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First openly gay referee Ryan Atkin says Rainbow Laces is a start, but big-name players must do more

Ryan Atkin recalls a game at Stevenage this season when he was fourth official and afterwards was tweeted by a 12-year-old boy who had recognised Atkin after English football’s only openly gay professional referee spoke publicly about his sexuality for the first time in August. The message was to tell Atkin that the boy and his father had resolved that if there had been any homophobic abuse from the stands, which there was not, then the two of them would have confronted it on his behalf. It was, Atkin, 32, says, one of the many messages of support he has received since he came out from all across the game and beyond in what has been a largely positive experience for him in a sport which still does not have a high-profile openly gay footballer. Atkin referees in the sixth tier National League South, as well as some fourth official duties in the Football League and his next game is Watford Under-23s against their Millwall counterparts on Monday. He is a key figure in the Rainbow Laces campaign, supported by The Daily Telegraph, to make all sport, including football, a more welcoming and inclusive environment for LGBT people. Atkin is clear that while efforts have been made in tackling homophobia, more can be done. “I don’t think as much education has gone into inclusivity and acceptance. We have made great strides when it has come to racism and making sure we treat people from all ethnic backgrounds equally. For me the rainbow laces campaign is about the building blocks to making change.” Starting with West Ham’s home game against Leicester on Friday night, players will be invited to wear the rainbow laces to “Come out for LGBT” over a 10-day period, with support from Team GB, and governing bodies including those in cycling, rugby and cricket. The Premier League has announced a three-year partnership with LGBT rights campaigners Stonewall to promote equality in the game. Ryan Atkin is the first openly gay referee in English football  Credit: Christopher Pledger /The Telegraph  There will be rainbow armbands for Premier League captains and a rainbow theme for the fourth officials’ boards although Atkin, a senior manager with Virgin Trains East Coast in his day job, would like to it to go further with big names in the sport being explicit about their support for LGBT equality. “There are key players in football who could make a difference by saying simply that homophobic abuse and homophobic comments are not acceptable,” he says. “Gary Lineker wore Rainbow Laces on Match of the Day last year but he didn’t say those words. There are big names like Sir Alex Ferguson, David Beckham, Cristiano Ronaldo but none of them have said it: that if you are going to be homophobic, then don’t participate in sport. It needs people who the younger generation look up to. These are the people who can challenge behaviours.” On the subject of the first high-profile gay footballer, Atkin points out that the modern players lead very private lives whether they are heterosexual or gay. “They might be comfortable with how they live their lives. How many stories do you read these days about footballers’ lives? This isn’t Hollywood. Why would they upset the life they have by coming out? It obviously we would be great for the LGBT community but we respect that people don’t have to do it.” Premier League captains will wear rainbow armbands in support of Stonewall's Rainbow Laces campaign  Credit: Reuters Among the 92 clubs of the Premier League and Football League, only Charlton Athletic have an affiliated LGBT-friendly team who wear the club’s kit and use their training facilities. Charlton Invicta play in the London Unity League and the Kent Sunday Junior Trophy and are run by player-manager Gary Ginnaw, 34, a cost lawyer and lifelong Charlton supporter. “For me having Johnnie Jackson [Charlton’s first team captain] come to our launch and speak on television about us, I’m incredibly grateful for all the club have done.” Ginnaw came out to family and friends when he was 24 and gave up playing football for his 20s because he did not want the scrutiny around his sexuality that he felt being in a team would bring. Being gay is not a pre-requisite to play for Charlton Invicta, and two-thirds of the team are heterosexual, rather it is a LGBT-friendly environment in which gay players can be certain of acceptance. “We played one game in the cup and my dad, who is my assistant manager, heard some comments beforehand from the opposition along the lines of ‘This is the gay team, we better watch ourselves’,” Ginnaw says. “After the game their perception was how well we had played. There are a lot of people who don’t know an openly gay man or woman. Until they meet you and speak to you they see we are not a bad team. Then views start to change.” Atkin says even more can be done to promote LGBT rights and end homophobia by key figures in football   Credit: Christopher Pledger /The Telegraph  Ginnaw is a passionate Charlton supporter and feels that the club’s strong history of fan activism means it would have an enlightened attitude towards a gay player, recalling just one incident when he heard homophobic language being used. “When the first big player comes out there might be a backlash,” he says. “The most important thing for him will be that he has the support of his team-mates, the fans and football authorities. In the end fans don’t care who a player is sharing his bed with, they care he’s doing his job well.” Many clubs now have affiliated LGBT supporter groups, including West Ham’s Pride of Irons which has a 194-strong membership. Their co-chairman Jim Dolan, 36, a banking consultant, says the club have been very supportive and last month they focussed on awareness to counter the potential for homophobic chants in the home game against Brighton and Hove Albion. It went so well that the club received a commendation from the Premier League. It is the small things that matter to fans: the club stock rainbow merchandise in their official store and for the LGBT Pride event in London in July sent along Hammerhead, the club mascot. “We have many in our group in their 40s and 50s,” Dolan says. “It is not just hip young people trying to change the world, its people who have come to games for years and sometimes put up with some horrible stuff. We are not new, we have always been there.”

First openly gay referee Ryan Atkin says Rainbow Laces is a start, but big-name players must do more

Ryan Atkin recalls a game at Stevenage this season when he was fourth official and afterwards was tweeted by a 12-year-old boy who had recognised Atkin after English football’s only openly gay professional referee spoke publicly about his sexuality for the first time in August. The message was to tell Atkin that the boy and his father had resolved that if there had been any homophobic abuse from the stands, which there was not, then the two of them would have confronted it on his behalf. It was, Atkin, 32, says, one of the many messages of support he has received since he came out from all across the game and beyond in what has been a largely positive experience for him in a sport which still does not have a high-profile openly gay footballer. Atkin referees in the sixth tier National League South, as well as some fourth official duties in the Football League and his next game is Watford Under-23s against their Millwall counterparts on Monday. He is a key figure in the Rainbow Laces campaign, supported by The Daily Telegraph, to make all sport, including football, a more welcoming and inclusive environment for LGBT people. Atkin is clear that while efforts have been made in tackling homophobia, more can be done. “I don’t think as much education has gone into inclusivity and acceptance. We have made great strides when it has come to racism and making sure we treat people from all ethnic backgrounds equally. For me the rainbow laces campaign is about the building blocks to making change.” Starting with West Ham’s home game against Leicester on Friday night, players will be invited to wear the rainbow laces to “Come out for LGBT” over a 10-day period, with support from Team GB, and governing bodies including those in cycling, rugby and cricket. The Premier League has announced a three-year partnership with LGBT rights campaigners Stonewall to promote equality in the game. Ryan Atkin is the first openly gay referee in English football  Credit: Christopher Pledger /The Telegraph  There will be rainbow armbands for Premier League captains and a rainbow theme for the fourth officials’ boards although Atkin, a senior manager with Virgin Trains East Coast in his day job, would like to it to go further with big names in the sport being explicit about their support for LGBT equality. “There are key players in football who could make a difference by saying simply that homophobic abuse and homophobic comments are not acceptable,” he says. “Gary Lineker wore Rainbow Laces on Match of the Day last year but he didn’t say those words. There are big names like Sir Alex Ferguson, David Beckham, Cristiano Ronaldo but none of them have said it: that if you are going to be homophobic, then don’t participate in sport. It needs people who the younger generation look up to. These are the people who can challenge behaviours.” On the subject of the first high-profile gay footballer, Atkin points out that the modern players lead very private lives whether they are heterosexual or gay. “They might be comfortable with how they live their lives. How many stories do you read these days about footballers’ lives? This isn’t Hollywood. Why would they upset the life they have by coming out? It obviously we would be great for the LGBT community but we respect that people don’t have to do it.” Premier League captains will wear rainbow armbands in support of Stonewall's Rainbow Laces campaign  Credit: Reuters Among the 92 clubs of the Premier League and Football League, only Charlton Athletic have an affiliated LGBT-friendly team who wear the club’s kit and use their training facilities. Charlton Invicta play in the London Unity League and the Kent Sunday Junior Trophy and are run by player-manager Gary Ginnaw, 34, a cost lawyer and lifelong Charlton supporter. “For me having Johnnie Jackson [Charlton’s first team captain] come to our launch and speak on television about us, I’m incredibly grateful for all the club have done.” Ginnaw came out to family and friends when he was 24 and gave up playing football for his 20s because he did not want the scrutiny around his sexuality that he felt being in a team would bring. Being gay is not a pre-requisite to play for Charlton Invicta, and two-thirds of the team are heterosexual, rather it is a LGBT-friendly environment in which gay players can be certain of acceptance. “We played one game in the cup and my dad, who is my assistant manager, heard some comments beforehand from the opposition along the lines of ‘This is the gay team, we better watch ourselves’,” Ginnaw says. “After the game their perception was how well we had played. There are a lot of people who don’t know an openly gay man or woman. Until they meet you and speak to you they see we are not a bad team. Then views start to change.” Atkin says even more can be done to promote LGBT rights and end homophobia by key figures in football   Credit: Christopher Pledger /The Telegraph  Ginnaw is a passionate Charlton supporter and feels that the club’s strong history of fan activism means it would have an enlightened attitude towards a gay player, recalling just one incident when he heard homophobic language being used. “When the first big player comes out there might be a backlash,” he says. “The most important thing for him will be that he has the support of his team-mates, the fans and football authorities. In the end fans don’t care who a player is sharing his bed with, they care he’s doing his job well.” Many clubs now have affiliated LGBT supporter groups, including West Ham’s Pride of Irons which has a 194-strong membership. Their co-chairman Jim Dolan, 36, a banking consultant, says the club have been very supportive and last month they focussed on awareness to counter the potential for homophobic chants in the home game against Brighton and Hove Albion. It went so well that the club received a commendation from the Premier League. It is the small things that matter to fans: the club stock rainbow merchandise in their official store and for the LGBT Pride event in London in July sent along Hammerhead, the club mascot. “We have many in our group in their 40s and 50s,” Dolan says. “It is not just hip young people trying to change the world, its people who have come to games for years and sometimes put up with some horrible stuff. We are not new, we have always been there.”

First openly gay referee Ryan Atkin says Rainbow Laces is a start, but big-name players must do more

Ryan Atkin recalls a game at Stevenage this season when he was fourth official and afterwards was tweeted by a 12-year-old boy who had recognised Atkin after English football’s only openly gay professional referee spoke publicly about his sexuality for the first time in August. The message was to tell Atkin that the boy and his father had resolved that if there had been any homophobic abuse from the stands, which there was not, then the two of them would have confronted it on his behalf. It was, Atkin, 32, says, one of the many messages of support he has received since he came out from all across the game and beyond in what has been a largely positive experience for him in a sport which still does not have a high-profile openly gay footballer. Atkin referees in the sixth tier National League South, as well as some fourth official duties in the Football League and his next game is Watford Under-23s against their Millwall counterparts on Monday. He is a key figure in the Rainbow Laces campaign, supported by The Daily Telegraph, to make all sport, including football, a more welcoming and inclusive environment for LGBT people. Atkin is clear that while efforts have been made in tackling homophobia, more can be done. “I don’t think as much education has gone into inclusivity and acceptance. We have made great strides when it has come to racism and making sure we treat people from all ethnic backgrounds equally. For me the rainbow laces campaign is about the building blocks to making change.” Starting with West Ham’s home game against Leicester on Friday night, players will be invited to wear the rainbow laces to “Come out for LGBT” over a 10-day period, with support from Team GB, and governing bodies including those in cycling, rugby and cricket. The Premier League has announced a three-year partnership with LGBT rights campaigners Stonewall to promote equality in the game. Ryan Atkin is the first openly gay referee in English football  Credit: Christopher Pledger /The Telegraph  There will be rainbow armbands for Premier League captains and a rainbow theme for the fourth officials’ boards although Atkin, a senior manager with Virgin Trains East Coast in his day job, would like to it to go further with big names in the sport being explicit about their support for LGBT equality. “There are key players in football who could make a difference by saying simply that homophobic abuse and homophobic comments are not acceptable,” he says. “Gary Lineker wore Rainbow Laces on Match of the Day last year but he didn’t say those words. There are big names like Sir Alex Ferguson, David Beckham, Cristiano Ronaldo but none of them have said it: that if you are going to be homophobic, then don’t participate in sport. It needs people who the younger generation look up to. These are the people who can challenge behaviours.” On the subject of the first high-profile gay footballer, Atkin points out that the modern players lead very private lives whether they are heterosexual or gay. “They might be comfortable with how they live their lives. How many stories do you read these days about footballers’ lives? This isn’t Hollywood. Why would they upset the life they have by coming out? It obviously we would be great for the LGBT community but we respect that people don’t have to do it.” Premier League captains will wear rainbow armbands in support of Stonewall's Rainbow Laces campaign  Credit: Reuters Among the 92 clubs of the Premier League and Football League, only Charlton Athletic have an affiliated LGBT-friendly team who wear the club’s kit and use their training facilities. Charlton Invicta play in the London Unity League and the Kent Sunday Junior Trophy and are run by player-manager Gary Ginnaw, 34, a cost lawyer and lifelong Charlton supporter. “For me having Johnnie Jackson [Charlton’s first team captain] come to our launch and speak on television about us, I’m incredibly grateful for all the club have done.” Ginnaw came out to family and friends when he was 24 and gave up playing football for his 20s because he did not want the scrutiny around his sexuality that he felt being in a team would bring. Being gay is not a pre-requisite to play for Charlton Invicta, and two-thirds of the team are heterosexual, rather it is a LGBT-friendly environment in which gay players can be certain of acceptance. “We played one game in the cup and my dad, who is my assistant manager, heard some comments beforehand from the opposition along the lines of ‘This is the gay team, we better watch ourselves’,” Ginnaw says. “After the game their perception was how well we had played. There are a lot of people who don’t know an openly gay man or woman. Until they meet you and speak to you they see we are not a bad team. Then views start to change.” Atkin says even more can be done to promote LGBT rights and end homophobia by key figures in football   Credit: Christopher Pledger /The Telegraph  Ginnaw is a passionate Charlton supporter and feels that the club’s strong history of fan activism means it would have an enlightened attitude towards a gay player, recalling just one incident when he heard homophobic language being used. “When the first big player comes out there might be a backlash,” he says. “The most important thing for him will be that he has the support of his team-mates, the fans and football authorities. In the end fans don’t care who a player is sharing his bed with, they care he’s doing his job well.” Many clubs now have affiliated LGBT supporter groups, including West Ham’s Pride of Irons which has a 194-strong membership. Their co-chairman Jim Dolan, 36, a banking consultant, says the club have been very supportive and last month they focussed on awareness to counter the potential for homophobic chants in the home game against Brighton and Hove Albion. It went so well that the club received a commendation from the Premier League. It is the small things that matter to fans: the club stock rainbow merchandise in their official store and for the LGBT Pride event in London in July sent along Hammerhead, the club mascot. “We have many in our group in their 40s and 50s,” Dolan says. “It is not just hip young people trying to change the world, its people who have come to games for years and sometimes put up with some horrible stuff. We are not new, we have always been there.”

