eventually loses momentum. Point Break (1991) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 11.30pm; Scotland, 12.30am Kathryn Bigelow’s cult surfing/crime film elevated Patrick Swayze’s actor status to true action hero. Keanu Reeves plays Johnny Utah, an FBI agent who goes undercover to infiltrate a gang of bankrobbing surfers led by the charismatic Bodhi (Swayze). The action heats up when Bodhi and Utah find they share a similar attitude towards danger. Lori Petty is the surfer who catches Johnny’s eye. Monday 26 February Body snatched? Greg Kinnear as the father Credit: Channel 4 Electric Dreams: The Father Thing Channel 4, 10.00pm After a first run split pretty evenly between stunners and misfires, the final four adaptations of short stories from pulp sci-fi icon Philip K Dick begins with a heavily derivative but entertaining piece from Michael Dinner, showrunner of excellent modern western Justified. The setting is an unnamed Midwest town, where young baseball-loving Charlie (Jack Gore) lives with his parents, hangs out with three other misfits and avoids the bullies; it’s as cosily familiar a slice of apple-pie Americana as you could find. And then the aftermath of a meteor shower causes Charlie to suspect that some of the town’s inhabitants may have been replaced by aliens, his own father (Greg Kinnear) included. Based more directly than some of its predecessors on Dick’s original story, this cannot help but nod to Invasion of the Body Snatchers, although the Cold War paranoia replaced by… what, exactly? There’s a parable of father-son relations in here, along with an allegory of divorce and a Stranger Things-influenced romp, but it shows its hand a little early, never settles on a tone and features a climax that will split opinion down the middle. That said, it’s never less than diverting. Gabriel Tate This Country BBC Three, from 10.00am Series one of Charlie and Daisy May Cooper’s mockumentary transcended its obvious debt to The Office to become a touching, acutely observed and defiant portrait of life on the margins in rural Britain. Importantly, it was also very funny, finding bathos and humour in the efforts of gormless cousins Kurtan and Kerry Mucklowe (played by the Coopers) to amuse themselves in a Cotswolds village. Thankfully, almost nothing has changed for this second series, although Kurtan has found a girlfriend and Kerry hitherto unknown charitable instincts. Shakespeare & Hathaway: Private Investigators BBC One, 2.15pm Jo Joyner and Mark Benton are perfectly cast in this amiable new 10-part series as Lu Shakespeare, wrongly suspected of killing her fiancé, and Frank Hathaway, the slobbish PI she ropes in to clear her name. The odd-couple chemistry is there from the start and Stratford-upon-Avon looks glorious – making this a welcome addition to the afternoon schedules. Hollywood in Vienna: the Sound of Space & Alexandre Desplat Sky Arts, 8.00pm This gala performance loosely based on a journey through the universe includes Parisian composer Alexandre Desplat’s melodies for movies, including Twilight and The Grand Budapest Hotel, as well as legendary scores from Star Wars to E.T. GT Classic Mary Berry BBC One, 8.30pm Cherish the unlikely sight of the former Bake Off judge partaking in a little “caveman cooking” in this latest rebranding of Mary Berry’s line in home-cooking, with the opener focusing on comfort food. MasterChef BBC One, 9.00pm The 11th run of the enduringly popular cooking contest begins with the first seven contestants creating dishes using ingredients including beef mince and duck breasts for John Torode, Gregg Wallace and some former finalists. The Unstoppable Flying Scotsman Channel 5, 9.00pm The world’s most famous steam locomotive is profiled in this two-parter from Rob Bell, always a reassuring translator of technical geekery for a mainstream audience. Here, he explores its origins and enduring appeal. GT Ice Cold in Alex (1958, b/w) ★★★★☆ Film4, 4.20pm J Lee Thompson’s tense British wartime thriller is one of the classics of the black-and-white era and richly entertaining. John Mills shines as Captain Anson, who dreams of an ice-cold glass of lager while escorting Britons across the desert to Alexandria during the Second World War. The film makes some interesting points about patriotism, as we learn Anson is unaware that he’s harbouring a traitor. Alien Resurrection (1997) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Sigourney Weaver returns as heroine Ellen Ripley for this fourth film in the franchise. Two hundred years have passed since Alien 3, and Ripley has now been cloned by scientists, which gives her greater strength but also conflicting loyalties, meaning we’re not sure that we can trust her. Despite the talent on board (Weaver, screenwriter Joss Whedon and director Jean-Pierre Jeunot), this is a poor effort. Elysium (2013) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 11.00pm Neill Blomkamp’s (District 9) intelligent sci-fi thriller has a fire in its belly and stars a brawny Matt Damon as a factory worker who scrapes out a living on the Earth’s crust. He’s involved in an accident but the medical care that he needs is on space station Elysium. Blomkamp focuses on faith, capitalism and private healthcare – in lesser hands, the film might have played out like a Lib Dem manifesto with spaceships. Tuesday 27 February Surrounded by splendour: Alan Titchmarsh Secrets of the National Trust with Alan Titchmarsh Channel 5, 8.00pm A tale of “female empowerment, politics and a fight for the throne of England itself” is how Alan Titchmarsh, opening a second series showcasing the National Trust’s finest properties, describes the history of Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire. Certainly, the story of Elizabeth Talbot, Countess of Shrewsbury (aka Bess of Hardwick), and how four strategic marriages helped her to become one of the most powerful women in Elizabethan England, is a fascinating one. And the glorious house she built in the 1590s, with vast facades of glass and sumptuous decor, was doubtless a marvel of the age. Whether you think Titchmarsh does either of them justice will depend on how much detail you like in a documentary, and how much repetition (you won’t possess enough fingers to count how often he mentions that Bess’s initials and coat of arms decorate the high parapet of the house) and “coming up next” you can bear. Either way, there are plenty of glories to gaze upon, so if you’re unlikely to get a chance to visit Hardwick Hall in person, the fine filming shows off the house and its grounds in considerable splendour. Gerard O’Donovan How to Get Fit Fast Channel 4, 8.00pm Anna Richardson and Amar Latif put the emphasis on fitness rather than weight loss in this new series exploring the off-the-shelf plans available, hoping to point viewers towards the exercise regime that suits them best. 100 Years Younger in 21 Days ITV, 9.00pm Eight well-worn famous faces attempt to turn the clock back at a “rejuvenation” clinic in Sardinia. June Brown, Sherrie Hewson, Claire King, Sid Owen, Roy Walker, Russell Grant, Googlebox’s Sandra Martin and music legend Shaun Ryder are among thoses hoping to knock off years without going under the knife. The FGM Detectives Channel 4, 10.00pm Despite the global efforts to ban the practice, female genital mutilation (FGM) continues to affect millions of women. Here Cathy Newman leads a two-year investigation into FGM in the UK, which is estimated to put 20,000 young British women at risk every year. Acid Attack: My Story BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm Naomi Oni recounts the horrific acid attack that left her with life-altering injuries in 2012, and how the police investigation (which, unbelievably, initially focused on whether she had inflicted the wounds on herself) proved the attacker to be a childhood friend. GO Unreal Amazon Prime, from today A drama playing on the fakeness, dubious ethics and behind-the-scenes manipulation of a hit reality TV dating show, UnREAL is nothing if not a series for our times. As the third season begins, Everlasting’s producer Rachel (Shiri Appleby) is getting her life back on track, despite her ruthless boss Quinn (Constance Zimmer) ramping up the pressure to deliver the show’s most outrageous season yet. Divorce Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm Sarah Jessica Parker returns with a second season of the bleak and bitingly funny comedy about the painful break-up of an American middle-class couple’s marriage. At least that’s what series one, created and partly written by the Sharon Horgan, was about. Season two, minus Horgan’s input, takes on a distinctly lighter tone as both Frances (Parker) and her now ex-husband Robert (Thomas Haden Church) begin tentatively to negotiate the possibilities of life post divorce. GO Charade (1963) ★★★★☆ Film4, 2.25pm Audrey Hepburn as a temperamental-but-alluring damsel in distress and Cary Grant as a shadowy charmer are characters that the actors played many times. But they do so exceptionally in this suspense comedy from Stanley Donen, often referred to as the best Hitchcock movie that Hitchcock never made. Hepburn is the widow being trailed by four men hunting for her late husband’s stolen fortune. Black Swan (2010) ★★★★★ Film4, 11.25pm Darren Aronofsky’s film is delirious hokum and high-class trash. Natalie Portman stars as Nina Sayers, a young dancer with the New York City Ballet preparing for a production of Swan Lake choreographed by the charismatic Thomas Leroy (Vincent Cassel). He is unconvinced by Nina’s ability to portray the passion of the Black Swan and her efforts to convince him lead her towards madness. Christine (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 11.50pm The story of Christine Chubbuck, a Florida newsreader who shot herself on air in 1974, is shocking and unfathomably sad. But it wouldn’t be worth retelling on film if it didn’t illuminate something. It asks a top-notch Rebecca Hall to play out the last days of Chubbuck’s life and dares us to hope that it’s about a different woman – one who made it out the other side of her own tragedy. Wednesday 28 February Victim: Édgar Ramírez as Versace Credit: BBC The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story BBC Two, 9.00pm Ryan Murphy’s true crime series follows up 2016’s dramatisation of the OJ Simpson trial with the story of serial killer Andrew Cunanan, who murdered at least five people over a three-month period, including the fashion designer Gianni Versace. Murphy and scriptwriter Tom Rob Smith use the word assassination very carefully here: the operatic opening scenes depict Versace (Édgar Ramírez) as a modern-day Medici prince, dispensing cheerful patronage to all in his Miami Beach fiefdom. By contrast, Cunanan (Darren Criss) is portrayed as a man so insecure in his own skin that he is almost physically incapable of telling the truth: “You tell gay people you’re gay and straight people you’re straight,” exclaims an exasperated friend. “I tell people what they need to hear,” comes the too-calm reply. Both Criss and Ramirez are excellent and there’s strong support from Ricky Martin as Versace’s bewildered live-in boyfriend and a perhaps slightly too-camp Penélope Cruz as Donatella. Smith’s solid script does a good job of juggling various timelines to show how this particular killer came to be. Sarah Hughes Ellie Undercover: Rent for Sex BBC Three, from 10.00am Investigative journalist Ellie Flynn presents this look at the growing number of unscrupulous landlords who offer rent-free accommodation in exchange for sex. It’s hard not to feel utterly dispirited as Flynn meets vulnerable women such as Chloe, who feels so trapped by her homelessness that she’s in no position to say no to these men. Athletics: The World Indoor Championships BBC Two, 7.00pm The four-day World Indoor Championships, which takes place at Arena Birmingham, kicks off on Thursday, featuring three events in the first evening session – including Team GB’s Laura Muir and Eilish McColgan in the final of the women’s 3,000 m. Events continue from 9.00am on Friday, with Greg Rutherford’s long jump bid among the highlights. The World’s Most Extraordinary Homes BBC Two, 8.00pm For those of us who enjoy gawping at other people’s homes, few programmes are more satisfying than this series presented by Caroline Quentin and architect Piers Taylor. Tonight the duo are in Portugal poking their noses into four very different properties. The Supervet Channel 4, 8.00pm Professor Noel Fitzpatrick and the team returns for a new round of veterinary problems, including a very excitable Labrador who requires elbow replacement surgery and a Jackahuahua puppy who needs to have spinal surgery after an attack in the park. Benidorm ITV, 9.00pm Hold on to your sunhats as ITV’s long-running Costa Blanca comedy returns for a 10th series with comedians Hale & Pace joining the cast as a pair of undercover cops. Elsewhere, Joyce (Sherrie Hewson) and Monty’s (John Challis) big day arrives. Save Me Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Don’t let the fact that it features yet another missing child put you off the week’s best new drama. Written by and starring Lennie James, Save Me tells the tale of Nelly (James), an ageing wide-boy of suspect charms, who finds himself in trouble after his estranged teenage daughter disappears. We’ve all met people like Nelly, the easy smiles hiding their sharp edges, and James does a wonderful job of making us warm to him despite the distrust. There’s strong support, too, from Suranne Jones as the missing girl’s mother. SH Film 2018 BBC One, 11.15pm; Wales, 11.35pm; NI, 12.10am The BBC’s long-running film series returns with an opening episode hosted by Radio 1’s Clara Amfo alongside critics Ellen E Jones and Larushka Ivan-Zadeh. The focus this week is on next Sunday’s Academy Awards, plus an interview with Lady Bird’s Oscar-nominated director, Greta Gerwig. SH The Quiet Man (1952) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.00pm Best known for his sombre westerns, John Ford turns personal for this wonderful romantic comedy which was considered a risky venture but went on to win the director his fourth Oscar. It tells the story of a boxer who falls in love with the sister of a bully. The famous grab-and-kiss scene between the smouldering John Wayne and love interest Maureen O’Hara (the “Queen of Technicolour”) also appears in E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. Big Eyes (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Amy Adams is ideally cast as the browbeaten artist Margaret Keane who, for eight years, churned out iconic, highly sought after paintings, only for her con artist husband (Christoph Waltz) to take all the credit. Tim Burton’s take on this curious real-life tale of curdled suburbia sadly lacks Adams’s subtlety: even the usually restrained Waltz is caught up in the blunt, overly stylised kookiness. Good (2008) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.50pm Viggo Mortensen gives a thoughtful performance as a German professor whose ideas about euthanasia are adopted by the Nazis. It’s only when he becomes a concentration camp inspector that he grasps the horror of his ideas. Vicente Amorim’s adaptation of CP Taylor’s play doesn’t shirk big questions, but he tends to fall back on clichés – hammerings on the piano, etc – and it plays a bit like a Nazi version of Rising Damp. Thursday 1 March A landmark return: David Olusoga, Mary Beard and Simon Schama Credit: BBC Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm Almost 50 years after changing the face of arts programming with the landmark series Civilisation, BBC Two returns with an expanded brief and all the bells and whistles of modern film-making, from drone cameras to infra-red photography. With nine episodes split between presenters Simon Schama (five), David Olusoga and Mary Beard (two each), Civilisations promises an opinionated overview of global art and culture. It opens with a striking sequence in which Schama – helming this first part – explores what has been lost and salvaged from the Isil pillage of Palmyra. From there, we’re whisked to Africa’s Cape coast and the first evidence of mankind’s creativity 77,000 years ago. Then it’s a breathless gallop through the millennia, alighting at the first settlements and depictions of the human face. Among the cave art, Mayan stairways and fertility fetishes, the real treasure is an astonishing Mycenaean Sealstone, jaw-dropping in its anatomical detail and artistic accomplishment. While it won’t have the same impact as the original series (what could?), Civilisations looks to be just as learned, accessible and thrilling as its predecessor – the whole series will be available on BBC iPlayer at 10.00pm. Gabriel Tate The Cruise: Voyage to Alaska ITV, 8.30pm; not Wales Over three episodes, the five-star luxury liner Star Princess and its redoubtable crew travels to the northernmost American state – where they encounter difficult weather, navigational challenges and problem passengers. Weinstein: the Inside Story BBC One, 9.00pm In collaboration with PBS America’s Frontline current-affairs strand, Panorama examines the fall of Harvey Weinstein and the lengths to which the disgraced Hollywood producer would go to keep his alleged bullying, threats and sexual assaults private. Speaking to insiders, the team builds a troubling picture of industry complicity. From Ice to Fire: the Incredible Science of Temperature BBC Four, 9.00pm Dr Helen Czerski concludes her excellent series with fire, and how its harnessing played a pivotal role in human evolution and survival, from essentials such as toolmaking and mining to relative fripperies such as hot-air balloons. The moment that Czerski triggers a lightning strike at a high-voltage laboratory carries a genuine frisson; as is customary with most BBC Four films, the presentation is lively and the science deftly handled. Serial Killer with Piers Morgan ITV, 9.00pm How do you follow interviewing Donald Trump? Piers Morgan returns to the less contentious turf of more one-to-ones with convicted murderers behind bars. He begins with Lorenzo Gilyard, the so-called Kansas City Strangler, who remains unremorseful after allegedly killing 13 women and girls over almost two decades. Panic at 30,000 Feet: Airline Emergency Channel 5, 9.00pm This nightmare-inducing new series explores what happens when flights go wrong, from mid-air collisions to runway explosions. GT Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 11.45pm The penultimate episode of this often disturbing and insightful series revisits Oak Creek, Wisconsin, where white supremacist Michael Page killed six and injured four at a Sikh temple, before killing himself, in 2012. For once, there is a vaguely positive denouement: Page’s brutality had the opposite to its intended effect and brought the community closer together. GT Jubal (1956) ★★★★☆ Film4, 12.40pm Ernest Borgnine stars in this brooding western shot in the Grand Teton mountains of Wyoming, which reworks the plot of Othello. Borgnine stars as a cattle rancher with a much younger wife (Valerie French), who is driven into a jealous rage when cattlehand Rod Steiger suggests that she is having an affair with young drifter Jubal (a magnificent Glenn Ford). Murder is most definitely on the cards. Pitch Perfect (2012) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm The world of collegiate a cappella singing contests can’t be as heartless as Jason Moore’s sour comedy would have us believe. Anna Kendrick stars as Beca, an angst-ridden outsider who must shake up her uninspiring and monotonous group, while trying to handle how weird they all are. And, of course, there’s a handsome man (Skylar Astin) who catches her eye. It’s a little like Glee but without the schmaltz. The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Clint Eastwood directs and stars in this warm-hearted marvellous western adapted from Forrest Carter’s novel and set during the American Civil War. Eastwood plays the Missouri farmer who, driven by memories of his family’s slaughter, becomes an outlaw when he refuses to join his Confederate comrades in surrender, in favour of seeking revenge on the men who murdered his kin. Friday 2 March Searching for the truth: Lydia Wilson as Matilda Credit: BBC Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm After last week’s hiatus because of the Six Nations rugby, it’s back to small-town Wales for another dose of supernatural country-house shenanigans. When we last saw fragile but determined musician Matilda (Lydia Wilson), she’d suffered the double whammy of finding her would-be mother Rose (Claire Rushbrook) unconscious in the bath and learning that mute Aunt Meredith (Jane Thorne) had died on the verge of offering up her secrets. How did Matilda react? By mysteriously blacking out and bashing her beloved cello against a cupboard. In the fourth episode then, she looks for connections between her mental health and Carys’s disappearance. And some clues emerge: Matilda meets dishevelled local Laura (Anastasia Hille), who claims to hear voices informing her of Carys’s fate, and back at the mansion, she comes across some old tomes detailing rituals to unlock the past. Even with its heavily scored bumps and shudders, Requiem can’t quite sustain its early Hammer Horror appeal. The strong performances and some genuinely chilling moments keep things compelling however, not least in the spine-tingling climax of this episode. Toby Dantzic Flint Town Netflix, from today Back in 2014, a cost-cutting exercise left thousands of homes in Flint, Michigan, with contaminated drinking water for years. This new eight-part documentary looks at the fallout from the crisis through the eyes of Flint’s beleaguered police force, who face an uphill struggle – the community needs their support but are also deeply mistrustful of those in authority, plus dwindling resources makes the officers’ jobs harder still. MasterChef BBC One, 7.30pm Having survived the cooking contest’s opening week, the six heat winners face food critic William Sitwell in this first quarter-final. He challenges them to conjure up a standout pudding showcasing either alcohol or spices. Love Your Garden ITV, 8.00pm; not STV/UTV/Wales This week, Alan Titchmarsh and his team are in Bidewell, Devon, helping Tamsyn and Alex Wood who returned to the UK from France after Alex suffered a brain injury. The aim is to turn the Woods’ garden into a coastal sanctuary inspired by Alex’s passion for surfing. The Yorkshire Steam Railway: All Aboard Channel 5, 8.00pm As amiable as its title suggests, this new documentary series follows the lives of those who work on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, one of the country’s most popular steam railways. In this series’ opener, the new season begins with the arrival of star engine Royal Scot, on loan from London. Tones, Drones and Arpeggios: The Magic of Minimalism BBC Four, 9.00pm Conductor Charles Hazlewood explores minimalism, which he argues is the most important musical form of the 20th century. In the fascinating opener of this two-part series, he unpicks the construction of these sometimes confounding sounds and tracks down the genre’s avant-garde pioneers, who brought their mesmeric, spirituality-inspired compositions from California to New York in the Sixties. TD Jo Brand: Secrets of Her Success Channel 5, 10.30pm Channel 5’s celebration of funny women continues with this absorbing profile of the pioneering doyenne of deadpan, Jo Brand. This charts her career from its rocky start on the male-dominated stand-up circuit to her much-admired hospital sitcom Getting On. TD Gladiator (2000) ★★★★★ Film4, 9.00pm This take on the traditional swords-and-sandals epic proved that Russell Crowe deserved to be recognised as a mainstream star, and reaffirmed Ridley Scott’s reputation as a first-rate director. Crowe is Maximus, a former Roman general who rebuilds his career as a gladiator. His bid for vengeance against a vile emperor (Joaquin Phoenix) is compelling. Plus there’s a last hurrah from Oliver Reed. Blades of Glory (2007) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm;N Ireland, 12.05am You might think that the sequinned world of figure skating is beyond parody, but here Will Ferrell and Jon Heder serve up a zestfully preposterous comedy. Both play rival Olympic ice skaters, Ferrell a loose-living maverick, Heder a prissy perfectionist, who are slung out of the sport but use a loophole to return as an erotic all-male pairing. Amy Poehler co-stars. A Hijacking (2012) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.55pm Tobias Lindholm’s vigorously intelligent hostage thriller, set on board a besieged ship in the Indian Ocean, deftly moves his story between the boat and the shipping company’s offices, where Søren Malling’s frazzled CEO attempts to thrash out a bargain. On the other end of the line is the Somalis’ translator. Flies buzz, sweat trickles, negotiations continue, and you feel your breath dry up. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
Friday 23 February Gogglebox Channel 4, 9.00pm We all know that Gogglebox won’t be the same this time around. One of the great joys of watching the armchair TV critic show, which returns for its 11th series, was the always warm, occasionally bickering relationship between straight-talking Liverpudlian couple, Leon and June Bernicoff. But, sadly, Leon died last December following a short illness and June recently confirmed that she won’t be taking part without him. So, in the absence of Leon’s notoriously unvarnished views (on chef Jamie Oliver: “‘Oh he’s a d---head”), what can we expect? Probably business as usual. After all, the show has survived the loss of popular families before, from everyone’s favourite posh couple, Steph and Dom, to the gloriously opinionated Scarlett Moffatt. Our guesses: the lovely Siddiquis will continue to be the most well-adjusted family, hairdressers Stephen and Christopher will trot out the most-pointed one-liners, Welsh couple Dave and Shirley will bring the giggles, even though it remains a mystery just how Dave watches TV in that very uncomfortable-looking position, and we still won’t be able to work out how many dogs the Malones actually have. SH Live Winter Olympics 2018 BBC One and BBC Two, from 6.00am Day 14 sees the semi-finals of the men’s ice hockey and the women’s curling competition, plus the final of the men’s 1,000 m speed skating. SH An Island Parish: After the Hurricane BBC Two, 9.00pm Sophie Okonedo narrates this special edition of the series which looks at the long-term effects of Hurricane Irma on the Caribbean island of Anguilla. Among those who lost everything are Simone Connor and her father Neville, who ran a restaurant and leisure complex on the island. SH Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm Now is the perfect time to jump back on the Will & Grace bandwagon as the wonderful Nick Offerman (the real-life husband of Megan Mullally, who plays Karen) guest stars as baker Jackson Boudreaux, aka the Bad Boy of Bread. Offerman is a scene-stealing delight and the final moments offer a lovely pay-off. SH Joan Rivers: By Her friends Channel 5, 10.30pm Anyone who saw the brilliant comedy The Marvellous Mrs Maisel, which was inspired by the late Joan Rivers’s early career, will know that the comedian’s domestic-focused stand-up routines were unlike anything that the audiences of that time had heard before. This tribute puts that ground-breaking career in context. SH The Tick Amazon Prime, from today Peter Serafinowicz’s goofy blue superhero returns for another series of misadventures. As with the last time, the series stands and falls with Serafinowicz’s performance: his morally upstanding but bizarre caped crusader has enough charm to paper over plot cracks. SH Seven Seconds Netflix, from today This new crime-drama series from Veena Sud, the writer behind the US version of The Killing, explores grief, deceit and social injustice. Starring Regina King, it focuses on the fallout from the death of a young boy who was injured by a police officer. SH The Old Grey Whistle Test Live: For One Night Only BBC Four, 9.00pm Bob Harris, who fronted The Old Grey Whistle Test from 1972-1978, returns with this event marking 30 years since the end of music show. This one-off includes live performances and interviews with fans and former presenters. SH Mute (2018) Netflix, from today True Blood alumnus Alexander Skarsgård plays Leo, the titular mute in Duncan Jones’s sci-fi thriller, which the director describes as a spiritual sequel to 2009’s Moon. Leo Beiler, a bartender with a violent past, searches for his missing girlfriend Naadirah (Seyneb Saleh) in a futuristic, neon-lit Berlin. He crosses paths with a pair of US army surgeons, brilliantly named Cactus Bill and Duck Teddington (played by Paul Rudd and Justin Theroux), on a mission of their own. X-Men: First Class (2011) ★★★☆☆ E4, 9.00pm Telepathic Charles Xavier (James McAvoy) bonds with metal-bending death camp survivor Erik Lehnsherr (Michael Fassbender) and the two of them track down other mutants to confront evil Nazi Sebastian Shaw (Kevin Bacon) when he triggers the Cuban Missile Crisis. Matthew Vaughn is much more comfortable with the small-scale character stuff than the action climax, but this prequel is mostly a lot of fun. While We’re Young (2014) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm A couple’s doomed attempt to recapture their youth gives Ben Stiller and Naomi Watts a new lease of comic life in Noah Baumbach’s sparkling film. Baumbach packs it with the wit and vigour of a polished one-act play as co-stars Adam Driver and Amanda Seyfried, playing hat-wearing hipsters, deliver punchlines that can’t help but remind you of Woody Allen at his peak. Saturday 24 February Loadsa laughs: Ant McPartlin and Declan Donnelly Credit: ITV Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway ITV, 7.00pm Anthony McPartlin and Declan Donnelly, the undisputed kings of Saturday night TV – never more so since they won the inaugural Bruce Forsyth Entertainment gong, among others, at the National Television Awards last month – return with a 16th series of their popular show. Packed full of comedy, audience participation, prize giveaways, celebrity guests, exclusive performances and madcap stunts, this is high-octane entertainment, with barely time to draw breath between items. Tonight, Kylie Minogue gives a first performance of her latest single and revisits some of her biggest hits, Britain’s Got Talent judge Amanda Holden falls victim to the first Undercover prank of the series and Olly Murs takes on the role of guest announcer in the End of Show Show. The hosts themselves, meanwhile, put the pedal to the floor for a daredevil Ant vs Dec monster truck challenge, and reprise their roles as super sleuths in a new comedy whodunit (with an all-star cast that includes Joanna Lumley, Michael Sheen, Emilia Fox and David Walliams) while sidekicks Scarlett Moffatt and Stephen Mulhern are out on the streets looking for people to plays games with. And that’s just for starters. Gerard O’Donovan Live Winter Olympics 2018 BBC One and BBC Two, from 6.00am It’s the penultimate day and there’s major Team GB interest as the four-man bobsleigh gets under way. However, most eyes will be on the curling, which has proved rather popular in these Games, as the men’s gold and women’s bronze medals are decided. There’s also action in the snowboarding and skiing. Six Nations Rugby Union: Ireland v Wales ITV, 1.30pm After their 12-6 defeat against England at Twickenham, Wales travel to Ireland, with Dan Biggar starting at fly-half, and Liam Williams and Leigh Halfpenny also returning after injury. Ireland have won two from two, beating France in Paris, before enjoying an eight-try buffet at Italy’s expense in a 56-19 victory. The visitors are unbeaten in their last three Six Nations matches against Ireland, but were held to a 16-16 draw when the sides last met here two years ago. Six Nations Rugby Union: Scotland v England BBC One, 4.00pm Tough one for England, this. Yes, they’ve won nine of the last 10 matches against Scotland, drawing the other one, but the pressure cauldron that is Murrayfield is never an easy place to visit, and they’ll have their tails up after an impressive 32-26 win against France. Still, according to head coach Gregor Townsend, Scotland will need to produce their “best-ever performance” if they are to triumph against England in the Calcutta Cup. Eddie Jones’s team beat Wales 12-6 thanks to two first-half tries by Jonny May, but were forced to hang on grimly in the frenetic closing stages as they set a new championship record for consecutive home wins (15, dating back to 2012). When these sides met in the tournament last year, England thrashed Scotland 61-21 at Twickenham. Churchill’s Darkest Decision More4, 7.55pm Fans of the hit film Darkest Hour will appreciate this documentary about another big Churchill dilemma. In 1940, following the fall of France, Germany was poised to seize the entire French fleet, making Hitler’s threat to invade Britain ever graver. Drastic measures were called for, but at a tragically high cost. David Attenborough’s Natural Curiosities BBC Two, 8.00pm Creatures with remarkable navigation skills are the focus of tonight’s edition, looking at how dung beetles use the Sun, Moon and stars as compass points, and how pigeons recall complex routes. Britain at Low Tide Channel 4, 8.00pm More stories from our shoreline as Tori Herridge visits Dorset, where she finds the home of the world’s first aircraft carrier and searches for an Iron Age monument that can only be seen for a few hours each year. Troy: Fall of a City BBC One, 9.10pm All hell breaks loose in this second episode when Helen’s (Bella Dayne) husband Menelaus finds out what Paris (Louis Hunter) took back to Troy. His enraged brother Agamemnon (Johnny Harris) calls all Greece to war, but when they fail to propitiate the gods, there’s a shocking price to pay. GO Mosaic Sky Atlantic, 10.00pm Steven Soderbergh’s crime drama starring Sharon Stone provoked a blizzard of publicity on its release last year in mobile app format. HBO’s six-part “linear” TV version is obviously less innovative (the app works like an interactive movie where the user can choose from which perspective the plot is viewed), but it still has plenty to offer. In this second episode, the backstory continues to play out as author Olivia Lake’s (Stone) relationships with lover Eric (Frederick Weller) and lodger Joel (Garrett Hedlund) become ever more tangled. GO Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2 (2013) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 5.00pm In this sequel to the 2009 animation based on the 1978 children’s book, inventor Flint Lockwood (voiced by Bill Hader) and friends must rescue the island of Swallow Falls from being overrun by food-mutated animals. It’s no triumph of screenwriting or subtext, but it’s a feast of ingeniously rendered gastronomic insanity and kids will absolutely love it. The Heat (2013) ★★★★☆ E4, 9.00pm Bridesmaids director Paul Feig brings back one of that film’s stars, Melissa McCarthy, as a foul-mouthed Boston cop whose policing style, aided by a fridge full of armaments, makes Dirty Harry look like Thumbelina. She’s paired with a goody-two-shoes FBI agent (Sandra Bullock reminding us what a pro she is at comedy). Together, they’re dynamite, plus the film has an emotional clout that hits you seemingly from nowhere. Philomena (2013) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.00pm; not Northern Ireland This true story is based on the experiences of journalist Martin Sixsmith (Steve Coogan), who helped Philomena Lee (Judi Dench), an Irish woman in her seventies, search for the son that she was forced to put up for adoption 50 years earlier. Stephen Frears’s film is charming and hard-hitting, delivering some tough emotional blows as well as some harsh truths about the Catholic Church’s past. Sunday 25 February Curiouser and curiouser: Holliday Grainger and Tom Burke Credit: BBC Strike: Career of Evil BBC One, 9.00pm Rumpled PI Cormoran Strike (Tom Burke) and his trusty Girl Friday Robin Ellacott (Holliday Grainger) return for the third of JK Rowling’s Robert Galbraith novels. It’s a few months after the events of The Silkworm and Strike and Robin have settled into an easy working partnership, albeit one that remains a little too cosy for Robin’s smarmy fiancé Matthew (Kerr Logan). Then Robin receives a gruesome present in the post and our intrepid duo found themselves caught up in an investigation that swiftly hits far too close to home. Career of Evil is the most tightly plotted of the Galbraith books and this well-paced opening episode neatly sets up the (plentiful) twists to come. That said, the real enjoyment comes not from the story but from the fantastic chemistry between Grainger and Burke, who bring an immense amount of warmth and charm to their scenes. Indeed, so successfully do they inhabit the roles that it’s frustrating to realise that, with no more Galbraith books currently published, this will be the last Strike for a while. It’s a genuine shame: if ever a TV adaptation deserved to be spun away from its source material it’s this one. Sarah Hughes ODI cricket: New Zealand v England Sky Sports Main Event, 12.30am You’ll have to stay up late to see this opening one-day international of the five-match series. England, having beaten the Aussies in their last ODI series, will fancy their chances. Young, Welsh and Pretty Minted BBC Three, from 10.00am The makers of Young, Welsh and Pretty Skint return with a new series focusing on a group of would-be entrepreneurs, including a YouTuber with 1.7 million subscribers and an image-obsessed Instagram influencer. Live Winter Olympics 2018 Closing Ceremony BBC Two, from 11.00am The Olympics bow out, allowing us to recall the heartbreak (Team GB’s Elise Christie’s wipeout in the speedskating final) and joy (American snowboarder Chloe Kim’s megawatt smile). K-pop star CL and boy band EXO take part in the ceremony which has a fusion theme, before the flag is handed over to Beijing for 2022. Premier League Football: Manchester United v Chelsea Sky Sports Main Event, 1.00pm With both sides struggling for consistency – United lost at Newcastle a fortnight ago, while Chelsea were trounced 4-1 by Watford earlier this month – today’s match at Old Trafford should be a tentative affair. Carabao Cup Final: Arsenal v Manchester City Sky Sports Main Event, 4.00pm Proving that the League Cup is having something of a resurgence, Arsenal and Manchester City are this year’s finalists, with the former aiming to win the trophy for the first time since 1993. City are favourites, though: imperious in the league, they also have form in the Carabao Cup, having won it in 2014 and 2016. Top Gear BBC Two, 8.00pm The petrolhead’s special returns with Matt LeBlanc promising increased family appeal. The new team of LeBlanc, Chris Harris and Rory Reid have decent chemistry and if this was your sort of thing then it probably remains so. Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble BBC Four, 8.00pm Few programmes are as inspiring as this one about cellist Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble, an ever-changing group of over 50 artists who perform alongside Ma. In addition to highlighting some phenomenal talents – Galician bagpiper Cristina Pato almost steals the show – the film details the hardships that they’ve faced, including revolution and exile. Anchoring it all is former child prodigy Ma: “I think when I was a kid a lot of things just happened,” he notes as footage shows him performing as a child for President Kennedy. “I’m always trying to figure out who I am and where I fit in the world.” SH Hannibal’s Elephant Army: The New Evidence Channel 4, 8.00pm Why did Carthaginian general Hannibal cross the Alps on a seemingly impossible journey with an army of 40,000 soldiers, 9,000 cavalry officers and 37 elephants? This fascinating film examines the evidence. Life and Death Row: The Mass Execution BBC Two, 9.00pm The harrowing series continues to turn a microscopic eye on all aspects of the death penalty. Tonight it’s the case of Stacey Johnson, on death row for 23 years. His stepdaughter insists on his innocence; his victim’s daughter says she’s sure that he’s a guilty man. SH Clouds of Sils Maria (2014) ★★★★☆ BBC Four, 9.30pm A complex, bewitching and fearlessly intelligent psychological fondue from France’s Olivier Assayas, with Juliet Binoche and Kristen Stewart as a famous actress and her diligent and devoted personal assistant, prepping for a play that shapes the drama of their own lives in its likeness. Playful and addictively strange, with career-best work from Stewart. Shutter Island (2010) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 11.05pm Martin Scorsese’s follow-up to The Departed, is, like that film, based on a novel by Dennis Lehane. He delves into gothic noir in this mystery thriller as detective Daniels (Leonardo DiCaprio) investigates the disappearance of an inmate from a prison for the clinically insane with the help of his partner (played brilliantly by Mark Ruffalo). This is a gripping story with some bold twists, although it eventually loses momentum. Point Break (1991) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 11.30pm; Scotland, 12.30am Kathryn Bigelow’s cult surfing/crime film elevated Patrick Swayze’s actor status to true action hero. Keanu Reeves plays Johnny Utah, an FBI agent who goes undercover to infiltrate a gang of bankrobbing surfers led by the charismatic Bodhi (Swayze). The action heats up when Bodhi and Utah find they share a similar attitude towards danger. Lori Petty is the surfer who catches Johnny’s eye. Monday 26 February Body snatched? Greg Kinnear as the father Credit: Channel 4 Electric Dreams: The Father Thing Channel 4, 10.00pm After a first run split pretty evenly between stunners and misfires, the final four adaptations of short stories from pulp sci-fi icon Philip K Dick begins with a heavily derivative but entertaining piece from Michael Dinner, showrunner of excellent modern western Justified. The setting is an unnamed Midwest town, where young baseball-loving Charlie (Jack Gore) lives with his parents, hangs out with three other misfits and avoids the bullies; it’s as cosily familiar a slice of apple-pie Americana as you could find. And then the aftermath of a meteor shower causes Charlie to suspect that some of the town’s inhabitants may have been replaced by aliens, his own father (Greg Kinnear) included. Based more directly than some of its predecessors on Dick’s original story, this cannot help but nod to Invasion of the Body Snatchers, although the Cold War paranoia replaced by… what, exactly? There’s a parable of father-son relations in here, along with an allegory of divorce and a Stranger Things-influenced romp, but it shows its hand a little early, never settles on a tone and features a climax that will split opinion down the middle. That said, it’s never less than diverting. Gabriel Tate This Country BBC Three, from 10.00am Series one of Charlie and Daisy May Cooper’s mockumentary transcended its obvious debt to The Office to become a touching, acutely observed and defiant portrait of life on the margins in rural Britain. Importantly, it was also very funny, finding bathos and humour in the efforts of gormless cousins Kurtan and Kerry Mucklowe (played by the Coopers) to amuse themselves in a Cotswolds village. Thankfully, almost nothing has changed for this second series, although Kurtan has found a girlfriend and Kerry hitherto unknown charitable instincts. Shakespeare & Hathaway: Private Investigators BBC One, 2.15pm Jo Joyner and Mark Benton are perfectly cast in this amiable new 10-part series as Lu Shakespeare, wrongly suspected of killing her fiancé, and Frank Hathaway, the slobbish PI she ropes in to clear her name. The odd-couple chemistry is there from the start and Stratford-upon-Avon looks glorious – making this a welcome addition to the afternoon schedules. Hollywood in Vienna: the Sound of Space & Alexandre Desplat Sky Arts, 8.00pm This gala performance loosely based on a journey through the universe includes Parisian composer Alexandre Desplat’s melodies for movies, including Twilight and The Grand Budapest Hotel, as well as legendary scores from Star Wars to E.T. GT Classic Mary Berry BBC One, 8.30pm Cherish the unlikely sight of the former Bake Off judge partaking in a little “caveman cooking” in this latest rebranding of Mary Berry’s line in home-cooking, with the opener focusing on comfort food. MasterChef BBC One, 9.00pm The 11th run of the enduringly popular cooking contest begins with the first seven contestants creating dishes using ingredients including beef mince and duck breasts for John Torode, Gregg Wallace and some former finalists. The Unstoppable Flying Scotsman Channel 5, 9.00pm The world’s most famous steam locomotive is profiled in this two-parter from Rob Bell, always a reassuring translator of technical geekery for a mainstream audience. Here, he explores its origins and enduring appeal. GT Ice Cold in Alex (1958, b/w) ★★★★☆ Film4, 4.20pm J Lee Thompson’s tense British wartime thriller is one of the classics of the black-and-white era and richly entertaining. John Mills shines as Captain Anson, who dreams of an ice-cold glass of lager while escorting Britons across the desert to Alexandria during the Second World War. The film makes some interesting points about patriotism, as we learn Anson is unaware that he’s harbouring a traitor. Alien Resurrection (1997) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Sigourney Weaver returns as heroine Ellen Ripley for this fourth film in the franchise. Two hundred years have passed since Alien 3, and Ripley has now been cloned by scientists, which gives her greater strength but also conflicting loyalties, meaning we’re not sure that we can trust her. Despite the talent on board (Weaver, screenwriter Joss Whedon and director Jean-Pierre Jeunot), this is a poor effort. Elysium (2013) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 11.00pm Neill Blomkamp’s (District 9) intelligent sci-fi thriller has a fire in its belly and stars a brawny Matt Damon as a factory worker who scrapes out a living on the Earth’s crust. He’s involved in an accident but the medical care that he needs is on space station Elysium. Blomkamp focuses on faith, capitalism and private healthcare – in lesser hands, the film might have played out like a Lib Dem manifesto with spaceships. Tuesday 27 February Surrounded by splendour: Alan Titchmarsh Secrets of the National Trust with Alan Titchmarsh Channel 5, 8.00pm A tale of “female empowerment, politics and a fight for the throne of England itself” is how Alan Titchmarsh, opening a second series showcasing the National Trust’s finest properties, describes the history of Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire. Certainly, the story of Elizabeth Talbot, Countess of Shrewsbury (aka Bess of Hardwick), and how four strategic marriages helped her to become one of the most powerful women in Elizabethan England, is a fascinating one. And the glorious house she built in the 1590s, with vast facades of glass and sumptuous decor, was doubtless a marvel of the age. Whether you think Titchmarsh does either of them justice will depend on how much detail you like in a documentary, and how much repetition (you won’t possess enough fingers to count how often he mentions that Bess’s initials and coat of arms decorate the high parapet of the house) and “coming up next” you can bear. Either way, there are plenty of glories to gaze upon, so if you’re unlikely to get a chance to visit Hardwick Hall in person, the fine filming shows off the house and its grounds in considerable splendour. Gerard O’Donovan How to Get Fit Fast Channel 4, 8.00pm Anna Richardson and Amar Latif put the emphasis on fitness rather than weight loss in this new series exploring the off-the-shelf plans available, hoping to point viewers towards the exercise regime that suits them best. 100 Years Younger in 21 Days ITV, 9.00pm Eight well-worn famous faces attempt to turn the clock back at a “rejuvenation” clinic in Sardinia. June Brown, Sherrie Hewson, Claire King, Sid Owen, Roy Walker, Russell Grant, Googlebox’s Sandra Martin and music legend Shaun Ryder are among thoses hoping to knock off years without going under the knife. The FGM Detectives Channel 4, 10.00pm Despite the global efforts to ban the practice, female genital mutilation (FGM) continues to affect millions of women. Here Cathy Newman leads a two-year investigation into FGM in the UK, which is estimated to put 20,000 young British women at risk every year. Acid Attack: My Story BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm Naomi Oni recounts the horrific acid attack that left her with life-altering injuries in 2012, and how the police investigation (which, unbelievably, initially focused on whether she had inflicted the wounds on herself) proved the attacker to be a childhood friend. GO Unreal Amazon Prime, from today A drama playing on the fakeness, dubious ethics and behind-the-scenes manipulation of a hit reality TV dating show, UnREAL is nothing if not a series for our times. As the third season begins, Everlasting’s producer Rachel (Shiri Appleby) is getting her life back on track, despite her ruthless boss Quinn (Constance Zimmer) ramping up the pressure to deliver the show’s most outrageous season yet. Divorce Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm Sarah Jessica Parker returns with a second season of the bleak and bitingly funny comedy about the painful break-up of an American middle-class couple’s marriage. At least that’s what series one, created and partly written by the Sharon Horgan, was about. Season two, minus Horgan’s input, takes on a distinctly lighter tone as both Frances (Parker) and her now ex-husband Robert (Thomas Haden Church) begin tentatively to negotiate the possibilities of life post divorce. GO Charade (1963) ★★★★☆ Film4, 2.25pm Audrey Hepburn as a temperamental-but-alluring damsel in distress and Cary Grant as a shadowy charmer are characters that the actors played many times. But they do so exceptionally in this suspense comedy from Stanley Donen, often referred to as the best Hitchcock movie that Hitchcock never made. Hepburn is the widow being trailed by four men hunting for her late husband’s stolen fortune. Black Swan (2010) ★★★★★ Film4, 11.25pm Darren Aronofsky’s film is delirious hokum and high-class trash. Natalie Portman stars as Nina Sayers, a young dancer with the New York City Ballet preparing for a production of Swan Lake choreographed by the charismatic Thomas Leroy (Vincent Cassel). He is unconvinced by Nina’s ability to portray the passion of the Black Swan and her efforts to convince him lead her towards madness. Christine (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 11.50pm The story of Christine Chubbuck, a Florida newsreader who shot herself on air in 1974, is shocking and unfathomably sad. But it wouldn’t be worth retelling on film if it didn’t illuminate something. It asks a top-notch Rebecca Hall to play out the last days of Chubbuck’s life and dares us to hope that it’s about a different woman – one who made it out the other side of her own tragedy. Wednesday 28 February Victim: Édgar Ramírez as Versace Credit: BBC The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story BBC Two, 9.00pm Ryan Murphy’s true crime series follows up 2016’s dramatisation of the OJ Simpson trial with the story of serial killer Andrew Cunanan, who murdered at least five people over a three-month period, including the fashion designer Gianni Versace. Murphy and scriptwriter Tom Rob Smith use the word assassination very carefully here: the operatic opening scenes depict Versace (Édgar Ramírez) as a modern-day Medici prince, dispensing cheerful patronage to all in his Miami Beach fiefdom. By contrast, Cunanan (Darren Criss) is portrayed as a man so insecure in his own skin that he is almost physically incapable of telling the truth: “You tell gay people you’re gay and straight people you’re straight,” exclaims an exasperated friend. “I tell people what they need to hear,” comes the too-calm reply. Both Criss and Ramirez are excellent and there’s strong support from Ricky Martin as Versace’s bewildered live-in boyfriend and a perhaps slightly too-camp Penélope Cruz as Donatella. Smith’s solid script does a good job of juggling various timelines to show how this particular killer came to be. Sarah Hughes Ellie Undercover: Rent for Sex BBC Three, from 10.00am Investigative journalist Ellie Flynn presents this look at the growing number of unscrupulous landlords who offer rent-free accommodation in exchange for sex. It’s hard not to feel utterly dispirited as Flynn meets vulnerable women such as Chloe, who feels so trapped by her homelessness that she’s in no position to say no to these men. Athletics: The World Indoor Championships BBC Two, 7.00pm The four-day World Indoor Championships, which takes place at Arena Birmingham, kicks off on Thursday, featuring three events in the first evening session – including Team GB’s Laura Muir and Eilish McColgan in the final of the women’s 3,000 m. Events continue from 9.00am on Friday, with Greg Rutherford’s long jump bid among the highlights. The World’s Most Extraordinary Homes BBC Two, 8.00pm For those of us who enjoy gawping at other people’s homes, few programmes are more satisfying than this series presented by Caroline Quentin and architect Piers Taylor. Tonight the duo are in Portugal poking their noses into four very different properties. The Supervet Channel 4, 8.00pm Professor Noel Fitzpatrick and the team returns for a new round of veterinary problems, including a very excitable Labrador who requires elbow replacement surgery and a Jackahuahua puppy who needs to have spinal surgery after an attack in the park. Benidorm ITV, 9.00pm Hold on to your sunhats as ITV’s long-running Costa Blanca comedy returns for a 10th series with comedians Hale & Pace joining the cast as a pair of undercover cops. Elsewhere, Joyce (Sherrie Hewson) and Monty’s (John Challis) big day arrives. Save Me Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Don’t let the fact that it features yet another missing child put you off the week’s best new drama. Written by and starring Lennie James, Save Me tells the tale of Nelly (James), an ageing wide-boy of suspect charms, who finds himself in trouble after his estranged teenage daughter disappears. We’ve all met people like Nelly, the easy smiles hiding their sharp edges, and James does a wonderful job of making us warm to him despite the distrust. There’s strong support, too, from Suranne Jones as the missing girl’s mother. SH Film 2018 BBC One, 11.15pm; Wales, 11.35pm; NI, 12.10am The BBC’s long-running film series returns with an opening episode hosted by Radio 1’s Clara Amfo alongside critics Ellen E Jones and Larushka Ivan-Zadeh. The focus this week is on next Sunday’s Academy Awards, plus an interview with Lady Bird’s Oscar-nominated director, Greta Gerwig. SH The Quiet Man (1952) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.00pm Best known for his sombre westerns, John Ford turns personal for this wonderful romantic comedy which was considered a risky venture but went on to win the director his fourth Oscar. It tells the story of a boxer who falls in love with the sister of a bully. The famous grab-and-kiss scene between the smouldering John Wayne and love interest Maureen O’Hara (the “Queen of Technicolour”) also appears in E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. Big Eyes (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Amy Adams is ideally cast as the browbeaten artist Margaret Keane who, for eight years, churned out iconic, highly sought after paintings, only for her con artist husband (Christoph Waltz) to take all the credit. Tim Burton’s take on this curious real-life tale of curdled suburbia sadly lacks Adams’s subtlety: even the usually restrained Waltz is caught up in the blunt, overly stylised kookiness. Good (2008) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.50pm Viggo Mortensen gives a thoughtful performance as a German professor whose ideas about euthanasia are adopted by the Nazis. It’s only when he becomes a concentration camp inspector that he grasps the horror of his ideas. Vicente Amorim’s adaptation of CP Taylor’s play doesn’t shirk big questions, but he tends to fall back on clichés – hammerings on the piano, etc – and it plays a bit like a Nazi version of Rising Damp. Thursday 1 March A landmark return: David Olusoga, Mary Beard and Simon Schama Credit: BBC Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm Almost 50 years after changing the face of arts programming with the landmark series Civilisation, BBC Two returns with an expanded brief and all the bells and whistles of modern film-making, from drone cameras to infra-red photography. With nine episodes split between presenters Simon Schama (five), David Olusoga and Mary Beard (two each), Civilisations promises an opinionated overview of global art and culture. It opens with a striking sequence in which Schama – helming this first part – explores what has been lost and salvaged from the Isil pillage of Palmyra. From there, we’re whisked to Africa’s Cape coast and the first evidence of mankind’s creativity 77,000 years ago. Then it’s a breathless gallop through the millennia, alighting at the first settlements and depictions of the human face. Among the cave art, Mayan stairways and fertility fetishes, the real treasure is an astonishing Mycenaean Sealstone, jaw-dropping in its anatomical detail and artistic accomplishment. While it won’t have the same impact as the original series (what could?), Civilisations looks to be just as learned, accessible and thrilling as its predecessor – the whole series will be available on BBC iPlayer at 10.00pm. Gabriel Tate The Cruise: Voyage to Alaska ITV, 8.30pm; not Wales Over three episodes, the five-star luxury liner Star Princess and its redoubtable crew travels to the northernmost American state – where they encounter difficult weather, navigational challenges and problem passengers. Weinstein: the Inside Story BBC One, 9.00pm In collaboration with PBS America’s Frontline current-affairs strand, Panorama examines the fall of Harvey Weinstein and the lengths to which the disgraced Hollywood producer would go to keep his alleged bullying, threats and sexual assaults private. Speaking to insiders, the team builds a troubling picture of industry complicity. From Ice to Fire: the Incredible Science of Temperature BBC Four, 9.00pm Dr Helen Czerski concludes her excellent series with fire, and how its harnessing played a pivotal role in human evolution and survival, from essentials such as toolmaking and mining to relative fripperies such as hot-air balloons. The moment that Czerski triggers a lightning strike at a high-voltage laboratory carries a genuine frisson; as is customary with most BBC Four films, the presentation is lively and the science deftly handled. Serial Killer with Piers Morgan ITV, 9.00pm How do you follow interviewing Donald Trump? Piers Morgan returns to the less contentious turf of more one-to-ones with convicted murderers behind bars. He begins with Lorenzo Gilyard, the so-called Kansas City Strangler, who remains unremorseful after allegedly killing 13 women and girls over almost two decades. Panic at 30,000 Feet: Airline Emergency Channel 5, 9.00pm This nightmare-inducing new series explores what happens when flights go wrong, from mid-air collisions to runway explosions. GT Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 11.45pm The penultimate episode of this often disturbing and insightful series revisits Oak Creek, Wisconsin, where white supremacist Michael Page killed six and injured four at a Sikh temple, before killing himself, in 2012. For once, there is a vaguely positive denouement: Page’s brutality had the opposite to its intended effect and brought the community closer together. GT Jubal (1956) ★★★★☆ Film4, 12.40pm Ernest Borgnine stars in this brooding western shot in the Grand Teton mountains of Wyoming, which reworks the plot of Othello. Borgnine stars as a cattle rancher with a much younger wife (Valerie French), who is driven into a jealous rage when cattlehand Rod Steiger suggests that she is having an affair with young drifter Jubal (a magnificent Glenn Ford). Murder is most definitely on the cards. Pitch Perfect (2012) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm The world of collegiate a cappella singing contests can’t be as heartless as Jason Moore’s sour comedy would have us believe. Anna Kendrick stars as Beca, an angst-ridden outsider who must shake up her uninspiring and monotonous group, while trying to handle how weird they all are. And, of course, there’s a handsome man (Skylar Astin) who catches her eye. It’s a little like Glee but without the schmaltz. The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Clint Eastwood directs and stars in this warm-hearted marvellous western adapted from Forrest Carter’s novel and set during the American Civil War. Eastwood plays the Missouri farmer who, driven by memories of his family’s slaughter, becomes an outlaw when he refuses to join his Confederate comrades in surrender, in favour of seeking revenge on the men who murdered his kin. Friday 2 March Searching for the truth: Lydia Wilson as Matilda Credit: BBC Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm After last week’s hiatus because of the Six Nations rugby, it’s back to small-town Wales for another dose of supernatural country-house shenanigans. When we last saw fragile but determined musician Matilda (Lydia Wilson), she’d suffered the double whammy of finding her would-be mother Rose (Claire Rushbrook) unconscious in the bath and learning that mute Aunt Meredith (Jane Thorne) had died on the verge of offering up her secrets. How did Matilda react? By mysteriously blacking out and bashing her beloved cello against a cupboard. In the fourth episode then, she looks for connections between her mental health and Carys’s disappearance. And some clues emerge: Matilda meets dishevelled local Laura (Anastasia Hille), who claims to hear voices informing her of Carys’s fate, and back at the mansion, she comes across some old tomes detailing rituals to unlock the past. Even with its heavily scored bumps and shudders, Requiem can’t quite sustain its early Hammer Horror appeal. The strong performances and some genuinely chilling moments keep things compelling however, not least in the spine-tingling climax of this episode. Toby Dantzic Flint Town Netflix, from today Back in 2014, a cost-cutting exercise left thousands of homes in Flint, Michigan, with contaminated drinking water for years. This new eight-part documentary looks at the fallout from the crisis through the eyes of Flint’s beleaguered police force, who face an uphill struggle – the community needs their support but are also deeply mistrustful of those in authority, plus dwindling resources makes the officers’ jobs harder still. MasterChef BBC One, 7.30pm Having survived the cooking contest’s opening week, the six heat winners face food critic William Sitwell in this first quarter-final. He challenges them to conjure up a standout pudding showcasing either alcohol or spices. Love Your Garden ITV, 8.00pm; not STV/UTV/Wales This week, Alan Titchmarsh and his team are in Bidewell, Devon, helping Tamsyn and Alex Wood who returned to the UK from France after Alex suffered a brain injury. The aim is to turn the Woods’ garden into a coastal sanctuary inspired by Alex’s passion for surfing. The Yorkshire Steam Railway: All Aboard Channel 5, 8.00pm As amiable as its title suggests, this new documentary series follows the lives of those who work on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, one of the country’s most popular steam railways. In this series’ opener, the new season begins with the arrival of star engine Royal Scot, on loan from London. Tones, Drones and Arpeggios: The Magic of Minimalism BBC Four, 9.00pm Conductor Charles Hazlewood explores minimalism, which he argues is the most important musical form of the 20th century. In the fascinating opener of this two-part series, he unpicks the construction of these sometimes confounding sounds and tracks down the genre’s avant-garde pioneers, who brought their mesmeric, spirituality-inspired compositions from California to New York in the Sixties. TD Jo Brand: Secrets of Her Success Channel 5, 10.30pm Channel 5’s celebration of funny women continues with this absorbing profile of the pioneering doyenne of deadpan, Jo Brand. This charts her career from its rocky start on the male-dominated stand-up circuit to her much-admired hospital sitcom Getting On. TD Gladiator (2000) ★★★★★ Film4, 9.00pm This take on the traditional swords-and-sandals epic proved that Russell Crowe deserved to be recognised as a mainstream star, and reaffirmed Ridley Scott’s reputation as a first-rate director. Crowe is Maximus, a former Roman general who rebuilds his career as a gladiator. His bid for vengeance against a vile emperor (Joaquin Phoenix) is compelling. Plus there’s a last hurrah from Oliver Reed. Blades of Glory (2007) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm;N Ireland, 12.05am You might think that the sequinned world of figure skating is beyond parody, but here Will Ferrell and Jon Heder serve up a zestfully preposterous comedy. Both play rival Olympic ice skaters, Ferrell a loose-living maverick, Heder a prissy perfectionist, who are slung out of the sport but use a loophole to return as an erotic all-male pairing. Amy Poehler co-stars. A Hijacking (2012) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.55pm Tobias Lindholm’s vigorously intelligent hostage thriller, set on board a besieged ship in the Indian Ocean, deftly moves his story between the boat and the shipping company’s offices, where Søren Malling’s frazzled CEO attempts to thrash out a bargain. On the other end of the line is the Somalis’ translator. Flies buzz, sweat trickles, negotiations continue, and you feel your breath dry up. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
What's on TV tonight: Gogglebox and The Old Grey Whistle Test Live
Friday 23 February Gogglebox Channel 4, 9.00pm We all know that Gogglebox won’t be the same this time around. One of the great joys of watching the armchair TV critic show, which returns for its 11th series, was the always warm, occasionally bickering relationship between straight-talking Liverpudlian couple, Leon and June Bernicoff. But, sadly, Leon died last December following a short illness and June recently confirmed that she won’t be taking part without him. So, in the absence of Leon’s notoriously unvarnished views (on chef Jamie Oliver: “‘Oh he’s a d---head”), what can we expect? Probably business as usual. After all, the show has survived the loss of popular families before, from everyone’s favourite posh couple, Steph and Dom, to the gloriously opinionated Scarlett Moffatt. Our guesses: the lovely Siddiquis will continue to be the most well-adjusted family, hairdressers Stephen and Christopher will trot out the most-pointed one-liners, Welsh couple Dave and Shirley will bring the giggles, even though it remains a mystery just how Dave watches TV in that very uncomfortable-looking position, and we still won’t be able to work out how many dogs the Malones actually have. SH Live Winter Olympics 2018 BBC One and BBC Two, from 6.00am Day 14 sees the semi-finals of the men’s ice hockey and the women’s curling competition, plus the final of the men’s 1,000 m speed skating. SH An Island Parish: After the Hurricane BBC Two, 9.00pm Sophie Okonedo narrates this special edition of the series which looks at the long-term effects of Hurricane Irma on the Caribbean island of Anguilla. Among those who lost everything are Simone Connor and her father Neville, who ran a restaurant and leisure complex on the island. SH Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm Now is the perfect time to jump back on the Will & Grace bandwagon as the wonderful Nick Offerman (the real-life husband of Megan Mullally, who plays Karen) guest stars as baker Jackson Boudreaux, aka the Bad Boy of Bread. Offerman is a scene-stealing delight and the final moments offer a lovely pay-off. SH Joan Rivers: By Her friends Channel 5, 10.30pm Anyone who saw the brilliant comedy The Marvellous Mrs Maisel, which was inspired by the late Joan Rivers’s early career, will know that the comedian’s domestic-focused stand-up routines were unlike anything that the audiences of that time had heard before. This tribute puts that ground-breaking career in context. SH The Tick Amazon Prime, from today Peter Serafinowicz’s goofy blue superhero returns for another series of misadventures. As with the last time, the series stands and falls with Serafinowicz’s performance: his morally upstanding but bizarre caped crusader has enough charm to paper over plot cracks. SH Seven Seconds Netflix, from today This new crime-drama series from Veena Sud, the writer behind the US version of The Killing, explores grief, deceit and social injustice. Starring Regina King, it focuses on the fallout from the death of a young boy who was injured by a police officer. SH The Old Grey Whistle Test Live: For One Night Only BBC Four, 9.00pm Bob Harris, who fronted The Old Grey Whistle Test from 1972-1978, returns with this event marking 30 years since the end of music show. This one-off includes live performances and interviews with fans and former presenters. SH Mute (2018) Netflix, from today True Blood alumnus Alexander Skarsgård plays Leo, the titular mute in Duncan Jones’s sci-fi thriller, which the director describes as a spiritual sequel to 2009’s Moon. Leo Beiler, a bartender with a violent past, searches for his missing girlfriend Naadirah (Seyneb Saleh) in a futuristic, neon-lit Berlin. He crosses paths with a pair of US army surgeons, brilliantly named Cactus Bill and Duck Teddington (played by Paul Rudd and Justin Theroux), on a mission of their own. X-Men: First Class (2011) ★★★☆☆ E4, 9.00pm Telepathic Charles Xavier (James McAvoy) bonds with metal-bending death camp survivor Erik Lehnsherr (Michael Fassbender) and the two of them track down other mutants to confront evil Nazi Sebastian Shaw (Kevin Bacon) when he triggers the Cuban Missile Crisis. Matthew Vaughn is much more comfortable with the small-scale character stuff than the action climax, but this prequel is mostly a lot of fun. While We’re Young (2014) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm A couple’s doomed attempt to recapture their youth gives Ben Stiller and Naomi Watts a new lease of comic life in Noah Baumbach’s sparkling film. Baumbach packs it with the wit and vigour of a polished one-act play as co-stars Adam Driver and Amanda Seyfried, playing hat-wearing hipsters, deliver punchlines that can’t help but remind you of Woody Allen at his peak. Saturday 24 February Loadsa laughs: Ant McPartlin and Declan Donnelly Credit: ITV Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway ITV, 7.00pm Anthony McPartlin and Declan Donnelly, the undisputed kings of Saturday night TV – never more so since they won the inaugural Bruce Forsyth Entertainment gong, among others, at the National Television Awards last month – return with a 16th series of their popular show. Packed full of comedy, audience participation, prize giveaways, celebrity guests, exclusive performances and madcap stunts, this is high-octane entertainment, with barely time to draw breath between items. Tonight, Kylie Minogue gives a first performance of her latest single and revisits some of her biggest hits, Britain’s Got Talent judge Amanda Holden falls victim to the first Undercover prank of the series and Olly Murs takes on the role of guest announcer in the End of Show Show. The hosts themselves, meanwhile, put the pedal to the floor for a daredevil Ant vs Dec monster truck challenge, and reprise their roles as super sleuths in a new comedy whodunit (with an all-star cast that includes Joanna Lumley, Michael Sheen, Emilia Fox and David Walliams) while sidekicks Scarlett Moffatt and Stephen Mulhern are out on the streets looking for people to plays games with. And that’s just for starters. Gerard O’Donovan Live Winter Olympics 2018 BBC One and BBC Two, from 6.00am It’s the penultimate day and there’s major Team GB interest as the four-man bobsleigh gets under way. However, most eyes will be on the curling, which has proved rather popular in these Games, as the men’s gold and women’s bronze medals are decided. There’s also action in the snowboarding and skiing. Six Nations Rugby Union: Ireland v Wales ITV, 1.30pm After their 12-6 defeat against England at Twickenham, Wales travel to Ireland, with Dan Biggar starting at fly-half, and Liam Williams and Leigh Halfpenny also returning after injury. Ireland have won two from two, beating France in Paris, before enjoying an eight-try buffet at Italy’s expense in a 56-19 victory. The visitors are unbeaten in their last three Six Nations matches against Ireland, but were held to a 16-16 draw when the sides last met here two years ago. Six Nations Rugby Union: Scotland v England BBC One, 4.00pm Tough one for England, this. Yes, they’ve won nine of the last 10 matches against Scotland, drawing the other one, but the pressure cauldron that is Murrayfield is never an easy place to visit, and they’ll have their tails up after an impressive 32-26 win against France. Still, according to head coach Gregor Townsend, Scotland will need to produce their “best-ever performance” if they are to triumph against England in the Calcutta Cup. Eddie Jones’s team beat Wales 12-6 thanks to two first-half tries by Jonny May, but were forced to hang on grimly in the frenetic closing stages as they set a new championship record for consecutive home wins (15, dating back to 2012). When these sides met in the tournament last year, England thrashed Scotland 61-21 at Twickenham. Churchill’s Darkest Decision More4, 7.55pm Fans of the hit film Darkest Hour will appreciate this documentary about another big Churchill dilemma. In 1940, following the fall of France, Germany was poised to seize the entire French fleet, making Hitler’s threat to invade Britain ever graver. Drastic measures were called for, but at a tragically high cost. David Attenborough’s Natural Curiosities BBC Two, 8.00pm Creatures with remarkable navigation skills are the focus of tonight’s edition, looking at how dung beetles use the Sun, Moon and stars as compass points, and how pigeons recall complex routes. Britain at Low Tide Channel 4, 8.00pm More stories from our shoreline as Tori Herridge visits Dorset, where she finds the home of the world’s first aircraft carrier and searches for an Iron Age monument that can only be seen for a few hours each year. Troy: Fall of a City BBC One, 9.10pm All hell breaks loose in this second episode when Helen’s (Bella Dayne) husband Menelaus finds out what Paris (Louis Hunter) took back to Troy. His enraged brother Agamemnon (Johnny Harris) calls all Greece to war, but when they fail to propitiate the gods, there’s a shocking price to pay. GO Mosaic Sky Atlantic, 10.00pm Steven Soderbergh’s crime drama starring Sharon Stone provoked a blizzard of publicity on its release last year in mobile app format. HBO’s six-part “linear” TV version is obviously less innovative (the app works like an interactive movie where the user can choose from which perspective the plot is viewed), but it still has plenty to offer. In this second episode, the backstory continues to play out as author Olivia Lake’s (Stone) relationships with lover Eric (Frederick Weller) and lodger Joel (Garrett Hedlund) become ever more tangled. GO Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2 (2013) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 5.00pm In this sequel to the 2009 animation based on the 1978 children’s book, inventor Flint Lockwood (voiced by Bill Hader) and friends must rescue the island of Swallow Falls from being overrun by food-mutated animals. It’s no triumph of screenwriting or subtext, but it’s a feast of ingeniously rendered gastronomic insanity and kids will absolutely love it. The Heat (2013) ★★★★☆ E4, 9.00pm Bridesmaids director Paul Feig brings back one of that film’s stars, Melissa McCarthy, as a foul-mouthed Boston cop whose policing style, aided by a fridge full of armaments, makes Dirty Harry look like Thumbelina. She’s paired with a goody-two-shoes FBI agent (Sandra Bullock reminding us what a pro she is at comedy). Together, they’re dynamite, plus the film has an emotional clout that hits you seemingly from nowhere. Philomena (2013) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.00pm; not Northern Ireland This true story is based on the experiences of journalist Martin Sixsmith (Steve Coogan), who helped Philomena Lee (Judi Dench), an Irish woman in her seventies, search for the son that she was forced to put up for adoption 50 years earlier. Stephen Frears’s film is charming and hard-hitting, delivering some tough emotional blows as well as some harsh truths about the Catholic Church’s past. Sunday 25 February Curiouser and curiouser: Holliday Grainger and Tom Burke Credit: BBC Strike: Career of Evil BBC One, 9.00pm Rumpled PI Cormoran Strike (Tom Burke) and his trusty Girl Friday Robin Ellacott (Holliday Grainger) return for the third of JK Rowling’s Robert Galbraith novels. It’s a few months after the events of The Silkworm and Strike and Robin have settled into an easy working partnership, albeit one that remains a little too cosy for Robin’s smarmy fiancé Matthew (Kerr Logan). Then Robin receives a gruesome present in the post and our intrepid duo found themselves caught up in an investigation that swiftly hits far too close to home. Career of Evil is the most tightly plotted of the Galbraith books and this well-paced opening episode neatly sets up the (plentiful) twists to come. That said, the real enjoyment comes not from the story but from the fantastic chemistry between Grainger and Burke, who bring an immense amount of warmth and charm to their scenes. Indeed, so successfully do they inhabit the roles that it’s frustrating to realise that, with no more Galbraith books currently published, this will be the last Strike for a while. It’s a genuine shame: if ever a TV adaptation deserved to be spun away from its source material it’s this one. Sarah Hughes ODI cricket: New Zealand v England Sky Sports Main Event, 12.30am You’ll have to stay up late to see this opening one-day international of the five-match series. England, having beaten the Aussies in their last ODI series, will fancy their chances. Young, Welsh and Pretty Minted BBC Three, from 10.00am The makers of Young, Welsh and Pretty Skint return with a new series focusing on a group of would-be entrepreneurs, including a YouTuber with 1.7 million subscribers and an image-obsessed Instagram influencer. Live Winter Olympics 2018 Closing Ceremony BBC Two, from 11.00am The Olympics bow out, allowing us to recall the heartbreak (Team GB’s Elise Christie’s wipeout in the speedskating final) and joy (American snowboarder Chloe Kim’s megawatt smile). K-pop star CL and boy band EXO take part in the ceremony which has a fusion theme, before the flag is handed over to Beijing for 2022. Premier League Football: Manchester United v Chelsea Sky Sports Main Event, 1.00pm With both sides struggling for consistency – United lost at Newcastle a fortnight ago, while Chelsea were trounced 4-1 by Watford earlier this month – today’s match at Old Trafford should be a tentative affair. Carabao Cup Final: Arsenal v Manchester City Sky Sports Main Event, 4.00pm Proving that the League Cup is having something of a resurgence, Arsenal and Manchester City are this year’s finalists, with the former aiming to win the trophy for the first time since 1993. City are favourites, though: imperious in the league, they also have form in the Carabao Cup, having won it in 2014 and 2016. Top Gear BBC Two, 8.00pm The petrolhead’s special returns with Matt LeBlanc promising increased family appeal. The new team of LeBlanc, Chris Harris and Rory Reid have decent chemistry and if this was your sort of thing then it probably remains so. Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble BBC Four, 8.00pm Few programmes are as inspiring as this one about cellist Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble, an ever-changing group of over 50 artists who perform alongside Ma. In addition to highlighting some phenomenal talents – Galician bagpiper Cristina Pato almost steals the show – the film details the hardships that they’ve faced, including revolution and exile. Anchoring it all is former child prodigy Ma: “I think when I was a kid a lot of things just happened,” he notes as footage shows him performing as a child for President Kennedy. “I’m always trying to figure out who I am and where I fit in the world.” SH Hannibal’s Elephant Army: The New Evidence Channel 4, 8.00pm Why did Carthaginian general Hannibal cross the Alps on a seemingly impossible journey with an army of 40,000 soldiers, 9,000 cavalry officers and 37 elephants? This fascinating film examines the evidence. Life and Death Row: The Mass Execution BBC Two, 9.00pm The harrowing series continues to turn a microscopic eye on all aspects of the death penalty. Tonight it’s the case of Stacey Johnson, on death row for 23 years. His stepdaughter insists on his innocence; his victim’s daughter says she’s sure that he’s a guilty man. SH Clouds of Sils Maria (2014) ★★★★☆ BBC Four, 9.30pm A complex, bewitching and fearlessly intelligent psychological fondue from France’s Olivier Assayas, with Juliet Binoche and Kristen Stewart as a famous actress and her diligent and devoted personal assistant, prepping for a play that shapes the drama of their own lives in its likeness. Playful and addictively strange, with career-best work from Stewart. Shutter Island (2010) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 11.05pm Martin Scorsese’s follow-up to The Departed, is, like that film, based on a novel by Dennis Lehane. He delves into gothic noir in this mystery thriller as detective Daniels (Leonardo DiCaprio) investigates the disappearance of an inmate from a prison for the clinically insane with the help of his partner (played brilliantly by Mark Ruffalo). This is a gripping story with some bold twists, although it eventually loses momentum. Point Break (1991) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 11.30pm; Scotland, 12.30am Kathryn Bigelow’s cult surfing/crime film elevated Patrick Swayze’s actor status to true action hero. Keanu Reeves plays Johnny Utah, an FBI agent who goes undercover to infiltrate a gang of bankrobbing surfers led by the charismatic Bodhi (Swayze). The action heats up when Bodhi and Utah find they share a similar attitude towards danger. Lori Petty is the surfer who catches Johnny’s eye. Monday 26 February Body snatched? Greg Kinnear as the father Credit: Channel 4 Electric Dreams: The Father Thing Channel 4, 10.00pm After a first run split pretty evenly between stunners and misfires, the final four adaptations of short stories from pulp sci-fi icon Philip K Dick begins with a heavily derivative but entertaining piece from Michael Dinner, showrunner of excellent modern western Justified. The setting is an unnamed Midwest town, where young baseball-loving Charlie (Jack Gore) lives with his parents, hangs out with three other misfits and avoids the bullies; it’s as cosily familiar a slice of apple-pie Americana as you could find. And then the aftermath of a meteor shower causes Charlie to suspect that some of the town’s inhabitants may have been replaced by aliens, his own father (Greg Kinnear) included. Based more directly than some of its predecessors on Dick’s original story, this cannot help but nod to Invasion of the Body Snatchers, although the Cold War paranoia replaced by… what, exactly? There’s a parable of father-son relations in here, along with an allegory of divorce and a Stranger Things-influenced romp, but it shows its hand a little early, never settles on a tone and features a climax that will split opinion down the middle. That said, it’s never less than diverting. Gabriel Tate This Country BBC Three, from 10.00am Series one of Charlie and Daisy May Cooper’s mockumentary transcended its obvious debt to The Office to become a touching, acutely observed and defiant portrait of life on the margins in rural Britain. Importantly, it was also very funny, finding bathos and humour in the efforts of gormless cousins Kurtan and Kerry Mucklowe (played by the Coopers) to amuse themselves in a Cotswolds village. Thankfully, almost nothing has changed for this second series, although Kurtan has found a girlfriend and Kerry hitherto unknown charitable instincts. Shakespeare & Hathaway: Private Investigators BBC One, 2.15pm Jo Joyner and Mark Benton are perfectly cast in this amiable new 10-part series as Lu Shakespeare, wrongly suspected of killing her fiancé, and Frank Hathaway, the slobbish PI she ropes in to clear her name. The odd-couple chemistry is there from the start and Stratford-upon-Avon looks glorious – making this a welcome addition to the afternoon schedules. Hollywood in Vienna: the Sound of Space & Alexandre Desplat Sky Arts, 8.00pm This gala performance loosely based on a journey through the universe includes Parisian composer Alexandre Desplat’s melodies for movies, including Twilight and The Grand Budapest Hotel, as well as legendary scores from Star Wars to E.T. GT Classic Mary Berry BBC One, 8.30pm Cherish the unlikely sight of the former Bake Off judge partaking in a little “caveman cooking” in this latest rebranding of Mary Berry’s line in home-cooking, with the opener focusing on comfort food. MasterChef BBC One, 9.00pm The 11th run of the enduringly popular cooking contest begins with the first seven contestants creating dishes using ingredients including beef mince and duck breasts for John Torode, Gregg Wallace and some former finalists. The Unstoppable Flying Scotsman Channel 5, 9.00pm The world’s most famous steam locomotive is profiled in this two-parter from Rob Bell, always a reassuring translator of technical geekery for a mainstream audience. Here, he explores its origins and enduring appeal. GT Ice Cold in Alex (1958, b/w) ★★★★☆ Film4, 4.20pm J Lee Thompson’s tense British wartime thriller is one of the classics of the black-and-white era and richly entertaining. John Mills shines as Captain Anson, who dreams of an ice-cold glass of lager while escorting Britons across the desert to Alexandria during the Second World War. The film makes some interesting points about patriotism, as we learn Anson is unaware that he’s harbouring a traitor. Alien Resurrection (1997) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Sigourney Weaver returns as heroine Ellen Ripley for this fourth film in the franchise. Two hundred years have passed since Alien 3, and Ripley has now been cloned by scientists, which gives her greater strength but also conflicting loyalties, meaning we’re not sure that we can trust her. Despite the talent on board (Weaver, screenwriter Joss Whedon and director Jean-Pierre Jeunot), this is a poor effort. Elysium (2013) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 11.00pm Neill Blomkamp’s (District 9) intelligent sci-fi thriller has a fire in its belly and stars a brawny Matt Damon as a factory worker who scrapes out a living on the Earth’s crust. He’s involved in an accident but the medical care that he needs is on space station Elysium. Blomkamp focuses on faith, capitalism and private healthcare – in lesser hands, the film might have played out like a Lib Dem manifesto with spaceships. Tuesday 27 February Surrounded by splendour: Alan Titchmarsh Secrets of the National Trust with Alan Titchmarsh Channel 5, 8.00pm A tale of “female empowerment, politics and a fight for the throne of England itself” is how Alan Titchmarsh, opening a second series showcasing the National Trust’s finest properties, describes the history of Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire. Certainly, the story of Elizabeth Talbot, Countess of Shrewsbury (aka Bess of Hardwick), and how four strategic marriages helped her to become one of the most powerful women in Elizabethan England, is a fascinating one. And the glorious house she built in the 1590s, with vast facades of glass and sumptuous decor, was doubtless a marvel of the age. Whether you think Titchmarsh does either of them justice will depend on how much detail you like in a documentary, and how much repetition (you won’t possess enough fingers to count how often he mentions that Bess’s initials and coat of arms decorate the high parapet of the house) and “coming up next” you can bear. Either way, there are plenty of glories to gaze upon, so if you’re unlikely to get a chance to visit Hardwick Hall in person, the fine filming shows off the house and its grounds in considerable splendour. Gerard O’Donovan How to Get Fit Fast Channel 4, 8.00pm Anna Richardson and Amar Latif put the emphasis on fitness rather than weight loss in this new series exploring the off-the-shelf plans available, hoping to point viewers towards the exercise regime that suits them best. 100 Years Younger in 21 Days ITV, 9.00pm Eight well-worn famous faces attempt to turn the clock back at a “rejuvenation” clinic in Sardinia. June Brown, Sherrie Hewson, Claire King, Sid Owen, Roy Walker, Russell Grant, Googlebox’s Sandra Martin and music legend Shaun Ryder are among thoses hoping to knock off years without going under the knife. The FGM Detectives Channel 4, 10.00pm Despite the global efforts to ban the practice, female genital mutilation (FGM) continues to affect millions of women. Here Cathy Newman leads a two-year investigation into FGM in the UK, which