First openly gay referee Ryan Atkin says Rainbow Laces is a start, but big-name players must do more

Ryan Atkin recalls a game at Stevenage this season when he was fourth official and afterwards was tweeted by a 12-year-old boy who had recognised Atkin after English football’s only openly gay professional referee spoke publicly about his sexuality for the first time in August. The message was to tell Atkin that the boy and his father had resolved that if there had been any homophobic abuse from the stands, which there was not, then the two of them would have confronted it on his behalf. It was, Atkin, 32, says, one of the many messages of support he has received since he came out from all across the game and beyond in what has been a largely positive experience for him in a sport which still does not have a high-profile openly gay footballer. Atkin referees in the sixth tier National League South, as well as some fourth official duties in the Football League and his next game is Watford Under-23s against their Millwall counterparts on Monday. He is a key figure in the Rainbow Laces campaign, supported by The Daily Telegraph, to make all sport, including football, a more welcoming and inclusive environment for LGBT people. Atkin is clear that while efforts have been made in tackling homophobia, more can be done. “I don’t think as much education has gone into inclusivity and acceptance. We have made great strides when it has come to racism and making sure we treat people from all ethnic backgrounds equally. For me the rainbow laces campaign is about the building blocks to making change.” Starting with West Ham’s home game against Leicester on Friday night, players will be invited to wear the rainbow laces to “Come out for LGBT” over a 10-day period, with support from Team GB, and governing bodies including those in cycling, rugby and cricket. The Premier League has announced a three-year partnership with LGBT rights campaigners Stonewall to promote equality in the game. Ryan Atkin is the first openly gay referee in English football  Credit: Christopher Pledger /The Telegraph  There will be rainbow armbands for Premier League captains and a rainbow theme for the fourth officials’ boards although Atkin, a senior manager with Virgin Trains East Coast in his day job, would like to it to go further with big names in the sport being explicit about their support for LGBT equality. “There are key players in football who could make a difference by saying simply that homophobic abuse and homophobic comments are not acceptable,” he says. “Gary Lineker wore Rainbow Laces on Match of the Day last year but he didn’t say those words. There are big names like Sir Alex Ferguson, David Beckham, Cristiano Ronaldo but none of them have said it: that if you are going to be homophobic, then don’t participate in sport. It needs people who the younger generation look up to. These are the people who can challenge behaviours.” On the subject of the first high-profile gay footballer, Atkin points out that the modern players lead very private lives whether they are heterosexual or gay. “They might be comfortable with how they live their lives. How many stories do you read these days about footballers’ lives? This isn’t Hollywood. Why would they upset the life they have by coming out? It obviously we would be great for the LGBT community but we respect that people don’t have to do it.” Premier League captains will wear rainbow armbands in support of Stonewall's Rainbow Laces campaign  Credit: Reuters Among the 92 clubs of the Premier League and Football League, only Charlton Athletic have an affiliated LGBT-friendly team who wear the club’s kit and use their training facilities. Charlton Invicta play in the London Unity League and the Kent Sunday Junior Trophy and are run by player-manager Gary Ginnaw, 34, a cost lawyer and lifelong Charlton supporter. “For me having Johnnie Jackson [Charlton’s first team captain] come to our launch and speak on television about us, I’m incredibly grateful for all the club have done.” Ginnaw came out to family and friends when he was 24 and gave up playing football for his 20s because he did not want the scrutiny around his sexuality that he felt being in a team would bring. Being gay is not a pre-requisite to play for Charlton Invicta, and two-thirds of the team are heterosexual, rather it is a LGBT-friendly environment in which gay players can be certain of acceptance. “We played one game in the cup and my dad, who is my assistant manager, heard some comments beforehand from the opposition along the lines of ‘This is the gay team, we better watch ourselves’,” Ginnaw says. “After the game their perception was how well we had played. There are a lot of people who don’t know an openly gay man or woman. Until they meet you and speak to you they see we are not a bad team. Then views start to change.” Atkin says even more can be done to promote LGBT rights and end homophobia by key figures in football   Credit: Christopher Pledger /The Telegraph  Ginnaw is a passionate Charlton supporter and feels that the club’s strong history of fan activism means it would have an enlightened attitude towards a gay player, recalling just one incident when he heard homophobic language being used. “When the first big player comes out there might be a backlash,” he says. “The most important thing for him will be that he has the support of his team-mates, the fans and football authorities. In the end fans don’t care who a player is sharing his bed with, they care he’s doing his job well.” Many clubs now have affiliated LGBT supporter groups, including West Ham’s Pride of Irons which has a 194-strong membership. Their co-chairman Jim Dolan, 36, a banking consultant, says the club have been very supportive and last month they focussed on awareness to counter the potential for homophobic chants in the home game against Brighton and Hove Albion. It went so well that the club received a commendation from the Premier League. It is the small things that matter to fans: the club stock rainbow merchandise in their official store and for the LGBT Pride event in London in July sent along Hammerhead, the club mascot. “We have many in our group in their 40s and 50s,” Dolan says. “It is not just hip young people trying to change the world, its people who have come to games for years and sometimes put up with some horrible stuff. We are not new, we have always been there.”

Stevenage v Tottenham Hotspur FA Cup Fifth Round

Football - Stevenage v Tottenham Hotspur FA Cup Fifth Round - The Lamex Stadium, Broadhall Way - 19/2/12 Stevenage FC fans before the game Mandatory Credit: Action Images / Matthew Childs Livepic

League Two - Stevenage vs Notts County

Soccer Football - League Two - Stevenage vs Notts County - Lamex Stadium, Stevenage, Britain - November 11, 2017 Notts County's Elliott Hewitt celebrates their first goal Action Images/Tom Jacobs

League Two - Stevenage vs Notts County

Soccer Football - League Two - Stevenage vs Notts County - Lamex Stadium, Stevenage, Britain - November 11, 2017 Notts County's Elliott Hewitt scores their first goal Action Images/Tom Jacobs

League Two - Stevenage vs Notts County

Soccer Football - League Two - Stevenage vs Notts County - Lamex Stadium, Stevenage, Britain - November 11, 2017 Notts County's Elliott Hewitt scores their first goal Action Images/Tom Jacobs

League Two - Stevenage vs Notts County

Soccer Football - League Two - Stevenage vs Notts County - Lamex Stadium, Stevenage, Britain - November 11, 2017 Notts County manager Kevin Nolan Action Images/Tom Jacobs

League Two - Stevenage vs Notts County

Soccer Football - League Two - Stevenage vs Notts County - Lamex Stadium, Stevenage, Britain - November 11, 2017 Stevenage's Danny Newton celebrates their first goal Action Images/Tom Jacobs

League Two - Stevenage vs Notts County

Soccer Football - League Two - Stevenage vs Notts County - Lamex Stadium, Stevenage, Britain - November 11, 2017 Stevenage's Matt Godden in action with Notts County's Terry Hawkridge and Carl Dickinson Action Images/Tom Jacobs

League Two - Stevenage vs Notts County

Soccer Football - League Two - Stevenage vs Notts County - Lamex Stadium, Stevenage, Britain - November 11, 2017 Stevenage's Danny Newton scores their first goal Action Images/Tom Jacobs

League Two - Stevenage vs Notts County

Soccer Football - League Two - Stevenage vs Notts County - Lamex Stadium, Stevenage, Britain - November 11, 2017 Notts County’s Carl Dickinson in action with Stevenage’s Chris Whelpdale Action Images/Tom Jacobs

League Two - Stevenage vs Notts County

Soccer Football - League Two - Stevenage vs Notts County - Lamex Stadium, Stevenage, Britain - November 11, 2017 Stevenage’s Ronnie Henry in action with Notts County’s Jorge Grant Action Images/Tom Jacobs

League Two - Stevenage vs Notts County

Soccer Football - League Two - Stevenage vs Notts County - Lamex Stadium, Stevenage, Britain - November 11, 2017 Stevenage’s Ronnie Henry in action with Notts County’s Jorge Grant Action Images/Tom Jacobs

League Two - Stevenage vs Notts County

Soccer Football - League Two - Stevenage vs Notts County - Lamex Stadium, Stevenage, Britain - November 11, 2017 Notts County manager Kevin Nolan before the match Action Images/Tom Jacobs

League Two - Stevenage vs Notts County

Soccer Football - League Two - Stevenage vs Notts County - Lamex Stadium, Stevenage, Britain - November 11, 2017 General view during a minutes silence as part of remembrance commemorations before the match Action Images/Tom Jacobs

League Two - Stevenage vs Notts County

Soccer Football - League Two - Stevenage vs Notts County - Lamex Stadium, Stevenage, Britain - November 11, 2017 The teams come onto the pitch before the match Action Images/Tom Jacobs

League Two - Stevenage vs Notts County

Soccer Football - League Two - Stevenage vs Notts County - Lamex Stadium, Stevenage, Britain - November 11, 2017 Notts County manager Kevin Nolan signs autographs for fans before the match Action Images/Tom Jacobs

League Two - Stevenage vs Notts County

Soccer Football - League Two - Stevenage vs Notts County - Lamex Stadium, Stevenage, Britain - November 11, 2017 General view of medals Action Images/Tom Jacobs

League Two - Stevenage vs Notts County

Soccer Football - League Two - Stevenage vs Notts County - Lamex Stadium, Stevenage, Britain - November 11, 2017 Stevenage manager Darren Sarll during a minutes silence as part of remembrance commemorations before the match Action Images/Tom Jacobs

League Two - Stevenage vs Notts County

Soccer Football - League Two - Stevenage vs Notts County - Lamex Stadium, Stevenage, Britain - November 11, 2017 General view of a Royal British Legion badge Action Images/Tom Jacobs

Brad Friedel hired as coach of New England Revolution

Tottenham Hotspur's goalkeeper Brad Friedel looks on from the dug-out as a substitute before the start of their English FA Cup fifth round replay soccer match against Stevenage at White Hart Lane, London, Wednesday, March 7, 2012. (AP Photo/Sang Tan)

FA Cup second-round draw: Fylde host 2013 winners Wigan, Boreham Wood sent to Coventry

FA Cup second round draw National League side AFC Fylde will host 2013 FA Cup winners Wigan in the second round of the competition. Fylde, through to this stage of the competition for the first time in their history following a victory over Kidderminster, were paired with the League One side when the second round draw was made on Monday. Fylde's fellow non-League side Boreham Wood will also face former winners of the competition in the shape of Coventry, who lifted the cup in 1987. Coventry will be at home for the tie. There were a total of 12 non-League sides in the draw. National League South Oxford City were drawn away to Notts County. Seventh-tier Hereford, the lowest-ranked side through to the second round, will face either Chorley or Fleetwood after their tie on Monday night. Leatherhead, who are ranked lower than Hereford, would go away to Wycombe if they win their replay against Billericay Town. Woking or Bury vs Tranmere or Peterborough MK Dons v Maidstone United Newport Co v Cambridge Utd Wycombe v Leatherhead or Billericay Port Vale v Yeovil Town Shrewsbury v Morecambe Doncaster Rovers v Northampton or Scunthorpe Slough Town v Rochdale AFC Wimbledon v Charlton Athletic Stevenage v Swindon Town Mansfield Town v Guiseley or Accrington Stanley Gateshead v Luton Town Bradford City v Plymouth Argyle Blackburn Rovers v Crewe Alexandra AFC Fylde v Wigan Athletic Gillingham v Carlisle Utd Notts Co v Oxford City Forest Green v Exeter City Chorley or Fleetwood v Hereford Coventry City v Boreham Wood Town 7:28PM There you go Everyone present with 'Mark' Chapman professes themselves pleased with the draw. There's not much more I can add to the raw draw. Enjoy! Thanks for your company.  7:24PM TV picks I would guess would be Slough v Rochdale and Fylde v Wigan. Gateshead v Luton would be worth watching.  7:23PM The second round draw in full Woking or Bury vs Tranmere or Peterborough MK Dons v Maidstone United Newport Co v Cambridge Utd Wycombe v Leatherhead or Billericay Port Vale v Yeovil Town Shrewsbury v Morecambe Doncaster Rovers v Northampton or Scunthorpe Slough Town v Rochdale AFC Wimbledon v Charlton Athletic Stevenage v Swindon Town Mansfield Town v Guiseley or Accrington Stanley Gateshead v Luton Town Bradford City v Plymouth Argyle Blackburn Rovers v Crewe Alexandra AFC Fylde v Wigan Athletic Gillingham v Carlisle Utd Notts Co v Oxford City Forest Green v Exeter City Chorley or Fleetwood v Hereford Coventry City v Boreham Wood 7:19PM Tie 20  Coventry City v Boreham Wood 7:19PM Tie 19 Chorley or Fleetwood v Hereford 7:18PM Tie 18 Forest Green v Exeter City 7:18PM Tie 17 Notts Co v Oxford City 7:18PM Tie 16 Gillingham v Carlisle Utd 7:17PM Tie 15 AFC Fylde v Wigan Athletic 7:17PM Tie 14 Blackburn Rovers v Crewe Alexandra 7:17PM Tie 13 Bradford City v Plymouth Argyle 7:16PM Tie 12 Gateshead v Luton Town 7:16PM Tie 11 Mansfield Town v Guiseley or Accrington Stanley 7:16PM Tie 10 Stevenage v Swindon Town 7:16PM Tie nine AFC Wimbledon v Charlton Athletic 7:15PM Tie eight Slough Town v Rochdale 7:15PM Tie seven Donny Rovers v Northampton or Scunthorpe 7:15PM Tie six Shrewsbury v Morecambe 7:14PM Tie five Port Vale v Yeovil Town 7:14PM Tie four Wycombe v Leatherhead or Billericay 7:14PM Tie three Newport Co v Cambridge Utd 7:13PM Tie two MK Dons v Maidstone United 7:13PM First out Woking or Bury vs Tranmere or Peterborough 7:10PM Andy Cole and Kevin Davies Will draw the balls.  7:10PM Here we go The BBC hands over to BT Sport 7:09PM The draw will take place in 10 minutes Mark Chapman interviews Saturday's Slough Town heroes who thrashed Gainsborough Trinity 6-0. Everyone displays his/her poppy pinned to a tracksuit top. Chapman has his in his buttonhole. I'm perplexed that Chapman, a Manc, allows himself to be called 'Chappers'. That's a bit rah, isn't it? 'Chappy', 'Chap', 'grizzly' or 'face farm' would be far more Manc 7:03PM Former winners Bradford, Charlton, Blackburn, Wimbledon (oh, yes), Coventry and Wigan are all in the 'hat'. I use the quotation marks advisedly, unless you favour adorning your swede with a jaunty, plastic transparent bowl. And let's face it, who doesn't.   6:51PM Good evening All first-round winners have bagged their £18,000 prize money and set off in pursuit of the £27,000 on offer for a victory in the second round this evening. What, it's not about the money, it's about the glory? Could have fooled me after years of Premier League and Championship numpties fielding scratch sides to concentrate on the consolidation of 12th place.  For years the FA has allowed its Challenge Cup to be abused by myopic, soulless blowhards and yet it still thrives. We shall celebrate it here today as we find out who stands in the way of teams on the next leg of the road to Wembley (for the semi-finals! Gah! See what they've done there? Audrey, the screens!)   6:40PM A second-round FA Cup draw primer What is it? It's the draw for the second round of the 2017 FA Cup. When is it? It's on Monday November 6. - ie today. What time does it start? It will begin after 19.00 GMT - before the Chorley vs Fleetwood match on Monday night. What TV channel is it on? The match and draw will be on BT Sport 1 and BBC 2. Alternatively, you can follow the draw here. What's left of this weekend's action? First-round review Exeter assistant manager Matt Oakley was delighted to progress to round two of the FA Cup after seeing his side see off gallant Heybridge Swifts 3-1 at St James' Park. Two Jayden Stockley goals shortly past the hour mark gave the Grecians a commanding lead, but Samuel Bentick turned in a cross to reduce the arrears and give the Swifts hope. But any hopes of a comeback were ended by Liam McAlinden, whose shot squeezed through the legs of goalkeeper Danny Sambridge, much to the relief of Oakley, who was standing in for the absent Paul Tisdale. "I'm very pleased. It was a banana skin waiting to happen for us, when you see the draw come out," Oakley said. Relief for Exeter as they see off Heybridge Swifts Credit:  PA "I am very pleased with the result, very pleased with the second half performance and pleased to come in at half-time with a clean sheet. "We had a very difficult time at Warrington a few years ago when we conceded after a few minutes and we couldn't break them down after that. It was one of the messages we talked about before the game, so I was very pleased. "They put us under a lot of pressure and probably came out after the first half with a bit more confidence than we did. I thought we started the game really well, I was really pleased with the start, but then we started losing the ball and a few misplaced touches and they grew in confidence and came into it. "They didn't threaten our goal too much, so I wasn't too worried about it. We just needed to tighten up in certain areas and improve our attacking play in wide areas and we did that well in the second half." What are the draw numbers? STEVENAGE  BRADFORD CITY  PORT VALE  NEWPORT COUNTY MORECAMBE YEOVIL TOWN PETERBOROUGH UNITED OR TRANMERE ROVERS     CAMBRIDGE UNITED FOREST GREEN ROVERS AFC FYLDE  LUTON TOWN SHREWSBURY TOWN  HEREFORD GUISELEY OR ACCRINGTON STANLEY  BLACKBURN ROVERS  DONCASTER ROVERS     LEATHERHEAD OR BILLERICAY TOWN  BOREHAM WOOD  MANSFIELD TOWN  OXFORD CITY     PLYMOUTH ARGYLE  AFC WIMBLEDON  ROCHDALE COVENTRY CITY  CHORLEY OR FLEETWOOD TOWN CARLISLE UNITED NOTTS COUNTY  SWINDON TOWN  MAIDSTONE UNITED  WOKING OR BURY     CREWE ALEXANDRA GILLINGHAM MILTON KEYNES DONS  SLOUGH TOWN     WYCOMBE WANDERERS  NORTHAMPTON TOWN OR SCUNTHORPE UNITED     CHARLTON ATHELTIC  WIGAN ATHLETIC GATESHEAD EXETER CITY When will the second round fixtures take place? Weekend of December 2 and 3. What are the latest FA Cup odds? Chelsea - 5/1 Man City - 5/1 Man Utd - 6/1 Tottenham - 8/1 Arsenal - 8/1 Liverpool - 9/1

FA Cup second-round draw: Fylde host 2013 winners Wigan, Boreham Wood sent to Coventry

FA Cup second round draw National League side AFC Fylde will host 2013 FA Cup winners Wigan in the second round of the competition. Fylde, through to this stage of the competition for the first time in their history following a victory over Kidderminster, were paired with the League One side when the second round draw was made on Monday. Fylde's fellow non-League side Boreham Wood will also face former winners of the competition in the shape of Coventry, who lifted the cup in 1987. Coventry will be at home for the tie. There were a total of 12 non-League sides in the draw. National League South Oxford City were drawn away to Notts County. Seventh-tier Hereford, the lowest-ranked side through to the second round, will face either Chorley or Fleetwood after their tie on Monday night. Leatherhead, who are ranked lower than Hereford, would go away to Wycombe if they win their replay against Billericay Town. Woking or Bury vs Tranmere or Peterborough MK Dons v Maidstone United Newport Co v Cambridge Utd Wycombe v Leatherhead or Billericay Port Vale v Yeovil Town Shrewsbury v Morecambe Doncaster Rovers v Northampton or Scunthorpe Slough Town v Rochdale AFC Wimbledon v Charlton Athletic Stevenage v Swindon Town Mansfield Town v Guiseley or Accrington Stanley Gateshead v Luton Town Bradford City v Plymouth Argyle Blackburn Rovers v Crewe Alexandra AFC Fylde v Wigan Athletic Gillingham v Carlisle Utd Notts Co v Oxford City Forest Green v Exeter City Chorley or Fleetwood v Hereford Coventry City v Boreham Wood Town 7:28PM There you go Everyone present with 'Mark' Chapman professes themselves pleased with the draw. There's not much more I can add to the raw draw. Enjoy! Thanks for your company.  7:24PM TV picks I would guess would be Slough v Rochdale and Fylde v Wigan. Gateshead v Luton would be worth watching.  7:23PM The second round draw in full Woking or Bury vs Tranmere or Peterborough MK Dons v Maidstone United Newport Co v Cambridge Utd Wycombe v Leatherhead or Billericay Port Vale v Yeovil Town Shrewsbury v Morecambe Doncaster Rovers v Northampton or Scunthorpe Slough Town v Rochdale AFC Wimbledon v Charlton Athletic Stevenage v Swindon Town Mansfield Town v Guiseley or Accrington Stanley Gateshead v Luton Town Bradford City v Plymouth Argyle Blackburn Rovers v Crewe Alexandra AFC Fylde v Wigan Athletic Gillingham v Carlisle Utd Notts Co v Oxford City Forest Green v Exeter City Chorley or Fleetwood v Hereford Coventry City v Boreham Wood 7:19PM Tie 20  Coventry City v Boreham Wood 7:19PM Tie 19 Chorley or Fleetwood v Hereford 7:18PM Tie 18 Forest Green v Exeter City 7:18PM Tie 17 Notts Co v Oxford City 7:18PM Tie 16 Gillingham v Carlisle Utd 7:17PM Tie 15 AFC Fylde v Wigan Athletic 7:17PM Tie 14 Blackburn Rovers v Crewe Alexandra 7:17PM Tie 13 Bradford City v Plymouth Argyle 7:16PM Tie 12 Gateshead v Luton Town 7:16PM Tie 11 Mansfield Town v Guiseley or Accrington Stanley 7:16PM Tie 10 Stevenage v Swindon Town 7:16PM Tie nine AFC Wimbledon v Charlton Athletic 7:15PM Tie eight Slough Town v Rochdale 7:15PM Tie seven Donny Rovers v Northampton or Scunthorpe 7:15PM Tie six Shrewsbury v Morecambe 7:14PM Tie five Port Vale v Yeovil Town 7:14PM Tie four Wycombe v Leatherhead or Billericay 7:14PM Tie three Newport Co v Cambridge Utd 7:13PM Tie two MK Dons v Maidstone United 7:13PM First out Woking or Bury vs Tranmere or Peterborough 7:10PM Andy Cole and Kevin Davies Will draw the balls.  7:10PM Here we go The BBC hands over to BT Sport 7:09PM The draw will take place in 10 minutes Mark Chapman interviews Saturday's Slough Town heroes who thrashed Gainsborough Trinity 6-0. Everyone displays his/her poppy pinned to a tracksuit top. Chapman has his in his buttonhole. I'm perplexed that Chapman, a Manc, allows himself to be called 'Chappers'. That's a bit rah, isn't it? 'Chappy', 'Chap', 'grizzly' or 'face farm' would be far more Manc 7:03PM Former winners Bradford, Charlton, Blackburn, Wimbledon (oh, yes), Coventry and Wigan are all in the 'hat'. I use the quotation marks advisedly, unless you favour adorning your swede with a jaunty, plastic transparent bowl. And let's face it, who doesn't.   6:51PM Good evening All first-round winners have bagged their £18,000 prize money and set off in pursuit of the £27,000 on offer for a victory in the second round this evening. What, it's not about the money, it's about the glory? Could have fooled me after years of Premier League and Championship numpties fielding scratch sides to concentrate on the consolidation of 12th place.  For years the FA has allowed its Challenge Cup to be abused by myopic, soulless blowhards and yet it still thrives. We shall celebrate it here today as we find out who stands in the way of teams on the next leg of the road to Wembley (for the semi-finals! Gah! See what they've done there? Audrey, the screens!)   6:40PM A second-round FA Cup draw primer What is it? It's the draw for the second round of the 2017 FA Cup. When is it? It's on Monday November 6. - ie today. What time does it start? It will begin after 19.00 GMT - before the Chorley vs Fleetwood match on Monday night. What TV channel is it on? The match and draw will be on BT Sport 1 and BBC 2. Alternatively, you can follow the draw here. What's left of this weekend's action? First-round review Exeter assistant manager Matt Oakley was delighted to progress to round two of the FA Cup after seeing his side see off gallant Heybridge Swifts 3-1 at St James' Park. Two Jayden Stockley goals shortly past the hour mark gave the Grecians a commanding lead, but Samuel Bentick turned in a cross to reduce the arrears and give the Swifts hope. But any hopes of a comeback were ended by Liam McAlinden, whose shot squeezed through the legs of goalkeeper Danny Sambridge, much to the relief of Oakley, who was standing in for the absent Paul Tisdale. "I'm very pleased. It was a banana skin waiting to happen for us, when you see the draw come out," Oakley said. Relief for Exeter as they see off Heybridge Swifts Credit:  PA "I am very pleased with the result, very pleased with the second half performance and pleased to come in at half-time with a clean sheet. "We had a very difficult time at Warrington a few years ago when we conceded after a few minutes and we couldn't break them down after that. It was one of the messages we talked about before the game, so I was very pleased. "They put us under a lot of pressure and probably came out after the first half with a bit more confidence than we did. I thought we started the game really well, I was really pleased with the start, but then we started losing the ball and a few misplaced touches and they grew in confidence and came into it. "They didn't threaten our goal too much, so I wasn't too worried about it. We just needed to tighten up in certain areas and improve our attacking play in wide areas and we did that well in the second half." What are the draw numbers? STEVENAGE  BRADFORD CITY  PORT VALE  NEWPORT COUNTY MORECAMBE YEOVIL TOWN PETERBOROUGH UNITED OR TRANMERE ROVERS     CAMBRIDGE UNITED FOREST GREEN ROVERS AFC FYLDE  LUTON TOWN SHREWSBURY TOWN  HEREFORD GUISELEY OR ACCRINGTON STANLEY  BLACKBURN ROVERS  DONCASTER ROVERS     LEATHERHEAD OR BILLERICAY TOWN  BOREHAM WOOD  MANSFIELD TOWN  OXFORD CITY     PLYMOUTH ARGYLE  AFC WIMBLEDON  ROCHDALE COVENTRY CITY  CHORLEY OR FLEETWOOD TOWN CARLISLE UNITED NOTTS COUNTY  SWINDON TOWN  MAIDSTONE UNITED  WOKING OR BURY     CREWE ALEXANDRA GILLINGHAM MILTON KEYNES DONS  SLOUGH TOWN     WYCOMBE WANDERERS  NORTHAMPTON TOWN OR SCUNTHORPE UNITED     CHARLTON ATHELTIC  WIGAN ATHLETIC GATESHEAD EXETER CITY When will the second round fixtures take place? Weekend of December 2 and 3. What are the latest FA Cup odds? Chelsea - 5/1 Man City - 5/1 Man Utd - 6/1 Tottenham - 8/1 Arsenal - 8/1 Liverpool - 9/1