is estimated to put 20,000 young British women at risk every year. Acid Attack: My Story BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm Naomi Oni recounts the horrific acid attack that left her with life-altering injuries in 2012, and how the police investigation (which, unbelievably, initially focused on whether she had inflicted the wounds on herself) proved the attacker to be a childhood friend. GO Unreal Amazon Prime, from today A drama playing on the fakeness, dubious ethics and behind-the-scenes manipulation of a hit reality TV dating show, UnREAL is nothing if not a series for our times. As the third season begins, Everlasting’s producer Rachel (Shiri Appleby) is getting her life back on track, despite her ruthless boss Quinn (Constance Zimmer) ramping up the pressure to deliver the show’s most outrageous season yet. Divorce Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm Sarah Jessica Parker returns with a second season of the bleak and bitingly funny comedy about the painful break-up of an American middle-class couple’s marriage. At least that’s what series one, created and partly written by the Sharon Horgan, was about. Season two, minus Horgan’s input, takes on a distinctly lighter tone as both Frances (Parker) and her now ex-husband Robert (Thomas Haden Church) begin tentatively to negotiate the possibilities of life post divorce. GO Charade (1963) ★★★★☆ Film4, 2.25pm Audrey Hepburn as a temperamental-but-alluring damsel in distress and Cary Grant as a shadowy charmer are characters that the actors played many times. But they do so exceptionally in this suspense comedy from Stanley Donen, often referred to as the best Hitchcock movie that Hitchcock never made. Hepburn is the widow being trailed by four men hunting for her late husband’s stolen fortune. Black Swan (2010) ★★★★★ Film4, 11.25pm Darren Aronofsky’s film is delirious hokum and high-class trash. Natalie Portman stars as Nina Sayers, a young dancer with the New York City Ballet preparing for a production of Swan Lake choreographed by the charismatic Thomas Leroy (Vincent Cassel). He is unconvinced by Nina’s ability to portray the passion of the Black Swan and her efforts to convince him lead her towards madness. Christine (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 11.50pm The story of Christine Chubbuck, a Florida newsreader who shot herself on air in 1974, is shocking and unfathomably sad. But it wouldn’t be worth retelling on film if it didn’t illuminate something. It asks a top-notch Rebecca Hall to play out the last days of Chubbuck’s life and dares us to hope that it’s about a different woman – one who made it out the other side of her own tragedy. Wednesday 28 February Victim: Édgar Ramírez as Versace Credit: BBC The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story BBC Two, 9.00pm Ryan Murphy’s true crime series follows up 2016’s dramatisation of the OJ Simpson trial with the story of serial killer Andrew Cunanan, who murdered at least five people over a three-month period, including the fashion designer Gianni Versace. Murphy and scriptwriter Tom Rob Smith use the word assassination very carefully here: the operatic opening scenes depict Versace (Édgar Ramírez) as a modern-day Medici prince, dispensing cheerful patronage to all in his Miami Beach fiefdom. By contrast, Cunanan (Darren Criss) is portrayed as a man so insecure in his own skin that he is almost physically incapable of telling the truth: “You tell gay people you’re gay and straight people you’re straight,” exclaims an exasperated friend. “I tell people what they need to hear,” comes the too-calm reply. Both Criss and Ramirez are excellent and there’s strong support from Ricky Martin as Versace’s bewildered live-in boyfriend and a perhaps slightly too-camp Penélope Cruz as Donatella. Smith’s solid script does a good job of juggling various timelines to show how this particular killer came to be. Sarah Hughes Ellie Undercover: Rent for Sex BBC Three, from 10.00am Investigative journalist Ellie Flynn presents this look at the growing number of unscrupulous landlords who offer rent-free accommodation in exchange for sex. It’s hard not to feel utterly dispirited as Flynn meets vulnerable women such as Chloe, who feels so trapped by her homelessness that she’s in no position to say no to these men. Athletics: The World Indoor Championships BBC Two, 7.00pm The four-day World Indoor Championships, which takes place at Arena Birmingham, kicks off on Thursday, featuring three events in the first evening session – including Team GB’s Laura Muir and Eilish McColgan in the final of the women’s 3,000 m. Events continue from 9.00am on Friday, with Greg Rutherford’s long jump bid among the highlights. The World’s Most Extraordinary Homes BBC Two, 8.00pm For those of us who enjoy gawping at other people’s homes, few programmes are more satisfying than this series presented by Caroline Quentin and architect Piers Taylor. Tonight the duo are in Portugal poking their noses into four very different properties. The Supervet Channel 4, 8.00pm Professor Noel Fitzpatrick and the team returns for a new round of veterinary problems, including a very excitable Labrador who requires elbow replacement surgery and a Jackahuahua puppy who needs to have spinal surgery after an attack in the park. Benidorm ITV, 9.00pm Hold on to your sunhats as ITV’s long-running Costa Blanca comedy returns for a 10th series with comedians Hale & Pace joining the cast as a pair of undercover cops. Elsewhere, Joyce (Sherrie Hewson) and Monty’s (John Challis) big day arrives. Save Me Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Don’t let the fact that it features yet another missing child put you off the week’s best new drama. Written by and starring Lennie James, Save Me tells the tale of Nelly (James), an ageing wide-boy of suspect charms, who finds himself in trouble after his estranged teenage daughter disappears. We’ve all met people like Nelly, the easy smiles hiding their sharp edges, and James does a wonderful job of making us warm to him despite the distrust. There’s strong support, too, from Suranne Jones as the missing girl’s mother. SH Film 2018 BBC One, 11.15pm; Wales, 11.35pm; NI, 12.10am The BBC’s long-running film series returns with an opening episode hosted by Radio 1’s Clara Amfo alongside critics Ellen E Jones and Larushka Ivan-Zadeh. The focus this week is on next Sunday’s Academy Awards, plus an interview with Lady Bird’s Oscar-nominated director, Greta Gerwig. SH The Quiet Man (1952) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.00pm Best known for his sombre westerns, John Ford turns personal for this wonderful romantic comedy which was considered a risky venture but went on to win the director his fourth Oscar. It tells the story of a boxer who falls in love with the sister of a bully. The famous grab-and-kiss scene between the smouldering John Wayne and love interest Maureen O’Hara (the “Queen of Technicolour”) also appears in E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. Big Eyes (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Amy Adams is ideally cast as the browbeaten artist Margaret Keane who, for eight years, churned out iconic, highly sought after paintings, only for her con artist husband (Christoph Waltz) to take all the credit. Tim Burton’s take on this curious real-life tale of curdled suburbia sadly lacks Adams’s subtlety: even the usually restrained Waltz is caught up in the blunt, overly stylised kookiness. Good (2008) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.50pm Viggo Mortensen gives a thoughtful performance as a German professor whose ideas about euthanasia are adopted by the Nazis. It’s only when he becomes a concentration camp inspector that he grasps the horror of his ideas. Vicente Amorim’s adaptation of CP Taylor’s play doesn’t shirk big questions, but he tends to fall back on clichés – hammerings on the piano, etc – and it plays a bit like a Nazi version of Rising Damp. Thursday 1 March A landmark return: David Olusoga, Mary Beard and Simon Schama Credit: BBC Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm Almost 50 years after changing the face of arts programming with the landmark series Civilisation, BBC Two returns with an expanded brief and all the bells and whistles of modern film-making, from drone cameras to infra-red photography. With nine episodes split between presenters Simon Schama (five), David Olusoga and Mary Beard (two each), Civilisations promises an opinionated overview of global art and culture. It opens with a striking sequence in which Schama – helming this first part – explores what has been lost and salvaged from the Isil pillage of Palmyra. From there, we’re whisked to Africa’s Cape coast and the first evidence of mankind’s creativity 77,000 years ago. Then it’s a breathless gallop through the millennia, alighting at the first settlements and depictions of the human face. Among the cave art, Mayan stairways and fertility fetishes, the real treasure is an astonishing Mycenaean Sealstone, jaw-dropping in its anatomical detail and artistic accomplishment. While it won’t have the same impact as the original series (what could?), Civilisations looks to be just as learned, accessible and thrilling as its predecessor – the whole series will be available on BBC iPlayer at 10.00pm. Gabriel Tate The Cruise: Voyage to Alaska ITV, 8.30pm; not Wales Over three episodes, the five-star luxury liner Star Princess and its redoubtable crew travels to the northernmost American state – where they encounter difficult weather, navigational challenges and problem passengers. Weinstein: the Inside Story BBC One, 9.00pm In collaboration with PBS America’s Frontline current-affairs strand, Panorama examines the fall of Harvey Weinstein and the lengths to which the disgraced Hollywood producer would go to keep his alleged bullying, threats and sexual assaults private. Speaking to insiders, the team builds a troubling picture of industry complicity. From Ice to Fire: the Incredible Science of Temperature BBC Four, 9.00pm Dr Helen Czerski concludes her excellent series with fire, and how its harnessing played a pivotal role in human evolution and survival, from essentials such as toolmaking and mining to relative fripperies such as hot-air balloons. The moment that Czerski triggers a lightning strike at a high-voltage laboratory carries a genuine frisson; as is customary with most BBC Four films, the presentation is lively and the science deftly handled. Serial Killer with Piers Morgan ITV, 9.00pm How do you follow interviewing Donald Trump? Piers Morgan returns to the less contentious turf of more one-to-ones with convicted murderers behind bars. He begins with Lorenzo Gilyard, the so-called Kansas City Strangler, who remains unremorseful after allegedly killing 13 women and girls over almost two decades. Panic at 30,000 Feet: Airline Emergency Channel 5, 9.00pm This nightmare-inducing new series explores what happens when flights go wrong, from mid-air collisions to runway explosions. GT Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 11.45pm The penultimate episode of this often disturbing and insightful series revisits Oak Creek, Wisconsin, where white supremacist Michael Page killed six and injured four at a Sikh temple, before killing himself, in 2012. For once, there is a vaguely positive denouement: Page’s brutality had the opposite to its intended effect and brought the community closer together. GT Jubal (1956) ★★★★☆ Film4, 12.40pm Ernest Borgnine stars in this brooding western shot in the Grand Teton mountains of Wyoming, which reworks the plot of Othello. Borgnine stars as a cattle rancher with a much younger wife (Valerie French), who is driven into a jealous rage when cattlehand Rod Steiger suggests that she is having an affair with young drifter Jubal (a magnificent Glenn Ford). Murder is most definitely on the cards. Pitch Perfect (2012) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm The world of collegiate a cappella singing contests can’t be as heartless as Jason Moore’s sour comedy would have us believe. Anna Kendrick stars as Beca, an angst-ridden outsider who must shake up her uninspiring and monotonous group, while trying to handle how weird they all are. And, of course, there’s a handsome man (Skylar Astin) who catches her eye. It’s a little like Glee but without the schmaltz. The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Clint Eastwood directs and stars in this warm-hearted marvellous western adapted from Forrest Carter’s novel and set during the American Civil War. Eastwood plays the Missouri farmer who, driven by memories of his family’s slaughter, becomes an outlaw when he refuses to join his Confederate comrades in surrender, in favour of seeking revenge on the men who murdered his kin. Friday 2 March Searching for the truth: Lydia Wilson as Matilda Credit: BBC Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm After last week’s hiatus because of the Six Nations rugby, it’s back to small-town Wales for another dose of supernatural country-house shenanigans. When we last saw fragile but determined musician Matilda (Lydia Wilson), she’d suffered the double whammy of finding her would-be mother Rose (Claire Rushbrook) unconscious in the bath and learning that mute Aunt Meredith (Jane Thorne) had died on the verge of offering up her secrets. How did Matilda react? By mysteriously blacking out and bashing her beloved cello against a cupboard. In the fourth episode then, she looks for connections between her mental health and Carys’s disappearance. And some clues emerge: Matilda meets dishevelled local Laura (Anastasia Hille), who claims to hear voices informing her of Carys’s fate, and back at the mansion, she comes across some old tomes detailing rituals to unlock the past. Even with its heavily scored bumps and shudders, Requiem can’t quite sustain its early Hammer Horror appeal. The strong performances and some genuinely chilling moments keep things compelling however, not least in the spine-tingling climax of this episode. Toby Dantzic Flint Town Netflix, from today Back in 2014, a cost-cutting exercise left thousands of homes in Flint, Michigan, with contaminated drinking water for years. This new eight-part documentary looks at the fallout from the crisis through the eyes of Flint’s beleaguered police force, who face an uphill struggle – the community needs their support but are also deeply mistrustful of those in authority, plus dwindling resources makes the officers’ jobs harder still. MasterChef BBC One, 7.30pm Having survived the cooking contest’s opening week, the six heat winners face food critic William Sitwell in this first quarter-final. He challenges them to conjure up a standout pudding showcasing either alcohol or spices. Love Your Garden ITV, 8.00pm; not STV/UTV/Wales This week, Alan Titchmarsh and his team are in Bidewell, Devon, helping Tamsyn and Alex Wood who returned to the UK from France after Alex suffered a brain injury. The aim is to turn the Woods’ garden into a coastal sanctuary inspired by Alex’s passion for surfing. The Yorkshire Steam Railway: All Aboard Channel 5, 8.00pm As amiable as its title suggests, this new documentary series follows the lives of those who work on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, one of the country’s most popular steam railways. In this series’ opener, the new season begins with the arrival of star engine Royal Scot, on loan from London. Tones, Drones and Arpeggios: The Magic of Minimalism BBC Four, 9.00pm Conductor Charles Hazlewood explores minimalism, which he argues is the most important musical form of the 20th century. In the fascinating opener of this two-part series, he unpicks the construction of these sometimes confounding sounds and tracks down the genre’s avant-garde pioneers, who brought their mesmeric, spirituality-inspired compositions from California to New York in the Sixties. TD Jo Brand: Secrets of Her Success Channel 5, 10.30pm Channel 5’s celebration of funny women continues with this absorbing profile of the pioneering doyenne of deadpan, Jo Brand. This charts her career from its rocky start on the male-dominated stand-up circuit to her much-admired hospital sitcom Getting On. TD Gladiator (2000) ★★★★★ Film4, 9.00pm This take on the traditional swords-and-sandals epic proved that Russell Crowe deserved to be recognised as a mainstream star, and reaffirmed Ridley Scott’s reputation as a first-rate director. Crowe is Maximus, a former Roman general who rebuilds his career as a gladiator. His bid for vengeance against a vile emperor (Joaquin Phoenix) is compelling. Plus there’s a last hurrah from Oliver Reed. Blades of Glory (2007) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm;N Ireland, 12.05am You might think that the sequinned world of figure skating is beyond parody, but here Will Ferrell and Jon Heder serve up a zestfully preposterous comedy. Both play rival Olympic ice skaters, Ferrell a loose-living maverick, Heder a prissy perfectionist, who are slung out of the sport but use a loophole to return as an erotic all-male pairing. Amy Poehler co-stars. A Hijacking (2012) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.55pm Tobias Lindholm’s vigorously intelligent hostage thriller, set on board a besieged ship in the Indian Ocean, deftly moves his story between the boat and the shipping company’s offices, where Søren Malling’s frazzled CEO attempts to thrash out a bargain. On the other end of the line is the Somalis’ translator. Flies buzz, sweat trickles, negotiations continue, and you feel your breath dry up. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
Friday 23 February Gogglebox Channel 4, 9.00pm We all know that Gogglebox won’t be the same this time around. One of the great joys of watching the armchair TV critic show, which returns for its 11th series, was the always warm, occasionally bickering relationship between straight-talking Liverpudlian couple, Leon and June Bernicoff. But, sadly, Leon died last December following a short illness and June recently confirmed that she won’t be taking part without him. So, in the absence of Leon’s notoriously unvarnished views (on chef Jamie Oliver: “‘Oh he’s a d---head”), what can we expect? Probably business as usual. After all, the show has survived the loss of popular families before, from everyone’s favourite posh couple, Steph and Dom, to the gloriously opinionated Scarlett Moffatt. Our guesses: the lovely Siddiquis will continue to be the most well-adjusted family, hairdressers Stephen and Christopher will trot out the most-pointed one-liners, Welsh couple Dave and Shirley will bring the giggles, even though it remains a mystery just how Dave watches TV in that very uncomfortable-looking position, and we still won’t be able to work out how many dogs the Malones actually have. SH Live Winter Olympics 2018 BBC One and BBC Two, from 6.00am Day 14 sees the semi-finals of the men’s ice hockey and the women’s curling competition, plus the final of the men’s 1,000 m speed skating. SH An Island Parish: After the Hurricane BBC Two, 9.00pm Sophie Okonedo narrates this special edition of the series which looks at the long-term effects of Hurricane Irma on the Caribbean island of Anguilla. Among those who lost everything are Simone Connor and her father Neville, who ran a restaurant and leisure complex on the island. SH Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm Now is the perfect time to jump back on the Will & Grace bandwagon as the wonderful Nick Offerman (the real-life husband of Megan Mullally, who plays Karen) guest stars as baker Jackson Boudreaux, aka the Bad Boy of Bread. Offerman is a scene-stealing delight and the final moments offer a lovely pay-off. SH Joan Rivers: By Her friends Channel 5, 10.30pm Anyone who saw the brilliant comedy The Marvellous Mrs Maisel, which was inspired by the late Joan Rivers’s early career, will know that the comedian’s domestic-focused stand-up routines were unlike anything that the audiences of that time had heard before. This tribute puts that ground-breaking career in context. SH The Tick Amazon Prime, from today Peter Serafinowicz’s goofy blue superhero returns for another series of misadventures. As with the last time, the series stands and falls with Serafinowicz’s performance: his morally upstanding but bizarre caped crusader has enough charm to paper over plot cracks. SH Seven Seconds Netflix, from today This new crime-drama series from Veena Sud, the writer behind the US version of The Killing, explores grief, deceit and social injustice. Starring Regina King, it focuses on the fallout from the death of a young boy who was injured by a police officer. SH The Old Grey Whistle Test Live: For One Night Only BBC Four, 9.00pm Bob Harris, who fronted The Old Grey Whistle Test from 1972-1978, returns with this event marking 30 years since the end of music show. This one-off includes live performances and interviews with fans and former presenters. SH Mute (2018) Netflix, from today True Blood alumnus Alexander Skarsgård plays Leo, the titular mute in Duncan Jones’s sci-fi thriller, which the director describes as a spiritual sequel to 2009’s Moon. Leo Beiler, a bartender with a violent past, searches for his missing girlfriend Naadirah (Seyneb Saleh) in a futuristic, neon-lit Berlin. He crosses paths with a pair of US army surgeons, brilliantly named Cactus Bill and Duck Teddington (played by Paul Rudd and Justin Theroux), on a mission of their own. X-Men: First Class (2011) ★★★☆☆ E4, 9.00pm Telepathic Charles Xavier (James McAvoy) bonds with metal-bending death camp survivor Erik Lehnsherr (Michael Fassbender) and the two of them track down other mutants to confront evil Nazi Sebastian Shaw (Kevin Bacon) when he triggers the Cuban Missile Crisis. Matthew Vaughn is much more comfortable with the small-scale character stuff than the action climax, but this prequel is mostly a lot of fun. While We’re Young (2014) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm A couple’s doomed attempt to recapture their youth gives Ben Stiller and Naomi Watts a new lease of comic life in Noah Baumbach’s sparkling film. Baumbach packs it with the wit and vigour of a polished one-act play as co-stars Adam Driver and Amanda Seyfried, playing hat-wearing hipsters, deliver punchlines that can’t help but remind you of Woody Allen at his peak. Saturday 24 February Loadsa laughs: Ant McPartlin and Declan Donnelly Credit: ITV Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway ITV, 7.00pm Anthony McPartlin and Declan Donnelly, the undisputed kings of Saturday night TV – never more so since they won the inaugural Bruce Forsyth Entertainment gong, among others, at the National Television Awards last month – return with a 16th series of their popular show. Packed full of comedy, audience participation, prize giveaways, celebrity guests, exclusive performances and madcap stunts, this is high-octane entertainment, with barely time to draw breath between items. Tonight, Kylie Minogue gives a first performance of her latest single and revisits some of her biggest hits, Britain’s Got Talent judge Amanda Holden falls victim to the first Undercover prank of the series and Olly Murs takes on the role of guest announcer in the End of Show Show. The hosts themselves, meanwhile, put the pedal to the floor for a daredevil Ant vs Dec monster truck challenge, and reprise their roles as super sleuths in a new comedy whodunit (with an all-star cast that includes Joanna Lumley, Michael Sheen, Emilia Fox and David Walliams) while sidekicks Scarlett Moffatt and Stephen Mulhern are out on the streets looking for people to plays games with. And that’s just for starters. Gerard O’Donovan Live Winter Olympics 2018 BBC One and BBC Two, from 6.00am It’s the penultimate day and there’s major Team GB interest as the four-man bobsleigh gets under way. However, most eyes will be on the curling, which has proved rather popular in these Games, as the men’s gold and women’s bronze medals are decided. There’s also action in the snowboarding and skiing. Six Nations Rugby Union: Ireland v Wales ITV, 1.30pm After their 12-6 defeat against England at Twickenham, Wales travel to Ireland, with Dan Biggar starting at fly-half, and Liam Williams and Leigh Halfpenny also returning after injury. Ireland have won two from two, beating France in Paris, before enjoying an eight-try buffet at Italy’s expense in a 56-19 victory. The visitors are unbeaten in their last three Six Nations matches against Ireland, but were held to a 16-16 draw when the sides last met here two years ago. Six Nations Rugby Union: Scotland v England BBC One, 4.00pm Tough one for England, this. Yes, they’ve won nine of the last 10 matches against Scotland, drawing the other one, but the pressure cauldron that is Murrayfield is never an easy place to visit, and they’ll have their tails up after an impressive 32-26 win against France. Still, according to head coach Gregor Townsend, Scotland will need to produce their “best-ever performance” if they are to triumph against England in the Calcutta Cup. Eddie Jones’s team beat Wales 12-6 thanks to two first-half tries by Jonny May, but were forced to hang on grimly in the frenetic closing stages as they set a new championship record for consecutive home wins (15, dating back to 2012). When these sides met in the tournament last year, England thrashed Scotland 61-21 at Twickenham. Churchill’s Darkest Decision More4, 7.55pm Fans of the hit film Darkest Hour will appreciate this documentary about another big Churchill dilemma. In 1940, following the fall of France, Germany was poised to seize the entire French fleet, making Hitler’s threat to invade Britain ever graver. Drastic measures were called for, but at a tragically high cost. David Attenborough’s Natural Curiosities BBC Two, 8.00pm Creatures with remarkable navigation skills are the focus of tonight’s edition, looking at how dung beetles use the Sun, Moon and stars as compass points, and how pigeons recall complex routes. Britain at Low Tide Channel 4, 8.00pm More stories from our shoreline as Tori Herridge visits Dorset, where she finds the home of the world’s first aircraft carrier and searches for an Iron Age monument that can only be seen for a few hours each year. Troy: Fall of a City BBC One, 9.10pm All hell breaks loose in this second episode when Helen’s (Bella Dayne) husband Menelaus finds out what Paris (Louis Hunter) took back to Troy. His enraged brother Agamemnon (Johnny Harris) calls all Greece to war, but when they fail to propitiate the gods, there’s a shocking price to pay. GO Mosaic Sky Atlantic, 10.00pm Steven Soderbergh’s crime drama starring Sharon Stone provoked a blizzard of publicity on its release last year in mobile app format. HBO’s six-part “linear” TV version is obviously less innovative (the app works like an interactive movie where the user can choose from which perspective the plot is viewed), but it still has plenty to offer. In this second episode, the backstory continues to play out as author Olivia Lake’s (Stone) relationships with lover Eric (Frederick Weller) and lodger Joel (Garrett Hedlund) become ever more tangled. GO Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2 (2013) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 5.00pm In this sequel to the 2009 animation based on the 1978 children’s book, inventor Flint Lockwood (voiced by Bill Hader) and friends must rescue the island of Swallow Falls from being overrun by food-mutated animals. It’s no triumph of screenwriting or subtext, but it’s a feast of ingeniously rendered gastronomic insanity and kids will absolutely love it. The Heat (2013) ★★★★☆ E4, 9.00pm Bridesmaids director Paul Feig brings back one of that film’s stars, Melissa McCarthy, as a foul-mouthed Boston cop whose policing style, aided by a fridge full of armaments, makes Dirty Harry look like Thumbelina. She’s paired with a goody-two-shoes FBI agent (Sandra Bullock reminding us what a pro she is at comedy). Together, they’re dynamite, plus the film has an emotional clout that hits you seemingly from nowhere. Philomena (2013) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.00pm; not Northern Ireland This true story is based on the experiences of journalist Martin Sixsmith (Steve Coogan), who helped Philomena Lee (Judi Dench), an Irish woman in her seventies, search for the son that she was forced to put up for adoption 50 years earlier. Stephen Frears’s film is charming and hard-hitting, delivering some tough emotional blows as well as some harsh truths about the Catholic Church’s past. Sunday 25 February Curiouser and curiouser: Holliday Grainger and Tom Burke Credit: BBC Strike: Career of Evil BBC One, 9.00pm Rumpled PI Cormoran Strike (Tom Burke) and his trusty Girl Friday Robin Ellacott (Holliday Grainger) return for the third of JK Rowling’s Robert Galbraith novels. It’s a few months after the events of The Silkworm and Strike and Robin have settled into an easy working partnership, albeit one that remains a little too cosy for Robin’s smarmy fiancé Matthew (Kerr Logan). Then Robin receives a gruesome present in the post and our intrepid duo found themselves caught up in an investigation that swiftly hits far too close to home. Career of Evil is the most tightly plotted of the Galbraith books and this well-paced opening episode neatly sets up the (plentiful) twists to come. That said, the real enjoyment comes not from the story but from the fantastic chemistry between Grainger and Burke, who bring an immense amount of warmth and charm to their scenes. Indeed, so successfully do they inhabit the roles that it’s frustrating to realise that, with no more Galbraith books currently published, this will be the last Strike for a while. It’s a genuine shame: if ever a TV adaptation deserved to be spun away from its source material it’s this one. Sarah Hughes ODI cricket: New Zealand v England Sky Sports Main Event, 12.30am You’ll have to stay up late to see this opening one-day international of the five-match series. England, having beaten the Aussies in their last ODI series, will fancy their chances. Young, Welsh and Pretty Minted BBC Three, from 10.00am The makers of Young, Welsh and Pretty Skint return with a new series focusing on a group of would-be entrepreneurs, including a YouTuber with 1.7 million subscribers and an image-obsessed Instagram influencer. Live Winter Olympics 2018 Closing Ceremony BBC Two, from 11.00am The Olympics bow out, allowing us to recall the heartbreak (Team GB’s Elise Christie’s wipeout in the speedskating final) and joy (American snowboarder Chloe Kim’s megawatt smile). K-pop star CL and boy band EXO take part in the ceremony which has a fusion theme, before the flag is handed over to Beijing for 2022. Premier League Football: Manchester United v Chelsea Sky Sports Main Event, 1.00pm With both sides struggling for consistency – United lost at Newcastle a fortnight ago, while Chelsea were trounced 4-1 by Watford earlier this month – today’s match at Old Trafford should be a tentative affair. Carabao Cup Final: Arsenal v Manchester City Sky Sports Main Event, 4.00pm Proving that the League Cup is having something of a resurgence, Arsenal and Manchester City are this year’s finalists, with the former aiming to win the trophy for the first time since 1993. City are favourites, though: imperious in the league, they also have form in the Carabao Cup, having won it in 2014 and 2016. Top Gear BBC Two, 8.00pm The petrolhead’s special returns with Matt LeBlanc promising increased family appeal. The new team of LeBlanc, Chris Harris and Rory Reid have decent chemistry and if this was your sort of thing then it probably remains so. Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble BBC Four, 8.00pm Few programmes are as inspiring as this one about cellist Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble, an ever-changing group of over 50 artists who perform alongside Ma. In addition to highlighting some phenomenal talents – Galician bagpiper Cristina Pato almost steals the show – the film details the hardships that they’ve faced, including revolution and exile. Anchoring it all is former child prodigy Ma: “I think when I was a kid a lot of things just happened,” he notes as footage shows him performing as a child for President Kennedy. “I’m always trying to figure out who I am and where I fit in the world.” SH Hannibal’s Elephant Army: The New Evidence Channel 4, 8.00pm Why did Carthaginian general Hannibal cross the Alps on a seemingly impossible journey with an army of 40,000 soldiers, 9,000 cavalry officers and 37 elephants? This fascinating film examines the evidence. Life and Death Row: The Mass Execution BBC Two, 9.00pm The harrowing series continues to turn a microscopic eye on all aspects of the death penalty. Tonight it’s the case of Stacey Johnson, on death row for 23 years. His stepdaughter insists on his innocence; his victim’s daughter says she’s sure that he’s a guilty man. SH Clouds of Sils Maria (2014) ★★★★☆ BBC Four, 9.30pm A complex, bewitching and fearlessly intelligent psychological fondue from France’s Olivier Assayas, with Juliet Binoche and Kristen Stewart as a famous actress and her diligent and devoted personal assistant, prepping for a play that shapes the drama of their own lives in its likeness. Playful and addictively strange, with career-best work from Stewart. Shutter Island (2010) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 11.05pm Martin Scorsese’s follow-up to The Departed, is, like that film, based on a novel by Dennis Lehane. He delves into gothic noir in this mystery thriller as detective Daniels (Leonardo DiCaprio) investigates the disappearance of an inmate from a prison for the clinically insane with the help of his partner (played brilliantly by Mark Ruffalo). This is a gripping story with some bold twists, although it eventually loses momentum. Point Break (1991) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 11.30pm; Scotland, 12.30am Kathryn Bigelow’s cult surfing/crime film elevated Patrick Swayze’s actor status to true action hero. Keanu Reeves plays Johnny Utah, an FBI agent who goes undercover to infiltrate a gang of bankrobbing surfers led by the charismatic Bodhi (Swayze). The action heats up when Bodhi and Utah find they share a similar attitude towards danger. Lori Petty is the surfer who catches Johnny’s eye. Monday 26 February Body snatched? Greg Kinnear as the father Credit: Channel 4 Electric Dreams: The Father Thing Channel 4, 10.00pm After a first run split pretty evenly between stunners and misfires, the final four adaptations of short stories from pulp sci-fi icon Philip K Dick begins with a heavily derivative but entertaining piece from Michael Dinner, showrunner of excellent modern western Justified. The setting is an unnamed Midwest town, where young baseball-loving Charlie (Jack Gore) lives with his parents, hangs out with three other misfits and avoids the bullies; it’s as cosily familiar a slice of apple-pie Americana as you could find. And then the aftermath of a meteor shower causes Charlie to suspect that some of the town’s inhabitants may have been replaced by aliens, his own father (Greg Kinnear) included. Based more directly than some of its predecessors on Dick’s original story, this cannot help but nod to Invasion of the Body Snatchers, although the Cold War paranoia replaced by… what, exactly? There’s a parable of father-son relations in here, along with an allegory of divorce and a Stranger Things-influenced romp, but it shows its hand a little early, never settles on a tone and features a climax that will split opinion down the middle. That said, it’s never less than diverting. Gabriel Tate This Country BBC Three, from 10.00am Series one of Charlie and Daisy May Cooper’s mockumentary transcended its obvious debt to The Office to become a touching, acutely observed and defiant portrait of life on the margins in rural Britain. Importantly, it was also very funny, finding bathos and humour in the efforts of gormless cousins Kurtan and Kerry Mucklowe (played by the Coopers) to amuse themselves in a Cotswolds village. Thankfully, almost nothing has changed for this second series, although Kurtan has found a girlfriend and Kerry hitherto unknown charitable instincts. Shakespeare & Hathaway: Private Investigators BBC One, 2.15pm Jo Joyner and Mark Benton are perfectly cast in this amiable new 10-part series as Lu Shakespeare, wrongly suspected of killing her fiancé, and Frank Hathaway, the slobbish PI she ropes in to clear her name. The odd-couple chemistry is there from the start and Stratford-upon-Avon looks glorious – making this a welcome addition to the afternoon schedules. Hollywood in Vienna: the Sound of Space & Alexandre Desplat Sky Arts, 8.00pm This gala performance loosely based on a journey through the universe includes Parisian composer Alexandre Desplat’s melodies for movies, including Twilight and The Grand Budapest Hotel, as well as legendary scores from Star Wars to E.T. GT Classic Mary Berry BBC One, 8.30pm Cherish the unlikely sight of the former Bake Off judge partaking in a little “caveman cooking” in this latest rebranding of Mary Berry’s line in home-cooking, with the opener focusing on comfort food. MasterChef BBC One, 9.00pm The 11th run of the enduringly popular cooking contest begins with the first seven contestants creating dishes using ingredients including beef mince and duck breasts for John Torode, Gregg Wallace and some former finalists. The Unstoppable Flying Scotsman Channel 5, 9.00pm The world’s most famous steam locomotive is profiled in this two-parter from Rob Bell, always a reassuring translator of technical geekery for a mainstream audience. Here, he explores its origins and enduring appeal. GT Ice Cold in Alex (1958, b/w) ★★★★☆ Film4, 4.20pm J Lee Thompson’s tense British wartime thriller is one of the classics of the black-and-white era and richly entertaining. John Mills shines as Captain Anson, who dreams of an ice-cold glass of lager while escorting Britons across the desert to Alexandria during the Second World War. The film makes some interesting points about patriotism, as we learn Anson is unaware that he’s harbouring a traitor. Alien Resurrection (1997) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Sigourney Weaver returns as heroine Ellen Ripley for this fourth film in the franchise. Two hundred years have passed since Alien 3, and Ripley has now been cloned by scientists, which gives her greater strength but also conflicting loyalties, meaning we’re not sure that we can trust her. Despite the talent on board (Weaver, screenwriter Joss Whedon and director Jean-Pierre Jeunot), this is a poor effort. Elysium (2013) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 11.00pm Neill Blomkamp’s (District 9) intelligent sci-fi thriller has a fire in its belly and stars a brawny Matt Damon as a factory worker who scrapes out a living on the Earth’s crust. He’s involved in an accident but the medical care that he needs is on space station Elysium. Blomkamp focuses on faith, capitalism and private healthcare – in lesser hands, the film might have played out like a Lib Dem manifesto with spaceships. Tuesday 27 February Surrounded by splendour: Alan Titchmarsh Secrets of the National Trust with Alan Titchmarsh Channel 5, 8.00pm A tale of “female empowerment, politics and a fight for the throne of England itself” is how Alan Titchmarsh, opening a second series showcasing the National Trust’s finest properties, describes the history of Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire. Certainly, the story of Elizabeth Talbot, Countess of Shrewsbury (aka Bess of Hardwick), and how four strategic marriages helped her to become one of the most powerful women in Elizabethan England, is a fascinating one. And the glorious house she built in the 1590s, with vast facades of glass and sumptuous decor, was doubtless a marvel of the age. Whether you think Titchmarsh does either of them justice will depend on how much detail you like in a documentary, and how much repetition (you won’t possess enough fingers to count how often he mentions that Bess’s initials and coat of arms decorate the high parapet of the house) and “coming up next” you can bear. Either way, there are plenty of glories to gaze upon, so if you’re unlikely to get a chance to visit Hardwick Hall in person, the fine filming shows off the house and its grounds in considerable splendour. Gerard O’Donovan How to Get Fit Fast Channel 4, 8.00pm Anna Richardson and Amar Latif put the emphasis on fitness rather than weight loss in this new series exploring the off-the-shelf plans available, hoping to point viewers towards the exercise regime that suits them best. 100 Years Younger in 21 Days ITV, 9.00pm Eight well-worn famous faces attempt to turn the clock back at a “rejuvenation” clinic in Sardinia. June Brown, Sherrie Hewson, Claire King, Sid Owen, Roy Walker, Russell Grant, Googlebox’s Sandra Martin and music legend Shaun Ryder are among thoses hoping to knock off years without going under the knife. The FGM Detectives Channel 4, 10.00pm Despite the global efforts to ban the practice, female genital mutilation (FGM) continues to affect millions of women. Here Cathy Newman leads a two-year investigation into FGM in the UK, which is estimated to put 20,000 young British women at risk every year. Acid Attack: My Story BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm Naomi Oni recounts the horrific acid attack that left her with life-altering injuries in 2012, and how the police investigation (which, unbelievably, initially focused on whether she had inflicted the wounds on herself) proved the attacker to be a childhood friend. GO Unreal Amazon Prime, from today A drama playing on the fakeness, dubious ethics and behind-the-scenes manipulation of a hit reality TV dating show, UnREAL is nothing if not a series for our times. As the third season begins, Everlasting’s producer Rachel (Shiri Appleby) is getting her life back on track, despite her ruthless boss Quinn (Constance Zimmer) ramping up the pressure to deliver the show’s most outrageous season yet. Divorce Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm Sarah Jessica Parker returns with a second season of the bleak and bitingly funny comedy about the painful break-up of an American middle-class couple’s marriage. At least that’s what series one, created and partly written by the Sharon Horgan, was about. Season two, minus Horgan’s input, takes on a distinctly lighter tone as both Frances (Parker) and her now ex-husband Robert (Thomas Haden Church) begin tentatively to negotiate the possibilities of life post divorce. GO Charade (1963) ★★★★☆ Film4, 2.25pm Audrey Hepburn as a temperamental-but-alluring damsel in distress and Cary Grant as a shadowy charmer are characters that the actors played many times. But they do so exceptionally in this suspense comedy from Stanley Donen, often referred to as the best Hitchcock movie that Hitchcock never made. Hepburn is the widow being trailed by four men hunting for her late husband’s stolen fortune. Black Swan (2010) ★★★★★ Film4, 11.25pm Darren Aronofsky’s film is delirious hokum and high-class trash. Natalie Portman stars as Nina Sayers, a young dancer with the New York City Ballet preparing for a production of Swan Lake choreographed by the charismatic Thomas Leroy (Vincent Cassel). He is unconvinced by Nina’s ability to portray the passion of the Black Swan and her efforts to convince him lead her towards madness. Christine (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 11.50pm The story of Christine Chubbuck, a Florida newsreader who shot herself on air in 1974, is shocking and unfathomably sad. But it wouldn’t be worth retelling on film if it didn’t illuminate something. It asks a top-notch Rebecca Hall to play out the last days of Chubbuck’s life and dares us to hope that it’s about a different woman – one who made it out the other side of her own tragedy. Wednesday 28 February Victim: Édgar Ramírez as Versace Credit: BBC The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story BBC Two, 9.00pm Ryan Murphy’s true crime series follows up 2016’s dramatisation of the OJ Simpson trial with the story of serial killer Andrew Cunanan, who murdered at least five people over a three-month period, including the fashion designer Gianni Versace. Murphy and scriptwriter Tom Rob Smith use the word assassination very carefully here: the operatic opening scenes depict Versace (Édgar Ramírez) as a modern-day Medici prince, dispensing cheerful patronage to all in his Miami Beach fiefdom. By contrast, Cunanan (Darren Criss) is portrayed as a man so insecure in his own skin that he is almost physically incapable of telling the truth: “You tell gay people you’re gay and straight people you’re straight,” exclaims an exasperated friend. “I tell people what they need to hear,” comes the too-calm reply. Both Criss and Ramirez are excellent and there’s strong support from Ricky Martin as Versace’s bewildered live-in boyfriend and a perhaps slightly too-camp Penélope Cruz as Donatella. Smith’s solid script does a good job of juggling various timelines to show how this particular killer came to be. Sarah Hughes Ellie Undercover: Rent for Sex BBC Three, from 10.00am Investigative journalist Ellie Flynn presents this look at the growing number of unscrupulous landlords who offer rent-free accommodation in exchange for sex. It’s hard not to feel utterly dispirited as Flynn meets vulnerable women such as Chloe, who feels so trapped by her homelessness that she’s in no position to say no to these men. Athletics: The World Indoor Championships BBC Two, 7.00pm The four-day World Indoor Championships, which takes place at Arena Birmingham, kicks off on Thursday, featuring three events in the first evening session – including Team GB’s Laura Muir and Eilish McColgan in the final of the women’s 3,000 m. Events continue from 9.00am on Friday, with Greg Rutherford’s long jump bid among the highlights. The World’s Most Extraordinary Homes BBC Two, 8.00pm For those of us who enjoy gawping at other people’s homes, few programmes are more satisfying than this series presented by Caroline Quentin and architect Piers Taylor. Tonight the duo are in Portugal poking their noses into four very different properties. The Supervet Channel 4, 8.00pm Professor Noel Fitzpatrick and the team returns for a new round of veterinary problems, including a very excitable Labrador who requires elbow replacement surgery and a Jackahuahua puppy who needs to have spinal surgery after an attack in the park. Benidorm ITV, 9.00pm Hold on to your sunhats as ITV’s long-running Costa Blanca comedy returns for a 10th series with comedians Hale & Pace joining the cast as a pair of undercover cops. Elsewhere, Joyce (Sherrie Hewson) and Monty’s (John Challis) big day arrives. Save Me Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Don’t let the fact that it features yet another missing child put you off the week’s best new drama. Written by and starring Lennie James, Save Me tells the tale of Nelly (James), an ageing wide-boy of suspect charms, who finds himself in trouble after his estranged teenage daughter disappears. We’ve all met people like Nelly, the easy smiles hiding their sharp edges, and James does a wonderful job of making us warm to him despite the distrust. There’s strong support, too, from Suranne Jones as the missing girl’s mother. SH Film 2018 BBC One, 11.15pm; Wales, 11.35pm; NI, 12.10am The BBC’s long-running film series returns with an opening episode hosted by Radio 1’s Clara Amfo alongside critics Ellen E Jones and Larushka Ivan-Zadeh. The focus this week is on next Sunday’s Academy Awards, plus an interview with Lady Bird’s Oscar-nominated director, Greta Gerwig. SH The Quiet Man (1952) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.00pm Best known for his sombre westerns, John Ford turns personal for this wonderful romantic comedy which was considered a risky venture but went on to win the director his fourth Oscar. It tells the story of a boxer who falls in love with the sister of a bully. The famous grab-and-kiss scene between the smouldering John Wayne and love interest Maureen O’Hara (the “Queen of Technicolour”) also appears in E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. Big Eyes (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Amy Adams is ideally cast as the browbeaten artist Margaret Keane who, for eight years, churned out iconic, highly sought after paintings, only for her con artist husband (Christoph Waltz) to take all the credit. Tim Burton’s take on this curious real-life tale of curdled suburbia sadly lacks Adams’s subtlety: even the usually restrained Waltz is caught up in the blunt, overly stylised kookiness. Good (2008) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.50pm Viggo Mortensen gives a thoughtful performance as a German professor whose ideas about euthanasia are adopted by the Nazis. It’s only when he becomes a concentration camp inspector that he grasps the horror of his ideas. Vicente Amorim’s adaptation of CP Taylor’s play doesn’t shirk big questions, but he tends to fall back on clichés – hammerings on the piano, etc – and it plays a bit like a Nazi version of Rising Damp. Thursday 1 March A landmark return: David Olusoga, Mary Beard and Simon Schama Credit: BBC Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm Almost 50 years after changing the face of arts programming with the landmark series Civilisation, BBC Two returns with an expanded brief and all the bells and whistles of modern film-making, from drone cameras to infra-red photography. With nine episodes split between presenters Simon Schama (five), David Olusoga and Mary Beard (two each), Civilisations promises an opinionated overview of global art and culture. It opens with a striking sequence in which Schama – helming this first part – explores what has been lost and salvaged from the Isil pillage of Palmyra. From there, we’re whisked to Africa’s Cape coast and the first evidence of mankind’s creativity 77,000 years ago. Then it’s a breathless gallop through the millennia, alighting at the first settlements and depictions of the human face. Among the cave art, Mayan stairways and fertility fetishes, the real treasure is an astonishing Mycenaean Sealstone, jaw-dropping in its anatomical detail and artistic accomplishment. While it won’t have the same impact as the original series (what could?), Civilisations looks to be just as learned, accessible and thrilling as its predecessor – the whole series will be available on BBC iPlayer at 10.00pm. Gabriel Tate The Cruise: Voyage to Alaska ITV, 8.30pm; not Wales Over three episodes, the five-star luxury liner Star Princess and its redoubtable crew travels to the northernmost American state – where they encounter difficult weather, navigational challenges and problem passengers. Weinstein: the Inside Story BBC One, 9.00pm In collaboration with PBS America’s Frontline current-affairs strand, Panorama examines the fall of Harvey Weinstein and the lengths to which the disgraced Hollywood producer would go to keep his alleged bullying, threats and sexual assaults private. Speaking to insiders, the team builds a troubling picture of industry complicity. From Ice to Fire: the Incredible Science of Temperature BBC Four, 9.00pm Dr Helen Czerski concludes her excellent series with fire, and how its harnessing played a pivotal role in human evolution and survival, from essentials such as toolmaking and mining to relative fripperies such as hot-air balloons. The moment that Czerski triggers a lightning strike at a high-voltage laboratory carries a genuine frisson; as is customary with most BBC Four films, the presentation is lively and the science deftly handled. Serial Killer with Piers Morgan ITV, 9.00pm How do you follow interviewing Donald Trump? Piers Morgan returns to the less contentious turf of more one-to-ones with convicted murderers behind bars. He begins with Lorenzo Gilyard, the so-called Kansas City Strangler, who remains unremorseful after allegedly killing 13 women and girls over almost two decades. Panic at 30,000 Feet: Airline Emergency Channel 5, 9.00pm This nightmare-inducing new series explores what happens when flights go wrong, from mid-air collisions to runway explosions. GT Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 11.45pm The penultimate episode of this often disturbing and insightful series revisits Oak Creek, Wisconsin, where white supremacist Michael Page killed six and injured four at a Sikh temple, before killing himself, in 2012. For once, there is a vaguely positive denouement: Page’s brutality had the opposite to its intended effect and brought the community closer together. GT Jubal (1956) ★★★★☆ Film4, 12.40pm Ernest Borgnine stars in this brooding western shot in the Grand Teton mountains of Wyoming, which reworks the plot of Othello. Borgnine stars as a cattle rancher with a much younger wife (Valerie French), who is driven into a jealous rage when cattlehand Rod Steiger suggests that she is having an affair with young drifter Jubal (a magnificent Glenn Ford). Murder is most definitely on the cards. Pitch Perfect (2012) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm The world of collegiate a cappella singing contests can’t be as heartless as Jason Moore’s sour comedy would have us believe. Anna Kendrick stars as Beca, an angst-ridden outsider who must shake up her uninspiring and monotonous group, while trying to handle how weird they all are. And, of course, there’s a handsome man (Skylar Astin) who catches her eye. It’s a little like Glee but without the schmaltz. The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Clint Eastwood directs and stars in this warm-hearted marvellous western adapted from Forrest Carter’s novel and set during the American Civil War. Eastwood plays the Missouri farmer who, driven by memories of his family’s slaughter, becomes an outlaw when he refuses to join his Confederate comrades in surrender, in favour of seeking revenge on the men who murdered his kin. Friday 2 March Searching for the truth: Lydia Wilson as Matilda Credit: BBC Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm After last week’s hiatus because of the Six Nations rugby, it’s back to small-town Wales for another dose of supernatural country-house shenanigans. When we last saw fragile but determined musician Matilda (Lydia Wilson), she’d suffered the double whammy of finding her would-be mother Rose (Claire Rushbrook) unconscious in the bath and learning that mute Aunt Meredith (Jane Thorne) had died on the verge of offering up her secrets. How did Matilda react? By mysteriously blacking out and bashing her beloved cello against a cupboard. In the fourth episode then, she looks for connections between her mental health and Carys’s disappearance. And some clues emerge: Matilda meets dishevelled local Laura (Anastasia Hille), who claims to hear voices informing her of Carys’s fate, and back at the mansion, she comes across some old tomes detailing rituals to unlock the past. Even with its heavily scored bumps and shudders, Requiem can’t quite sustain its early Hammer Horror appeal. The strong performances and some genuinely chilling moments keep things compelling however, not least in the spine-tingling climax of this episode. Toby Dantzic Flint Town Netflix, from today Back in 2014, a cost-cutting exercise left thousands of homes in Flint, Michigan, with contaminated drinking water for years. This new eight-part documentary looks at the fallout from the crisis through the eyes of Flint’s beleaguered police force, who face an uphill struggle – the community needs their support but are also deeply mistrustful of those in authority, plus dwindling resources makes the officers’ jobs harder still. MasterChef BBC One, 7.30pm Having survived the cooking contest’s opening week, the six heat winners face food critic William Sitwell in this first quarter-final. He challenges them to conjure up a standout pudding showcasing either alcohol or spices. Love Your Garden ITV, 8.00pm; not STV/UTV/Wales This week, Alan Titchmarsh and his team are in Bidewell, Devon, helping Tamsyn and Alex Wood who returned to the UK from France after Alex suffered a brain injury. The aim is to turn the Woods’ garden into a coastal sanctuary inspired by Alex’s passion for surfing. The Yorkshire Steam Railway: All Aboard Channel 5, 8.00pm As amiable as its title suggests, this new documentary series follows the lives of those who work on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, one of the country’s most popular steam railways. In this series’ opener, the new season begins with the arrival of star engine Royal Scot, on loan from London. Tones, Drones and Arpeggios: The Magic of Minimalism BBC Four, 9.00pm Conductor Charles Hazlewood explores minimalism, which he argues is the most important musical form of the 20th century. In the fascinating opener of this two-part series, he unpicks the construction of these sometimes confounding sounds and tracks down the genre’s avant-garde pioneers, who brought their mesmeric, spirituality-inspired compositions from California to New York in the Sixties. TD Jo Brand: Secrets of Her Success Channel 5, 10.30pm Channel 5’s celebration of funny women continues with this absorbing profile of the pioneering doyenne of deadpan, Jo Brand. This charts her career from its rocky start on the male-dominated stand-up circuit to her much-admired hospital sitcom Getting On. TD Gladiator (2000) ★★★★★ Film4, 9.00pm This take on the traditional swords-and-sandals epic proved that Russell Crowe deserved to be recognised as a mainstream star, and reaffirmed Ridley Scott’s reputation as a first-rate director. Crowe is Maximus, a former Roman general who rebuilds his career as a gladiator. His bid for vengeance against a vile emperor (Joaquin Phoenix) is compelling. Plus there’s a last hurrah from Oliver Reed. Blades of Glory (2007) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm;N Ireland, 12.05am You might think that the sequinned world of figure skating is beyond parody, but here Will Ferrell and Jon Heder serve up a zestfully preposterous comedy. Both play rival Olympic ice skaters, Ferrell a loose-living maverick, Heder a prissy perfectionist, who are slung out of the sport but use a loophole to return as an erotic all-male pairing. Amy Poehler co-stars. A Hijacking (2012) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.55pm Tobias Lindholm’s vigorously intelligent hostage thriller, set on board a besieged ship in the Indian Ocean, deftly moves his story between the boat and the shipping company’s offices, where Søren Malling’s frazzled CEO attempts to thrash out a bargain. On the other end of the line is the Somalis’ translator. Flies buzz, sweat trickles, negotiations continue, and you feel your breath dry up. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
What's on TV tonight: Gogglebox and The Old Grey Whistle Test Live
Friday 23 February Gogglebox Channel 4, 9.00pm We all know that Gogglebox won’t be the same this time around. One of the great joys of watching the armchair TV critic show, which returns for its 11th series, was the always warm, occasionally bickering relationship between straight-talking Liverpudlian couple, Leon and June Bernicoff. But, sadly, Leon died last December following a short illness and June recently confirmed that she won’t be taking part without him. So, in the absence of Leon’s notoriously unvarnished views (on chef Jamie Oliver: “‘Oh he’s a d---head”), what can we expect? Probably business as usual. After all, the show has survived the loss of popular families before, from everyone’s favourite posh couple, Steph and Dom, to the gloriously opinionated Scarlett Moffatt. Our guesses: the lovely Siddiquis will continue to be the most well-adjusted family, hairdressers Stephen and Christopher will trot out the most-pointed one-liners, Welsh couple Dave and Shirley will bring the giggles, even though it remains a mystery just how Dave watches TV in that very uncomfortable-looking position, and we still won’t be able to work out how many dogs the Malones actually have. SH Live Winter Olympics 2018 BBC One and BBC Two, from 6.00am Day 14 sees the semi-finals of the men’s ice hockey and the women’s curling competition, plus the final of the men’s 1,000 m speed skating. SH An Island Parish: After the Hurricane BBC Two, 9.00pm Sophie Okonedo narrates this special edition of the series which looks at the long-term effects of Hurricane Irma on the Caribbean island of Anguilla. Among those who lost everything are Simone Connor and her father Neville, who ran a restaurant and leisure complex on the island. SH Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm Now is the perfect time to jump back on the Will & Grace bandwagon as the wonderful Nick Offerman (the real-life husband of Megan Mullally, who plays Karen) guest stars as baker Jackson Boudreaux, aka the Bad Boy of Bread. Offerman is a scene-stealing delight and the final moments offer a lovely pay-off. SH Joan Rivers: By Her friends Channel 5, 10.30pm Anyone who saw the brilliant comedy The Marvellous Mrs Maisel, which was inspired by the late Joan Rivers’s early career, will know that the comedian’s domestic-focused stand-up routines were unlike anything that the audiences of that time had heard before. This tribute puts that ground-breaking career in context. SH The Tick Amazon Prime, from today Peter Serafinowicz’s goofy blue superhero returns for another series of misadventures. As with the last time, the series stands and falls with Serafinowicz’s performance: his morally upstanding but bizarre caped crusader has enough charm to paper over plot cracks. SH Seven Seconds Netflix, from today This new crime-drama series from Veena Sud, the writer behind the US version of The Killing, explores grief, deceit and social injustice. Starring Regina King, it focuses on the fallout from the death of a young boy who was injured by a police officer. SH The Old Grey Whistle Test Live: For One Night Only BBC Four, 9.00pm Bob Harris, who fronted The Old Grey Whistle Test from 1972-1978, returns with this event marking 30 years since the end of music show. This one-off includes live performances and interviews with fans and former presenters. SH Mute (2018) Netflix, from today True Blood alumnus Alexander Skarsgård plays Leo, the titular mute in Duncan Jones’s sci-fi thriller, which the director describes as a spiritual sequel to 2009’s Moon. Leo Beiler, a bartender with a violent past, searches for his missing girlfriend Naadirah (Seyneb Saleh) in a futuristic, neon-lit Berlin. He crosses paths with a pair of US army surgeons, brilliantly named Cactus Bill and Duck Teddington (played by Paul Rudd and Justin Theroux), on a mission of their own. X-Men: First Class (2011) ★★★☆☆ E4, 9.00pm Telepathic Charles Xavier (James McAvoy) bonds with metal-bending death camp survivor Erik Lehnsherr (Michael Fassbender) and the two of them track down other mutants to confront evil Nazi Sebastian Shaw (Kevin Bacon) when he triggers the Cuban Missile Crisis. Matthew Vaughn is much more comfortable with the small-scale character stuff than the action climax, but this prequel is mostly a lot of fun. While We’re Young (2014) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm A couple’s doomed attempt to recapture their youth gives Ben Stiller and Naomi Watts a new lease of comic life in Noah Baumbach’s sparkling film. Baumbach packs it with the wit and vigour of a polished one-act play as co-stars Adam Driver and Amanda Seyfried, playing hat-wearing hipsters, deliver punchlines that can’t help but remind you of Woody Allen at his peak. Saturday 24 February Loadsa laughs: Ant McPartlin and Declan Donnelly Credit: ITV Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway ITV, 7.00pm Anthony McPartlin and Declan Donnelly, the undisputed kings of Saturday night TV – never more so since they won the inaugural Bruce Forsyth Entertainment gong, among others, at the National Television Awards last month – return with a 16th series of their popular show. Packed full of comedy, audience participation, prize giveaways, celebrity guests, exclusive performances and madcap stunts, this is high-octane entertainment, with barely time to draw breath between items. Tonight, Kylie Minogue gives a first performance of her latest single and revisits some of her biggest hits, Britain’s Got Talent judge Amanda Holden falls victim to the first Undercover prank of the series and Olly Murs takes on the role of guest announcer in the End of Show Show. The hosts themselves, meanwhile, put the pedal to the floor for a daredevil Ant vs Dec monster truck challenge, and reprise their roles as super sleuths in a new comedy whodunit (with an all-star cast that includes Joanna Lumley, Michael Sheen, Emilia Fox and David Walliams) while sidekicks Scarlett Moffatt and Stephen Mulhern are out on the streets looking for people to plays games with. And that’s just for starters. Gerard O’Donovan Live Winter Olympics 2018 BBC One and BBC Two, from 6.00am It’s the penultimate day and there’s major Team GB interest as the four-man bobsleigh gets under way. However, most eyes will be on the curling, which has proved rather popular in these Games, as the men’s gold and women’s bronze medals are decided. There’s also action in the snowboarding and skiing. Six Nations Rugby Union: Ireland v Wales ITV, 1.30pm After their 12-6 defeat against England at Twickenham, Wales travel to Ireland, with Dan Biggar starting at fly-half, and Liam Williams and Leigh Halfpenny also returning after injury. Ireland have won two from two, beating France in Paris, before enjoying an eight-try buffet at Italy’s expense in a 56-19 victory. The visitors are unbeaten in their last three Six Nations matches against Ireland, but were held to a 16-16 draw when the sides last met here two years ago. Six Nations Rugby Union: Scotland v England BBC One, 4.00pm Tough one for England, this. Yes, they’ve won nine of the last 10 matches against Scotland, drawing the other one, but the pressure cauldron that is Murrayfield is never an easy place to visit, and they’ll have their tails up after an impressive 32-26 win against France. Still, according to head coach Gregor Townsend, Scotland will need to produce their “best-ever performance” if they are to triumph against England in the Calcutta Cup. Eddie Jones’s team beat Wales 12-6 thanks to two first-half tries by Jonny May, but were forced to hang on grimly in the frenetic closing stages as they set a new championship record for consecutive home wins (15, dating back to 2012). When these sides met in the tournament last year, England thrashed Scotland 61-21 at Twickenham. Churchill’s Darkest Decision More4, 7.55pm Fans of the hit film Darkest Hour will appreciate this documentary about another big Churchill dilemma. In 1940, following the fall of France, Germany was poised to seize the entire French fleet, making Hitler’s threat to invade Britain ever graver. Drastic measures were called for, but at a tragically high cost. David Attenborough’s Natural Curiosities BBC Two, 8.00pm Creatures with remarkable navigation skills are the focus of tonight’s edition, looking at how dung beetles use the Sun, Moon and stars as compass points, and how pigeons recall complex routes. Britain at Low Tide Channel 4, 8.00pm More stories from our shoreline as Tori Herridge visits Dorset, where she finds the home of the world’s first aircraft carrier and searches for an Iron Age monument that can only be seen for a few hours each year. Troy: Fall of a City BBC One, 9.10pm All hell breaks loose in this second episode when Helen’s (Bella Dayne) husband Menelaus finds out what Paris (Louis Hunter) took back to Troy. His enraged brother Agamemnon (Johnny Harris) calls all Greece to war, but when they fail to propitiate the gods, there’s a shocking price to pay. GO Mosaic Sky Atlantic, 10.00pm Steven Soderbergh’s crime drama starring Sharon Stone provoked a blizzard of publicity on its release last year in mobile app format. HBO’s six-part “linear” TV version is obviously less innovative (the app works like an interactive movie where the user can choose from which perspective the plot is viewed), but it still has plenty to offer. In this second episode, the backstory continues to play out as author Olivia Lake’s (Stone) relationships with lover Eric (Frederick Weller) and lodger Joel (Garrett Hedlund) become ever more tangled. GO Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2 (2013) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 5.00pm In this sequel to the 2009 animation based on the 1978 children’s book, inventor Flint Lockwood (voiced by Bill Hader) and friends must rescue the island of Swallow Falls from being overrun by food-mutated animals. It’s no triumph of screenwriting or subtext, but it’s a feast of ingeniously rendered gastronomic insanity and kids will absolutely love it. The Heat (2013) ★★★★☆ E4, 9.00pm Bridesmaids director Paul Feig brings back one of that film’s stars, Melissa McCarthy, as a foul-mouthed Boston cop whose policing style, aided by a fridge full of armaments, makes Dirty Harry look like Thumbelina. She’s paired with a goody-two-shoes FBI agent (Sandra Bullock reminding us what a pro she is at comedy). Together, they’re dynamite, plus the film has an emotional clout that hits you seemingly from nowhere. Philomena (2013) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.00pm; not Northern Ireland This true story is based on the experiences of journalist Martin Sixsmith (Steve Coogan), who helped Philomena Lee (Judi Dench), an Irish woman in her seventies, search for the son that she was forced to put up for adoption 50 years earlier. Stephen Frears’s film is charming and hard-hitting, delivering some tough emotional blows as well as some harsh truths about the Catholic Church’s past. Sunday 25 February Curiouser and curiouser: Holliday Grainger and Tom Burke Credit: BBC Strike: Career of Evil BBC One, 9.00pm Rumpled PI Cormoran Strike (Tom Burke) and his trusty Girl Friday Robin Ellacott (Holliday Grainger) return for the third of JK Rowling’s Robert Galbraith novels. It’s a few months after the events of The Silkworm and Strike and Robin have settled into an easy working partnership, albeit one that remains a little too cosy for Robin’s smarmy fiancé Matthew (Kerr Logan). Then Robin receives a gruesome present in the post and our intrepid duo found themselves caught up in an investigation that swiftly hits far too close to home. Career of Evil is the most tightly plotted of the Galbraith books and this well-paced opening episode neatly sets up the (plentiful) twists to come. That said, the real enjoyment comes not from the story but from the fantastic chemistry between Grainger and Burke, who bring an immense amount of warmth and charm to their scenes. Indeed, so successfully do they inhabit the roles that it’s frustrating to realise that, with no more Galbraith books currently published, this will be the last Strike for a while. It’s a genuine shame: if ever a TV adaptation deserved to be spun away from its source material it’s this one. Sarah Hughes ODI cricket: New Zealand v England Sky Sports Main Event, 12.30am You’ll have to stay up late to see this opening one-day international of the five-match series. England, having beaten the Aussies in their last ODI series, will fancy their chances. Young, Welsh and Pretty Minted BBC Three, from 10.00am The makers of Young, Welsh and Pretty Skint return with a new series focusing on a group of would-be entrepreneurs, including a YouTuber with 1.7 million subscribers and an image-obsessed Instagram influencer. Live Winter Olympics 2018 Closing Ceremony BBC Two, from 11.00am The Olympics bow out, allowing us to recall the heartbreak (Team GB’s Elise Christie’s wipeout in the speedskating final) and joy (American snowboarder Chloe Kim’s megawatt smile). K-pop star CL and boy band EXO take part in the ceremony which has a fusion theme, before the flag is handed over to Beijing for 2022. Premier League Football: Manchester United v Chelsea Sky Sports Main Event, 1.00pm With both sides struggling for consistency – United lost at Newcastle a fortnight ago, while Chelsea were trounced 4-1 by Watford earlier this month – today’s match at Old Trafford should be a tentative affair. Carabao Cup Final: Arsenal v Manchester City Sky Sports Main Event, 4.00pm Proving that the League Cup is having something of a resurgence, Arsenal and Manchester City are this year’s finalists, with the former aiming to win the trophy for the first time since 1993. City are favourites, though: imperious in the league, they also have form in the Carabao Cup, having won it in 2014 and 2016. Top Gear BBC Two, 8.00pm The petrolhead’s special returns with Matt LeBlanc promising increased family appeal. The new team of LeBlanc, Chris Harris and Rory Reid have decent chemistry and if this was your sort of thing then it probably remains so. Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble BBC Four, 8.00pm Few programmes are as inspiring as this one about cellist Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble, an ever-changing group of over 50 artists who perform alongside Ma. In addition to highlighting some phenomenal talents – Galician bagpiper Cristina Pato almost steals the show – the film details the hardships that they’ve faced, including revolution and exile. Anchoring it all is former child prodigy Ma: “I think when I was a kid a lot of things just happened,” he notes as footage shows him performing as a child for President Kennedy. “I’m always trying to figure out who I am and where I fit in the world.” SH Hannibal’s Elephant Army: The New Evidence Channel 4, 8.00pm Why did Carthaginian general Hannibal cross the Alps on a seemingly impossible journey with an army of 40,000 soldiers, 9,000 cavalry officers and 37 elephants? This fascinating film examines the evidence. Life and Death Row: The Mass Execution BBC Two, 9.00pm The harrowing series continues to turn a microscopic eye on all aspects of the death penalty. Tonight it’s the case of Stacey Johnson, on death row for 23 years. His stepdaughter insists on his innocence; his victim’s daughter says she’s sure that he’s a guilty man. SH Clouds of Sils Maria (2014) ★★★★☆ BBC Four, 9.30pm A complex, bewitching and fearlessly intelligent psychological fondue from France’s Olivier Assayas, with Juliet Binoche and Kristen Stewart as a famous actress and her diligent and devoted personal assistant, prepping for a play that shapes the drama of their own lives in its likeness. Playful and addictively strange, with career-best work from Stewart. Shutter Island (2010) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 11.05pm Martin Scorsese’s follow-up to The Departed, is, like that film, based on a novel by Dennis Lehane. He delves into gothic noir in this mystery thriller as detective Daniels (Leonardo DiCaprio) investigates the disappearance of an inmate from a prison for the clinically insane with the help of his partner (played brilliantly by Mark Ruffalo). This is a gripping story with some bold twists, although it eventually loses momentum. Point Break (1991) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 11.30pm; Scotland, 12.30am Kathryn Bigelow’s cult surfing/crime film elevated Patrick Swayze’s actor status to true action hero. Keanu Reeves plays Johnny Utah, an FBI agent who goes undercover to infiltrate a gang of bankrobbing surfers led by the charismatic Bodhi (Swayze). The action heats up when Bodhi and Utah find they share a similar attitude towards danger. Lori Petty is the surfer who catches Johnny’s eye. Monday 26 February Body snatched? Greg Kinnear as the father Credit: Channel 4 Electric Dreams: The Father Thing Channel 4, 10.00pm After a first run split pretty evenly between stunners and misfires, the final four adaptations of short stories from pulp sci-fi icon Philip K Dick begins with a heavily derivative but entertaining piece from Michael Dinner, showrunner of excellent modern western Justified. The setting is an unnamed Midwest town, where young baseball-loving Charlie (Jack Gore) lives with his parents, hangs out with three other misfits and avoids the bullies; it’s as cosily familiar a slice of apple-pie Americana as you could find. And then the aftermath of a meteor shower causes Charlie to suspect that some of the town’s inhabitants may have been replaced by aliens, his own father (Greg Kinnear) included. Based more directly than some of its predecessors on Dick’s original story, this cannot help but nod to Invasion of the Body Snatchers, although the Cold War paranoia replaced by… what, exactly? There’s a parable of father-son relations in here, along with an allegory of divorce and a Stranger Things-influenced romp, but it shows its hand a little early, never settles on a tone and features a climax that will split opinion down the middle. That said, it’s never less than diverting. Gabriel Tate This Country BBC Three, from 10.00am Series one of Charlie and Daisy May Cooper’s mockumentary transcended its obvious debt to The Office to become a touching, acutely observed and defiant portrait of life on the margins in rural Britain. Importantly, it was also very funny, finding bathos and humour in the efforts of gormless cousins Kurtan and Kerry Mucklowe (played by the Coopers) to amuse themselves in a Cotswolds village. Thankfully, almost nothing has changed for this second series, although Kurtan has found a girlfriend and Kerry hitherto unknown charitable instincts. Shakespeare & Hathaway: Private Investigators BBC One, 2.15pm Jo Joyner and Mark Benton are perfectly cast in this amiable new 10-part series as Lu Shakespeare, wrongly suspected of killing her fiancé, and Frank Hathaway, the slobbish PI she ropes in to clear her name. The odd-couple chemistry is there from the start and Stratford-upon-Avon looks glorious – making this a welcome addition to the afternoon schedules. Hollywood in Vienna: the Sound of Space & Alexandre Desplat Sky Arts, 8.00pm This gala performance loosely based on a journey through the universe includes Parisian composer Alexandre Desplat’s melodies for movies, including Twilight and The Grand Budapest Hotel, as well as legendary scores from Star Wars to E.T. GT Classic Mary Berry BBC One, 8.30pm Cherish the unlikely sight of the former Bake Off judge partaking in a little “caveman cooking” in this latest rebranding of Mary Berry’s line in home-cooking, with the opener focusing on comfort food. MasterChef BBC One, 9.00pm The 11th run of the enduringly popular cooking contest begins with the first seven contestants creating dishes using ingredients including beef mince and duck breasts for John Torode, Gregg Wallace and some former finalists. The Unstoppable Flying Scotsman Channel 5, 9.00pm The world’s most famous steam locomotive is profiled in this two-parter from Rob Bell, always a reassuring translator of technical geekery for a mainstream audience. Here, he explores its origins and enduring appeal. GT Ice Cold in Alex (1958, b/w) ★★★★☆ Film4, 4.20pm J Lee Thompson’s tense British wartime thriller is one of the classics of the black-and-white era and richly entertaining. John Mills shines as Captain Anson, who dreams of an ice-cold glass of lager while escorting Britons across the desert to Alexandria during the Second World War. The film makes some interesting points about patriotism, as we learn Anson is unaware that he’s harbouring a traitor. Alien Resurrection (1997) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Sigourney Weaver returns as heroine Ellen Ripley for this fourth film in the franchise. Two hundred years have passed since Alien 3, and Ripley has now been cloned by scientists, which gives her greater strength but also conflicting loyalties, meaning we’re not sure that we can trust her. Despite the talent on board (Weaver, screenwriter Joss Whedon and director Jean-Pierre Jeunot), this is a poor effort. Elysium (2013) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 11.00pm Neill Blomkamp’s (District 9) intelligent sci-fi thriller has a fire in its belly and stars a brawny Matt Damon as a factory worker who scrapes out a living on the Earth’s crust. He’s involved in an accident but the medical care that he needs is on space station Elysium. Blomkamp focuses on faith, capitalism and private healthcare – in lesser hands, the film might have played out like a Lib Dem manifesto with spaceships. Tuesday 27 February Surrounded by splendour: Alan Titchmarsh Secrets of the National Trust with Alan Titchmarsh Channel 5, 8.00pm A tale of “female empowerment, politics and a fight for the throne of England itself” is how Alan Titchmarsh, opening a second series showcasing the National Trust’s finest properties, describes the history of Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire. Certainly, the story of Elizabeth Talbot, Countess of Shrewsbury (aka Bess of Hardwick), and how four strategic marriages helped her to become one of the most powerful women in Elizabethan England, is a fascinating one. And the glorious house she built in the 1590s, with vast facades of glass and sumptuous decor, was doubtless a marvel of the age. Whether you think Titchmarsh does either of them justice will depend on how much detail you like in a documentary, and how much repetition (you won’t possess enough fingers to count how often he mentions that Bess’s initials and coat of arms decorate the high parapet of the house) and “coming up next” you can bear. Either way, there are plenty of glories to gaze upon, so if you’re unlikely to get a chance to visit Hardwick Hall in person, the fine filming shows off the house and its grounds in considerable splendour. Gerard O’Donovan How to Get Fit Fast Channel 4, 8.00pm Anna Richardson and Amar Latif put the emphasis on fitness rather than weight loss in this new series exploring the off-the-shelf plans available, hoping to point viewers towards the exercise regime that suits them best. 100 Years Younger in 21 Days ITV, 9.00pm Eight well-worn famous faces attempt to turn the clock back at a “rejuvenation” clinic in Sardinia. June Brown, Sherrie Hewson, Claire King, Sid Owen, Roy Walker, Russell Grant, Googlebox’s Sandra Martin and music legend Shaun Ryder are among thoses hoping to knock off years without going under the knife. The FGM Detectives Channel 4, 10.00pm Despite the global efforts to ban the practice, female genital mutilation (FGM) continues to affect millions of women. Here Cathy Newman leads a two-year investigation into FGM in the UK, which is estimated to put 20,000 young British women at risk every year. Acid Attack: My Story BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm Naomi Oni recounts the horrific acid attack that left her with life-altering injuries in 2012, and how the police investigation (which, unbelievably, initially focused on whether she had inflicted the wounds on herself) proved the attacker to be a childhood friend. GO Unreal Amazon Prime, from today A drama playing on the fakeness, dubious ethics and behind-the-scenes manipulation of a hit reality TV dating show, UnREAL is nothing if not a series for our times. As the third season begins, Everlasting’s producer Rachel (Shiri Appleby) is getting her life back on track, despite her ruthless boss Quinn (Constance Zimmer) ramping up the pressure to deliver the show’s most outrageous season yet. Divorce Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm Sarah Jessica Parker returns with a second season of the bleak and bitingly funny comedy about the painful break-up of an American middle-class couple’s marriage. At least that’s what series one, created and partly written by the Sharon Horgan, was about. Season two, minus Horgan’s input, takes on a distinctly lighter tone as both Frances (Parker) and her now ex-husband Robert (Thomas Haden Church) begin tentatively to negotiate the possibilities of life post divorce. GO Charade (1963) ★★★★☆ Film4, 2.25pm Audrey Hepburn as a temperamental-but-alluring damsel in distress and Cary Grant as a shadowy charmer are characters that the actors played many times. But they do so exceptionally in this suspense comedy from Stanley Donen, often referred to as the best Hitchcock movie that Hitchcock never made. Hepburn is the widow being trailed by four men hunting for her late husband’s stolen fortune. Black Swan (2010) ★★★★★ Film4, 11.25pm Darren Aronofsky’s film is delirious hokum and high-class trash. Natalie Portman stars as Nina Sayers, a young dancer with the New York City Ballet preparing for a production of Swan Lake choreographed by the charismatic Thomas Leroy (Vincent Cassel). He is unconvinced by Nina’s ability to portray the passion of the Black Swan and her efforts to convince him lead her towards madness. Christine (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 11.50pm The story of Christine Chubbuck, a Florida newsreader who shot herself on air in 1974, is shocking and unfathomably sad. But it wouldn’t be worth retelling on film if it didn’t illuminate something. It asks a top-notch Rebecca Hall to play out the last days of Chubbuck’s life and dares us to hope that it’s about a different woman – one who made it out the other side of her own tragedy. Wednesday 28 February Victim: Édgar Ramírez as Versace Credit: BBC The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story BBC Two, 9.00pm Ryan Murphy’s true crime series follows up 2016’s dramatisation of the OJ Simpson trial with the story of serial killer Andrew Cunanan, who murdered at least five people over a three-month period, including the fashion designer Gianni Versace. Murphy and scriptwriter Tom Rob Smith use the word assassination very carefully here: the operatic opening scenes depict Versace (Édgar Ramírez) as a modern-day Medici prince, dispensing cheerful patronage to all in his Miami Beach fiefdom. By contrast, Cunanan (Darren Criss) is portrayed as a man so insecure in his own skin that he is almost physically incapable of telling the truth: “You tell gay people you’re gay and straight people you’re straight,” exclaims an exasperated friend. “I tell people what they need to hear,” comes the too-calm reply. Both Criss and Ramirez are excellent and there’s strong support from Ricky Martin as Versace’s bewildered live-in boyfriend and a perhaps slightly too-camp Penélope Cruz as Donatella. Smith’s solid script does a good job of juggling various timelines to show how this particular killer came to be. Sarah Hughes Ellie Undercover: Rent for Sex BBC Three, from 10.00am Investigative journalist Ellie Flynn presents this look at the growing number of unscrupulous landlords who offer rent-free accommodation in exchange for sex. It’s hard not to feel utterly dispirited as Flynn meets vulnerable women such as Chloe, who feels so trapped by her homelessness that she’s in no position to say no to these men. Athletics: The World Indoor Championships BBC Two, 7.00pm The four-day World Indoor Championships, which takes place at Arena Birmingham, kicks off on Thursday, featuring three events in the first evening session – including Team GB’s Laura Muir and Eilish McColgan in the final of the women’s 3,000 m. Events continue from 9.00am on Friday, with Greg Rutherford’s long jump bid among the highlights. The World’s Most Extraordinary Homes BBC Two, 8.00pm For those of us who enjoy gawping at other people’s homes, few programmes are more satisfying than this series presented by Caroline Quentin and architect Piers Taylor. Tonight the duo are in Portugal poking their noses into four very different properties. The Supervet Channel 4, 8.00pm Professor Noel Fitzpatrick and the team returns for a new round of veterinary problems, including a very excitable Labrador who requires elbow replacement surgery and a Jackahuahua puppy who needs to have spinal surgery after an attack in the park. Benidorm ITV, 9.00pm Hold on to your sunhats as ITV’s long-running Costa Blanca comedy returns for a 10th series with comedians Hale & Pace joining the cast as a pair of undercover cops. Elsewhere, Joyce (Sherrie Hewson) and Monty’s (John Challis) big day arrives. Save Me Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Don’t let the fact that it features yet another missing child put you off the week’s best new drama. Written by and starring Lennie James, Save Me tells the tale of Nelly (James), an ageing wide-boy of suspect charms, who finds himself in trouble after his estranged teenage daughter disappears. We’ve all met people like Nelly, the easy smiles hiding their sharp edges, and James does a wonderful job of making us warm to him despite the distrust. There’s strong support, too, from Suranne Jones as the missing girl’s mother. SH Film 2018 BBC One, 11.15pm; Wales, 11.35pm; NI, 12.10am The BBC’s long-running film series returns with an opening episode hosted by Radio 1’s Clara Amfo alongside critics Ellen E Jones and Larushka Ivan-Zadeh. The focus this week is on next Sunday’s Academy Awards, plus an interview with Lady Bird’s Oscar-nominated director, Greta Gerwig. SH The Quiet Man (1952) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.00pm Best known for his sombre westerns, John Ford turns personal for this wonderful romantic comedy which was considered a risky venture but went on to win the director his fourth Oscar. It tells the story of a boxer who falls in love with the sister of a bully. The famous grab-and-kiss scene between the smouldering John Wayne and love interest Maureen O’Hara (the “Queen of Technicolour”) also appears in E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. Big Eyes (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Amy Adams is ideally cast as the browbeaten artist Margaret Keane who, for eight years, churned out iconic, highly sought after paintings, only for her con artist husband (Christoph Waltz) to take all the credit. Tim Burton’s take on this curious real-life tale of curdled suburbia sadly lacks Adams’s subtlety: even the usually restrained Waltz