Sutton and Lincoln crash out of FA Cup as Oxford City and Boreham Wood provide first-round upsets

Last season, it took Arsenal to end Sutton United’s participation in the FA Cup, and a controversy sparked by a hastily eaten meat pie, after a glorious run that saw them reach the fifth round. On Saturday they went out in tamer circumstances in the first, losing 1-0 at 10-man Cambridge United who reached the second round for the fifth consecutive season. There was nothing to compare with the drama of 12 months ago when their great adventure included victories over Cheltenham, AFC Wimbledon and Leeds before the embarrassment of Piegate, which led to a two-month ban from football for reserve goalkeeper Wayne Shaw. His former team-mates know they should probably have done better on Sunday after enjoying a numerical advantage for 50 minutes following the dismissal of George Maris for simulation. The visitors failed to make their advantage pay and conceded on the stroke of half-time when Jabo Ibehre turned home the rebound after Jevani Brown hit the bar. Elsewhere, Paul Konchesky and Jermaine Pennant, who reached the finals in 2006 and 2010 with West Ham and Liverpool respectively, retain an interest in this year’s competition after Billericay Town drew 1-1 with Leatherhead, a draw that puts the Isthmian Premier League side in the second-round draw for the first time in their history. “It was a great game. I’m proud of my boys, they dug in and I’m pleased to be in the hat,” said Billericay owner-manager Glenn Tamplin. Former winners Charlton Athletic (1947) and Coventry City (1987) are definitely though after seeing off Truro City 3-1 and Maidenhead United 2-0 respectively.  Truro were making their debut in the first round as the first Cornish side there since 1969 but conceded to Ben Reeves after 10 minutes and seldom looked likely to pull off the shock their 996 fans had travelled so far to see. Charlton comfortably saw off Truro Credit: Naomi Baker/Getty Images Jordan Ponticelli scored both Coventry goals in a straightforward win while elsewhere Swindon Town brushed off National League South side Dartford 5-1 with Timi Elsnik scoring twice. Guiseley were more than happy with their afternoon’s work after holding League Two high-fliers Accrington Stanley to a goalless draw but the other non-league hopefuls Heybridge Swifts and Solihull Moors fell to Exeter City and Wycombe Wanderers respectively. The final first-round game on Monday sees League One side Fleetwood Town travel to Chorley, who are in the first round for the first time in 27 years. The teams last met competitively in 2006 in the Northern Premier League Division One and Fleetwood manager Uwe Rosler warned his players “to do the business on the day”. On Saturday, Oxford City from the National League South beat Colchester United, who are 56 places above them, 1-0 to reach the second round for only the second time. Boreham Wood provided the other big first-round shock against Blackpool Credit: Harry Murphy/Getty Images The day’s other shock came from Boreham Wood, 10th in the National League, who came back from a goal down to beat 1953 winners Blackpool 2-1 at home with the goals coming from substitutes Blair Turgott, on loan from Stevenage, and Dan Holman. Another non-league side Maidstone, of the National League South, won 4-2 at the League Two side Cheltenham. But Lincoln City, who lost at Arsenal in the quarter-finals last season, lost 1-0 to AFC Wimbledon.

Sutton and Lincoln crash out of FA Cup as Oxford City and Boreham Wood provide first-round upsets

Last season, it took Arsenal to end Sutton United’s participation in the FA Cup, and a controversy sparked by a hastily eaten meat pie, after a glorious run that saw them reach the fifth round. On Saturday they went out in tamer circumstances in the first, losing 1-0 at 10-man Cambridge United who reached the second round for the fifth consecutive season. There was nothing to compare with the drama of 12 months ago when their great adventure included victories over Cheltenham, AFC Wimbledon and Leeds before the embarrassment of Piegate, which led to a two-month ban from football for reserve goalkeeper Wayne Shaw. His former team-mates know they should probably have done better on Sunday after enjoying a numerical advantage for 50 minutes following the dismissal of George Maris for simulation. The visitors failed to make their advantage pay and conceded on the stroke of half-time when Jabo Ibehre turned home the rebound after Jevani Brown hit the bar. Elsewhere, Paul Konchesky and Jermaine Pennant, who reached the finals in 2006 and 2010 with West Ham and Liverpool respectively, retain an interest in this year’s competition after Billericay Town drew 1-1 with Leatherhead, a draw that puts the Isthmian Premier League side in the second-round draw for the first time in their history. “It was a great game. I’m proud of my boys, they dug in and I’m pleased to be in the hat,” said Billericay owner-manager Glenn Tamplin. Former winners Charlton Athletic (1947) and Coventry City (1987) are definitely though after seeing off Truro City 3-1 and Maidenhead United 2-0 respectively.  Truro were making their debut in the first round as the first Cornish side there since 1969 but conceded to Ben Reeves after 10 minutes and seldom looked likely to pull off the shock their 996 fans had travelled so far to see. Charlton comfortably saw off Truro Credit: Naomi Baker/Getty Images Jordan Ponticelli scored both Coventry goals in a straightforward win while elsewhere Swindon Town brushed off National League South side Dartford 5-1 with Timi Elsnik scoring twice. Guiseley were more than happy with their afternoon’s work after holding League Two high-fliers Accrington Stanley to a goalless draw but the other non-league hopefuls Heybridge Swifts and Solihull Moors fell to Exeter City and Wycombe Wanderers respectively. The final first-round game on Monday sees League One side Fleetwood Town travel to Chorley, who are in the first round for the first time in 27 years. The teams last met competitively in 2006 in the Northern Premier League Division One and Fleetwood manager Uwe Rosler warned his players “to do the business on the day”. On Saturday, Oxford City from the National League South beat Colchester United, who are 56 places above them, 1-0 to reach the second round for only the second time. Boreham Wood provided the other big first-round shock against Blackpool Credit: Harry Murphy/Getty Images The day’s other shock came from Boreham Wood, 10th in the National League, who came back from a goal down to beat 1953 winners Blackpool 2-1 at home with the goals coming from substitutes Blair Turgott, on loan from Stevenage, and Dan Holman. Another non-league side Maidstone, of the National League South, won 4-2 at the League Two side Cheltenham. But Lincoln City, who lost at Arsenal in the quarter-finals last season, lost 1-0 to AFC Wimbledon.

Sutton and Lincoln crash out of FA Cup as Oxford City and Boreham Wood provide first-round upsets

Last season, it took Arsenal to end Sutton United’s participation in the FA Cup, and a controversy sparked by a hastily eaten meat pie, after a glorious run that saw them reach the fifth round. On Saturday they went out in tamer circumstances in the first, losing 1-0 at 10-man Cambridge United who reached the second round for the fifth consecutive season. There was nothing to compare with the drama of 12 months ago when their great adventure included victories over Cheltenham, AFC Wimbledon and Leeds before the embarrassment of Piegate, which led to a two-month ban from football for reserve goalkeeper Wayne Shaw. His former team-mates know they should probably have done better on Sunday after enjoying a numerical advantage for 50 minutes following the dismissal of George Maris for simulation. The visitors failed to make their advantage pay and conceded on the stroke of half-time when Jabo Ibehre turned home the rebound after Jevani Brown hit the bar. Elsewhere, Paul Konchesky and Jermaine Pennant, who reached the finals in 2006 and 2010 with West Ham and Liverpool respectively, retain an interest in this year’s competition after Billericay Town drew 1-1 with Leatherhead, a draw that puts the Isthmian Premier League side in the second-round draw for the first time in their history. “It was a great game. I’m proud of my boys, they dug in and I’m pleased to be in the hat,” said Billericay owner-manager Glenn Tamplin. Former winners Charlton Athletic (1947) and Coventry City (1987) are definitely though after seeing off Truro City 3-1 and Maidenhead United 2-0 respectively.  Truro were making their debut in the first round as the first Cornish side there since 1969 but conceded to Ben Reeves after 10 minutes and seldom looked likely to pull off the shock their 996 fans had travelled so far to see. Charlton comfortably saw off Truro Credit: Naomi Baker/Getty Images Jordan Ponticelli scored both Coventry goals in a straightforward win while elsewhere Swindon Town brushed off National League South side Dartford 5-1 with Timi Elsnik scoring twice. Guiseley were more than happy with their afternoon’s work after holding League Two high-fliers Accrington Stanley to a goalless draw but the other non-league hopefuls Heybridge Swifts and Solihull Moors fell to Exeter City and Wycombe Wanderers respectively. The final first-round game on Monday sees League One side Fleetwood Town travel to Chorley, who are in the first round for the first time in 27 years. The teams last met competitively in 2006 in the Northern Premier League Division One and Fleetwood manager Uwe Rosler warned his players “to do the business on the day”. On Saturday, Oxford City from the National League South beat Colchester United, who are 56 places above them, 1-0 to reach the second round for only the second time. Boreham Wood provided the other big first-round shock against Blackpool Credit: Harry Murphy/Getty Images The day’s other shock came from Boreham Wood, 10th in the National League, who came back from a goal down to beat 1953 winners Blackpool 2-1 at home with the goals coming from substitutes Blair Turgott, on loan from Stevenage, and Dan Holman. Another non-league side Maidstone, of the National League South, won 4-2 at the League Two side Cheltenham. But Lincoln City, who lost at Arsenal in the quarter-finals last season, lost 1-0 to AFC Wimbledon.