is caught up in the blunt, overly stylised kookiness. Good (2008) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.50pm Viggo Mortensen gives a thoughtful performance as a German professor whose ideas about euthanasia are adopted by the Nazis. It’s only when he becomes a concentration camp inspector that he grasps the horror of his ideas. Vicente Amorim’s adaptation of CP Taylor’s play doesn’t shirk big questions, but he tends to fall back on clichés – hammerings on the piano, etc – and it plays a bit like a Nazi version of Rising Damp. Thursday 1 March A landmark return: David Olusoga, Mary Beard and Simon Schama Credit: BBC Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm Almost 50 years after changing the face of arts programming with the landmark series Civilisation, BBC Two returns with an expanded brief and all the bells and whistles of modern film-making, from drone cameras to infra-red photography. With nine episodes split between presenters Simon Schama (five), David Olusoga and Mary Beard (two each), Civilisations promises an opinionated overview of global art and culture. It opens with a striking sequence in which Schama – helming this first part – explores what has been lost and salvaged from the Isil pillage of Palmyra. From there, we’re whisked to Africa’s Cape coast and the first evidence of mankind’s creativity 77,000 years ago. Then it’s a breathless gallop through the millennia, alighting at the first settlements and depictions of the human face. Among the cave art, Mayan stairways and fertility fetishes, the real treasure is an astonishing Mycenaean Sealstone, jaw-dropping in its anatomical detail and artistic accomplishment. While it won’t have the same impact as the original series (what could?), Civilisations looks to be just as learned, accessible and thrilling as its predecessor – the whole series will be available on BBC iPlayer at 10.00pm. Gabriel Tate The Cruise: Voyage to Alaska ITV, 8.30pm; not Wales Over three episodes, the five-star luxury liner Star Princess and its redoubtable crew travels to the northernmost American state – where they encounter difficult weather, navigational challenges and problem passengers. Weinstein: the Inside Story BBC One, 9.00pm In collaboration with PBS America’s Frontline current-affairs strand, Panorama examines the fall of Harvey Weinstein and the lengths to which the disgraced Hollywood producer would go to keep his alleged bullying, threats and sexual assaults private. Speaking to insiders, the team builds a troubling picture of industry complicity. From Ice to Fire: the Incredible Science of Temperature BBC Four, 9.00pm Dr Helen Czerski concludes her excellent series with fire, and how its harnessing played a pivotal role in human evolution and survival, from essentials such as toolmaking and mining to relative fripperies such as hot-air balloons. The moment that Czerski triggers a lightning strike at a high-voltage laboratory carries a genuine frisson; as is customary with most BBC Four films, the presentation is lively and the science deftly handled. Serial Killer with Piers Morgan ITV, 9.00pm How do you follow interviewing Donald Trump? Piers Morgan returns to the less contentious turf of more one-to-ones with convicted murderers behind bars. He begins with Lorenzo Gilyard, the so-called Kansas City Strangler, who remains unremorseful after allegedly killing 13 women and girls over almost two decades. Panic at 30,000 Feet: Airline Emergency Channel 5, 9.00pm This nightmare-inducing new series explores what happens when flights go wrong, from mid-air collisions to runway explosions. GT Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 11.45pm The penultimate episode of this often disturbing and insightful series revisits Oak Creek, Wisconsin, where white supremacist Michael Page killed six and injured four at a Sikh temple, before killing himself, in 2012. For once, there is a vaguely positive denouement: Page’s brutality had the opposite to its intended effect and brought the community closer together. GT Jubal (1956) ★★★★☆ Film4, 12.40pm Ernest Borgnine stars in this brooding western shot in the Grand Teton mountains of Wyoming, which reworks the plot of Othello. Borgnine stars as a cattle rancher with a much younger wife (Valerie French), who is driven into a jealous rage when cattlehand Rod Steiger suggests that she is having an affair with young drifter Jubal (a magnificent Glenn Ford). Murder is most definitely on the cards. Pitch Perfect (2012) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm The world of collegiate a cappella singing contests can’t be as heartless as Jason Moore’s sour comedy would have us believe. Anna Kendrick stars as Beca, an angst-ridden outsider who must shake up her uninspiring and monotonous group, while trying to handle how weird they all are. And, of course, there’s a handsome man (Skylar Astin) who catches her eye. It’s a little like Glee but without the schmaltz. The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Clint Eastwood directs and stars in this warm-hearted marvellous western adapted from Forrest Carter’s novel and set during the American Civil War. Eastwood plays the Missouri farmer who, driven by memories of his family’s slaughter, becomes an outlaw when he refuses to join his Confederate comrades in surrender, in favour of seeking revenge on the men who murdered his kin. Friday 2 March Searching for the truth: Lydia Wilson as Matilda Credit: BBC Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm After last week’s hiatus because of the Six Nations rugby, it’s back to small-town Wales for another dose of supernatural country-house shenanigans. When we last saw fragile but determined musician Matilda (Lydia Wilson), she’d suffered the double whammy of finding her would-be mother Rose (Claire Rushbrook) unconscious in the bath and learning that mute Aunt Meredith (Jane Thorne) had died on the verge of offering up her secrets. How did Matilda react? By mysteriously blacking out and bashing her beloved cello against a cupboard. In the fourth episode then, she looks for connections between her mental health and Carys’s disappearance. And some clues emerge: Matilda meets dishevelled local Laura (Anastasia Hille), who claims to hear voices informing her of Carys’s fate, and back at the mansion, she comes across some old tomes detailing rituals to unlock the past. Even with its heavily scored bumps and shudders, Requiem can’t quite sustain its early Hammer Horror appeal. The strong performances and some genuinely chilling moments keep things compelling however, not least in the spine-tingling climax of this episode. Toby Dantzic Flint Town Netflix, from today Back in 2014, a cost-cutting exercise left thousands of homes in Flint, Michigan, with contaminated drinking water for years. This new eight-part documentary looks at the fallout from the crisis through the eyes of Flint’s beleaguered police force, who face an uphill struggle – the community needs their support but are also deeply mistrustful of those in authority, plus dwindling resources makes the officers’ jobs harder still. MasterChef BBC One, 7.30pm Having survived the cooking contest’s opening week, the six heat winners face food critic William Sitwell in this first quarter-final. He challenges them to conjure up a standout pudding showcasing either alcohol or spices. Love Your Garden ITV, 8.00pm; not STV/UTV/Wales This week, Alan Titchmarsh and his team are in Bidewell, Devon, helping Tamsyn and Alex Wood who returned to the UK from France after Alex suffered a brain injury. The aim is to turn the Woods’ garden into a coastal sanctuary inspired by Alex’s passion for surfing. The Yorkshire Steam Railway: All Aboard Channel 5, 8.00pm As amiable as its title suggests, this new documentary series follows the lives of those who work on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, one of the country’s most popular steam railways. In this series’ opener, the new season begins with the arrival of star engine Royal Scot, on loan from London. Tones, Drones and Arpeggios: The Magic of Minimalism BBC Four, 9.00pm Conductor Charles Hazlewood explores minimalism, which he argues is the most important musical form of the 20th century. In the fascinating opener of this two-part series, he unpicks the construction of these sometimes confounding sounds and tracks down the genre’s avant-garde pioneers, who brought their mesmeric, spirituality-inspired compositions from California to New York in the Sixties. TD Jo Brand: Secrets of Her Success Channel 5, 10.30pm Channel 5’s celebration of funny women continues with this absorbing profile of the pioneering doyenne of deadpan, Jo Brand. This charts her career from its rocky start on the male-dominated stand-up circuit to her much-admired hospital sitcom Getting On. TD Gladiator (2000) ★★★★★ Film4, 9.00pm This take on the traditional swords-and-sandals epic proved that Russell Crowe deserved to be recognised as a mainstream star, and reaffirmed Ridley Scott’s reputation as a first-rate director. Crowe is Maximus, a former Roman general who rebuilds his career as a gladiator. His bid for vengeance against a vile emperor (Joaquin Phoenix) is compelling. Plus there’s a last hurrah from Oliver Reed. Blades of Glory (2007) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm;N Ireland, 12.05am You might think that the sequinned world of figure skating is beyond parody, but here Will Ferrell and Jon Heder serve up a zestfully preposterous comedy. Both play rival Olympic ice skaters, Ferrell a loose-living maverick, Heder a prissy perfectionist, who are slung out of the sport but use a loophole to return as an erotic all-male pairing. Amy Poehler co-stars. A Hijacking (2012) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.55pm Tobias Lindholm’s vigorously intelligent hostage thriller, set on board a besieged ship in the Indian Ocean, deftly moves his story between the boat and the shipping company’s offices, where Søren Malling’s frazzled CEO attempts to thrash out a bargain. On the other end of the line is the Somalis’ translator. Flies buzz, sweat trickles, negotiations continue, and you feel your breath dry up. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
Friday 23 February Gogglebox Channel 4, 9.00pm We all know that Gogglebox won’t be the same this time around. One of the great joys of watching the armchair TV critic show, which returns for its 11th series, was the always warm, occasionally bickering relationship between straight-talking Liverpudlian couple, Leon and June Bernicoff. But, sadly, Leon died last December following a short illness and June recently confirmed that she won’t be taking part without him. So, in the absence of Leon’s notoriously unvarnished views (on chef Jamie Oliver: “‘Oh he’s a d---head”), what can we expect? Probably business as usual. After all, the show has survived the loss of popular families before, from everyone’s favourite posh couple, Steph and Dom, to the gloriously opinionated Scarlett Moffatt. Our guesses: the lovely Siddiquis will continue to be the most well-adjusted family, hairdressers Stephen and Christopher will trot out the most-pointed one-liners, Welsh couple Dave and Shirley will bring the giggles, even though it remains a mystery just how Dave watches TV in that very uncomfortable-looking position, and we still won’t be able to work out how many dogs the Malones actually have. SH Live Winter Olympics 2018 BBC One and BBC Two, from 6.00am Day 14 sees the semi-finals of the men’s ice hockey and the women’s curling competition, plus the final of the men’s 1,000 m speed skating. SH An Island Parish: After the Hurricane BBC Two, 9.00pm Sophie Okonedo narrates this special edition of the series which looks at the long-term effects of Hurricane Irma on the Caribbean island of Anguilla. Among those who lost everything are Simone Connor and her father Neville, who ran a restaurant and leisure complex on the island. SH Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm Now is the perfect time to jump back on the Will & Grace bandwagon as the wonderful Nick Offerman (the real-life husband of Megan Mullally, who plays Karen) guest stars as baker Jackson Boudreaux, aka the Bad Boy of Bread. Offerman is a scene-stealing delight and the final moments offer a lovely pay-off. SH Joan Rivers: By Her friends Channel 5, 10.30pm Anyone who saw the brilliant comedy The Marvellous Mrs Maisel, which was inspired by the late Joan Rivers’s early career, will know that the comedian’s domestic-focused stand-up routines were unlike anything that the audiences of that time had heard before. This tribute puts that ground-breaking career in context. SH The Tick Amazon Prime, from today Peter Serafinowicz’s goofy blue superhero returns for another series of misadventures. As with the last time, the series stands and falls with Serafinowicz’s performance: his morally upstanding but bizarre caped crusader has enough charm to paper over plot cracks. SH Seven Seconds Netflix, from today This new crime-drama series from Veena Sud, the writer behind the US version of The Killing, explores grief, deceit and social injustice. Starring Regina King, it focuses on the fallout from the death of a young boy who was injured by a police officer. SH The Old Grey Whistle Test Live: For One Night Only BBC Four, 9.00pm Bob Harris, who fronted The Old Grey Whistle Test from 1972-1978, returns with this event marking 30 years since the end of music show. This one-off includes live performances and interviews with fans and former presenters. SH Mute (2018) Netflix, from today True Blood alumnus Alexander Skarsgård plays Leo, the titular mute in Duncan Jones’s sci-fi thriller, which the director describes as a spiritual sequel to 2009’s Moon. Leo Beiler, a bartender with a violent past, searches for his missing girlfriend Naadirah (Seyneb Saleh) in a futuristic, neon-lit Berlin. He crosses paths with a pair of US army surgeons, brilliantly named Cactus Bill and Duck Teddington (played by Paul Rudd and Justin Theroux), on a mission of their own. X-Men: First Class (2011) ★★★☆☆ E4, 9.00pm Telepathic Charles Xavier (James McAvoy) bonds with metal-bending death camp survivor Erik Lehnsherr (Michael Fassbender) and the two of them track down other mutants to confront evil Nazi Sebastian Shaw (Kevin Bacon) when he triggers the Cuban Missile Crisis. Matthew Vaughn is much more comfortable with the small-scale character stuff than the action climax, but this prequel is mostly a lot of fun. While We’re Young (2014) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm A couple’s doomed attempt to recapture their youth gives Ben Stiller and Naomi Watts a new lease of comic life in Noah Baumbach’s sparkling film. Baumbach packs it with the wit and vigour of a polished one-act play as co-stars Adam Driver and Amanda Seyfried, playing hat-wearing hipsters, deliver punchlines that can’t help but remind you of Woody Allen at his peak. Saturday 24 February Loadsa laughs: Ant McPartlin and Declan Donnelly Credit: ITV Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway ITV, 7.00pm Anthony McPartlin and Declan Donnelly, the undisputed kings of Saturday night TV – never more so since they won the inaugural Bruce Forsyth Entertainment gong, among others, at the National Television Awards last month – return with a 16th series of their popular show. Packed full of comedy, audience participation, prize giveaways, celebrity guests, exclusive performances and madcap stunts, this is high-octane entertainment, with barely time to draw breath between items. Tonight, Kylie Minogue gives a first performance of her latest single and revisits some of her biggest hits, Britain’s Got Talent judge Amanda Holden falls victim to the first Undercover prank of the series and Olly Murs takes on the role of guest announcer in the End of Show Show. The hosts themselves, meanwhile, put the pedal to the floor for a daredevil Ant vs Dec monster truck challenge, and reprise their roles as super sleuths in a new comedy whodunit (with an all-star cast that includes Joanna Lumley, Michael Sheen, Emilia Fox and David Walliams) while sidekicks Scarlett Moffatt and Stephen Mulhern are out on the streets looking for people to plays games with. And that’s just for starters. Gerard O’Donovan Live Winter Olympics 2018 BBC One and BBC Two, from 6.00am It’s the penultimate day and there’s major Team GB interest as the four-man bobsleigh gets under way. However, most eyes will be on the curling, which has proved rather popular in these Games, as the men’s gold and women’s bronze medals are decided. There’s also action in the snowboarding and skiing. Six Nations Rugby Union: Ireland v Wales ITV, 1.30pm After their 12-6 defeat against England at Twickenham, Wales travel to Ireland, with Dan Biggar starting at fly-half, and Liam Williams and Leigh Halfpenny also returning after injury. Ireland have won two from two, beating France in Paris, before enjoying an eight-try buffet at Italy’s expense in a 56-19 victory. The visitors are unbeaten in their last three Six Nations matches against Ireland, but were held to a 16-16 draw when the sides last met here two years ago. Six Nations Rugby Union: Scotland v England BBC One, 4.00pm Tough one for England, this. Yes, they’ve won nine of the last 10 matches against Scotland, drawing the other one, but the pressure cauldron that is Murrayfield is never an easy place to visit, and they’ll have their tails up after an impressive 32-26 win against France. Still, according to head coach Gregor Townsend, Scotland will need to produce their “best-ever performance” if they are to triumph against England in the Calcutta Cup. Eddie Jones’s team beat Wales 12-6 thanks to two first-half tries by Jonny May, but were forced to hang on grimly in the frenetic closing stages as they set a new championship record for consecutive home wins (15, dating back to 2012). When these sides met in the tournament last year, England thrashed Scotland 61-21 at Twickenham. Churchill’s Darkest Decision More4, 7.55pm Fans of the hit film Darkest Hour will appreciate this documentary about another big Churchill dilemma. In 1940, following the fall of France, Germany was poised to seize the entire French fleet, making Hitler’s threat to invade Britain ever graver. Drastic measures were called for, but at a tragically high cost. David Attenborough’s Natural Curiosities BBC Two, 8.00pm Creatures with remarkable navigation skills are the focus of tonight’s edition, looking at how dung beetles use the Sun, Moon and stars as compass points, and how pigeons recall complex routes. Britain at Low Tide Channel 4, 8.00pm More stories from our shoreline as Tori Herridge visits Dorset, where she finds the home of the world’s first aircraft carrier and searches for an Iron Age monument that can only be seen for a few hours each year. Troy: Fall of a City BBC One, 9.10pm All hell breaks loose in this second episode when Helen’s (Bella Dayne) husband Menelaus finds out what Paris (Louis Hunter) took back to Troy. His enraged brother Agamemnon (Johnny Harris) calls all Greece to war, but when they fail to propitiate the gods, there’s a shocking price to pay. GO Mosaic Sky Atlantic, 10.00pm Steven Soderbergh’s crime drama starring Sharon Stone provoked a blizzard of publicity on its release last year in mobile app format. HBO’s six-part “linear” TV version is obviously less innovative (the app works like an interactive movie where the user can choose from which perspective the plot is viewed), but it still has plenty to offer. In this second episode, the backstory continues to play out as author Olivia Lake’s (Stone) relationships with lover Eric (Frederick Weller) and lodger Joel (Garrett Hedlund) become ever more tangled. GO Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2 (2013) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 5.00pm In this sequel to the 2009 animation based on the 1978 children’s book, inventor Flint Lockwood (voiced by Bill Hader) and friends must rescue the island of Swallow Falls from being overrun by food-mutated animals. It’s no triumph of screenwriting or subtext, but it’s a feast of ingeniously rendered gastronomic insanity and kids will absolutely love it. The Heat (2013) ★★★★☆ E4, 9.00pm Bridesmaids director Paul Feig brings back one of that film’s stars, Melissa McCarthy, as a foul-mouthed Boston cop whose policing style, aided by a fridge full of armaments, makes Dirty Harry look like Thumbelina. She’s paired with a goody-two-shoes FBI agent (Sandra Bullock reminding us what a pro she is at comedy). Together, they’re dynamite, plus the film has an emotional clout that hits you seemingly from nowhere. Philomena (2013) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.00pm; not Northern Ireland This true story is based on the experiences of journalist Martin Sixsmith (Steve Coogan), who helped Philomena Lee (Judi Dench), an Irish woman in her seventies, search for the son that she was forced to put up for adoption 50 years earlier. Stephen Frears’s film is charming and hard-hitting, delivering some tough emotional blows as well as some harsh truths about the Catholic Church’s past. Sunday 25 February Curiouser and curiouser: Holliday Grainger and Tom Burke Credit: BBC Strike: Career of Evil BBC One, 9.00pm Rumpled PI Cormoran Strike (Tom Burke) and his trusty Girl Friday Robin Ellacott (Holliday Grainger) return for the third of JK Rowling’s Robert Galbraith novels. It’s a few months after the events of The Silkworm and Strike and Robin have settled into an easy working partnership, albeit one that remains a little too cosy for Robin’s smarmy fiancé Matthew (Kerr Logan). Then Robin receives a gruesome present in the post and our intrepid duo found themselves caught up in an investigation that swiftly hits far too close to home. Career of Evil is the most tightly plotted of the Galbraith books and this well-paced opening episode neatly sets up the (plentiful) twists to come. That said, the real enjoyment comes not from the story but from the fantastic chemistry between Grainger and Burke, who bring an immense amount of warmth and charm to their scenes. Indeed, so successfully do they inhabit the roles that it’s frustrating to realise that, with no more Galbraith books currently published, this will be the last Strike for a while. It’s a genuine shame: if ever a TV adaptation deserved to be spun away from its source material it’s this one. Sarah Hughes ODI cricket: New Zealand v England Sky Sports Main Event, 12.30am You’ll have to stay up late to see this opening one-day international of the five-match series. England, having beaten the Aussies in their last ODI series, will fancy their chances. Young, Welsh and Pretty Minted BBC Three, from 10.00am The makers of Young, Welsh and Pretty Skint return with a new series focusing on a group of would-be entrepreneurs, including a YouTuber with 1.7 million subscribers and an image-obsessed Instagram influencer. Live Winter Olympics 2018 Closing Ceremony BBC Two, from 11.00am The Olympics bow out, allowing us to recall the heartbreak (Team GB’s Elise Christie’s wipeout in the speedskating final) and joy (American snowboarder Chloe Kim’s megawatt smile). K-pop star CL and boy band EXO take part in the ceremony which has a fusion theme, before the flag is handed over to Beijing for 2022. Premier League Football: Manchester United v Chelsea Sky Sports Main Event, 1.00pm With both sides struggling for consistency – United lost at Newcastle a fortnight ago, while Chelsea were trounced 4-1 by Watford earlier this month – today’s match at Old Trafford should be a tentative affair. Carabao Cup Final: Arsenal v Manchester City Sky Sports Main Event, 4.00pm Proving that the League Cup is having something of a resurgence, Arsenal and Manchester City are this year’s finalists, with the former aiming to win the trophy for the first time since 1993. City are favourites, though: imperious in the league, they also have form in the Carabao Cup, having won it in 2014 and 2016. Top Gear BBC Two, 8.00pm The petrolhead’s special returns with Matt LeBlanc promising increased family appeal. The new team of LeBlanc, Chris Harris and Rory Reid have decent chemistry and if this was your sort of thing then it probably remains so. Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble BBC Four, 8.00pm Few programmes are as inspiring as this one about cellist Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble, an ever-changing group of over 50 artists who perform alongside Ma. In addition to highlighting some phenomenal talents – Galician bagpiper Cristina Pato almost steals the show – the film details the hardships that they’ve faced, including revolution and exile. Anchoring it all is former child prodigy Ma: “I think when I was a kid a lot of things just happened,” he notes as footage shows him performing as a child for President Kennedy. “I’m always trying to figure out who I am and where I fit in the world.” SH Hannibal’s Elephant Army: The New Evidence Channel 4, 8.00pm Why did Carthaginian general Hannibal cross the Alps on a seemingly impossible journey with an army of 40,000 soldiers, 9,000 cavalry officers and 37 elephants? This fascinating film examines the evidence. Life and Death Row: The Mass Execution BBC Two, 9.00pm The harrowing series continues to turn a microscopic eye on all aspects of the death penalty. Tonight it’s the case of Stacey Johnson, on death row for 23 years. His stepdaughter insists on his innocence; his victim’s daughter says she’s sure that he’s a guilty man. SH Clouds of Sils Maria (2014) ★★★★☆ BBC Four, 9.30pm A complex, bewitching and fearlessly intelligent psychological fondue from France’s Olivier Assayas, with Juliet Binoche and Kristen Stewart as a famous actress and her diligent and devoted personal assistant, prepping for a play that shapes the drama of their own lives in its likeness. Playful and addictively strange, with career-best work from Stewart. Shutter Island (2010) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 11.05pm Martin Scorsese’s follow-up to The Departed, is, like that film, based on a novel by Dennis Lehane. He delves into gothic noir in this mystery thriller as detective Daniels (Leonardo DiCaprio) investigates the disappearance of an inmate from a prison for the clinically insane with the help of his partner (played brilliantly by Mark Ruffalo). This is a gripping story with some bold twists, although it eventually loses momentum. Point Break (1991) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 11.30pm; Scotland, 12.30am Kathryn Bigelow’s cult surfing/crime film elevated Patrick Swayze’s actor status to true action hero. Keanu Reeves plays Johnny Utah, an FBI agent who goes undercover to infiltrate a gang of bankrobbing surfers led by the charismatic Bodhi (Swayze). The action heats up when Bodhi and Utah find they share a similar attitude towards danger. Lori Petty is the surfer who catches Johnny’s eye. Monday 26 February Body snatched? Greg Kinnear as the father Credit: Channel 4 Electric Dreams: The Father Thing Channel 4, 10.00pm After a first run split pretty evenly between stunners and misfires, the final four adaptations of short stories from pulp sci-fi icon Philip K Dick begins with a heavily derivative but entertaining piece from Michael Dinner, showrunner of excellent modern western Justified. The setting is an unnamed Midwest town, where young baseball-loving Charlie (Jack Gore) lives with his parents, hangs out with three other misfits and avoids the bullies; it’s as cosily familiar a slice of apple-pie Americana as you could find. And then the aftermath of a meteor shower causes Charlie to suspect that some of the town’s inhabitants may have been replaced by aliens, his own father (Greg Kinnear) included. Based more directly than some of its predecessors on Dick’s original story, this cannot help but nod to Invasion of the Body Snatchers, although the Cold War paranoia replaced by… what, exactly? There’s a parable of father-son relations in here, along with an allegory of divorce and a Stranger Things-influenced romp, but it shows its hand a little early, never settles on a tone and features a climax that will split opinion down the middle. That said, it’s never less than diverting. Gabriel Tate This Country BBC Three, from 10.00am Series one of Charlie and Daisy May Cooper’s mockumentary transcended its obvious debt to The Office to become a touching, acutely observed and defiant portrait of life on the margins in rural Britain. Importantly, it was also very funny, finding bathos and humour in the efforts of gormless cousins Kurtan and Kerry Mucklowe (played by the Coopers) to amuse themselves in a Cotswolds village. Thankfully, almost nothing has changed for this second series, although Kurtan has found a girlfriend and Kerry hitherto unknown charitable instincts. Shakespeare & Hathaway: Private Investigators BBC One, 2.15pm Jo Joyner and Mark Benton are perfectly cast in this amiable new 10-part series as Lu Shakespeare, wrongly suspected of killing her fiancé, and Frank Hathaway, the slobbish PI she ropes in to clear her name. The odd-couple chemistry is there from the start and Stratford-upon-Avon looks glorious – making this a welcome addition to the afternoon schedules. Hollywood in Vienna: the Sound of Space & Alexandre Desplat Sky Arts, 8.00pm This gala performance loosely based on a journey through the universe includes Parisian composer Alexandre Desplat’s melodies for movies, including Twilight and The Grand Budapest Hotel, as well as legendary scores from Star Wars to E.T. GT Classic Mary Berry BBC One, 8.30pm Cherish the unlikely sight of the former Bake Off judge partaking in a little “caveman cooking” in this latest rebranding of Mary Berry’s line in home-cooking, with the opener focusing on comfort food. MasterChef BBC One, 9.00pm The 11th run of the enduringly popular cooking contest begins with the first seven contestants creating dishes using ingredients including beef mince and duck breasts for John Torode, Gregg Wallace and some former finalists. The Unstoppable Flying Scotsman Channel 5, 9.00pm The world’s most famous steam locomotive is profiled in this two-parter from Rob Bell, always a reassuring translator of technical geekery for a mainstream audience. Here, he explores its origins and enduring appeal. GT Ice Cold in Alex (1958, b/w) ★★★★☆ Film4, 4.20pm J Lee Thompson’s tense British wartime thriller is one of the classics of the black-and-white era and richly entertaining. John Mills shines as Captain Anson, who dreams of an ice-cold glass of lager while escorting Britons across the desert to Alexandria during the Second World War. The film makes some interesting points about patriotism, as we learn Anson is unaware that he’s harbouring a traitor. Alien Resurrection (1997) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Sigourney Weaver returns as heroine Ellen Ripley for this fourth film in the franchise. Two hundred years have passed since Alien 3, and Ripley has now been cloned by scientists, which gives her greater strength but also conflicting loyalties, meaning we’re not sure that we can trust her. Despite the talent on board (Weaver, screenwriter Joss Whedon and director Jean-Pierre Jeunot), this is a poor effort. Elysium (2013) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 11.00pm Neill Blomkamp’s (District 9) intelligent sci-fi thriller has a fire in its belly and stars a brawny Matt Damon as a factory worker who scrapes out a living on the Earth’s crust. He’s involved in an accident but the medical care that he needs is on space station Elysium. Blomkamp focuses on faith, capitalism and private healthcare – in lesser hands, the film might have played out like a Lib Dem manifesto with spaceships. Tuesday 27 February Surrounded by splendour: Alan Titchmarsh Secrets of the National Trust with Alan Titchmarsh Channel 5, 8.00pm A tale of “female empowerment, politics and a fight for the throne of England itself” is how Alan Titchmarsh, opening a second series showcasing the National Trust’s finest properties, describes the history of Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire. Certainly, the story of Elizabeth Talbot, Countess of Shrewsbury (aka Bess of Hardwick), and how four strategic marriages helped her to become one of the most powerful women in Elizabethan England, is a fascinating one. And the glorious house she built in the 1590s, with vast facades of glass and sumptuous decor, was doubtless a marvel of the age. Whether you think Titchmarsh does either of them justice will depend on how much detail you like in a documentary, and how much repetition (you won’t possess enough fingers to count how often he mentions that Bess’s initials and coat of arms decorate the high parapet of the house) and “coming up next” you can bear. Either way, there are plenty of glories to gaze upon, so if you’re unlikely to get a chance to visit Hardwick Hall in person, the fine filming shows off the house and its grounds in considerable splendour. Gerard O’Donovan How to Get Fit Fast Channel 4, 8.00pm Anna Richardson and Amar Latif put the emphasis on fitness rather than weight loss in this new series exploring the off-the-shelf plans available, hoping to point viewers towards the exercise regime that suits them best. 100 Years Younger in 21 Days ITV, 9.00pm Eight well-worn famous faces attempt to turn the clock back at a “rejuvenation” clinic in Sardinia. June Brown, Sherrie Hewson, Claire King, Sid Owen, Roy Walker, Russell Grant, Googlebox’s Sandra Martin and music legend Shaun Ryder are among thoses hoping to knock off years without going under the knife. The FGM Detectives Channel 4, 10.00pm Despite the global efforts to ban the practice, female genital mutilation (FGM) continues to affect millions of women. Here Cathy Newman leads a two-year investigation into FGM in the UK, which is estimated to put 20,000 young British women at risk every year. Acid Attack: My Story BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm Naomi Oni recounts the horrific acid attack that left her with life-altering injuries in 2012, and how the police investigation (which, unbelievably, initially focused on whether she had inflicted the wounds on herself) proved the attacker to be a childhood friend. GO Unreal Amazon Prime, from today A drama playing on the fakeness, dubious ethics and behind-the-scenes manipulation of a hit reality TV dating show, UnREAL is nothing if not a series for our times. As the third season begins, Everlasting’s producer Rachel (Shiri Appleby) is getting her life back on track, despite her ruthless boss Quinn (Constance Zimmer) ramping up the pressure to deliver the show’s most outrageous season yet. Divorce Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm Sarah Jessica Parker returns with a second season of the bleak and bitingly funny comedy about the painful break-up of an American middle-class couple’s marriage. At least that’s what series one, created and partly written by the Sharon Horgan, was about. Season two, minus Horgan’s input, takes on a distinctly lighter tone as both Frances (Parker) and her now ex-husband Robert (Thomas Haden Church) begin tentatively to negotiate the possibilities of life post divorce. GO Charade (1963) ★★★★☆ Film4, 2.25pm Audrey Hepburn as a temperamental-but-alluring damsel in distress and Cary Grant as a shadowy charmer are characters that the actors played many times. But they do so exceptionally in this suspense comedy from Stanley Donen, often referred to as the best Hitchcock movie that Hitchcock never made. Hepburn is the widow being trailed by four men hunting for her late husband’s stolen fortune. Black Swan (2010) ★★★★★ Film4, 11.25pm Darren Aronofsky’s film is delirious hokum and high-class trash. Natalie Portman stars as Nina Sayers, a young dancer with the New York City Ballet preparing for a production of Swan Lake choreographed by the charismatic Thomas Leroy (Vincent Cassel). He is unconvinced by Nina’s ability to portray the passion of the Black Swan and her efforts to convince him lead her towards madness. Christine (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 11.50pm The story of Christine Chubbuck, a Florida newsreader who shot herself on air in 1974, is shocking and unfathomably sad. But it wouldn’t be worth retelling on film if it didn’t illuminate something. It asks a top-notch Rebecca Hall to play out the last days of Chubbuck’s life and dares us to hope that it’s about a different woman – one who made it out the other side of her own tragedy. Wednesday 28 February Victim: Édgar Ramírez as Versace Credit: BBC The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story BBC Two, 9.00pm Ryan Murphy’s true crime series follows up 2016’s dramatisation of the OJ Simpson trial with the story of serial killer Andrew Cunanan, who murdered at least five people over a three-month period, including the fashion designer Gianni Versace. Murphy and scriptwriter Tom Rob Smith use the word assassination very carefully here: the operatic opening scenes depict Versace (Édgar Ramírez) as a modern-day Medici prince, dispensing cheerful patronage to all in his Miami Beach fiefdom. By contrast, Cunanan (Darren Criss) is portrayed as a man so insecure in his own skin that he is almost physically incapable of telling the truth: “You tell gay people you’re gay and straight people you’re straight,” exclaims an exasperated friend. “I tell people what they need to hear,” comes the too-calm reply. Both Criss and Ramirez are excellent and there’s strong support from Ricky Martin as Versace’s bewildered live-in boyfriend and a perhaps slightly too-camp Penélope Cruz as Donatella. Smith’s solid script does a good job of juggling various timelines to show how this particular killer came to be. Sarah Hughes Ellie Undercover: Rent for Sex BBC Three, from 10.00am Investigative journalist Ellie Flynn presents this look at the growing number of unscrupulous landlords who offer rent-free accommodation in exchange for sex. It’s hard not to feel utterly dispirited as Flynn meets vulnerable women such as Chloe, who feels so trapped by her homelessness that she’s in no position to say no to these men. Athletics: The World Indoor Championships BBC Two, 7.00pm The four-day World Indoor Championships, which takes place at Arena Birmingham, kicks off on Thursday, featuring three events in the first evening session – including Team GB’s Laura Muir and Eilish McColgan in the final of the women’s 3,000 m. Events continue from 9.00am on Friday, with Greg Rutherford’s long jump bid among the highlights. The World’s Most Extraordinary Homes BBC Two, 8.00pm For those of us who enjoy gawping at other people’s homes, few programmes are more satisfying than this series presented by Caroline Quentin and architect Piers Taylor. Tonight the duo are in Portugal poking their noses into four very different properties. The Supervet Channel 4, 8.00pm Professor Noel Fitzpatrick and the team returns for a new round of veterinary problems, including a very excitable Labrador who requires elbow replacement surgery and a Jackahuahua puppy who needs to have spinal surgery after an attack in the park. Benidorm ITV, 9.00pm Hold on to your sunhats as ITV’s long-running Costa Blanca comedy returns for a 10th series with comedians Hale & Pace joining the cast as a pair of undercover cops. Elsewhere, Joyce (Sherrie Hewson) and Monty’s (John Challis) big day arrives. Save Me Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Don’t let the fact that it features yet another missing child put you off the week’s best new drama. Written by and starring Lennie James, Save Me tells the tale of Nelly (James), an ageing wide-boy of suspect charms, who finds himself in trouble after his estranged teenage daughter disappears. We’ve all met people like Nelly, the easy smiles hiding their sharp edges, and James does a wonderful job of making us warm to him despite the distrust. There’s strong support, too, from Suranne Jones as the missing girl’s mother. SH Film 2018 BBC One, 11.15pm; Wales, 11.35pm; NI, 12.10am The BBC’s long-running film series returns with an opening episode hosted by Radio 1’s Clara Amfo alongside critics Ellen E Jones and Larushka Ivan-Zadeh. The focus this week is on next Sunday’s Academy Awards, plus an interview with Lady Bird’s Oscar-nominated director, Greta Gerwig. SH The Quiet Man (1952) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.00pm Best known for his sombre westerns, John Ford turns personal for this wonderful romantic comedy which was considered a risky venture but went on to win the director his fourth Oscar. It tells the story of a boxer who falls in love with the sister of a bully. The famous grab-and-kiss scene between the smouldering John Wayne and love interest Maureen O’Hara (the “Queen of Technicolour”) also appears in E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. Big Eyes (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Amy Adams is ideally cast as the browbeaten artist Margaret Keane who, for eight years, churned out iconic, highly sought after paintings, only for her con artist husband (Christoph Waltz) to take all the credit. Tim Burton’s take on this curious real-life tale of curdled suburbia sadly lacks Adams’s subtlety: even the usually restrained Waltz is caught up in the blunt, overly stylised kookiness. Good (2008) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.50pm Viggo Mortensen gives a thoughtful performance as a German professor whose ideas about euthanasia are adopted by the Nazis. It’s only when he becomes a concentration camp inspector that he grasps the horror of his ideas. Vicente Amorim’s adaptation of CP Taylor’s play doesn’t shirk big questions, but he tends to fall back on clichés – hammerings on the piano, etc – and it plays a bit like a Nazi version of Rising Damp. Thursday 1 March A landmark return: David Olusoga, Mary Beard and Simon Schama Credit: BBC Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm Almost 50 years after changing the face of arts programming with the landmark series Civilisation, BBC Two returns with an expanded brief and all the bells and whistles of modern film-making, from drone cameras to infra-red photography. With nine episodes split between presenters Simon Schama (five), David Olusoga and Mary Beard (two each), Civilisations promises an opinionated overview of global art and culture. It opens with a striking sequence in which Schama – helming this first part – explores what has been lost and salvaged from the Isil pillage of Palmyra. From there, we’re whisked to Africa’s Cape coast and the first evidence of mankind’s creativity 77,000 years ago. Then it’s a breathless gallop through the millennia, alighting at the first settlements and depictions of the human face. Among the cave art, Mayan stairways and fertility fetishes, the real treasure is an astonishing Mycenaean Sealstone, jaw-dropping in its anatomical detail and artistic accomplishment. While it won’t have the same impact as the original series (what could?), Civilisations looks to be just as learned, accessible and thrilling as its predecessor – the whole series will be available on BBC iPlayer at 10.00pm. Gabriel Tate The Cruise: Voyage to Alaska ITV, 8.30pm; not Wales Over three episodes, the five-star luxury liner Star Princess and its redoubtable crew travels to the northernmost American state – where they encounter difficult weather, navigational challenges and problem passengers. Weinstein: the Inside Story BBC One, 9.00pm In collaboration with PBS America’s Frontline current-affairs strand, Panorama examines the fall of Harvey Weinstein and the lengths to which the disgraced Hollywood producer would go to keep his alleged bullying, threats and sexual assaults private. Speaking to insiders, the team builds a troubling picture of industry complicity. From Ice to Fire: the Incredible Science of Temperature BBC Four, 9.00pm Dr Helen Czerski concludes her excellent series with fire, and how its harnessing played a pivotal role in human evolution and survival, from essentials such as toolmaking and mining to relative fripperies such as hot-air balloons. The moment that Czerski triggers a lightning strike at a high-voltage laboratory carries a genuine frisson; as is customary with most BBC Four films, the presentation is lively and the science deftly handled. Serial Killer with Piers Morgan ITV, 9.00pm How do you follow interviewing Donald Trump? Piers Morgan returns to the less contentious turf of more one-to-ones with convicted murderers behind bars. He begins with Lorenzo Gilyard, the so-called Kansas City Strangler, who remains unremorseful after allegedly killing 13 women and girls over almost two decades. Panic at 30,000 Feet: Airline Emergency Channel 5, 9.00pm This nightmare-inducing new series explores what happens when flights go wrong, from mid-air collisions to runway explosions. GT Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 11.45pm The penultimate episode of this often disturbing and insightful series revisits Oak Creek, Wisconsin, where white supremacist Michael Page killed six and injured four at a Sikh temple, before killing himself, in 2012. For once, there is a vaguely positive denouement: Page’s brutality had the opposite to its intended effect and brought the community closer together. GT Jubal (1956) ★★★★☆ Film4, 12.40pm Ernest Borgnine stars in this brooding western shot in the Grand Teton mountains of Wyoming, which reworks the plot of Othello. Borgnine stars as a cattle rancher with a much younger wife (Valerie French), who is driven into a jealous rage when cattlehand Rod Steiger suggests that she is having an affair with young drifter Jubal (a magnificent Glenn Ford). Murder is most definitely on the cards. Pitch Perfect (2012) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm The world of collegiate a cappella singing contests can’t be as heartless as Jason Moore’s sour comedy would have us believe. Anna Kendrick stars as Beca, an angst-ridden outsider who must shake up her uninspiring and monotonous group, while trying to handle how weird they all are. And, of course, there’s a handsome man (Skylar Astin) who catches her eye. It’s a little like Glee but without the schmaltz. The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Clint Eastwood directs and stars in this warm-hearted marvellous western adapted from Forrest Carter’s novel and set during the American Civil War. Eastwood plays the Missouri farmer who, driven by memories of his family’s slaughter, becomes an outlaw when he refuses to join his Confederate comrades in surrender, in favour of seeking revenge on the men who murdered his kin. Friday 2 March Searching for the truth: Lydia Wilson as Matilda Credit: BBC Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm After last week’s hiatus because of the Six Nations rugby, it’s back to small-town Wales for another dose of supernatural country-house shenanigans. When we last saw fragile but determined musician Matilda (Lydia Wilson), she’d suffered the double whammy of finding her would-be mother Rose (Claire Rushbrook) unconscious in the bath and learning that mute Aunt Meredith (Jane Thorne) had died on the verge of offering up her secrets. How did Matilda react? By mysteriously blacking out and bashing her beloved cello against a cupboard. In the fourth episode then, she looks for connections between her mental health and Carys’s disappearance. And some clues emerge: Matilda meets dishevelled local Laura (Anastasia Hille), who claims to hear voices informing her of Carys’s fate, and back at the mansion, she comes across some old tomes detailing rituals to unlock the past. Even with its heavily scored bumps and shudders, Requiem can’t quite sustain its early Hammer Horror appeal. The strong performances and some genuinely chilling moments keep things compelling however, not least in the spine-tingling climax of this episode. Toby Dantzic Flint Town Netflix, from today Back in 2014, a cost-cutting exercise left thousands of homes in Flint, Michigan, with contaminated drinking water for years. This new eight-part documentary looks at the fallout from the crisis through the eyes of Flint’s beleaguered police force, who face an uphill struggle – the community needs their support but are also deeply mistrustful of those in authority, plus dwindling resources makes the officers’ jobs harder still. MasterChef BBC One, 7.30pm Having survived the cooking contest’s opening week, the six heat winners face food critic William Sitwell in this first quarter-final. He challenges them to conjure up a standout pudding showcasing either alcohol or spices. Love Your Garden ITV, 8.00pm; not STV/UTV/Wales This week, Alan Titchmarsh and his team are in Bidewell, Devon, helping Tamsyn and Alex Wood who returned to the UK from France after Alex suffered a brain injury. The aim is to turn the Woods’ garden into a coastal sanctuary inspired by Alex’s passion for surfing. The Yorkshire Steam Railway: All Aboard Channel 5, 8.00pm As amiable as its title suggests, this new documentary series follows the lives of those who work on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, one of the country’s most popular steam railways. In this series’ opener, the new season begins with the arrival of star engine Royal Scot, on loan from London. Tones, Drones and Arpeggios: The Magic of Minimalism BBC Four, 9.00pm Conductor Charles Hazlewood explores minimalism, which he argues is the most important musical form of the 20th century. In the fascinating opener of this two-part series, he unpicks the construction of these sometimes confounding sounds and tracks down the genre’s avant-garde pioneers, who brought their mesmeric, spirituality-inspired compositions from California to New York in the Sixties. TD Jo Brand: Secrets of Her Success Channel 5, 10.30pm Channel 5’s celebration of funny women continues with this absorbing profile of the pioneering doyenne of deadpan, Jo Brand. This charts her career from its rocky start on the male-dominated stand-up circuit to her much-admired hospital sitcom Getting On. TD Gladiator (2000) ★★★★★ Film4, 9.00pm This take on the traditional swords-and-sandals epic proved that Russell Crowe deserved to be recognised as a mainstream star, and reaffirmed Ridley Scott’s reputation as a first-rate director. Crowe is Maximus, a former Roman general who rebuilds his career as a gladiator. His bid for vengeance against a vile emperor (Joaquin Phoenix) is compelling. Plus there’s a last hurrah from Oliver Reed. Blades of Glory (2007) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm;N Ireland, 12.05am You might think that the sequinned world of figure skating is beyond parody, but here Will Ferrell and Jon Heder serve up a zestfully preposterous comedy. Both play rival Olympic ice skaters, Ferrell a loose-living maverick, Heder a prissy perfectionist, who are slung out of the sport but use a loophole to return as an erotic all-male pairing. Amy Poehler co-stars. A Hijacking (2012) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.55pm Tobias Lindholm’s vigorously intelligent hostage thriller, set on board a besieged ship in the Indian Ocean, deftly moves his story between the boat and the shipping company’s offices, where Søren Malling’s frazzled CEO attempts to thrash out a bargain. On the other end of the line is the Somalis’ translator. Flies buzz, sweat trickles, negotiations continue, and you feel your breath dry up. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