True Football Stories: How super fans funded Stevenage with the help of Chelsea legend Vialli

True Football Stories: How super fans funded Stevenage with the help of Chelsea legend Vialli

Goal's True Football Stories series meets the supporters who have embraced the former Stamford Bridge player-manager's Tifosy project

True Football Stories: How super fans funded Stevenage with the help of Chelsea legend Vialli

True Football Stories: How super fans funded Stevenage with the help of Chelsea legend Vialli

Goal's True Football Stories series meets the supporters who have embraced the former Stamford Bridge player-manager's Tifosy project

FA Cup first round draw: Hyde United (eighth tier) host MK Dons

  7:28PM And that's the draw The excitement is over! No more balls will be drawn! Morecambe vs Hartlepool is pretty good, Doncaster will visit either East Thurrock or Ebsfleet. Hyde vs MK Dons is a brilliant tie for the minnows. I was really hoping for a Slough vs Swindon draw, purely for Office quotes.  7:25PM Eighth tier Hyde will play MK Dons! The crowd goes wild in the BBC studio as the draw is announced. That's the big club the players wanted. 7:24PM Lads, can we please have some music Or something. This draw is not one of the most exciting things I've ever seen on television. That Liverpool vs Man Utd game on Saturday was more entertaining. 7:21PM AFC Wimbledon vs Lincoln City AFC Wimbledon are one of the clubs to have benefited immensely from TV money brought by the FA Cup and they are drawn against Lincoln City.  7:19PM Some more fixtures for you Peterborough Utd v Tranmere Cambridge Utd v Sutton Utd Forest Green Rovers v Macclesfield Town AFC Fylde v Kidderminster Harriers Luton v Portsmouth Shrewsbury v Aldershot Hereford v AFC Telford Utd Guiseley v Accrington Stanley Blackburn Rovers v Barnet 7:16PM No huge match ups so far Bradford City v Chesterfield Port Vale v Oxford Utd Newport County v Walsall Morecambe v Hartlepool Utd 7:14PM And it's set of balls number eight And Lancelot is the FA Cup draw machine for tonight. What a hilarious National Lottery joke. And the first fixture is Stevenage vs Nantwich or Kettering. IT'S ALL KICKING OFF NOW, CLIVE. 7:12PM Your Davids, your Goliaths Hyde, Heybridge Swifts and Ossett Town are the lowest ranked teams in the competition, with all three occupying the eighth tier of English football.  7:10PM David Sharpe The Wigan chairman, grandson of Dave Whelan, fancies Wigan's chances this season. And now it's time for the draw!   7:05PM Who do the small teams want to get in the draw? According to a couple of Hyde football staff (manager and player), the management want to play against a team they can probably beat whereas the players want to draw Blackburn or Charlton - one of the 'big' clubs. Hyde actually own the record for biggest defeat in the FA Cup. A 26-0 hiding (see what I did) by Preston North End. 7:00PM The live coverage begins! Here we go. The draw is being held at Hyde United's ground. Look how cool their sun was earlier: Red sun today. FA Cup draw at Hyde United. Is that an omen. #EmiratesFACuppic.twitter.com/LoZ27mZjKW— Hyde United FC (@hydeunited) October 16, 2017   6:47PM The difference the FA Cup actually makes I wrote this in January about just how much an FA Cup run is worth to a small club. It turns out the answer is everything. The FA awards a prize of £1.8million to the winners of the competition, the kind of short-change a Champions League club might use as a sweetener for a promising youth prospect’s signing-on fee. For non-league side Curzon Ashton just qualifying for the second round of the competition will, and has, had an enormous impact.   Image     Landscape Portrait Square Original/Custom   Edit Selected Crop... Caption:   Description: curzon ashton Agency: GETTY IMAGES Artist:       Edit...   Delete     “It means so much to us a club,” says their CEO Natalie Atkinson. “The FA Cup is enabling us, through prize money, funds gained and TV money to work with the FA and football foundations to replace our 3G pitch next to the stadium.” Curzon Ashton, currently 15th in the National League North, lost 4-3 to AFC Wimbledon in December, conceding four goals in the final 10 minutes of the game. The prize for qualifying for the second round was £27,000, in addition to £18,000 earned from the first round. Those sucker-punch goals prevented a windfall of £67,500 for making it to third round. However, thanks to the wonder of television money, the club received more for their defeat to Wimbledon than they would have if they’d won a non-televised second round match. There's more on the article, if you fancy clicking on it. 6:30PM The magic of the cup This most holy of trophies always produces magical moments and even if a guilty few/most don't pay attention to the competition until their team is involved, those matches between minnows of the lower leagues and giants of... in this case, League One, are always thoroughly enjoyable.  Sutton are looking to make a lot more money from another (pie free) run at the cup this year, Accrington Stanley's involvement will be upping the YouTube view count on this milk advert, and today is the first time I have ever heard of Gainsborough Trinity. Perhaps they will become my new favourite non-league - maybe they'll be yours! It all depends who has to play who - and which of those games the people in charge at BBC decide to broadcast... 6:15PM Good evening! Hello there sports fans. Welcome to our live coverage of what is sure to be a riveting FA Cup first round draw. The action will kick-off at 7:10pm and we'll keep you up to date with the draw as it happens. For right now, that wait should give you time to look at all the nice photographs of that weird looking sun from earlier today. It was like being in Blade Runner. 6:09PM Preview What is it? It's the draw for the first round proper of the FA Cup: the oldest competition in world football.  The first round sees the 48 teams from League One and League Two joined by 32 non-league sides. When is it? Monday October 16. What time is it? The draw itself will begin at 7:10pm on Monday evening. The first round of the FA Cup will take place on Saturday November 4  Credit: AP  What TV channel is it on? The draw will be broadcast live on both BBC Two and BT Sport. Mark Chapman will present the BBC's coverage of the draw in half-hour long episode from 7pm, while BT Sport 3's show will also begin at 7pm.  When will the matches take place?  The first round will take place over the weekend of Friday November 3 to Monday 6 November 2017 Who's in the hat? Sutton United made it to the fifth round of the FA Cup last season  Credit: Getty Images  Three teams from the eighth tier of English football are among the non-league teams in the hat for the first round. Hyde United, who play in the Northern Premier League, beat Scarborough Athletic on Sunday afternoon to book their place in the competition.  Hampton and Richmond, who are coached by Sky Sports commentator Martin Tyler, failed in their bid to reach the FA Cup proper after losing to  National League South rivals Truro City. Truro's 2-0 victory over their league rivals means they become the first Cornwal team to reach the FA Cup first round since 1969.  Billericay Town, whose current players include Jamie O'Hara, Paul Konchesky and Jermaine Pennant, will also take their place in the draw.  FA Cup first round numbers 1 ACCRINGTON STANLEY 2 AFC WIMBLEDON 3 BARNET 4 BLACKBURN ROVERS 5 BLACKPOOL 6 BRADFORD CITY 7 BRISTOL ROVERS 8 BURY 9 CAMBRIDGE UNITED 10 CARLISLE UNITED 11 CHARLTON ATHLETIC 12 CHELTENHAM TOWN 13 CHESTERFIELD 14 COLCHESTER UNITED 15 COVENTRY CITY 16 CRAWLEY TOWN 17 CREWE ALEXANDRA 18 DONCASTER ROVERS 19 EXETER CITY 20 FLEETWOOD TOWN 21 FOREST GREEN ROVERS 22 GILLINGHAM 23 GRIMSBY TOWN 24 LINCOLN CITY 25 LUTON TOWN 26 MANSFIELD TOWN 27 MILTON KEYNES DONS 28 MORECAMBE 29 NEWPORT COUNTY 30 NORTHAMPTON TOWN 31 NOTTS COUNTY 32 OLDHAM ATHLETIC 33 OXFORD UNITED 34 PETERBOROUGH UNITED 35 PLYMOUTH ARGYLE 36 PORT VALE 37 PORTSMOUTH 38 ROCHDALE 39 ROTHERHAM UNITED 40 SCUNTHORPE UNITED 41 SHREWSBURY TOWN 42 SOUTHEND UNITED 43 STEVENAGE 44 SWINDON TOWN 45 WALSALL 46 WIGAN ATHLETIC 47 WYCOMBE WANDERERS 48 YEOVIL TOWN 49 TRANMERE ROVERS 50 SOLIHULL MOORS OR OSSETT TOWN 51 HARTLEPOOL UNITED 52 SHAW LANE ASSOCIATION 53 CHORLEY OR BOSTON UNITED 54 AFC TELFORD UNITED 55 GAINSBOROUGH TRINITY 56 NANTWICH TOWN OR KETTERING TOWN 57 GATESHEAD 58 GUISELEY 59 AFC FYLDE 60 KIDDERMINSTER HARRIERS 61 HYDE UNITED 62 MACCLESFIELD TOWN 63 BRACKLEY TOWN OR BILLERICAY TOWN 64 DAGENHAM & REDBRIDGE OR LEYTON ORIENT 65 HEREFORD 66 ALDERSHOT TOWN  67 BATH CITY OR CHELMSFORD CITY 68 OXFORD CITY 69 MAIDENHEAD UNITED 70 HEYBRIDGE SWIFTS 71 WOKING OR CONCORD RANGERS 72 TRURO CITY 73 DOVER ATHLETIC OR BROMLEY 74 SLOUGH TOWN 75 DARTFORD 76 BOREHAM WOOD 77 MAIDSTONE UNITED OR ENFIELD TOWN 78 LEATHERHEAD 79 SUTTON UNITED 80 EAST THURROCK UNITED OR EBBSFLEET UNITED