What's on TV tonight: Gogglebox and The Old Grey Whistle Test Live
Friday 23 February Gogglebox Channel 4, 9.00pm We all know that Gogglebox won’t be the same this time around. One of the great joys of watching the armchair TV critic show, which returns for its 11th series, was the always warm, occasionally bickering relationship between straight-talking Liverpudlian couple, Leon and June Bernicoff. But, sadly, Leon died last December following a short illness and June recently confirmed that she won’t be taking part without him. So, in the absence of Leon’s notoriously unvarnished views (on chef Jamie Oliver: “‘Oh he’s a d---head”), what can we expect? Probably business as usual. After all, the show has survived the loss of popular families before, from everyone’s favourite posh couple, Steph and Dom, to the gloriously opinionated Scarlett Moffatt. Our guesses: the lovely Siddiquis will continue to be the most well-adjusted family, hairdressers Stephen and Christopher will trot out the most-pointed one-liners, Welsh couple Dave and Shirley will bring the giggles, even though it remains a mystery just how Dave watches TV in that very uncomfortable-looking position, and we still won’t be able to work out how many dogs the Malones actually have. SH Live Winter Olympics 2018 BBC One and BBC Two, from 6.00am Day 14 sees the semi-finals of the men’s ice hockey and the women’s curling competition, plus the final of the men’s 1,000 m speed skating. SH An Island Parish: After the Hurricane BBC Two, 9.00pm Sophie Okonedo narrates this special edition of the series which looks at the long-term effects of Hurricane Irma on the Caribbean island of Anguilla. Among those who lost everything are Simone Connor and her father Neville, who ran a restaurant and leisure complex on the island. SH Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm Now is the perfect time to jump back on the Will & Grace bandwagon as the wonderful Nick Offerman (the real-life husband of Megan Mullally, who plays Karen) guest stars as baker Jackson Boudreaux, aka the Bad Boy of Bread. Offerman is a scene-stealing delight and the final moments offer a lovely pay-off. SH Joan Rivers: By Her friends Channel 5, 10.30pm Anyone who saw the brilliant comedy The Marvellous Mrs Maisel, which was inspired by the late Joan Rivers’s early career, will know that the comedian’s domestic-focused stand-up routines were unlike anything that the audiences of that time had heard before. This tribute puts that ground-breaking career in context. SH The Tick Amazon Prime, from today Peter Serafinowicz’s goofy blue superhero returns for another series of misadventures. As with the last time, the series stands and falls with Serafinowicz’s performance: his morally upstanding but bizarre caped crusader has enough charm to paper over plot cracks. SH Seven Seconds Netflix, from today This new crime-drama series from Veena Sud, the writer behind the US version of The Killing, explores grief, deceit and social injustice. Starring Regina King, it focuses on the fallout from the death of a young boy who was injured by a police officer. SH The Old Grey Whistle Test Live: For One Night Only BBC Four, 9.00pm Bob Harris, who fronted The Old Grey Whistle Test from 1972-1978, returns with this event marking 30 years since the end of music show. This one-off includes live performances and interviews with fans and former presenters. SH Mute (2018) Netflix, from today True Blood alumnus Alexander Skarsgård plays Leo, the titular mute in Duncan Jones’s sci-fi thriller, which the director describes as a spiritual sequel to 2009’s Moon. Leo Beiler, a bartender with a violent past, searches for his missing girlfriend Naadirah (Seyneb Saleh) in a futuristic, neon-lit Berlin. He crosses paths with a pair of US army surgeons, brilliantly named Cactus Bill and Duck Teddington (played by Paul Rudd and Justin Theroux), on a mission of their own. X-Men: First Class (2011) ★★★☆☆ E4, 9.00pm Telepathic Charles Xavier (James McAvoy) bonds with metal-bending death camp survivor Erik Lehnsherr (Michael Fassbender) and the two of them track down other mutants to confront evil Nazi Sebastian Shaw (Kevin Bacon) when he triggers the Cuban Missile Crisis. Matthew Vaughn is much more comfortable with the small-scale character stuff than the action climax, but this prequel is mostly a lot of fun. While We’re Young (2014) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm A couple’s doomed attempt to recapture their youth gives Ben Stiller and Naomi Watts a new lease of comic life in Noah Baumbach’s sparkling film. Baumbach packs it with the wit and vigour of a polished one-act play as co-stars Adam Driver and Amanda Seyfried, playing hat-wearing hipsters, deliver punchlines that can’t help but remind you of Woody Allen at his peak. Saturday 24 February Loadsa laughs: Ant McPartlin and Declan Donnelly Credit: ITV Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway ITV, 7.00pm Anthony McPartlin and Declan Donnelly, the undisputed kings of Saturday night TV – never more so since they won the inaugural Bruce Forsyth Entertainment gong, among others, at the National Television Awards last month – return with a 16th series of their popular show. Packed full of comedy, audience participation, prize giveaways, celebrity guests, exclusive performances and madcap stunts, this is high-octane entertainment, with barely time to draw breath between items. Tonight, Kylie Minogue gives a first performance of her latest single and revisits some of her biggest hits, Britain’s Got Talent judge Amanda Holden falls victim to the first Undercover prank of the series and Olly Murs takes on the role of guest announcer in the End of Show Show. The hosts themselves, meanwhile, put the pedal to the floor for a daredevil Ant vs Dec monster truck challenge, and reprise their roles as super sleuths in a new comedy whodunit (with an all-star cast that includes Joanna Lumley, Michael Sheen, Emilia Fox and David Walliams) while sidekicks Scarlett Moffatt and Stephen Mulhern are out on the streets looking for people to plays games with. And that’s just for starters. Gerard O’Donovan Live Winter Olympics 2018 BBC One and BBC Two, from 6.00am It’s the penultimate day and there’s major Team GB interest as the four-man bobsleigh gets under way. However, most eyes will be on the curling, which has proved rather popular in these Games, as the men’s gold and women’s bronze medals are decided. There’s also action in the snowboarding and skiing. Six Nations Rugby Union: Ireland v Wales ITV, 1.30pm After their 12-6 defeat against England at Twickenham, Wales travel to Ireland, with Dan Biggar starting at fly-half, and Liam Williams and Leigh Halfpenny also returning after injury. Ireland have won two from two, beating France in Paris, before enjoying an eight-try buffet at Italy’s expense in a 56-19 victory. The visitors are unbeaten in their last three Six Nations matches against Ireland, but were held to a 16-16 draw when the sides last met here two years ago. Six Nations Rugby Union: Scotland v England BBC One, 4.00pm Tough one for England, this. Yes, they’ve won nine of the last 10 matches against Scotland, drawing the other one, but the pressure cauldron that is Murrayfield is never an easy place to visit, and they’ll have their tails up after an impressive 32-26 win against France. Still, according to head coach Gregor Townsend, Scotland will need to produce their “best-ever performance” if they are to triumph against England in the Calcutta Cup. Eddie Jones’s team beat Wales 12-6 thanks to two first-half tries by Jonny May, but were forced to hang on grimly in the frenetic closing stages as they set a new championship record for consecutive home wins (15, dating back to 2012). When these sides met in the tournament last year, England thrashed Scotland 61-21 at Twickenham. Churchill’s Darkest Decision More4, 7.55pm Fans of the hit film Darkest Hour will appreciate this documentary about another big Churchill dilemma. In 1940, following the fall of France, Germany was poised to seize the entire French fleet, making Hitler’s threat to invade Britain ever graver. Drastic measures were called for, but at a tragically high cost. David Attenborough’s Natural Curiosities BBC Two, 8.00pm Creatures with remarkable navigation skills are the focus of tonight’s edition, looking at how dung beetles use the Sun, Moon and stars as compass points, and how pigeons recall complex routes. Britain at Low Tide Channel 4, 8.00pm More stories from our shoreline as Tori Herridge visits Dorset, where she finds the home of the world’s first aircraft carrier and searches for an Iron Age monument that can only be seen for a few hours each year. Troy: Fall of a City BBC One, 9.10pm All hell breaks loose in this second episode when Helen’s (Bella Dayne) husband Menelaus finds out what Paris (Louis Hunter) took back to Troy. His enraged brother Agamemnon (Johnny Harris) calls all Greece to war, but when they fail to propitiate the gods, there’s a shocking price to pay. GO Mosaic Sky Atlantic, 10.00pm Steven Soderbergh’s crime drama starring Sharon Stone provoked a blizzard of publicity on its release last year in mobile app format. HBO’s six-part “linear” TV version is obviously less innovative (the app works like an interactive movie where the user can choose from which perspective the plot is viewed), but it still has plenty to offer. In this second episode, the backstory continues to play out as author Olivia Lake’s (Stone) relationships with lover Eric (Frederick Weller) and lodger Joel (Garrett Hedlund) become ever more tangled. GO Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2 (2013) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 5.00pm In this sequel to the 2009 animation based on the 1978 children’s book, inventor Flint Lockwood (voiced by Bill Hader) and friends must rescue the island of Swallow Falls from being overrun by food-mutated animals. It’s no triumph of screenwriting or subtext, but it’s a feast of ingeniously rendered gastronomic insanity and kids will absolutely love it. The Heat (2013) ★★★★☆ E4, 9.00pm Bridesmaids director Paul Feig brings back one of that film’s stars, Melissa McCarthy, as a foul-mouthed Boston cop whose policing style, aided by a fridge full of armaments, makes Dirty Harry look like Thumbelina. She’s paired with a goody-two-shoes FBI agent (Sandra Bullock reminding us what a pro she is at comedy). Together, they’re dynamite, plus the film has an emotional clout that hits you seemingly from nowhere. Philomena (2013) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.00pm; not Northern Ireland This true story is based on the experiences of journalist Martin Sixsmith (Steve Coogan), who helped Philomena Lee (Judi Dench), an Irish woman in her seventies, search for the son that she was forced to put up for adoption 50 years earlier. Stephen Frears’s film is charming and hard-hitting, delivering some tough emotional blows as well as some harsh truths about the Catholic Church’s past. Sunday 25 February Curiouser and curiouser: Holliday Grainger and Tom Burke Credit: BBC Strike: Career of Evil BBC One, 9.00pm Rumpled PI Cormoran Strike (Tom Burke) and his trusty Girl Friday Robin Ellacott (Holliday Grainger) return for the third of JK Rowling’s Robert Galbraith novels. It’s a few months after the events of The Silkworm and Strike and Robin have settled into an easy working partnership, albeit one that remains a little too cosy for Robin’s smarmy fiancé Matthew (Kerr Logan). Then Robin receives a gruesome present in the post and our intrepid duo found themselves caught up in an investigation that swiftly hits far too close to home. Career of Evil is the most tightly plotted of the Galbraith books and this well-paced opening episode neatly sets up the (plentiful) twists to come. That said, the real enjoyment comes not from the story but from the fantastic chemistry between Grainger and Burke, who bring an immense amount of warmth and charm to their scenes. Indeed, so successfully do they inhabit the roles that it’s frustrating to realise that, with no more Galbraith books currently published, this will be the last Strike for a while. It’s a genuine shame: if ever a TV adaptation deserved to be spun away from its source material it’s this one. Sarah Hughes ODI cricket: New Zealand v England Sky Sports Main Event, 12.30am You’ll have to stay up late to see this opening one-day international of the five-match series. England, having beaten the Aussies in their last ODI series, will fancy their chances. Young, Welsh and Pretty Minted BBC Three, from 10.00am The makers of Young, Welsh and Pretty Skint return with a new series focusing on a group of would-be entrepreneurs, including a YouTuber with 1.7 million subscribers and an image-obsessed Instagram influencer. Live Winter Olympics 2018 Closing Ceremony BBC Two, from 11.00am The Olympics bow out, allowing us to recall the heartbreak (Team GB’s Elise Christie’s wipeout in the speedskating final) and joy (American snowboarder Chloe Kim’s megawatt smile). K-pop star CL and boy band EXO take part in the ceremony which has a fusion theme, before the flag is handed over to Beijing for 2022. Premier League Football: Manchester United v Chelsea Sky Sports Main Event, 1.00pm With both sides struggling for consistency – United lost at Newcastle a fortnight ago, while Chelsea were trounced 4-1 by Watford earlier this month – today’s match at Old Trafford should be a tentative affair. Carabao Cup Final: Arsenal v Manchester City Sky Sports Main Event, 4.00pm Proving that the League Cup is having something of a resurgence, Arsenal and Manchester City are this year’s finalists, with the former aiming to win the trophy for the first time since 1993. City are favourites, though: imperious in the league, they also have form in the Carabao Cup, having won it in 2014 and 2016. Top Gear BBC Two, 8.00pm The petrolhead’s special returns with Matt LeBlanc promising increased family appeal. The new team of LeBlanc, Chris Harris and Rory Reid have decent chemistry and if this was your sort of thing then it probably remains so. Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble BBC Four, 8.00pm Few programmes are as inspiring as this one about cellist Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble, an ever-changing group of over 50 artists who perform alongside Ma. In addition to highlighting some phenomenal talents – Galician bagpiper Cristina Pato almost steals the show – the film details the hardships that they’ve faced, including revolution and exile. Anchoring it all is former child prodigy Ma: “I think when I was a kid a lot of things just happened,” he notes as footage shows him performing as a child for President Kennedy. “I’m always trying to figure out who I am and where I fit in the world.” SH Hannibal’s Elephant Army: The New Evidence Channel 4, 8.00pm Why did Carthaginian general Hannibal cross the Alps on a seemingly impossible journey with an army of 40,000 soldiers, 9,000 cavalry officers and 37 elephants? This fascinating film examines the evidence. Life and Death Row: The Mass Execution BBC Two, 9.00pm The harrowing series continues to turn a microscopic eye on all aspects of the death penalty. Tonight it’s the case of Stacey Johnson, on death row for 23 years. His stepdaughter insists on his innocence; his victim’s daughter says she’s sure that he’s a guilty man. SH Clouds of Sils Maria (2014) ★★★★☆ BBC Four, 9.30pm A complex, bewitching and fearlessly intelligent psychological fondue from France’s Olivier Assayas, with Juliet Binoche and Kristen Stewart as a famous actress and her diligent and devoted personal assistant, prepping for a play that shapes the drama of their own lives in its likeness. Playful and addictively strange, with career-best work from Stewart. Shutter Island (2010) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 11.05pm Martin Scorsese’s follow-up to The Departed, is, like that film, based on a novel by Dennis Lehane. He delves into gothic noir in this mystery thriller as detective Daniels (Leonardo DiCaprio) investigates the disappearance of an inmate from a prison for the clinically insane with the help of his partner (played brilliantly by Mark Ruffalo). This is a gripping story with some bold twists, although it eventually loses momentum. Point Break (1991) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 11.30pm; Scotland, 12.30am Kathryn Bigelow’s cult surfing/crime film elevated Patrick Swayze’s actor status to true action hero. Keanu Reeves plays Johnny Utah, an FBI agent who goes undercover to infiltrate a gang of bankrobbing surfers led by the charismatic Bodhi (Swayze). The action heats up when Bodhi and Utah find they share a similar attitude towards danger. Lori Petty is the surfer who catches Johnny’s eye. Monday 26 February Body snatched? Greg Kinnear as the father Credit: Channel 4 Electric Dreams: The Father Thing Channel 4, 10.00pm After a first run split pretty evenly between stunners and misfires, the final four adaptations of short stories from pulp sci-fi icon Philip K Dick begins with a heavily derivative but entertaining piece from Michael Dinner, showrunner of excellent modern western Justified. The setting is an unnamed Midwest town, where young baseball-loving Charlie (Jack Gore) lives with his parents, hangs out with three other misfits and avoids the bullies; it’s as cosily familiar a slice of apple-pie Americana as you could find. And then the aftermath of a meteor shower causes Charlie to suspect that some of the town’s inhabitants may have been replaced by aliens, his own father (Greg Kinnear) included. Based more directly than some of its predecessors on Dick’s original story, this cannot help but nod to Invasion of the Body Snatchers, although the Cold War paranoia replaced by… what, exactly? There’s a parable of father-son relations in here, along with an allegory of divorce and a Stranger Things-influenced romp, but it shows its hand a little early, never settles on a tone and features a climax that will split opinion down the middle. That said, it’s never less than diverting. Gabriel Tate This Country BBC Three, from 10.00am Series one of Charlie and Daisy May Cooper’s mockumentary transcended its obvious debt to The Office to become a touching, acutely observed and defiant portrait of life on the margins in rural Britain. Importantly, it was also very funny, finding bathos and humour in the efforts of gormless cousins Kurtan and Kerry Mucklowe (played by the Coopers) to amuse themselves in a Cotswolds village. Thankfully, almost nothing has changed for this second series, although Kurtan has found a girlfriend and Kerry hitherto unknown charitable instincts. Shakespeare & Hathaway: Private Investigators BBC One, 2.15pm Jo Joyner and Mark Benton are perfectly cast in this amiable new 10-part series as Lu Shakespeare, wrongly suspected of killing her fiancé, and Frank Hathaway, the slobbish PI she ropes in to clear her name. The odd-couple chemistry is there from the start and Stratford-upon-Avon looks glorious – making this a welcome addition to the afternoon schedules. Hollywood in Vienna: the Sound of Space & Alexandre Desplat Sky Arts, 8.00pm This gala performance loosely based on a journey through the universe includes Parisian composer Alexandre Desplat’s melodies for movies, including Twilight and The Grand Budapest Hotel, as well as legendary scores from Star Wars to E.T. GT Classic Mary Berry BBC One, 8.30pm Cherish the unlikely sight of the former Bake Off judge partaking in a little “caveman cooking” in this latest rebranding of Mary Berry’s line in home-cooking, with the opener focusing on comfort food. MasterChef BBC One, 9.00pm The 11th run of the enduringly popular cooking contest begins with the first seven contestants creating dishes using ingredients including beef mince and duck breasts for John Torode, Gregg Wallace and some former finalists. The Unstoppable Flying Scotsman Channel 5, 9.00pm The world’s most famous steam locomotive is profiled in this two-parter from Rob Bell, always a reassuring translator of technical geekery for a mainstream audience. Here, he explores its origins and enduring appeal. GT Ice Cold in Alex (1958, b/w) ★★★★☆ Film4, 4.20pm J Lee Thompson’s tense British wartime thriller is one of the classics of the black-and-white era and richly entertaining. John Mills shines as Captain Anson, who dreams of an ice-cold glass of lager while escorting Britons across the desert to Alexandria during the Second World War. The film makes some interesting points about patriotism, as we learn Anson is unaware that he’s harbouring a traitor. Alien Resurrection (1997) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Sigourney Weaver returns as heroine Ellen Ripley for this fourth film in the franchise. Two hundred years have passed since Alien 3, and Ripley has now been cloned by scientists, which gives her greater strength but also conflicting loyalties, meaning we’re not sure that we can trust her. Despite the talent on board (Weaver, screenwriter Joss Whedon and director Jean-Pierre Jeunot), this is a poor effort. Elysium (2013) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 11.00pm Neill Blomkamp’s (District 9) intelligent sci-fi thriller has a fire in its belly and stars a brawny Matt Damon as a factory worker who scrapes out a living on the Earth’s crust. He’s involved in an accident but the medical care that he needs is on space station Elysium. Blomkamp focuses on faith, capitalism and private healthcare – in lesser hands, the film might have played out like a Lib Dem manifesto with spaceships. Tuesday 27 February Surrounded by splendour: Alan Titchmarsh Secrets of the National Trust with Alan Titchmarsh Channel 5, 8.00pm A tale of “female empowerment, politics and a fight for the throne of England itself” is how Alan Titchmarsh, opening a second series showcasing the National Trust’s finest properties, describes the history of Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire. Certainly, the story of Elizabeth Talbot, Countess of Shrewsbury (aka Bess of Hardwick), and how four strategic marriages helped her to become one of the most powerful women in Elizabethan England, is a fascinating one. And the glorious house she built in the 1590s, with vast facades of glass and sumptuous decor, was doubtless a marvel of the age. Whether you think Titchmarsh does either of them justice will depend on how much detail you like in a documentary, and how much repetition (you won’t possess enough fingers to count how often he mentions that Bess’s initials and coat of arms decorate the high parapet of the house) and “coming up next” you can bear. Either way, there are plenty of glories to gaze upon, so if you’re unlikely to get a chance to visit Hardwick Hall in person, the fine filming shows off the house and its grounds in considerable splendour. Gerard O’Donovan How to Get Fit Fast Channel 4, 8.00pm Anna Richardson and Amar Latif put the emphasis on fitness rather than weight loss in this new series exploring the off-the-shelf plans available, hoping to point viewers towards the exercise regime that suits them best. 100 Years Younger in 21 Days ITV, 9.00pm Eight well-worn famous faces attempt to turn the clock back at a “rejuvenation” clinic in Sardinia. June Brown, Sherrie Hewson, Claire King, Sid Owen, Roy Walker, Russell Grant, Googlebox’s Sandra Martin and music legend Shaun Ryder are among thoses hoping to knock off years without going under the knife. The FGM Detectives Channel 4, 10.00pm Despite the global efforts to ban the practice, female genital mutilation (FGM) continues to affect millions of women. Here Cathy Newman leads a two-year investigation into FGM in the UK, which is estimated to put 20,000 young British women at risk every year. Acid Attack: My Story BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm Naomi Oni recounts the horrific acid attack that left her with life-altering injuries in 2012, and how the police investigation (which, unbelievably, initially focused on whether she had inflicted the wounds on herself) proved the attacker to be a childhood friend. GO Unreal Amazon Prime, from today A drama playing on the fakeness, dubious ethics and behind-the-scenes manipulation of a hit reality TV dating show, UnREAL is nothing if not a series for our times. As the third season begins, Everlasting’s producer Rachel (Shiri Appleby) is getting her life back on track, despite her ruthless boss Quinn (Constance Zimmer) ramping up the pressure to deliver the show’s most outrageous season yet. Divorce Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm Sarah Jessica Parker returns with a second season of the bleak and bitingly funny comedy about the painful break-up of an American middle-class couple’s marriage. At least that’s what series one, created and partly written by the Sharon Horgan, was about. Season two, minus Horgan’s input, takes on a distinctly lighter tone as both Frances (Parker) and her now ex-husband Robert (Thomas Haden Church) begin tentatively to negotiate the possibilities of life post divorce. GO Charade (1963) ★★★★☆ Film4, 2.25pm Audrey Hepburn as a temperamental-but-alluring damsel in distress and Cary Grant as a shadowy charmer are characters that the actors played many times. But they do so exceptionally in this suspense comedy from Stanley Donen, often referred to as the best Hitchcock movie that Hitchcock never made. Hepburn is the widow being trailed by four men hunting for her late husband’s stolen fortune. Black Swan (2010) ★★★★★ Film4, 11.25pm Darren Aronofsky’s film is delirious hokum and high-class trash. Natalie Portman stars as Nina Sayers, a young dancer with the New York City Ballet preparing for a production of Swan Lake choreographed by the charismatic Thomas Leroy (Vincent Cassel). He is unconvinced by Nina’s ability to portray the passion of the Black Swan and her efforts to convince him lead her towards madness. Christine (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 11.50pm The story of Christine Chubbuck, a Florida newsreader who shot herself on air in 1974, is shocking and unfathomably sad. But it wouldn’t be worth retelling on film if it didn’t illuminate something. It asks a top-notch Rebecca Hall to play out the last days of Chubbuck’s life and dares us to hope that it’s about a different woman – one who made it out the other side of her own tragedy. Wednesday 28 February Victim: Édgar Ramírez as Versace Credit: BBC The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story BBC Two, 9.00pm Ryan Murphy’s true crime series follows up 2016’s dramatisation of the OJ Simpson trial with the story of serial killer Andrew Cunanan, who murdered at least five people over a three-month period, including the fashion designer Gianni Versace. Murphy and scriptwriter Tom Rob Smith use the word assassination very carefully here: the operatic opening scenes depict Versace (Édgar Ramírez) as a modern-day Medici prince, dispensing cheerful patronage to all in his Miami Beach fiefdom. By contrast, Cunanan (Darren Criss) is portrayed as a man so insecure in his own skin that he is almost physically incapable of telling the truth: “You tell gay people you’re gay and straight people you’re straight,” exclaims an exasperated friend. “I tell people what they need to hear,” comes the too-calm reply. Both Criss and Ramirez are excellent and there’s strong support from Ricky Martin as Versace’s bewildered live-in boyfriend and a perhaps slightly too-camp Penélope Cruz as Donatella. Smith’s solid script does a good job of juggling various timelines to show how this particular killer came to be. Sarah Hughes Ellie Undercover: Rent for Sex BBC Three, from 10.00am Investigative journalist Ellie Flynn presents this look at the growing number of unscrupulous landlords who offer rent-free accommodation in exchange for sex. It’s hard not to feel utterly dispirited as Flynn meets vulnerable women such as Chloe, who feels so trapped by her homelessness that she’s in no position to say no to these men. Athletics: The World Indoor Championships BBC Two, 7.00pm The four-day World Indoor Championships, which takes place at Arena Birmingham, kicks off on Thursday, featuring three events in the first evening session – including Team GB’s Laura Muir and Eilish McColgan in the final of the women’s 3,000 m. Events continue from 9.00am on Friday, with Greg Rutherford’s long jump bid among the highlights. The World’s Most Extraordinary Homes BBC Two, 8.00pm For those of us who enjoy gawping at other people’s homes, few programmes are more satisfying than this series presented by Caroline Quentin and architect Piers Taylor. Tonight the duo are in Portugal poking their noses into four very different properties. The Supervet Channel 4, 8.00pm Professor Noel Fitzpatrick and the team returns for a new round of veterinary problems, including a very excitable Labrador who requires elbow replacement surgery and a Jackahuahua puppy who needs to have spinal surgery after an attack in the park. Benidorm ITV, 9.00pm Hold on to your sunhats as ITV’s long-running Costa Blanca comedy returns for a 10th series with comedians Hale & Pace joining the cast as a pair of undercover cops. Elsewhere, Joyce (Sherrie Hewson) and Monty’s (John Challis) big day arrives. Save Me Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Don’t let the fact that it features yet another missing child put you off the week’s best new drama. Written by and starring Lennie James, Save Me tells the tale of Nelly (James), an ageing wide-boy of suspect charms, who finds himself in trouble after his estranged teenage daughter disappears. We’ve all met people like Nelly, the easy smiles hiding their sharp edges, and James does a wonderful job of making us warm to him despite the distrust. There’s strong support, too, from Suranne Jones as the missing girl’s mother. SH Film 2018 BBC One, 11.15pm; Wales, 11.35pm; NI, 12.10am The BBC’s long-running film series returns with an opening episode hosted by Radio 1’s Clara Amfo alongside critics Ellen E Jones and Larushka Ivan-Zadeh. The focus this week is on next Sunday’s Academy Awards, plus an interview with Lady Bird’s Oscar-nominated director, Greta Gerwig. SH The Quiet Man (1952) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.00pm Best known for his sombre westerns, John Ford turns personal for this wonderful romantic comedy which was considered a risky venture but went on to win the director his fourth Oscar. It tells the story of a boxer who falls in love with the sister of a bully. The famous grab-and-kiss scene between the smouldering John Wayne and love interest Maureen O’Hara (the “Queen of Technicolour”) also appears in E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. Big Eyes (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Amy Adams is ideally cast as the browbeaten artist Margaret Keane who, for eight years, churned out iconic, highly sought after paintings, only for her con artist husband (Christoph Waltz) to take all the credit. Tim Burton’s take on this curious real-life tale of curdled suburbia sadly lacks Adams’s subtlety: even the usually restrained Waltz is caught up in the blunt, overly stylised kookiness. Good (2008) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.50pm Viggo Mortensen gives a thoughtful performance as a German professor whose ideas about euthanasia are adopted by the Nazis. It’s only when he becomes a concentration camp inspector that he grasps the horror of his ideas. Vicente Amorim’s adaptation of CP Taylor’s play doesn’t shirk big questions, but he tends to fall back on clichés – hammerings on the piano, etc – and it plays a bit like a Nazi version of Rising Damp. Thursday 1 March A landmark return: David Olusoga, Mary Beard and Simon Schama Credit: BBC Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm Almost 50 years after changing the face of arts programming with the landmark series Civilisation, BBC Two returns with an expanded brief and all the bells and whistles of modern film-making, from drone cameras to infra-red photography. With nine episodes split between presenters Simon Schama (five), David Olusoga and Mary Beard (two each), Civilisations promises an opinionated overview of global art and culture. It opens with a striking sequence in which Schama – helming this first part – explores what has been lost and salvaged from the Isil pillage of Palmyra. From there, we’re whisked to Africa’s Cape coast and the first evidence of mankind’s creativity 77,000 years ago. Then it’s a breathless gallop through the millennia, alighting at the first settlements and depictions of the human face. Among the cave art, Mayan stairways and fertility fetishes, the real treasure is an astonishing Mycenaean Sealstone, jaw-dropping in its anatomical detail and artistic accomplishment. While it won’t have the same impact as the original series (what could?), Civilisations looks to be just as learned, accessible and thrilling as its predecessor – the whole series will be available on BBC iPlayer at 10.00pm. Gabriel Tate The Cruise: Voyage to Alaska ITV, 8.30pm; not Wales Over three episodes, the five-star luxury liner Star Princess and its redoubtable crew travels to the northernmost American state – where they encounter difficult weather, navigational challenges and problem passengers. Weinstein: the Inside Story BBC One, 9.00pm In collaboration with PBS America’s Frontline current-affairs strand, Panorama examines the fall of Harvey Weinstein and the lengths to which the disgraced Hollywood producer would go to keep his alleged bullying, threats and sexual assaults private. Speaking to insiders, the team builds a troubling picture of industry complicity. From Ice to Fire: the Incredible Science of Temperature BBC Four, 9.00pm Dr Helen Czerski concludes her excellent series with fire, and how its harnessing played a pivotal role in human evolution and survival, from essentials such as toolmaking and mining to relative fripperies such as hot-air balloons. The moment that Czerski triggers a lightning strike at a high-voltage laboratory carries a genuine frisson; as is customary with most BBC Four films, the presentation is lively and the science deftly handled. Serial Killer with Piers Morgan ITV, 9.00pm How do you follow interviewing Donald Trump? Piers Morgan returns to the less contentious turf of more one-to-ones with convicted murderers behind bars. He begins with Lorenzo Gilyard, the so-called Kansas City Strangler, who remains unremorseful after allegedly killing 13 women and girls over almost two decades. Panic at 30,000 Feet: Airline Emergency Channel 5, 9.00pm This nightmare-inducing new series explores what happens when flights go wrong, from mid-air collisions to runway explosions. GT Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 11.45pm The penultimate episode of this often disturbing and insightful series revisits Oak Creek, Wisconsin, where white supremacist Michael Page killed six and injured four at a Sikh temple, before killing himself, in 2012. For once, there is a vaguely positive denouement: Page’s brutality had the opposite to its intended effect and brought the community closer together. GT Jubal (1956) ★★★★☆ Film4, 12.40pm Ernest Borgnine stars in this brooding western shot in the Grand Teton mountains of Wyoming, which reworks the plot of Othello. Borgnine stars as a cattle rancher with a much younger wife (Valerie French), who is driven into a jealous rage when cattlehand Rod Steiger suggests that she is having an affair with young drifter Jubal (a magnificent Glenn Ford). Murder is most definitely on the cards. Pitch Perfect (2012) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm The world of collegiate a cappella singing contests can’t be as heartless as Jason Moore’s sour comedy would have us believe. Anna Kendrick stars as Beca, an angst-ridden outsider who must shake up her uninspiring and monotonous group, while trying to handle how weird they all are. And, of course, there’s a handsome man (Skylar Astin) who catches her eye. It’s a little like Glee but without the schmaltz. The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Clint Eastwood directs and stars in this warm-hearted marvellous western adapted from Forrest Carter’s novel and set during the American Civil War. Eastwood plays the Missouri farmer who, driven by memories of his family’s slaughter, becomes an outlaw when he refuses to join his Confederate comrades in surrender, in favour of seeking revenge on the men who murdered his kin. Friday 2 March Searching for the truth: Lydia Wilson as Matilda Credit: BBC Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm After last week’s hiatus because of the Six Nations rugby, it’s back to small-town Wales for another dose of supernatural country-house shenanigans. When we last saw fragile but determined musician Matilda (Lydia Wilson), she’d suffered the double whammy of finding her would-be mother Rose (Claire Rushbrook) unconscious in the bath and learning that mute Aunt Meredith (Jane Thorne) had died on the verge of offering up her secrets. How did Matilda react? By mysteriously blacking out and bashing her beloved cello against a cupboard. In the fourth episode then, she looks for connections between her mental health and Carys’s disappearance. And some clues emerge: Matilda meets dishevelled local Laura (Anastasia Hille), who claims to hear voices informing her of Carys’s fate, and back at the mansion, she comes across some old tomes detailing rituals to unlock the past. Even with its heavily scored bumps and shudders, Requiem can’t quite sustain its early Hammer Horror appeal. The strong performances and some genuinely chilling moments keep things compelling however, not least in the spine-tingling climax of this episode. Toby Dantzic Flint Town Netflix, from today Back in 2014, a cost-cutting exercise left thousands of homes in Flint, Michigan, with contaminated drinking water for years. This new eight-part documentary looks at the fallout from the crisis through the eyes of Flint’s beleaguered police force, who face an uphill struggle – the community needs their support but are also deeply mistrustful of those in authority, plus dwindling resources makes the officers’ jobs harder still. MasterChef BBC One, 7.30pm Having survived the cooking contest’s opening week, the six heat winners face food critic William Sitwell in this first quarter-final. He challenges them to conjure up a standout pudding showcasing either alcohol or spices. Love Your Garden ITV, 8.00pm; not STV/UTV/Wales This week, Alan Titchmarsh and his team are in Bidewell, Devon, helping Tamsyn and Alex Wood who returned to the UK from France after Alex suffered a brain injury. The aim is to turn the Woods’ garden into a coastal sanctuary inspired by Alex’s passion for surfing. The Yorkshire Steam Railway: All Aboard Channel 5, 8.00pm As amiable as its title suggests, this new documentary series follows the lives of those who work on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, one of the country’s most popular steam railways. In this series’ opener, the new season begins with the arrival of star engine Royal Scot, on loan from London. Tones, Drones and Arpeggios: The Magic of Minimalism BBC Four, 9.00pm Conductor Charles Hazlewood explores minimalism, which he argues is the most important musical form of the 20th century. In the fascinating opener of this two-part series, he unpicks the construction of these sometimes confounding sounds and tracks down the genre’s avant-garde pioneers, who brought their mesmeric, spirituality-inspired compositions from California to New York in the Sixties. TD Jo Brand: Secrets of Her Success Channel 5, 10.30pm Channel 5’s celebration of funny women continues with this absorbing profile of the pioneering doyenne of deadpan, Jo Brand. This charts her career from its rocky start on the male-dominated stand-up circuit to her much-admired hospital sitcom Getting On. TD Gladiator (2000) ★★★★★ Film4, 9.00pm This take on the traditional swords-and-sandals epic proved that Russell Crowe deserved to be recognised as a mainstream star, and reaffirmed Ridley Scott’s reputation as a first-rate director. Crowe is Maximus, a former Roman general who rebuilds his career as a gladiator. His bid for vengeance against a vile emperor (Joaquin Phoenix) is compelling. Plus there’s a last hurrah from Oliver Reed. Blades of Glory (2007) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm;N Ireland, 12.05am You might think that the sequinned world of figure skating is beyond parody, but here Will Ferrell and Jon Heder serve up a zestfully preposterous comedy. Both play rival Olympic ice skaters, Ferrell a loose-living maverick, Heder a prissy perfectionist, who are slung out of the sport but use a loophole to return as an erotic all-male pairing. Amy Poehler co-stars. A Hijacking (2012) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.55pm Tobias Lindholm’s vigorously intelligent hostage thriller, set on board a besieged ship in the Indian Ocean, deftly moves his story between the boat and the shipping company’s offices, where Søren Malling’s frazzled CEO attempts to thrash out a bargain. On the other end of the line is the Somalis’ translator. Flies buzz, sweat trickles, negotiations continue, and you feel your breath dry up. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