FA Cup first round draw: Hyde United (eighth tier) host MK Dons

  7:28PM And that's the draw The excitement is over! No more balls will be drawn! Morecambe vs Hartlepool is pretty good, Doncaster will visit either East Thurrock or Ebsfleet. Hyde vs MK Dons is a brilliant tie for the minnows. I was really hoping for a Slough vs Swindon draw, purely for Office quotes.  7:25PM Eighth tier Hyde will play MK Dons! The crowd goes wild in the BBC studio as the draw is announced. That's the big club the players wanted. 7:24PM Lads, can we please have some music Or something. This draw is not one of the most exciting things I've ever seen on television. That Liverpool vs Man Utd game on Saturday was more entertaining. 7:21PM AFC Wimbledon vs Lincoln City AFC Wimbledon are one of the clubs to have benefited immensely from TV money brought by the FA Cup and they are drawn against Lincoln City.  7:19PM Some more fixtures for you Peterborough Utd v Tranmere Cambridge Utd v Sutton Utd Forest Green Rovers v Macclesfield Town AFC Fylde v Kidderminster Harriers Luton v Portsmouth Shrewsbury v Aldershot Hereford v AFC Telford Utd Guiseley v Accrington Stanley Blackburn Rovers v Barnet 7:16PM No huge match ups so far Bradford City v Chesterfield Port Vale v Oxford Utd Newport County v Walsall Morecambe v Hartlepool Utd 7:14PM And it's set of balls number eight And Lancelot is the FA Cup draw machine for tonight. What a hilarious National Lottery joke. And the first fixture is Stevenage vs Nantwich or Kettering. IT'S ALL KICKING OFF NOW, CLIVE. 7:12PM Your Davids, your Goliaths Hyde, Heybridge Swifts and Ossett Town are the lowest ranked teams in the competition, with all three occupying the eighth tier of English football.  7:10PM David Sharpe The Wigan chairman, grandson of Dave Whelan, fancies Wigan's chances this season. And now it's time for the draw!   7:05PM Who do the small teams want to get in the draw? According to a couple of Hyde football staff (manager and player), the management want to play against a team they can probably beat whereas the players want to draw Blackburn or Charlton - one of the 'big' clubs. Hyde actually own the record for biggest defeat in the FA Cup. A 26-0 hiding (see what I did) by Preston North End. 7:00PM The live coverage begins! Here we go. The draw is being held at Hyde United's ground. Look how cool their sun was earlier: Red sun today. FA Cup draw at Hyde United. Is that an omen. #EmiratesFACuppic.twitter.com/LoZ27mZjKW— Hyde United FC (@hydeunited) October 16, 2017   6:47PM The difference the FA Cup actually makes I wrote this in January about just how much an FA Cup run is worth to a small club. It turns out the answer is everything. The FA awards a prize of £1.8million to the winners of the competition, the kind of short-change a Champions League club might use as a sweetener for a promising youth prospect’s signing-on fee. For non-league side Curzon Ashton just qualifying for the second round of the competition will, and has, had an enormous impact.   Image     Landscape Portrait Square Original/Custom   Edit Selected Crop... Caption:   Description: curzon ashton Agency: GETTY IMAGES Artist:       Edit...   Delete     “It means so much to us a club,” says their CEO Natalie Atkinson. “The FA Cup is enabling us, through prize money, funds gained and TV money to work with the FA and football foundations to replace our 3G pitch next to the stadium.” Curzon Ashton, currently 15th in the National League North, lost 4-3 to AFC Wimbledon in December, conceding four goals in the final 10 minutes of the game. The prize for qualifying for the second round was £27,000, in addition to £18,000 earned from the first round. Those sucker-punch goals prevented a windfall of £67,500 for making it to third round. However, thanks to the wonder of television money, the club received more for their defeat to Wimbledon than they would have if they’d won a non-televised second round match. There's more on the article, if you fancy clicking on it. 6:30PM The magic of the cup This most holy of trophies always produces magical moments and even if a guilty few/most don't pay attention to the competition until their team is involved, those matches between minnows of the lower leagues and giants of... in this case, League One, are always thoroughly enjoyable.  Sutton are looking to make a lot more money from another (pie free) run at the cup this year, Accrington Stanley's involvement will be upping the YouTube view count on this milk advert, and today is the first time I have ever heard of Gainsborough Trinity. Perhaps they will become my new favourite non-league - maybe they'll be yours! It all depends who has to play who - and which of those games the people in charge at BBC decide to broadcast... 6:15PM Good evening! Hello there sports fans. Welcome to our live coverage of what is sure to be a riveting FA Cup first round draw. The action will kick-off at 7:10pm and we'll keep you up to date with the draw as it happens. For right now, that wait should give you time to look at all the nice photographs of that weird looking sun from earlier today. It was like being in Blade Runner. 6:09PM Preview What is it? It's the draw for the first round proper of the FA Cup: the oldest competition in world football.  The first round sees the 48 teams from League One and League Two joined by 32 non-league sides. When is it? Monday October 16. What time is it? The draw itself will begin at 7:10pm on Monday evening. The first round of the FA Cup will take place on Saturday November 4  Credit: AP  What TV channel is it on? The draw will be broadcast live on both BBC Two and BT Sport. Mark Chapman will present the BBC's coverage of the draw in half-hour long episode from 7pm, while BT Sport 3's show will also begin at 7pm.  When will the matches take place?  The first round will take place over the weekend of Friday November 3 to Monday 6 November 2017 Who's in the hat? Sutton United made it to the fifth round of the FA Cup last season  Credit: Getty Images  Three teams from the eighth tier of English football are among the non-league teams in the hat for the first round. Hyde United, who play in the Northern Premier League, beat Scarborough Athletic on Sunday afternoon to book their place in the competition.  Hampton and Richmond, who are coached by Sky Sports commentator Martin Tyler, failed in their bid to reach the FA Cup proper after losing to  National League South rivals Truro City. Truro's 2-0 victory over their league rivals means they become the first Cornwal team to reach the FA Cup first round since 1969.  Billericay Town, whose current players include Jamie O'Hara, Paul Konchesky and Jermaine Pennant, will also take their place in the draw.  FA Cup first round numbers 1 ACCRINGTON STANLEY 2 AFC WIMBLEDON 3 BARNET 4 BLACKBURN ROVERS 5 BLACKPOOL 6 BRADFORD CITY 7 BRISTOL ROVERS 8 BURY 9 CAMBRIDGE UNITED 10 CARLISLE UNITED 11 CHARLTON ATHLETIC 12 CHELTENHAM TOWN 13 CHESTERFIELD 14 COLCHESTER UNITED 15 COVENTRY CITY 16 CRAWLEY TOWN 17 CREWE ALEXANDRA 18 DONCASTER ROVERS 19 EXETER CITY 20 FLEETWOOD TOWN 21 FOREST GREEN ROVERS 22 GILLINGHAM 23 GRIMSBY TOWN 24 LINCOLN CITY 25 LUTON TOWN 26 MANSFIELD TOWN 27 MILTON KEYNES DONS 28 MORECAMBE 29 NEWPORT COUNTY 30 NORTHAMPTON TOWN 31 NOTTS COUNTY 32 OLDHAM ATHLETIC 33 OXFORD UNITED 34 PETERBOROUGH UNITED 35 PLYMOUTH ARGYLE 36 PORT VALE 37 PORTSMOUTH 38 ROCHDALE 39 ROTHERHAM UNITED 40 SCUNTHORPE UNITED 41 SHREWSBURY TOWN 42 SOUTHEND UNITED 43 STEVENAGE 44 SWINDON TOWN 45 WALSALL 46 WIGAN ATHLETIC 47 WYCOMBE WANDERERS 48 YEOVIL TOWN 49 TRANMERE ROVERS 50 SOLIHULL MOORS OR OSSETT TOWN 51 HARTLEPOOL UNITED 52 SHAW LANE ASSOCIATION 53 CHORLEY OR BOSTON UNITED 54 AFC TELFORD UNITED 55 GAINSBOROUGH TRINITY 56 NANTWICH TOWN OR KETTERING TOWN 57 GATESHEAD 58 GUISELEY 59 AFC FYLDE 60 KIDDERMINSTER HARRIERS 61 HYDE UNITED 62 MACCLESFIELD TOWN 63 BRACKLEY TOWN OR BILLERICAY TOWN 64 DAGENHAM & REDBRIDGE OR LEYTON ORIENT 65 HEREFORD 66 ALDERSHOT TOWN  67 BATH CITY OR CHELMSFORD CITY 68 OXFORD CITY 69 MAIDENHEAD UNITED 70 HEYBRIDGE SWIFTS 71 WOKING OR CONCORD RANGERS 72 TRURO CITY 73 DOVER ATHLETIC OR BROMLEY 74 SLOUGH TOWN 75 DARTFORD 76 BOREHAM WOOD 77 MAIDSTONE UNITED OR ENFIELD TOWN 78 LEATHERHEAD 79 SUTTON UNITED 80 EAST THURROCK UNITED OR EBBSFLEET UNITED

FA Cup first round draw: Hyde United (eighth tier) host MK Dons

  7:28PM And that's the draw The excitement is over! No more balls will be drawn! Morecambe vs Hartlepool is pretty good, Doncaster will visit either East Thurrock or Ebsfleet. Hyde vs MK Dons is a brilliant tie for the minnows. I was really hoping for a Slough vs Swindon draw, purely for Office quotes.  7:25PM Eighth tier Hyde will play MK Dons! The crowd goes wild in the BBC studio as the draw is announced. That's the big club the players wanted. 7:24PM Lads, can we please have some music Or something. This draw is not one of the most exciting things I've ever seen on television. That Liverpool vs Man Utd game on Saturday was more entertaining. 7:21PM AFC Wimbledon vs Lincoln City AFC Wimbledon are one of the clubs to have benefited immensely from TV money brought by the FA Cup and they are drawn against Lincoln City.  7:19PM Some more fixtures for you Peterborough Utd v Tranmere Cambridge Utd v Sutton Utd Forest Green Rovers v Macclesfield Town AFC Fylde v Kidderminster Harriers Luton v Portsmouth Shrewsbury v Aldershot Hereford v AFC Telford Utd Guiseley v Accrington Stanley Blackburn Rovers v Barnet 7:16PM No huge match ups so far Bradford City v Chesterfield Port Vale v Oxford Utd Newport County v Walsall Morecambe v Hartlepool Utd 7:14PM And it's set of balls number eight And Lancelot is the FA Cup draw machine for tonight. What a hilarious National Lottery joke. And the first fixture is Stevenage vs Nantwich or Kettering. IT'S ALL KICKING OFF NOW, CLIVE. 7:12PM Your Davids, your Goliaths Hyde, Heybridge Swifts and Ossett Town are the lowest ranked teams in the competition, with all three occupying the eighth tier of English football.  7:10PM David Sharpe The Wigan chairman, grandson of Dave Whelan, fancies Wigan's chances this season. And now it's time for the draw!   7:05PM Who do the small teams want to get in the draw? According to a couple of Hyde football staff (manager and player), the management want to play against a team they can probably beat whereas the players want to draw Blackburn or Charlton - one of the 'big' clubs. Hyde actually own the record for biggest defeat in the FA Cup. A 26-0 hiding (see what I did) by Preston North End. 7:00PM The live coverage begins! Here we go. The draw is being held at Hyde United's ground. Look how cool their sun was earlier: Red sun today. FA Cup draw at Hyde United. Is that an omen. #EmiratesFACuppic.twitter.com/LoZ27mZjKW— Hyde United FC (@hydeunited) October 16, 2017   6:47PM The difference the FA Cup actually makes I wrote this in January about just how much an FA Cup run is worth to a small club. It turns out the answer is everything. The FA awards a prize of £1.8million to the winners of the competition, the kind of short-change a Champions League club might use as a sweetener for a promising youth prospect’s signing-on fee. For non-league side Curzon Ashton just qualifying for the second round of the competition will, and has, had an enormous impact.   Image     Landscape Portrait Square Original/Custom   Edit Selected Crop... Caption:   Description: curzon ashton Agency: GETTY IMAGES Artist:       Edit...   Delete     “It means so much to us a club,” says their CEO Natalie Atkinson. “The FA Cup is enabling us, through prize money, funds gained and TV money to work with the FA and football foundations to replace our 3G pitch next to the stadium.” Curzon Ashton, currently 15th in the National League North, lost 4-3 to AFC Wimbledon in December, conceding four goals in the final 10 minutes of the game. The prize for qualifying for the second round was £27,000, in addition to £18,000 earned from the first round. Those sucker-punch goals prevented a windfall of £67,500 for making it to third round. However, thanks to the wonder of television money, the club received more for their defeat to Wimbledon than they would have if they’d won a non-televised second round match. There's more on the article, if you fancy clicking on it. 6:30PM The magic of the cup This most holy of trophies always produces magical moments and even if a guilty few/most don't pay attention to the competition until their team is involved, those matches between minnows of the lower leagues and giants of... in this case, League One, are always thoroughly enjoyable.  Sutton are looking to make a lot more money from another (pie free) run at the cup this year, Accrington Stanley's involvement will be upping the YouTube view count on this milk advert, and today is the first time I have ever heard of Gainsborough Trinity. Perhaps they will become my new favourite non-league - maybe they'll be yours! It all depends who has to play who - and which of those games the people in charge at BBC decide to broadcast... 6:15PM Good evening! Hello there sports fans. Welcome to our live coverage of what is sure to be a riveting FA Cup first round draw. The action will kick-off at 7:10pm and we'll keep you up to date with the draw as it happens. For right now, that wait should give you time to look at all the nice photographs of that weird looking sun from earlier today. It was like being in Blade Runner. 6:09PM Preview What is it? It's the draw for the first round proper of the FA Cup: the oldest competition in world football.  The first round sees the 48 teams from League One and League Two joined by 32 non-league sides. When is it? Monday October 16. What time is it? The draw itself will begin at 7:10pm on Monday evening. The first round of the FA Cup will take place on Saturday November 4  Credit: AP  What TV channel is it on? The draw will be broadcast live on both BBC Two and BT Sport. Mark Chapman will present the BBC's coverage of the draw in half-hour long episode from 7pm, while BT Sport 3's show will also begin at 7pm.  When will the matches take place?  The first round will take place over the weekend of Friday November 3 to Monday 6 November 2017 Who's in the hat? Sutton United made it to the fifth round of the FA Cup last season  Credit: Getty Images  Three teams from the eighth tier of English football are among the non-league teams in the hat for the first round. Hyde United, who play in the Northern Premier League, beat Scarborough Athletic on Sunday afternoon to book their place in the competition.  Hampton and Richmond, who are coached by Sky Sports commentator Martin Tyler, failed in their bid to reach the FA Cup proper after losing to  National League South rivals Truro City. Truro's 2-0 victory over their league rivals means they become the first Cornwal team to reach the FA Cup first round since 1969.  Billericay Town, whose current players include Jamie O'Hara, Paul Konchesky and Jermaine Pennant, will also take their place in the draw.  FA Cup first round numbers 1 ACCRINGTON STANLEY 2 AFC WIMBLEDON 3 BARNET 4 BLACKBURN ROVERS 5 BLACKPOOL 6 BRADFORD CITY 7 BRISTOL ROVERS 8 BURY 9 CAMBRIDGE UNITED 10 CARLISLE UNITED 11 CHARLTON ATHLETIC 12 CHELTENHAM TOWN 13 CHESTERFIELD 14 COLCHESTER UNITED 15 COVENTRY CITY 16 CRAWLEY TOWN 17 CREWE ALEXANDRA 18 DONCASTER ROVERS 19 EXETER CITY 20 FLEETWOOD TOWN 21 FOREST GREEN ROVERS 22 GILLINGHAM 23 GRIMSBY TOWN 24 LINCOLN CITY 25 LUTON TOWN 26 MANSFIELD TOWN 27 MILTON KEYNES DONS 28 MORECAMBE 29 NEWPORT COUNTY 30 NORTHAMPTON TOWN 31 NOTTS COUNTY 32 OLDHAM ATHLETIC 33 OXFORD UNITED 34 PETERBOROUGH UNITED 35 PLYMOUTH ARGYLE 36 PORT VALE 37 PORTSMOUTH 38 ROCHDALE 39 ROTHERHAM UNITED 40 SCUNTHORPE UNITED 41 SHREWSBURY TOWN 42 SOUTHEND UNITED 43 STEVENAGE 44 SWINDON TOWN 45 WALSALL 46 WIGAN ATHLETIC 47 WYCOMBE WANDERERS 48 YEOVIL TOWN 49 TRANMERE ROVERS 50 SOLIHULL MOORS OR OSSETT TOWN 51 HARTLEPOOL UNITED 52 SHAW LANE ASSOCIATION 53 CHORLEY OR BOSTON UNITED 54 AFC TELFORD UNITED 55 GAINSBOROUGH TRINITY 56 NANTWICH TOWN OR KETTERING TOWN 57 GATESHEAD 58 GUISELEY 59 AFC FYLDE 60 KIDDERMINSTER HARRIERS 61 HYDE UNITED 62 MACCLESFIELD TOWN 63 BRACKLEY TOWN OR BILLERICAY TOWN 64 DAGENHAM & REDBRIDGE OR LEYTON ORIENT 65 HEREFORD 66 ALDERSHOT TOWN  67 BATH CITY OR CHELMSFORD CITY 68 OXFORD CITY 69 MAIDENHEAD UNITED 70 HEYBRIDGE SWIFTS 71 WOKING OR CONCORD RANGERS 72 TRURO CITY 73 DOVER ATHLETIC OR BROMLEY 74 SLOUGH TOWN 75 DARTFORD 76 BOREHAM WOOD 77 MAIDSTONE UNITED OR ENFIELD TOWN 78 LEATHERHEAD 79 SUTTON UNITED 80 EAST THURROCK UNITED OR EBBSFLEET UNITED