Friday 23 February Gogglebox Channel 4, 9.00pm We all know that Gogglebox won’t be the same this time around. One of the great joys of watching the armchair TV critic show, which returns for its 11th series, was the always warm, occasionally bickering relationship between straight-talking Liverpudlian couple, Leon and June Bernicoff. But, sadly, Leon died last December following a short illness and June recently confirmed that she won’t be taking part without him. So, in the absence of Leon’s notoriously unvarnished views (on chef Jamie Oliver: “‘Oh he’s a d---head”), what can we expect? Probably business as usual. After all, the show has survived the loss of popular families before, from everyone’s favourite posh couple, Steph and Dom, to the gloriously opinionated Scarlett Moffatt. Our guesses: the lovely Siddiquis will continue to be the most well-adjusted family, hairdressers Stephen and Christopher will trot out the most-pointed one-liners, Welsh couple Dave and Shirley will bring the giggles, even though it remains a mystery just how Dave watches TV in that very uncomfortable-looking position, and we still won’t be able to work out how many dogs the Malones actually have. SH Live Winter Olympics 2018 BBC One and BBC Two, from 6.00am Day 14 sees the semi-finals of the men’s ice hockey and the women’s curling competition, plus the final of the men’s 1,000 m speed skating. SH An Island Parish: After the Hurricane BBC Two, 9.00pm Sophie Okonedo narrates this special edition of the series which looks at the long-term effects of Hurricane Irma on the Caribbean island of Anguilla. Among those who lost everything are Simone Connor and her father Neville, who ran a restaurant and leisure complex on the island. SH Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm Now is the perfect time to jump back on the Will & Grace bandwagon as the wonderful Nick Offerman (the real-life husband of Megan Mullally, who plays Karen) guest stars as baker Jackson Boudreaux, aka the Bad Boy of Bread. Offerman is a scene-stealing delight and the final moments offer a lovely pay-off. SH Joan Rivers: By Her friends Channel 5, 10.30pm Anyone who saw the brilliant comedy The Marvellous Mrs Maisel, which was inspired by the late Joan Rivers’s early career, will know that the comedian’s domestic-focused stand-up routines were unlike anything that the audiences of that time had heard before. This tribute puts that ground-breaking career in context. SH The Tick Amazon Prime, from today Peter Serafinowicz’s goofy blue superhero returns for another series of misadventures. As with the last time, the series stands and falls with Serafinowicz’s performance: his morally upstanding but bizarre caped crusader has enough charm to paper over plot cracks. SH Seven Seconds Netflix, from today This new crime-drama series from Veena Sud, the writer behind the US version of The Killing, explores grief, deceit and social injustice. Starring Regina King, it focuses on the fallout from the death of a young boy who was injured by a police officer. SH The Old Grey Whistle Test Live: For One Night Only BBC Four, 9.00pm Bob Harris, who fronted The Old Grey Whistle Test from 1972-1978, returns with this event marking 30 years since the end of music show. This one-off includes live performances and interviews with fans and former presenters. SH Mute (2018) Netflix, from today True Blood alumnus Alexander Skarsgård plays Leo, the titular mute in Duncan Jones’s sci-fi thriller, which the director describes as a spiritual sequel to 2009’s Moon. Leo Beiler, a bartender with a violent past, searches for his missing girlfriend Naadirah (Seyneb Saleh) in a futuristic, neon-lit Berlin. He crosses paths with a pair of US army surgeons, brilliantly named Cactus Bill and Duck Teddington (played by Paul Rudd and Justin Theroux), on a mission of their own. X-Men: First Class (2011) ★★★☆☆ E4, 9.00pm Telepathic Charles Xavier (James McAvoy) bonds with metal-bending death camp survivor Erik Lehnsherr (Michael Fassbender) and the two of them track down other mutants to confront evil Nazi Sebastian Shaw (Kevin Bacon) when he triggers the Cuban Missile Crisis. Matthew Vaughn is much more comfortable with the small-scale character stuff than the action climax, but this prequel is mostly a lot of fun. While We’re Young (2014) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm A couple’s doomed attempt to recapture their youth gives Ben Stiller and Naomi Watts a new lease of comic life in Noah Baumbach’s sparkling film. Baumbach packs it with the wit and vigour of a polished one-act play as co-stars Adam Driver and Amanda Seyfried, playing hat-wearing hipsters, deliver punchlines that can’t help but remind you of Woody Allen at his peak. Saturday 24 February Loadsa laughs: Ant McPartlin and Declan Donnelly Credit: ITV Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway ITV, 7.00pm Anthony McPartlin and Declan Donnelly, the undisputed kings of Saturday night TV – never more so since they won the inaugural Bruce Forsyth Entertainment gong, among others, at the National Television Awards last month – return with a 16th series of their popular show. Packed full of comedy, audience participation, prize giveaways, celebrity guests, exclusive performances and madcap stunts, this is high-octane entertainment, with barely time to draw breath between items. Tonight, Kylie Minogue gives a first performance of her latest single and revisits some of her biggest hits, Britain’s Got Talent judge Amanda Holden falls victim to the first Undercover prank of the series and Olly Murs takes on the role of guest announcer in the End of Show Show. The hosts themselves, meanwhile, put the pedal to the floor for a daredevil Ant vs Dec monster truck challenge, and reprise their roles as super sleuths in a new comedy whodunit (with an all-star cast that includes Joanna Lumley, Michael Sheen, Emilia Fox and David Walliams) while sidekicks Scarlett Moffatt and Stephen Mulhern are out on the streets looking for people to plays games with. And that’s just for starters. Gerard O’Donovan Live Winter Olympics 2018 BBC One and BBC Two, from 6.00am It’s the penultimate day and there’s major Team GB interest as the four-man bobsleigh gets under way. However, most eyes will be on the curling, which has proved rather popular in these Games, as the men’s gold and women’s bronze medals are decided. There’s also action in the snowboarding and skiing. Six Nations Rugby Union: Ireland v Wales ITV, 1.30pm After their 12-6 defeat against England at Twickenham, Wales travel to Ireland, with Dan Biggar starting at fly-half, and Liam Williams and Leigh Halfpenny also returning after injury. Ireland have won two from two, beating France in Paris, before enjoying an eight-try buffet at Italy’s expense in a 56-19 victory. The visitors are unbeaten in their last three Six Nations matches against Ireland, but were held to a 16-16 draw when the sides last met here two years ago. Six Nations Rugby Union: Scotland v England BBC One, 4.00pm Tough one for England, this. Yes, they’ve won nine of the last 10 matches against Scotland, drawing the other one, but the pressure cauldron that is Murrayfield is never an easy place to visit, and they’ll have their tails up after an impressive 32-26 win against France. Still, according to head coach Gregor Townsend, Scotland will need to produce their “best-ever performance” if they are to triumph against England in the Calcutta Cup. Eddie Jones’s team beat Wales 12-6 thanks to two first-half tries by Jonny May, but were forced to hang on grimly in the frenetic closing stages as they set a new championship record for consecutive home wins (15, dating back to 2012). When these sides met in the tournament last year, England thrashed Scotland 61-21 at Twickenham. Churchill’s Darkest Decision More4, 7.55pm Fans of the hit film Darkest Hour will appreciate this documentary about another big Churchill dilemma. In 1940, following the fall of France, Germany was poised to seize the entire French fleet, making Hitler’s threat to invade Britain ever graver. Drastic measures were called for, but at a tragically high cost. David Attenborough’s Natural Curiosities BBC Two, 8.00pm Creatures with remarkable navigation skills are the focus of tonight’s edition, looking at how dung beetles use the Sun, Moon and stars as compass points, and how pigeons recall complex routes. Britain at Low Tide Channel 4, 8.00pm More stories from our shoreline as Tori Herridge visits Dorset, where she finds the home of the world’s first aircraft carrier and searches for an Iron Age monument that can only be seen for a few hours each year. Troy: Fall of a City BBC One, 9.10pm All hell breaks loose in this second episode when Helen’s (Bella Dayne) husband Menelaus finds out what Paris (Louis Hunter) took back to Troy. His enraged brother Agamemnon (Johnny Harris) calls all Greece to war, but when they fail to propitiate the gods, there’s a shocking price to pay. GO Mosaic Sky Atlantic, 10.00pm Steven Soderbergh’s crime drama starring Sharon Stone provoked a blizzard of publicity on its release last year in mobile app format. HBO’s six-part “linear” TV version is obviously less innovative (the app works like an interactive movie where the user can choose from which perspective the plot is viewed), but it still has plenty to offer. In this second episode, the backstory continues to play out as author Olivia Lake’s (Stone) relationships with lover Eric (Frederick Weller) and lodger Joel (Garrett Hedlund) become ever more tangled. GO Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2 (2013) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 5.00pm In this sequel to the 2009 animation based on the 1978 children’s book, inventor Flint Lockwood (voiced by Bill Hader) and friends must rescue the island of Swallow Falls from being overrun by food-mutated animals. It’s no triumph of screenwriting or subtext, but it’s a feast of ingeniously rendered gastronomic insanity and kids will absolutely love it. The Heat (2013) ★★★★☆ E4, 9.00pm Bridesmaids director Paul Feig brings back one of that film’s stars, Melissa McCarthy, as a foul-mouthed Boston cop whose policing style, aided by a fridge full of armaments, makes Dirty Harry look like Thumbelina. She’s paired with a goody-two-shoes FBI agent (Sandra Bullock reminding us what a pro she is at comedy). Together, they’re dynamite, plus the film has an emotional clout that hits you seemingly from nowhere. Philomena (2013) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.00pm; not Northern Ireland This true story is based on the experiences of journalist Martin Sixsmith (Steve Coogan), who helped Philomena Lee (Judi Dench), an Irish woman in her seventies, search for the son that she was forced to put up for adoption 50 years earlier. Stephen Frears’s film is charming and hard-hitting, delivering some tough emotional blows as well as some harsh truths about the Catholic Church’s past. Sunday 25 February Curiouser and curiouser: Holliday Grainger and Tom Burke Credit: BBC Strike: Career of Evil BBC One, 9.00pm Rumpled PI Cormoran Strike (Tom Burke) and his trusty Girl Friday Robin Ellacott (Holliday Grainger) return for the third of JK Rowling’s Robert Galbraith novels. It’s a few months after the events of The Silkworm and Strike and Robin have settled into an easy working partnership, albeit one that remains a little too cosy for Robin’s smarmy fiancé Matthew (Kerr Logan). Then Robin receives a gruesome present in the post and our intrepid duo found themselves caught up in an investigation that swiftly hits far too close to home. Career of Evil is the most tightly plotted of the Galbraith books and this well-paced opening episode neatly sets up the (plentiful) twists to come. That said, the real enjoyment comes not from the story but from the fantastic chemistry between Grainger and Burke, who bring an immense amount of warmth and charm to their scenes. Indeed, so successfully do they inhabit the roles that it’s frustrating to realise that, with no more Galbraith books currently published, this will be the last Strike for a while. It’s a genuine shame: if ever a TV adaptation deserved to be spun away from its source material it’s this one. Sarah Hughes ODI cricket: New Zealand v England Sky Sports Main Event, 12.30am You’ll have to stay up late to see this opening one-day international of the five-match series. England, having beaten the Aussies in their last ODI series, will fancy their chances. Young, Welsh and Pretty Minted BBC Three, from 10.00am The makers of Young, Welsh and Pretty Skint return with a new series focusing on a group of would-be entrepreneurs, including a YouTuber with 1.7 million subscribers and an image-obsessed Instagram influencer. Live Winter Olympics 2018 Closing Ceremony BBC Two, from 11.00am The Olympics bow out, allowing us to recall the heartbreak (Team GB’s Elise Christie’s wipeout in the speedskating final) and joy (American snowboarder Chloe Kim’s megawatt smile). K-pop star CL and boy band EXO take part in the ceremony which has a fusion theme, before the flag is handed over to Beijing for 2022. Premier League Football: Manchester United v Chelsea Sky Sports Main Event, 1.00pm With both sides struggling for consistency – United lost at Newcastle a fortnight ago, while Chelsea were trounced 4-1 by Watford earlier this month – today’s match at Old Trafford should be a tentative affair. Carabao Cup Final: Arsenal v Manchester City Sky Sports Main Event, 4.00pm Proving that the League Cup is having something of a resurgence, Arsenal and Manchester City are this year’s finalists, with the former aiming to win the trophy for the first time since 1993. City are favourites, though: imperious in the league, they also have form in the Carabao Cup, having won it in 2014 and 2016. Top Gear BBC Two, 8.00pm The petrolhead’s special returns with Matt LeBlanc promising increased family appeal. The new team of LeBlanc, Chris Harris and Rory Reid have decent chemistry and if this was your sort of thing then it probably remains so. Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble BBC Four, 8.00pm Few programmes are as inspiring as this one about cellist Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble, an ever-changing group of over 50 artists who perform alongside Ma. In addition to highlighting some phenomenal talents – Galician bagpiper Cristina Pato almost steals the show – the film details the hardships that they’ve faced, including revolution and exile. Anchoring it all is former child prodigy Ma: “I think when I was a kid a lot of things just happened,” he notes as footage shows him performing as a child for President Kennedy. “I’m always trying to figure out who I am and where I fit in the world.” SH Hannibal’s Elephant Army: The New Evidence Channel 4, 8.00pm Why did Carthaginian general Hannibal cross the Alps on a seemingly impossible journey with an army of 40,000 soldiers, 9,000 cavalry officers and 37 elephants? This fascinating film examines the evidence. Life and Death Row: The Mass Execution BBC Two, 9.00pm The harrowing series continues to turn a microscopic eye on all aspects of the death penalty. Tonight it’s the case of Stacey Johnson, on death row for 23 years. His stepdaughter insists on his innocence; his victim’s daughter says she’s sure that he’s a guilty man. SH Clouds of Sils Maria (2014) ★★★★☆ BBC Four, 9.30pm A complex, bewitching and fearlessly intelligent psychological fondue from France’s Olivier Assayas, with Juliet Binoche and Kristen Stewart as a famous actress and her diligent and devoted personal assistant, prepping for a play that shapes the drama of their own lives in its likeness. Playful and addictively strange, with career-best work from Stewart. Shutter Island (2010) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 11.05pm Martin Scorsese’s follow-up to The Departed, is, like that film, based on a novel by Dennis Lehane. He delves into gothic noir in this mystery thriller as detective Daniels (Leonardo DiCaprio) investigates the disappearance of an inmate from a prison for the clinically insane with the help of his partner (played brilliantly by Mark Ruffalo). This is a gripping story with some bold twists, although it eventually loses momentum. Point Break (1991) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 11.30pm; Scotland, 12.30am Kathryn Bigelow’s cult surfing/crime film elevated Patrick Swayze’s actor status to true action hero. Keanu Reeves plays Johnny Utah, an FBI agent who goes undercover to infiltrate a gang of bankrobbing surfers led by the charismatic Bodhi (Swayze). The action heats up when Bodhi and Utah find they share a similar attitude towards danger. Lori Petty is the surfer who catches Johnny’s eye. Monday 26 February Body snatched? Greg Kinnear as the father Credit: Channel 4 Electric Dreams: The Father Thing Channel 4, 10.00pm After a first run split pretty evenly between stunners and misfires, the final four adaptations of short stories from pulp sci-fi icon Philip K Dick begins with a heavily derivative but entertaining piece from Michael Dinner, showrunner of excellent modern western Justified. The setting is an unnamed Midwest town, where young baseball-loving Charlie (Jack Gore) lives with his parents, hangs out with three other misfits and avoids the bullies; it’s as cosily familiar a slice of apple-pie Americana as you could find. And then the aftermath of a meteor shower causes Charlie to suspect that some of the town’s inhabitants may have been replaced by aliens, his own father (Greg Kinnear) included. Based more directly than some of its predecessors on Dick’s original story, this cannot help but nod to Invasion of the Body Snatchers, although the Cold War paranoia replaced by… what, exactly? There’s a parable of father-son relations in here, along with an allegory of divorce and a Stranger Things-influenced romp, but it shows its hand a little early, never settles on a tone and features a climax that will split opinion down the middle. That said, it’s never less than diverting. Gabriel Tate This Country BBC Three, from 10.00am Series one of Charlie and Daisy May Cooper’s mockumentary transcended its obvious debt to The Office to become a touching, acutely observed and defiant portrait of life on the margins in rural Britain. Importantly, it was also very funny, finding bathos and humour in the efforts of gormless cousins Kurtan and Kerry Mucklowe (played by the Coopers) to amuse themselves in a Cotswolds village. Thankfully, almost nothing has changed for this second series, although Kurtan has found a girlfriend and Kerry hitherto unknown charitable instincts. Shakespeare & Hathaway: Private Investigators BBC One, 2.15pm Jo Joyner and Mark Benton are perfectly cast in this amiable new 10-part series as Lu Shakespeare, wrongly suspected of killing her fiancé, and Frank Hathaway, the slobbish PI she ropes in to clear her name. The odd-couple chemistry is there from the start and Stratford-upon-Avon looks glorious – making this a welcome addition to the afternoon schedules. Hollywood in Vienna: the Sound of Space & Alexandre Desplat Sky Arts, 8.00pm This gala performance loosely based on a journey through the universe includes Parisian composer Alexandre Desplat’s melodies for movies, including Twilight and The Grand Budapest Hotel, as well as legendary scores from Star Wars to E.T. GT Classic Mary Berry BBC One, 8.30pm Cherish the unlikely sight of the former Bake Off judge partaking in a little “caveman cooking” in this latest rebranding of Mary Berry’s line in home-cooking, with the opener focusing on comfort food. MasterChef BBC One, 9.00pm The 11th run of the enduringly popular cooking contest begins with the first seven contestants creating dishes using ingredients including beef mince and duck breasts for John Torode, Gregg Wallace and some former finalists. The Unstoppable Flying Scotsman Channel 5, 9.00pm The world’s most famous steam locomotive is profiled in this two-parter from Rob Bell, always a reassuring translator of technical geekery for a mainstream audience. Here, he explores its origins and enduring appeal. GT Ice Cold in Alex (1958, b/w) ★★★★☆ Film4, 4.20pm J Lee Thompson’s tense British wartime thriller is one of the classics of the black-and-white era and richly entertaining. John Mills shines as Captain Anson, who dreams of an ice-cold glass of lager while escorting Britons across the desert to Alexandria during the Second World War. The film makes some interesting points about patriotism, as we learn Anson is unaware that he’s harbouring a traitor. Alien Resurrection (1997) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Sigourney Weaver returns as heroine Ellen Ripley for this fourth film in the franchise. Two hundred years have passed since Alien 3, and Ripley has now been cloned by scientists, which gives her greater strength but also conflicting loyalties, meaning we’re not sure that we can trust her. Despite the talent on board (Weaver, screenwriter Joss Whedon and director Jean-Pierre Jeunot), this is a poor effort. Elysium (2013) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 11.00pm Neill Blomkamp’s (District 9) intelligent sci-fi thriller has a fire in its belly and stars a brawny Matt Damon as a factory worker who scrapes out a living on the Earth’s crust. He’s involved in an accident but the medical care that he needs is on space station Elysium. Blomkamp focuses on faith, capitalism and private healthcare – in lesser hands, the film might have played out like a Lib Dem manifesto with spaceships. Tuesday 27 February Surrounded by splendour: Alan Titchmarsh Secrets of the National Trust with Alan Titchmarsh Channel 5, 8.00pm A tale of “female empowerment, politics and a fight for the throne of England itself” is how Alan Titchmarsh, opening a second series showcasing the National Trust’s finest properties, describes the history of Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire. Certainly, the story of Elizabeth Talbot, Countess of Shrewsbury (aka Bess of Hardwick), and how four strategic marriages helped her to become one of the most powerful women in Elizabethan England, is a fascinating one. And the glorious house she built in the 1590s, with vast facades of glass and sumptuous decor, was doubtless a marvel of the age. Whether you think Titchmarsh does either of them justice will depend on how much detail you like in a documentary, and how much repetition (you won’t possess enough fingers to count how often he mentions that Bess’s initials and coat of arms decorate the high parapet of the house) and “coming up next” you can bear. Either way, there are plenty of glories to gaze upon, so if you’re unlikely to get a chance to visit Hardwick Hall in person, the fine filming shows off the house and its grounds in considerable splendour. Gerard O’Donovan How to Get Fit Fast Channel 4, 8.00pm Anna Richardson and Amar Latif put the emphasis on fitness rather than weight loss in this new series exploring the off-the-shelf plans available, hoping to point viewers towards the exercise regime that suits them best. 100 Years Younger in 21 Days ITV, 9.00pm Eight well-worn famous faces attempt to turn the clock back at a “rejuvenation” clinic in Sardinia. June Brown, Sherrie Hewson, Claire King, Sid Owen, Roy Walker, Russell Grant, Googlebox’s Sandra Martin and music legend Shaun Ryder are among thoses hoping to knock off years without going under the knife. The FGM Detectives Channel 4, 10.00pm Despite the global efforts to ban the practice, female genital mutilation (FGM) continues to affect millions of women. Here Cathy Newman leads a two-year investigation into FGM in the UK, which is estimated to put 20,000 young British women at risk every year. Acid Attack: My Story BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm Naomi Oni recounts the horrific acid attack that left her with life-altering injuries in 2012, and how the police investigation (which, unbelievably, initially focused on whether she had inflicted the wounds on herself) proved the attacker to be a childhood friend. GO Unreal Amazon Prime, from today A drama playing on the fakeness, dubious ethics and behind-the-scenes manipulation of a hit reality TV dating show, UnREAL is nothing if not a series for our times. As the third season begins, Everlasting’s producer Rachel (Shiri Appleby) is getting her life back on track, despite her ruthless boss Quinn (Constance Zimmer) ramping up the pressure to deliver the show’s most outrageous season yet. Divorce Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm Sarah Jessica Parker returns with a second season of the bleak and bitingly funny comedy about the painful break-up of an American middle-class couple’s marriage. At least that’s what series one, created and partly written by the Sharon Horgan, was about. Season two, minus Horgan’s input, takes on a distinctly lighter tone as both Frances (Parker) and her now ex-husband Robert (Thomas Haden Church) begin tentatively to negotiate the possibilities of life post divorce. GO Charade (1963) ★★★★☆ Film4, 2.25pm Audrey Hepburn as a temperamental-but-alluring damsel in distress and Cary Grant as a shadowy charmer are characters that the actors played many times. But they do so exceptionally in this suspense comedy from Stanley Donen, often referred to as the best Hitchcock movie that Hitchcock never made. Hepburn is the widow being trailed by four men hunting for her late husband’s stolen fortune. Black Swan (2010) ★★★★★ Film4, 11.25pm Darren Aronofsky’s film is delirious hokum and high-class trash. Natalie Portman stars as Nina Sayers, a young dancer with the New York City Ballet preparing for a production of Swan Lake choreographed by the charismatic Thomas Leroy (Vincent Cassel). He is unconvinced by Nina’s ability to portray the passion of the Black Swan and her efforts to convince him lead her towards madness. Christine (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 11.50pm The story of Christine Chubbuck, a Florida newsreader who shot herself on air in 1974, is shocking and unfathomably sad. But it wouldn’t be worth retelling on film if it didn’t illuminate something. It asks a top-notch Rebecca Hall to play out the last days of Chubbuck’s life and dares us to hope that it’s about a different woman – one who made it out the other side of her own tragedy. Wednesday 28 February Victim: Édgar Ramírez as Versace Credit: BBC The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story BBC Two, 9.00pm Ryan Murphy’s true crime series follows up 2016’s dramatisation of the OJ Simpson trial with the story of serial killer Andrew Cunanan, who murdered at least five people over a three-month period, including the fashion designer Gianni Versace. Murphy and scriptwriter Tom Rob Smith use the word assassination very carefully here: the operatic opening scenes depict Versace (Édgar Ramírez) as a modern-day Medici prince, dispensing cheerful patronage to all in his Miami Beach fiefdom. By contrast, Cunanan (Darren Criss) is portrayed as a man so insecure in his own skin that he is almost physically incapable of telling the truth: “You tell gay people you’re gay and straight people you’re straight,” exclaims an exasperated friend. “I tell people what they need to hear,” comes the too-calm reply. Both Criss and Ramirez are excellent and there’s strong support from Ricky Martin as Versace’s bewildered live-in boyfriend and a perhaps slightly too-camp Penélope Cruz as Donatella. Smith’s solid script does a good job of juggling various timelines to show how this particular killer came to be. Sarah Hughes Ellie Undercover: Rent for Sex BBC Three, from 10.00am Investigative journalist Ellie Flynn presents this look at the growing number of unscrupulous landlords who offer rent-free accommodation in exchange for sex. It’s hard not to feel utterly dispirited as Flynn meets vulnerable women such as Chloe, who feels so trapped by her homelessness that she’s in no position to say no to these men. Athletics: The World Indoor Championships BBC Two, 7.00pm The four-day World Indoor Championships, which takes place at Arena Birmingham, kicks off on Thursday, featuring three events in the first evening session – including Team GB’s Laura Muir and Eilish McColgan in the final of the women’s 3,000 m. Events continue from 9.00am on Friday, with Greg Rutherford’s long jump bid among the highlights. The World’s Most Extraordinary Homes BBC Two, 8.00pm For those of us who enjoy gawping at other people’s homes, few programmes are more satisfying than this series presented by Caroline Quentin and architect Piers Taylor. Tonight the duo are in Portugal poking their noses into four very different properties. The Supervet Channel 4, 8.00pm Professor Noel Fitzpatrick and the team returns for a new round of veterinary problems, including a very excitable Labrador who requires elbow replacement surgery and a Jackahuahua puppy who needs to have spinal surgery after an attack in the park. Benidorm ITV, 9.00pm Hold on to your sunhats as ITV’s long-running Costa Blanca comedy returns for a 10th series with comedians Hale & Pace joining the cast as a pair of undercover cops. Elsewhere, Joyce (Sherrie Hewson) and Monty’s (John Challis) big day arrives. Save Me Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Don’t let the fact that it features yet another missing child put you off the week’s best new drama. Written by and starring Lennie James, Save Me tells the tale of Nelly (James), an ageing wide-boy of suspect charms, who finds himself in trouble after his estranged teenage daughter disappears. We’ve all met people like Nelly, the easy smiles hiding their sharp edges, and James does a wonderful job of making us warm to him despite the distrust. There’s strong support, too, from Suranne Jones as the missing girl’s mother. SH Film 2018 BBC One, 11.15pm; Wales, 11.35pm; NI, 12.10am The BBC’s long-running film series returns with an opening episode hosted by Radio 1’s Clara Amfo alongside critics Ellen E Jones and Larushka Ivan-Zadeh. The focus this week is on next Sunday’s Academy Awards, plus an interview with Lady Bird’s Oscar-nominated director, Greta Gerwig. SH The Quiet Man (1952) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.00pm Best known for his sombre westerns, John Ford turns personal for this wonderful romantic comedy which was considered a risky venture but went on to win the director his fourth Oscar. It tells the story of a boxer who falls in love with the sister of a bully. The famous grab-and-kiss scene between the smouldering John Wayne and love interest Maureen O’Hara (the “Queen of Technicolour”) also appears in E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. Big Eyes (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Amy Adams is ideally cast as the browbeaten artist Margaret Keane who, for eight years, churned out iconic, highly sought after paintings, only for her con artist husband (Christoph Waltz) to take all the credit. Tim Burton’s take on this curious real-life tale of curdled suburbia sadly lacks Adams’s subtlety: even the usually restrained Waltz is caught up in the blunt, overly stylised kookiness. Good (2008) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.50pm Viggo Mortensen gives a thoughtful performance as a German professor whose ideas about euthanasia are adopted by the Nazis. It’s only when he becomes a concentration camp inspector that he grasps the horror of his ideas. Vicente Amorim’s adaptation of CP Taylor’s play doesn’t shirk big questions, but he tends to fall back on clichés – hammerings on the piano, etc – and it plays a bit like a Nazi version of Rising Damp. Thursday 1 March A landmark return: David Olusoga, Mary Beard and Simon Schama Credit: BBC Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm Almost 50 years after changing the face of arts programming with the landmark series Civilisation, BBC Two returns with an expanded brief and all the bells and whistles of modern film-making, from drone cameras to infra-red photography. With nine episodes split between presenters Simon Schama (five), David Olusoga and Mary Beard (two each), Civilisations promises an opinionated overview of global art and culture. It opens with a striking sequence in which Schama – helming this first part – explores what has been lost and salvaged from the Isil pillage of Palmyra. From there, we’re whisked to Africa’s Cape coast and the first evidence of mankind’s creativity 77,000 years ago. Then it’s a breathless gallop through the millennia, alighting at the first settlements and depictions of the human face. Among the cave art, Mayan stairways and fertility fetishes, the real treasure is an astonishing Mycenaean Sealstone, jaw-dropping in its anatomical detail and artistic accomplishment. While it won’t have the same impact as the original series (what could?), Civilisations looks to be just as learned, accessible and thrilling as its predecessor – the whole series will be available on BBC iPlayer at 10.00pm. Gabriel Tate The Cruise: Voyage to Alaska ITV, 8.30pm; not Wales Over three episodes, the five-star luxury liner Star Princess and its redoubtable crew travels to the northernmost American state – where they encounter difficult weather, navigational challenges and problem passengers. Weinstein: the Inside Story BBC One, 9.00pm In collaboration with PBS America’s Frontline current-affairs strand, Panorama examines the fall of Harvey Weinstein and the lengths to which the disgraced Hollywood producer would go to keep his alleged bullying, threats and sexual assaults private. Speaking to insiders, the team builds a troubling picture of industry complicity. From Ice to Fire: the Incredible Science of Temperature BBC Four, 9.00pm Dr Helen Czerski concludes her excellent series with fire, and how its harnessing played a pivotal role in human evolution and survival, from essentials such as toolmaking and mining to relative fripperies such as hot-air balloons. The moment that Czerski triggers a lightning strike at a high-voltage laboratory carries a genuine frisson; as is customary with most BBC Four films, the presentation is lively and the science deftly handled. Serial Killer with Piers Morgan ITV, 9.00pm How do you follow interviewing Donald Trump? Piers Morgan returns to the less contentious turf of more one-to-ones with convicted murderers behind bars. He begins with Lorenzo Gilyard, the so-called Kansas City Strangler, who remains unremorseful after allegedly killing 13 women and girls over almost two decades. Panic at 30,000 Feet: Airline Emergency Channel 5, 9.00pm This nightmare-inducing new series explores what happens when flights go wrong, from mid-air collisions to runway explosions. GT Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 11.45pm The penultimate episode of this often disturbing and insightful series revisits Oak Creek, Wisconsin, where white supremacist Michael Page killed six and injured four at a Sikh temple, before killing himself, in 2012. For once, there is a vaguely positive denouement: Page’s brutality had the opposite to its intended effect and brought the community closer together. GT Jubal (1956) ★★★★☆ Film4, 12.40pm Ernest Borgnine stars in this brooding western shot in the Grand Teton mountains of Wyoming, which reworks the plot of Othello. Borgnine stars as a cattle rancher with a much younger wife (Valerie French), who is driven into a jealous rage when cattlehand Rod Steiger suggests that she is having an affair with young drifter Jubal (a magnificent Glenn Ford). Murder is most definitely on the cards. Pitch Perfect (2012) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm The world of collegiate a cappella singing contests can’t be as heartless as Jason Moore’s sour comedy would have us believe. Anna Kendrick stars as Beca, an angst-ridden outsider who must shake up her uninspiring and monotonous group, while trying to handle how weird they all are. And, of course, there’s a handsome man (Skylar Astin) who catches her eye. It’s a little like Glee but without the schmaltz. The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Clint Eastwood directs and stars in this warm-hearted marvellous western adapted from Forrest Carter’s novel and set during the American Civil War. Eastwood plays the Missouri farmer who, driven by memories of his family’s slaughter, becomes an outlaw when he refuses to join his Confederate comrades in surrender, in favour of seeking revenge on the men who murdered his kin. Friday 2 March Searching for the truth: Lydia Wilson as Matilda Credit: BBC Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm After last week’s hiatus because of the Six Nations rugby, it’s back to small-town Wales for another dose of supernatural country-house shenanigans. When we last saw fragile but determined musician Matilda (Lydia Wilson), she’d suffered the double whammy of finding her would-be mother Rose (Claire Rushbrook) unconscious in the bath and learning that mute Aunt Meredith (Jane Thorne) had died on the verge of offering up her secrets. How did Matilda react? By mysteriously blacking out and bashing her beloved cello against a cupboard. In the fourth episode then, she looks for connections between her mental health and Carys’s disappearance. And some clues emerge: Matilda meets dishevelled local Laura (Anastasia Hille), who claims to hear voices informing her of Carys’s fate, and back at the mansion, she comes across some old tomes detailing rituals to unlock the past. Even with its heavily scored bumps and shudders, Requiem can’t quite sustain its early Hammer Horror appeal. The strong performances and some genuinely chilling moments keep things compelling however, not least in the spine-tingling climax of this episode. Toby Dantzic Flint Town Netflix, from today Back in 2014, a cost-cutting exercise left thousands of homes in Flint, Michigan, with contaminated drinking water for years. This new eight-part documentary looks at the fallout from the crisis through the eyes of Flint’s beleaguered police force, who face an uphill struggle – the community needs their support but are also deeply mistrustful of those in authority, plus dwindling resources makes the officers’ jobs harder still. MasterChef BBC One, 7.30pm Having survived the cooking contest’s opening week, the six heat winners face food critic William Sitwell in this first quarter-final. He challenges them to conjure up a standout pudding showcasing either alcohol or spices. Love Your Garden ITV, 8.00pm; not STV/UTV/Wales This week, Alan Titchmarsh and his team are in Bidewell, Devon, helping Tamsyn and Alex Wood who returned to the UK from France after Alex suffered a brain injury. The aim is to turn the Woods’ garden into a coastal sanctuary inspired by Alex’s passion for surfing. The Yorkshire Steam Railway: All Aboard Channel 5, 8.00pm As amiable as its title suggests, this new documentary series follows the lives of those who work on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, one of the country’s most popular steam railways. In this series’ opener, the new season begins with the arrival of star engine Royal Scot, on loan from London. Tones, Drones and Arpeggios: The Magic of Minimalism BBC Four, 9.00pm Conductor Charles Hazlewood explores minimalism, which he argues is the most important musical form of the 20th century. In the fascinating opener of this two-part series, he unpicks the construction of these sometimes confounding sounds and tracks down the genre’s avant-garde pioneers, who brought their mesmeric, spirituality-inspired compositions from California to New York in the Sixties. TD Jo Brand: Secrets of Her Success Channel 5, 10.30pm Channel 5’s celebration of funny women continues with this absorbing profile of the pioneering doyenne of deadpan, Jo Brand. This charts her career from its rocky start on the male-dominated stand-up circuit to her much-admired hospital sitcom Getting On. TD Gladiator (2000) ★★★★★ Film4, 9.00pm This take on the traditional swords-and-sandals epic proved that Russell Crowe deserved to be recognised as a mainstream star, and reaffirmed Ridley Scott’s reputation as a first-rate director. Crowe is Maximus, a former Roman general who rebuilds his career as a gladiator. His bid for vengeance against a vile emperor (Joaquin Phoenix) is compelling. Plus there’s a last hurrah from Oliver Reed. Blades of Glory (2007) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm;N Ireland, 12.05am You might think that the sequinned world of figure skating is beyond parody, but here Will Ferrell and Jon Heder serve up a zestfully preposterous comedy. Both play rival Olympic ice skaters, Ferrell a loose-living maverick, Heder a prissy perfectionist, who are slung out of the sport but use a loophole to return as an erotic all-male pairing. Amy Poehler co-stars. A Hijacking (2012) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.55pm Tobias Lindholm’s vigorously intelligent hostage thriller, set on board a besieged ship in the Indian Ocean, deftly moves his story between the boat and the shipping company’s offices, where Søren Malling’s frazzled CEO attempts to thrash out a bargain. On the other end of the line is the Somalis’ translator. Flies buzz, sweat trickles, negotiations continue, and you feel your breath dry up. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
What's on TV tonight: Gogglebox and The Old Grey Whistle Test Live
Friday 23 February Gogglebox Channel 4, 9.00pm We all know that Gogglebox won’t be the same this time around. One of the great joys of watching the armchair TV critic show, which returns for its 11th series, was the always warm, occasionally bickering relationship between straight-talking Liverpudlian couple, Leon and June Bernicoff. But, sadly, Leon died last December following a short illness and June recently confirmed that she won’t be taking part without him. So, in the absence of Leon’s notoriously unvarnished views (on chef Jamie Oliver: “‘Oh he’s a d---head”), what can we expect? Probably business as usual. After all, the show has survived the loss of popular families before, from everyone’s favourite posh couple, Steph and Dom, to the gloriously opinionated Scarlett Moffatt. Our guesses: the lovely Siddiquis will continue to be the most well-adjusted family, hairdressers Stephen and Christopher will trot out the most-pointed one-liners, Welsh couple Dave and Shirley will bring the giggles, even though it remains a mystery just how Dave watches TV in that very uncomfortable-looking position, and we still won’t be able to work out how many dogs the Malones actually have. SH Live Winter Olympics 2018 BBC One and BBC Two, from 6.00am Day 14 sees the semi-finals of the men’s ice hockey and the women’s curling competition, plus the final of the men’s 1,000 m speed skating. SH An Island Parish: After the Hurricane BBC Two, 9.00pm Sophie Okonedo narrates this special edition of the series which looks at the long-term effects of Hurricane Irma on the Caribbean island of Anguilla. Among those who lost everything are Simone Connor and her father Neville, who ran a restaurant and leisure complex on the island. SH Will & Grace Channel 5, 10.00pm Now is the perfect time to jump back on the Will & Grace bandwagon as the wonderful Nick Offerman (the real-life husband of Megan Mullally, who plays Karen) guest stars as baker Jackson Boudreaux, aka the Bad Boy of Bread. Offerman is a scene-stealing delight and the final moments offer a lovely pay-off. SH Joan Rivers: By Her friends Channel 5, 10.30pm Anyone who saw the brilliant comedy The Marvellous Mrs Maisel, which was inspired by the late Joan Rivers’s early career, will know that the comedian’s domestic-focused stand-up routines were unlike anything that the audiences of that time had heard before. This tribute puts that ground-breaking career in context. SH The Tick Amazon Prime, from today Peter Serafinowicz’s goofy blue superhero returns for another series of misadventures. As with the last time, the series stands and falls with Serafinowicz’s performance: his morally upstanding but bizarre caped crusader has enough charm to paper over plot cracks. SH Seven Seconds Netflix, from today This new crime-drama series from Veena Sud, the writer behind the US version of The Killing, explores grief, deceit and social injustice. Starring Regina King, it focuses on the fallout from the death of a young boy who was injured by a police officer. SH The Old Grey Whistle Test Live: For One Night Only BBC Four, 9.00pm Bob Harris, who fronted The Old Grey Whistle Test from 1972-1978, returns with this event marking 30 years since the end of music show. This one-off includes live performances and interviews with fans and former presenters. SH Mute (2018) Netflix, from today True Blood alumnus Alexander Skarsgård plays Leo, the titular mute in Duncan Jones’s sci-fi thriller, which the director describes as a spiritual sequel to 2009’s Moon. Leo Beiler, a bartender with a violent past, searches for his missing girlfriend Naadirah (Seyneb Saleh) in a futuristic, neon-lit Berlin. He crosses paths with a pair of US army surgeons, brilliantly named Cactus Bill and Duck Teddington (played by Paul Rudd and Justin Theroux), on a mission of their own. X-Men: First Class (2011) ★★★☆☆ E4, 9.00pm Telepathic Charles Xavier (James McAvoy) bonds with metal-bending death camp survivor Erik Lehnsherr (Michael Fassbender) and the two of them track down other mutants to confront evil Nazi Sebastian Shaw (Kevin Bacon) when he triggers the Cuban Missile Crisis. Matthew Vaughn is much more comfortable with the small-scale character stuff than the action climax, but this prequel is mostly a lot of fun. While We’re Young (2014) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm A couple’s doomed attempt to recapture their youth gives Ben Stiller and Naomi Watts a new lease of comic life in Noah Baumbach’s sparkling film. Baumbach packs it with the wit and vigour of a polished one-act play as co-stars Adam Driver and Amanda Seyfried, playing hat-wearing hipsters, deliver punchlines that can’t help but remind you of Woody Allen at his peak. Saturday 24 February Loadsa laughs: Ant McPartlin and Declan Donnelly Credit: ITV Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway ITV, 7.00pm Anthony McPartlin and Declan Donnelly, the undisputed kings of Saturday night TV – never more so since they won the inaugural Bruce Forsyth Entertainment gong, among others, at the National Television Awards last month – return with a 16th series of their popular show. Packed full of comedy, audience participation, prize giveaways, celebrity guests, exclusive performances and madcap stunts, this is high-octane entertainment, with barely time to draw breath between items. Tonight, Kylie Minogue gives a first performance of her latest single and revisits some of her biggest hits, Britain’s Got Talent judge Amanda Holden falls victim to the first Undercover prank of the series and Olly Murs takes on the role of guest announcer in the End of Show Show. The hosts themselves, meanwhile, put the pedal to the floor for a daredevil Ant vs Dec monster truck challenge, and reprise their roles as super sleuths in a new comedy whodunit (with an all-star cast that includes Joanna Lumley, Michael Sheen, Emilia Fox and David Walliams) while sidekicks Scarlett Moffatt and Stephen Mulhern are out on the streets looking for people to plays games with. And that’s just for starters. Gerard O’Donovan Live Winter Olympics 2018 BBC One and BBC Two, from 6.00am It’s the penultimate day and there’s major Team GB interest as the four-man bobsleigh gets under way. However, most eyes will be on the curling, which has proved rather popular in these Games, as the men’s gold and women’s bronze medals are decided. There’s also action in the snowboarding and skiing. Six Nations Rugby Union: Ireland v Wales ITV, 1.30pm After their 12-6 defeat against England at Twickenham, Wales travel to Ireland, with Dan Biggar starting at fly-half, and Liam Williams and Leigh Halfpenny also returning after injury. Ireland have won two from two, beating France in Paris, before enjoying an eight-try buffet at Italy’s expense in a 56-19 victory. The visitors are unbeaten in their last three Six Nations matches against Ireland, but were held to a 16-16 draw when the sides last met here two years ago. Six Nations Rugby Union: Scotland v England BBC One, 4.00pm Tough one for England, this. Yes, they’ve won nine of the last 10 matches against Scotland, drawing the other one, but the pressure cauldron that is Murrayfield is never an easy place to visit, and they’ll have their tails up after an impressive 32-26 win against France. Still, according to head coach Gregor Townsend, Scotland will need to produce their “best-ever performance” if they are to triumph against England in the Calcutta Cup. Eddie Jones’s team beat Wales 12-6 thanks to two first-half tries by Jonny May, but were forced to hang on grimly in the frenetic closing stages as they set a new championship record for consecutive home wins (15, dating back to 2012). When these sides met in the tournament last year, England thrashed Scotland 61-21 at Twickenham. Churchill’s Darkest Decision More4, 7.55pm Fans of the hit film Darkest Hour will appreciate this documentary about another big Churchill dilemma. In 1940, following the fall of France, Germany was poised to seize the entire French fleet, making Hitler’s threat to invade Britain ever graver. Drastic measures were called for, but at a tragically high cost. David Attenborough’s Natural Curiosities BBC Two, 8.00pm Creatures with remarkable navigation skills are the focus of tonight’s edition, looking at how dung beetles use the Sun, Moon and stars as compass points, and how pigeons recall complex routes. Britain at Low Tide Channel 4, 8.00pm More stories from our shoreline as Tori Herridge visits Dorset, where she finds the home of the world’s first aircraft carrier and searches for an Iron Age monument that can only be seen for a few hours each year. Troy: Fall of a City BBC One, 9.10pm All hell breaks loose in this second episode when Helen’s (Bella Dayne) husband Menelaus finds out what Paris (Louis Hunter) took back to Troy. His enraged brother Agamemnon (Johnny Harris) calls all Greece to war, but when they fail to propitiate the gods, there’s a shocking price to pay. GO Mosaic Sky Atlantic, 10.00pm Steven Soderbergh’s crime drama starring Sharon Stone provoked a blizzard of publicity on its release last year in mobile app format. HBO’s six-part “linear” TV version is obviously less innovative (the app works like an interactive movie where the user can choose from which perspective the plot is viewed), but it still has plenty to offer. In this second episode, the backstory continues to play out as author Olivia Lake’s (Stone) relationships with lover Eric (Frederick Weller) and lodger Joel (Garrett Hedlund) become ever more tangled. GO Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2 (2013) ★★★☆☆ Comedy Central, 5.00pm In this sequel to the 2009 animation based on the 1978 children’s book, inventor Flint Lockwood (voiced by Bill Hader) and friends must rescue the island of Swallow Falls from being overrun by food-mutated animals. It’s no triumph of screenwriting or subtext, but it’s a feast of ingeniously rendered gastronomic insanity and kids will absolutely love it. The Heat (2013) ★★★★☆ E4, 9.00pm Bridesmaids director Paul Feig brings back one of that film’s stars, Melissa McCarthy, as a foul-mouthed Boston cop whose policing style, aided by a fridge full of armaments, makes Dirty Harry look like Thumbelina. She’s paired with a goody-two-shoes FBI agent (Sandra Bullock reminding us what a pro she is at comedy). Together, they’re dynamite, plus the film has an emotional clout that hits you seemingly from nowhere. Philomena (2013) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 10.00pm; not Northern Ireland This true story is based on the experiences of journalist Martin Sixsmith (Steve Coogan), who helped Philomena Lee (Judi Dench), an Irish woman in her seventies, search for the son that she was forced to put up for adoption 50 years earlier. Stephen Frears’s film is charming and hard-hitting, delivering some tough emotional blows as well as some harsh truths about the Catholic Church’s past. Sunday 25 February Curiouser and curiouser: Holliday Grainger and Tom Burke Credit: BBC Strike: Career of Evil BBC One, 9.00pm Rumpled PI Cormoran Strike (Tom Burke) and his trusty Girl Friday Robin Ellacott (Holliday Grainger) return for the third of JK Rowling’s Robert Galbraith novels. It’s a few months after the events of The Silkworm and Strike and Robin have settled into an easy working partnership, albeit one that remains a little too cosy for Robin’s smarmy fiancé Matthew (Kerr Logan). Then Robin receives a gruesome present in the post and our intrepid duo found themselves caught up in an investigation that swiftly hits far too close to home. Career of Evil is the most tightly plotted of the Galbraith books and this well-paced opening episode neatly sets up the (plentiful) twists to come. That said, the real enjoyment comes not from the story but from the fantastic chemistry between Grainger and Burke, who bring an immense amount of warmth and charm to their scenes. Indeed, so successfully do they inhabit the roles that it’s frustrating to realise that, with no more Galbraith books currently published, this will be the last Strike for a while. It’s a genuine shame: if ever a TV adaptation deserved to be spun away from its source material it’s this one. Sarah Hughes ODI cricket: New Zealand v England Sky Sports Main Event, 12.30am You’ll have to stay up late to see this opening one-day international of the five-match series. England, having beaten the Aussies in their last ODI series, will fancy their chances. Young, Welsh and Pretty Minted BBC Three, from 10.00am The makers of Young, Welsh and Pretty Skint return with a new series focusing on a group of would-be entrepreneurs, including a YouTuber with 1.7 million subscribers and an image-obsessed Instagram influencer. Live Winter Olympics 2018 Closing Ceremony BBC Two, from 11.00am The Olympics bow out, allowing us to recall the heartbreak (Team GB’s Elise Christie’s wipeout in the speedskating final) and joy (American snowboarder Chloe Kim’s megawatt smile). K-pop star CL and boy band EXO take part in the ceremony which has a fusion theme, before the flag is handed over to Beijing for 2022. Premier League Football: Manchester United v Chelsea Sky Sports Main Event, 1.00pm With both sides struggling for consistency – United lost at Newcastle a fortnight ago, while Chelsea were trounced 4-1 by Watford earlier this month – today’s match at Old Trafford should be a tentative affair. Carabao Cup Final: Arsenal v Manchester City Sky Sports Main Event, 4.00pm Proving that the League Cup is having something of a resurgence, Arsenal and Manchester City are this year’s finalists, with the former aiming to win the trophy for the first time since 1993. City are favourites, though: imperious in the league, they also have form in the Carabao Cup, having won it in 2014 and 2016. Top Gear BBC Two, 8.00pm The petrolhead’s special returns with Matt LeBlanc promising increased family appeal. The new team of LeBlanc, Chris Harris and Rory Reid have decent chemistry and if this was your sort of thing then it probably remains so. Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble BBC Four, 8.00pm Few programmes are as inspiring as this one about cellist Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble, an ever-changing group of over 50 artists who perform alongside Ma. In addition to highlighting some phenomenal talents – Galician bagpiper Cristina Pato almost steals the show – the film details the hardships that they’ve faced, including revolution and exile. Anchoring it all is former child prodigy Ma: “I think when I was a kid a lot of things just happened,” he notes as footage shows him performing as a child for President Kennedy. “I’m always trying to figure out who I am and where I fit in the world.” SH Hannibal’s Elephant Army: The New Evidence Channel 4, 8.00pm Why did Carthaginian general Hannibal cross the Alps on a seemingly impossible journey with an army of 40,000 soldiers, 9,000 cavalry officers and 37 elephants? This fascinating film examines the evidence. Life and Death Row: The Mass Execution BBC Two, 9.00pm The harrowing series continues to turn a microscopic eye on all aspects of the death penalty. Tonight it’s the case of Stacey Johnson, on death row for 23 years. His stepdaughter insists on his innocence; his victim’s daughter says she’s sure that he’s a guilty man. SH Clouds of Sils Maria (2014) ★★★★☆ BBC Four, 9.30pm A complex, bewitching and fearlessly intelligent psychological fondue from France’s Olivier Assayas, with Juliet Binoche and Kristen Stewart as a famous actress and her diligent and devoted personal assistant, prepping for a play that shapes the drama of their own lives in its likeness. Playful and addictively strange, with career-best work from Stewart. Shutter Island (2010) ★★★☆☆ Channel 4, 11.05pm Martin Scorsese’s follow-up to The Departed, is, like that film, based on a novel by Dennis Lehane. He delves into gothic noir in this mystery thriller as detective Daniels (Leonardo DiCaprio) investigates the disappearance of an inmate from a prison for the clinically insane with the help of his partner (played brilliantly by Mark Ruffalo). This is a gripping story with some bold twists, although it eventually loses momentum. Point Break (1991) ★★★★☆ BBC One, 11.30pm; Scotland, 12.30am Kathryn Bigelow’s cult surfing/crime film elevated Patrick Swayze’s actor status to true action hero. Keanu Reeves plays Johnny Utah, an FBI agent who goes undercover to infiltrate a gang of bankrobbing surfers led by the charismatic Bodhi (Swayze). The action heats up when Bodhi and Utah find they share a similar attitude towards danger. Lori Petty is the surfer who catches Johnny’s eye. Monday 26 February Body snatched? Greg Kinnear as the father Credit: Channel 4 Electric Dreams: The Father Thing Channel 4, 10.00pm After a first run split pretty evenly between stunners and misfires, the final four adaptations of short stories from pulp sci-fi icon Philip K Dick begins with a heavily derivative but entertaining piece from Michael Dinner, showrunner of excellent modern western Justified. The setting is an unnamed Midwest town, where young baseball-loving Charlie (Jack Gore) lives with his parents, hangs out with three other misfits and avoids the bullies; it’s as cosily familiar a slice of apple-pie Americana as you could find. And then the aftermath of a meteor shower causes Charlie to suspect that some of the town’s inhabitants may have been replaced by aliens, his own father (Greg Kinnear) included. Based more directly than some of its predecessors on Dick’s original story, this cannot help but nod to Invasion of the Body Snatchers, although the Cold War paranoia replaced by… what, exactly? There’s a parable of father-son relations in here, along with an allegory of divorce and a Stranger Things-influenced romp, but it shows its hand a little early, never settles on a tone and features a climax that will split opinion down the middle. That said, it’s never less than diverting. Gabriel Tate This Country BBC Three, from 10.00am Series one of Charlie and Daisy May Cooper’s mockumentary transcended its obvious debt to The Office to become a touching, acutely observed and defiant portrait of life on the margins in rural Britain. Importantly, it was also very funny, finding bathos and humour in the efforts of gormless cousins Kurtan and Kerry Mucklowe (played by the Coopers) to amuse themselves in a Cotswolds village. Thankfully, almost nothing has changed for this second series, although Kurtan has found a girlfriend and Kerry hitherto unknown charitable instincts. Shakespeare & Hathaway: Private Investigators BBC One, 2.15pm Jo Joyner and Mark Benton are perfectly cast in this amiable new 10-part series as Lu Shakespeare, wrongly suspected of killing her fiancé, and Frank Hathaway, the slobbish PI she ropes in to clear her name. The odd-couple chemistry is there from the start and Stratford-upon-Avon looks glorious – making this a welcome addition to the afternoon schedules. Hollywood in Vienna: the Sound of Space & Alexandre Desplat Sky Arts, 8.00pm This gala performance loosely based on a journey through the universe includes Parisian composer Alexandre Desplat’s melodies for movies, including Twilight and The Grand Budapest Hotel, as well as legendary scores from Star Wars to E.T. GT Classic Mary Berry BBC One, 8.30pm Cherish the unlikely sight of the former Bake Off judge partaking in a little “caveman cooking” in this latest rebranding of Mary Berry’s line in home-cooking, with the opener focusing on comfort food. MasterChef BBC One, 9.00pm The 11th run of the enduringly popular cooking contest begins with the first seven contestants creating dishes using ingredients including beef mince and duck breasts for John Torode, Gregg Wallace and some former finalists. The Unstoppable Flying Scotsman Channel 5, 9.00pm The world’s most famous steam locomotive is profiled in this two-parter from Rob Bell, always a reassuring translator of technical geekery for a mainstream audience. Here, he explores its origins and enduring appeal. GT Ice Cold in Alex (1958, b/w) ★★★★☆ Film4, 4.20pm J Lee Thompson’s tense British wartime thriller is one of the classics of the black-and-white era and richly entertaining. John Mills shines as Captain Anson, who dreams of an ice-cold glass of lager while escorting Britons across the desert to Alexandria during the Second World War. The film makes some interesting points about patriotism, as we learn Anson is unaware that he’s harbouring a traitor. Alien Resurrection (1997) ★★☆☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Sigourney Weaver returns as heroine Ellen Ripley for this fourth film in the franchise. Two hundred years have passed since Alien 3, and Ripley has now been cloned by scientists, which gives her greater strength but also conflicting loyalties, meaning we’re not sure that we can trust her. Despite the talent on board (Weaver, screenwriter Joss Whedon and director Jean-Pierre Jeunot), this is a poor effort. Elysium (2013) ★★★★☆ Channel 5, 11.00pm Neill Blomkamp’s (District 9) intelligent sci-fi thriller has a fire in its belly and stars a brawny Matt Damon as a factory worker who scrapes out a living on the Earth’s crust. He’s involved in an accident but the medical care that he needs is on space station Elysium. Blomkamp focuses on faith, capitalism and private healthcare – in lesser hands, the film might have played out like a Lib Dem manifesto with spaceships. Tuesday 27 February Surrounded by splendour: Alan Titchmarsh Secrets of the National Trust with Alan Titchmarsh Channel 5, 8.00pm A tale of “female empowerment, politics and a fight for the throne of England itself” is how Alan Titchmarsh, opening a second series showcasing the National Trust’s finest properties, describes the history of Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire. Certainly, the story of Elizabeth Talbot, Countess of Shrewsbury (aka Bess of Hardwick), and how four strategic marriages helped her to become one of the most powerful women in Elizabethan England, is a fascinating one. And the glorious house she built in the 1590s, with vast facades of glass and sumptuous decor, was doubtless a marvel of the age. Whether you think Titchmarsh does either of them justice will depend on how much detail you like in a documentary, and how much repetition (you won’t possess enough fingers to count how often he mentions that Bess’s initials and coat of arms decorate the high parapet of the house) and “coming up next” you can bear. Either way, there are plenty of glories to gaze upon, so if you’re unlikely to get a chance to visit Hardwick Hall in person, the fine filming shows off the house and its grounds in considerable splendour. Gerard O’Donovan How to Get Fit Fast Channel 4, 8.00pm Anna Richardson and Amar Latif put the emphasis on fitness rather than weight loss in this new series exploring the off-the-shelf plans available, hoping to point viewers towards the exercise regime that suits them best. 100 Years Younger in 21 Days ITV, 9.00pm Eight well-worn famous faces attempt to turn the clock back at a “rejuvenation” clinic in Sardinia. June Brown, Sherrie Hewson, Claire King, Sid Owen, Roy Walker, Russell Grant, Googlebox’s Sandra Martin and music legend Shaun Ryder are among thoses hoping to knock off years without going under the knife. The FGM Detectives Channel 4, 10.00pm Despite the global efforts to ban the practice, female genital mutilation (FGM) continues to affect millions of women. Here Cathy Newman leads a two-year investigation into FGM in the UK, which is estimated to put 20,000 young British women at risk every year. Acid Attack: My Story BBC One, 10.45pm; NI, 11.10pm Naomi Oni recounts the horrific acid attack that left her with life-altering injuries in 2012, and how the police investigation (which, unbelievably, initially focused on whether she had inflicted the wounds on herself) proved the attacker to be a childhood friend. GO Unreal Amazon Prime, from today A drama playing on the fakeness, dubious ethics and behind-the-scenes manipulation of a hit reality TV dating show, UnREAL is nothing if not a series for our times. As the third season begins, Everlasting’s producer Rachel (Shiri Appleby) is getting her life back on track, despite her ruthless boss Quinn (Constance Zimmer) ramping up the pressure to deliver the show’s most outrageous season yet. Divorce Sky Atlantic, 10.10pm Sarah Jessica Parker returns with a second season of the bleak and bitingly funny comedy about the painful break-up of an American middle-class couple’s marriage. At least that’s what series one, created and partly written by the Sharon Horgan, was about. Season two, minus Horgan’s input, takes on a distinctly lighter tone as both Frances (Parker) and her now ex-husband Robert (Thomas Haden Church) begin tentatively to negotiate the possibilities of life post divorce. GO Charade (1963) ★★★★☆ Film4, 2.25pm Audrey Hepburn as a temperamental-but-alluring damsel in distress and Cary Grant as a shadowy charmer are characters that the actors played many times. But they do so exceptionally in this suspense comedy from Stanley Donen, often referred to as the best Hitchcock movie that Hitchcock never made. Hepburn is the widow being trailed by four men hunting for her late husband’s stolen fortune. Black Swan (2010) ★★★★★ Film4, 11.25pm Darren Aronofsky’s film is delirious hokum and high-class trash. Natalie Portman stars as Nina Sayers, a young dancer with the New York City Ballet preparing for a production of Swan Lake choreographed by the charismatic Thomas Leroy (Vincent Cassel). He is unconvinced by Nina’s ability to portray the passion of the Black Swan and her efforts to convince him lead her towards madness. Christine (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 11.50pm The story of Christine Chubbuck, a Florida newsreader who shot herself on air in 1974, is shocking and unfathomably sad. But it wouldn’t be worth retelling on film if it didn’t illuminate something. It asks a top-notch Rebecca Hall to play out the last days of Chubbuck’s life and dares us to hope that it’s about a different woman – one who made it out the other side of her own tragedy. Wednesday 28 February Victim: Édgar Ramírez as Versace Credit: BBC The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story BBC Two, 9.00pm Ryan Murphy’s true crime series follows up 2016’s dramatisation of the OJ Simpson trial with the story of serial killer Andrew Cunanan, who murdered at least five people over a three-month period, including the fashion designer Gianni Versace. Murphy and scriptwriter Tom Rob Smith use the word assassination very carefully here: the operatic opening scenes depict Versace (Édgar Ramírez) as a modern-day Medici prince, dispensing cheerful patronage to all in his Miami Beach fiefdom. By contrast, Cunanan (Darren Criss) is portrayed as a man so insecure in his own skin that he is almost physically incapable of telling the truth: “You tell gay people you’re gay and straight people you’re straight,” exclaims an exasperated friend. “I tell people what they need to hear,” comes the too-calm reply. Both Criss and Ramirez are excellent and there’s strong support from Ricky Martin as Versace’s bewildered live-in boyfriend and a perhaps slightly too-camp Penélope Cruz as Donatella. Smith’s solid script does a good job of juggling various timelines to show how this particular killer came to be. Sarah Hughes Ellie Undercover: Rent for Sex BBC Three, from 10.00am Investigative journalist Ellie Flynn presents this look at the growing number of unscrupulous landlords who offer rent-free accommodation in exchange for sex. It’s hard not to feel utterly dispirited as Flynn meets vulnerable women such as Chloe, who feels so trapped by her homelessness that she’s in no position to say no to these men. Athletics: The World Indoor Championships BBC Two, 7.00pm The four-day World Indoor Championships, which takes place at Arena Birmingham, kicks off on Thursday, featuring three events in the first evening session – including Team GB’s Laura Muir and Eilish McColgan in the final of the women’s 3,000 m. Events continue from 9.00am on Friday, with Greg Rutherford’s long jump bid among the highlights. The World’s Most Extraordinary Homes BBC Two, 8.00pm For those of us who enjoy gawping at other people’s homes, few programmes are more satisfying than this series presented by Caroline Quentin and architect Piers Taylor. Tonight the duo are in Portugal poking their noses into four very different properties. The Supervet Channel 4, 8.00pm Professor Noel Fitzpatrick and the team returns for a new round of veterinary problems, including a very excitable Labrador who requires elbow replacement surgery and a Jackahuahua puppy who needs to have spinal surgery after an attack in the park. Benidorm ITV, 9.00pm Hold on to your sunhats as ITV’s long-running Costa Blanca comedy returns for a 10th series with comedians Hale & Pace joining the cast as a pair of undercover cops. Elsewhere, Joyce (Sherrie Hewson) and Monty’s (John Challis) big day arrives. Save Me Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Don’t let the fact that it features yet another missing child put you off the week’s best new drama. Written by and starring Lennie James, Save Me tells the tale of Nelly (James), an ageing wide-boy of suspect charms, who finds himself in trouble after his estranged teenage daughter disappears. We’ve all met people like Nelly, the easy smiles hiding their sharp edges, and James does a wonderful job of making us warm to him despite the distrust. There’s strong support, too, from Suranne Jones as the missing girl’s mother. SH Film 2018 BBC One, 11.15pm; Wales, 11.35pm; NI, 12.10am The BBC’s long-running film series returns with an opening episode hosted by Radio 1’s Clara Amfo alongside critics Ellen E Jones and Larushka Ivan-Zadeh. The focus this week is on next Sunday’s Academy Awards, plus an interview with Lady Bird’s Oscar-nominated director, Greta Gerwig. SH The Quiet Man (1952) ★★★★★ Film4, 4.00pm Best known for his sombre westerns, John Ford turns personal for this wonderful romantic comedy which was considered a risky venture but went on to win the director his fourth Oscar. It tells the story of a boxer who falls in love with the sister of a bully. The famous grab-and-kiss scene between the smouldering John Wayne and love interest Maureen O’Hara (the “Queen of Technicolour”) also appears in E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. Big Eyes (2014) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Amy Adams is ideally cast as the browbeaten artist Margaret Keane who, for eight years, churned out iconic, highly sought after paintings, only for her con artist husband (Christoph Waltz) to take all the credit. Tim Burton’s take on this curious real-life tale of curdled suburbia sadly lacks Adams’s subtlety: even the usually restrained Waltz is caught up in the blunt, overly stylised kookiness. Good (2008) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.50pm Viggo Mortensen gives a thoughtful performance as a German professor whose ideas about euthanasia are adopted by the Nazis. It’s only when he becomes a concentration camp inspector that he grasps the horror of his ideas. Vicente Amorim’s adaptation of CP Taylor’s play doesn’t shirk big questions, but he tends to fall back on clichés – hammerings on the piano, etc – and it plays a bit like a Nazi version of Rising Damp. Thursday 1 March A landmark return: David Olusoga, Mary Beard and Simon Schama Credit: BBC Civilisations BBC Two, 9.00pm Almost 50 years after changing the face of arts programming with the landmark series Civilisation, BBC Two returns with an expanded brief and all the bells and whistles of modern film-making, from drone cameras to infra-red photography. With nine episodes split between presenters Simon Schama (five), David Olusoga and Mary Beard (two each), Civilisations promises an opinionated overview of global art and culture. It opens with a striking sequence in which Schama – helming this first part – explores what has been lost and salvaged from the Isil pillage of Palmyra. From there, we’re whisked to Africa’s Cape coast and the first evidence of mankind’s creativity 77,000 years ago. Then it’s a breathless gallop through the millennia, alighting at the first settlements and depictions of the human face. Among the cave art, Mayan stairways and fertility fetishes, the real treasure is an astonishing Mycenaean Sealstone, jaw-dropping in its anatomical detail and artistic accomplishment. While it won’t have the same impact as the original series (what could?), Civilisations looks to be just as learned, accessible and thrilling as its predecessor – the whole series will be available on BBC iPlayer at 10.00pm. Gabriel Tate The Cruise: Voyage to Alaska ITV, 8.30pm; not Wales Over three episodes, the five-star luxury liner Star Princess and its redoubtable crew travels to the northernmost American state – where they encounter difficult weather, navigational challenges and problem passengers. Weinstein: the Inside Story BBC One, 9.00pm In collaboration with PBS America’s Frontline current-affairs strand, Panorama examines the fall of Harvey Weinstein and the lengths to which the disgraced Hollywood producer would go to keep his alleged bullying, threats and sexual assaults private. Speaking to insiders, the team builds a troubling picture of industry complicity. From Ice to Fire: the Incredible Science of Temperature BBC Four, 9.00pm Dr Helen Czerski concludes her excellent series with fire, and how its harnessing played a pivotal role in human evolution and survival, from essentials such as toolmaking and mining to relative fripperies such as hot-air balloons. The moment that Czerski triggers a lightning strike at a high-voltage laboratory carries a genuine frisson; as is customary with most BBC Four films, the presentation is lively and the science deftly handled. Serial Killer with Piers Morgan ITV, 9.00pm How do you follow interviewing Donald Trump? Piers Morgan returns to the less contentious turf of more one-to-ones with convicted murderers behind bars. He begins with Lorenzo Gilyard, the so-called Kansas City Strangler, who remains unremorseful after allegedly killing 13 women and girls over almost two decades. Panic at 30,000 Feet: Airline Emergency Channel 5, 9.00pm This nightmare-inducing new series explores what happens when flights go wrong, from mid-air collisions to runway explosions. GT Active Shooter: America Under Fire Sky Atlantic, 11.45pm The penultimate episode of this often disturbing and insightful series revisits Oak Creek, Wisconsin, where white supremacist Michael Page killed six and injured four at a Sikh temple, before killing himself, in 2012. For once, there is a vaguely positive denouement: Page’s brutality had the opposite to its intended effect and brought the community closer together. GT Jubal (1956) ★★★★☆ Film4, 12.40pm Ernest Borgnine stars in this brooding western shot in the Grand Teton mountains of Wyoming, which reworks the plot of Othello. Borgnine stars as a cattle rancher with a much younger wife (Valerie French), who is driven into a jealous rage when cattlehand Rod Steiger suggests that she is having an affair with young drifter Jubal (a magnificent Glenn Ford). Murder is most definitely on the cards. Pitch Perfect (2012) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm The world of collegiate a cappella singing contests can’t be as heartless as Jason Moore’s sour comedy would have us believe. Anna Kendrick stars as Beca, an angst-ridden outsider who must shake up her uninspiring and monotonous group, while trying to handle how weird they all are. And, of course, there’s a handsome man (Skylar Astin) who catches her eye. It’s a little like Glee but without the schmaltz. The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976) ★★★★☆ ITV4, 9.00pm Clint Eastwood directs and stars in this warm-hearted marvellous western adapted from Forrest Carter’s novel and set during the American Civil War. Eastwood plays the Missouri farmer who, driven by memories of his family’s slaughter, becomes an outlaw when he refuses to join his Confederate comrades in surrender, in favour of seeking revenge on the men who murdered his kin. Friday 2 March Searching for the truth: Lydia Wilson as Matilda Credit: BBC Requiem BBC One, 9.00pm After last week’s hiatus because of the Six Nations rugby, it’s back to small-town Wales for another dose of supernatural country-house shenanigans. When we last saw fragile but determined musician Matilda (Lydia Wilson), she’d suffered the double whammy of finding her would-be mother Rose (Claire Rushbrook) unconscious in the bath and learning that mute Aunt Meredith (Jane Thorne) had died on the verge of offering up her secrets. How did Matilda react? By mysteriously blacking out and bashing her beloved cello against a cupboard. In the fourth episode then, she looks for connections between her mental health and Carys’s disappearance. And some clues emerge: Matilda meets dishevelled local Laura (Anastasia Hille), who claims to hear voices informing her of Carys’s fate, and back at the mansion, she comes across some old tomes detailing rituals to unlock the past. Even with its heavily scored bumps and shudders, Requiem can’t quite sustain its early Hammer Horror appeal. The strong performances and some genuinely chilling moments keep things compelling however, not least in the spine-tingling climax of this episode. Toby Dantzic Flint Town Netflix, from today Back in 2014, a cost-cutting exercise left thousands of homes in Flint, Michigan, with contaminated drinking water for years. This new eight-part documentary looks at the fallout from the crisis through the eyes of Flint’s beleaguered police force, who face an uphill struggle – the community needs their support but are also deeply mistrustful of those in authority, plus dwindling resources makes the officers’ jobs harder still. MasterChef BBC One, 7.30pm Having survived the cooking contest’s opening week, the six heat winners face food critic William Sitwell in this first quarter-final. He challenges them to conjure up a standout pudding showcasing either alcohol or spices. Love Your Garden ITV, 8.00pm; not STV/UTV/Wales This week, Alan Titchmarsh and his team are in Bidewell, Devon, helping Tamsyn and Alex Wood who returned to the UK from France after Alex suffered a brain injury. The aim is to turn the Woods’ garden into a coastal sanctuary inspired by Alex’s passion for surfing. The Yorkshire Steam Railway: All Aboard Channel 5, 8.00pm As amiable as its title suggests, this new documentary series follows the lives of those who work on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, one of the country’s most popular steam railways. In this series’ opener, the new season begins with the arrival of star engine Royal Scot, on loan from London. Tones, Drones and Arpeggios: The Magic of Minimalism BBC Four, 9.00pm Conductor Charles Hazlewood explores minimalism, which he argues is the most important musical form of the 20th century. In the fascinating opener of this two-part series, he unpicks the construction of these sometimes confounding sounds and tracks down the genre’s avant-garde pioneers, who brought their mesmeric, spirituality-inspired compositions from California to New York in the Sixties. TD Jo Brand: Secrets of Her Success Channel 5, 10.30pm Channel 5’s celebration of funny women continues with this absorbing profile of the pioneering doyenne of deadpan, Jo Brand. This charts her career from its rocky start on the male-dominated stand-up circuit to her much-admired hospital sitcom Getting On. TD Gladiator (2000) ★★★★★ Film4, 9.00pm This take on the traditional swords-and-sandals epic proved that Russell Crowe deserved to be recognised as a mainstream star, and reaffirmed Ridley Scott’s reputation as a first-rate director. Crowe is Maximus, a former Roman general who rebuilds his career as a gladiator. His bid for vengeance against a vile emperor (Joaquin Phoenix) is compelling. Plus there’s a last hurrah from Oliver Reed. Blades of Glory (2007) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 11.05pm; Wales, 11.35pm;N Ireland, 12.05am You might think that the sequinned world of figure skating is beyond parody, but here Will Ferrell and Jon Heder serve up a zestfully preposterous comedy. Both play rival Olympic ice skaters, Ferrell a loose-living maverick, Heder a prissy perfectionist, who are slung out of the sport but use a loophole to return as an erotic all-male pairing. Amy Poehler co-stars. A Hijacking (2012) ★★★★☆ BBC Two, 11.55pm Tobias Lindholm’s vigorously intelligent hostage thriller, set on board a besieged ship in the Indian Ocean, deftly moves his story between the boat and the shipping company’s offices, where Søren Malling’s frazzled CEO attempts to thrash out a bargain. On the other end of the line is the Somalis’ translator. Flies buzz, sweat trickles, negotiations continue, and you feel your breath dry up. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Catherine Gee, Simon Horsford, Sarah Hughes, Clive Morgan, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power, Patrick Smith, Gabriel Tate and Rachel Ward
Scotland's flanker and captain John Barclay (R) and head coach Gregor Townsend chat after their Autumn International rugby union Test match against Australia, at Murrayfield in Edinburgh, on November 25, 2017
Scotland's flanker and captain John Barclay (R) and head coach Gregor Townsend chat after their Autumn International rugby union Test match against Australia, at Murrayfield in Edinburgh, on November 25, 2017
Scotland's flanker and captain John Barclay (R) and head coach Gregor Townsend chat after their Autumn International rugby union Test match against Australia, at Murrayfield in Edinburgh, on November 25, 2017
Scotland's flanker and captain John Barclay (R) and head coach Gregor Townsend chat after their Autumn International rugby union Test match against Australia, at Murrayfield in Edinburgh, on November 25, 2017
Scotland's flanker and captain John Barclay (R) and head coach Gregor Townsend chat after their Autumn International rugby union Test match against Australia, at Murrayfield in Edinburgh, on November 25, 2017
Scotland's flanker and captain John Barclay (R) and head coach Gregor Townsend chat after their Autumn International rugby union Test match against Australia, at Murrayfield in Edinburgh, on November 25, 2017
Scotland's flanker and captain John Barclay (R) and head coach Gregor Townsend chat after their Autumn International rugby union Test match against Australia, at Murrayfield in Edinburgh, on November 25, 2017 (AFP Photo/Andy BUCHANAN)
Scotland's flanker and captain John Barclay (R) and head coach Gregor Townsend chat after their Autumn International rugby union Test match against Australia, at Murrayfield in Edinburgh, on November 25, 2017
Scotland's flanker and captain John Barclay (R) and head coach Gregor Townsend chat after their Autumn International rugby union Test match against Australia, at Murrayfield in Edinburgh, on November 25, 2017 (AFP Photo/Andy BUCHANAN)
Wales' full-back Leigh Halfpenny (R) kicks a penalty during their Six Nations rugby union match against Scotland, at the Principality Stadium in Cardiff, on February 3, 2018 (AFP Photo/Geoff CADDICK)
Wales' full-back Leigh Halfpenny (R) kicks a penalty during their Six Nations rugby union match against Scotland, at the Principality Stadium in Cardiff, on February 3, 2018
Wales' full-back Leigh Halfpenny (R) kicks a penalty during their Six Nations rugby union match against Scotland, at the Principality Stadium in Cardiff, on February 3, 2018 (AFP Photo/Geoff CADDICK)
Wales' full-back Leigh Halfpenny (R) kicks a penalty during their Six Nations rugby union match against Scotland, at the Principality Stadium in Cardiff, on February 3, 2018
Wales' full-back Leigh Halfpenny (R) kicks a penalty during their Six Nations rugby union match against Scotland, at the Principality Stadium in Cardiff, on February 3, 2018
Wales' full-back Leigh Halfpenny (R) kicks a penalty during their Six Nations rugby union match against Scotland, at the Principality Stadium in Cardiff, on February 3, 2018
FILE - In this Saturday, Nov. 19, 2016 file photo, England's Nathan Hughes, left, fends off the challenge from Fiji's Leone Nakarawa during their rugby union international at Twickenham stadium in London. No. 8 Nathan Hughes will start for England against Scotland in Six Nations rugby at Murrayfield on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. Hughes recovered from knee ligament damage in club play in December, and was conveniently fit in time to replace the absent Sam Simmonds, who featured against Italy and Wales. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant, file)
FILE - In this Saturday, Nov. 19, 2016 file photo, England's Nathan Hughes, left, fends off the challenge from Fiji's Leone Nakarawa during their rugby union international at Twickenham stadium in London. No. 8 Nathan Hughes will start for England against Scotland in Six Nations rugby at Murrayfield on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. Hughes recovered from knee ligament damage in club play in December, and was conveniently fit in time to replace the absent Sam Simmonds, who featured against Italy and Wales. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant, file)
FILE - In this Saturday, Nov. 19, 2016 file photo, England's Nathan Hughes, left, fends off the challenge from Fiji's Leone Nakarawa during their rugby union international at Twickenham stadium in London. No. 8 Nathan Hughes will start for England against Scotland in Six Nations rugby at Murrayfield on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018. Hughes recovered from knee ligament damage in club play in December, and was conveniently fit in time to replace the absent Sam Simmonds, who featured against Italy and Wales. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant, file)