Gianluca Vialli: 'Crowdfunding in football clubs will be the norm in 10 years' time'

“Football has been everything to me,” Gianluca Vialli says. “I bought my first house, my first car, because of football. More importantly I had sex for the first time because of football - otherwise I would still be a virgin!” Borrowing Peter Crouch’s famous, self-deprecating line – when asked what he would have been if he were not a footballer the Stoke City striker once replied “a virgin” – is some sales pitch from Vialli. “There are so many ex-footballers in the football industry but I think it’s important to find something meaningful, innovative, that can make a difference,” he explains. “I felt this was an opportunity to get involved in something that in 10 years time will be the norm.” “This” is a venture that aims to tap into the growing desire of sport – and football, in particular – to use alternative ways to improve their finances by turning to their fans. The former Chelsea striker and manager is one of the founders of Tifosy, an equity crowd-funding organisation – or “fan-funding” as Vialli calls it - that allows people to invest in sports clubs. The obvious danger in an interview like this, as we meet for a coffee near Vialli’s home in west London, is that it may sound like a free advert or simply a plug. And football and finance do not always make a good mix. Vialli has had an interesting time since his playing career ended Credit: Action images But Tifosy already have a number of projects to be proud of and to press their case and, interestingly, one of the key aims is to call for more “transparency” from those who own football clubs while also trying to bridge the disconnect that has undoubtedly developed between them and the fans. It is a hot topic. So what, so far, has Tifosy done? Here are a few interesting examples: In the summer of 2014 Portsmouth supporters raised £270,000 to pay for pitches to give the club’s academy a permanent base. Almost 5,500 people contributed in a three-month campaign and those pitches were officially unveiled last August. In Parma, Italy, €170,000 was raised to create the ‘Crociato’ Museum to house the club’s trophies and memorabilia after it went bust. The museum officially opened on Jan 13 this year, the day of the feast of St Hilary, the patron saint of Parma. It has helped kick-start the re-birth of the club. Also in Italy, Serie A and Serie B launched an appeal to help construct a football pitch and clubhouse for refugees on the island of Lampedusa, which is just 70 miles from the North African coast. The target is €100,000 and so far they are just over half way there. Back in England Stevenage raised £600,000 in just six weeks to build the League Two club a new North Stand. More than 200 fans invested between £500 and £25,000 through the first ever mini-bond in English football. Vialli is an interesting character to head up Tifosy, which he established with Fausto Zanetton, a former investment banker with Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley. The 53-year-old Italian won Serie A titles with Sampdoria and Juventus – with whom he also won the Champions League - before first playing for and then managing Chelsea in the pre-Roman Abramovich era. During his period in charge at Stamford Bridge Vialli won five trophies in three years, at that time making him the club’s most successful manager, but it ended unhappily and was followed by a brief spell at Watford. Portsmouth needed new training facilities and Tifosy helped out Credit: Getty images Since then Vialli has been more a pundit, working for Sky Italia, but his background is different from the average footballer. The son of a wealthy industrialist he grew up in a 60-room, 15th century castle in Lombardy and had to overcome his ‘rich kid’ background from the moment he joined his first club, Cremonese, to eventually earn 59 caps for Italy. That background may, partly, explain how comfortable he feels in the world of finance but he protests that his involvement is not about making money. “It’s about helping football clubs to raise money in order to become a bit more sustainable and financially sound,” Vialli explains. “But, at the same time, to build better relationships between football clubs and fans. “It is a platform to allow fans to invest in meaningful projects for their own football clubs. It is about football clubs doing something with the fans to make the club more solid, more sustainable and also generate a financial return for the fans. Football clubs have got to be sustainable companies and if you involve the fans then you have a duty to be a bit more transparent and to think a bit harder about any decision you make.” Portsmouth, he says, is a good example. Vialli was once Chelsea's most successful manager Credit: Jeff Gilbert “The club needed some training facilities for the academy which was training miles away,” Vialli explains. “For the club, which was owned by the fans at the time, it was perfect: I want to see a guy in a few years time, a local guy, trained at the academy, which would not have happened if the money was not raised.” Tifosy does take a cut of between five to seven per cent from the sum raised from an investment campaign and while equity crowd-funding schemes have been criticised in recent years, with the argument that they can target unwitting investors who are making an emotional decision, Vialli says they have turned down a number of ideas and are highly selective. “We started of with a rewards campaign – you donate and in return you get a reward like a shirt or a name on a plaque. But now we have the possibility to invest in mini-bonds, like at Stevenage,” Vialli says. “But this is not just a way to raise money, and obviously in the Premier League this is not so much a need because there is so much money, but if you want to raise money for a meaningful project and you want to involve the fans then why not? It can be match-funding: the club puts £1 in for every £1 the fans put in. Why should I not want to invest in a club that I love, even if it’s a rich club, if I am also going to get four per cent interest? If it is a rich club then maybe even better because my money is safer. I am not saying football clubs should turn into banks but they should do something together for the fans.”

Gianluca Vialli: 'Crowdfunding in football clubs will be the norm in 10 years' time'

“Football has been everything to me,” Gianluca Vialli says. “I bought my first house, my first car, because of football. More importantly I had sex for the first time because of football - otherwise I would still be a virgin!” Borrowing Peter Crouch’s famous, self-deprecating line – when asked what he would have been if he were not a footballer the Stoke City striker once replied “a virgin” – is some sales pitch from Vialli. “There are so many ex-footballers in the football industry but I think it’s important to find something meaningful, innovative, that can make a difference,” he explains. “I felt this was an opportunity to get involved in something that in 10 years time will be the norm.” “This” is a venture that aims to tap into the growing desire of sport – and football, in particular – to use alternative ways to improve their finances by turning to their fans. The former Chelsea striker and manager is one of the founders of Tifosy, an equity crowd-funding organisation – or “fan-funding” as Vialli calls it - that allows people to invest in sports clubs. The obvious danger in an interview like this, as we meet for a coffee near Vialli’s home in west London, is that it may sound like a free advert or simply a plug. And football and finance do not always make a good mix. Vialli has had an interesting time since his playing career ended Credit: Action images But Tifosy already have a number of projects to be proud of and to press their case and, interestingly, one of the key aims is to call for more “transparency” from those who own football clubs while also trying to bridge the disconnect that has undoubtedly developed between them and the fans. It is a hot topic. So what, so far, has Tifosy done? Here are a few interesting examples: In the summer of 2014 Portsmouth supporters raised £270,000 to pay for pitches to give the club’s academy a permanent base. Almost 5,500 people contributed in a three-month campaign and those pitches were officially unveiled last August. In Parma, Italy, €170,000 was raised to create the ‘Crociato’ Museum to house the club’s trophies and memorabilia after it went bust. The museum officially opened on Jan 13 this year, the day of the feast of St Hilary, the patron saint of Parma. It has helped kick-start the re-birth of the club. Also in Italy, Serie A and Serie B launched an appeal to help construct a football pitch and clubhouse for refugees on the island of Lampedusa, which is just 70 miles from the North African coast. The target is €100,000 and so far they are just over half way there. Back in England Stevenage raised £600,000 in just six weeks to build the League Two club a new North Stand. More than 200 fans invested between £500 and £25,000 through the first ever mini-bond in English football. Vialli is an interesting character to head up Tifosy, which he established with Fausto Zanetton, a former investment banker with Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley. The 53-year-old Italian won Serie A titles with Sampdoria and Juventus – with whom he also won the Champions League - before first playing for and then managing Chelsea in the pre-Roman Abramovich era. During his period in charge at Stamford Bridge Vialli won five trophies in three years, at that time making him the club’s most successful manager, but it ended unhappily and was followed by a brief spell at Watford. Portsmouth needed new training facilities and Tifosy helped out Credit: Getty images Since then Vialli has been more a pundit, working for Sky Italia, but his background is different from the average footballer. The son of a wealthy industrialist he grew up in a 60-room, 15th century castle in Lombardy and had to overcome his ‘rich kid’ background from the moment he joined his first club, Cremonese, to eventually earn 59 caps for Italy. That background may, partly, explain how comfortable he feels in the world of finance but he protests that his involvement is not about making money. “It’s about helping football clubs to raise money in order to become a bit more sustainable and financially sound,” Vialli explains. “But, at the same time, to build better relationships between football clubs and fans. “It is a platform to allow fans to invest in meaningful projects for their own football clubs. It is about football clubs doing something with the fans to make the club more solid, more sustainable and also generate a financial return for the fans. Football clubs have got to be sustainable companies and if you involve the fans then you have a duty to be a bit more transparent and to think a bit harder about any decision you make.” Portsmouth, he says, is a good example. Vialli was once Chelsea's most successful manager Credit: Jeff Gilbert “The club needed some training facilities for the academy which was training miles away,” Vialli explains. “For the club, which was owned by the fans at the time, it was perfect: I want to see a guy in a few years time, a local guy, trained at the academy, which would not have happened if the money was not raised.” Tifosy does take a cut of between five to seven per cent from the sum raised from an investment campaign and while equity crowd-funding schemes have been criticised in recent years, with the argument that they can target unwitting investors who are making an emotional decision, Vialli says they have turned down a number of ideas and are highly selective. “We started of with a rewards campaign – you donate and in return you get a reward like a shirt or a name on a plaque. But now we have the possibility to invest in mini-bonds, like at Stevenage,” Vialli says. “But this is not just a way to raise money, and obviously in the Premier League this is not so much a need because there is so much money, but if you want to raise money for a meaningful project and you want to involve the fans then why not? It can be match-funding: the club puts £1 in for every £1 the fans put in. Why should I not want to invest in a club that I love, even if it’s a rich club, if I am also going to get four per cent interest? If it is a rich club then maybe even better because my money is safer. I am not saying football clubs should turn into banks but they should do something together for the fans.”

Gianluca Vialli: 'Crowdfunding in football clubs will be the norm in 10 years' time'

“Football has been everything to me,” Gianluca Vialli says. “I bought my first house, my first car, because of football. More importantly I had sex for the first time because of football - otherwise I would still be a virgin!” Borrowing Peter Crouch’s famous, self-deprecating line – when asked what he would have been if he were not a footballer the Stoke City striker once replied “a virgin” – is some sales pitch from Vialli. “There are so many ex-footballers in the football industry but I think it’s important to find something meaningful, innovative, that can make a difference,” he explains. “I felt this was an opportunity to get involved in something that in 10 years time will be the norm.” “This” is a venture that aims to tap into the growing desire of sport – and football, in particular – to use alternative ways to improve their finances by turning to their fans. The former Chelsea striker and manager is one of the founders of Tifosy, an equity crowd-funding organisation – or “fan-funding” as Vialli calls it - that allows people to invest in sports clubs. The obvious danger in an interview like this, as we meet for a coffee near Vialli’s home in west London, is that it may sound like a free advert or simply a plug. And football and finance do not always make a good mix. Vialli has had an interesting time since his playing career ended Credit: Action images But Tifosy already have a number of projects to be proud of and to press their case and, interestingly, one of the key aims is to call for more “transparency” from those who own football clubs while also trying to bridge the disconnect that has undoubtedly developed between them and the fans. It is a hot topic. So what, so far, has Tifosy done? Here are a few interesting examples: In the summer of 2014 Portsmouth supporters raised £270,000 to pay for pitches to give the club’s academy a permanent base. Almost 5,500 people contributed in a three-month campaign and those pitches were officially unveiled last August. In Parma, Italy, €170,000 was raised to create the ‘Crociato’ Museum to house the club’s trophies and memorabilia after it went bust. The museum officially opened on Jan 13 this year, the day of the feast of St Hilary, the patron saint of Parma. It has helped kick-start the re-birth of the club. Also in Italy, Serie A and Serie B launched an appeal to help construct a football pitch and clubhouse for refugees on the island of Lampedusa, which is just 70 miles from the North African coast. The target is €100,000 and so far they are just over half way there. Back in England Stevenage raised £600,000 in just six weeks to build the League Two club a new North Stand. More than 200 fans invested between £500 and £25,000 through the first ever mini-bond in English football. Vialli is an interesting character to head up Tifosy, which he established with Fausto Zanetton, a former investment banker with Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley. The 53-year-old Italian won Serie A titles with Sampdoria and Juventus – with whom he also won the Champions League - before first playing for and then managing Chelsea in the pre-Roman Abramovich era. During his period in charge at Stamford Bridge Vialli won five trophies in three years, at that time making him the club’s most successful manager, but it ended unhappily and was followed by a brief spell at Watford. Portsmouth needed new training facilities and Tifosy helped out Credit: Getty images Since then Vialli has been more a pundit, working for Sky Italia, but his background is different from the average footballer. The son of a wealthy industrialist he grew up in a 60-room, 15th century castle in Lombardy and had to overcome his ‘rich kid’ background from the moment he joined his first club, Cremonese, to eventually earn 59 caps for Italy. That background may, partly, explain how comfortable he feels in the world of finance but he protests that his involvement is not about making money. “It’s about helping football clubs to raise money in order to become a bit more sustainable and financially sound,” Vialli explains. “But, at the same time, to build better relationships between football clubs and fans. “It is a platform to allow fans to invest in meaningful projects for their own football clubs. It is about football clubs doing something with the fans to make the club more solid, more sustainable and also generate a financial return for the fans. Football clubs have got to be sustainable companies and if you involve the fans then you have a duty to be a bit more transparent and to think a bit harder about any decision you make.” Portsmouth, he says, is a good example. Vialli was once Chelsea's most successful manager Credit: Jeff Gilbert “The club needed some training facilities for the academy which was training miles away,” Vialli explains. “For the club, which was owned by the fans at the time, it was perfect: I want to see a guy in a few years time, a local guy, trained at the academy, which would not have happened if the money was not raised.” Tifosy does take a cut of between five to seven per cent from the sum raised from an investment campaign and while equity crowd-funding schemes have been criticised in recent years, with the argument that they can target unwitting investors who are making an emotional decision, Vialli says they have turned down a number of ideas and are highly selective. “We started of with a rewards campaign – you donate and in return you get a reward like a shirt or a name on a plaque. But now we have the possibility to invest in mini-bonds, like at Stevenage,” Vialli says. “But this is not just a way to raise money, and obviously in the Premier League this is not so much a need because there is so much money, but if you want to raise money for a meaningful project and you want to involve the fans then why not? It can be match-funding: the club puts £1 in for every £1 the fans put in. Why should I not want to invest in a club that I love, even if it’s a rich club, if I am also going to get four per cent interest? If it is a rich club then maybe even better because my money is safer. I am not saying football clubs should turn into banks but they should do something together for the fans.”

Gianluca Vialli: 'Crowdfunding in football clubs will be the norm in 10 years' time'

“Football has been everything to me,” Gianluca Vialli says. “I bought my first house, my first car, because of football. More importantly I had sex for the first time because of football - otherwise I would still be a virgin!” Borrowing Peter Crouch’s famous, self-deprecating line – when asked what he would have been if he were not a footballer the Stoke City striker once replied “a virgin” – is some sales pitch from Vialli. “There are so many ex-footballers in the football industry but I think it’s important to find something meaningful, innovative, that can make a difference,” he explains. “I felt this was an opportunity to get involved in something that in 10 years time will be the norm.” “This” is a venture that aims to tap into the growing desire of sport – and football, in particular – to use alternative ways to improve their finances by turning to their fans. The former Chelsea striker and manager is one of the founders of Tifosy, an equity crowd-funding organisation – or “fan-funding” as Vialli calls it - that allows people to invest in sports clubs. The obvious danger in an interview like this, as we meet for a coffee near Vialli’s home in west London, is that it may sound like a free advert or simply a plug. And football and finance do not always make a good mix. Vialli has had an interesting time since his playing career ended Credit: Action images But Tifosy already have a number of projects to be proud of and to press their case and, interestingly, one of the key aims is to call for more “transparency” from those who own football clubs while also trying to bridge the disconnect that has undoubtedly developed between them and the fans. It is a hot topic. So what, so far, has Tifosy done? Here are a few interesting examples: In the summer of 2014 Portsmouth supporters raised £270,000 to pay for pitches to give the club’s academy a permanent base. Almost 5,500 people contributed in a three-month campaign and those pitches were officially unveiled last August. In Parma, Italy, €170,000 was raised to create the ‘Crociato’ Museum to house the club’s trophies and memorabilia after it went bust. The museum officially opened on Jan 13 this year, the day of the feast of St Hilary, the patron saint of Parma. It has helped kick-start the re-birth of the club. Also in Italy, Serie A and Serie B launched an appeal to help construct a football pitch and clubhouse for refugees on the island of Lampedusa, which is just 70 miles from the North African coast. The target is €100,000 and so far they are just over half way there. Back in England Stevenage raised £600,000 in just six weeks to build the League Two club a new North Stand. More than 200 fans invested between £500 and £25,000 through the first ever mini-bond in English football. Vialli is an interesting character to head up Tifosy, which he established with Fausto Zanetton, a former investment banker with Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley. The 53-year-old Italian won Serie A titles with Sampdoria and Juventus – with whom he also won the Champions League - before first playing for and then managing Chelsea in the pre-Roman Abramovich era. During his period in charge at Stamford Bridge Vialli won five trophies in three years, at that time making him the club’s most successful manager, but it ended unhappily and was followed by a brief spell at Watford. Portsmouth needed new training facilities and Tifosy helped out Credit: Getty images Since then Vialli has been more a pundit, working for Sky Italia, but his background is different from the average footballer. The son of a wealthy industrialist he grew up in a 60-room, 15th century castle in Lombardy and had to overcome his ‘rich kid’ background from the moment he joined his first club, Cremonese, to eventually earn 59 caps for Italy. That background may, partly, explain how comfortable he feels in the world of finance but he protests that his involvement is not about making money. “It’s about helping football clubs to raise money in order to become a bit more sustainable and financially sound,” Vialli explains. “But, at the same time, to build better relationships between football clubs and fans. “It is a platform to allow fans to invest in meaningful projects for their own football clubs. It is about football clubs doing something with the fans to make the club more solid, more sustainable and also generate a financial return for the fans. Football clubs have got to be sustainable companies and if you involve the fans then you have a duty to be a bit more transparent and to think a bit harder about any decision you make.” Portsmouth, he says, is a good example. Vialli was once Chelsea's most successful manager Credit: Jeff Gilbert “The club needed some training facilities for the academy which was training miles away,” Vialli explains. “For the club, which was owned by the fans at the time, it was perfect: I want to see a guy in a few years time, a local guy, trained at the academy, which would not have happened if the money was not raised.” Tifosy does take a cut of between five to seven per cent from the sum raised from an investment campaign and while equity crowd-funding schemes have been criticised in recent years, with the argument that they can target unwitting investors who are making an emotional decision, Vialli says they have turned down a number of ideas and are highly selective. “We started of with a rewards campaign – you donate and in return you get a reward like a shirt or a name on a plaque. But now we have the possibility to invest in mini-bonds, like at Stevenage,” Vialli says. “But this is not just a way to raise money, and obviously in the Premier League this is not so much a need because there is so much money, but if you want to raise money for a meaningful project and you want to involve the fans then why not? It can be match-funding: the club puts £1 in for every £1 the fans put in. Why should I not want to invest in a club that I love, even if it’s a rich club, if I am also going to get four per cent interest? If it is a rich club then maybe even better because my money is safer. I am not saying football clubs should turn into banks but they should do something together for the fans.”

Kevin Nolan: 'I don't have a divine right to manage in the Premier League - Notts County is my apprenticeship'

There are microwaves that have lasted longer than managers at Meadow Lane of late. Kevin Nolan is the 19th to have passed through the gates here at venerable Notts County, the oldest club in the world still competing at a professional level, in the last 18 years. But he still hopes, as he positions his League Two manager of the month award on his office mantelpiece, to become part of the furniture. It helps, perhaps, that Alan Hardy, Nolan’s chairman and a figure with whom he enjoys a palpable rapport, made his fortune in the interiors trade. Once, it would have taken a brave soul to accept Notts County’s call. Former owner Ray Trew developed a reputation for being more trigger-happy than Errol Flynn on sheriff’s duty in Dodge City. Martin Allen lasted all of 10 months in the dug-out, Paul Ince six months, and Jamie Fullarton a mere 69 days. Throw in an earlier ill-starred spell by Sven-Goran Eriksson as director of football, a post he abdicated the moment Trew took over, and Sol Campbell’s bizarre one-game cameo, and the picture was a tempestuous one. Nolan’s quest, with Hardy’s fulsome backing, is to steer the club into calmer waters. Ever since his players rebounded from 10 consecutive defeats last season to avert relegation, the decline has turned around, with a recent sequence of seven victories propelling them to the top of the table. Emblematic of the change is Nolan, who at 35 already seems to this manor born. Where his predecessor, John Sheridan, was sacked in January for gross misconduct, after allegedly blaming a referee for his children not receiving Christmas presents, Nolan is trying to build an image as a paragon of virtue: loyal, conscientious, meticulous. “I love being in control of a club,” he says. “I’m trying to give this one the right attitude, built on trust and respect.” Nolan picked up September's League Two manager of the month award Credit: John Robertson A captain at Bolton Wanderer when he was just 23, Nolan has long been identified as a natural leader of men. Sam Allardyce, whom he followed from Bolton to Newcastle and later to West Ham, described him as a classic general, adept at “weeding out the troublemakers”. But the transition to management has hardly been seamless. At benighted Leyton Orient, he found himself at the mercy of petty meddling by former owner Francesco Becchetti, only to be fired after 15 games. “Sacked for winning almost half your matches? That’s more egg on the face for him than me,” Nolan says. “I didn’t want an owner instructing me on what team I had to pick. When someone’s telling me, ‘That player should be playing in this way’, I’ve got no time for it. The first thing Alan did here was to explain that he would always have an opinion, but that he would only ever look to help me. That was a breath of fresh air.” The move was also heavy with emotion. Three days after he took charge of his first game, Nolan’s grandfather, a crucial influence in his upbringing after attending almost all his games, passed away. When he next walked out at Meadow Lane, the sense of loss threatened to overwhelm him, but stoicism prevailed. “I’m not a religious person, but I felt that he was with me that day,” he says. “I hope that he keeps me striving to be better.” Nolan hardly wants for popularity in his latest post. Revived left-back Carl Dickinson has paid tribute to the vibrancy of his man-management and the clarity of his team talks, while a Bolton fan appeared in his latest press conference just to shake his hand. His stock has seldom been so high. After two red cards at West Ham, he endured some fearful abuse, not least from owner David Sullivan’s son, who foolishly wrote on Twitter: “How the f--- Nolan is playing about League Two amazes me. Gives us all hope.” Nolan, famed for his resilience, acknowledges that a few barbs cut deep. “Some of the abuse does hurt. I’m human, not a robot, but I always want to prove people wrong. At such moments, you turn to your family, to those you believe in you.” Nolan was long ago identified as a natural leader of men Credit: ap In just his second year, Nolan is ahead of most managerial curves, but youth is increasingly in vogue in this division. Harry Kewell at Crawley is 39, Stevenage’s Darren Sarll is 34, while Barnet’s Rossi Eames, a retired gymnast, is another whippersnapper at 32. In Nolan’s view, there could be no finer proving ground. “Sometimes you have to start at the bottom, to build yourself up again. Yes, I played in the Premier League for many years, but that doesn’t give me a divine right to manage there. I have to earn that right, and this is my apprenticeship.” That said, Nolan does have a gentleman’s agreement with Hardy that he will be allowed to leave if a more powerful club comes calling – which, given Notts County’s rate of resurgence, appears increasingly likely. “It’s a magnificent gesture on Alan’s behalf, but for me it means nothing,” he says, diplomatically. “With the passion he has shown, it would be ridiculous if I couldn’t show the same work ethic.” One senses the workaholic lifestyle agrees with Nolan, who abhors any state of limbo. “As a player, before I had children, I can remember going home some days at 2pm, putting DVDs on, falling asleep, having my tea, going back to sea, watching another film. Before I knew it, it was morning. “Now, I never switch off. Until recently, my assistant, Richard Thomas, was living in my apartment, and we would be talking about football until one every morning. We’re still on the same WhatsApp group, texting each other all night about tactics. But I love every minute – I wouldn’t change it for the world. I love the fact that I don’t stop thinking about football. I don’t want that Saturday afternoon buzz to be taken away again.”

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